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Sample records for activity depresses cochlear

  1. An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jan A.; Teagle, Holly F. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information about the hardware components and speech-processing strategies of cochlear implant systems. The use of assistive listening devices with cochlear implants is also discussed. A brief description of surgical procedures and the initial activation of the device are also presented, along with programming considerations.…

  2. Phase of shear vibrations within cochlear partition leads to activation of the cochlear amplifier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Lamb

    Full Text Available Since Georg von Bekesy laid out the place theory of the hearing, researchers have been working to understand the remarkable properties of mammalian hearing. Because access to the cochlea is restricted in live animals, and important aspects of hearing are destroyed in dead ones, models play a key role in interpreting local measurements. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB models are attractive because they are analytically tractable, appropriate to the oblong geometry of the cochlea, and can predict wave behavior over a large span of the cochlea. Interest in the role the tectorial membrane (TM plays in cochlear tuning led us to develop models that directly interface the TM with the cochlear fluid. In this work we add an angled shear between the TM and reticular lamina (RL, which serves as an input to a nonlinear active force. This feature plus a novel combination of previous work gives us a model with TM-fluid interaction, TM-RL shear, a nonlinear active force and a second wave mode. The behavior we get leads to the conclusion the phase between the shear and basilar membrane (BM vibration is critical for amplification. We show there is a transition in this phase that occurs at a frequency below the cutoff, which is strongly influenced by TM stiffness. We describe this mechanism of sharpened BM velocity profile, which demonstrates the importance of the TM in overall cochlear tuning and offers an explanation for the response characteristics of the Tectb mutant mouse.

  3. Physical activity & depression

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiantoula E.; Tsiadoula L.; Patsiaouras A.; Kokaridas D.

    2012-01-01

    Depression is a major public health disorder. Clinical depression is the most frequent disability in North America among other countries and by 2020 it is estimated that it will represent the second most common disability worldwide. Physical activity can be used to prevent as well as treat depression. Its characteristics and structure should be individualized to the personality and special needs of the patient as well as to the severity of the disorder. Intensity, duration and the place of pe...

  4. Physical activity & depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiantoula E.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major public health disorder. Clinical depression is the most frequent disability in North America among other countries and by 2020 it is estimated that it will represent the second most common disability worldwide. Physical activity can be used to prevent as well as treat depression. Its characteristics and structure should be individualized to the personality and special needs of the patient as well as to the severity of the disorder. Intensity, duration and the place of performance are of special importance. Research has identified neurobiological and psychological paths that can develop between physical activity and well being. More studies although are needed in order to standardize the use of physical activity as a treatment option, mainly in the groups of children and teenagers.

  5. Cochlear power flux as an indicator of mechanical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diependaal, R J; de Boer, E; Viergever, M A

    1987-09-01

    The question of whether one can conclude just from basilar membrane (BM) vibration data that the cochlea is an active mechanical system is addressed. To this end, a method is developed which computes the power flux through a channel cross section of a short-wave cochlear model from a given BM vibration pattern. The power flux is an important indicator of mechanical activity because a rise in this function corresponds to creation of mechanical energy. The power flux method is applied to BM velocity patterns as measured by Johnstone and Yates [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 55, 584-587 (1974)] and by Sellick et al. [Hear. Res. 10, 101-108 (1983)] in the guinea pig and by Robles et al. [Peripheral Auditory Mechanisms, edited by J.B. Allen, J.L. Hall, A.E. Hubbard, S.T. Neely, and A. Tubis (Springer, New York, 1986a), pp. 121-128, and J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 80, 1364-1374 (1986b)] in the chinchilla. Before the calculations are performed, the BM data are interpolated and smoothed in order to avoid numerical errors as a result of too few and noisy data points. The choice of the smoothing method influences the computed power flux function considerably. Nevertheless, the calculations appear to make a clear distinction between the "old" data, showing broad BM tuning (Johnstone and Yates, 1974), and the "new" data, in which the response is much more peaked (Sellick et al., 1983; Robles et al., 1986a, b). The former do not give rise to a significant increase of the power flux; the latter do, although less convincingly for the Sellick et al. (1983) data than for the Robles et al. (1986a,b) data. It is thus concluded that the recently obtained, sharply tuned BM responses reflect the presence of mechanical activity in the cochlea.

  6. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  7. Cochlear implant benefits in deafness rehabilitation: PET study of temporal voice Activations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coez, A.; Zilbovicius, M. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, INSERM, Res Unit Neuroimaging and Psychiat, U797, IFR49, F-91406 Orsay (France); Zilbovicius, M.; Syrota, A.; Samson, Y. [CEA, DSV, DRM, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, F-91406 Orsay (France); Bizaguet, E. [Lab Correct Audit, Paris (France); Coez, A. [Univ Paris Sud 11, Paris (France); Ferrary, E.; Bouccara, D.; Mosnier, I.; Sterkers, O. [INSERM, Unit M 867, Paris (France); Ambert-Dahan, E. [Hop Beaujon, Serv ORL Chirurg Cervicofaciale, AP-HP, Clichy (France); Ferrary, E.; Bouccara, D.; Mosnier, I.; Sterkers, O. [Inst Fed Rech Claude Bernard Physiol et Pathol, IFR02, Paris (France); Samson, Y. [Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Serv Urgences Cerebro-vasc, AP-HP, Paris (France); Samson, Y. [Univ Paris 06, Paris (France); Sterkers, O. [Univ Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    Cochlear implants may improve the medical and social prognosis of profound deafness. Nevertheless, some patients have experienced poor results without any clear explanations. One correlate may be an alteration in cortical voice processing. To test this hypothesis, we studied the activation of human temporal voice areas (TVA) using a well-standardized PET paradigm adapted from previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies. Methods: A PET H{sub 2}{sup 15}O activation study was performed on 3 groups of adult volunteers: normal-hearing control subjects (n 6) and cochlear-implanted post-lingually deaf patients with {>=}2 y of cochlear implant experience, with intelligibility scores in the 'Lafon monosyllabic task' {>=}80% (Good group; n 6) or {<=}20% (Poor group; n 6). Relative cerebral blood flow was measured in 3 conditions: rest, passive listening to human voice, and non-voice stimuli. Results: Compared with silence, the activations induced by non-voice stimuli were bilaterally located in the superior temporal regions in all groups. However these activations were significantly and similarly reduced in both cochlear implant groups, whereas control subjects showed supplementary activations. Compared with non-voice, the voice stimuli induced bilateral activation of the TVA along the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in both the control and the Good groups. In contrast, these activations were not detected in the Poor group, which showed only left unilateral middle STS activation. Conclusion: These results suggest that PET is an adequate method to explore cochlear implant benefits and that this benefit could be linked to the activation of the TVA. (authors)

  8. The Responses of Preschoolers with Cochlear Implants to Musical Activities: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraer-Joiner, Lyn E.; Chen-Hafteck, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the musical experiences of preschool cochlear implant users. Research objectives were to examine: (1) musical, social and emotional responses to activities; and (2) whether length of experience with the implant influenced responses. Participants were three prelingually deafened children, age 4,…

  9. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Puria, Sunil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  10. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Puria, Sunil; Steele, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  11. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations

  12. Cochlear implants

    OpenAIRE

    Despotović, Adrijana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to analyze the performance of the child with cochlear implant (CI) at language, math and movement activities. For the purpose of research exercises from all three above mentioned activities are prepared. Results of the exercises constitute the ground for the comparison of a child with CI and children with no hearing disability. Testing language skills was performed with exercises that included understanding, diction and identifying syllables. Mathematic skills...

  13. Intelligence, Parental Depression, and Behavior Adaptability in Deaf Children Being Considered for Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Krull, Kevin; Hannay, Julia; Mehta, Paras; Caudle, Susan; Oghalai, John

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive ability and behavioral adaptability are distinct, yet related, constructs that can impact childhood development. Both are often reduced in deaf children of hearing parents who do not provide sufficient language and communication access. Additionally, parental depression is commonly observed due to parent-child communication difficulties…

  14. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  15. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar N Alagramam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  16. Auditory cortical activity during cochlear implant-mediated perception of spoken language, melody, and rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limb, Charles J; Molloy, Anne T; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Braun, Allen R

    2010-03-01

    Despite the significant advances in language perception for cochlear implant (CI) recipients, music perception continues to be a major challenge for implant-mediated listening. Our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie successful implant listening remains limited. To our knowledge, this study represents the first neuroimaging investigation of music perception in CI users, with the hypothesis that CI subjects would demonstrate greater auditory cortical activation than normal hearing controls. H(2) (15)O positron emission tomography (PET) was used here to assess auditory cortical activation patterns in ten postlingually deafened CI patients and ten normal hearing control subjects. Subjects were presented with language, melody, and rhythm tasks during scanning. Our results show significant auditory cortical activation in implant subjects in comparison to control subjects for language, melody, and rhythm. The greatest activity in CI users compared to controls was seen for language tasks, which is thought to reflect both implant and neural specializations for language processing. For musical stimuli, PET scanning revealed significantly greater activation during rhythm perception in CI subjects (compared to control subjects), and the least activation during melody perception, which was the most difficult task for CI users. These results may suggest a possible relationship between auditory performance and degree of auditory cortical activation in implant recipients that deserves further study.

  17. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this topic can be found in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. How does a cochlear implant ... speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. ...

  18. Measuring Levels of Stress and Depression in Mothers of Children Using Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Santhi S; Prakash, S. G. R.; Ravichandran, Aparna; Susan, K. Y.; Alex, Winnie

    2013-01-01

    Hearing impairment is an exceptional circumstance that restricts the child's ability to communicate verbally. Depression is a common stress-related response for hearing parents of children with hearing loss. Evidence suggests that mothers are more inclined than fathers to experience depression in response to their child's hearing loss…

  19. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION PREVALENCE IN ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Starokha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current paper describes an experience of cochlear implantation in elderly. Cochlear implantation has become a widely accepted intervention in the treatment of individuals with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implants are now accepted as a standard of care to optimize hearing and subsequent speech development in children and adults with deafness. But cochlear implantation affects not only hearing abilities, speech perception and speech production; it also has an outstanding impact on the social life, activities and self-esteem of each patient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cochlear implantation efficacy in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. There were 5 patients under our observation. Surgery was performed according to traditional posterior tympanotomy and cochleostomy for cochlear implant electrode insertion for all observed patients. The study was conducted in two stages: before speech processor’s activation and 3 months later. Pure tone free field audiometry was performed to each patient to assess the efficiency of cochlear implantation in dynamics. The aim of the study was also to evaluate quality of life in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss after unilateral cochlear implantation. Each patient underwent questioning with 36 Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. SF-36 is a set of generic, coherent, and easily administered quality-of-life measures. The SF-36 consists of eight scaled scores, which are the weighted sums of the questions in their section. Each scale is directly transformed into a 0-100 scale on the assumption that each question carries equal weight. The eight sections are: physical functioning; physical role functioning; emotional role functioning; vitality; emotional well-being; social role functioning; bodily pain; general health perceptions. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in elderly consistently improved quality of life

  20. Activity-dependent regulation of calcium and ribosomes in the chick cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, C L; Hyson, R L

    2016-03-01

    Cochlea removal results in the death of 20-30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). Two potentially cytotoxic events, a dramatic rise in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and a decline in the integrity of ribosomes are observed within 1h of deafferentation. Glutamatergic input from the auditory nerve has been shown to preserve NM neuron health by activating metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), maintaining both normal [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. One interpretation of these results is that a common mGluR-activated signaling cascade is required for the maintenance of both [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomal integrity. This could happen if both responses are influenced directly by a common messenger, or if the loss of mGluR activation causes changes in one component that secondarily causes changes in the other. The present studies tested this common-mediator hypothesis in slice preparations by examining activity-dependent regulation of [Ca(2+)]i and ribosomes in the same tissue after selectively blocking group I mGluRs (1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA)) or group II mGluRs (LY 341495) during unilateral auditory nerve stimulation. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i of NM neurons were measured using fura-2 ratiometric calcium imaging and the tissue was subsequently processed for Y10B immunoreactivity (Y10B-ir), an antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. The group I mGluR antagonist blocked the activity-dependent regulation of both [Ca(2+)]i and Y10B-ir, but the group II antagonist blocked only the activity-dependent regulation of Y10B-ir. That is, even when group II receptors were blocked, stimulation continued to maintain low [Ca(2+)]i, but it did not maintain Y10B-ir. These results suggest a dissociation in how calcium and ribosomes are regulated in NM neurons and that ribosomes can be regulated through a mechanism that is independent of calcium regulation. PMID:26739326

  1. Sudden gains in behavioural activation for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Ciara; Ekers, David; Gilbody, Simon; Richards, David; Toner-Clewes, Benjamin; McMillan, Dean

    2014-09-01

    Sudden gains have been linked to improved outcomes in cognitive behaviour therapy for depression. The relationship between sudden gains and outcome is less clear in other treatment modalities, including interpersonal psychotherapy and supportive expressive therapy, which may indicate different mechanisms of change between treatment modalities. The current study examined sudden gains in adults meeting diagnostic criteria for depression (N = 40) offered up to 12 sessions of behavioural activation treatment. Sudden gains were found in 42.5% of the sample. Sudden gains occurred early (median pre-gain session 2) and were related to outcome: those who experienced a sudden gain had significantly lower post-treatment scores on the PHQ-9. Furthermore, the proportion meeting the reliable and clinically significant change criteria at end of treatment was higher in the sudden gain group. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the mechanisms by which sudden gains relate to therapy outcome in behavioural activation.

  2. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an optimal period to develop speech and language skills. Research has shown that when these children receive a cochlear implant followed by intensive therapy before they are 18 months ... age develop language skills at a rate comparable to children with normal ...

  3. Cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  4. Screen time, physical activity and depression risk in minority women

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Y. Breland; Fox, Ashley M.; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging research suggests that sedentary behavior, sometimes measured as screen time, may be an important correlate of depression. Physical activity, while not the direct opposite of sedentary behavior, has also been associated with depression (albeit inversely). Although low-income and minority populations may experience greater levels of depression, little research has focused on the relationships between screen time or physical activity and depression in low-income, minority populations i...

  5. THE EFFECT OF NIMODIPINE ON COCHLEAR POTENTIALS AND NA+/K+-ATPASE ACTIVITY IN NORMAL AND HYDROPIC COCHLEAS OF THE ALBINO GUINEA-PIG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBENTHEM, PPG; KLIS, SFL; ALBERS, FWJ; DEWILDT, DJ; VELDMAN, JE; HUIZING, EH; SMOORENBURG, GF

    1994-01-01

    In experimental endolymphatic hydrops (EEH) a decrease in the endocochlear potential (EP) has been reported and is thought to be due to decreased activity of the enzyme Na+/K+-ATPase in the stria vascularis. By stimulating Na+/K+-ATPase, the EP, and thereby cochlear function as a whole, might be res

  6. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  7. Depression severity, diet quality, and physical activity in women with obesity and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Appelhans, Bradley M.; Whited, Matthew C.; Schneider, Kristin L.; Ma, Yunsheng; Oleski, Jessica L.; Merriam, Philip A.; Waring, Molly E.; Olendzki, Barbara C.; Mann, Devin M.; OCKENE, IRA S.; Pagoto, Sherry L.

    2012-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is prevalent in clinical weight loss settings and predicts poor weight loss outcomes. It is unknown whether the severity of depressive symptoms among those with MDD is associated with diet quality or physical activity levels. This knowledge is important for improving weight loss treatment for these patients. It was hypothesized that more severe depression is associated with poorer diet quality and lower physical activity levels among individuals with obesity an...

  8. Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this text, the authors recall the main principles and data ruling cochlear implants. Then, a first circle of technical equipment for assistance is presented. This circle includes: device setting (DS), Electrically evoked Auditory Brainstem Responses (EABR), Neural Response Telemetry (NRT), Stapedial Reflex (SR) and Electrodogram Acquisition (EA). This first cycle becomes more and more important as children are implanted younger and younger; the amount of data available with this assistance makes necessary the use of models (implicit or explicit) to handle this information. Consequently, this field is more open than ever.

  9. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  10. Active faults of the Baikal depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, K.G.; Miroshnichenko, A.I.; San'kov, V. A.; Babushkin, S.M.; Larkin, G.V.; Badardinov, A.A.; Wong, H.K.; Colman, S.; Delvaux, D.

    1997-01-01

    The Baikal depression occupies a central position in the system of the basins of the Baikal Rift Zone and corresponds to the nucleus from which the continental lithosphere began to open. For different reasons, the internal structure of the Lake Baikal basin remained unknown for a long time. In this article, we present for the first time a synthesis of the data concerning the structure of the sedimentary section beneath Lake Baikal, which were obtained by complex seismic and structural investigations, conducted mainly from 1989 to 1992. We make a brief description of the most interesting seismic profiles which provide a rough idea of a sedimentary unit structure, present a detailed structural interpretation and show the relationship between active faults in the lake, heat flow anomalies and recent hydrothermalism.

  11. Behavioral Activation Is an Evidence-Based Treatment for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews of evidence-based treatment for depression did not identify behavioral activation as an evidence-based practice. Therefore, this article conducted a systematic review of behavioral activation treatment of depression, which identified three meta-analyses, one recent randomized controlled trial and one recent follow-up of an earlier…

  12. A cohort study of leisure time physical activity and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Stine Schou; Tolstrup, Janne Schumann; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht;

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the role of leisure time physical activity on the risk of developing depression in a large longitudinal setting.......The objective of the study was to examine the role of leisure time physical activity on the risk of developing depression in a large longitudinal setting....

  13. Baseline and cognition activated brain SPECT imaging in depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities through the semiquantitative analysis of the baseline and cognition activated rCBF imaging in unmedicated depressed patients. Methods: 27 depressed patients unmedicated by anti-depressants were enrolled. The diagnosis (depression of moderate degree with somatization) was confirmed by the ICD-10 criteria. 15 age matched normal controls were studied under identical conditions. Baseline and cognition activated 99mTc-ECD SPECT were performed on 21 of the 27 patients with depression and 13 of the 15 normal controls. Baseline 99mTc-ECD SPECT alone were performed on the rest 6 patients with depression and 2 normal controls. The cognitive activation is achieved by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). 1110 MBq of 99mTc-ECD was administered by intravenous bolus injection 5 minutes after the onset of the WCST. Semi-quantitative analysis was conducted with the 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th slices of the transaxial imaging. rCBF ratios of every ROI were calculated using the average tissue activity in the region divided by the maximum activity in the cerebellum. Results: 1) The baseline rCBF of left frontal (0.720) and left temporal lobe (0.720) were decreased significantly in depressed patients comparing with those of the control subjects. 2) The activated rCBF of left frontal lobe (0.719) and left temporal lobe (0.690), left parietal lobe (0.701) were decreased evidently than those of the controls. Conclusions: 1) Hypoperfusions of left frontal and left temporal cortexes were identified in patients with depression. 2) The hypoperfusion of left frontal and left temporal cortexes may be the cause of cognition disorder and depressed mood in patients with depression. 3) Cognition activated brain perfusion imaging is helpful for making a more accurate diagnosis of depression

  14. Potassium Channel Activator Attenuates Salicylate-Induced Cochlear Hearing Loss Potentially Ameliorating Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eSun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High dose sodium salicylate causes moderate, reversible hearing loss and tinnitus. Salicylate-induced hearing loss is believed to arise from a reduction in the electromotile response of outer hair cells (OHCs and/or reduction of KCNQ4 potassium currents in OHCs which decreases the driving force for the transduction current. Therefore, enhancing OHC potassium currents could potentially prevent salicylate-induced temporary hearing loss. In this study, we tested whether opening voltage-gated potassium channels using ICA-105665, a novel small molecule that opens KCNQ2/3 and KCNQ3/5 channels, can reduce salicylate-induced hearing loss. We found that systemic application of ICA-105665 at 10 mg/kg prevented the salicylate-induced amplitude reduction and threshold shift in the compound action potentials recorded at the round window of the cochlea. ICA-105665 also prevented the salicylate-induced reduction of distortion products of otoacoustic emission (DPOAE. These results suggest that ICA-105665 partially compensates for salicylate induced cochlear hearing loss by enhancing KCNQ2/3 and KCNQ3/5 potassium currents and the motility of OHCs.

  15. Physical (in)activity and depression in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink-Vossen, S.; Collard, R.M.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Comijs, H.C.; Vocht, H.M. de; Naarding, P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge about characteristics explaining low level of physical activity in late-life depression is needed to develop specific interventions aimed at improving physical health in depressed people above the age of 60. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used data from the Netherlands Stu

  16. Cortical plasticity after cochlear implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B; Gjedde, A; Wallentin, M;

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic progress in the restoration of hearing takes place in the first months after cochlear implantation. To map the brain activity underlying this process, we used positron emission tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen...

  17. Medial cortex activity, self-reflection and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Marcia K.; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan; Mitchell, Karen J.; Levin, Yael

    2009-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural activity associated with self-reflection in depressed [current major depressive episode (MDE)] and healthy control participants, focusing on medial cortex areas previously shown to be associated with self-reflection. Both the MDE and healthy control groups showed greater activity in anterior medial cortex (medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus) when cued to think about hopes and aspirations compared with duties and o...

  18. Anti depressant activity of Mamsyadi Kwatha: An Ayurvedic compound formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreevathsa, M; Ravishankar, B; Dwivedi, Rambabu

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a psychiatric condition in which there is loss of interest in all pleasurable outlets, viz. food, sex, work, friends, hobbies and entertainment. The prevalence rate of the disease is 6-8% in women and 3-5% in men. Ayurveda, the science of life, provides systematic management principles for depression. Mamsyadi Kwatha is one such formulation stated by Yadavji Trikamji Acharya in Siddha Yoga Sangraha and Bheshaja Samhita, which is said to be effective in psychiatric conditions. The ingredients are Jatamansi (Nardostachys jatamansi), Ashwagandh (Withania somnifera) and Parasika Yavani (Hyocymus niger) in an 8:4:1 ratio, respectively. The test drug was subjected for antidepressant activity in experimental models. The models selected for anti depressant activity were behavioral despair test, anti-reserpine test and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) test in albino mice. The test formulation showed significant inhibition of behavioural despair (P depressant activity. PMID:24049416

  19. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2015-05-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool and 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as 'low' or 'middle' had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as 'high' were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music.

  20. Physical Activity in Depressed Elderly. A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mura, Gioia; Carta, Mauro Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background: exercise may reduce depressive symptoms both in healthy aged populations and in old patients diagnosed with MDD, but few specific analysis were conducted on the efficacy of exercise as an adjunctive treatment with antidepressants, which may be probably more useful in clinical practice, considered the high prevalence of treatment resistant depression in late life, the low cost and safety of physical activity interventions. Objective: to establish the new findings on the effectivene...

  1. Associations between physical activity and depressive symptoms in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon Jo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high prevalence of depression in women is an increasing public health concern. Although studies have found associations between physical activity (PA and depression, little is known about the optimal domain, dose and social context of PA for reducing the risk of depression. This study aimed to investigate associations between specific components of PA (domain, dose and social context and odds of depressive symptoms in women. Methods The sample included 1,501 women, aged 18–65. Analyses were performed using cross-sectional data collected from a mail-out survey in 2004. The survey included self-report measures of PA behaviours and depressive symptoms. Crude and adjusted (age, marital status and physical health odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated for each component of PA and odds of depressive symptoms using logistic regression analyses. Results Those who reported more than 3.5 hours leisure-time PA per week had lower odds of depressive symptoms when compared to those who undertook less than this. No other domains of PA (eg. work-related, transport-related or domestic activity were associated with odds of depressive symptoms. Odds of depressive symptoms were lower among women who reported more than 1.5 hours of moderate-intensity (OR = 0.67, CI = 0.45–0.98 or more than 1.75 hours vigorous-intensity (OR = 0.60, CI = 0.42–0.84 leisure-time PA per week. Being discouraged to be active by others was associated with higher odds of depressive symptoms (OR = 2.28, CI = 1.00–5.16, whilst being active with a family member was associated with lower odds of depressive symptoms (OR = 0.61, CI = 0.43–0.87. Conclusion Acknowledging the cross-sectional design, these findings suggest that the domain and social context of PA may be more important for mental health among women than simply the total dose of PA.

  2. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  3. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued, that...... these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of...... depression are presented....

  4. [Behavioral activation and depression: a contextual treatment approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy Chartier, Isabelle; Blanchet, Valérie; Provencher, Martin D

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a widespread psychological disorder that affects approximately one in five North American. Typical reactions to depression include inactivity, isolation, and rumination. Several treatments and psychological interventions have emerged to address this problematic. Cognitive behavioural therapies have received increasingly large amounts of empirical support. A sub-component of cognitive behavioural therapy, behavioural activation, has been shown to in itself effectively treat symptoms of depression. This intervention involves efforts to re-activate the depressed client by having them engage in pleasant, gratifying, leisure, social, or physical activities, thereby counteracting the tendency to be inactive and to isolate oneself. Clients are guided through the process of establishing a list of potentially rewarding social, leisure, mastery-oriented or physical activities, to then establish a gradual hierarchy of objectives to be accomplished over the span of several weeks. Concrete action plans are devised, and solutions to potential obstacles are elaborated. The client is the asked to execute the targeted objective and to record their mood prior to and following the activity. Behavioural activation effectively reverses the downward spiral to depression. Interestingly, studies show that behavioural activation has a positive effect on cognitive activities. It has been shown to reduce rumination and favour cognitive restructuring, without requiring cognitively-based interventions. The advantage of this treatment is therefore that it is simpler to administer in comparison to full-packaged cognitive behavioural therapies, it requires a lesser number of sessions and can be disseminated in a low-intensity format. This article begins by summarizing the origins of the behavioural model of depression, which serves as a basis to the understanding of behavioural activation. This is followed by a detailed explanation of the different phases involved in a behavioural

  5. [Behavioral activation and depression: a contextual treatment approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy Chartier, Isabelle; Blanchet, Valérie; Provencher, Martin D

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a widespread psychological disorder that affects approximately one in five North American. Typical reactions to depression include inactivity, isolation, and rumination. Several treatments and psychological interventions have emerged to address this problematic. Cognitive behavioural therapies have received increasingly large amounts of empirical support. A sub-component of cognitive behavioural therapy, behavioural activation, has been shown to in itself effectively treat symptoms of depression. This intervention involves efforts to re-activate the depressed client by having them engage in pleasant, gratifying, leisure, social, or physical activities, thereby counteracting the tendency to be inactive and to isolate oneself. Clients are guided through the process of establishing a list of potentially rewarding social, leisure, mastery-oriented or physical activities, to then establish a gradual hierarchy of objectives to be accomplished over the span of several weeks. Concrete action plans are devised, and solutions to potential obstacles are elaborated. The client is the asked to execute the targeted objective and to record their mood prior to and following the activity. Behavioural activation effectively reverses the downward spiral to depression. Interestingly, studies show that behavioural activation has a positive effect on cognitive activities. It has been shown to reduce rumination and favour cognitive restructuring, without requiring cognitively-based interventions. The advantage of this treatment is therefore that it is simpler to administer in comparison to full-packaged cognitive behavioural therapies, it requires a lesser number of sessions and can be disseminated in a low-intensity format. This article begins by summarizing the origins of the behavioural model of depression, which serves as a basis to the understanding of behavioural activation. This is followed by a detailed explanation of the different phases involved in a behavioural

  6. Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Sherry L; Gucciardi Enza; Stewart Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Depression causes significant distress or impairment in physical, social, occupational and other key areas of functioning. Women are approximately twice as likely as men to experience depression. Psychosocial factors likely mediate the risks for depression incurred by biological influences. Key Findings Data from the 1999 National Population Health Survey show that depression is more common among Canadian women, with an annual self-reported incidence of 5.7% compared wit...

  7. Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Donna E.; Gucciardi, Enza; Grace, Sherry L.

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Depression causes significant distress or impairment in physical, social, occupational and other key areas of functioning. Women are approximately twice as likely as men to experience depression. Psychosocial factors likely mediate the risks for depression incurred by biological influences. Key Findings Data from the 1999 National Population Health Survey show that depression is more common among Canadian women, with an annual self-reported incidence of 5.7% compared with 2.9% in...

  8. Behavioural activation for the treatment of depression in military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, Dean

    2013-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Depression is a common mental health problem in both civilian and military populations. Access to evidence based psychological therapies for treating common mental health problems such as depression may not be adequate at present. Behavioural Activation (BA) represents a National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommended, evidence-based treatment for depression. The aim of this review was to review the literature to determine how BA could work as a therapeutic approach for military personnel with depression. METHOD: Five specialty-specific electronic databases were searched using the key words 'behavioural activation', 'activity scheduling' and 'depression'. Emerging themes were drawn out of the literature using a long table approach to thematic analysis. RESULTS: Seven themes were identified: Clinical Effectiveness, Cultural Competence, Co-morbidity, Cost Effectiveness, Alternatives to Face-to-Face Therapy, Training and Patient Experience. CONCLUSIONS: Group based BA is a cost effective option that may build upon service personnel's cultural affinity to teamwork and peer support. Brief training workshops and supervision could be provided to military mental health nurses to deliver group based BA. However service delivery may also be enhanced by enabling some nurses to specialise as Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapists. More research is needed to understand whether this pragmatic, two pronged approach to training would result in the sustained dissemination of evidence based practice.

  9. MUSIC AND COCHLEAR IMPLANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao Yitao; Xu Li

    2013-01-01

    Currently, most people with modern multichannel cochlear implant systems can understand speech in qui-et environment very well. However, studies in recent decades reported a lack of satisfaction in music percep-tion with cochlear implants. This article reviews the literature on music ability of cochlear implant users by presenting a systematic outline of the capabilities and limitations of cochlear implant recipients with regard to their music perception as well as production. The review also evaluates the similarities and differences be-tween electric hearing and acoustic hearing regarding music perception. We summarize the research results in terms of the individual components of music (e.g., rhythm, pitch, and timbre). Finally, we briefly intro-duce the vocal singing of prelingually-deafened children with cochlear implants as evaluated by acoustic measures.

  10. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P;

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  11. Decoding of dopaminergic mesolimbic activity and depressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alexander; Deri, Ilana; Friedman, Yaakov; Dremencov, Eliyahu; Goutkin, Sophia; Kravchinsky, Elizabeth; Mintz, Matti; Levi, Dino; Overstreet, David H; Yadid, Gal

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic mesolimbic and mesocortical systems are involved in hedonia and motivation, two core symptoms of depression. However, their role in the pathophysiology of depression and their manipulation to treat depression has received little attention. Previously, we showed decreased limbic dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in an animal model of depression, Flinder sensitive line (FSL) rats. Here we describe a high correlation between phase-space algorithm of bursting-like activity of DA cells in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and efficiency of DA release in the accumbens. This bursting-like activity of VTA DA cells of FSL rats is characterized by a low dimension complexity. Treatment with the antidepressant desipramine affected both the dimension complexity of cell firing in the VTA and rate of DA release in the accumbens, as well as alleviating depressive-like behavior. Our findings indicate the potential usefulness of monitoring limbic dopaminergic dynamics in combination with non-linear analysis. Decoding the functionality of the dopaminergic system may help in development of future antidepressant drugs. PMID:17873290

  12. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in an active nonlinear cochlear model in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruth, Florian; Jülicher, Frank; Lindner, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    A large fraction of human cochleas emits sounds even in the absence of external stimulation. These so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) are a hallmark of the active nonlinear amplification process taking place in the cochlea. Here, we extend a previously proposed frequency domain model and put forward an active nonlinear one-dimensional model of the cochlea in the time domain describing human SOAEs [5]. In our model, oscillatory elements are close to an instability (Hopf bifurcation), they are subject to dynamical noise and coupled by hydrodynamic, elastic and dissipative interactions. Furthermore, oscillators are subject to a weak spatial irregularity in their activity (normally distributed and exponentially correlated in space) that gives rise to the individuality of each simulated cochlea. Our model captures main statistical features of the distribution of emission frequencies, the distribution of the numbers of emissions per cochlea, and the distribution of the distances between neighboring emissions as were previously measured in experiment [14].

  13. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin ... the Use of Cochlear Implants What are the Benefits of Cochlear Implants? For people with implants: Hearing ...

  14. Undergraduate Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms: A National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Catherine A.; Kennedy, Catherine; Morgan, George; Anderson, Sharon K.; Morris, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of college students' physical activity and gender on depressive and suicidal symptoms. Method: The National College Health Assessment survey was administered to college students nationwide. Data were analyzed with 4x2 ANOVAs and Games-Howell post hoc tests when appropriate. Results: More frequent physical activity…

  15. Major depression in mothers predict reduced ventral striatum activation in adolescent female offspring with and without depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior research has identified reduced reward-related brain activation as a promising endophenotype for the early identification of adolescents with major depressive disorder. However, it is unclear whether reduced reward-related brain activation constitutes a true vulnerability for major depressive ...

  16. Treating depression and depression-like behaviour with physical activity: an immune perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Anthony Eyre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing burden of major depressive disorder makes the search for an extended understanding of aetiology, and for the development of additional treatments highly significant. Biological factors may be useful biomarkers for treatment with physical activity (PA, and neurobiological effects of PA may herald new therapeutic development in the future. This paper provides a thorough and up-to-date review of studies examining the neuroimmunomodulatory effects of PA on the brain in depression and depression-like behaviours. From a neuroimmune perspective, evidence suggests PA does enhance the beneficial and reduce the detrimental effects of the neuroimmune system. PA appears to increase the following factors: interleukin (IL-10, IL-6 (acutely, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, central nervous system-specific autoreactive CD4+ T cells, M2 microglia, quiescent astrocytes, CX3CL1 and insulin-like growth factor-1. On the other hand, PA appears to reduce detrimental neuroimmune factors such as: Th1/Th2 balance, pro-inflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein, M1 microglia and reactive astrocytes. The effect of other mechanisms is unknown, such as: CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (T regs, CD200, chemokines, miRNA, M2-type blood-derived macrophages and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α (via receptor 2 (R2. The beneficial effects of PA are likely to occur centrally and peripherally (e.g. in visceral fat reduction. The investigation of the neuroimmune effects of PA on depression and depression-like behaviour is a rapidly developing and important field.

  17. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  18. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  19. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  20. Cochlear Implant in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Samadi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the result of a great combination and collaboration of engineering and medicine. It is mainly because it has the most conflict with the human nervous system among all prosthesis. Cochlear implant helps a child with profound hearing loss to understand and articulate speech and let an adult person with hearing loss communicate with people by phone. Although these wonderful results could not be seen in all patients, will let us know about the great scientific findings.

  1. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lustig, Lawrence R.; Akil, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  2. Facial recognition of happiness among older adults with active and remitted major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Paulo R; Thuras, Paul; Johns, Brian; Lim, Kelvin O

    2016-09-30

    Biased emotion processing in depression might be a trait characteristic independent of mood improvement and a vulnerable factor to develop further depressive episodes. This phenomenon of among older adults with depression has not been adequately examined. In a 2-year cross-sectional study, 59 older patients with either active or remitted major depression, or never-depressed, completed a facial emotion recognition task (FERT) to probe perceptual bias of happiness. The results showed that depressed patients, compared with never depressed subjects, had a significant lower sensitivity to identify happiness particularly at moderate intensity of facial stimuli. Patients in remission from a previous major depressive episode but with none or minimal symptoms had similar sensitivity rate to identify happy facial expressions as compared to patients with an active depressive episode. Further studies would be necessary to confirm whether recognition of happy expression reflects a persistent perceptual bias of major depression in older adults. PMID:27428081

  3. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering

  4. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D. [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Gao, Simon [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Hee Yoon [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Groves, Andrew K. [Department of Neuroscience, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, and Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Zuo, Jian [Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Applegate, Brian E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  5. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment of insomnia that share many of the properties of benzodiazepines. Other CNS depressants include meprobamate, methaqualone ( ... they are prescribed for to put you to sleep, relieve anxiety and muscle spasms, and prevent seizures. ...

  6. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other long-term effects include: impaired sexual function insomnia and other sleep problems breathing problems convulsions (similar to seizures) depression and other mental health issues continue Other Possible Problems Taking too much ...

  7. Prospective Reciprocal Relations between Physical Activity and Depression in Female Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerstad, Sarah J.; Boutelle, Kerri N.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Stice, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although an inverse correlation between physical activity and depression among adolescents has been found in research, this relation has seldom been examined prospectively. Thus, we tested whether physical activity reduces risk for future escalations in depression and whether depression decreases likelihood of future change in physical…

  8. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, B.; Gjedde, A.; Wallentin, M.; Vuust, P.

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic progress in the restoration of hearing takes place in the first months after cochlear implantation. To map the brain activity underlying this process, we used positron emission tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners with prelingual hearing loss. Furthermore, Broca's area was activated as an effect of time, but only in CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss. The study demonstrates that adaptation to the cochlear implant is highly related to the history of hearing loss. Speech processing in patients whose hearing loss occurred after the acquisition of language involves brain areas associated with speech comprehension, which is not the case for patients whose hearing loss occurred before the acquisition of language. Finally, the findings confirm the key role of Broca's area in restoration of speech perception, but only in individuals in whom Broca's area has been active prior to the loss of hearing. PMID:24377050

  9. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallo, Donato

    2014-04-15

    Reading the CPD article was beneficial to my professional nursing practice and development. I gained a greater understanding of how depression is likely to exacerbate the effects of a physical illness or complicate the treatment of other health conditions. PMID:24712633

  10. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to get better. Not a Normal Part of Aging Click for more information Depression is a common problem among older adults, but it is NOT a ... Z | videos A-Z | training | about us | contact us | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  11. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION: MY EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is a small, surgically implanted complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss, typically involves damage to hair cells in the cochlea, as a result sound cannot reach the auditory nerve which usually receives information from hair cells. A cochlear implant skips the damaged hair cells and to stimulate the auditory nerve directly. An implant does not restore normal hearing, instead it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech. I am here presenting this article in relation to the indications, intraoperative and postoperative complications of cochlear implantation in our institute since January 2013. Children who receive implants at earlier age, outperform their peers who are implanted at a later age. This is reflected in all the areas of speech and language development.

  12. The Cochlear Tuning Curve

    CERN Document Server

    Magnasco, M O

    2001-01-01

    The tuning curve of the cochlea measures how large an input is required to elicit a given output level as a function of the frequency. It is a fundamental object of auditory theory, for it summarizes how to infer what a sound was on the basis of the cochlear output. A simple model is presented showing that only two elements are sufficient for establishing the cochlear tuning curve: a broadly tuned traveling wave, moving unidirectionally from high to low frequencies, and a set of mechanosensors poised at the threshold of an oscillatory (Hopf) instability. These two components suffice to generate the various frequency-response regimes which are needed for a cochlear tuning curve with a high slope.

  13. Language understanding and vocabulary of early cochlear implanted children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, L; Busch, GW; Sandahl, M;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with the level of language understanding, the level of receptive and active vocabulary, and to estimate effect-related odds ratios for cochlear implanted children's language level....

  14. [Physical activity is just as good as CBT or drugs for depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Eva; Hovland, Anders; Kjellman, Bengt; Taube, Jill; Martinsen, Egil

    2015-01-01

    In this article on the effect of physical activity on depression, data have been drawn from several meta-analyses, in particular, the latest Cochrane review entitled »Exercise for depression« published in 2013. The results show that physical activity can help prevent the onset and relapse of depression. Depressed people should be recommended aerobic or muscular strength training. There is clear evidence that physical activity alone is beneficial for the treatment of mild and moderate depression and can reduce symptoms of mild to moderate depression to the same extent as standard treatments (psychotherapy and antidepressant medication). Combining physical activity with these treatments may yield additional benefits. Individuals with depression should be recommended physical activity in adjunct to psychotherapy and medication.

  15. CNS depressant activities of roots of Coccos nucifera in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Gain, Sumanta; Jana, Sandip; Mandal, Soumit

    2011-01-01

    The ethanol extract of Coccos nucifera (EECN) was tested for possible pharmacological effects on experimental animals. EECN significantly potentiated the sleeping time of mice induced by standard hypnotics viz. pentobarbital sodium, diazepam, and meprobamate in a dose dependent manner. EECN showed significant analgesic properties as evidenced by the significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches induced in mice by 1.2% acetic acid solution. It also potentiated analgesia induced by morphine and pethidine in mice. Pretreatment with EECN caused significant protection against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions. The behavioral studies on mice indicate CNS depressant activity of the ethanol extract of C. nucifera. PMID:21485298

  16. Physical Activity of Depressed Patients and Their Motivation to Exercise: Nordic Walking in Family Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suija, Kadri; Pechter, Ulle; Kalda, Ruth; Tahepold, Heli; Maaroos, Jaak; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to find out how motivated depressed patients are to exercise regularly, to measure the physical activity of depressed patients and to find out how regular Nordic Walking affects the mood and physical fitness of depressed patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Three years after the Prediction of Primary…

  17. Cortical activation in profoundly deaf patients during cochlear implant stimulation demonstrated by H sub 2 (15)O PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, H.; Lamprecht, A.; Kuehn, A.R.; Roden, W.; Vosteen, K.H.; Feinendegen, L.E. (Institute of Medicine, Juelich, (West Germany))

    1991-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are used to provide sensations of sound to profoundly deaf patients. The performance of the CI is assessed mainly by the subjective reports of patients. The aim of this study was to look for objective cortical responses to the stimulation of the CI. Two postlingually and two prelingually deaf patients were investigated by positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 15}O-labeled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) to determine the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Instead of quantifying rCBF in absolute terms, it was estimated by referring the regional tissue concentration of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O to the mean whole brain concentration. CI stimulation encoded from white noise and sequential words led to an increased rCBF in the primary and secondary (Wernicke) auditory cortex. Relative elevations of up to 33% were observed bilaterally, although they were higher contralateral to the CI. These results were obtained not only in the postlingually deaf patients but also in two patients who had never been able to hear. Thus, it could be demonstrated that PET measurements of cerebral H{sub 2}{sup 15}O distribution yield objective responses of the central auditory system during electrical stimulation by CIs in profoundly deaf patients.

  18. Thyroid axis activity and suicidal behavior in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Fabrice; Mokrani, Marie-Claude; Lopera, Felix Gonzalez; Diep, Thanh Son; Rabia, Hassen; Fattah, Saïd

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between suicidal behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis activity in depressed patients. The serum levels of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were evaluated before and after 0800 and 2300 h thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenges, on the same day, in 95 medication-free DSM-IV euthyroid major depressed inpatients and 44 healthy hospitalized controls. Compared to controls: (1) patients with a positive suicide history (PSH; n=53) showed lower basal FT4 (at 0800 h: p<0.005; at 2300 h: p<0.03), but normal FT3 levels, while patients with a negative suicide history (NSH; n=42) showed normal FT4 and FT3 levels; (2) TSH responses to TRH (DeltaTSH) were blunted in NSHs (at 0800 h: p<0.03; at 2300 h: p<0.00001), but not in PSHs; (3) both NSHs and PSHs showed lower DeltaDeltaTSH values (differences between 2300 h-DeltaTSH and 0800 h-DeltaTSH) (p<0.000001 and p<0.003, respectively). Compared to NSHs, basal FT4 levels were reduced in PSHs (at 0800 h: p<0.002; at 2300h: p<0.006). HPT parameters were not significantly different between recent suicide attempters (n=32) and past suicide attempters (n=21). However, compared to controls, recent suicide attempters showed lower 2300 h-DeltaTSH (p<0.04) and DeltaDeltaTSH (p<0.002) values, and lower basal FT4 values (at 0800 h: p<0.006; at 2300 h: p<0.02). Our results, obtained in a large sample of depressed inpatients, indicate that various degrees of HPT axis dysregulation are associated with the history of suicide. PMID:20129737

  19. Depression and Everyday Social Activity, Belonging, and Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    Steger, Michael F.; Kashdan, Todd B.

    2009-01-01

    Dysfunctional social behavior has been implicated in the experience of depression. People with greater depressive symptoms report more frequent negative social interactions and react more strongly to them. It remains unknown, however, whether reaction strength differs depending on whether social interactions are positive or negative. Drawing on socio-evolutionary models of depression (N. B. Allen & P. B. T. Badcock, 2003), we proposed that people with greater depressive symptoms should not on...

  20. Depression in Women and in Men: Differences on Behavioral Avoidance and on Behavioral Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Wagener, Aurélie; Baeyens, Céline; Blairy, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a well-known disorder characterized by e.g. sadness, loss of interest and pleasure, feelings of guilt or worthlessness. Depression is also characterized by a decrease of the level of engagement in activities also conceptualized as behavioral avoidance. Indeed, depressed patients less and less engage themselves in pleasurable activities (e.g. they spend more and more time in their bed, see their friends more rarely). Reciprocally, this decrease of the level of engagement in activ...

  1. Tinnitus before and 6 Months after Cochlear Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kompis, M; Pelizzone, M.; Dillier, N; J. Allum; Demin, N; Senn, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this prospective multicenter study, tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related distress were investigated in 174 cochlear implant (CI) candidates who underwent CI surgery at a Swiss cochlear implant center. All subjects participated in two session, one preoperatively and one 6 months after device activation. In both sessions, tinnitus loudness was assessed using a visual analogue scale and tinnitus distress using a standardized tinnitus questionnaire. The data were compared with unaided pre- a...

  2. Hypoperfusion in baseline and cognitively activated brain SPECT imaging of adult and elderly patients with depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the rCBF abnormalities of the baseline and cognitively activated rCBF imaging in unmedicated adult and elderly patients with depression. Methods: The subjects were divided into four groups: depressed adults, normal adult controls, depressed elders and normal elderly controls. All depressed patients were unmedicated and the diagnoses (depression of moderate degree with accompanying somatization) were confirmed by the ICD-10 criteria. Age range of the 39 depressed adult patients was 17 - 55 years. 17 age-matched normal adult controls (age range 21 - 50 years) were studied under identical conditions. The age range of 18 depressed elderly patients was 62 - 76 years. 21 age-matched normal elderly controls (age range 60 - 72 years) were studied under identical conditions. Baseline and cognitively activated 99Tcm-ECD SPECT were performed on 25 of the 39 adult patients with depression and 17 normal adult controls. Baseline 99Tcm-ECD SPECT only was performed on the remaining 14 patients with depression. Baseline and cognitively activated 99Tcm-ECD SPECT were performed on 12 of the 18 elderly patients with depression and 18 of the 21 normal elderly controls. Baseline 99Tcm-ECD SPECT only was performed on the remaining elderly patients and 3 normal elderly controls. Results: 1) The characteristic abnormalities of baseline and cognitively activated brain SPECT imaging of depression in adults: the baseline rCBF values of frontal and temporal lobe decreased significantly and the activated rCBF values of frontal, temporal lobe decreased more evidently than that in the baseline imaging and additionally decreased activated rCBF values in parietal lobe were found. 2) The characteristic abnormalities of baseline and cognitively activated brain SPECT imaging of elderly patients with depression: the baseline rCBF values of frontal, temporal lobe and right basal ganglia decreased significantly and the activated rCBF values of frontal, temporal, right parietal lobe

  3. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Rachel C.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Luo, Wen

    2011-01-01

    Following a landmark component analysis of cognitive therapy by Jacobson and colleagues (1996), there has been renewed interest in behavioral activation (BA) treatments for depression. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) was developed to measure when and how clients become activated over the course of BA treatment. Multiple…

  4. Cochlear implants in genetic deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuezhong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic defects are one of the most important etiologies of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss and play an important role in determining cochlear implantation outcomes. While the pathogenic mutation types of a number of deafness genes have been cloned, the pathogenesis mechanisms and their relationship to the outcomes of cochlear implantation remain a hot research area. The auditory performance is considered to be affected by the etiology of hearing loss and the number of surviving spiral ganglion cells, as well as others. Current research advances in cochlear implantation for hereditary deafness, especially the relationship among clinic-types, genotypes and outcomes of cochlear implantation, will be discussed in this review.

  5. Neural Changes following Behavioral Activation for a Depressed Breast Cancer Patient: A Functional MRI Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gawrysiak, Michael J.; John P. Carvalho; Rogers, Baxter P.; Nicholas, Christopher R. N.; Dougherty, John H.; Hopko, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is an innovative but at this stage underutilized method to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in this case study to examine changes in brain activity in a depressed breast cancer patient receiving an 8-session Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), based on the work of Hopko and Lejuez (2007). A music listening paradigm was used during fMRI brain scans to assess reward responsivenes...

  6. Impact of physical activities in elderly with depression:- a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Subedi, Laxmi

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this research is to explore the effect of physical activities in treating depression among elderly population living in an institution using different existing literature. Also, aim is to make this study useful to healthcare professionals and students while working with elderly population suffering from depression. The research question is kept in concern during the study: 1. How do phys- ical activities promote health for elderly suffering from depression living in an institu...

  7. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    2007-01-01

      Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  8. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  9. Modelling Cochlear Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlea plays a crucial role in mammal hearing. The basic function of the cochlea is to map sounds of different frequencies onto corresponding characteristic positions on the basilar membrane (BM. Sounds enter the fluid-filled cochlea and cause deflection of the BM due to pressure differences between the cochlear fluid chambers. These deflections travel along the cochlea, increasing in amplitude, until a frequency-dependent characteristic position and then decay away rapidly. The hair cells can detect these deflections and encode them as neural signals. Modelling the mechanics of the cochlea is of help in interpreting experimental observations and also can provide predictions of the results of experiments that cannot currently be performed due to technical limitations. This paper focuses on reviewing the numerical modelling of the mechanical and electrical processes in the cochlea, which include fluid coupling, micromechanics, the cochlear amplifier, nonlinearity, and electrical coupling.

  10. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and depression during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Iva Tendais; Bárbara Figueiredo; Jorge Mota; Ana Conde

    2011-01-01

    This study examines physical activity patterns among women, from pre-pregnancy to the second trimester of pregnancy, and the relationship between physical activity status based on physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depression over pregnancy. 56 healthy pregnant women self-reported physical activity, HRQoL and depression at 10-15 and 19-24 weeks of pregnancy and physical activity before pregnancy. Whereas vigorous leisure physical activity decreased aft...

  11. Activities on Facebook Reveal the Depressive State of Users

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sungkyu; Lee, Sang Won; Kwak, Jinah; Cha, Meeyoung; Jeong, Bumseok

    2013-01-01

    Background As online social media have become prominent, much effort has been spent on identifying users with depressive symptoms in order to aim at early diagnosis, treatment, and even prevention by using various online social media. In this paper, we focused on Facebook to discern any correlations between the platform’s features and users’ depressive symptoms. This work may be helpful in trying to reach and detect large numbers of depressed individuals more easily. Objective Our goal was to...

  12. Immune and hormonal activity in adults suffering from depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O.V. Nunes

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available An association between depression and altered immune and hormonal systems has been suggested by the results of many studies. In the present study we carried out immune and hormonal measurements in 40 non-medicated, ambulatory adult patients with depression determined by CID-10 criteria and compared with 34 healthy nondepressed subjects. The severity of the condition was determined with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Of 40 depressed patients, 31 had very severe and 9 severe or moderate depression, 29 (72.5% were females and 11 (27.5% were males (2.6:1 ratio. The results revealed a significant reduction of albumin and elevation of alpha-1, alpha-2 and ß-globulins, and soluble IL-2 receptor in patients with depression compared to the values obtained for nondepressed subjects (P<0.05. The decrease lymphocyte proliferation in response to a mitogen was significantly lower in severely or moderately depressed patients when compared to control (P<0.05. These data confirm the immunological disturbance of acute phase proteins and cellular immune response in patients with depression. Other results may be explained by a variety of interacting factors such as number of patients, age, sex, and the nature, severity and/or duration of depression. Thus, the data obtained should be interpreted with caution and the precise clinical relevance of these findings requires further investigation.

  13. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND DEPRESSION STATUS AMONG THE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrfan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at examining the correlation between physical activity levels and depression status among the university students. The study was a correlational research and was conducted with cross-sectional method. The sample of the study was composed of 906 students who studied at the Afyon Kocatepe University. The data of the study were collected using a questionnaire form consisted of items about personal information and physical activities and depression status. The data were evaluated with SPSS statistical software. First; descriptive statistical data were gathered. The correlational status among the variables was analyzed with Pearson Correlation Coefficients. The differences of depression status in terms of physical activity levels of the students were analyzed with ANOVA test. As a result of the study; it was found out that there was a statistically significant difference between physical activity levels and depression status of the students in terms of gender variable. It was identified that there was a significant difference in depression status of the students in terms of their physical activity levels (p<0.01. It was seen that there was a negative correlation between physical activity levels and depression status of the students (p<0.001. In conclusion; it was found out that physical activity MET scores of the female students were lower than male students while their depression levels were higher than male students and depression levels of the students decreased as their physical activity levels increased.

  14. Depression and Everyday Social Activity, Belonging, and Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Michael F; Kashdan, Todd B

    2009-04-01

    Dysfunctional social behavior has been implicated in the experience of depression. People with greater depressive symptoms report more frequent negative social interactions and react more strongly to them. It remains unknown, however, whether reaction strength differs depending on whether social interactions are positive or negative. Drawing on socio-evolutionary models of depression (N. B. Allen & P. B. T. Badcock, 2003), we proposed that people with greater depressive symptoms should not only react more strongly to negative social interactions but also to positive social interactions and a sense of belonging. Using non-clinical samples, two daily process studies examined the role of depression in people's reactivity to social interactions in natural, ongoing, social contexts. In Study 1, the number of positive and negative social events showed a stronger relation to well-being among people with greater depressive symptoms. Study 2 extended this finding to perceptions of belonging in memorable social interactions, finding a stronger link between belonging and well-being among people with greater depressive symptoms. Together these studies provide the first indication that depressive symptoms may sensitize people to everyday experiences of both social rejection and social acceptance. PMID:20428460

  15. Adolescents with Major Depression Demonstrate Increased Amygdala Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tony T.; Simmons, Alan N.; Matthews, Scott C.; Tapert, Susan F.; Frank, Guido K.; Max, Jeffrey E.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Lansing, Amy E.; Brown, Gregory; Strigo, Irina A.; Wu, Jing; Paulus, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Functional neuroimaging studies have led to a significantly deeper understanding of the underlying neural correlates and the development of several mature models of depression in adults. In contrast, our current understanding of the underlying neural substrates of adolescent depression is very limited. Although numerous studies have…

  16. Depression and physical activity in a sample of nigerian adolescents: levels, relationships and predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okafor Nkechi C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity is related to many morbidities but the evidence of its link with depression in adolescents needs further investigation in view of the existing conflicting reports. Methods The data for this cross-sectional study were collected from 1,100 Nigerian adolescents aged 12-17 years. Depressive symptomatology and physical activity were assessed using the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI and the Physical Activity Questionnaire-Adolescent version (PAQ-A respectively. Independent t tests, Pearson's Moment Correlation and Multi-level logistic regression analyses for individual and school area influences were carried out on the data at p Results The mean age of the participants was 15.20 ± 1.435 years. The prevalence of mild to moderate depression was 23.8%, definite depression was 5.7% and low physical activity was 53.8%. More severe depressive symptoms were linked with lower levels of physical activity (r = -0.82, p Conclusions A sizable burden of depression and low physical activity existed among the studied adolescents and these were linked to both individual and school factors. Future studies should examine the effects of physical activity among clinical samples of adolescents with depression.

  17. The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Healthy Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Overdorf EdD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Depression and inactivity in the elderly are major health problems with significant ramifications for healthy aging. Research shows an inverse relationship between depression and physical activity levels. The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in healthy older women, first within the framework of exercise programs, and second via the impact of an intervention. Method: Two experiments were conducted. In the first, 65 women, all above the age of 60, participated. Measures of physical activity were gained by self-report using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire while the measure of depressive symptomatology was the Beck Depression Inventory. In the second, 11 women participated in a line dancing intervention, and their self-reported depressive symptomatology was measured prior to and just after the 6-week exercise intervention using the Beck Depression Inventory. In addition, during the second experiment, pedometer data were gathered during the fourth week. Results and Conclusion: The data of the first study revealed a relationship between the total amount of physical activity and scores on the Beck Depression Inventory; that is, the more active a person is, the lower her self-reported depressive symptoms. Significant correlations were found between the Beck Depression Inventory and the reports of vigorous and moderate exercise levels, but not with walking. Participants who were part of an organized exercise group exercised significantly more than those who exercised on their own. In the second study, those who participated in a line dancing intervention had significantly lower Beck Depression Inventory scores post intervention. The implications of these findings for public health are discussed.

  18. Microanalysis of ozone depression of motor activity. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepper, J.L.; Weiss, B.; Cox, C.

    1982-01-01

    Ozone, the principal oxidant in photochemical smog, impairs athletic performance and induces complaints of fatigue and lethargy. It also reduces motor activity in rodents. A detailed analysis of this finding was attempted. Eight male Long-Evans rats were housed in cages attached to running wheels located within a 2-m/sup 3/ exposure chamber. Each revolution of a wheel closed a switch with the time between switch closures recorded by an attached computer. The rats were exposed for 6-hr periods during the nocturnal phase of their light cycle to ozone concentrations of 0.12, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 ppM. Ozone produced initial decrements in the number of revolutions and a progressively greater decrease with continued exposure. Statistically significant depression took place at 0.12 ppM. analysis of the individual components of wheel running revealed differential susceptibility to ozone. After termination of exposure to low concentrations of ozone, animals showed increased running. At the higher concentrations, running remained suppressed below control values for several hours. A new multivariate graphical technique, the biplot, is presented as a way to simultaneously display the relationships among many complex variables.

  19. Considering depression as a consequence of activation of the inflammatory response system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, J; Klein, HC; Versijpt, J; den Boer, J; ter Horst, GJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the possible interrelation between peripheral and/or cerebral inflammation and depression. Often, depression is regarded as a consequence of life events, including disabling diseases. The question addressed here is whether activation of the inflammatory response system (IRS) ca

  20. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  1. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in older persons with and without a depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, D.; Korten, N. C. M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Stek, M. L.; van der Mast, R. C.; Voshaar, R. Oude; Comijs, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) has been associated with depression, but findings have been inconsistent. Among older depressed persons, both hyperactivity and hypo-activity of the HPA-axis were demonstrated. However, most studies were population

  2. Spousal caregivers' activity restriction and depression : A model for changes over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, AP; Schulz, R; Matthews, KA; Scheier, MF; Ormel, J; Lindenberg, SM

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we examine the effects of increasing as well as decreasing caregiving demands on depressive symptomatology. In addition, we focus on spousal caregivers' activity restriction as an explanatory mechanism for changes in depressive symptomatology in the caregiving context. Two databases ar

  3. Anti depressant activity of Mamsyadi Kwatha: An Ayurvedic compound formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shreevathsa, M.; Ravishankar, B.; Dwivedi, Rambabu

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a psychiatric condition in which there is loss of interest in all pleasurable outlets, viz. food, sex, work, friends, hobbies and entertainment. The prevalence rate of the disease is 6-8% in women and 3-5% in men. Ayurveda, the science of life, provides systematic management principles for depression. Mamsyadi Kwatha is one such formulation stated by Yadavji Trikamji Acharya in Siddha Yoga Sangraha and Bheshaja Samhita, which is said to be effective in psychiatric conditions. Th...

  4. Physical Activity and Cognitive Function in Older Adults: The Mediating Effect of Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, David E; Marson, Daniel C; Triebel, Kristen L; Ball, Karlene K; Wadley, Virginia G; Cody, Shameka L

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms and social networks may influence the relationship between physical activity and cognition. Using structural equation modeling, depressive symptoms and social networks were examined as mediators between physical activity and cognition in community-dwelling older adults (N = 122), with a range of cognitive abilities (e.g., normal, mild cognitive impairment). The model included age, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleeping, social networks, depressive symptoms, and cognitive function. A path was observed between physical activity, depressive symptoms, and cognition; specifically, those who were more physically active experienced less depression and better cognitive functioning. No relationship between social networks and cognition was found. This model fits the data well (goodness-of-fit index = .93, adjusted goodness-of-fit index = .90, root mean square error of approximation = .06). Results suggest that physical activity may mitigate depressive symptoms, with beneficial effects on cognitive functioning in both those with and without mild cognitive impairment. Suggestions for managing depression and improving cognitive functioning are provided. PMID:27224681

  5. Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms among College Students and the Influence of Sport Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Uglešić, Boran; Lasić, Davor; Žuljan-Cvitanović, Marija; Buković, Damir; Karelović, Deni; Delić – Brkljačić, Diana; Buković, Nevia; Radan, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    The present study asses the prevalence of depressive symptoms among college students in Split, Croatia, and positive influence of sport activity on decreasing the depression symptoms. Authors screened all 664 college students of the first year of study. All of them were over the 18 years and the mean age was 19.4±1.2 years. There were 466 females (70.2%) and 178 (26.8%) males. They answered The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and questionnaire about their sport activity (no sport activity, r...

  6. Effects of Physical Activity on Trace Elements and Depression Related Biomarkers in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2016-08-01

    Not much is known about the role of physical activity (PA), obesity related variables, and trace elements as potential risk factors affecting neurotransmitters in schoolchildren with depression. Our objective was to investigate the effect of physical activity (PA) on depressive symptoms in children and adolescents. Also, we aimed to study the association of demographic variables, serum levels of Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), serotonin, and salivary cortisol with depression in this population. One hundred and fifty school children (90 boys and 60 girls) aged 7-18 years were recruited for this study. All participants were evaluated for depression using CDI-score analysis. Their physical activity levels were checked using pre-validated questionnaires. The serum levels of Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), cortisol, and serotonin were estimated using atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques. About 48.7 % of the study population had depressive symptoms (CDI-score; ≥13), and were classified into mild, moderate, and severe categories. Older children, especially girls, had higher levels of depression. Participants with moderate and severe depression had significantly lower physical activity, serotonin, and zinc levels, Zn/Cu ratios, and significantly higher copper and cortisol levels. Physically active boys showed significantly lower depressive CDI-scores and improvement in cortisol, serotonin, Cu, and Zn concentrations compared to girls of sedentary life style. CDI- scores correlated positively with BMI, cortisol and Cu, and negatively with PA, serotonin and Zn concentrations. BMI, cortisol, serotonin, Cu and Zn, could explain about 59.3-79 % of the depressive symptoms among schoolchildren, according to stepwise regression analysis. This was especially true in especially older girls. PA and an adequate balance in Zn and Cu levels, plays a positive role in improving CDI-depressive score, BMI, serotonin and cortisol levels among schoolchildren. PMID:26701336

  7. Integration of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD) Into a College Orientation Program: Depression and Alcohol Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; MacPherson, Laura; Baruch, David E.; Tull, Matthew T.; Lejuez, C.W.

    2011-01-01

    College freshmen face a variety of academic and social challenges as they adjust to college life that can place them at risk for a number of negative outcomes, including depression and alcohol-related problems. Orientation classes that focus on teaching incoming students how to better cope with college-oriented stress may provide an opportunity to prevent the development of these adjustment problems. This article outlines a program based on behavioral activation that can be integrated into co...

  8. Prevalence of depressive symptoms amongst highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART patients in AIDSRelief Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Shumba

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There is limited data on the prevalence of depression in HIV and AIDS patients in Sub- Saharan Africa and little resources have been allocated to address this issue. Depression affects patient adherence to treatment and predisposes patients to resistance which poses a public health threat. It also affects quality of life and productivity of patients. From August 2008 to March 2009, 731 patient adherence surveys were administered to assess disease, treatment knowledge and services received. The primary variable of interest was patients’ level of depressive symptoms score, constructed using factor analysis from five survey questions relating to: sadness, need to be alone, hopelessness and confusion and was categorized as no depressive symptoms (score 0, low depressive symptoms (score 1-2, moderate depressive symptoms (score 3-4 and high depressive symptoms (score 5-10. Majority of the patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART (59% were found to have depressive symptoms and this was more among women than men (66% vs 43%. There was some association of depressive symptoms with non-disclosure (70% of those who had not disclosed had depressive symptoms compared to 53% among those who had disclosed. There is a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among adult patients on HAART. There is need for in-depth evaluation to find out the root causes of depressive symptoms among HAART patients in AIDSRelief clinics. There is need to integrate mental health management in HIV care and treatment as well as training the existing health workers on mental health management.

  9. Association between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms: Midlife Women in SWAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Sheila A.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Segawa, Eisuke; Avery, Elizabeth; Sternfeld, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The relationship of physical activity (PA) and positive mood has been the focus of considerable research, primarily cross-sectional. This study was done to evaluate the relationship between PA and high depressive symptoms across time and to examine whether being physically active attenuates the risk of depressive symptoms in midlife women. Methods The present study is a longitudinal observation study of the menopausal transition in a multiethnic population. Ten years of data on 2891 women were analyzed. The participants were women from seven geographic areas nationwide, aged 42 to 52 years at baseline, still menstruating and not using exogenous reproductive hormones. Physical activity was measured with the Kaiser Permanente Physical Activity Scale (KPAS). The main outcome measure, depressive symptoms, was assessed with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) with primary outcome CES-D score of 16 or higher. Results In mixed effect logistic regression models adjusted for covariates, compared to inactivity, physical activity Meeting PA Guidelines (approximating public health guidelines) and physical activity Below PA Guidelines were each associated with lower risk of High Depressive Symptoms (CES-D score of 16 or higher) [odds ratio (OR) =0.52, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.40-0.70; OR =0.81, 95% CI 0.67-0.98, respectively] across 10 years. Being married, Japanese and Hispanic ethnicity, current smoking, reporting very upsetting life events, using anti-depressive medications, having hot flashes, and high BMI were all positively associated with High Depressive Symptoms, while high social support was negatively associated. Conclusions Higher PA was associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms persistently over ten years independent of potential confounders. Our findings suggest that reaching moderate intensity PA levels during midlife may be protective against depressive symptoms. PMID:24914519

  10. Developmental Neuroplasticity After Cochlear Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kral, Andrej; Sharma, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Cortical development is dependent on stimulus-driven learning. The absence of sensory input from birth, as occurs in congenital deafness, affects normal growth and connectivity needed to form a functional sensory system—resulting in deficits in oral language learning. Cochlear implants bypass cochlear damage by directly stimulating the auditory nerve and brain, making it possible to avoid many of the deleterious effects of sensory deprivation. Congenitally deaf animals and children who receiv...

  11. Increased activities of both superoxide dismutase and catalase were indicators of acute depressive episodes in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Chang; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2016-01-30

    Oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this study was to investigate the serum levels of oxidative stress biomarkers and S100B in patients with MDD in an acute phase, and evaluate the changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD), protein carbonyl content (PCC), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine after treatment (8-OHdG), catalase (CAT), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and S100B. We consecutively enrolled 21 MDD inpatients in an acute phase and 40 healthy subjects. Serum oxidative stress markers were measured with assay kits. Serum SOD and CAT activities in MDD patients in an acute phase were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects, and serum PCC levels were significantly lower. The HAM-D scores had a significantly positive association with S100B levels. Eighteen depressed patients were followed up, and there was no significant difference among all of the markers after treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased activities of both SOD and CAT might be indicators of acute depressive episodes in MDD patients.

  12. EFFECTIVE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS WITH NOOTROPICS DRUG PANTOGAM ACTIV

    OpenAIRE

    Baranov, A. P.; A. V. Strutynsky; O. Sh. Oynotkinova; Gorbacheva, E. V.; V. V. Trishina; A. S. Gusev-Scherbakov; J. J. Golubev

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the efficiency of the inclusion nootropic drug Pantogam Activ in the complex therapy of 82 patients with heart failure, ischemic heart diseases, anxiety and depressive disorders. It was shown that an 8-week treatment with Pantogam Activ in most patients is accompanied by a significant reduction of anxiety and depressive disorders, increase exercise tolerance, improved autonomic regulation of heart function and decrease the frequency of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmi...

  13. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Petersen

    2013-01-01

    tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners with prelingual hearing loss. Furthermore, Broca’s area was activated as an effect of time, but only in CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss. The study demonstrates that adaptation to the cochlear implant is highly related to the history of hearing loss. Speech processing in patients whose hearing loss occurred after the acquisition of language involves brain areas associated with speech comprehension, which is not the case for patients whose hearing loss occurred before the acquisition of language. Finally, the findings confirm the key role of Broca’s area in restoration of speech perception, but only in individuals in whom Broca’s area has been active prior to the loss of hearing.

  14. Night locomotor activity and quality of sleep in quetiapine-treated patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todder, Doron; Caliskan, Serdal; Baune, Bernhard T

    2006-12-01

    This research assesses the development of the night-activity rhythm and quality of sleep during course of treatment among patients with unipolar or bipolar depression and receiving antidepressant treatment plus quetiapine. Twenty-seven patients with major depressive episode were included into a 4-week follow-up study and compared with 27 healthy controls. Motor activity was continuously measured with an electronic wrist device (actigraphy), sleep was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and patients were clinically assessed with the Hamilton depression score. All patients received a standard antidepressant treatment plus quetiapine. Whereas we found a rapid and maintaining improvement of subjective sleep parameters during the 4-week study, we observed a rapid improvement of some objective sleep parameters (actigraph) within the first week, but no further significant change of objective sleep parameters during the rest of the study. Another main finding of this study is that changes of subjectively and objectively assessed sleep parameters do not necessarily reflect clinical improvement of depression during the same timeline. Despite partial clinical remission, objective sleep parameters still showed significantly different patterns compared with controls. This study is the first to examine the effect of quetiapine on locomotor activity alongside with sleep in depression. As the studied patients with depression showed improvement in subjective and objective sleep parameters, quetiapine may be a promising drug for patients with depression and insomnia. Further studies need to investigate in detail the timeline of clinical remission and alterations of objective and subjective sleep parameters. PMID:17110822

  15. Cortisol's effects on hippocampal activation in depressed patients are related to alterations in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Heather C; Jahn, Allison L; Davidson, Richard J; Kern, Simone; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Halverson, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Many investigators have hypothesized that brain response to cortisol is altered in depression. However, neural activation in response to exogenously manipulated cortisol elevations has not yet been directly examined in depressed humans. Animal research shows that glucocorticoids have robust effects on hippocampal function, and can either enhance or suppress neuroplastic events in the hippocampus depending on a number of factors. We hypothesized that depressed individuals would show 1) altered hippocampal response to exogenous administration of cortisol, and 2) altered effects of cortisol on learning. In a repeated-measures design, 19 unmedicated depressed and 41 healthy individuals completed two fMRI scans. Fifteen mg oral hydrocortisone (i.e., cortisol) or placebo (order randomized and double-blind) was administered 1 h prior to encoding of emotional and neutral words during fMRI scans. Data analysis examined the effects of cortisol administration on 1) brain activation during encoding, and 2) subsequent free recall for words. Cortisol affected subsequent recall performance in depressed but not healthy individuals. We found alterations in hippocampal response to cortisol in depressed women, but not in depressed men (who showed altered response to cortisol in other regions, including subgenual prefrontal cortex). In both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function were positively correlated with its effects on recall performance assessed days later. Our data provide evidence that in depressed compared to healthy women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function are altered. Our data also show that in both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on emotional memory formation and hippocampal function are related.

  16. Activities of daily living, depression, and quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake J Lawrence

    Full Text Available This study examined whether activities of daily living (ADL mediate the relationship between depression and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL in people with Parkinson's disease (PD. A cross-sectional, correlational research design examined data from 174 participants who completed the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-section 2 (UPDRS-section 2 [ADL]. Multiple Regression Analysis (MRA was used to examine the mediator model. Depression and ADL significantly (p<.001 predicted HR-QOL, and depression significantly (p<.001 predicted ADL. Whilst ADL did not impact on the relationship between depression and HR-QOL, there was a significant (p<.001 indirect effect of depression on HR-QOL via ADL, suggesting both direct and indirect (via ADL effects of depression on HR-QOL. The magnitude of this effect was moderate (R2 = .13. People with PD who report depression also experience greater difficulty completing ADL, which impacts upon their HR-QOL. It is recommended that clinicians adopt a multidisciplinary approach to care by combining pharmacological treatments with psycho/occupational therapy, thereby alleviating the heterogeneous impact of motor and non-motor symptoms on HR-QOL in people with PD.

  17. Physical activity reduces the risk of subsequent depression for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, William J; Deleger, Stéphane; Roberts, Robert E; Kaplan, George A

    2002-08-15

    Previous studies assessing protective effects of physical activity on depression have had conflicting results; one recent study argued that excluding disabled subjects attenuated any observed effects. The authors' objective was to compare the effects of higher levels of physical activity on prevalent and incident depression with and without exclusion of disabled subjects. Participants were 1,947 community-dwelling adults from the Alameda County Study aged 50-94 years at baseline in 1994 with 5 years of follow-up. Depression was measured using criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Physical activity was measured with an eight-point scale; odds ratios are based upon a one-point increase on the scale. Even with adjustments for age, sex, ethnicity, financial strain, chronic conditions, disability, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking, and social relations, greater physical activity was protective for both prevalent depression (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79, 1.01) and incident depression (adjusted OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.73, 0.96) over 5 years. Exclusion of disabled subjects did not attenuate the incidence results (adjusted OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.92). Findings support the protective effects of physical activity on depression for older adults and argue against excluding disabled subjects from similar studies.

  18. [Morita Therapy to Treat Depression: When and How to Encourage Patients to Join Activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses how Morita therapy is used to treat depression, illustrated with a clinical case, and makes comparisons between Morita therapy and behavioral activation (BA). The author further examines the issue of when and how to encourage patients to join activities in clinical practice in Japan. Both Morita therapy and BA share at least a common view that it is effective to activate patients' constructive behavior at a certain point in depression treatment. However, BA therapists, compared to Morita therapists, seem to pay less attention to the necessity of resting and the appropriate timing for introducing behavioral activation. There may be some contextual differences between depressive patients in Japan and those in North America. In the case of Japanese patients, exhaustion from overwork is often considered a factor triggering the development of depression. At the same time, the Morita-based pathogenic model of depression seems different from BA's model of the same disorder. BA's approach to understanding depression may be considered a psychological (behavioristic) model. In this model, the cause of depression lies in: (a) a lack of positive reinforcement, and (b) negative reinforcement resulting from avoidance of the experience of discomfort. Therefore, the basic strategy of BA is to release depressive patients from an avoidant lifestyle, which serves as a basis for negative reinforcement, and to redirect the patients toward activities which offer the experience of positive reinforcement BA is primarily practiced by clinical psychologists in the U. S. while psychiatrists prescribe medication as a medical service. On the other hand, the clinical practice of treating depression in Japan is based primarily on medical models of depression. This is also true of Morita therapy, but in a broad sense. While those who follow medical models in a narrow sense try to identify the cause of illness and then remove it, Morita therapists pay more attention to the

  19. [Morita Therapy to Treat Depression: When and How to Encourage Patients to Join Activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses how Morita therapy is used to treat depression, illustrated with a clinical case, and makes comparisons between Morita therapy and behavioral activation (BA). The author further examines the issue of when and how to encourage patients to join activities in clinical practice in Japan. Both Morita therapy and BA share at least a common view that it is effective to activate patients' constructive behavior at a certain point in depression treatment. However, BA therapists, compared to Morita therapists, seem to pay less attention to the necessity of resting and the appropriate timing for introducing behavioral activation. There may be some contextual differences between depressive patients in Japan and those in North America. In the case of Japanese patients, exhaustion from overwork is often considered a factor triggering the development of depression. At the same time, the Morita-based pathogenic model of depression seems different from BA's model of the same disorder. BA's approach to understanding depression may be considered a psychological (behavioristic) model. In this model, the cause of depression lies in: (a) a lack of positive reinforcement, and (b) negative reinforcement resulting from avoidance of the experience of discomfort. Therefore, the basic strategy of BA is to release depressive patients from an avoidant lifestyle, which serves as a basis for negative reinforcement, and to redirect the patients toward activities which offer the experience of positive reinforcement BA is primarily practiced by clinical psychologists in the U. S. while psychiatrists prescribe medication as a medical service. On the other hand, the clinical practice of treating depression in Japan is based primarily on medical models of depression. This is also true of Morita therapy, but in a broad sense. While those who follow medical models in a narrow sense try to identify the cause of illness and then remove it, Morita therapists pay more attention to the

  20. Effects of chronic furosemide on central neural hyperactivity and cochlear thresholds after cochlear trauma in guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina eMulders

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased neuronal spontaneous firing rates have been observed throughout the central auditory system after trauma to the cochlea and this hyperactivity is believed to be associated with the phantom perception of tinnitus. Previously we have shown in an animal model of hearing loss, that an acute injection with furosemide can significantly decrease hyperactivity after cochlear trauma and eliminate behavioural evidence of tinnitus of early onset. However, furosemide also has the potential to affect cochlear thresholds. In this paper we measured the effects of a chronic (daily injections for 7 days furosemide treatment on the spontaneous firing rate of inferior colliculus neurons and on cochlear thresholds in order to establish whether a beneficial effect on hyperactivity can be obtained without causing additional hearing loss. Guinea pigs were exposed to a 10 kHz, 124dB, 2 hour acoustic trauma, and after 5 days of recovery, were given daily i.p. injections of 80mg/kg furosemide or an equivalent amount of saline. The activity of single IC neurons was recorded 24 hours following the last injection. The furosemide treatment had no effect on cochlear thresholds compared to saline injections but did result in significant reductions in spontaneous firing rates recorded in inferior colliculus. These results that suggest a long term beneficial effect of furosemide on hyperactivity after cochlear trauma may be achievable without detrimental effects on hearing, which is important when considering therapeutic potential.

  1. Mindfulness-based therapy and behavioral activation: A randomized controlled trial with depressed college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIndoo, C C; File, A A; Preddy, T; Clark, C G; Hopko, D R

    2016-02-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) manifests in 20-30% of college students, with increased incidence in recent decades. Very limited research has assessed the efficacy of evidence-based interventions for MDD in college students. Mindfulness-Based Therapy (MBT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are two interventions with significant potential to meet demands of college counseling clinics and effectively treat college students with MDD. This study utilized a randomized controlled research design (n = 50) to examine the efficacy of four-sessions of abbreviated MBT and BA relative to a wait-list control condition with depressed college students. Intent-to-treat data analyses on depression outcome measures suggested both treatments were superior to the control group. There were significant pre-post treatment improvements across measures of depression, rumination, stress, and mindfulness, gains largely maintained at 1-month follow-up. Neither active treatment effectively reduced somatic anxiety. Both treatments generally had moderate-strong effect sizes relative to the control group, and based on depression response and remission criteria, 56-79% of patients exhibited clinically significant improvement. Based on reliable change indices, 75-85% experienced clinically significant reductions in depression. There was strong therapist competence and adherence to treatment protocols and high patient satisfaction with both interventions. Study limitations and implications for the assessment and treatment of depressed college students are discussed. PMID:26745622

  2. A biological pathway linking inflammation and depression: activation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christmas DM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available David M Christmas, JP Potokar, Simon JC DaviesAcademic Unit of Psychiatry, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK A presentation relating to this manuscript was made by Dr David Christmas at the 9th International Meeting on Clinical Pharmacology in Psychiatry (9th IMCPP in Copenhagen, Denmark in September 2010Abstract: This article highlights the evidence linking depression to increased inflammatory drive and explores putative mechanisms for the association by reviewing both preclinical and clinical literature. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is induced by proinflammatory cytokines and may form a link between immune functioning and altered neurotransmission, which results in depression. Increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity may cause both tryptophan depletion and increased neurotoxic metabolites of the kynurenine pathway, two alterations which have been hypothesized to cause depression. The tryptophan-kynurenine pathway is comprehensively described with a focus on the evidence linking metabolite alterations to depression. The use of immune-activated groups at high risk of depression have been used to explore these hypotheses; we focus on the studies involving chronic hepatitis C patients receiving interferon-alpha, an immune activating cytokine. Findings from this work have led to novel strategies for the future development of antidepressants including inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, moderating the cytokines which activate it, or addressing other targets in the kynurenine pathway.Keywords: depression, inflammation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, kynurenine, serotonin, tryptophan

  3. Effect of Cannabinoid Receptor Activation on Spreading Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Hadi; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s):The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of cannabinoid on cortical spreading depression (CSD) in rat brain. Cannabis has been used for centuries for both symptomatic and prophylactic treatment of different types of headaches including migraine. CSD is believed to be a putative neuronal mechanism underlying migraine aura and subsequent pain. Materials and Methods:The effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), as well as, cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists ...

  4. Analgesic, antibacterial and central nervous system depressant activities of Albizia procera leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mst. Mahfuza Khatoon; Mst. Hajera Khatun; Md. Ekramul Islam; Mst. Shahnaj Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain analgesic, antibacterial and central nervous system (CNS) depressant activities of ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride fractions of methanol extract of Albizia procera (A. procera) leaves. Methods: Leaves extracts of A. procera were tested for analgesic activity by acetic acid induced and formalin test method in mice. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed by agar well diffusion method. CNS depressant activity was evaluated by hole cross and open field tests. Results: All the extracts at 200 mg/kg exhibited significant (P Conclusions: It is concluded that all the extracts possess potential analgesic and CNS depressants activity. This study also showed that different fractions of methanol extract could be potential sources of new antimicrobial agents.

  5. [Evidence for the Efficacy of Behavioral Activation against Depressive Disorder: A Literature Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Toshihide; Ishibashi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests the significant efficacy of behavioral activation therapy (BA) for the treatment of depression, although BA had formerly been regarded as only a part of the techniques for cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT). The aim of this article is to review the effectiveness, indications, and limitations of BA for the psychosocial treatment of depression. The research group of Washington University in St. Louis, who previously suggested the marked efficacy of BA based on component analysis of CBT, performed a large-scale study to compare the effect of BA and cognitive therapy (CT) or antidepressant medication on the acute phase of depression. As the results, BA was superior to CT and comparable to antidepressant medication in acute-phase treatment for a subgroup of patients with relatively severe depression. Moreover, a long-term follow-up study revealed a benefit of BA compared to pharmacological treatment in regard to the persistence of the effect and cost-effectiveness. More recently, a number of meta-analyses have indicated no significant difference among BA and other psychotherapies regarding their efficacy for the treatment of depression. Because BA does not require patients or therapists to learn complex skills and is also time-efficient, it is recommended as the first-line treatment for mild or moderate depression. However, further studies are needed to consider indications, the timing of induction, and variation in BA techniques if it is applied for the treatment of depression in a general clinical setting in Japan.

  6. The mental health benefits of regular physical activity, and its role in preventing future depressive illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robert Stanton,1 Brenda Happell,1 Peter Reaburn2 1Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Centre for Mental Health Nursing Innovation and School of Nursing and Midwifery, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia; 2School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia Abstract: There is a large body of literature which examines the mental health benefits of physical activity. In general, studies report an inverse, dose dependent relationship between leisure-time physical activity participation, and mental health outcomes. Studies also show a positive association between maximal aerobic capacity and general well-being. More recent studies have confirmed the positive effects of physical activity participation on cognition, including the treatment and prevention of dementia. The current exercise prescription suggested for the treatment of depression is similar to that recommended to the general population for the development and maintenance of cardiorespiratory fitness. There is also strong evidence from large population level studies that long term physical activity participation reduces the risk of future depressive illness. From the available evidence, it would appear that physical activity performed at a frequency, intensity, and duration which is substantially less than that required for the development and maintenance of cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness in the general population, may afford significant benefits in reducing the risk of future depressive illness. This may be particularly encouraging for people with prior depressive illness, or at high risk of future depressive illness, since this vulnerable population already faces significant barriers to physical activity participation over and above those encountered by the general population. Keywords: exercise, major depression, depressive disorder, preventive medicine

  7. Perceptual Interactions Between Electrodes Using Focused and Monopolar Cochlear Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; McDermott, Hugh J.; Swanson, Brett A.;

    2015-01-01

    In today’s cochlear implant (CI) systems, the monopolar (MP) electrode configuration is the most commonly used stimulation mode, requiring only a single current source. However, with an implant that will allow simultaneous activation of multiple independent current sources, it is possible to impl...

  8. Technology developments to initiate a next generation of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckaerts, B; Corless, A R; Mercanzini, A; Silmon, A M; Bertsch, A; Van Himbeeck, C; Wasikiewicz, J; Vanden Bulcke, M; Vadgama, P; Renaud, P

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the EU-supported research project Healthy Aims, we developed a range of novel electrode arrays and related technologies for use in hearing prosthesis. This paper summarizes our ongoing research activities on alternative electrode manufacturing routes, functional electrode interfaces and smart intra-cochlear and intra-modiolus electrode arrays.

  9. Does physical activity moderate the relationship between depression symptomatology and low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübscher, Markus; Hartvigsen, Jan; Fernandez, Matthew;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether depression symptomatology is associated with low back pain (LBP) in twins aged 70+ and whether this effect depends on a person's physical activity (PA) status. METHODS: This prospective cohort and nested case-control study used a nationally representative sample...... of twins. Data on depression symptomatology (modified Cambridge Mental Disorders Examination) and self-reported PA were obtained from the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins using twins without LBP at baseline. Associations between depression symptomatology (highest quartile) at baseline and LBP two...... years later were investigated using logistic regression analyses adjusted for sex. To examine the moderating effect of PA, we tested its interaction with depression. Associations were analysed using the complete sample of 2446 twins and a matched case-control analysis of 97 twin pairs discordant for LBP...

  10. Developmental neuroplasticity after cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Andrej; Sharma, Anu

    2012-02-01

    Cortical development is dependent on stimulus-driven learning. The absence of sensory input from birth, as occurs in congenital deafness, affects normal growth and connectivity needed to form a functional sensory system, resulting in deficits in oral language learning. Cochlear implants bypass cochlear damage by directly stimulating the auditory nerve and brain, making it possible to avoid many of the deleterious effects of sensory deprivation. Congenitally deaf animals and children who receive implants provide a platform to examine the characteristics of cortical plasticity in the auditory system. In this review, we discuss the existence of time limits for, and mechanistic constraints on, sensitive periods for cochlear implantation and describe the effects of multimodal and cognitive reorganization that result from long-term auditory deprivation. PMID:22104561

  11. Physical activity as a treatment for depression: the TREAD randomised trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawlor Debbie A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is one of the most common reasons for consulting a General Practitioner (GP within the UK. Whilst antidepressants have been shown to be clinically effective, many patients and healthcare professionals would like to access other forms of treatment as an alternative or adjunct to drug therapy for depression. A recent systematic review presented some evidence that physical activity could offer one such option, although further investigation is needed to test its effectiveness within the context of the National Health Service. The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a randomised, controlled trial (RCT designed to evaluate an intervention developed to increase physical activity as a treatment for depression within primary care. Methods/design The TREAD study is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm RCT which targets patients presenting with a new episode of depression. Patients were approached if they were aged 18-69, had recently consulted their GP for depression and, where appropriate, had been taking antidepressants for less than one month. Only those patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a depressive episode as assessed by the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R, a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score of at least 14 and informed written consent were included in the study. Eligible patients were individually randomised to one of two treatment groups; usual GP care or usual GP care plus facilitated physical activity. The primary outcome of the trial is clinical symptoms of depression assessed using the BDI four months after randomisation. A number of secondary outcomes are also measured at the 4-, 8- and 12-month follow-up points including quality of life, attitude to and involvement in physical activity and antidepressant use/adherence. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT basis and will use linear and logistic regression models to compare treatments. Discussion The results of

  12. Microengineered hydromechanical cochlear model

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert D.; Grosh, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Micromachined fluid-filled variable impedance waveguides intended to mimic the mechanics of the passive mammalian cochlea have been fabricated and experimentally examined. The structures were microfabricated with dimensions similar to those of the biological system. Experimental tests demonstrate acoustically excited traveling fluid-structure waves with phase accumulations between 1.5 and 3 π radians at the location of maximum response. The resulting measured frequency-position mapping function, with similarities to that observed in the cochlea, is presented. Results for both isotropic and orthotropic membranes are reported, demonstrating that the achieved orthotropy ratio of 8:1 in tension is insufficient to produce the sharp filtering observed in animal experiments and many computational models that use higher ratios. It is also shown experimentally that high viscosity fluids must be used to provide sufficient damping to avoid the formation of a nonphysiological standing wave pattern. A mathematical model incorporating a thin-layer viscous, compressible fluid approximation coupled to an orthotropic membrane model is validated against experimental results. The work presented herein is motivated by the possibility of producing microfabricated cochlear-like filters, thus the structure is designed for production in a scalable microfabrication process. PMID:15665089

  13. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlear implant (CI represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development.

  14. Pediatric cochlear implantation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenti, Vincenzo; Bacciu, Andrea; Guida, Maurizio; Marra, Francesca; Bertoldi, Barbara; Bacciu, Salvatore; Pasanisi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Deafness in pediatric age can adversely impact language acquisition as well as educational and social-emotional development. Once diagnosed, hearing loss should be rehabilitated early; the goal is to provide the child with maximum access to the acoustic features of speech within a listening range that is safe and comfortable. In presence of severe to profound deafness, benefit from auditory amplification cannot be enough to allow a proper language development. Cochlear implants are partially implantable electronic devices designed to provide profoundly deafened patients with hearing sensitivity within the speech range. Since their introduction more than 30 years ago, cochlear implants have improved their performance to the extent that are now considered to be standard of care in the treatment of children with severe to profound deafness. Over the years patient candidacy has been expanded and the criteria for implantation continue to evolve within the paediatric population. The minimum age for implantation has progressively reduced; it has been recognized that implantation at a very early age (12-18 months) provides children with the best outcomes, taking advantage of sensitive periods of auditory development. Bilateral implantation offers a better sound localization, as well as a superior ability to understand speech in noisy environments than unilateral cochlear implant. Deafened children with special clinical situations, including inner ear malformation, cochlear nerve deficiency, cochlear ossification, and additional disabilities can be successfully treated, even thogh they require an individualized candidacy evaluation and a complex post-implantation rehabilitation. Benefits from cochlear implantation include not only better abilities to hear and to develop speech and language skills, but also improved academic attainment, improved quality of life, and better employment status. Cochlear implants permit deaf people to hear, but they have a long way to go before

  15. Telephone-Based Physical Activity Counseling for Major Depression in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Ehde, Dawn M.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Wadhwani, Roini; Sullivan, Mark D.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Kraft, George H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Physical activity represents a promising treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We conducted a single-blind, two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-week physical activity counseling intervention delivered primarily by telephone (n = 44) to a wait-list control group (N = 48).…

  16. Structural Relationships between Social Activities and Longitudinal Trajectories of Depression among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Song-Iee; Hasche, Leslie; Bowland, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the structural relationships between social activities and trajectories of late-life depression. Design and Methods: Latent class analysis was used with a nationally representative sample of older adults (N = 5,294) from the Longitudinal Study on Aging II to classify patterns of social activities. A latent growth curve…

  17. Chronic activation of NPFFR2 stimulates the stress-related depressive behaviors through HPA axis modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Tin; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Yang, Ching-Yao; Yu, Yu-Lian; Chen, Ting-Chun; Day, Yuan-Ji; Chang, Che-Chien; Huang, Guo-Jen; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2016-09-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) is a morphine-modulating peptide that regulates the analgesic effect of opioids, and also controls food consumption and cardiovascular function through its interaction with two cognate receptors, NPFFR1 and NPFFR2. In the present study, we explore a novel modulatory role for NPFF-NPFFR2 in stress-related depressive behaviors. In a mouse model of chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression, the expression of NPFF significantly increased in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and amygdala. In addition, transgenic (Tg) mice over-expressing NPFFR2 displayed clear depression and anxiety-like behaviors with hyperactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, reduced expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Furthermore, acute treatment of NPFFR2 agonists in wild-type (WT) mice enhanced the activity of the HPA axis, and chronic administration resulted in depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Chronic stimulation of NPFFR2 also decreased the expression of hippocampal GR and led to persistent activation of the HPA axis. Strikingly, bilateral intra-paraventricular nucleus (PVN) injection of NPFFR2 shRNA predominately inhibits the depressive-like behavior in CMS-exposed mice. Antidepressants, fluoxetine and ketamine, effectively relieved the depressive behaviors of NPFFR2-Tg mice. We speculate that persistent NPFFR2 activation, in particular in the hypothalamus, up-regulates the HPA axis and results in long-lasting increases in circulating corticosterone (CORT), consequently damaging hippocampal function. This novel role of NPFFR2 in regulating the HPA axis and hippocampal function provides a new avenue for combating depression and anxiety-like disorder. PMID:27243477

  18. Chronic activation of NPFFR2 stimulates the stress-related depressive behaviors through HPA axis modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Tin; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Yang, Ching-Yao; Yu, Yu-Lian; Chen, Ting-Chun; Day, Yuan-Ji; Chang, Che-Chien; Huang, Guo-Jen; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2016-09-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) is a morphine-modulating peptide that regulates the analgesic effect of opioids, and also controls food consumption and cardiovascular function through its interaction with two cognate receptors, NPFFR1 and NPFFR2. In the present study, we explore a novel modulatory role for NPFF-NPFFR2 in stress-related depressive behaviors. In a mouse model of chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression, the expression of NPFF significantly increased in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and amygdala. In addition, transgenic (Tg) mice over-expressing NPFFR2 displayed clear depression and anxiety-like behaviors with hyperactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, reduced expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Furthermore, acute treatment of NPFFR2 agonists in wild-type (WT) mice enhanced the activity of the HPA axis, and chronic administration resulted in depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Chronic stimulation of NPFFR2 also decreased the expression of hippocampal GR and led to persistent activation of the HPA axis. Strikingly, bilateral intra-paraventricular nucleus (PVN) injection of NPFFR2 shRNA predominately inhibits the depressive-like behavior in CMS-exposed mice. Antidepressants, fluoxetine and ketamine, effectively relieved the depressive behaviors of NPFFR2-Tg mice. We speculate that persistent NPFFR2 activation, in particular in the hypothalamus, up-regulates the HPA axis and results in long-lasting increases in circulating corticosterone (CORT), consequently damaging hippocampal function. This novel role of NPFFR2 in regulating the HPA axis and hippocampal function provides a new avenue for combating depression and anxiety-like disorder.

  19. Dual Sensory Loss and Depressive Symptoms: The Importance of Hearing, Daily Functioning and Activity Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Matthew Kiely

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between dual sensory loss (DSL and mental health has been well established. However, most studies have relied on self-report data and lacked measures that would enable researchers to examine causal pathways between DSL and depression. This study seeks to extend this research by examining the effects of DSL on mental health, and identify factors that explain the longitudinal associations between sensory loss and depressive symptoms. Methods: Piecewise linear-mixed models were used to analyse 16-years of longitudinal data collected on up to five occasions from 1611 adults (51% men aged between 65 and 103 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D. Vision loss (VL was defined by corrected visual acuity greater than 0.3 logMAR in the better eye, blindness or glaucoma. Hearing loss (HL was defined by pure tone average (PTA greater than 25 dB in the better hearing ear. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, medical conditions, lifestyle behaviours, Activities of Daily Living (ADLs, cognitive function, and social engagement. Results: Unadjusted models indicated that higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with HL (B=1.16, SE=0.33 and DSL (B=2.15, SE=0.39 but not VL. Greater rates of change in depressive symptoms were also evident after the onset of HL (B=0.16, SE=0.06, p

  20. Adolescents' social environment and depression: social networks, extracurricular activity, and family relationship influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michael J; Schmidt, Christopher; Abraham, Anisha; Walker, Leslie; Tercyak, Kenneth

    2009-12-01

    The present study examined components of adolescents' social environment (social network, extracurricular activities, and family relationships) in association with depression. A total of 332 adolescents presenting for a routine medical check-up were self-assessed for social network risk (i.e., smoking habits of best male and female friends), extracurricular activity level (i.e., participation in organized sports teams, clubs, etc.), family relationship quality (i.e., cohesion and conflict), and symptoms of depression (i.e., minimal, mild, moderate/severe). Results of a forward linear regression modeling indicate that social environment components were associated with a significant proportion of the variance in adolescent depression (Adjusted R (2) = .177, p social network (beta = .107, p relationships (beta = -.368, p social environment plays in adolescent depression, as well as yields new insights into socially-based intervention targets that may ameliorate adolescent depression. These intervention targets may be gender-specific, include positive social network skills training, increase adolescents' engagement in organized activities, and attend to the quality of their family relationships.

  1. EFFECTIVE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS WITH NOOTROPICS DRUG PANTOGAM ACTIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Baranov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the efficiency of the inclusion nootropic drug Pantogam Activ in the complex therapy of 82 patients with heart failure, ischemic heart diseases, anxiety and depressive disorders. It was shown that an 8-week treatment with Pantogam Activ in most patients is accompanied by a significant reduction of anxiety and depressive disorders, increase exercise tolerance, improved autonomic regulation of heart function and decrease the frequency of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, which is accompanied by a marked improvement in the quality of life. 

  2. Electronic monitoring of psychomotor activity as a supplementary objective measure of depression severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Brage, Søren; Vinberg, Maj;

    2015-01-01

    the assessment of depression severity would be a major step forward. AIMS: To investigate correlations between electronic monitoring of psychomotor activity and severity of depression according to HDRS-17. METHODS: A total of 36 patients with unipolar disorder (n = 18) or bipolar disorder (n = 18) and 31 healthy...... control persons aged 18-60 years were included. Psychomotor activity was measured using a combined heart rate and movement sensor device (Actiheart) for 3 consecutive days, 24 h a day. RESULTS: We found that sleeping heart rate (beats/min) correlated with HDRS-17 in both patients with unipolar disorder...

  3. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and depression during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Tendais

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines physical activity patterns among women, from pre-pregnancy to the second trimester of pregnancy, and the relationship between physical activity status based on physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life (HRQoL and depression over pregnancy. 56 healthy pregnant women self-reported physical activity, HRQoL and depression at 10-15 and 19-24 weeks of pregnancy and physical activity before pregnancy. Whereas vigorous leisure physical activity decreased after conception, moderate leisure physical activity and work related physical activity remained stable over time. The prevalence of recommended physical activity was 39.3% and 12.5% in the 1st and 2nd trimesters of pregnancy respectively, and 14.3% pre-pregnancy. From the 1st to the 2nd pregnancy trimester, most physical HRQoL dimensions scores decreased and only mental component increased, independently of physical activity status. No changes in mean depression scores were observed. These data suggest that physical activity patterns change with pregnancy and that physical and mental components are differentially affected by pregnancy course, independently of physical activity status.

  4. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and depression during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendais, Iva; Figueiredo, Bárbara; Mota, Jorge; Conde, Ana

    2011-02-01

    This study examines physical activity patterns among women, from pre-pregnancy to the second trimester of pregnancy, and the relationship between physical activity status based on physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depression over pregnancy. 56 healthy pregnant women self-reported physical activity, HRQoL and depression at 10-15 and 19-24 weeks of pregnancy and physical activity before pregnancy. Whereas vigorous leisure physical activity decreased after conception, moderate leisure physical activity and work related physical activity remained stable over time. The prevalence of recommended physical activity was 39.3% and 12.5% in the 1st and 2nd trimesters of pregnancy respectively, and 14.3% pre-pregnancy. From the 1st to the 2nd pregnancy trimester, most physical HRQoL dimensions scores decreased and only mental component increased, independently of physical activity status. No changes in mean depression scores were observed. These data suggest that physical activity patterns change with pregnancy and that physical and mental components are differentially affected by pregnancy course, independently of physical activity status.

  5. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianying Li; Cheng Xu; Xiaohua Cao; Qiang Gao; Yan Wang; Yanfang Wang; Juyi Peng; Kerang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  6. Reading skills after cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Agnes Maria

    2007-01-01

    It has frequently been found that profoundly deaf children with conventional hearing aids have difficulties with the comprehension of written text. Cochlear Implants (CIs) were expected to enhance the reading comprehension of these profoundly deaf children because they provide auditory access to spo

  7. Brain bioelectrical activity changes in patients with poststroke depression and apathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kichuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of brain bioelectrical activity in patents with poststroke apathy and depressive disorders.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 175 patients (84 men and 91 women with new-onset cerebral stroke at different sites. A total of 107 (61% patients of them were observed to have depressive disorders (n=41 (38% and apathy (n=66 (62% within a year after disease onset. A control group included 68 (39% patients without poststroke affective disorders. The mean age of the study group patients was 66±10 years and that of the control patients was 68±11 years. The severity and magnitude of neurological deficit were evaluated using the U.S. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS. The patients underwent electroencephalography (EEG, brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The investigators used diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-IV criteria to diagnose depression and the Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D and the mini-mental status examination (MMSE to evaluate the mental status. The basic rhythmic power indices in the affected and unaffected hemispheres were calculated, as well as anteroposterior alpha rhythm distribution coefficient and interhemispheric asymmetry coefficient. Results and discussion. The computer EEG analysis was shown to identify the hallmark characteristics of brain bioelectric activity in patients with different types of affective disorders in the acute, early and late recovery periods of stroke. The patients with affective disorders were found to have brain bioelectrical activity changes predominantly in the rapid frequency sub-band on EEG, suggesting midbrain structural dysfunction. In the patients with poststroke depression, depressive disorder scale scores were related to the power of bioelectric activity in the slow and alpha frequency bands manly in the acute stroke period whereas those were correlated with the EEG

  8. Neural Changes following Behavioral Activation for a Depressed Breast Cancer Patient: A Functional MRI Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Gawrysiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging is an innovative but at this stage underutilized method to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used in this case study to examine changes in brain activity in a depressed breast cancer patient receiving an 8-session Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD, based on the work of Hopko and Lejuez (2007. A music listening paradigm was used during fMRI brain scans to assess reward responsiveness at pre- and posttreatment. Following treatment, the patient exhibited attenuated depression and changes in blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD response in regions of the prefrontal cortex and the subgenual cingulate cortex. These preliminary findings outline a novel means to assess psychotherapy efficacy and suggest that BATD elicits functional brain changes in areas implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Further research is necessary to explore neurobiological mechanisms of change in BATD, particularly the potential mediating effects of reward responsiveness and associated brain functioning.

  9. Evaluation of CNS depressant activity of different plant parts of Nyctanthes arbortristis linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sanjita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the water-soluble portion of the ethanol extracts of flowers, barks, seeds and leaves of Nyctanthes arbortristis Linn. to confirm their CNS depressant activity. The ethanol extracts of the plant parts were obtained by soxhlet extraction. After performing the gross behavioral study, the CNS depressant activity was evaluated by observing the prolongation of sleeping time induced by pentobarbital sodium in mice. Attempts have been made to explore the possible mechanism behind this activity by determining their effect on brain monoamine neurotransmitters like dopamine and serotonin. The gross behavioral study showed that ethanol extracts of the leaves, flowers and seeds possess significant CNS depressant activity. The leaves, flowers, seeds and barks (600 mg/kg showed significant and dose-dependent prolongation of onset and duration of sleep and so found to cause decrease dopamine and increase serotonin level. From which it can be concluded that the CNS depressant activity of the ethanol extracts of seeds, leaves and flowers may be due to the decrease in dopamine and increase in serotonin level.

  10. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B; Sweeney, Alex D; Bennett, Marc L

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly, innovative technology is discussed, including the hybrid cochlear implant and the totally implantable cochlear implant.

  11. Microglia activation is associated with IFN-α induced depressive-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholz, Simone; Eßlinger, Manuela; Plümper, Jennifer; Manitz, Marie-Pierre; Juckel, Georg; Friebe, Astrid

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory immune activation has been frequently associated with the development of major depression. This association was confirmed in patients receiving long-term treatment with pro-inflammatory interferon-α (IFN-α). Microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, might serve as an important interface in this immune system-to-brain communication. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of microglia in an IFN-α mouse model of immune-mediated depression. Male BALB/c mice were treated with daily injections of IFN-α for two weeks. Depressive-like behavior was analyzed in the forced swim and tail suspension test. Activation of microglia was measured by flow cytometry. Pro-inflammatory M1 type (MHC-II, CD40, CD54, CD80, CD86, CCR7), anti-inflammatory M2 type (CD206, CD200R), and maturation markers (CD11c, CCR7) were tested, as well as the chemokine receptor CCR2. IFN-α led to a significant increase in depressive-like behavior and expression of the pro-inflammatory surface markers MHC-II, CD86, and CD54, indicating M1 polarization. Because IFN-α-treated mice showed great individual variance in the behavioral response to IFN-α, they were further divided into vulnerable and non-vulnerable subgroups. Only IFN-α vulnerable mice (characterized by their development of depressive-like behavior in response to IFN-α) showed an increased expression of MHC-II and CD86, while CD54 was similarly enhanced in both subgroups. Thus, IFN-α-induced activation of microglia was specifically associated with depressive-like behavior. PMID:26408795

  12. Calcium-sensing receptor activation depresses synaptic transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Cecilia G.; Harnett, Mark T.; Chen, Wenyan; Smith, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    At excitatory synapses, decreases in cleft [Ca] arising from activity-dependent transmembrane Ca flux reduce the probability of subsequent transmitter release. Intense neural activity, induced by physiological and pathological stimuli, disturb the external microenvironment reducing extracellular [Ca] ([Ca]o) and thus may impair neurotransmission. Increases in [Ca]o activate the extracellular calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) which in turn inhibits non-selective cation channels (NSCC) at the maj...

  13. [Regular physical activity and mental health. The role of exercise in the prevention of, and intervention in depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    In our review we examine the relationship between physical activity and mental health; especially we determine the effectiveness of exercise in the prevention and treatment of depression. Over the past two decades the literature in the area of physical activity and mental health has been growing. However it seems that the findings and evidences not being utilized by mental health agencies and health practitioners. Depression is the most common disorder in the world, generally has a higher prevalence among women. In our study we overview and demonstrate that the exercise is a powerful intervention for prevention and treatment not only in non-clinical but also in clinical levels of depression. In sub-clinical levels of depression the meta-analytic findings and population surveys suggest that the exercise is associated with a significant moderate reduction of depression in different groups by gender and age; as well as a physically active lifestyle associates with lower levels of depression. In clinical levels of depression the physical activity is an effective tool in the prevention, studies support an association between higher levels of physical activity and lower levels of depression. In the treatment of clinical depression the randomized-controlled trials suggest the clear positive effects of exercise. This effect is similar to psychotherapeutic interventions and it was appeared under relatively short time (4-8 weeks). The exercise is one of the most important preventive health-related behaviors. Our review suggests a protective effect from activity on the development of clinical levels of depression and depressive symptoms. In addition the randomized controlled trials support a causal connection between exercise and reduction of depression. In sum the reviewed studies clearly support the antidepressant effect of exercise.

  14. Behavioural activation for depression; an update of meta-analysis of effectiveness and sub group analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ekers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a common, disabling condition for which psychological treatments are recommended. Behavioural activation has attracted increased interest in recent years. It has been over 5 years since our meta-analyses summarised the evidence supporting and this systematic review updates those findings and examines moderators of treatment effect. METHOD: Randomised trials of behavioural activation for depression versus controls or anti-depressant medication were identified using electronic database searches, previous reviews and reference lists. Data on symptom level and study level moderators were extracted and analysed using meta-analysis, sub-group analysis and meta-regression respectively. RESULTS: Twenty six randomised controlled trials including 1524 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. A random effects meta-analysis of symptom level post treatment showed behavioural activation to be superior to controls (SMD -0.74 CI -0.91 to -0.56, k = 25, N = 1088 and medication (SMD -0.42 CI -0.83 to-0.00, k = 4, N = 283. Study quality was low in the majority of studies and follow- up time periods short. There was no indication of publication bias and subgroup analysis showed limited association between moderators and effect size. CONCLUSIONS: The results in this meta-analysis support and strengthen the evidence base indicating Behavioural Activation is an effective treatment for depression. Further high quality research with longer term follow-up is needed to strengthen the evidence base.

  15. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  16. Romantic and Sexual Activities, Parent-Adolescent Stress, and Depressive Symptoms among Early Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Joanne; Stroud, Catherine B.; Starr, Lisa R.; Miller, Melissa Ramsay; Yoneda, Athena; Hershenberg, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Building on evidence that romantic experiences are associated with depressive symptoms in adolescence, we examined their bidirectional association, as well as the role of sexual activity and parent-adolescent stress in their association. Data were collected from 71 early adolescent girls (M age 13.45 years; SD = 0.68) and their primary caregiver…

  17. Watered depressions as ecological phenomena in regions affected by mining activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of the importance of mine watered depressions in a landscape affected by mining activities (model localities - Louky nad Olsi, Orlova and Horni Sucha, Karvina district) from an ecological point of view - conservation and formation of wetland and water ecosystems, genetic resources and biodiversity conservation

  18. Poor Vision, Functioning, and Depressive Symptoms: A Test of the Activity Restriction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwala, Jamila; Lawson, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested the applicability of the activity restriction model of depressed affect to the context of poor vision in late life. This model hypothesizes that late-life stressors contribute to poorer mental health not only directly but also indirectly by restricting routine everyday functioning. Method: We used data from a national…

  19. Diversity in cochlear morphology and its influence on cochlear implant electrode position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, K.S. van der; Briaire, J.J.; Wolterbeek, R..; Snel-Bongers, J.; Verbist, B.M.; Frijns, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    To define a minimal set of descriptive parameters for cochlear morphology and study its influence on the cochlear implant electrode position in relation to surgical insertion distance.Cochlear morphology and electrode position were analyzed using multiplanar reconstructions of the pre- and postopera

  20. Anatomic considerations of cochlear morphology and its implications for insertion trauma in cochlear implant surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbist, B.M.; Ferrarini, L.; Briaire, J.J.; Zarowski, A.; Admiraal-Behloul, F.; Olofsen, H.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Frijns, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: The goal of this study is to analyze the 3-dimensional anatomy of the cochlear spiral and to investigate the consequences of its course to insertion trauma during cochlear implantation. BACKGROUND: Insertion trauma in cochlear implant surgery is a feared surgical risk, potentially causin

  1. Associations of physical activity, screen time with depression, anxiety and sleep quality among Chinese college freshmen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Feng

    Full Text Available To investigate the independent and interactive associations of physical activity (PA and screen time (ST with depression, anxiety and sleep quality among Chinese college students.A cross-sectional study was conducted in Wuhan University, China from November to December 2011. The students reported their PA, ST and socio-economic characteristics using self-administered questionnaires. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS and Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of the independent and interactive relationships of PA and ST with depression, anxiety and sleep quality.A total of 1106 freshmen (471 females and 635 males aged 18.9±0.9 years were included in the study. After adjustment for potential confounders, high PA and low ST were independently associated with significantly lower risks for poor sleep quality (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.30-0.78 and depression (OR: 0.67, 95%CI: 0.44-0.89, respectively. An interactive inverse association was observed for combined effects of PA and low ST on depression (OR: 0.62, 95%CI: 0.40-0.92 and sleep quality (OR: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.27-0.91. No statistically significant associations were found between PA, ST and anxiety among the participants.These findings suggest an independent and interactive relationship of high PA and low ST with significantly reduced prevalence of depressive problems and favorable sleep quality among Chinese college freshmen.

  2. Depressed natural killer cell activity in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B K; Theander, T G;

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity against K562 target cells was measured in patients within 24 h of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and regularly thereafter for 6 weeks. NK cell activity was suppressed on days 1, 3, and 7 (P less than 0.01), day 14 (P less than 0.05) and at 6 weeks (P = 0...

  3. Reasoning with linear orders: Differential parietal cortex activation in subclinical depression. An fMRI investigation in subclinical depression and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elanor C. Hinton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to learn new information and manipulate it for efficient retrieval has long been studied through reasoning paradigms, which also has applicability to the study of social behaviour. Humans can learn about the linear order within groups using reasoning, and the success of such reasoning may vary according to affective state, such as depression. We investigated the neural basis of these latter findings using functional neuroimaging. Using BDI-II criteria, 14 non-depressed and 12 mildly depressed volunteers took part in a linear-order reasoning task during fMRI. The hippocampus, parietal and prefrontal cortices were activated during the task, in accordance with previous studies. In the learning phase and in the test phase, greater activation of the parietal cortex was found in the depressed group, which may be a compensatory mechanism in order to reach the same behavioural performance as the non-depressed group, or evidence for a different reasoning strategy in the depressed group.

  4. Weak reward source memory in depression reflects blunted activation of VTA/SN and parahippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Daniel G; Dobbins, Ian G; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2014-10-01

    Reward responses in the medial temporal lobes and dopaminergic midbrain boost episodic memory formation in healthy adults, and weak memory for emotionally positive material in depression suggests this mechanism may be dysfunctional in major depressive disorder (MDD). To test this hypothesis, we performed a study in which unmedicated adults with MDD and healthy controls encoded drawings paired with reward or zero tokens during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In a recognition test, participants judged whether drawings were previously associated with the reward token ('reward source') or the zero token ('zero source'). Unlike controls, depressed participants failed to show better memory for drawings from the reward source vs the zero source. Consistent with predictions, controls also showed a stronger encoding response to reward tokens vs zero tokens in the right parahippocampus and dopaminergic midbrain, whereas the MDD group showed the opposite pattern-stronger responses to zero vs reward tokens-in these regions. Differential activation of the dopaminergic midbrain by reward vs zero tokens was positively correlated with the reward source memory advantage in controls, but not depressed participants. These data suggest that weaker memory for positive material in depression reflects blunted encoding responses in the dopaminergic midbrain and medial temporal lobes. PMID:24078019

  5. Increased frontal sleep slow wave activity in adolescents with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Tesler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep slow wave activity (SWA, the major electrophysiological characteristic of deep sleep, mirrors both cortical restructuring and functioning. The incidence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD substantially rises during the vulnerable developmental phase of adolescence, where essential cortical restructuring is taking place. The goal of this study was to assess characteristics of SWA topography in adolescents with MDD, in order to assess abnormalities in both cortical restructuring and functioning on a local level. All night high-density EEG was recorded in 15 patients meeting DSM-5 criteria for MDD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The actual symptom severity was assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R. Topographical power maps were calculated based on the average SWA of the first non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep episode. Depressed adolescents exhibited significantly more SWA in a cluster of frontal electrodes compared to controls. SWA over frontal brain regions correlated positively with the CDRS-R subscore “morbid thoughts”. Self-reported sleep latency was significantly higher in depressed adolescents compared to controls whereas sleep architecture did not differ between the groups. Higher frontal SWA in depressed adolescents may represent a promising biomarker tracing cortical regions of intense use and/or restructuring.

  6. Depression in pregnancy is associated with decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in fetal cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Ebru; Bakacak, Murat; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih; Tolun, Fatma İnanç; Tuman, Taha Can

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of fetal cord blood (FCB) during child delivery has created a novel topic in the field of psychiatric research. The umbilical vein receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother's circulation and transports them to the fetal circulation. Investigating fetal cord blood during delivery is beneficial for understanding the fetal environment. Depression in pregnancy is associated with medical and emotional burdens. In this study, we aimed to investigate glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the FCB of depressed mothers and healthy controls. Our study included 45 depressed mothers and 59 healthy controls. The FCB samples were collected from the umbilical vein during delivery. We found that Gpx levels were significantly decreased in the FCB of depressed mothers than healthy controls, medians were 0.14 U/ml and 0.16 U/ml respectively, Z: -3.567 and p < 0.001. MPO levels were similar in both groups, medians were 1.0 U/L and 1.2 U/L respectively, Z: -1.837 and p:0.066. Depression in pregnancy may be associated with decreased antioxidant levels, and this condition may cause an oxidative load, which may lead to improper brain development. Future studies should be performed in larger samples to clarify our preliminary results. PMID:27174401

  7. Dissemination of behavioural activation for depression to mental health nurses: training evaluation and benchmarked clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekers, D M; Dawson, M S; Bailey, E

    2013-03-01

    Depression causes significant distress, disability and cost within the UK. Behavioural activation (BA) is an effective single-strand psychological approach which may lend itself to brief training programmes for a wide range of clinical staff. No previous research has directly examined outcomes of such dissemination. A 5-day training course for 10 primary care mental health workers aiming to increase knowledge and clinical skills in BA was evaluated using the Training Acceptability Rating Scale. Depression symptom level data collected in a randomized controlled trial using trainees were then compared to results from meta-analysis of studies using experienced therapists. BA training was highly acceptable to trainees (94.4%, SD 6%). The combined effect size of BA was unchanged by the addition of the results of this evaluation to those of studies using specialist therapists. BA offers a promising psychological intervention for depression that appears suitable for delivery by mental health nurses following brief training.

  8. Meta-analysis of brain activation in depressive patients with emotional perception disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenwang Jin; Ming Zhang; Dan Li; Shaohui Ma; Yuan Wang; Min Li; Lihua Liu

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the distribution of abnormally activated brain regions in depressive patients during emotional perception processing using activation likelihood estimation, a quantitative meta-analytic technique. DATA SOURCES: Computer-based online retrieval was conducted using the PscyINFO, Pubmed and CNKI databases, searching literature from the establishment of each database until June 2010.STUDY SELECTION: Inclusion criteria: (1) studies examined emotion perception tasks using functional magnetic resonance imaging; (2) studies indicated regional brain activation abnormalities in depressive patients compared with controls in standard Talairach or MNI coordinates. Any analyzed coordinates based on the MNI system were converted to Talairach space with icbm2tal software. The map of activation likelihood estimation was finally created through the Gaussian smooth (full-width half-maximum = 8 mm), permutation test and corrected for multiple comparisons using the false discovery rate method (q = 0.05) with Ginger-ALE 2.0 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Activation of brain regions in patients.RESULTS: Seventeen studies were identified, involving a total of 261 patients, 273 healthy controls and 201 foci. Meta-analysis revealed a dysfunctional emotion regulation loop in depressive patients, comprised of the prefrontal cortex, the basal ganglia and the limbic lobe, in which the amygdala was a key component. During emotion processing, the left prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia were hypoactive among depressive patients, whereas the opposite change was found in the limbic lobe. CONCLUSION: Abnormal connections among the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia and limbic lobe may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive disorder.

  9. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Relationship of Physical Activity with Depression and Cognitive Deficit in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo T, R S; Tribess, Sheilla; Sasaki, Jeffer Eidi; Meneguci, Joilson; Martins, Cristiane A; Freitas, Ismael F; Romo-Perez, Vicente; Virtuoso, Jair S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association of physical activity with depression and cognition deficit, separately and combined, in Brazilian older adults. We analyzed data from 622 older adults. Physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale, while cognitive deficit was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to assess associations of depression and cognitive deficit with sociodemographic, health, and behavioral variables. Prevalence of physical inactivity (physical activity/ week), depression, and cognitive deficit were 35.7%, 37.4%, and 16.7%. Physical inactivity was associated with depression (OR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.14-2.94) and with depression and cognitive deficit combined (OR: 4.23, 95% CI: 2.01-8.91). Physically inactive participants were also more likely to present limitations in orientation and language functions. Physical inactivity was associated with depression and also with depression and cognitive deficit combined in older adults.

  10. Neuroinflammation and Depression: Microglia Activation, Extracellular Microvesicles and microRNA Dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brites, Dora; Fernandes, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic inflammation are often associated with the emergence of depression symptoms, while diagnosed depressed patients show increased levels of circulating cytokines. Further studies revealed the activation of the brain immune cell microglia in depressed patients with a greater magnitude in individuals that committed suicide, indicating a crucial role for neuroinflammation in depression brain pathogenesis. Rapid advances in the understanding of microglial and astrocytic neurobiology were obtained in the past 15-20 years. Indeed, recent data reveal that microglia play an important role in managing neuronal cell death, neurogenesis, and synaptic interactions, besides their involvement in immune-response generating cytokines. The communication between microglia and neurons is essential to synchronize these diverse functions with brain activity. Evidence is accumulating that secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs), comprising ectosomes and exosomes with a size ranging from 0.1-1 μm, are key players in intercellular signaling. These EVs may carry specific proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs). Transfer of exosomes to neurons was shown to be mediated by oligodendrocytes, microglia and astrocytes that may either be supportive to neurons, or instead disseminate the disease. Interestingly, several recent reports have identified changes in miRNAs in depressed patients, which target not only crucial pathways associated with synaptic plasticity, learning and memory but also the production of neurotrophic factors and immune cell modulation. In this article, we discuss the role of neuroinflammation in the emergence of depression, namely dynamic alterations in the status of microglia response to stimulation, and how their activation phenotypes may have an etiological role in neurodegeneneration, in particular in depressive-like behavior. We will overview the involvement of miRNAs, exosomes, ectosomes and microglia in regulating critical pathways associated with

  11. Neuroinflammation and depression: microglia activation, extracellular microvesicles and microRNA dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora eBrites

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic inflammation are often associated with the emergence of depression symptoms, while diagnosed depressed patients show increased levels of circulating cytokines. Further studies revealed the activation of the brain immune cell microglia in depressed patients with a greater magnitude in individuals that committed suicide, indicating a crucial role for neuroinflammation in depression brain pathogenesis. Rapid advances in the understanding of microglial and astrocytic neurobiology were obtained in the past fifteen to twenty years. Indeed, recent data reveal that microglia play an important role in managing neuronal cell death, neurogenesis, and synaptic interactions, besides their involvement in immune-response generating cytokines. The communication between microglia and neurons is essential to synchronize these diverse functions with brain activity. Evidence is accumulating that secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs, comprising ectosomes and exosomes with a size ranging from 0.1 to 1 μm, are key players in intercellular signaling. These EVs may carry specific proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs. Transfer of exosomes to neurons was shown to be mediated by oligodendrocytes, microglia and astrocytes that may either be supportive to neurons, or instead disseminate the disease. Interestingly, several recent reports have identified changes in miRNAs in depressed patients, which target not only crucial pathways associated with synaptic plasticity, learning and memory but also the production of neurotrophic factors and immune cell modulation. In this article, we discuss the role of neuroinflammation in the emergence of depression, namely dynamic alterations in the status of microglia response to stimulation, and how their activation phenotypes may have an etiological role in neurodegeneneration, in particular in depressive-like behavior. We will overview the involvement of miRNAs, exosomes, ectosomes and microglia in regulating

  12. The inferior cochlear vein: surgical aspects in cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, HongLei; Chen, Wei; Zhu, XiaoQuan; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-02-01

    The patency of the inferior cochlear vein (ICV) may be challenged in cochlear implantation (CI) due to its location near the round window (RW). This may be essential to consider during selection of different trajectories for electrode insertion aiming at preserving residual hearing. Venous blood from the human cochlea is drained through the ICV. The vein also drains blood from the modiolus containing the spiral ganglion neurons. Surgical interference with this vein could cause neural damage influencing CI outcome. We analyzed the topographical relationship between the RW and ICV bony channel and cochlear aqueduct (CA) from a surgical standpoint. Archival human temporal bones were further microdissected to visualize the CA and its accessory canals (AC1 and AC2). This was combined with examinations of plastic and silicone molds of the human labyrinth. Metric analyses were made using photo stereomicroscopy documenting the proximal portion of the AC1, the internal aperture of the CA and the RW. The mean distance between the AC1 and the anterior rim of the RW was 0.81 mm in bone specimens and 0.67 mm assessed in corrosion casts. The AC1 runs from the floor of the scala tympani through the otic capsule passing parallel to the CA to the posterior cranial fossa. The mean distance between the CA and AC1 canal was 0.31 and 0.25 mm, respectively. PMID:25700831

  13. Depressive symptoms are associated with dietary intake but not physical activity among overweight and obese women from disadvantaged neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Kara M; Sharpe, Patricia A; Wilcox, Sara; Hutto, Brent E

    2014-04-01

    Evidence suggests that depressive symptoms are associated with poorer dietary intake and inadequate physical activity; however, this association has not been examined in lower-income overweight and obese African American women. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the associations between depressive symptoms and diet and physical activity in 196 women (87% African American; age, 25-51 years). Higher depressive symptoms were hypothesized to predict poorer diet quality, greater emotional eating, lower physical activity levels, and greater sedentary time. Depressive symptoms were measured using the validated short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Dietary intake and quality were assessed using three 24-hour dietary recalls. Emotional eating was evaluated using 4 items from the emotional eating subscale of the Eating Behavior Patterns Questionnaire. Physical activity and sedentary time were objectively measured using the ActiGraph accelerometer. Linear regression models tested the associations between depressive symptoms and each dietary and physical activity outcome variable. Symptoms of depression were positively associated with total daily caloric intake from saturated fat and total sugars, as well as emotional eating scores (P fast food consumption, the Alternate Healthy Eating Index score, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, or sedentary time. Future studies should explore the mechanisms linking the identified associations between depressive symptoms and dietary intake, such as the role of emotional eating. PMID:24774065

  14. Modulation of intracranial meningeal nociceptor activity by cortical spreading depression: a reassessment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jun; Levy, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD), a putative migraine trigger, has been shown recently to promote multiple activation patterns of meningeal nociceptors. In the current study we used a modified experimental approach in a rat model to: 1) reassess the responses of meningeal nociceptors following a single CSD episode, 2) examine factors that may influence the propensity of meningeal nociceptors to develop a prolonged activation following a CSD, and 3) test the responses of meningeal nocicepto...

  15. Major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... providers do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  16. Major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... Doctors do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  17. Surgical Complications of Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Hashemi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implantation is a method used for the treatment ofpatients with profound hearing loss. This procedure may theaccompanied by some major or minor complications. Weevaluated the surgical complications of cochlear implantationin Fars province (south of Iran. A total of 150 patients withcochlear implantation were enrolled in the present study. Mostof the patients were pre-lingual children and most of our deviceswere nucleus prosthesis. We had three device failuresand four major complications, including one misplaced electrode,one case of meningitis, one case of foreign body reactionto suture and one case with extensive hematoma. Thesecomplications were managed successfully by surgical interventionor re-implantation. Facial nerve damage or woundbreakdown was not seen. Minor complications including smallhematoma, edema, stitch infection and dizziness were found in15 cases, which were managed medically. In our center, therate of minor complications was comparable to other centersin the world. But the rate of major surgical complications waslower than other centers.

  18. Smartphone-Supported versus Full Behavioural Activation for Depression: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien Hoa Ly

    Full Text Available There is need for more cost and time effective treatments for depression. This is the first randomised controlled trial in which a blended treatment--including four face-to-face sessions and a smartphone application--was compared against a full behavioural treatment. Hence, the aim of the current paper was to examine whether a blended smartphone treatment was non-inferior to a full behavioural activation treatment for depression.This was a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (NCT01819025 comparing a blended treatment (n=46 against a full ten-session treatment (n=47 for people suffering from major depression. Primary outcome measure was the BDI-II, that was administered at pre- and post-treatment, as well as six months after the treatment.Results showed significant improvements in both groups across time on the primary outcome measure (within-group Cohen's d=1.35; CI [-0.82, 3.52] to d=1.47; CI [-0.41, 3.35]; between group d=-0.13 CI [-2.37, 2.09] and d=-0.10 CI [-2.53, 2.33]. At the same time, the blended treatment reduced the therapist time with an average of 47%.We could not establish whether the blended treatment was non-inferior to a full BA treatment. Nevertheless, this study points to that the blended treatment approach could possibly treat nearly twice as many patients suffering from depression by using a smartphone application as add-on. More studies are needed before we can suggest that the blended treatment method is a promising cost-effective alternative to regular face-to-face treatment for depression.Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment of Depression With Smartphone Support NCT01819025.

  19. Cochlear Implants and Brain Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    Cochlear implants have been implanted in over 110,000 deaf adults and children worldwide and provide these patients with important auditory cues necessary for auditory awareness and speech perception via electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (AN). In 1942 Woolsey & Walzl presented the first report of cortical responses to localised electrical stimulation of different sectors of the AN in normal hearing cats, and established the cochleotopic organization of the projections to primary au...

  20. Amygdala activation during emotional face processing in adolescents with affective disorders: the role of underlying depression and anxiety symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca G Van Den Bulk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDepressive and anxiety disorders are often first diagnosed during adolescence and it is known that they persist into adulthood. Previous studies often tried to dissociate depressive and anxiety disorders, but high comorbidity makes this difficult and maybe even impossible. The goal of this study was to use neuroimaging to test what the unique contribution is of depression and anxiety symptomatology on emotional processing and amygdala activation, and to compare the results with a healthy control group. We included 25 adolescents with depressive and/or anxiety disorders and 26 healthy adolescents. Participants performed an emotional face processing task while in the MRI scanner. We were particularly interested in the relation between depression/anxiety symptomatology and patterns of amygdala activation. There were no significant differences in activation patterns between the control group and the clinical group on whole brain level and ROI level. However, we found that dimensional scores on an anxiety but not a depression subscale significantly predicted brain activation in the right amygdala when processing fearful, happy and neutral faces. These results suggest that anxiety symptoms are a better predictor for differentiating activation patterns in the amygdala than depression symptoms. Although the current study includes a relatively large sample of treatment naïve adolescents with depression/anxiety disorders, results might be influenced by differences between studies in recruitment strategies or methodology. Future research should include larger samples with a more equal distribution of adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of depression and/or anxiety. To conclude, this study shows that abnormal amygdala responses to emotional faces in depression and anxiety seems to be more dependent on anxiety symptoms than on depression symptoms, and thereby highlights the need for more research to better characterize clinical groups in future

  1. Antidepressant activity of standardized extract of Bacopa monniera in experimental models of depression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, K; Dorababu, M; Goel, R K; Bhattacharya, S K

    2002-04-01

    Bacopa monniera Wettst. (syn. Herpestis monniera L.; Scrophulariaceae) is a commonly used Ayurvedic drug for mental disorders. The standardized extract was reported earlier to have significant anti-oxidant effect, anxiolytic activity and improve memory retention in Alzheimer's disease. Presently, the standardized methanolic extract of Bacopa monniera (bacoside A - 38.0+/-0.9) was investigated for potential antidepressant activity in rodent models of depression. The effect was compared with the standard antidepressant drug imipramine (15 mg/kg, ip). The extract when given in the dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg, orally once daily for 5 days was found to have significant antidepressant activity in forced swim and learned helplessness models of depression and was comparable to that of imipramine.

  2. Physical activity, depressed mood and pregnancy worries in European obese pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Wit, Linda; Jelsma, Judith G M; van Poppel, Mireille N M;

    2015-01-01

    -related worries with the Cambridge Worry Scale (CWS). In addition, socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, and perceptions and attitude regarding weight management and physical activity were measured. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess the association of mental health status......BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between mental health status (i.e. depressed mood and pregnancy-related worries) and objectively measured physical activity levels in obese pregnant women from seven European countries. METHODS: Baseline data from the vitamin D...... and lifestyle intervention for the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus (DALI) study were used. Time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behaviour was measured with accelerometers. Depressed mood was measured with the WHO well-being index (WHO-5) and pregnancy...

  3. Activity of diltiazem and nifedipine in some animal models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostowski, W; Dyr, W; Puciłowski, O

    1990-01-01

    The effect of two calcium channel inhibitors, diltiazem and nifedipine in animal models of depression: a) behavioral despair test and b) behavioral deficit produced by uncontrollable footshock was investigated. Additionally, the influence of both drugs on mouse killing (muricide) behavior induced by chronic isolation was studied. Both drugs given in single doses increased the active behavior of rats in behavioral despair test. Nifedipine but not diltiazem was partially effective in the test when administered chronically (14 days). Both drugs also attenuated stress-induced behavioral depression in the open field and forced swim test. Diltiazem was markedly more active in the former whereas nifedipine in the latter test. Neither compound influenced killing behavior in muricidal rats. Our data support the notion that calcium channel inhibitors may possess antidepressant activity, although there appear to exist certain differences in their scope of action depending on the model applied.

  4. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2008-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on cochlear implantation in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of 5 congenitally...

  5. Intracochlear misdirected implantation of a cochlear implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tange, R A; Grolman, W; Maat, A

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses a rare complication of an intracochlear misdirection of the electrode of a cochlear implant in a 55-year-old male. The patient received a cochlear implant using the mastoid-saving surgical approach. Intraoperative measurements showed impedance and NRT reactions suggesting a reas

  6. Deafness: Cross-modal plasticity and cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Jeung-Whoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong Sun

    2001-01-01

    Hearing in profoundly deaf people can be helped by inserting an implant into the inner ear to stimulate the cochlear nerve. This also boosts the low metabolic activity of the auditory cortex, the region of the brain normally used for hearing. Other sensory modalities, such as sign language, can also activate the auditory cortex, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Here we show that when metabolism in the auditory cortex of prelingually deaf children (whose hearing was lost before they learned to talk) has been restored by cross-modal plasticity, the auditory cortex can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant installed afterwards. Neural substrates in the auditory cortex might therefore be routed permanently to other cognitive processes in prelingually deaf patients.

  7. Effect of Physical Activity on Anxiety and Depression Among Women: Risk Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelio Olmedilla-Zafra**

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific literature indicates that there is a positive relationship between exercise and various psychological aspects such as anxiety and depression. Some sociodemographic variables also seem to be involved in this relationship, and socio-cultural factors can be important. The objectives of the present study were to find out the influence of the practice of physical activity on anxiety and depression and to determine the profiles at greater risk with regard to certain sociodemographic variables (age, level of studies, occupation, and children. The sample was composed of 200 women from the city of Cartagena, Spain, between 18 and 65 years of age. Results show that the most vulnerable groups of women for suffering greater levels of anxiety and depression are characterized by the following profiles: anxiety (sedentary women, between 18-24 years of age or older than 54 years, who have not completed studies or those with secondary studies, housewives or those who work outside the home, and those without children and depression (sedentary women, older than 54 years of age or between 18-24 years, those with secondary studies, and housewives.

  8. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  9. Targets of polyamine dysregulation in major depression and suicide: Activity-dependent feedback, excitability, and neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Agenor; Mamdani, Firoza; Hjelm, Brooke E; Vawter, Marquis P; Sequeira, Adolfo

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide characterized by altered neuronal activity in brain regions involved in the control of stress and emotion. Although multiple lines of evidence suggest that altered stress-coping mechanisms underlie the etiology of MDD, the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability in MDD at the molecular level is not well established. In this review, we examine past and current evidence implicating dysregulation of the polyamine system as a central factor in the homeostatic response to stress and the etiology of MDD. We discuss the cellular effects of abnormal metabolism of polyamines in the context of their role in sensing and modulation of neuronal, electrical, and synaptic activity. Finally, we discuss evidence supporting an allostatic model of depression based on a chronic elevation in polyamine levels resulting in self-sustained stress response mechanisms maintained by maladaptive homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:27108532

  10. Cycloastragenol Is a Potent Telomerase Activator in Neuronal Cells: Implications for Depression Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny C.F. Ip

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cycloastragenol (CAG is an aglycone of astragaloside IV. It was first identified when screening Astragalus membranaceus extracts for active ingredients with antiaging properties. The present study demonstrates that CAG stimulates telomerase activity and cell proliferation in human neonatal keratinocytes. In particular, CAG promotes scratch wound closure of human neonatal keratinocyte monolayers in vitro. The distinct telomerase-activating property of CAG prompted evaluation of its potential application in the treatment of neurological disorders. Accordingly, CAG induced telomerase activity and cAMP response element binding (CREB activation in PC12 cells and primary neurons. Blockade of CREB expression in neuronal cells by RNA interference reduced basal telomerase activity, and CAG was no longer efficacious in increasing telomerase activity. CAG treatment not only induced the expression of bcl2, a CREB-regulated gene, but also the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase in primary cortical neurons. Interestingly, oral administration of CAG for 7 days attenuated depression-like behavior in experimental mice. In conclusion, CAG stimulates telomerase activity in human neonatal keratinocytes and rat neuronal cells, and induces CREB activation followed by tert and bcl2 expression. Furthermore, CAG may have a novel therapeutic role in depression. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Kynurenine pathway metabolites are associated with hippocampal activity during autobiographical memory recall in patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kymberly D; Drevets, Wayne C; Dantzer, Robert; Teague, T Kent; Bodurka, Jerzy; Savitz, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation-related changes in the concentrations of inflammatory mediators such as c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 1β (IL-1), and IL-6 as well as kynurenine metabolites are associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and affect depressive behavior, cognition, and hippocampal plasticity in animal models. We previously reported that the ratios of kynurenic acid (KynA) to the neurotoxic metabolites, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA), were positively correlated with hippocampal volume in depression. The hippocampus is critical for autobiographical memory (AM) recall which is impaired in MDD. Here we tested whether the ratios, KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were associated with AM recall performance as well as hippocampal activity during AM recall. Thirty-five unmedicated depressed participants and 25 healthy controls (HCs) underwent fMRI scanning while recalling emotionally-valenced AMs and provided serum samples for the quantification of kynurenine metabolites, CRP, and cytokines (IL-1 receptor antagonist - IL-1RA; IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha - TNF, interferon gamma -IFN-γ, IL-10). KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were lower in the MDD group relative to the HCs. The concentrations of the CRP and the cytokines did not differ significantly between the HCs and the MDD group. Depressed individuals recalled fewer specific AMs and displayed increased left hippocampal activity during the recall of positive and negative memories. KynA/3HK was inversely associated with left hippocampal activity during specific AM recall in the MDD group. Further, KynA/QA was positively correlated with percent negative specific memories recalled in the MDD group and showed a non-significant trend toward a positive correlation with percent positive specific memories recalled in HCs. In contrast, neither CRP nor the cytokines were significantly associated with AM recall or activity of the hippocampus during AM recall. Conceivably, an imbalance in levels of KynA versus QA

  12. Neural activity in relation to clinically derived personality syndromes in depression using a psychodynamic fMRI paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eTaubner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The heterogeneity between patients with depression cannot be captured adequately with existing descriptive systems of diagnosis and neurobiological models of depression. Furthermore, considering the highly individual nature of depression, the application of general stimuli in past research efforts may not capture the essence of the disorder. This study aims to identify subtypes of depression by using empirically-derived personality-syndromes, and to explore neural correlates of the derived personality syndromes.Method: In the present exploratory study an individually tailored and psychodynamically based fMRI paradigm using dysfunctional relationship patterns was presented to 20 chronically depressed patients. Results from the Shedler-Westen-Assessment-Procedure (SWAP-200 were analyzed by Q-factor analysis to identify clinically relevant subgroups of depression and related brain activation.Results: The principle component analysis of SWAP-200 items from all 20 patients lead to a 2-factor solution: Depressive Personality and Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality. Both factors were used in a whole-brain correlational analysis but only the second factor yielded significant positive correlations in four regions: A large cluster in the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, the left ventral striatum, a small cluster in the left temporal pole and another small cluster in the right middle frontal gyrus. Discussion: The degree to which patients with depression score high on the factor Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality correlated with relatively higher activity in three key areas involved in emotion processing, evaluation of reward/punishment, negative cognitions, depressive pathology and social knowledge (OFC, ventral striatum, temporal pole. Results may contribute to an alternative description of neural correlates of depression showing differential brain activation dependent on the extent of specific personality syndromes in

  13. The relationship between postnatal depression, sociodemographic factors, levels of partner support, and levels of physical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Saligheh, Maryam; Rooney, Rosanna M.; McNamara, Beverley; Kane, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: postnatal depression (PND) is defined as a psychological mood disorder that occurs in a mother within 6 weeks of her giving birth. It refers to an episode that causes mood disturbance and it could begin in, or extend into, the postpartum period. It is thought to have a high impact upon the mother's health as well as the family's functioning and the child's development. Socio-demographic, psych-social, and physical activity factors may all contribute to postpartum mood and ability ...

  14. Source distribution of neuromagnetic slow wave activity in schizophrenic and depressive patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wienbruch, Christian; Moratti, Stephan; Elbert, Thomas; Vogel, Ulrike; Fehr, Thorsten; Kissler, Johanna; Schiller, August; Rockstroh, Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Focal slow waves in the delta and theta frequency range frequently appear in psychopathological conditions. Due to their focal nature they can be localized by dipole modeling. We previously reported regional clustering of slow waves in temporal and parietal cortex of schizophrenic patients whereas such activity is largely absent in normals. Here we examine, to what extent distribution of slow wave generators differentiates schizophrenic from depressive syndromes. Methods: The regio...

  15. The effect of major depression on participation in preventive health care activities

    OpenAIRE

    Lavorato Dina H; Williams Jeanne VA; Patten Scott B; Eliasziw Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study was to determine whether major depressive episodes (MDE) contribute to a lower rate of participation in three prevention activities: blood pressure checks, mammograms and Pap tests. Methods The data source for this study was the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS), a longitudinal study that started in 1994 and has subsequently re-interviewed its participants every two years. The NPHS included a short form version of the Composite I...

  16. Physical activity, quality of life and symptoms of depression in community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salguero, Alfonso; Martínez-García, Raquel; Molinero, Olga; Márquez, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate in a sample of Spanish elderly whether measures of physical activity are related to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptoms of depression in community dwelling and institutionalized elderly. The sample was a cohort of 436 elderly (234 women and 202 men, aged 60-98 years) from the North of Spain. 58% were community-dwellers and 42% were institutionalized in senior residences. Participants completed measures of physical activity (Yale Physical Activity Survey, YPAS), HRQoL (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey, SF-36) and symptoms of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS). All SF-36 domains, except role-emotional, were significantly correlated with the YPAS activity dimension summary index. Physical function, role-physical, general health and vitality correlated with total time activity, and correlations were observed between weekly energy expenditure and physical function, role physical, vitality and mental health. Depressive symptom scores correlated significantly with the YPAS activity dimension summary index and the weekly energy expenditure. Scores for various domains of the SF-36 and for depressive symptoms significantly differed among less and more active individuals of the same sex and institutionalization category. Differences generally reached a higher extent in institutionalized subjects in comparison to community dwellers. In conclusion, physical activity was related to different domains of both the physical and mental components of HRQoL and to decreased depressive symptoms. Results emphasize the positive effects of physical activity in both community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults.

  17. Behavioral sexual dimorphism in models of anxiety and depression due to changes in HPA axis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokras, Nikolaos; Dalla, Christina; Sideris, Antonios C; Dendi, Artemis; Mikail, Hudu G; Antoniou, Katerina; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zeta

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are considered as stress-related disorders, which present considerable sex differentiation. In animal models of anxiety and depression sex differences have been described and linked to the sexually dimorphic hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenals (HPA) axis. The present study aimed to adjust corticosterone, the main HPA axis stress hormone, in male and female adrenalectomized rats with oral (25 μg/ml) corticosterone replacement (ADXR). Subsequently we investigated the behavioral performance of ADXR rats in the open field, light/dark and forced swim test (FST). Male ADXR rats showed less anxiety-like behavior when compared to sham-operated controls, despite adequate corticosterone replacement. They further showed increased swimming and reduced climbing behavior in the FST, while immobility duration did not differ from sham-operated males. On the contrary, adrenalectomy and corticosterone replacement did not have significant effects on the female behavioral response. Females were generally more active and presented less anxiety-like behavior than males, while they exhibited higher depressive-like symptomatology in the FST. ADXR affected behavioral responses predominantly in males, which in turn modified sex differences in the behavioral profile. Females in proestrous and estrous did not differ from females in diestrous and methestrous in any measured behavioral response. Present results suggest that the male and not the female behavioral responses in models of anxiety and depression were mainly affected by ADXR. These findings may play a significant role in explaining the differential coping strategy of the two sexes in response to stressful experiences. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  18. Cannabinoid agonists rearrange synaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses and depress motoneuron activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-05-01

    Impairment of motor skills is one of the most common acute adverse effects of cannabis. Related studies have focused mainly on psychomotor alterations, and little is known about the direct impact of cannabinoids (CBs) on motoneuron physiology. As key modulators of synaptic function, CBs regulate multiple neuronal functions and behaviors. Presynaptic CB1 mediates synaptic strength depression by inhibiting neurotransmitter release, via a poorly understood mechanism. The present study examined the effect of CB agonists on excitatory synaptic inputs incoming to hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) in vitro and in vivo. The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the synthetic CB agonist WIN 55,212-2 rapidly and reversibly induced short-term depression (STD) of glutamatergic synapses on motoneurons by a presynaptic mechanism. Presynaptic effects were fully reversed by the CB1-selective antagonist AM281. Electrophysiological and electron microscopy analysis showed that WIN 55,212-2 reduced the number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. Given that AM281 fully abolished depolarization-induced depression of excitation, motoneurons can be feasible sources of CBs, which in turn act as retrograde messengers regulating synaptic function. Finally, microiontophoretic application of the CB agonist O-2545 reversibly depressed, presumably via CB1, glutamatergic inspiratory-related activity of HMNs in vivo. Therefore, evidence support that CBs, via presynaptic CB1, induce excitatory STD by reducing the readily releasable pool of SVs at excitatory synapses, then attenuating motoneuron activity. These outcomes contribute a possible mechanistic basis for cannabis-associated motor performance disturbances such as ataxia, dysarthria and dyscoordination. PMID:25595101

  19. Achieving early functional auditory access in paediatric cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzan, E; Muzzi, E; Marchi, R; Falzone, C; Battelino, S; Ciciriello, E

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) is a viable option for providing access to auditory stimulation in severe-to-profound hearing loss/impairment of cochlear origin. It has been demonstrated that CI is safe and effective for deaf children. Younger age at activation after CI is linked with better outcomes. It is important to study variables and issues that can interfere with an early fitting and access to sound after CI. They range from patient characteristics, family compliance and support, to technical, medical or organisational problems. A SWOT analysis and a subsequent TOWS matrix was conducted to discuss issues and propose recommendations to be considered when operating an early switch on of the CI. PMID:27054390

  20. Comparative Evaluation of CNS Depressant Activity of the Flavonoid Fractions from the Fresh Leaves and Flowers of Ixora coccinea Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen AK*

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ixora coccinea Linn belonging to the family Rubiaceae is a plant native to India and Sri Lanka. It is also called Jungle Jeranium. It has been traditionally used in eczema, irregular mensturation, diarrhoea, hypertension skin ulcers, as an antiseptic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. Our present work is the study of its CNS depression activity so that it can be used a herbal sedative The flavonoid fractions of leaves and flowers were tested for CNS depressant activity using Actophotometer where both the leaf and flower extracts showed marked CNS depression up to 87.36%and 95.40%, respectively.

  1. K-Ar dating of the magmatic activity in the Momchilgrad volcanotectonic depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Momchilgrad volcanotectonic depression originated in the Southern parts of Eastern Rhodopes during the paleocene. The earliest products of the magmatic activity in the area are the rocks of the Kalabak andesite complex of Priabonian age (35 - 39 MA). The pyroclastic rocks and lavas of Beli Plast rhyodacite, Majarovo latite, Perperek trachyrhyolite, Zvezdel basaltic - andesite, Ustra rhyolite, Sveti Ilia trachyriodacite, Momchilgrad trachydacite complexes (28-34 MA) and Pcheloyad dyke complex (26.5-32.2 MA) formed lately during Rupelian and Rupelian-Chatian respectively. Obtained K-Ar age ranges for the different complexes overlap significantly indicating that the magmatic activity might have occurred during quite short period of time. (authors)

  2. EEG frontal asymmetry related to pleasantness of music perception in healthy children and cochlear implanted users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, G; Maglione, A G; Scorpecci, A; Malerba, P; Marsella, P; Di Francesco, G; Vitiello, S; Colosimo, A; Babiloni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Interestingly, the international debate about the quality of music fruition for cochlear implanted users does not take into account the hypothesis that bilateral users could perceive music in a more pleasant way with respect to monolateral users. In this scenario, the aim of the present study was to investigate if cerebral signs of pleasantness during music perception in healthy child are similar to those observed in monolateral and in bilateral cochlear implanted users. In fact, previous observations in literature on healthy subjects have indicated that variations of the frontal EEG alpha activity are correlated with the perceived pleasantness of the sensory stimulation received (approach-withdrawal theory). In particular, here we described differences between cortical activities estimated in the alpha frequency band for a healthy child and in patients having a monolateral or a bilateral cochlear implant during the fruition of a musical cartoon. The results of the present analysis showed that the alpha EEG asymmetry patterns observed in a healthy child and that of a bilateral cochlear implanted patient are congruent with the approach-withdrawal theory. Conversely, the scalp topographic distribution of EEG power spectra in the alpha band resulting from the monolateral cochlear user presents a different EEG pattern from the normal and bilateral implanted patients. Such differences could be explained at the light of the approach-withdrawal theory. In fact, the present findings support the hypothesis that a monolateral cochlear implanted user could perceive the music in a less pleasant way when compared to a healthy subject or to a bilateral cochlear user.

  3. EEG frontal asymmetry related to pleasantness of music perception in healthy children and cochlear implanted users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, G; Maglione, A G; Scorpecci, A; Malerba, P; Marsella, P; Di Francesco, G; Vitiello, S; Colosimo, A; Babiloni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Interestingly, the international debate about the quality of music fruition for cochlear implanted users does not take into account the hypothesis that bilateral users could perceive music in a more pleasant way with respect to monolateral users. In this scenario, the aim of the present study was to investigate if cerebral signs of pleasantness during music perception in healthy child are similar to those observed in monolateral and in bilateral cochlear implanted users. In fact, previous observations in literature on healthy subjects have indicated that variations of the frontal EEG alpha activity are correlated with the perceived pleasantness of the sensory stimulation received (approach-withdrawal theory). In particular, here we described differences between cortical activities estimated in the alpha frequency band for a healthy child and in patients having a monolateral or a bilateral cochlear implant during the fruition of a musical cartoon. The results of the present analysis showed that the alpha EEG asymmetry patterns observed in a healthy child and that of a bilateral cochlear implanted patient are congruent with the approach-withdrawal theory. Conversely, the scalp topographic distribution of EEG power spectra in the alpha band resulting from the monolateral cochlear user presents a different EEG pattern from the normal and bilateral implanted patients. Such differences could be explained at the light of the approach-withdrawal theory. In fact, the present findings support the hypothesis that a monolateral cochlear implanted user could perceive the music in a less pleasant way when compared to a healthy subject or to a bilateral cochlear user. PMID:23366987

  4. Integration of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD) into a College Orientation Program: Depression and Alcohol Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; MacPherson, Laura; Tull, Matthew T.; Baruch, David E.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    College freshmen face a variety of academic and social challenges as they adjust to college life that can place them at risk for a number of negative outcomes, including depression and alcohol-related problems. Orientation classes that focus on teaching incoming students how to better cope with college-oriented stress may provide an opportunity to…

  5. Using behavioural activation in the treatment of depression: a control theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, P; Law, A; Bates, R; Hylton, K; Mansell, W

    2013-12-01

    Behavioural activation is an intervention that can be used to counteract the typical patterns of withdrawal, avoidance and inactivity that characterize depression. This paper examines the processes of change that may occur during behavioural activation from the perspective of control theory. Some of the key concepts that are associated with control theory are introduced and the process of change that may occur during behavioural activation is illustrated using two case studies. The case studies provide anecdotal evidence which supports the hypothesis that the effective implementation of behavioural activation may depend upon clients being able to retain or regain the sense of control that they value. The differences between a control-theory-based approach and more orthodox behavioural and cognitive approaches are highlighted and the implications of these differences are discussed. Flexible approaches that are informed by control theory, may offer a useful alternative to the more established behavioural and cognitive approaches towards behavioural activation.

  6. Is All Human Hearing Cochlear?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Faranak Emami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the possibility that the saccule may contribute to human hearing. The forty participants included twenty healthy people and twenty other subjects selected from patients who presented with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo to Audiology Department of Hazrat Rasoul Akram hospital (Tehran, Iran. Assessments comprised of audiological evaluations, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs, recognition of spoken phonemes in white noise (Rsp in wn, and auditory brainstem response to 500 Hz tone burst (ABR500 HZ. Twenty affected ears with decreased vestibular excitability as detected by abnormal cVEMPs revealed decreased scores of Rsp in wn and abnormal findings of ABR500 HZ. Both unaffected and normal ears had normal results. Multiple comparisons of mean values of cVEMPs and ABR500 HZ between three groups were significant (P<0.05, ANOVA. The correlation between RSP in wn and p13 latencies was significant. The peak-to-peak amplitudes showed significant correlation to RSP in wn. The correlation between RSP in wn and the latencies of n23 was significant. In high-level of noisy competing situations, healthy human saccular sensation can mediate the detection of low frequencies and possibly help in cochlear hearing for frequency and intensity discrimination. So, all human hearing is not cochlear.

  7. Actigraphic registration of motor activity reveals a more structured behavioural pattern in schizophrenia than in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oedegaard Ketil J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disturbances in motor activity pattern are seen in both schizophrenia and depression. However, this activity has rarely been studied objectively. The purpose of the present study has been to study the complexity of motor activity patterns in these patients by using actigraphy. Findings Motor activity was recorded using wrist-worn actigraphs for periods of 2 weeks in patients with schizophrenia and major depression and compare them to healthy controls. Average motor activity was recorded and three non-parametric variables, interdaily stability (IS, intradaily variability (IV, and relative amplitude (RA were calculated on the basis of these data. The motor activity was significantly lower both in patients with schizophrenia (153 ± 61, mean ± SD, p Conclusions Motor activity was significantly reduced in both schizophrenic and depressed patients. However, schizophrenic patients differed from both depressed patients and controls, demonstrating motor activity patterns marked by less complexity and more structured behaviour. These findings may indicate that disturbances in motor activity reflect different pathophysiological mechanisms in schizophrenia compared to major depression.

  8. A Systematic Review of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Behavioral Activation Apps for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Anna; Rao, Sanjay; McGrath, Patrick J; Wozney, Lori; Wheaton, Mike; Conrod, Jill; Rozario, Sharlene

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common mental health condition for which many mobile apps aim to provide support. This review aims to identify self-help apps available exclusively for people with depression and evaluate those that offer cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or behavioural activation (BA). One hundred and seventeen apps have been identified after searching both the scientific literature and the commercial market. 10.26% (n = 12) of these apps identified through our search offer support that seems to be consistent with evidence-based principles of CBT or BA. Taking into account the non existence of effectiveness/efficacy studies, and the low level of adherence to the core ingredients of the CBT/BA models, the utility of these CBT/BA apps are questionable. The usability of reviewed apps is highly variable and they rarely are accompanied by explicit privacy or safety policies. Despite the growing public demand, there is a concerning lack of appropiate CBT or BA apps, especially from a clinical and legal point of view. The application of superior scientific, technological, and legal knowledge is needed to improve the development, testing, and accessibility of apps for people with depression. PMID:27135410

  9. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in depression: Results from Animal and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haitang; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Suzhen; Lu, Na; Yue, Yingying; Liang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Zhijun; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a stress-related factor, and serum PAI-1 levels are increased in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). Herein, we analysed PAI-1 protein levels in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of rodents exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress or treated with escitalopram. In addition, we examined PAI-1 concentrations in serum obtained from 17 drug-free depressed patients before and after escitalopram treatment. We found that PAI-1 expression was increased in area 1 of the cingulate cortex and prelimbic cortex of the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 and dentate gyrus in stressed rats. A downregulation of PAI-1 following chronic escitalopram treatment was also found. PAI-1 levels were higher in the CSF and serum in stressed rats than in controls, although the difference did not reach statistical significance in the serum. Escitalopram treatment significantly decreased PAI-1 levels in the serum, but not in the CSF. MDD patients had significantly greater serum PAI-1 concentrations than controls. Our results suggest that PAI-1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:27456456

  10. Effects of the behavioral inhibition system (BIS), behavioral activation system (BAS), and emotion regulation on depression: A one-year follow-up study in Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanzhang; Xu, Yun; Chen, Zi

    2015-12-15

    Depression is a worldwide mental health problem among adolescents. The current study aimed to examine the roles of the behavioral inhibition system (BIS), behavioral activation system (BAS), and emotion regulation on adolescent depression. A total of 330 Chinese adolescents were recruited to complete initial assessments of BIS/BAS, emotion regulation, and depression, with a follow-up after one year. Depression on these two occasions was positively correlated with gender, age, initial scores of BIS/BAS activity, and with Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire scores for self-blame, rumination, putting into perspective, catastrophizing, and blaming others, and negatively correlated with initial positive reappraisal scores. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that higher BIS activity, catastrophizing, rumination, and lower positive reappraisal predicted depression after one year. However, after controlling for initial depression, these variables were indirectly related to subsequent depression. Implications are discussed for assessments of depression and interventions targeted at the BIS, BAS, and emotion regulation.

  11. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Venail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement, electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device. The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = −0.11 ± 0.02, P<0.01, the scalar placement of the electrodes (β = −8.50 ± 1.97, P<0.01, and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF. Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas.

  12. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira [Faculty of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane.

  13. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27219347

  14. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  15. SAD-B Phosphorylation of CAST Controls Active Zone Vesicle Recycling for Synaptic Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochida, Sumiko; Hida, Yamato; Tanifuji, Shota; Hagiwara, Akari; Hamada, Shun; Abe, Manabu; Ma, Huan; Yasumura, Misato; Kitajima, Isao; Sakimura, Kenji; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-09-13

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a common form of activity-dependent plasticity observed widely in the nervous system. Few molecular pathways that control STD have been described, but the active zone (AZ) release apparatus provides a possible link between neuronal activity and plasticity. Here, we show that an AZ cytomatrix protein CAST and an AZ-associated protein kinase SAD-B coordinately regulate STD by controlling reloading of the AZ with release-ready synaptic vesicles. SAD-B phosphorylates the N-terminal serine (S45) of CAST, and S45 phosphorylation increases with higher firing rate. A phosphomimetic CAST (S45D) mimics CAST deletion, which enhances STD by delaying reloading of the readily releasable pool (RRP), resulting in a pool size decrease. A phosphonegative CAST (S45A) inhibits STD and accelerates RRP reloading. Our results suggest that the CAST/SAD-B reaction serves as a brake on synaptic transmission by temporal calibration of activity and synaptic depression via RRP size regulation. PMID:27626661

  16. [Cochlear implant in children: rational, indications and cost/efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, A; Bovo, R; Trevisi, P; Forli, F; Berrettini, S

    2013-06-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a partially implanted electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound and support speech to severely to profoundly hearing impaired patients. It is constituted by an external portion, that usually sits behind the ear and an internal portion surgically placed under the skin. The external components include a microphone connected to a speech processor that selects and arranges sounds pucked up by the microphone. This is connected to a transmitter coil, worn on the side of the head, which transmits data to an internal receiver coil placed under the skin. The received data are delivered to an array of electrodes that are surgically implanted within the cochlea. The primary neural targets of the electrodes are the spiral ganglion cells which innervate fibers of the auditory nerve. When the electrodes are activated by the signal, they send a current along the auditory nerve and auditory pathways to the auditory cortex. Children and adults who are profoundly or severely hearing impaired can be fitted with cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration, approximately 188,000 people worldwide have received implants. In Italy it is extimated that there are about 6-7000 implanted patients, with an average of 700 CI surgeries per year. Cochlear implantation, followed by intensive postimplantation speech therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, and social skills. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of CI. With regard to the results after cochlear implantation in relation to early implantation, better linguistic results are reported in children implanted before 12 months of life, even if no sufficient data exist regarding the relation between this advantage and the duration of implant use and how long

  17. Relationship between depression and physical activity, disability, burden, and health-related quality of life among patients with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Namita; Khanna, Rahul; Shah, Ruchit M

    2015-04-01

    This study purports to examine the relationship of depression with physical activity, disability, arthritis-attributable burden (joint limitation, work limitation, social activity limitation, and joint pain), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among arthritis patients. Data from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized adults in the United States, was used for the purpose of this study. Multivariable logistic regression was employed to address the study objectives. The final study sample included 167,068 arthritis patients, 45,459 of whom had comorbid depression. Arthritis patients with depression had lower odds of engaging in physical activity (odds ratio [OR]=1.070, confidence interval [CI] 1.006-1.139) and higher odds of being disabled (OR=1.411, CI 1.306-1.524). Arthritis patients with depression also had greater odds of arthritis-attributable joint limitations (OR=1.551, CI 1.460-1.648), work limitations (OR=1.506, CI 1.414-1.604), social activity limitations (OR=1.647, CI 1.557-1.742), and pain (OR=1.438, CI 1.364-1.517) as compared to those without depression. Arthritis patients with versus without depression had greater odds of poor general health status (OR=1.698, CI 1.586-1.819), physical HRQOL (OR=1.592, CI 1.486-1.704), mental HRQOL (OR=6.225, CI 5.768-6.718), and activity limitations (OR=2.345, CI 2.168-2.537). Study results indicate toward a negative functional impact of depression among arthritis patients. Policy makers should consider incorporating screening and management of depression into routine clinical care of arthritis patients.

  18. Associations between depressive symptoms and fronto-temporal activities during a verbal fluency task in patients with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Shenghong; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Miura, Akihiko; Iwata, Masaaki; Nagata, Izumi; Kaneko, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Though depressive symptoms are common in patients with schizophrenia, they are often left untreated and are associated with a high relapse rate, suicidal ideation, increased mortality, reduced social adjustment, and poor quality of life. The present study aims to elucidate the association between depressive symptoms and fronto-temporal activities during a cognitive task in patients with schizophrenia. The fronto-temporal activities of 41 Japanese patients with schizophrenia was evaluated during a verbal fluency task using 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the depression/anxiety component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) five-factor model. The depression/anxiety component of the PANSS five-factor model was negatively correlated with activities of the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), right dorsolateral PFC, and left temporal regions. Our findings suggest that reduced fronto-temporal activities on NIRS during a verbal fluency task is related to depressive symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27465466

  19. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Delage Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition.

  20. Cochlear implant in an ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Aimee M; Lassen, L Frederick

    2013-02-01

    Presbycusis, or sensorineural hearing loss in the elderly population, affects approximately 40% to 50% of people over the age of 75. A variety of devices are available to those with hearing loss. Cochlear implants, for example, are especially useful for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss. The population is aging, so the demand for cochlear implantation in ambulatory surgery centers will likely increase. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASC) can provide a more convenient and less expensive location for cochlear implant surgery than hospital-based operating facilities. Patient selection using standard ASC criteria, coupled with an understanding of the unique surgical and anesthetic needs of cochlear implant patients, are key to bringing this once exotic inpatient procedure into the ASC.

  1. Depression Augments Activity-Related Pain in Women but not in Men with Chronic Musculoskeletal Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Adams; Pascal Thibault; Nicole Davidson; Maureen Simmonds; Ana Velly; Michael JL Sullivan

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of the present study was to examine the role of sex as a moderator of the relation between depression and activity-related pain.METHODS: The study sample consisted of 83 participants (42 women, 41 men) with musculoskeletal conditions. Participants were asked to lift a series of 18 canisters that varied in weight (2.9 kg, 3.4 kg and 3.9 kg) and distance from the body. Participants were asked to rate their pain while they lifted each canister and estimate the w...

  2. Music Therapy for Preschool Cochlear Implant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia; Kenworthy, Maura; Van Voorst, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides research and clinical information relevant to music therapy for preschool children who use cochlear implants (CI). It consolidates information from various disciplinary sources regarding (a) cochlear implantation of young prelingually-deaf children (~age 2-5), (b) patterns of auditory and speech-language development, and (c) research regarding music perception of children with CIs. This information serves as a foundation for the final portion of the article, which describe...

  3. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase in metabolic depression in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved eukaryotic protein serine/threonine kinase that controls cellular and whole body energy homoeostasis. AMPK is activated during energy stress by a rise in AMP:ATP ratio and maintains energy balance by phosphorylating targets to switch on catabolic ATP-generating pathways, while at the same time switching off anabolic ATP-consuming processes. Metabolic depression is a strategy used by many animals to survive environmental stress and has been extensively studied across phylogeny by comparative biochemists and physiologists, but the role of AMPK has only recently been addressed. This review first deals with the evolution of AMPK in eukaryotes (excluding plants and fungi) and its regulation. Changes in adenine nucleotides and AMPK activation are described in animals during environmental energy stress, before considering the involvement of AMPK in controlling β-oxidation, fatty acid synthesis, triacylglycerol mobilization and protein synthesis. Lastly, strategies are presented to validate the role of AMPK in mediating metabolic depression by phosphorylating downstream targets.

  4. Feed-Forward and Feed-Backward Amplification Model from Cochlear Cytoarchitecture: An Interspecies Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Yong-Jin; Steele, Charles R.; Puria, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    The high sensitivity and wide bandwidth of mammalian hearing are thought to derive from an active process involving the somatic and hair-bundle motility of the thousands of outer hair cells uniquely found in mammalian cochleae. To better understand this, a biophysical three-dimensional cochlear fluid model was developed for gerbil, chinchilla, cat, and human, featuring an active “push-pull” cochlear amplifier mechanism based on the cytoarchitecture of the organ of Corti and using the time-ave...

  5. Informed Consent, Deaf Culture, and Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Lauren; Graber, Abraham D

    2015-01-01

    While cochlear implantation is now considered routine in many parts of the world, the debate over how to ethically implement this technology continues. One's stance on implantation often hinges on one's understanding of deafness. On one end of the spectrum are those who see cochlear implants as a much needed cure for an otherwise intractable disability. On the other end of the spectrum are those who view the Deaf as members of a thriving culture and see the cochlear implant as an attempt to eliminate this culture. Rather than take a stance in this debate, we will argue that the informed consent process for cochlear implantation must include access to Deaf perspectives. Deaf individuals know best what it is like to be a member of the Deaf community; the reasonable person would put significant weight on the testimony of Deaf individuals when considering whether to undergo cochlear implantation. The reasonable person standard determines what information careproviders must present as part of the informed consent process; thus, informed consent for cochlear implantation requires access to the testimony of Deaf individuals. PMID:26399672

  6. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding. PMID:11766315

  7. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding.

  8. Neurotrophins differentially stimulate the growth of cochlear neurites on collagen surfaces and in gels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joanna Xie; Kwang Pak; Amaretta Evans; Andy Kamgar-Parsi; Stephen Fausti; Lina Mullen; Allen Frederic Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The electrodes of a cochlear implant are located far from the surviving neurons of the spiral ganglion, which results in decreased precision of neural activation compared to the normal ear. If the neurons could be induced to extend neurites toward the implant, it might be possible to stimulate more discrete subpopulations of neurons, and to increase the resolution of the device. However, a major barrier to neurite growth toward a cochlear implant is the fluid filling the scala tympani, which separates the neurons from the electrodes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the growth of cochlear neurites in three-dimensional extracellular matrix molecule gels, and to increase biocompatibility by using fibroblasts stably transfected to produce neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Spiral ganglion explants from neonatal rats were evaluated in cultures. They were exposed to soluble neurotrophins, cells transfected to secrete neurotrophins, and/or collagen gels. We found that cochlear neurites grew readily on collagen surfaces and in three-dimensional collagen gels. Co-culture with cells producing neurotrophin-3 resulted in increased numbers of neurites, and neurites that were longer than when explants were cultured with control fibroblasts stably transfected with green fluorescent protein. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-producing cells resulted in a more dramatic increase in the number of neurites, but there was no significant effect on neurite length. It is suggested that extracellular matrix molecule gels and cells transfected to produce neurotrophins offer an opportunity to attract spiral ganglion neurites toward a cochlear implant.

  9. [The experience of the work of a regional cochlear implantation center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashchenko, A I; Eretnova, N M; Bakhshinian, V V; Petrova, I P; Tavartkiladze, G A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the main lines of the development of a regional cochlear implantation centre and to estimate the effectiveness of rehabilitation of the children treated with the use of cochlear implantation. Analysis of the results of the work of the branch of the Russian Research and Practical Centre of Audiology and Hearing Rehabilitation based at Voronezh Regional Children's Clinical Hospital No 1 provided materials for the establishment of the principle directions of activities of the regional cochlear implantation centre where a total of 161 children have been kept under observation during the last years. Fifty six of the 138 children at the age varying from 1 to 12 years were given the surgical treatment. The patients were followed up within two and more years after connection of the speech processor. The study group was comprised only of the pre-lingually deaf children. It is concluded that the performance of most cochlear implantation procedures based at local centres allows to reduce the cost of rehabilitation and makes the high-tech medical aid more readily available to the patients; moreover, the practical introduction of remote speech processor programming software into the work of regional cochlear implantation centres enhances the effectiveness of the rehabilitative measures based at local medical facilities. PMID:24781168

  10. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and depression during pregnancy Atividade física, qualidade de vida e depressão durante a gravidez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Tendais

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines physical activity patterns among women, from pre-pregnancy to the second trimester of pregnancy, and the relationship between physical activity status based on physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life (HRQoL and depression over pregnancy. 56 healthy pregnant women self-reported physical activity, HRQoL and depression at 10-15 and 19-24 weeks of pregnancy and physical activity before pregnancy. Whereas vigorous leisure physical activity decreased after conception, moderate leisure physical activity and work related physical activity remained stable over time. The prevalence of recommended physical activity was 39.3% and 12.5% in the 1st and 2nd trimesters of pregnancy respectively, and 14.3% pre-pregnancy. From the 1st to the 2nd pregnancy trimester, most physical HRQoL dimensions scores decreased and only mental component increased, independently of physical activity status. No changes in mean depression scores were observed. These data suggest that physical activity patterns change with pregnancy and that physical and mental components are differentially affected by pregnancy course, independently of physical activity status.Este estudo examina os padrões de atividade física antes da concepção até o segundo trimestre de gravidez e a relação entre o nível de atividade física, com base nas recomendações de atividade física, a qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde (QVRS e depressão ao longo da gravidez. Cinquenta e seis grávidas saudáveis reportaram nível de atividade física, QVRS e depressão às 10-15 e 19-24 semanas de gravidez, além de atividade física antes da concepção. Enquanto a atividade física vigorosa no lazer diminuiu depois da concepção, as atividades físicas moderadas no lazer e no trabalho mantiveram-se estáveis. A prevalência de atividade física recomendada foi de 39,3%, 12,5% e 14,3% antes, no primeiro e no segundo trimestres de gravidez, respectivamente

  11. Bombesin facilitates GABAergic transmission and depresses epileptiform activity in the entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-peng; Xiao, Zhaoyang; Cilz, Nicholas I; Hu, Binqi; Dong, Hailong; Lei, Saobo

    2014-01-01

    Bombesin and the bombesin-like peptides including neuromedin B (NMB) and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) are important neuromodulators in the brain. We studied their effects on GABAergic transmission and epileptiform activity in the entorhinal cortex (EC). Bath application of bombesin concentration-dependently increased both the frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs recorded from the principal neurons in the EC. Application of NMB and GRP exerted the same effects as bombesin. Bombesin had no effects on mIPSCs recorded in the presence of TTX but slightly depressed the evoked IPSCs. Omission of extracellular Ca(2+) or inclusion of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers, Cd(2+) and Ni(2+), blocked bombesin-induced increases in sIPSCs suggesting that bombesin increases GABA release via facilitating extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Bombesin induced membrane depolarization and slightly increased the input resistance of GABAergic interneurons recorded from layer III of the EC. The action potential firing frequency of the interneurons was also increased by bombesin. Bombesin-mediated depolarization of interneurons was unlikely to be mediated by the opening of a cationic conductance but due to the inhibition of inward rectifier K(+) channels. Bath application of bombesin, NMB and GRP depressed the frequency of the epileptiform activity elicited by deprivation of Mg(2+) from the extracellular solution suggesting that bombesin and the bombesin-like peptides have antiepileptic effects in the brain. PMID:23966303

  12. Long lasting protein synthesis- and activity-dependent spine shrinkage and elimination after synaptic depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Ramiro-Cortés

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuits modify their response to synaptic inputs in an experience-dependent fashion. Increases in synaptic weights are accompanied by structural modifications, and activity dependent, long lasting growth of dendritic spines requires new protein synthesis. When multiple spines are potentiated within a dendritic domain, they show dynamic structural plasticity changes, indicating that spines can undergo bidirectional physical modifications. However, it is unclear whether protein synthesis dependent synaptic depression leads to long lasting structural changes. Here, we investigate the structural correlates of protein synthesis dependent long-term depression (LTD mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs through two-photon imaging of dendritic spines on hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We find that induction of mGluR-LTD leads to robust and long lasting spine shrinkage and elimination that lasts for up to 24 hours. These effects depend on signaling through group I mGluRs, require protein synthesis, and activity. These data reveal a mechanism for long lasting remodeling of synaptic inputs, and offer potential insights into mental retardation.

  13. Actimetric evidence that CLOCK 3111 T/C SNP influences sleep and activity patterns in patients affected by bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Francesco; Dallaspezia, Sara; Fulgosi, Mara Cigala; Lorenzi, Cristina; Serretti, Alessandro; Barbini, Barbara; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    Depressive insomnia and diurnal fluctuations of mood and activity are core clinical features of mood disorders. Here we studied the effect of CLOCK 3111 T/C SNP (rs1801260) on the actimetric recorded diurnal activity and nocturnal sleep of 39 bipolar depressed inpatients. Compared to T/T homozygotes, carriers of the C allele had a similar degree of severity of depression, but showed higher activity levels in the evening, a delayed sleep onset (mean 79 min later), and a reduced amount of sleep during the night (mean 75 min less). Ongoing lithium treatment significantly interacted with rs1801260 by enhancing activity levels in the evening and reducing the differences among genotype groups. Individual characteristics of the molecular clock can influence sleep symptoms in mood disorders.

  14. Whole-Brain Mapping of Neuronal Activity in the Learned Helplessness Model of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsoo; Perova, Zinaida; Mirrione, Martine M; Pradhan, Kith; Henn, Fritz A; Shea, Stephen; Osten, Pavel; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Some individuals are resilient, whereas others succumb to despair in repeated stressful situations. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying such divergent behavioral responses remain unclear. Here, we employed an automated method for mapping neuronal activity in search of signatures of stress responses in the entire mouse brain. We used serial two-photon tomography to detect expression of c-FosGFP - a marker of neuronal activation - in c-fosGFP transgenic mice subjected to the learned helplessness (LH) procedure, a widely used model of stress-induced depression-like phenotype in laboratory animals. We found that mice showing "helpless" behavior had an overall brain-wide reduction in the level of neuronal activation compared with mice showing "resilient" behavior, with the exception of a few brain areas, including the locus coeruleus, that were more activated in the helpless mice. In addition, the helpless mice showed a strong trend of having higher similarity in whole-brain activity profile among individuals, suggesting that helplessness is represented by a more stereotypic brain-wide activation pattern. This latter effect was confirmed in rats subjected to the LH procedure, using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography to assess neural activity. Our findings reveal distinct brain activity markings that correlate with adaptive and maladaptive behavioral responses to stress, and provide a framework for further studies investigating the contribution of specific brain regions to maladaptive stress responses. PMID:26869888

  15. Whole-brain mapping of neuronal activity in the learned helplessness model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo eKim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some individuals are resilient, whereas others succumb to despair in repeated stressful situations. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying such divergent behavioral responses remain unclear. Here, we employed an automated method for mapping neuronal activity in search of signatures of stress responses in the entire mouse brain. We used serial two-photon tomography to detect expression of c-FosGFP – a marker of neuronal activation – in c-fosGFP transgenic mice subjected to the learned helplessness (LH procedure, a widely used model of stress-induced depression-like phenotype in laboratory animals. We found that mice showing helpless behavior had an overall brain-wide reduction in the level of neuronal activation compared with mice showing resilient behavior, with the exception of a few brain areas, including the locus coeruleus, that were more activated in the helpless mice. In addition, the helpless mice showed a strong trend of having higher similarity in whole brain activity profile among individuals, suggesting that helplessness is represented by a more stereotypic brain-wide activation pattern. This latter effect was confirmed in rats subjected to the LH procedure, using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography to assess neural activity. Our findings reveal distinct brain activity markings that correlate with adaptive and maladaptive behavioral responses to stress, and provide a framework for further studies investigating the contribution of specific brain regions to maladaptive stress responses.

  16. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  17. Cochlear Implants Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Cochlear Implants Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... Mia, right, and Isabelle Jeppsen meet with Mia's cochlear implant surgeon, John Niparko, M.D., of Johns ...

  18. Effect of pediatric bilateral cochlear implantation on language development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boons, Tinne; Brokx, Jan; Frijns, Johan; Peeraer, Louis; Philips, Birgit; Vermeulen,; Wouters,; Wieringen, van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine spoken language outcomes in children undergoing bilateral cochlear implantation compared with matched peers undergoing unilateral implantation. Design: Case-control, frequency-matched, retrospective cross-sectional multicenter study. Setting: Two Belgian and 3 Dutch cochlear im

  19. Visual Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Children with Cochlear Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Campbell

    Full Text Available Visual cross-modal re-organization is a neurophysiological process that occurs in deafness. The intact sensory modality of vision recruits cortical areas from the deprived sensory modality of audition. Such compensatory plasticity is documented in deaf adults and animals, and is related to deficits in speech perception performance in cochlear-implanted adults. However, it is unclear whether visual cross-modal re-organization takes place in cochlear-implanted children and whether it may be a source of variability contributing to speech and language outcomes. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if visual cross-modal re-organization occurs in cochlear-implanted children, and whether it is related to deficits in speech perception performance.Visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded via high-density EEG in 41 normal hearing children and 14 cochlear-implanted children, aged 5-15 years, in response to apparent motion and form change. Comparisons of VEP amplitude and latency, as well as source localization results, were conducted between the groups in order to view evidence of visual cross-modal re-organization. Finally, speech perception in background noise performance was correlated to the visual response in the implanted children.Distinct VEP morphological patterns were observed in both the normal hearing and cochlear-implanted children. However, the cochlear-implanted children demonstrated larger VEP amplitudes and earlier latency, concurrent with activation of right temporal cortex including auditory regions, suggestive of visual cross-modal re-organization. The VEP N1 latency was negatively related to speech perception in background noise for children with cochlear implants.Our results are among the first to describe cross modal re-organization of auditory cortex by the visual modality in deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. Our findings suggest that, as a group, children with cochlear implants show evidence of visual cross

  20. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viggiano E

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Emanuela Viggiano,1,2 Vincenzo Monda,1 Antonietta Messina,1 Fiorenzo Moscatelli,3 Anna Valenzano,3 Domenico Tafuri,4 Giuseppe Cibelli,3 Bruno De Luca,1 Giovanni Messina,1,3 Marcellino Monda1 1Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, 4Department of Motor Sciences and Wellness, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy Abstract: Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD, which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. Keywords: cortical spreading depression, neuroprotective effect, uncoupling protein-5

  1. In vivo Study on Depressant Effects and Muscle Coordination Activity of Galphimia glauca Stem Methanol Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garige, Baba Shankar Rao; Keshetti, Srisailam; Vattikuti, Uma Maheshwara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galphimia glauca is an evergreen shrub found across peninsular India, belonging to family Malpighiaceae. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the in vivo depressant effects and muscle coordination activity of G. glauca stem methanol extract (GGSME). Materials and Methods: The stem methanol extract was administered in Swiss albino mice in 1 day to study the central nervous system (CNS) depressant and muscle coordination activity employing animal models such as sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep test, hole-board test, open field test, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions, picrotoxin-induced convulsions, grip strengthening test in mice, and Rota-rod test. Results: The LD50 of GGSME was found to be >2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Mice treated with stem methanol extract at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, b.w. doses extended the sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg. b.w., i.p.). The stem methanol extract at 400 mg/kg dose showed a significant (P ≤ 0.001) dose-dependent decrease in the number of rears and head dipping number in the hole-board test. The extract exhibited a significant (P ≤ 0.001) effect on the ambulatory behavior of mice in the open field test and also extended the onset of seizures induced by PTZ (90 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) and picrotoxin (10 mg/kg, b.w., i.p.). The extract also exhibited significant (P ≤ 0.001) effects on muscle coordination in rota-rod and grip strengthening test in mice. Conclusion: The study results conclude that the GGSME has a potential CNS depressant and muscle relaxant effects compared to the standard drugs. SUMMARY Anxiety is implicated in the number of psychiatric disordersIn vivo depressant activity is studied employing animal models like Sodium pentobarbital-.induced sleep test, Hole-board test, Open field test, Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions and Picrotoxin-induced convulsions tests.Muscle coordination activity is studied employing animal models like Grip strengthening

  2. In vivo Study on Depressant Effects and Muscle Coordination Activity of Galphimia glauca Stem Methanol Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garige, Baba Shankar Rao; Keshetti, Srisailam; Vattikuti, Uma Maheshwara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galphimia glauca is an evergreen shrub found across peninsular India, belonging to family Malpighiaceae. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the in vivo depressant effects and muscle coordination activity of G. glauca stem methanol extract (GGSME). Materials and Methods: The stem methanol extract was administered in Swiss albino mice in 1 day to study the central nervous system (CNS) depressant and muscle coordination activity employing animal models such as sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep test, hole-board test, open field test, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions, picrotoxin-induced convulsions, grip strengthening test in mice, and Rota-rod test. Results: The LD50 of GGSME was found to be >2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Mice treated with stem methanol extract at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, b.w. doses extended the sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg. b.w., i.p.). The stem methanol extract at 400 mg/kg dose showed a significant (P ≤ 0.001) dose-dependent decrease in the number of rears and head dipping number in the hole-board test. The extract exhibited a significant (P ≤ 0.001) effect on the ambulatory behavior of mice in the open field test and also extended the onset of seizures induced by PTZ (90 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) and picrotoxin (10 mg/kg, b.w., i.p.). The extract also exhibited significant (P ≤ 0.001) effects on muscle coordination in rota-rod and grip strengthening test in mice. Conclusion: The study results conclude that the GGSME has a potential CNS depressant and muscle relaxant effects compared to the standard drugs. SUMMARY Anxiety is implicated in the number of psychiatric disordersIn vivo depressant activity is studied employing animal models like Sodium pentobarbital-.induced sleep test, Hole-board test, Open field test, Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions and Picrotoxin-induced convulsions tests.Muscle coordination activity is studied employing animal models like Grip strengthening

  3. Associations of physical activity with depressiveness and coping in subjects with high-grade obesity aiming at bariatric surgery: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Elbelt, Ulf; Ahnis, Anne; Riedl, Andrea; Burkert, Silke; Schuetz, Tatjana; Ordemann, Juergen; Strasburger, Christian J.; Klapp, Burghard F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced physical activity is supposed to be associated with depressiveness and more passive coping patterns. For further evaluation of this assumed relation we studied energy expenditure due to physical activity - usually referred to as activity thermogenesis (AT) - together with depressiveness (clinical diagnosis, depression module of the Patient Health Questionnaire), and coping behaviours (Brief COPE Inventory) in 50 patients with high-grade obesity (42 ± 12 years; 9 with II° an...

  4. THE COCHLEAR AMPLIFIER:IS IT HAIR BUNDLE MOTION OF OUTER HAIR CELLS?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi; He David Z

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are involved in a mechanical feedback loop in which the fast somatic motility of OHCs is required for cochlear amplification. Alternatively, amplification is thought to arise from active hair bundle movements ob-served in non-mammalian hair cells. We measured the voltage-evoked hair bundle motions in the gerbil cochlea to determine if such movements are also present in mammalian OHCs. The OHCs displayed a large hair bundle movement that was not based on mechanotransducer channels but based on somatic motility. Significantly, bundle movements were able to generate radial motion of the tectorial membrane in situ. This result implies that the motility-associated hair bundle motion may be part of the cochlear amplifier.

  5. DEPRESSIVE AND ANXIETY DISORDERS AND THE ASSOCIATION WITH OBESITY, PHYSICAL, AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Leonore M.; Fokkema, Marjolein; van Straten, Annemieke; Lamers, Femke; Cuijpers, Pim; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There is evidence of more obesity among persons with depressive and depressive and anxiety disorders. However, the nature and the underlying mechanisms of the association are still unclear. This study examines the association between depressive and anxiety disorders and obesity, physical

  6. A Comparative Study of Group Behavioral Activation and Cognitive Therapy in Reducing Subsyndromal Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Soleimani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study compared the effectiveness of two group treatments, behavioral activation (BA and cognitive therapy (CT, in reducing subsyndromal anxiety and depressive symptoms in a sample of Iranian university students.Method: Twenty-seven Iranian university students who scored 18 or higher on the depression subscale and 16 or higher on the anxiety subscale of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-42 were randomly assigned into treatment groups. One group received 8 sessions of BA (n = 14, and the other received 8 sessions of group CT (n = 13.Result: Analysis of covariance revealed that the BA group had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms than the CT group. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the levels of anxiety, stress symptoms or functional impairment after treatment.Conclusion: This study found evidence for the effectiveness of BA in reducing anxiety, depressive and stress symptoms and functional impairment compared to CT. BA was more effective than CT in improving depressive symptoms and was as effective as CT in decreasing anxiety, stress and functional impairment. BA is also a cost-effective intervention, particularly in group formats.

  7. Retrolabyrinthine approach for cochlear nerve preservation in neurofibromatosis type 2 and simultaneous cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few cases of cochlear implantation (CI in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 patients had been reported in the literature. The approaches described were translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid or middle cranial fossa. Objectives: To describe a case of a NF2- deafened-patient who underwent to vestibular schwannoma resection via RLA with cochlear nerve preservation and CI through the round window, at the same surgical time. Resumed Report: A 36-year-old woman with severe bilateral hearing loss due to NF2 was submitted to vestibular schwannoma resection and simultaneous CI. Functional assessment of cochlear nerve was performed by electrical promontory stimulation. Complete tumor removal was accomplishment via RLA with anatomic and functional cochlear and facial nerve preservation. Cochlear electrode array was partially inserted via round window. Sound field hearing threshold improvement was achieved. Mean tonal threshold was 46.2 dB HL. The patient could only detect environmental sounds and human voice but cannot discriminate vowels, words nor do sentences at 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Cochlear implantation is a feasible auditory restoration option in NF2 when cochlear anatomic and functional nerve preservation is achieved. The RLA is adequate for this purpose and features as an option for hearing preservation in NF2 patients.

  8. A facilitator of leisure activities for stress-related growth experience among middle-aged Korean women with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Leisure may serve as a coping resource following negative life events that facilitate positive changes. Previous studies on leisure have mainly focused on stress-related growth among individuals living in Western cultures. This study aimed to capture the role of leisure involvement as a facilitator of stress-related growth among middle-aged Korean women with depression. Three main themes were identified as an outcome of participation in leisure activities: (a) strengthening meaningful relationships, (b) improving positive emotions, and (c) facilitating personal strength. By participating in leisure activities, individuals with depression may develop the ability to cope with stress and experience positive changes.

  9. Data on the impact of SSRIs and depression symptoms on the neural activities in obsessive-compulsive disorder at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunhui; Juhas, Michal; Greenshaw, Andrew J; Hu, Qiang; Meng, Xin; Cui, Hongsheng; Ding, Yongzhuo; Kang, Lu; Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Yuhua; Cui, Guangcheng; Li, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The data provided here related to our research article (Chen et al., 2016) [1]. We provide whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity patterns in obsessive-compulsive disorder at resting-state [1]. This article also provides supplementary information to our research article, i.e., between - group comparisons of the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and combined depression symptoms on resting-state neural activities in obsessive-compulsive disorder. The data presented here provide novel insights into the effect of SSRIs and combined depression symptoms on the neural activities at rest. PMID:27504477

  10. Perceptual Spaces Induced by Cochlear Implant All-Polar Stimulation Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; McKay, Colette M

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that a main limitation of the cochlear implant is the spread of current induced by each electrode, which activates an inappropriately large range of sensory neurons. To reduce this spread, an alternative stimulation mode, the all-polar mode, was tested with five participants...

  11. Children's Development of Intonation during the First Year of Cochlear Implant Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, David P.; Ertmer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the longitudinal development of intonation in 18 deaf children who received cochlear implants (CIs) before the age of 3 years and 12 infants with typical development (TD) who served as controls. At the time their implants were activated, the children with CIs ranged in age from 9 to 36 months. Cross-group comparisons were…

  12. Perceptual space induced by cochlear implant all-polar stimulation mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; Mckay, Colette M.

    2015-01-01

    It has often been argued that a main limitation of the cochlear implant is the spread of current induced by each electrode, which activates an inappropriately large range of sensory neurons. In order to reduce this spread, a new stimulation mode, the all-polar mode, was tested with 5 participants...

  13. Immediate and delayed cochlear neuropathy after noise exposure in pubescent mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Bjerg Jensen

    Full Text Available Moderate acoustic overexposure in adult rodents is known to cause acute loss of synapses on sensory inner hair cells (IHCs and delayed degeneration of the auditory nerve, despite the completely reversible temporary threshold shift (TTS and morphologically intact hair cells. Our objective was to determine whether a cochlear synaptopathy followed by neuropathy occurs after noise exposure in pubescence, and to define neuropathic versus non-neuropathic noise levels for pubescent mice. While exposing 6 week old CBA/CaJ mice to 8-16 kHz bandpass noise for 2 hrs, we defined 97 dB sound pressure level (SPL as the threshold for this particular type of neuropathic exposure associated with TTS, and 94 dB SPL as the highest non-neuropathic noise level associated with TTS. Exposure to 100 dB SPL caused permanent threshold shift although exposure of 16 week old mice to the same noise is reported to cause only TTS. Amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response, which reflects the summed activity of the cochlear nerve, was complemented by synaptic ribbon counts in IHCs using confocal microscopy, and by stereological counts of peripheral axons and cell bodies of the cochlear nerve from 24 hours to 16 months post exposure. Mice exposed to neuropathic noise demonstrated immediate cochlear synaptopathy by 24 hours post exposure, and delayed neurodegeneration characterized by axonal retraction at 8 months, and spiral ganglion cell loss at 8-16 months post exposure. Although the damage was initially limited to the cochlear base, it progressed to also involve the cochlear apex by 8 months post exposure. Our data demonstrate a fine line between neuropathic and non-neuropathic noise levels associated with TTS in the pubescent cochlea.

  14. THE IMPACT OF MINING ACTIVITIES ON THE WEST OF PETROŞANI DEPRESSION AND IDENTIFICATION OF AFFECTED GEOMORPHOLOGICAL RESOURCES. CASE STUDY: ANINOASA-VULCAN-LUPENI SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    N. NIMARĂ; G. B. TOFAN

    2015-01-01

    The Impact of Mining Activities on the West of Petroşani Depression and Identification of Affected Geomorphological Resources. Case Study: Aninoasa- Vulcan-Lupeni Sector. The west region of Petroşani Depression, like the whole depression, suffered some changes in the geomorphologic environment as a result of coal mining activities. Following displacement processes of mass materials and relocation of it, changes in shape are brought to the original territory that contrast with the natural land...

  15. Self-shielding coefficient and thermal flux depression factor of voluminous sample in neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the major problems encountered during the irradiation of large inhomogeneous samples in performing activation analysis using neutron is the perturbation of the neutron field due to absorption and scattering of neutron within the sample as well as along the neutron guide in the case of prompt gamma activation analysis. The magnitude of this perturbation shown by self-shielding coefficient and flux depression depend on several factors including the average neutron energy, the size and shape of the sample, as well as the macroscopic absorption cross section of the sample. In this study, we use Monte Carlo N-Particle codes to simulate the variation of neutron self-shielding coefficient and thermal flux depression factor as a function of the macroscopic thermal absorption cross section. The simulation works was carried out using the high performance computing facility available at UTM while the experimental work was performed at the tangential beam port of Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI, Malaysia Nuclear Agency. The neutron flux measured along the beam port is found to be in good agreement with the simulated data. Our simulation results also reveal that total flux perturbation factor decreases as the value of absorption increases. This factor is close to unity for low absorbing sample and tends towards zero for strong absorber. In addition, sample with long mean chord length produces smaller flux perturbation than the shorter mean chord length. When comparing both the graphs of self-shielding factor and total disturbance, we can conclude that the total disturbance of the thermal neutron flux on the large samples is dominated by the self-shielding effect. (Author)

  16. Expression of p21-activated kinases 1 and 3 is altered in the brain of subjects with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsova, Beata; Alvarez Juliá, Anabel; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Frasch, Alberto Carlos; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2016-10-01

    The p21-activated kinases (PAKs) of group I are the main effectors for the small Rho GTPases, critically involved in neurodevelopment, plasticity and maturation of the nervous system. Moreover, the neuronal complexity controlled by PAK1/PAK3 signaling determines the postnatal brain size and synaptic properties. Stress induces alterations at the level of structural and functional synaptic plasticity accompanied by reductions in size and activity of the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). These abnormalities are likely to contribute to the pathology of depression and, in part, reflect impaired cytoskeleton remodeling pointing to the role of Rho GTPase signaling. Thus, the present study assessed the expression of the group I PAKs and their activators in the brain of depressed subjects. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), mRNA levels and coexpression of the group I PAKs: PAK1, PAK2, and PAK3 as well as of their activators: RAC1, CDC42 and ARHGEF7 were examined in postmortem samples from the PFC (n=25) and the hippocampus (n=23) of subjects with depression and compared to control subjects (PFC n=24; hippocampus n=21). Results demonstrated that mRNA levels of PAK1 and PAK3, are significantly reduced in the brain of depressed subjects, with PAK1 being reduced in the PFC and PAK3 in the hippocampus. No differences were observed for the ubiquitously expressed PAK2. Following analysis of gene coexpression demonstrated disruption of coordinated gene expression in the brain of subjects with depression. Abnormalities in mRNA expression of PAK1 and PAK3 as well as their altered coexpression patterns were detected in the brain of subjects with depression. PMID:27474226

  17. Activation of the attachment system and mentalization in depressive and healthy individuals: An experimental control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fizke Ella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From a developmental and clinical point of view attachment theory and mentalization are closely connected and have become increasingly important to understand the origins of psychopathological development. However, very little is known about how exactly different inner working models of attachment are related to diverse mentalizing abilities and this is particularly true for adult populations - healthy as well as clinical populations. In the present study we investigated this relation with a sample of inpatients diagnosed with depression and a sample of healthy individuals. In an experimental setting the attachment system was activated using the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP. Mentalization was assessed during activation and in comparison to a control condition using a modified version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET. We expected that an activation of the attachment system i diminishes the capacity to take another’s perspective in individuals with unresolved state of mind, ii has no impact in individuals with secure attachment representation and iii is dependent of clinical status in individuals with insecure (but organized working models of attachment. Overall, these hypotheses were confirmed. However, the impact of clinical status on mentalization in insecure attachment has to be further explored. We summarize that attachment state of mind has a mediating influence on mentalization basically in such situations where the attachment system is activated.

  18. Force enhancement and force depression in a modified muscle model used for muscle activation prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosterina, Natalia; Wang, Ruoli; Eriksson, Anders; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2013-08-01

    This article introduces history-dependent effects in a skeletal muscle model applied to dynamic simulations of musculoskeletal system motion. Force depression and force enhancement induced by active muscle shortening and lengthening, respectively, represent muscle history effects. A muscle model depending on the preceding contractile events together with the current parameters was developed for OpenSim software, and applied in simulations of standing heel-raise and squat movements. Muscle activations were computed using joint kinematics and ground reaction forces recorded from the motion capture of seven individuals. In the muscle-actuated simulations, a modification was applied to the computed activation, and was compared to the measured electromyography data. For the studied movements, the history gives a small but visible effect to the muscular force trace, but some parameter values must be identified before the exact magnitude can be analysed. The muscle model modification improves the existing muscle models and gives a more accurate description of underlying forces and activations in musculoskeletal system movement simulations. PMID:23561824

  19. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  20. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined 3H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid

  1. The effect of major depression on participation in preventive health care activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavorato Dina H

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to determine whether major depressive episodes (MDE contribute to a lower rate of participation in three prevention activities: blood pressure checks, mammograms and Pap tests. Methods The data source for this study was the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS, a longitudinal study that started in 1994 and has subsequently re-interviewed its participants every two years. The NPHS included a short form version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI-SF to assess past year MDE and also collected data on participation in preventive activities. Initially, we examined whether respondents with MDE in a particular year were less likely to participate in screening during that same year. In order to assess whether MDE negatively altered the pattern of participation, those successfully screened at the baseline interview in 1994 were identified and divided into cohorts depending on their MDE status. Proportional hazard models were used to quantify the effect of MDE on subsequent participation in screening. Results No effect of MDE on participation in the three preventive activities was identified either in the cross-sectional or longitudinal analysis. Adjustment for a set of relevant covariates did not alter this result. Conclusion Whereas MDE might be expected to reduce the frequency of participation in screening activities, no evidence for this was found in the current analysis. Since people with MDE may contact the health system more frequently, this may offset any tendency of the illness itself to reduce participation in screening.

  2. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  3. Amplitude recruitment of cochlear potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingqi; SUN Wei; SUN Jianhe; YU Ning; JIANG Sichang

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from outer hair cells (OHC) and the cochlear microphonics (CM) were recorded from scala media (SM) in three turn of guinea pig cochlea,the compound action potential (CAP) were recorded at the round window (RW) before and after the animal were exposed to white noise. The results suggest that the nonlinear properties with “saduration” of Input/output (I/O) function of OHC AC recepter potential and CM were founded; the nonlinear properties with “Low”, “Platean” and “high” of CAP also were investigated. After explosion, the threshold shift of CAP has about 10 dB. The I/O of OHC responses and CM were changed in a linearizing (i.e., nonlinearity loss), the “platean” of I/O CAP disappeared and the growth rate of CAP amplitude were larger than before explosion. The response amplitude recruitment of OHC appears to result from reduction in gain (i.e., hearing loss); It was due to the nonlinear growth function of OHC receptor potentials was changed in linearzing that the basilar membrance motion was changed in linearizing. Since intensity coding in the inner ear depends on an interactions of nonlinear basilar membrance and nerve fibers. So that it must lead to a linearizing of CAP as input responses.

  4. Understanding music with cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Lisa; Mürbe, Dirk; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve via a Cochlear Implant (CI) enables profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds. Many CI users find language comprehension satisfactory, but music perception is generally considered difficult. However, music contains different dimensions which might be accessible in different ways. We aimed to highlight three main dimensions of music processing in CI users which rely on different processing mechanisms: (1) musical discrimination abilities, (2) access to meaning in music, and (3) subjective music appreciation. All three dimensions were investigated in two CI user groups (post- and prelingually deafened CI users, all implanted as adults) and a matched normal hearing control group. The meaning of music was studied by using event-related potentials (with the N400 component as marker) during a music-word priming task while music appreciation was gathered by a questionnaire. The results reveal a double dissociation between the three dimensions of music processing. Despite impaired discrimination abilities of both CI user groups compared to the control group, appreciation was reduced only in postlingual CI users. While musical meaning processing was restorable in postlingual CI users, as shown by a N400 effect, data of prelingual CI users lack the N400 effect and indicate previous dysfunctional concept building. PMID:27558546

  5. Understanding music with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Lisa; Mürbe, Dirk; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve via a Cochlear Implant (CI) enables profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds. Many CI users find language comprehension satisfactory, but music perception is generally considered difficult. However, music contains different dimensions which might be accessible in different ways. We aimed to highlight three main dimensions of music processing in CI users which rely on different processing mechanisms: (1) musical discrimination abilities, (2) access to meaning in music, and (3) subjective music appreciation. All three dimensions were investigated in two CI user groups (post- and prelingually deafened CI users, all implanted as adults) and a matched normal hearing control group. The meaning of music was studied by using event-related potentials (with the N400 component as marker) during a music-word priming task while music appreciation was gathered by a questionnaire. The results reveal a double dissociation between the three dimensions of music processing. Despite impaired discrimination abilities of both CI user groups compared to the control group, appreciation was reduced only in postlingual CI users. While musical meaning processing was restorable in postlingual CI users, as shown by a N400 effect, data of prelingual CI users lack the N400 effect and indicate previous dysfunctional concept building. PMID:27558546

  6. Depression - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  7. Fear of falling and depressive symptoms in Chinese elderly living in nursing homes: fall efficacy and activity level as mediator or moderator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K-L; Yeung, F K C; Wong, E C H

    2005-05-01

    Depression is a common problem for many Hong Kong Chinese elderly, especially those living in nursing homes. This study examines the relationship between fear of falling and depressive symptoms as well as the role of participation in physical activity and fall efficacy in the linkage between the fear of falling and depression. A sample of 100 residents living in nursing homes were interviewed. Using multiple regression models, we found that elderly persons who had greater fear of falling tended to report depressive symptoms more frequently after controlling socio-demographic and physical health status variables. In addition, activity involvement and fall efficacy acted as mediators and moderators in the link between the fear of falling and depression. Policy makers and aged care professional practitioners should find these findings valuable in promoting activity to aid in the prevention of depression amongst the elderly population.

  8. Cochlear Damages Caused by Vibration Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Moussavi Najarkola, Seyyed Ali; Khavanin, Ali; Mirzaei, Ramazan; Salehnia, Mojdeh; MUHAMMADNEJAD, AHAD

    2013-01-01

    Background Many industrial devices have an excessive vibration which can affect human body systems. The effect of vibration on cochlear histology has been as a debatable problem in occupational health and medicine. Objectives Due to limitation present in human studies, the research was conducted to survey the influence of vibration on cochlear histology in an animal model. Materials and Methods Twelve albino rabbits were experimented as: Vibration group (n = 6; exposed to 1.0 m.s-2 r.m.s vert...

  9. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Keith S.; Hollon, Steven D.; Dimidjian, Sona; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert J.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2008-01-01

    This study followed treatment responders from a randomized controlled trial of adults with major depression. Patients treated with medication but withdrawn onto pill-placebo had more relapse through 1 year of follow-up compared to patients who received prior behavioral activation, prior cognitive therapy, or continued medication. Prior…

  10. Ototoxicity of paclitaxel in rat cochlear organotypic cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yang [Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan [Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Shi, Jian-rong [Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Salvi, Richard [Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Roth, Jerome A., E-mail: jaroth@buffalo.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used antineoplastic drug employed alone or in combination to treat many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel blocks microtubule depolymerization thereby stabilizing microtubules and suppressing cell proliferation and other cellular processes. Previous reports indicate that paclitaxel can cause mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and some histopathologic changes in the mouse cochlea; however, damage to the neurons and the underlying cell death mechanisms are poorly understood. To evaluate the ototoxicity of paclitaxel in more detail, cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal day 3 rats were treated with paclitaxel for 24 or 48 h with doses ranging from 1 to 30 μM. No obvious histopathologies were observed after 24 h treatment with any of the paclitaxel doses employed, but with 48 h treatment, paclitaxel damaged cochlear hair cells in a dose-dependent manner and also damaged auditory nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) near the base of the cochlea. TUNEL labeling was negative in the organ of Corti, but positive in SGN with karyorrhexis 48 h after 30 μM paclitaxel treatment. In addition, caspase-6, caspase-8 and caspase-9 labeling was present in SGN treated with 30 μM paclitaxel for 48 h. These results suggest that caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways are involved in paclitaxel-induced damage of SGN, but not hair cells in cochlea. - Highlights: • Paclitaxel was toxic to cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. • Paclitaxel-induced spiral ganglion degeneration was apoptotic. • Paclitaxel activated caspase-6, -8 and -8 in spiral ganglion neurons.

  11. Ototoxicity of paclitaxel in rat cochlear organotypic cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used antineoplastic drug employed alone or in combination to treat many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel blocks microtubule depolymerization thereby stabilizing microtubules and suppressing cell proliferation and other cellular processes. Previous reports indicate that paclitaxel can cause mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and some histopathologic changes in the mouse cochlea; however, damage to the neurons and the underlying cell death mechanisms are poorly understood. To evaluate the ototoxicity of paclitaxel in more detail, cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal day 3 rats were treated with paclitaxel for 24 or 48 h with doses ranging from 1 to 30 μM. No obvious histopathologies were observed after 24 h treatment with any of the paclitaxel doses employed, but with 48 h treatment, paclitaxel damaged cochlear hair cells in a dose-dependent manner and also damaged auditory nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) near the base of the cochlea. TUNEL labeling was negative in the organ of Corti, but positive in SGN with karyorrhexis 48 h after 30 μM paclitaxel treatment. In addition, caspase-6, caspase-8 and caspase-9 labeling was present in SGN treated with 30 μM paclitaxel for 48 h. These results suggest that caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways are involved in paclitaxel-induced damage of SGN, but not hair cells in cochlea. - Highlights: • Paclitaxel was toxic to cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. • Paclitaxel-induced spiral ganglion degeneration was apoptotic. • Paclitaxel activated caspase-6, -8 and -8 in spiral ganglion neurons

  12. "COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH INNER EAR MALFORMATIONS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Borghei S. Abdi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Performing cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformation has always been a matter of dispute. This study was designed to analyze the operative findings,complications, and postoperative performance of patients with inner ear anomalies who underwent cochlear implantation. Six patients with inner ear malformations underwent implantation in our academic tertiary referral center from 1997 to 2002. The average follow-up period was 27 months. Malformations included one incomplete partition, one common cavity, one narrow internal acoustic canal (IAC in a patient with Riley-Day syndrome and 3 cases of large vestibular aqueduct. All received multi-channel implants either Nucleus 22 or Clarion device. Facial nerve was anomalous in 2 cases. CSF gusher occurred in 4 patients, which was controlled with packing the cochleostomy site. In all cases, the full length of electrode array was inserted, except one with Mondini's dysplasia where insertion failed in the first operation and was referred to another center for a successful surgery on the opposite ear. No other surgical complications were encountered. In 4 cases, all the 22 electrodes could be activated. All patients showed improved hearing performance after implantation. Four showed open-set speech recognition. The one with narrow IAC showed improved awareness to environmental sounds. In the other case (common cavity, the perception tests could not be performed because of very young age. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformations is a successful way of rehabilitation, although complications should be expected and auditory responses may be highly variable and relatively moderate.

  13. [A new method for measuring central activation: fourier analysis of pupillary oscillations in depressed patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberger, J; Linzmayer, L; Grünberger, M; Saletu, B

    1994-01-01

    While the changes in pupillary size during wakefulness and drowsiness are easy to understand, the origin of pupillary oscillations is quite mysterious. Waves of spontaneous pupillary constriction and dilation accompany periods of increasing sleepiness and spontaneous arousal. Lowenstein et al. (1963) demonstrated that in the dark, the pupils of young normal alert subjects show waves of dilatation and contraction lasting from about 4 to 40 s and measuring up to 0.5 mm. Furthermore, superimposed fast and very extensive oscillations were observed. The first described oscillations seemed to reflect central nervous activation. Therefore we analysed pupillary oscillations during the recording period of static pupillometry (described by the authors in 1992) which lasted for 25.6 s. Before calculating the Fourier analysis, blinks have to be identified and eliminated by means of a new technique which is called "smoothing". Using the Fourier analysis, the spectrum was divided into 5 frequency bands (0.0-0.2; 0.21-0.4; 0.41-0.60; 0.61-0.8; 0.81-1 Hz). We were also interested in the total spectrum. In order to demonstrate utilisation of the new technique, 146 male and female depressed patients (ICD-Diagnosis 296.1, 296.3, 296.1, 296.3 + 300, respectively, 300.4, 301.1, 296.1, 296.3 + 290, respectively), aged between 18 and 45 years, were investigated by means of pupillometry, followed by analysis of pupillary oscillations. The whole group of depressive patients who received antidepressive medication was compared with 64 healthy subjects of similar age to demonstrate differences in the frequency bands.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8197747

  14. The relationship between postnatal depression, sociodemographic factors, levels of partner support, and levels of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam eSaligeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: postnatal depression (PND is defined as a psychological mood disorder that occurs in a mother within six weeks of her giving birth. It refers to an episode that causes mood disturbance and it could begin in, or extend into, the postpartum period. It is thought to have a high impact upon the mother’s health as well as the family’s functioning and the child’s development. Socio-demographic, psych-social, and physical activity factors may all contribute to postpartum mood and ability to cope with responsibilities. The primary aim of this study was to determine which of these factors predicted PND in postpartum women. A secondary aim was to identify the socio-demographic and psycho-social predictors of physical activity in postpartum women . Methods: The study used a cross-sectional correlational design. A sample of 150 postpartum women was sent a package of six standardised questionnaires. Results: There was no association between physical activity and PND; however, older mothers, mothers of younger children, mothers who are less reluctant to ask for help, and mothers who are more satisfied with the help they get experience lower levels of PND. Mothers of older babies, mothers with more children, and less educated mothers are more likely to engage in caregiving activities, whereas mothers with fewer children and higher levels of partner support are more likely to engage in occupational activities. None of the socio-demographic factors or any of the parenting factors predicted levels of sporting activity.

  15. A speech processing study using an acoustic model of a multiple-channel cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying

    1998-10-01

    A cochlear implant is an electronic device designed to provide sound information for adults and children who have bilateral profound hearing loss. The task of representing speech signals as electrical stimuli is central to the design and performance of cochlear implants. Studies have shown that the current speech- processing strategies provide significant benefits to cochlear implant users. However, the evaluation and development of speech-processing strategies have been complicated by hardware limitations and large variability in user performance. To alleviate these problems, an acoustic model of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy is implemented in this study, in which a set of acoustic stimuli whose psychophysical characteristics are as close as possible to those produced by a cochlear implant are presented on normal-hearing subjects. To test the effectiveness and feasibility of this acoustic model, a psychophysical experiment was conducted to match the performance of a normal-hearing listener using model- processed signals to that of a cochlear implant user. Good agreement was found between an implanted patient and an age-matched normal-hearing subject in a dynamic signal discrimination experiment, indicating that this acoustic model is a reasonably good approximation of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy. The acoustic model was then used to examine the potential of the SPEAK strategy in terms of its temporal and frequency encoding of speech. It was hypothesized that better temporal and frequency encoding of speech can be accomplished by higher stimulation rates and a larger number of activated channels. Vowel and consonant recognition tests were conducted on normal-hearing subjects using speech tokens processed by the acoustic model, with different combinations of stimulation rate and number of activated channels. The results showed that vowel recognition was best at 600 pps and 8 activated channels, but further increases in stimulation rate and

  16. NMDA-receptor activation but not ion flux is required for amyloid-beta induced synaptic depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tamburri

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease is characterized by a gradual decrease of synaptic function and, ultimately, by neuronal loss. There is considerable evidence supporting the involvement of oligomeric amyloid-beta (Aβ in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Historically, AD research has mainly focused on the long-term changes caused by Aβ rather than analyzing its immediate effects. Here we show that acute perfusion of hippocampal slice cultures with oligomeric Aβ depresses synaptic transmission within 20 minutes. This depression is dependent on synaptic stimulation and the activation of NMDA-receptors, but not on NMDA-receptor mediated ion flux. It, therefore, appears that Aβ dependent synaptic depression is mediated through a use-dependent metabotropic-like mechanism of the NMDA-receptor, but does not involve NMDA-receptor mediated synaptic transmission, i.e. it is independent of calcium flux through the NMDA-receptor.

  17. Structured pro-active care for chronic depression by practice nurses in primary care: a qualitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Bennett

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This qualitative study explored the impact and appropriateness of structured pro-active care reviews by practice nurses for patients with chronic or recurrent depression and dysthymia within the ProCEED trial. ProCEED (Pro-active Care and its Evaluation for Enduring Depression was a United Kingdom wide randomised controlled trial, comparing usual general practitioner care with structured 'pro-active care' which involved 3 monthly review appointments with practice nurses over 2 years for patients with chronic or recurrent depression. METHOD: In-depth interviews were completed with 41 participants: 26 patients receiving pro-active care and 15 practice nurses providing this care. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using a 'framework' approach. RESULTS: Patients perceived the practice nurses to be appropriate professionals to engage with regarding their depression and most nurses felt confident in a case management role. The development of a therapeutic alliance between the patient and nurse was central to this model and, where it appeared lacking, dissatisfaction was felt by both patients and nurses with a likely negative impact on outcomes. Patient and nurse factors impacting on the therapeutic alliance were identified and nurse typologies explored. DISCUSSION: Pro-active care reviews utilising practice nurses as case managers were found acceptable by the majority of patients and practice nurses and may be a suitable way to provide care for patients with long-term depression in primary care. Motivated and interested practice nurses could be an appropriate and valuable resource for this patient group. This has implications for resource decisions by clinicians and commissioners within primary care.

  18. Brain activation predicts treatment improvement in patients with major depressive disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samson, Andrea C

    2012-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with alterations in brain function that might be useful for therapy evaluation. The current study aimed to identify predictors for therapy improvement and to track functional brain changes during therapy. Twenty-one drug-free patients with MDD underwent functional MRI twice during performance of an emotional perception task: once before and once after 4 weeks of antidepressant treatment (mirtazapine or venlafaxine). Twelve healthy controls were investigated once with the same methods. A significant difference between groups was a relative greater activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in the patients vs. controls. Before treatment, patients responding better to pharmacological treatment showed greater activation in the dorsomedial PFC (dmPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (pCC) and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) when viewing of negative emotional pictures was compared with the resting condition. Activations in the caudate nucleus and insula contrasted for emotional compared to neutral stimuli were also associated with successful treatment. Responders had also significantly higher levels of activation, compared to non-responders, in a range of other brain regions. Brain activation related to treatment success might be related to altered self-referential processes and a differential response to external emotional stimuli, suggesting differences in the processing of emotionally salient stimuli between those who are likely to respond to pharmacological treatment and those who will not. The present investigation suggests the pCC, dmPFC, SFG, caudate nucleus and insula may have a key role as a biological marker for treatment response and predictor for therapeutic success.

  19. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase by Antidepressants Counteracts Stress-Induced Activation of P38-Kinase in Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Grassmé

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Major depressive disorder is a common disease with serious morbidity, including increased risk of death from suicide. Major depressive disorder is treated with antidepressants. However, the molecular targets of antidepressants remained ill-defined and require further elucidation. Methods: Mice were treated with corticosterone to induce stress, amitriptyline and the p38-kinase (p38K inhibitor SB239063 or a combination of these drugs. Phosphorylation of p38K in hippocampal neurons was determined by immunostaining with a phospho-specific antibody, neuronal proliferation using BrdU-labelling and behaviour employing a set of behavioural tests. Results: Corticosterone induced phosphorylation/activation of p38K in the hippocampus in vivo. Antidepressants reversed the effect of corticosterone on p38K activation in wildtype mice, but had no effect in acid sphingomyelinase-deficient animals. Corticosterone also reduced neurogenesis and triggered depression-like behavioural changes, effects that were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of p38K. Conclusion: Stress induces p38K phosphorylation/activation in the hippocampus and thereby reduces neurogenesis and induces depression-like symptoms, events that are prevented by antidepressants via inhibition of the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system.

  20. Tobacco Use Experimentation, Physical Activity, and Risk of Depression among Multiethnic Urban Preadolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Cassandra A.; Highland, Krista B.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2016-01-01

    Children with low socioeconomic status and ethnic minorities experience disproportionate risk of elevated depressive symptoms. This study examines the effects of risk/protective factors for depressive symptoms among multiethnic urban preadolescents. Eighth graders (N = 463; 34% African American, 29% Hispanic, 17% White, and 20% Other/Mixed; 23%…

  1. Expanding Behavioral Activation to Depressed Adolescents: Lessons Learned in Treatment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Elizabeth; Schloredt, Kelly; Gudmundsen, Gretchen; Martell, Christopher; Dimidjian, Sona

    2011-01-01

    Depression during adolescence represents a significant public health concern. It is estimated that up to 20% of adolescents experience an episode of depression that interferes with academic and social functioning and is associated with an increased risk for self-harm. Although significant progress has been made in the last decade in treating…

  2. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Depression: Description and Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Baruch, David E.; Gaynor, Scott T.

    2006-01-01

    The field of clinical behavior analysis is growing rapidly and has the potential to affect and transform mainstream cognitive behavior therapy. To have such an impact, the field must provide a formulation of and intervention strategies for clinical depression, the "common cold" of outpatient populations. Two treatments for depression have emerged:…

  3. Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conjugate vaccine=MenACWY Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants Recommend on Facebook ... cochlear implants are more likely to get bacterial meningitis than children without cochlear implants. In addition, some ...

  4. The Impact of Comorbid Clinical Depression on The Health-Related Quality of Life of Adults on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Maiduguri, Northeastern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Abdu Wakawa; Jidda Mohammed Said; Wakil Musa Abba; Saleh Shehu; Isa Bukar Rabbebe; Omeiza Beida

    2014-01-01

    Background: Globally, depression compromises the quality of life (QOL) of people suffering from it. We assessed the impact of comorbid depression on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in northeastern Nigeria in this study. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and three adults on HAART were recruited for this study from the ART clinic of the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital in northeastern Nigeria. The depressive disord...

  5. Listening Effort with Cochlear Implant Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Baskent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Fitting a cochlear implant (CI) for optimal speech perception does not necessarily optimize listening effort. This study aimed to show that listening effort may change between CI processing conditions for which speech intelligibility remains constant. Method: Nineteen normal-hearing participants listened to CI simulations with varying…

  6. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Lu; Juan Huang; Fan-Gang Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to

  7. The management of cochlear nerve deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S R; Stivaros, S M; Ramsden, R T; O'Driscoll, M P; Nichani, J R; Bruce, I A; Green, K M; Henderson, L A; Rutherford, S A; King, A T; Lloyd, S K

    2013-11-01

    The assessment process is critical in deciding whether a profoundly deaf child with cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) will be suitable for a cochlear or auditory brainstem implant (ABI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using submillimetric T2 weighted gradient echo or turbo spin echo sequences is mandatory for all profoundly deaf children to diagnose CND. Evidence of audition on behavioural or electrophysiological tests following both auditory and electrical stimulation sometimes allows identification of significant auditory tissue not visible on MRI. In particular electric auditory brainstem response (EABR) testing may allow some quantification of auditory tissue and help decide whether a cochlear implant will be beneficial. Age and cognitive development are the most critical factors in determining ABI benefit. Hearing outcomes from both cochlear implants and ABIs are variable and likely to be limited in children with CND. A proportion of children will get no benefit. Usually the implants would be expected to provide recognition of environmental sounds and understanding of simple phonetics. Most children will not develop normal speech and they will often need to learn to communicate with sign language. The ABI involves a major neurosurgical procedure and at present the long term outcomes are unknown. It is therefore essential that parents who are considering this intervention have plenty of time to consider all aspects and the opportunity for in depth discussion. PMID:24533760

  8. Simplifying cochlear implant speech processor fitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willeboer, C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional fittings of the speech processor of a cochlear implant (CI) rely to a large extent on the implant recipient's subjective responses. For each of the 22 intracochlear electrodes the recipient has to indicate the threshold level (T-level) and comfortable loudness level (C-level) while stim

  9. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  10. Cochlear implants: our experience and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins, Mariane Barreto Brandão

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cochlear Implants are important for individuals with severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Objective: Evaluate the experience of cochlear implant center of Otorhinolaryngology through the analysis of records of 9 patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective study performed with the patients records. Number 0191.0.107.000-11 ethics committee approval. We evaluated gender, etiology, age at surgery, duration of deafness, classification of deafness, unilateral or bilateral surgery, intraoperative and postoperative neural response and impedance of the electrodes in intraoperative and preoperative tests and found those that counter-indicated surgery. Results: There were 6 pediatric and 3 adult patients. Four male and 5 female. Etiologies: maternal rubella, cytomegalovirus, ototoxicity, meningitis, and sudden deafness. The age at surgery and duration of deafness ranged from 2 - 46 years and 2 - 18 years, respectively. Seven patients were pre-lingual. All had profound bilateral PA. There were 7 bilateral implants. Intraoperative complications: hemorrhage. Complications after surgery: vertigo and internal device failure. In 7 patients the electrodes were implanted through. Telemetry showed satisfactory neural response and impedance. CT and MRI was performed in all patients. We found enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct in a patient and incudomalleolar malformation. Conclusion: The cochlear implant as a form of auditory rehabilitation is well established and spreading to different centers specialized in otoaudiology. Thus, the need for structured services and trained professionals in this type of procedure is clear.

  11. Depression - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blues; Gloom; Sadness; Melancholy ... depression . The main types of depression include: Major depression . It occurs when feelings of sadness, loss, anger, or frustration interfere with daily life ...

  12. Allele-specific programming of Npy and epigenetic effects of physical activity in a genetic model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melas, P A; Lennartsson, A; Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, H; Wei, Y; Åberg, E; Werme, M; Rogdaki, M; Mannervik, M; Wegener, G; Brené, S; Mathé, A A; Lavebratt, C

    2013-05-07

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been implicated in depression, emotional processing and stress response. Part of this evidence originates from human single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) studies. In the present study, we report that a SNP in the rat Npy promoter (C/T; rs105431668) affects in vitro transcription and DNA-protein interactions. Genotyping studies showed that the C-allele of rs105431668 is present in a genetic rat model of depression (Flinders sensitive line; FSL), while the SNP's T-allele is present in its controls (Flinders resistant line; FRL). In vivo experiments revealed binding of a transcription factor (CREB2) and a histone acetyltransferase (Ep300) only at the SNP locus of the FRL. Accordingly, the FRL had increased hippocampal levels of Npy mRNA and H3K18 acetylation; a gene-activating histone modification maintained by Ep300. Next, based on previous studies showing antidepressant-like effects of physical activity in the FSL, we hypothesized that physical activity may affect Npy's epigenetic status. In line with this assumption, physical activity was associated with increased levels of Npy mRNA and H3K18 acetylation. Physical activity was also associated with reduced mRNA levels of a histone deacetylase (Hdac5). Conclusively, the rat rs105431668 appears to be a functional Npy SNP that may underlie depression-like characteristics. In addition, the achieved epigenetic reprogramming of Npy provides molecular support for the putative effectiveness of physical activity as a non-pharmacological antidepressant.

  13. Assessment of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimichalis, Michail; Sim, Jae Hoon; Huber, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the functional results of a new, active, acoustic-mechanical hearing implant, the Direct Acoustic Cochlear Stimulation Partial Implant (DACS PI), in a preclinical study. The DACS PI is an electromagnetic device fixed to the mastoid by screws and coupled to a standard stapes prosthesis by an artificial incus (AI). The function of the DACS PI-aided reconstruction was assessed by determining: (1) the maximum equivalent sound pressure level (SPL) of the implant, which was obtained from measurements of the volume displacement at the round window in normal and implanted ears, and (2) the quality at the coupling interface between the AI of the DACS and the stapes prosthesis, which was quantified from measurements of relative motions between the AI and the prosthesis. Both measurements were performed with fresh temporal bones using a scanning laser Doppler interferometry system. The expected maximum equivalent SPL with a typical driving voltage of 0.3 V was about 115-125 dB SPL up to 1.5 kHz in reconstruction with the DACS PI, and decreased with a roll-off slope of about 65 dB/decade, reaching 90 dB SPL at 8 kHz. The large roll-off relative to a normal ear was presumed to be a relatively high inductive impedance of the coil of the DACS PI actuator at higher frequencies. Good coupling quality between the AI and the prosthesis was achieved below the resonance (∼1.5 kHz) of the DACS PI for all tested stapes prostheses. Above the resonance, the SMart Piston, which is composed of a shape-memory alloy, had the best coupling quality.

  14. Effects of Delayed Second Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Rui-ming; WU Xi-hong; JANG Zi-gang; JING Yuan-yuan; LIN Yun-juan; YU Li-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective Since Helms' successful bilateral cochlear implantation with good results in 1996, there have been increasing number of reports on bilateral cochlear implantation. Most second device have been implantated within one year after the first. Considering effects of long time auditory deprivation, it is not clear whether a delayed second cochlear implant serves to add additional benefits and how it may interact with central nervous system plasticity. Methods Three cases who received delayed second cochlear implants at People's Hospital of Peking University from 2002 to 2005 were reviewed. The interval between the first and second implants was longer than 2 years in all three patients. Sound perception, and unilateral/bilateral speech discrimination in quiet and noise were evaluated. In addition, GAP detection test was conducted in one patient. Results In one case,having both implants on provided improved performance compared to using only one implant both in quiet and noise. Presumably due to visual interference from lip-reading or short interval between second implant and testing,one patient showed no improvement from using the second implant either in quiet or noise, while the last case demonstrated additional benefits from the second implant only in quiet. In all three patients, performance in recognizing the four tones in Mandarin was superior over word recognition. Conclusions Considerable plasticity in the cerebral auditory center is preserved, despite long acoustic deprivation in some children who have received unilateral cochlear implant. Delayed second implants can result in significant improvements in some of these children. Visual interference from lip-reading may be an obstacle during retraining. The better recognition of tones in the Mandarin language may represent a different sound discrimination mechanism in the auditory system,although it may also be related to the signal processing mechanisms of the implant used (MED-EL COMBI 40+).

  15. Restoration of post-activation depression of the H-reflex by treadmill exercise in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of aging and chronic physical activity on the postactivation depression of the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex). The maximal amplitude H wave/maximal amplitude M wave ratio was measured, and the rate-sensitive depression of the H-reflex was assessed. Measurements were performed on sedentary rats aged of 3, 6, 12, and 20 months and on animals aged of 12 and 20 months performing an incremental treadmill exercise protocol during the last eight weeks preceding the recordings. At the end of the experiment, the muscle mass and/or body mass ratio was calculated. Results indicated that the H-reflex depression of the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were present until age of 6 and 12 months, respectively. For the tibialis anterior muscle, results also pointed out a decrease in the relative muscle mass with age and that the exercise allowed to restore the rate-sensitive depression of the H-reflex and to increase the relative muscle mass in comparison with sedentary animals. These findings clearly demonstrate that neural alteration of the spinal cord is prevented by activity in aged rats. PMID:27143422

  16. The Effect of Reminiscence Therapy on Cognition, Depression, and Activities of Daily Living for Patients With Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru Aşiret, Güler; Kapucu, Sevgisun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was, conducted with experimental design, to investigate the effect of reminiscence therapy on cognition, depression, activities of daily living of institutionalized mild and moderate Alzheimer patients. The study was conducted with a total of 62 patients (31 intervention group and 31 control group) in four home care in Ankara, Turkey. Study was done between the July 1, 2013 and December 20, 2014. Reminiscence therapy sessions were held with groups consists of 4-5 patients, once a week with 30-35 minute duration for 12 weeks. Standardized Mini Mental Test was used in sample selection. Patients were listed through their mini mental test scores, and randomized as odd numbers to control group and even numbers to intervention group. Data were collected with forms developed by researcher 'Data Sheet' and 'Activities of Daily Living Follow-up Form' as well as scales 'Standardized Mini Mental Test' and 'Geriatric Depression Scale'. Chi-square, Mann Whitney-U test, variance analyses in repeated measures and Bonferroni tests were used for analysis. The increase in mean Standardized Mini Mental Test score and the decrease in mean Geriatric Depression Scale score of the individuals in the intervention group compared to the control group at the end of the reminiscence therapy was statistically significant (P < 0.05). At the end of reminiscence therapy sessions, increase in cognition and decrease in depression were found statistically significant in intervention group.

  17. Individualized and clinically derived stimuli activate limbic structures in depression: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Kessler

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In the search for neurobiological correlates of depression, a major finding is hyperactivity in limbic-paralimbic regions. However, results so far have been inconsistent, and the stimuli used are often unspecific to depression. This study explored hemodynamic responses of the brain in patients with depression while processing individualized and clinically derived stimuli. METHODS: Eighteen unmedicated patients with recurrent major depressive disorder and 17 never-depressed control subjects took part in standardized clinical interviews from which individualized formulations of core interpersonal dysfunction were derived. In the patient group such formulations reflected core themes relating to the onset and maintenance of depression. In controls, formulations reflected a major source of distress. This material was thereafter presented to subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI assessment. RESULTS: Increased hemodynamic responses in the anterior cingulate cortex, medial frontal gyrus, fusiform gyrus and occipital lobe were observed in both patients and controls when viewing individualized stimuli. Relative to control subjects, patients with depression showed increased hemodynamic responses in limbic-paralimbic and subcortical regions (e.g. amygdala and basal ganglia but no signal decrease in prefrontal regions. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first evidence that individualized stimuli derived from standardized clinical interviewing can lead to hemodynamic responses in regions associated with self-referential and emotional processing in both groups and limbic-paralimbic and subcortical structures in individuals with depression. Although the regions with increased responses in patients have been previously reported, this study enhances the ecological value of fMRI findings by applying stimuli that are of personal relevance to each individual's depression.

  18. Modeling and segmentation of intra-cochlear anatomy in conventional CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Jack H.; Rutherford, Robert B.; Labadie, Robert F.; Majdani, Omid; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2010-03-01

    Cochlear implant surgery is a procedure performed to treat profound hearing loss. Since the cochlea is not visible in surgery, the physician uses anatomical landmarks to estimate the pose of the cochlea. Research has indicated that implanting the electrode in a particular cavity of the cochlea, the scala tympani, results in better hearing restoration. The success of the scala tympani implantation is largely dependent on the point of entry and angle of electrode insertion. Errors can occur due to the imprecise nature of landmark-based, manual navigation as well as inter-patient variations between scala tympani and the anatomical landmarks. In this work, we use point distribution models of the intra-cochlear anatomy to study the inter-patient variations between the cochlea and the typical anatomic landmarks, and we implement an active shape model technique to automatically localize intra-cochlear anatomy in conventional CT images, where intra-cochlear structures are not visible. This fully automatic segmentation could aid the surgeon to choose the point of entry and angle of approach to maximize the likelihood of scala tympani insertion, resulting in more substantial hearing restoration.

  19. Inverse Effects of Oxytocin on Attributing Mental Activity to Others in Depressed and Healthy Subjects: A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pincus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxytocin is a stress-attenuating and pro-social neuropeptide. To date, no study has looked at the effects of oxytocin in modulating brain activity in depressed individuals nor attempted to correlate this activity with attribution of mental activity in others. Method: We enrolled 10 unmedicated depressed adults and 10 matched healthy controls in a crossover, double blind placebo controlled fmri 40 i.u. intra-nasal oxytocin study (20 i.u. per nostril. Each subject performed Reading the Mind in the Eyes task (RMET before and after inhalation of oxytocin or placebo control for a total of 80 scans. Results: Before oxytocin administration, RMET engaged medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula and associative areas. Depressed subjects showed increased anterior ventral activation for the RMET minus gender identification contrast whereas matched controls showed increased dorsal and frontal activity. Compared to placebo, oxytocin in depressed subjects showed increased activity in the superior middle frontal gyrus and insula, while controls exhibited more activity in ventral regions. Oxytocin also led to inverse effects in reaction times on attribution task between groups, with controls getting faster and depressed individuals slower to respond. Conclusion: Depression is associated with increased paralimbic activity during emotional mental attribution of others, appearing to be distinctly modulated by oxytocin when compared to healthy controls. Further studies are needed to explore long-term exposure to pro-social neuropeptides on mood in depressed populations and assess their clinical relevance.

  20. Electrokinetic shape changes of cochlear outer hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachar, Bechara; Brownell, William E.; Altschuler, Richard; Fex, Jörgen

    1986-07-01

    Rapid mechanical changes have been associated with electrical activity in a variety of non-muscle excitable cells1-5. Recently, mechanical changes have been reported in cochlear hair cells6-8. Here we describe electrically evoked mechanical changes in isolated cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) with characteristics which suggest that direct electrokinetic phenomena are implicated in the response. OHCs make up one of two mechanosensitive hair cell populations in the mammalian cochlea; their role may be to modulate the micromechanical properties of the hearing organ through mechanical feedback mechanisms6-10. In the experiments described here, we applied sinusoidally modulated electrical potentials across isolated OHCs; this produced oscillatory elongation and shortening of the cells and oscillatory displacements of intracellular organdies. The movements were a function of the direction and strength of the electrical field, were inversely related to the ionic concentration of the medium, and occurred in the presence of metabolic uncouplers. The cylindrical shape of the OHCs and the presence of a system of membranes within the cytoplasm-laminated cisternae11-may provide the anatomical substrate for electrokinetic phenomena such as electro-osmosis12,13.

  1. Method of treating depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Fritz

    2012-01-24

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  2. Relative roles of different mechanisms of depression at the mouse endbulb of Held

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hua; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Several mechanisms can underlie short-term synaptic depression, including vesicle depletion, receptor desensitization, and changes in presynaptic release probability. To determine which mechanisms affect depression under physiological conditions, we studied the synapse formed by auditory nerve fibers onto bushy cells in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (the “endbulb of Held”) using voltage-clamp recordings of brain slices from P15–21 mice near physiological temperatures. Depression of both ...

  3. Experiences of a guided smartphone-based behavioral activation therapy for depression: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien Hoa Ly

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a number of studies have investigated treatments administered via smartphones showing that this treatment format has a potential to be effective. However, we still have limited knowledge of how patients experience this treatment format. The objective of this study was to explore participants' views of a smartphone-based behavioral activation treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 strategically (participants with different overall experiences selected participants, suffering from major depression according to the DSM-IV. The interview data were processed with the aid of thematic analysis. The analysis generated the three main themes: Commitment, Treatment and Lack of important components, with attached subthemes. In conclusion, the findings from the current study correspond with existing knowledge in the field of internet-based treatment. Considering that this kind of treatment is still quite new, the need for further research and development is considerable. Nevertheless, its availability, assimilation into users' everyday lives and possible motivational qualities speak of its potential.

  4. Synaptophysin 1 Clears Synaptobrevin 2 from the Presynaptic Active Zone to Prevent Short-Term Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajit Rajappa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Release site clearance is an important process during synaptic vesicle (SV recycling. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism. Here we identify self-assembly of exocytosed Synaptobrevin 2 (Syb2 and Synaptophysin 1 (Syp1 by homo- and hetero-oligomerization into clusters as key mechanisms mediating release site clearance for preventing cis-SNARE complex formation at the active zone (AZ. In hippocampal neurons from Syp1 knockout mice, neurons expressing a monomeric Syb2 mutant, or after acute block of the ATPase N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF, responsible for cis-SNARE complex disassembly, we found strong frequency-dependent short-term depression (STD, whereas retrieval of Syb2 by compensatory endocytosis was only affected weakly. Defects in Syb2 endocytosis were stimulus- and frequency-dependent, indicating that Syp1 is not essential for Syb2 retrieval, but for its efficient clearance upstream of endocytosis. Our findings identify an SV protein as a release site clearance factor.

  5. Addition of exogenous NAD+ prevents mefloquine-induced neuroaxonal and hair cell degeneration through reduction of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in cochlear organotypic cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalian Ding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mefloquine is widely used for the treatment of malaria. However, this drug is known to induce neurological side effects including depression, anxiety, balance disorder, and sensorineural hearing loss. Yet, there is currently no treatment for these side effects. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we show that the coenzyme NAD(+, known to play a critical role in maintaining the appropriate cellular redox environment, protects cochlear axons and sensory hair cells from mefloquine-induced degeneration in cultured rat cochleae. Mefloquine alone destroyed hair cells and nerve fiber axons in rat cochlear organotypics cultures in a dose-dependent manner, while treatment with NAD(+ protected axons and hair cells from mefloquine-induced degeneration. Furthermore, cochlear organs treated with mefloquine showed increased oxidative stress marker levels, including superoxide and protein carbonyl, and increased apoptosis marker levels, including TUNEL-positive nuclei and caspases-3. Treatment with NAD(+ reduced the levels of these oxidative stress and apoptosis markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings suggest that that mefloquine disrupts the cellular redox environment and induces oxidative stress in cochlear hair cells and nerve fibers leading to caspases-3-mediated apoptosis of these structures. Exogenous NAD(+ suppresses mefloquine-induced oxidative stress and prevents the degeneration of cochlear axons and sensory hair cells caused by mefloquine treatment.

  6. Platelet activating factors are associated with depressive symptoms in coronary artery disease patients: a hypothesis-generating study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazereeuw G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Graham Mazereeuw,1,2,4 Nathan Herrmann,1,5 Hongbin Xu,3,4 Alexandre P Blanchard,3,4 Daniel Figeys,3,4 Paul I Oh,6 Steffany AL Bennett,3,4 Krista L Lanctôt1,2,4–61Hurvitz Brain Sciences Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Ottawa Institute of Systems Biology and Neural Regeneration Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 4CIHR  Training Program in Neurodegenerative Lipidomics, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 6UHN Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, ON, CanadaIntroduction: Depression is a frequent complication of coronary artery disease (CAD with an unknown etiology. Platelet activating factor (PAF lipids, which are associated with CAD, have recently been linked with novel proposed etiopathological mechanisms for depression such as inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and vascular endothelial dysfunction.Methods and results: This hypothesis-generating study investigated the relationships between various PAF species and depressive symptoms in 26 CAD patients (age: 60.6±9.2 years, 69% male, mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAM-D] score: 11.8±5.2, HAM-D range: 3–20. Plasma PAF analyses were performed using high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in precursor ion scan. Significant associations between depressive symptom severity (HAM-D score and a greater plasma abundance of the PAFs phosphocholine (PC PC(O-12:0/2:0 (r=0.49, P=0.01, PC(O-14:1/2:0 (r=0.43, P=0.03, PC(O-17:3/2:0 (r=0.44, P=0.04, and PC(O-18:3/2:0 (r=0.50, P=0.01 were observed. Associations between those PAFs and HAM-D score persisted after adjusting for age and sex.Conclusion: These

  7. A web delivered intervention for depression combining Behavioural Activation with physical activity promotion: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey David Lambert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity (PA yields moderate effect sizes for treating depression (Cooney et al., 2013. PA may also help reduce depressive relapse, providing additional psychological benefits such as positive self-regard and a sense of competence (Babyak et al., 2000. Behavioural Activation (BA is an evidence-based psychological therapy for depression, which aims to get people more engaged with activities that provide positive reinforcement for non-depressed behaviours (Hopko, Lejuez, LePage, Hopko, & McNeil, 2003. The structured nature of BA is consistent with the use of good behaviour change techniques (specific goal-setting, self-regulation offering a potential platform for promoting PA alongside depression treatment. BA may also be useful for gradually increasing PA in people who are more sedentary than the general population. Aims: This pilot randomised controlled trial aims to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and fidelity of a web-delivered intervention combining BA and PA (eBAcPAc to enhance mental and physical health, and assess the trial methods. Method: A community sample of 120 people exhibiting symptoms of depression and who are participating in less than 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week will be randomized to receive eBAcPAc or be put on a wait list control group. eBAcPAc is informed by previous work (Farrand et al., 2014; Pentecost et al., 2015 and further developed using the Centre for eHealth Research and Disease management Roadmap (CeHReS (van Gemert-Pijnen et al., 2011 in order to be applied in an web-based setting. A platform hosted by the University of Glasgow which has been used to deliver a wide range of successful web-delivered interventions for mental health, will be used to deliver eBAcPAc. Feasibility measures will include data on recruitment, attrition and acceptability. Pre-post outcome measures will include the PHQ-9, and self-reported and accelerometer measured PA. Process and

  8. Factors contributing to communication skills development in cochlear implanted children

    OpenAIRE

    Ostojić Sanja; Đoković Sanja; Radić-Šestić Marina; Nikolić Mina; Mikić Branka; Mirić Danica

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim. Over the last 10 years more than 300 persons received cochlear implant in Serbia and more than 90% of the recipients were children under 10 years of age. The program of cochlear implantation includes postoperative rehabilitation in which cognitive, integrative and developmental methods are used. The study was conducted to reveal factors affecting communication performance (CP) of cochlear implanted (CI) children. Special attention was focuse...

  9. Prelingual deafness: Benefits from cochlear implants versus conventional hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Torre, Ana Adelina Giantomassi Della; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens de

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The majority of patients with hearing loss, including those with severe hearing loss, benefits from the use of hearing aids. The cochlear implant is believed to achieve better results in a child with hearing loss in cases where the severity of disability renders hearing aids incapable of providing adequate sound information, as they require sufficient cochlear reserve so that acoustic detention occurs. Objective: To assess if cochlear implants provide more benefit than c...

  10. Investigations of prosody perception by adult cochlear implant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, David Jackson

    -synthesized speech to investigate the perceptual abilities of adult cochlear implant listeners in Danish and Swedish language settings. These studies examine performance relationships between prosody and other indexes of speech perception, including common clinical measurements.Results shed light on inherent device...... limitations and speech perception via an electrical-neural interface. This thesis is relevant to auditory rehabilitation, cochlear implant candidacy issues and sound processing in cochlear implants....

  11. Single and Multiple Microphone Noise Reduction Strategies in Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi; Friedland, David R.

    2012-01-01

    To restore hearing sensation, cochlear implants deliver electrical pulses to the auditory nerve by relying on sophisticated signal processing algorithms that convert acoustic inputs to electrical stimuli. Although individuals fitted with cochlear implants perform well in quiet, in the presence of background noise, the speech intelligibility of cochlear implant listeners is more susceptible to background noise than that of normal hearing listeners. Traditionally, to increase performance in noi...

  12. Activation of orexin neurons in dorsomedial/perifornical hypothalamus and antidepressant reversal in a rodent model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, Mathieu; Gaillard, Philippe; Minier, Frédéric; Tanti, Arnaud; Belzung, Catherine; Leman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Chronic stressful life events are risk factors for depression often accompanied by homeostatic disturbances. Hypothalamic neuropeptides, such as orexins (OXs) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), are involved in regulation of several autonomic functions that are altered in depression. However, little is known about the link between orexinergic or MCH-ergic systems and depression. Using double immunohistochemical labeling for OX- or MCH-containing neurons and Fos protein, we studied the effects of a chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant treatment (fluoxetine) on the OX and MCH neuronal activation in mice exposed to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS), a rodent model of depression. Western blot was also performed to assess OX and MCH receptor expression in various brain areas. Finally, almorexant, a dual OX receptor antagonist, was assessed in the tail suspension test. UCMS induced physical and behavioral disturbances in mice reversed by 6-week fluoxetine treatment. Orexinergic neurons were more activated in the dorsomedial and perifornical hypothalamic area (DMH-PFA) of UCMS-subjected mice compared to the lateral hypothalamus (LH), and this increase was reversed by 6-week fluoxetine treatment. UCMS also reduced expression of OX-receptor 2 in the thalamus and hypothalamus, but not in animals chronically treated with fluoxetine. MCH neurons were neither affected by UCMS nor by antidepressant treatment, while UCMS modulated MCH receptor 1 expression in thalamus and hippocampus. Finally, chronic but not acute administration of almorexant, induced antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test. These data suggest that OX neurons in the DMH-PFA and MCH-ergic system may contribute to the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. PMID:21530551

  13. The role of daily mobility in mental health inequalities: the interactive influence of activity space and neighbourhood of residence on depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Julie; Cadot, Emmanuelle; Roustit, Christelle; Parizot, Isabelle; Chauvin, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    The literature reports an association between neighbourhood deprivation and individual depression after adjustment for individual factors. The present paper investigates whether vulnerability to neighbourhood features is influenced by individual "activity space" (i.e., the space within which people move about or travel in the course of their daily activities). It can be assumed that a deprived residential environment can exert a stronger influence on the mental health of people whose activity space is limited to their neighbourhood of residence, since their exposure to their neighbourhood would be greater. Moreover, we studied the relationship between activity space size and depression. A limited activity space could indeed reflect spatial and social confinement and thus be associated with a higher risk of being depressed, or, conversely, it could be linked to a deep attachment to the neighbourhood of residence and thus be associated with a lower risk of being depressed. Multilevel logistic regression analyses of a representative sample consisting of 3011 inhabitants surveyed in 2005 in the Paris, France metropolitan area and nested within 50 census blocks showed, after adjusting for individual-level variables, that people living in deprived neighbourhoods were significantly more depressed that those living in more advantaged neighbourhoods. We also observed a statistically significant cross-level interaction between activity space and neighbourhood deprivation, as they relate to depression. Living in a deprived neighbourhood had a stronger and statistically significant effect on depression in people whose activity space was limited to their neighbourhood than in those whose daily travels extended beyond it. In addition, a limited activity space appeared to be a protective factor with regard to depression for people living in advantaged neighbourhoods and a risk factor for those living in deprived neighbourhoods. It could therefore be useful to take activity space

  14. Reduction in delta activity predicted improved negative affect in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Philip; Goldschmied, Jennifer; Casement, Melynda; Kim, Hyang Sook; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne; Deldin, Patricia

    2015-08-30

    While prior research has demonstrated a paradoxical antidepressant effect of slow-wave disruption (SWD), the specific dimensions of depression affected is still unclear. The current study aimed to extend this research by utilizing a dimensional approach in examining the antidepressant effects of SWD. Of particular interest is the affective dimension, as negative affect in depression is arguably the most salient characteristic of depression. This sample included 16 individuals with depression (10 female) recruited from the community. Participants slept in the lab for three nights (adaptation, baseline night, and SWD) with polysomnography, and completed measures of negative affect and depression severity the following morning. Results show that reduction in delta power was linearly associated with improved negative affect. Comparison of individual change scores revealed that half of the individuals showed improved negative affect, which is comparable to the reported 40-60% antidepressant response rate to sleep deprivation. Results suggest that vulnerability in the sleep homeostatic system may be a contributing individual differences factor in response to slow-wave disruption in depression. PMID:26123231

  15. Behavioural activation for the treatment of low-income, African American adolescents with major depressive disorder: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Maryann; Keeley, Mary L; Ritschel, Lorie; Craighead, W Edward

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural activation (BA) is a psychosocial treatment that has shown promise in the treatment of adults suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent studies have shown that BA may also be effective for treating depressed adolescents. There are no studies that have reported on the BA treatment of depressed and low-income African American adolescents; thus, the current study reports on the effectiveness of a version of BA adapted for the treatment of African American adolescents who were diagnosed with MDD (n = 3). Participants were allowed to attend a maximum of 17 sessions of weekly psychotherapy. Based on results taken from structured interviews, two of the three participants no longer met criteria for MDD at the end of treatment, and the severity of clinician-rated depressive symptoms and impairment decreased for all participants at post-treatment assessment. Additionally, all participants and their caregivers reported satisfaction with treatment. Implications of these findings, study limitations and suggestions for future directions are discussed.

  16. Cochlear implantation and change in quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Christian; Grøntved, Ågot Møller

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in adults and to evaluate the average implant usage per day. Ten profoundly deaf adults were implanted during the period April 1994 to September 1997. The patients answered questionnaires 1 year or more after receiving...... their cochlear implants. All of the patients used their implant daily. The average implant usage per day was 16 h. The patients stated that, given the choice, they would again opt for a cochlear implant and would recommend a cochlear implant for a deaf friend. A paired comparison showed that the implants led...

  17. Evaluation of anti-depressant and anxiolytic activity of Rasayana Ghana Tablet (A compound Ayurvedic formulation) in albino mice

    OpenAIRE

    Deole, Yogesh S.; Chavan, Sulakshan S.; Ashok, B. K.; Ravishankar, B.; Thakar, A.B.; Chandola, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, many Ayurvedic formulations are being researched to provide an effective antidepressant and anxiolytic drug in the field of psycho-pharmacology. The present study was planned to evaluate the anti-depressant and anxiolytic activity of Rasayana Ghana Tablet comprising three herbs Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia Miers), Aamalaki (Emblica officinalis Garten) (RGT) and Gokshura (Tribulus terrestris Linn). Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups of six animals each, comprisin...

  18. Recreational Physical Activity Ameliorates Some of the Negative Impact of Major Depression on Health-Related Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    ScottBurtonPatten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Major depressive episodes (MDEs) have a negative effect on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The objective of this study was to determine whether recreational physical activity can ameliorate some of this negative impact. Methods: The data source for the study was the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS). The NPHS is a longitudinal study that has collected data from a representative cohort of 15,254 community residents. Sixteen years of follow-up data are ...

  19. The effect of depression and adherence in a dietary and physical activity intervention for overweight and obese adults

    OpenAIRE

    Abascal, Liana B.

    2008-01-01

    Overweight and obesity result in serious medical, economic, and psychological consequences. A better understanding of factors that lead to successful weight loss treatment is needed, including mediators and moderators of treatment effects. This study investigated the effect of depression on adherence to a dietary and physical activity behavior change intervention in a sample of overweight and obese men and women. The PACEi Men in Motion (n=441) and Women in Balance (n=401) on-line interventio...

  20. Improving physical quality of life with group physical activity in the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannu Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to compare the change in quality of life over 32 weeks in depressed women assuming antidepressant drug with (experimental group or without (control group physical exercise from a study which results on objective dimension of outcome were already published. Methods Trial with randomized naturalistic control. Patients selected from the clinical activity registries of a Psychiatric University Unit. Inclusion criteria: female, between 40 and 60 years, diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorders (MMD, DSM-IV TR resistant to ongoing treatment. Exclusion criteria: diagnosis of psychotic disorders; any contraindications to physical activity. 30 patients (71.4% of the eligible participated to the study. Cases: 10 randomized patients undergoing pharmacological treatment plus physical activity. Controls: 20 patients undergoing only pharmacological therapy. Quality of life was measured by means of WHOQOL-Bref. Results The patients that made physical activity had their WHOQOL-Bref physical score improved from T0 to T8, the differences was statistically significant. In the control group WHOQOL-Bref physical remains the same and, consequentially, the difference between T0 and T8 do not reach any statistical significance. The perceived quality of life in the other domains did not change during the treatment in both groups. Thus no other differences were found between and within groups. Discussion and Conclusion The data presented in the previous paper found that physical activity seems a good adjunctive treatment in the long term management of patients with MDD. These new data indicated that physical activity may also improve the perceived physical quality of life. The dimensions related with social functioning, environment and psychical well being seem do not improved, unexpectedly, during the trial. Two objective dimension not strictly related to the depressive symptoms improved: social functioning and Clinical Global

  1. Increased Mesohippocampal Dopaminergic Activity and Improved Depression-Like Behaviors in Maternally Separated Rats Following Repeated Fasting/Refeeding Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Won Jahng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that rats that experienced 3 h of daily maternal separation during the first 2 weeks of birth (MS showed binge-like eating behaviors with increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis when they were subjected to fasting/refeeding cycles repeatedly. In this study, we have examined the psychoemotional behaviors of MS rats on the fasting/refeeding cycles, together with their brain dopamine levels. Fasting/refeeding cycles normalized the ambulatory activity of MS rats, which was decreased by MS experience. Depression-like behaviors, but not anxiety, by MS experience were improved after fasting/refeeding cycles. Fasting/refeeding cycles did not significantly affect the behavioral scores of nonhandled (NH control rats. Fasting/refeeding cycles increased dopamine levels not only in the hippocampus but also in the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in MS rats, but not in NH controls. Results demonstrate that fasting/refeeding cycles increase the mesohippocampal dopaminergic activity and improve depression-like behaviors in rats that experienced MS. Together with our previous paper, it is suggested that increased dopamine neurotransmission in the hippocampus may be implicated in the underlying mechanisms by which the fasting/refeeding cycles induce binge-like eating and improve depression-like behaviors in MS rats.

  2. Feasibility of Pairing Behavioral Activation With Exercise for Women With Type 2 Diabetes and Depression: The Get It Study Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristin L; Panza, Emily; Handschin, Barbara; Ma, Yunsheng; Busch, Andrew M; Waring, Molly E; Appelhans, Bradley M; Whited, Matthew C; Keeney, Jacey; Kern, Daniel; Blendea, Mihaela; Ockene, Ira; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is often comorbid with diabetes and associated with worse glycemic control. Exercise improves glycemic control and depression, and thus could be a parsimonious intervention for patients with comorbid diabetes and major depression. Because patients with diabetes and comorbid depression are often sedentary and lack motivation to exercise, we developed a group exercise intervention that integrates strategies from behavioral activation therapy for depression to increase motivation for and enjoyment of exercise. We conducted a 6-month pilot randomized controlled trial to test the feasibility of the behavioral activation exercise intervention (EX) for women with diabetes and depression. Of the 715 individuals who contacted us about the study, 29 participants were randomized to the EX condition or an enhanced usual care condition (EUC), which represents 4.1% of participants who initially contacted us. Inclusion criteria made recruitment challenging and limits the feasibility of recruiting women with diabetes and depression for a larger trial of the intervention. Retention was 96.5% and 86.2% at 3 and 6months. Participants reported high treatment acceptability; use of behavioral activation strategies and exercise class attendance was acceptable. No condition differences were observed for glycemic control, depressive symptoms, and physical activity, though depressive symptoms and self-reported physical activity improved over time. Compared to participants in the EUC condition, participants in the EX condition reported greater exercise enjoyment and no increase in avoidance behavior over time. Using behavioral activation strategies to increase exercise is feasible in a group exercise setting. However, whether these strategies can be delivered in a less intensive manner to a broader population of sedentary adults, for greater initiation and maintenance of physical activity, deserves further study. PMID:26956652

  3. The Effects of DPPH on Cochlear Microcirculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔维佳; 陈敏

    2003-01-01

    Summary: To investigate the effects of the free radical, 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picylhydrazyl, on cochlearblood flow, 20 guinea pigs were divided into 3 groups at random, 6 for control group, 6 for 1 mmol/L group and 8 for 0. 1 mmol/L group. 2μl vehicle or drugs were dropped into round window mem-brane (RWM). Cochlear microcirculation was monitored by laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF), andmean arterial blood flow (MABP), which was transferred by pressure conductor sensor and preampli-fier, was simultaneously recorded on the computer. Our results showed that MABP was stablethroughout the experiment. Cochlear blood flow (CBF) increased by 10. 32 % (P<0. 05) in 1mmol/L group, and decreased by 4. 89 % in 0. 1 mmol/L group (P<0. 05). In control groupcochlear microcirculation showed no significant changes. It is concluded that DPPH exerted effects oncochlear microcirculation.

  4. An Internet-based program for depression using activity and physiological sensors: efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Cristina; Mira, Adriana; Moragrega, Inés; García-Palacios, Azucena; Bretón-López, Juana; Castilla, Diana; Riera López del Amo, Antonio; Soler, Carla; Molinari, Guadalupe; Quero, Soledad; Guillén-Botella, Verónica; Miralles, Ignacio; Nebot, Sara; Serrano, Berenice; Majoe, Dennis; Alcañiz, Mariano; Baños, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT) has been shown to be efficacious. Moreover, CCBT can be enhanced by using physiological and activity sensors, but there is no evidence about the acceptability of all these tools. The objective of this study is to examine the efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use of an Internet-based CCBT program for preventing depression, with and without sensors (electroencephalography, electrocardiograhpy ECG, and actigraphy), in a high-risk population (unemployed men). Patients and methods Sixty participants at risk of depression (unemployed men) were randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: 1) intervention program (N=22), 2) intervention program plus sensors (N=19), and 3) control group (N=19). Participants completed depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect, and perceived stress measures. Furthermore, they also completed the measures for expectation, satisfaction, and the ease of use of the program. Results Results showed that the two intervention groups improved significantly more than the control group on the clinical variables, and the improvements were greater in the group that used sensors than in the group that did not use them. Furthermore, participants in both intervention groups scored high on expectations and satisfaction with the CCBT program (with and without sensors). The mean score for usability was 88 out of 100 (standard deviation =12.32). No significant differences were found between groups on any of these variables. Conclusion This is the first study to analyze the efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use of an Internet-based program using physiological and activity sensors. These results suggest that an Internet program for depression with or without physiological and activity sensors is effective, satisfactory, and easy to use. PMID:27042067

  5. Atividade física sistematizada e sintomas de depressão na demência de Alzheimer: uma revisão sistemática Systematized physical activity and depressive symptoms in Alzheimer's dementia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thays Martins Vital

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão sistemática de artigos científicos que analisaram os efeitos da atividade física sistematizada nos sintomas de depressão de pacientes com demência de Alzheimer. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma busca nas seguintes bases de dados: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, MedLine e Biological Abstracts, utilizando-se as seguintes palavras-chave: "Alzheimer dementia" , "Alzheimer disease" , "Alzheimer, physical activity", "physical exercise", "motor intervention" , "physical therapy" , "exercise" , "aerobic" , "strength" , "fitness" , "depression" , "dysphoria" , "depressive symptoms" e "depressive episodes". Além da busca nas bases de dados, foi realizada também uma busca manual nas listas de referências dos artigos selecionados. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados quatro estudos que preencheram todos os critérios de inclusão adotados para o presente trabalho. Dois estudos apresentaram reduções dos sintomas depressivos, e outros dois não encontraram redução desses sintomas. CONCLUSÃO: Com a realização desta revisão sistemática, observou-se que não há consenso em relação aos benefícios da atividade física aos sintomas depressivos em pacientes com demência de Alzheimer.OBJECTIVE: To develop a systematic review of scientific articles that have been analyzed the effects of systematic physical activity in depression of patients with Alzheimer's disease. METHODS: We performed a search in the following databases: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, MedLine and Biological Abstracts, we used the following keywords: "Alzheimer dementia", "Alzheimer disease", "Alzheimer's, physical activity", "physical exercise", "motor intervention", "physical therapy", "exercise", "aerobic", "strength", "fitness", "depression", "dysphoria", "depressive symptoms" and "depressive episodes", and also a manual search in references of the selected articles. RESULTS: Have been found four studies that met all criteria of this study. Two

  6. Recreational Physical Activity Ameliorates Some of the Negative Impact of Major Depression on Health-Related Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burton Patten

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Major depressive episodes (MDEs have a negative effect on health-related quality of life (HRQoL. The objective of this study was to determine whether recreational physical activity can ameliorate some of this negative impact. Methods: The data source for the study was the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS. The NPHS is a longitudinal study that has collected data from a representative cohort of 15,254 community residents. Sixteen years of follow-up data are available. The NPHS included: an instrument to assess MDE (the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form for Major Depression, an inventory of recreational activities (each associated with hours of participation and estimated metabolic expenditures and a HRQoL instrument (the Health Utility Index, Mark 3 or HUI3. Proportional hazard and linear regression models were used in this study to determine whether MDE-related declines in HRQoL were lessened by participation in an active recreational lifestyle. Results: Consistent with expectation, major depression was associated with a significant decline in HRQoL over time. While no statistical interactions were observed, the risk of diminished HRQoL in association with MDE was reduced by physical activity. In a proportional hazards model, the hazard ratio for transition to poor HRQoL was 0.7 (95% CI: 0.6 – 0.8, p < 0.0001. In linear regression models, physical activity was significantly associated with more positive HRQoL (β = 0.019, 95% CI 0.004 to – 0.034, p =0.02.Conclusions: Recreational physical activity appears to ameliorate some of the decline in HRQoL seen in association with MDE. Physical activity may be an effective tertiary preventive strategy for this condition.

  7. Short term depression unmasks the ghost frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd V Olde Scheper

    Full Text Available Short Term Plasticity (STP has been shown to exist extensively in synapses throughout the brain. Its function is more or less clear in the sense that it alters the probability of synaptic transmission at short time scales. However, it is still unclear what effect STP has on the dynamics of neural networks. We show, using a novel dynamic STP model, that Short Term Depression (STD can affect the phase of frequency coded input such that small networks can perform temporal signal summation and determination with high accuracy. We show that this property of STD can readily solve the problem of the ghost frequency, the perceived pitch of a harmonic complex in absence of the base frequency. Additionally, we demonstrate that this property can explain dynamics in larger networks. By means of two models, one of chopper neurons in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus and one of a cortical microcircuit with inhibitory Martinotti neurons, it is shown that the dynamics in these microcircuits can reliably be reproduced using STP. Our model of STP gives important insights into the potential roles of STP in self-regulation of cortical activity and long-range afferent input in neuronal microcircuits.

  8. Hearing Preservation in Cochlear Implant Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Carvalho Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, it was thought that hearing loss patients with residual low-frequency hearing would not be good candidates for cochlear implantation since insertion was expected to induce inner ear trauma. Recent advances in electrode design and surgical techniques have made the preservation of residual low-frequency hearing achievable and desirable. The importance of preserving residual low-frequency hearing cannot be underestimated in light of the added benefit of hearing in noisy atmospheres and in music quality. The concept of electrical and acoustic stimulation involves electrically stimulating the nonfunctional, high-frequency region of the cochlea with a cochlear implant and applying a hearing aid in the low-frequency range. The principle of preserving low-frequency hearing by a “soft surgery” cochlear implantation could also be useful to the population of children who might profit from regenerative hair cell therapy in the future. Main aspects of low-frequency hearing preservation surgery are discussed in this review: its brief history, electrode design, principles and advantages of electric-acoustic stimulation, surgical technique, and further implications of this new treatment possibility for hearing impaired patients.

  9. Exercise amelioration of depression-like behavior in OVX mice is associated with suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujun; Xu, Yongjun; Sheng, Hui; Ni, Xin; Lu, Jianqiang

    2016-07-01

    Exercise has benefit for perimenopause women in many ways, such as affective disorders. Our previous study has demonstrated that inflammation in hippocampus contributes to development of depression-like behavior in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Recently, oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome has been implicated to be involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and chronic stress-induced depression-like behavior in rodents. We sought to investigate whether ovariectomy-induced depression-like behavior is associated with NLRP3 inflammasome activation in brain and the effect of exercise on NLRP3 inflammasome activation in this model. The results showed that ovariectomy resulted in depression-like behavior in mice and an increase in levels of IL-1β and IL-18 in hippocampus. Exercise ameliorated the depression-like behavior and decreased levels of IL-1β and IL-18 in hippocampus. The level of IL-1β and IL-18 in hippocampus correlated to depression-like behavior in OVX mice. The levels of NLRP3, cleaved caspase-1 P10 and CD11b in hippocampus were increased in OVX mice compared with control group. Exercise could reduce the levels of NLRP3, cleaved caspase-1 P10 and CD11b in OVX mice. Our study suggests that NLRP3 inflammasome activation contribute to inflammation in hippocampus upon to deprivation of ovary. Exercise amelioration of depression-like behavior is associated with suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in hippocampus of this model. PMID:27036651

  10. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression: psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor

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    Gemma Modinos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We used Support Vector Machine (SVM to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. Two groups were subsequently formed: (i subclinical (mild mood disturbance (n = 17 and (ii no mood disturbance (n = 17. Participants also completed a self-report questionnaire on subclinical psychotic symptoms, the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences Questionnaire (CAPE positive subscale. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI paradigm entailed passive viewing of negative emotional and neutral scenes. The pattern of brain activity during emotional processing allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 77% (p = 0.002, within a network of regions including the amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex. However, further analysis suggested that the classification accuracy could also be explained by subclinical psychotic symptom scores (correlation with SVM weights r = 0.459, p = 0.006. Psychosis proneness may thus be a confounding factor for neuroimaging studies in subclinical depression.

  11. Isolation of compound and CNS depressant activities of Mikania scandens Willd with special emphasis to brain biogenic amines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Mazumder, Upal Kanti

    2014-12-01

    Mikania scandens, a twining herb that grows as a weed in India and Bangladesh is used as vegetables and is a good source of vitamin A, C, B complex, mikanin, sesquiterpenes, betasitosterin, stigmasterol and friedelin. The present communication reports CNS depressant activities with special emphasis to brain biogenic amines in mice. Ethanol extract of leaves of M. scandens (EEMS) was prepared by Soxhalation and analyzed chemically. EEMS potentiated sleeping time induced by pentobarbitone, diazepam and meprobamate and showed significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches. EEMS caused significant protection against pentylene tetrazole-induced convulsion and increased catecholamines and brain amino acids level significantly. Results showed that EEMS produced good CNS depressant effects in mice. PMID:25651612

  12. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex

  13. Type II Cochlear Ganglion Neurons Do Not Drive the Olivocochlear Reflex: Re-Examination of the Cochlear Phenotype in Peripherin Knock-Out Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cochlear nerve includes a small population of unmyelinated sensory fibers connecting outer hair cells to the brain. The functional role of these type II afferent neurons is controversial, because neurophysiological data are sparse. A recent study (Froud et al., 2015) reported that targeted deletion of peripherin, a type of neurofilament, eliminated type II afferents and inactivated efferent feedback to the outer hair cells, thereby suggesting that type II afferents were the sensory drive to this sound-evoked, negative-feedback reflex, the olivocochlear pathway. Here, we re-evaluated the cochlear phenotype in mice from the peripherin knock-out line and show that (1) type II afferent terminals are present in normal number and (2) olivocochlear suppression of cochlear responses is absent even when this efferent pathway is directly activated by shocks. We conclude that type II neurons are not the sensory drive for the efferent reflex and that peripherin deletion likely causes dysfunction of synaptic transmission between olivocochlear terminals and their peripheral targets. PMID:27570826

  14. Exploring Perspectives on Cochlear Implants and Language Acquisition within the Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implants generated intense debate almost immediately following their introduction in the 1980s. Today, with a vast number of deaf individuals with cochlear implants, the debate about the cochlear implant device and mode of communication continues. Q-methodology was used in this study to explore cochlear implants and language acquisition…

  15. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  16. A Literature Analysis of Themes in Paediatric Cochlear Implant Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendar, Nils Ola Ebbe; Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2015-01-01

    Research on children with cochlear implants (CI) has documented positive outcomes, but also that many still experience language delays. The aim of this article is to explore how research on children with cochlear implants cover topics of early language development compared to research on children...

  17. Acoustic trauma increases cochlear and hair cell uptake of gentamicin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to intense sound or high doses of aminoglycoside antibiotics can increase hearing thresholds, induce cochlear dysfunction, disrupt hair cell morphology and promote hair cell death, leading to permanent hearing loss. When the two insults are combined, synergistic ototoxicity occurs, exacerbating cochlear vulnerability to sound exposure. The underlying mechanism of this synergism remains unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sound exposure enhances the intra-cochlear trafficking of aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin, leading to increased hair cell uptake of aminoglycosides and subsequent ototoxicity. METHODS: Juvenile C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to moderate or intense sound levels, while fluorescently-conjugated or native gentamicin was administered concurrently or following sound exposure. Drug uptake was then examined in cochlear tissues by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: Prolonged sound exposure that induced temporary threshold shifts increased gentamicin uptake by cochlear hair cells, and increased gentamicin permeation across the strial blood-labyrinth barrier. Enhanced intra-cochlear trafficking and hair cell uptake of gentamicin also occurred when prolonged sound, and subsequent aminoglycoside exposure were temporally separated, confirming previous observations. Acute, concurrent sound exposure did not increase cochlear uptake of aminoglycosides. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged, moderate sound exposures enhanced intra-cochlear aminoglycoside trafficking into the stria vascularis and hair cells. Changes in strial and/or hair cell physiology and integrity due to acoustic overstimulation could increase hair cell uptake of gentamicin, and may represent one mechanism of synergistic ototoxicity.

  18. Frequency-place compression and expansion in cochlear implant listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, D; Shannon, RV

    2004-01-01

    In multichannel cochlear implants, low frequency information is delivered to apical cochlear locations while high frequency information is delivered to more basal locations, mimicking the normal acoustic tonotopic organization of the auditory nerves. In clinical practice; little attention has been p

  19. Evaluating the Feasibility of Using Remote Technology for Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of remote technology to provide cochlear implant services has gained popularity in recent years. This article contains a review of research evaluating the feasibility of remote service delivery for recipients of cochlear implants. To date, published studies have determined that speech-processor programming levels and other objective tests…

  20. Serving Deaf Students Who Have Cochlear Implants. PEPNet Tipsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searls, J. Matt, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are complex electronic devices surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear. These devices utilize electrodes placed in the inner ear (the cochlea) to stimulate the auditory nerve of individuals with significant permanent hearing loss. Cochlear implants may not be suitable for everyone. They are designed to provide…

  1. Speech Intelligibility and Prosody Production in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Steven B.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Phan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to examine the relation between speech intelligibility and prosody production in children who use cochlear implants. Methods: The Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and Prosodic Utterance Production (PUP) task were administered to 15 children who use cochlear implants and 10 children with normal…

  2. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  3. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-01-01

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns. PMID:26836414

  4. Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopko, Derek R.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Robertson, Sarah M. C.; Ryba, Marlena M.; Carvalho, John P.; Colman, Lindsey K.; Mullane, Christen; Gawrysiak, Michael; Bell, John L.; McNulty, James K.; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with…

  5. Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depressed Cancer Patients: Factors Associated with Treatment Outcome and Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopko, D. R.; Robertson, S. M. C.; Colman, L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been increased focus on evaluating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for cancer patients. Among the several limitations inherent to these programs of research, few studies have targeted patients with well-diagnosed clinical depression and little is known about factors that best predict treatment outcome and…

  6. Ten Year Revision of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression: Revised Treatment Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejuez, C. W.; Hopko, Derek R.; Acierno, Ron; Daughters, Stacey B.; Pagoto, Sherry L.

    2011-01-01

    Following from the seminal work of Ferster, Lewinsohn, and Jacobson, as well as theory and research on the Matching Law, Lejuez, Hopko, LePage, Hopko, and McNeil developed a reinforcement-based depression treatment that was brief, uncomplicated, and tied closely to behavioral theory. They called this treatment the brief behavioral activation…

  7. Evaluation of analgesic, anti-inflammatory and CNS depressant activities of methanolic extract of Lawsonia inermis barks in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthfun Nesa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study was carried out to assess the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and CNS depressant activity of the methanolic extract of  the Lawsonia inermis barks(MELIB. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory effects of MEBLI were studied using carrageenan-induced inflammatory method at the dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg b.wt., p.o. Analgesic activity was measured using acetic acid-induced writhing model and formalin-induced licking and biting in mice. The CNS depressant activity was evaluated by observing the reduction of locomotor and exploratory activities in the open field and hole cross tests at a dose of 300 and 500 mg/kg body weight. Results: Statistical analysis showed that dose  of 500 mg/kg  exhibited higher analgesic activity against acetic acid-induced pain in mice than the standard drug diclofenac sodium. Furthermore, doses of 300 and 500 mg/kg caused higher percent of protection (91.16% and 95.03%, respectively of licking and biting of formalin-induced mice than diclophenac sodium (70.72%. The Lawsonia inemis methanolic extract (300 and 500 mg/kg alsoexhibited sustained inhibition (54.97% and 65.56% of paw edema at the 4th hour compared with standard indomethacin (74.17%. Besides, the plant extract also had significant (p

  8. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL), activity of daily living (ADL) and depressive mood disorder in temporal lobe epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrner, J; Kalchmayr, R; Serles, W; Olbrich, A; Pataraia, E; Aull, S; Bacher, J; Leutmezer, F; Gröppel, G; Deecke, L; Baumgartner, C

    1999-04-01

    We determined the interrelations of chronological age, age at seizure onset, duration of seizure disorder, cognitive functioning (IQ), scales of activities of daily living, depressive mood disorder and measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Furthermore, we investigated the association of the laterality of seizure onset zone and absence/presence of hippocampal atrophy and/or sclerosis (HA/HS) with measures of HRQOL, activities of daily living (ADL) and depressive mood disorder. In the setting of pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation, a sample of 56 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was studied using the Bonner Skalen für Epilepsie (BPSE) and the depression inventory D-S of von Zerssen. Patients reported high levels of dependency on others and poor coping capabilities. Our data also showed specific ADL-behaviour suggesting social withdrawal and isolation. Our results indicate emotional impairment as a major problem in TLE, because 45% of our patients scored in the depressive range of the D-S depression scale. Depression score was found to be a powerful predictor of self-reported quality of life after adjusting for seizure-related variables, demographic variables and cognitive functioning (IQ). The only scale showing a significant laterality effect was ADL-home. No relationship between the dependent measures of HRQOL, ADL-social, ADL-cultural, depressive mood disorder and laterality of the epileptogenic zone or absence/presence of HA/HS was found. HRQOL and depressive mood disorder are strongly interrelated indicating that patients with depressive symptoms report lower quality of life and specific patterns of ADL. HRQOL, ADL and depressive mood disorder are largely independent of biological markers such as laterality of seizure onset zone and absence/presence of HA/HS in TLE.

  9. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Koyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months. Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome.

  10. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months). Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:27376080

  11. PET imaging of cochlear-implant and normal-hearing subjects listening to speech and nonspeech

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Donald; Miyamoto, Richard T.; Pisoni, David B.; Sehgal, Mark; Hutchins, Gary D.

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) was used to compare the brain activation patterns of normal-hearing (NH) with postlingually deaf, cochlear-implant (CI) subjects listening to speech and nonspeech signals. The speech stimuli were derived from test batteries for assessing speech-perception performance of hearing-impaired subjects with different sensory aids. Subjects were scanned while passively listening to monaural (right ear) stimuli in five conditions: Silent ...

  12. Fate of Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cells and Stereocilia after Loss of the Stereocilia

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Shuping; Yang, Shiming; Guo, Weiwei; David Z Z He

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical activity. The site of hair cell transduction is the hair bundle, an array of stereocilia with different height arranged in a staircase. Tip links connect the apex of each stereocilium to the side of its taller neighbor. The hair bundle and tip links of hair cells are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. It has been shown that hair cells in lower vertebrates and in the mammalian vestibular system may survive bundle ...

  13. Cochlear imaging in the era of cochlear implantation : from silence to sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbist, Berit Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are a well accepted treatment for hearing impaired people. In pre- and postoperative assessment of CI-candidates imaging plays an important role to analyze anatomy, rule out pathology and determine intracochlear positioning and integrity of the implant. Developments in CI-des

  14. 多巴胺对豚鼠听觉传入神经的抑制作用及其频率选择性%Suppressive effect and its frequency selection of dopamine on the cochlear auditory afferent nerve activity in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯志强; 余力生; 李兴启; 刘军

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the suppressive effect and its frequency selection of dopamine on the cochlear auditory afferent nerve activity. To offer an important step in understanding the modulation of dopamine in the inner cell synaptic complex. Methods Forty guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups and the whole intracochlear perfusions were performed: (1) perfused with artificial perilymph solutions; (2) perfused with artifical perilymph solutions containing 10 mmol/L dopamine; (3) perfused with artificial perilymph solutions containing 30 mmol/L dopamine; (4) perfused with artifical perilymph solutions containing 50 mmol/L dopamine. Compound action potential (CAP)evoked by different frequencies (250 Hz,500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, 4000 Hz, 8000 Hz, 16 000 Hz) and cochlear microphonics (CM) evoked by4000 Hz tone burst were recorded from the roud window of guinea pigs before perfusion and 1 hours, 2 hours after perfusions. Results There was no significant difference in CAP threshold before and after perfusion in the artificial perilymph solutions group (P > 0.05) . An increase of CAP threshold of most detecting frequencies were observed in the three dopamine-perfused groups(P 0.05);灌流多巴胺后大部分频率的CAP阈值提高,与灌流前相比差异具有统计学意义(P值均0.05).结论 多巴胺对豚鼠听觉传入神经具有抑制性作用,而对外毛细胞无影响;这种抑制作用具有频率选择性,对高频纤维的抑制作用较强,而对低频的抑制作用较弱.

  15. Brooding and Pondering: Isolating the Active Ingredients of Depressive Rumination with Exploratory Factor Analysis and Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armey, Michael F.; Fresco, David M.; Moore, Michael T.; Mennin, Douglas S.; Turk, Cynthia L.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Kecmanovic, Jelena; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2009-01-01

    Depressive rumination, as assessed by Nolen-Hoeksema's Response Styles Questionnaire (RSQ), predicts the onset, chronicity, and duration of depressed mood. However, some RSQ items contain depressive content and result in a heterogeneous factor structure. After the a priori elimination of items potentially confounded with depressed item content,…

  16. Chronic intermittent hypoxia depresses afferent neurotransmission in NTS neurons by a reduction in the number of active synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almado, Carlos Eduardo L; Machado, Benedito H; Leão, Ricardo M

    2012-11-21

    Long-term synaptic plasticity has been recently described in brainstem areas associated to visceral afferent sensory integration. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), an animal model for studying obstructive sleep apnea in humans, depresses the afferent neurotransmission in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) neurons, which affect respiratory and autonomic regulation. Here we identified the synaptic mechanisms of CIH-induced depression of the afferent neurotransmission in NTS neurons in juvenile rats. We verified that CIH reduced the amplitude of both NMDA and non-NMDA glutamatergic excitatory currents (eEPSCs) evoked by tractus solitarii stimulation (TS-eEPSC) of second-order neurons in the NTS. No changes were observed in release probability, evidenced by absence of any CIH-elicited effects on short-term depression and failures in EPSCs evoked in low calcium. CIH also produced no changes in TS-eEPSC quantal size, since the amplitudes of both low calcium-evoked EPSCs and asynchronous TS-eEPSCs (evoked in the presence of Sr(2+)) were unchanged. Using single TS afferent fiber stimulation in slices from control and CIH rats we clearly show that CIH reduced the quantal content of the TS-eEPSCs without affecting the quantal size or release probability, suggesting a reduction in the number of active synapses as the mechanism of CIH induced TS-eEPSC depression. In accordance with this concept, the input-output relationship of stimulus intensity and TS-eEPSC amplitude shows an early saturation in CIH animals. These findings open new perspectives for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the synaptic plasticity in the brainstem sensory neurons under challenges such as those produced by CIH in experimental and pathological conditions.

  17. Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  18. Depression (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... others. Family members also have a risk of depression. Anxiety and depression are also common in family members ... cancer . A small number of children may have: Depression . Anxiety . Trouble sleeping. Problems getting along with family or ...

  19. Fatty Acid Blood Levels, Vitamin D Status, Physical Performance, Activity, and Resiliency: A Novel Potential Screening Tool for Depressed Mood in Active Duty Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Nicholas D; Kotwal, Russ S; Lewis, Michael D; Funderburk, Leslee K; Elliott, Timothy R; Crouse, Stephen F; Smith, Stephen B; Greenwood, Michael; Kreider, Richard B

    2016-09-01

    This study examined whether blood fatty acid levels, vitamin D status, and/or physical activity are associated with physical fitness scores; a measure of mood, Patient Health Questionnaire-9; and a measure of resiliency, Dispositional Resiliency Scale-15 in active duty Soldiers. 100 active duty males at Fort Hood, Texas, underwent a battery of psychometric tests, anthropometric measurements, and fitness tests, and they also provided fasting blood samples for fatty acid and vitamin D analysis. Pearson bivariate correlation analysis revealed significant correlations among psychometric tests, anthropometric measurements, physical performance, reported physical inactivity (sitting time), and fatty acid and vitamin D blood levels. On the basis of these findings, a regression equation was developed to predict a depressed mood status as determined by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The equation accurately predicted depressed mood status in 80% of our participants with a sensitivity of 76.9% and a specificity of 80.5%. Results indicate that the use of a regression equation may be helpful in identifying Soldiers at higher risk for mental health issues. Future studies should evaluate the impact of exercise and diet as a means of improving resiliency and reducing depressed mood in Soldiers. PMID:27612362

  20. Auditory Cortical Maturation in a Child with Cochlear Implant: Analysis of Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Aparecida Fagundes Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to longitudinally assess the behavioral and electrophysiological hearing changes of a girl inserted in a CI program, who had bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss and underwent surgery of cochlear implantation with electrode activation at 21 months of age. She was evaluated using the P1 component of Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (LLAEP; speech perception tests of the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure (GASP; Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS; and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS. The study was conducted prior to activation and after three, nine, and 18 months of cochlear implant activation. The results of the LLAEP were compared with data from a hearing child matched by gender and chronological age. The results of the LLAEP of the child with cochlear implant showed gradual decrease in latency of the P1 component after auditory stimulation (172 ms–134 ms. In the GASP, IT-MAIS, and MUSS, gradual development of listening skills and oral language was observed. The values of the LLAEP of the hearing child were expected for chronological age (132 ms–128 ms. The use of different clinical instruments allow a better understanding of the auditory habilitation and rehabilitation process via CI.

  1. Auditory Cortical Maturation in a Child with Cochlear Implant: Analysis of Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliane Aparecida Fagundes; Couto, Maria Inês Vieira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Carvalho, Ana Claudia Martinho; Matas, Carla Gentile

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to longitudinally assess the behavioral and electrophysiological hearing changes of a girl inserted in a CI program, who had bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss and underwent surgery of cochlear implantation with electrode activation at 21 months of age. She was evaluated using the P1 component of Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (LLAEP); speech perception tests of the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure (GASP); Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS); and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS). The study was conducted prior to activation and after three, nine, and 18 months of cochlear implant activation. The results of the LLAEP were compared with data from a hearing child matched by gender and chronological age. The results of the LLAEP of the child with cochlear implant showed gradual decrease in latency of the P1 component after auditory stimulation (172 ms–134 ms). In the GASP, IT-MAIS, and MUSS, gradual development of listening skills and oral language was observed. The values of the LLAEP of the hearing child were expected for chronological age (132 ms–128 ms). The use of different clinical instruments allow a better understanding of the auditory habilitation and rehabilitation process via CI. PMID:26881163

  2. Reasoning with Linear Orders: Differential Parietal Cortex Activation in Sub-Clinical Depression. An fMRI Investigation in Sub-Clinical Depression and Controls

    OpenAIRE

    Hinton, Elanor C.; Wise, Richard G; Singh, Krish D.; Ulrich evon Hecker

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to learn new information and manipulate it for efficient retrieval has long been studied through reasoning paradigms, which also has applicability to the study of social behavior. Humans can learn about the linear order within groups using reasoning, and the success of such reasoning may vary according to affective state, such as depression. We investigated the neural basis of these latter findings using functional neuroimaging. Using BDI-II criteria, 14 non-depressed (ND) and 12...

  3. [ACTIVITY OF HYPOTHALAMIC-PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS OF PRENATALLY STRESSED MALE RATS IN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF DEPRESSION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordyan, N E; Pivina, S G; Rakitskaya, V V; Akulova, V K

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity changes were examined in the adult, prenatally stressed male rats in the experimental depression model--the paradigm of "learned helplessness". It was shown that in males descending from intact mothers a depressive-like state was accompanied by an increase in HPA activity. The expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) increases, coupled with a rise in plasma levels of ACTH and corticosterone as well as in adrenal weight. At the same time in males born from mothers stressed during the last week of pregnancy we observed a decrease in activity of both the central (hypothalamus) and the peripheral (adrenal cortex) parts of regulation of this hormonal axis similar to that revealed for these animals in our previous study in "stress-restress" paradigm. It is concluded that prenatal stress modifies the sensitivity of animals to the inescapable intense stress impact, which manifests itself in a specific pattern of the HPA axis activity after stress load. PMID:27220240

  4. Dietary whole cottonseed depresses lipogenesis but has no effect on stearoyl coenzyme desaturase activity in bovine subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, A M; Sturdivant, C A; Lunt, D K; Smith, S B

    1997-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of long-term feeding of whole cottonseed (WCS) on lipogenesis and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase activity in growing steers. Brangus steers were fed either a control, cornbased diet (n = 11) or 30% WCS (n = 12). The 30% WCS contributed an estimated 6.6% additional lipid to the diet. Steers fed the added WCS had greater live weights (P = 0.04) and kidney, pelvic, and heart fat (P = 0.005). Subcutaneous fat thickness was not different (P = 0.20) between treatment groups, although WCS elicited an increase in the proportion of large diameter subcutaneous adipocytes. The rate of [U-14C]acetate incorporation into fatty acids in subcutaneous adipose tissue was reduced by dietary WCS (171.4 vs 122.1 nmol x 100 mg adipose tissue-1 x 2 hr-1, P = 0.03), indicating that the increased dietary fat depressed de novo lipogenesis. Hepatic desaturase activity was much lower than that of subcutaneous adipose tissue, a feature common to cattle. We anticipated that added WCS also would depress stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver due to its cyclopropene fatty acid content. Instead, desaturase activity was numerically (although not significantly) greater in liver (P = 0.37) and adipose tissue (P = 0.23). PMID:9417995

  5. Effects of type of physical exercise and leisure activities on the depression scores of obese Brazilian adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Stella

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that depressive states may lead to hypokinesia with diminished metabolic rate and energy use. Hypokinesia associated with certain eating behaviors may lead to an unfavorable energy balance that can contribute to the emergence and prevalence of obesity among children and adults. The purpose of the present study was to examine the possibility of reducing depression inventory scores in female adolescents with third-degree obesity while testing the effectiveness of different exercise programs in reducing anxiety and depression scores. The sample consisted of 40 female subjects (mean age 16 ± 1.56 years divided into 4 groups (aerobic training, anaerobic training, leisure activities, and control. Subjects had a body mass index of 95% or more in relation to the 50th percentile. The aerobic program consisted of three ergometric bicycle sessions per week over a 3-month period (12 weeks and the activities were prescribed after determining the anaerobic ventilatory threshold (VO2 threshold. Anaerobic training was based on the Wingate anaerobic power test. The leisure program consisted of a varied range of activities (games, exercises, etc.. A nutritionist interviewed the members of these two groups and the control group every week in order to adapt them to the nutritional guidelines proposed for the study. The study showed that all three programs (aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise and leisure activities were effective in reducing body mass. However, we found a significant reduction when analyzing the depression scores only for aerobic exercise (18.9 ± 9.33 to 10.6 ± 9.56 or 43.9% but no significant alterations for anaerobic exercise (11.36 ± 5.23 to 9.63 ± 4.78 or 15.22% and leisure (17.28 ± 7.55 to 15.07 ± 7.54 or 12.78%, thus indicating that in principle this type of activity could be included to improve emotional well-being of obese adolescent girls.

  6. Pilot of the brief behavioral activation treatment for depression in latinos with limited english proficiency: preliminary evaluation of efficacy and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Anahi; Castillo, Soraida D; Maero, Fabian; Lejuez, C W; Macpherson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) experience multiple barriers to accessing efficacious mental health treatments. Using a stage model of behavior therapy research, this Stage I investigation evaluated the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), an intervention that may be well equipped to address existing treatment barriers. A sample of 10 Latinos with LEP and depressive symptomatology participated in a 10-session, direct (i.e., literal) Spanish-language translation of BATD, with no other cultural modifications. Participants were assessed at each session for depressive symptomatology and for the proposed BATD mechanisms: activity engagement and environmental reward. One month after treatment, participants were reassessed and interviewed to elicit feedback about BATD. Hierarchical linear model analyses were used to measure BATD outcomes. Results showed depressive symptomatology decreased (p<.001), while both activation (p=.04) and environmental reward (p=.02) increased over the course of BATD. Increases in activation corresponded concurrently with decreases in depression (p=.01), while environmental reward preceded decreases in depressive symptomatology (all p's ≤ .04). Follow-up analyses revealed sustained clinical gains in depression and activation, and an increase in environmental reward at follow-up. Participant interviews conducted 1 month after treatment conclusion indicated that BATD is an acceptable treatment for our sample of interest. Despite the limitations inherent in a study restricted to a sample of 10, preliminary outcomes of this Stage I research suggest that members of this otherwise underserved group showed improvements in depressive symptomatology and are willing to participate in and adhere to BATD. The study's positive outcomes suggest that a Stage II randomized clinical trial is a logical next step.

  7. Pilot of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Latinos with Limited English Proficiency: Preliminary Evaluation of Efficacy and Acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Anahi; Castillo, Soraida D.; Maero, Fabian; Lejuez, C. W.; MacPherson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) experience multiple barriers to accessing efficacious mental health treatments. Using a stage model of behavioral therapies research, this Stage 1b investigation evaluated the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), an intervention which may be well-equipped to address existing treatment barriers. A sample of 10 Latinos with LEP and depressive symptomatology participated in a 10-session,direct (i.e., literal) Spanish-language translation of BATD, with no other cultural modifications. Participants were assessed at each session for depressive symptomatology and for the proposed BATD mechanisms: activity engagement and environmental reward. One month after treatment, participants were reassessed and interviewed to elicit feedback about BATD. Hierarchical Linear Model analyses were used to measure BATD outcomes. Results showed depressive symptomatology decreased (p<.001), while both activation (p = .04) and environmental reward (p = .02) increased over the course of BATD. Increases in activation corresponded concurrently with decreases in depression (p = .01), while environmental reward preceded decreases in depressive symptomatology (all p’s≤ .04). Follow-up analyses revealed sustained clinical gains in depression and activation, and an increase in environmental reward at follow-up. Participant interviews conducted one month after treatment conclusion indicated that BATD is an acceptable treatment for our sample of interest. Despite the limitations inherent to a study restricted to sample of ten, preliminary outcomes of this Stage I research suggest that members of this otherwise underserved group showed improvements in depressive symptomatology and are willing to participate in and adhere to BATD. The study’s positive outcomes suggest that a Stage II randomized clinical trial is a logical next step. PMID:24411118

  8. Effects of Cortical Spreading Depression on Synaptic Activity, Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Piilgaard

    2010-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates I have during my PhD studied the effects of cortical spreading depression (CSD) on synaptic activity, blood flow and oxygen consumption in rat cerebral cortex. This was performed in vivo using an open cranial window approach in anesthetized rats. I applied...... Laser-Doppler Flowmetry for measurements of cerebral blood flow, glass microelectrodes for recording of synaptic activity – local field potentials – and ongoing cortical electrical activity and a Clark type electrode for measurements of tissue partial pressure of oxygen (tpO2). Offline calculations...... of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were performed using a compartment model as described Gjedde1. In the first study we characterized the frequency dependency of evoked responses of the transcallosal fiber network (TC) in the somatosensory cortex concerning: synaptic activity, cerebral blood flow...

  9. Jiawei Wendan decoction affects mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in the hippocampus of depression rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Zhang; Man Zhang; Li Wu; Meng Xia; Guangbin Li

    2011-01-01

    A previous study from our group showed that Jiawei Wendan decoction inhibits protein expression of interleukin-1β, 2, and 6, as well as plasma neuropeptide Y, P substance and somatostatin in the hippocampus of depression rat models. The present study analyzed the influence of Jiawei Wendan decoction on the mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway in the hippocampus. Results demonstrated that Jiawei Wendan decoction effectively upregulated expression of small molecular G proteins, extracellular regulated kinase 1/2, and activated ribosomal S6 kinase protein in the rat hippocampus. In addition, Jiawei Wendan decoction exhibits antidepressant effects similar to fluoxetine. The underlying mechanisms were shown to be dependent on increased mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway activity.

  10. Developmental minocycline treatment reverses the effects of neonatal immune activation on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, hippocampal inflammation, and HPA axis activity in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Jafar; Kosari-Nasab, Morteza; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal infection is associated with increased lifetime risk for neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression, with evidence showing that dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-(HPA)-axis system may be partly responsible. Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that minocycline exhibits antidepressant effects through inhibition of microglial activation and anti-inflammatory actions, and of interest is that recent studies suggest that minocycline alleviates the behavioral abnormalities induced by early-life insults. The current study was designed to determine if developmental minocycline treatment attenuates the neonatal immune activation-induced anxiety- and depression-like symptoms and HPA-axis-dysregulation later in life. To this end, neonatal mice were treated to either lipopolysaccharide or saline on postnatal days (PND) 3-5, then dams during lactation (PND 6-20) and male offspring during adolescence (PND 21-40) received oral administration of minocycline or water via regular drinking bottles. Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, HPA-axis-reactivity (corticosterone), and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and IL-1β) after exposure to stress were evaluated. The results indicated that neonatal immune activation resulted in increased anxiety and depression-like symptoms, HPA-axis-hyperactivity, and elevated the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the hippocampus in response to stress in adulthood. Interestingly, developmental minocycline treatment significantly reduced the abnormalities induced by neonatal inflammation in adult mice. In addition, minocycline, regardless of postnatal inflammation, did not have any detrimental effects on the above measured parameters. Considering that minocycline is currently under exploration as an alternative or adjunctive therapy for reducing the symptoms of neurological disorders, our findings suggest that minocycline during development can decrease the behavioral abnormalities induced by early

  11. Developmental minocycline treatment reverses the effects of neonatal immune activation on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, hippocampal inflammation, and HPA axis activity in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Jafar; Kosari-Nasab, Morteza; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal infection is associated with increased lifetime risk for neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression, with evidence showing that dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-(HPA)-axis system may be partly responsible. Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that minocycline exhibits antidepressant effects through inhibition of microglial activation and anti-inflammatory actions, and of interest is that recent studies suggest that minocycline alleviates the behavioral abnormalities induced by early-life insults. The current study was designed to determine if developmental minocycline treatment attenuates the neonatal immune activation-induced anxiety- and depression-like symptoms and HPA-axis-dysregulation later in life. To this end, neonatal mice were treated to either lipopolysaccharide or saline on postnatal days (PND) 3-5, then dams during lactation (PND 6-20) and male offspring during adolescence (PND 21-40) received oral administration of minocycline or water via regular drinking bottles. Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, HPA-axis-reactivity (corticosterone), and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and IL-1β) after exposure to stress were evaluated. The results indicated that neonatal immune activation resulted in increased anxiety and depression-like symptoms, HPA-axis-hyperactivity, and elevated the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the hippocampus in response to stress in adulthood. Interestingly, developmental minocycline treatment significantly reduced the abnormalities induced by neonatal inflammation in adult mice. In addition, minocycline, regardless of postnatal inflammation, did not have any detrimental effects on the above measured parameters. Considering that minocycline is currently under exploration as an alternative or adjunctive therapy for reducing the symptoms of neurological disorders, our findings suggest that minocycline during development can decrease the behavioral abnormalities induced by early

  12. Genetic variation in Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels and its relationship with neuroticism, cognition and risk of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Mcintosh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are encoded by four genes (HCN1-4 and, through activation by cyclic AMP (cAMP, represent a point of convergence for several psychosis risk genes. On the basis of positive preliminary data, we sought to test whether genetic variation in HCN1-4 conferred risk of depression or cognitive impairment in the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study. HCN1, HCN2, HCN3 and HCN4 were genotyped for 43 haplotype-tagging SNPs and tested for association with DSM-IV depression, neuroticism and a battery of cognitive tests assessing cognitive ability, memory, verbal fluency and psychomotor performance. No association was found between any HCN channel gene SNP and risk of depression, neuroticism or on any cognitive measure. The current study does not support a genetic role for HCN channels in conferring risk of depression or cognitive impairment in human subjects within the Scottish population.

  13. Effects of paternal and maternal depressive symptoms on child internalizing symptoms and asthma disease activity: mediation by interparental negativity and parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L; Miller, Bruce D; Simmens, Samuel J

    2011-02-01

    This study tested a hypothesized model of the relationships among parental depressive symptoms, family process (interparental negativity and negative parenting behavior), child internalizing symptoms, and asthma disease activity. A total of 106 children with asthma, aged 7 to 17, participated with their fathers and mothers. Parental depressive symptoms were assessed by self-report. Interparental and parenting behaviors were observed and rated during family discussion tasks. Child internalizing symptoms were assessed by self-report and by clinician interview and rating. Asthma disease activity was assessed according to National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute guidelines. Results of structural equation modeling generally supported interparental negativity and negative parenting behavior as mediators linking parental depressive symptoms and child emotional and physical dysfunction. However, paternal and maternal depressive symptoms play their role through different pathways of negative family process. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Neural correlates of transmeatal cochlear laser (TCL) stimulation in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedentopf, Christian M; Ischebeck, Anja; Haala, Ilka A; Mottaghy, Felix M; Schikora, Detlef; Verius, Michael; Koppelstaetter, Florian; Buchberger, Waltraud; Schlager, Andreas; Felber, Stephan R; Golaszewski, Stefan M

    2007-01-16

    Transmeatal cochlear laser (TCL) treatment has recently been proposed as a therapeutic procedure for cochlear dysfunction such as chronic cochlear tinnitus or sensorineural hearing loss. The aim of this study was to investigate whether TLC has any influence on the central nervous system using functional MRI with healthy young adults. The laser stimulation device was placed on the tympanic membrane of both ears. A laser stimulation run and a placebo run were performed in random order. The participants were unable to differentiate between verum and placebo stimulation. In the comparison of verum to placebo runs, we observed significant activations within the left superior frontal gyrus, the right middle and medial frontal gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule, the left superior occipital gyrus, the precuneus and cuneus bilaterally, the right anterior and the left and right middle and posterior cingulate gyrus and the left thalamus. This network of brain areas corresponds well to results from previous PET studies of patients with tinnitus. Though TCL seems to have a clinically measurable effect on the central nervous system the neurophysiological mechanism leading to the observed activated neuronal network remains unknown. PMID:17123710

  15. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  16. Cochlear Micromechanics (Part II): A moderated discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummer, Anthony W.; Mountain, David C.

    2015-12-01

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topic of "Cochlear Micromechanics". The discussion, moderated by the authors, took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  17. Cochlear Micromechanics (Part I): A moderated discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Stephen T.

    2015-12-01

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topic of "Cochlear Micromechanics". The discussion, moderated by the author, took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  18. Depression influences the quality of diabetes-related self-management activities in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mut-Vitcu G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gabriela Mut-Vitcu,1 Bogdan Timar,2 Romulus Timar,1 Cristian Oancea,3 Ioan Cosmin Citu4 1Second Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Functional Sciences, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, “Victor Babes” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of depression and its impact on the quality of diabetes-related self-care activities in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 184 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Depression was evaluated using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 while the quality of diabetes-related self-care activities was assessed using the Summary of Diabetes-Related Self Care Activities Questionnaire. Results: In our study group, 53.3% of the patients had moderate depression, 17.9% had severe depression, and 28.8% had no depression symptoms. Patient’s age (P=0.024, presence of diabetic neuropathy (P<0.001, and body mass index (P=0.037 proved to be independent and significant predictors for developing depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. The severity of depression was reverse correlated with the quality of self-care activities for all the studied components: global score (r=-0.305, diet intervention score (r=-0.297, exercise score (r=-0.388, glycemic monitoring score (r=-0.055, and feet care score (r=-0.180. The presence of severe depression was associated with an increased prevalence of diabetes complications such as diabetic neuropathy and chronic kidney disease. Conclusion: The prevalence of depression is higher in patients with type 2 diabetes compared to general population. Depression has a major negative impact on the quality of diabetes-related self-care activities and, being a treatable condition, proactive screening followed in case of a positive diagnosis by adequate treatment should be performed in all patients with diabetes. Keywords: diabetes

  19. Chronic Conductive Hearing Loss Leads to Cochlear Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Charles Liberman

    Full Text Available Synapses between cochlear nerve terminals and hair cells are the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear in both noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, and this neuropathy is exacerbated in the absence of efferent feedback from the olivocochlear bundle. If age-related loss is dominated by a lifetime of exposure to environmental sounds, reduction of acoustic drive to the inner ear might improve cochlear preservation throughout life. To test this, we removed the tympanic membrane unilaterally in one group of young adult mice, removed the olivocochlear bundle in another group and compared their cochlear function and innervation to age-matched controls one year later. Results showed that tympanic membrane removal, and the associated threshold elevation, was counterproductive: cochlear efferent innervation was dramatically reduced, especially the lateral olivocochlear terminals to the inner hair cell area, and there was a corresponding reduction in the number of cochlear nerve synapses. This loss led to a decrease in the amplitude of the suprathreshold cochlear neural responses. Similar results were seen in two cases with conductive hearing loss due to chronic otitis media. Outer hair cell death was increased only in ears lacking medial olivocochlear innervation following olivocochlear bundle cuts. Results suggest the novel ideas that 1 the olivocochlear efferent pathway has a dramatic use-dependent plasticity even in the adult ear and 2 a component of the lingering auditory processing disorder seen in humans after persistent middle-ear infections is cochlear in origin.

  20. Cochlear implant candidates: assessment with CT and MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnsberger, H R; Dart, D J; Parkin, J L; Smoker, W R; Osborn, A G

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-seven patients with severe to profound hearing loss were evaluated for possible placement of a multichannel cochlear implant hearing device. After initial clinical screening, 42 patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) examination. Five of these patients were also examined with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Twenty-two patients received implants. CT of the middle and inner ear was normal in 24 patients (57.1%) and showed labyrinthine ossification in 12 (28.6%), cochlear or fenestral otosclerosis (or both) in four (9.5%), and congenital cochlear malformation in two (4.8%). The information provided by CT was used to (a) exclude patients in whom multichannel cochlear implantation would most likely be unsuccessful (owing to obliterative labyrinthine ossification, or congenital cochlear malformation, severe cochlear, or fenestral otosclerosis), (b) help select the best ear for implantation, and (c) provide a preoperative picture of normal variants and avoidable surgical pitfalls. MR experience is limited but assessment of the size of the cochlear nerve and the membranous labyrinth is possible with this modality and may provide additional information in the evaluation of these patients. PMID:3108956

  1. Insula and striatum activity in effort-related monetary reward processing in gambling disorder: The role of depressive symptomatology

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    Mira Fauth-Bühler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurobiological underpinnings of effort-related monetary reward processing of gambling disorder have not been previously studied. To date neuroimaging studies lack in large sample sizes and as a consequence less attention has been given to brain reward processing that could potentially be attributed to comorbid conditions such as depressive mood state. We assessed monetary reward processing using an effort-dependent task during 3 tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated a large sample of male, right-handed, slot-machine-playing disordered gamblers (DGs; N = 80 as well as age- and smoking-matched male healthy controls (HCs; N = 89. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. DGs and HCs were divided into subgroups (“high” and “low” based on their BDI scores. Effort-related monetary reward processing did not differ between the complete groups of HCs and DGs. Brain activation during receipt of monetary reward though revealed a significant Group × BDI interaction: DGs with higher BDI scores compared to DGs with lower BDI scores showed greater brain activity in the right insula cortex and dorsal striatum while no differences were observed for HCs with higher versus lower BDI scores. Our results suggest that effort-related aspects of monetary motivation, i.e. when monetary output is tied to performance, are not altered in DG. Additionally, our findings strengthen the need for subgroup comparisons in future investigations of the disorder as part of a personalized medicine approach.

  2. Dysregulated left inferior parietal activity in schizophrenia and depression: functional connectivity and characterization

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    Veronika I. Müller

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The inferior parietal cortex (IPC is a heterogeneous region that is known to be involved in a multitude of diverse different tasks and processes, though its contribution to these often-complex functions is yet poorly understood. In a previous study we demonstrated that patients with depression failed to deactivate the left IPC during processing of congruent audiovisual information. We now found the same dysregulation (same region and condition in schizophrenia. By using task-independent (resting state and task-dependent (MACM analyses we aimed at characterizing this particular region with regard to its connectivity and function. Across both approaches, results revealed functional connectivity of the left inferior parietal seed region with bilateral IPC, precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PrC/PCC, medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC, left middle frontal (MFG as well as inferior frontal (IFG gyrus. Network-level functional characterization further revealed that on the one hand, all interconnected regions are part of a network involved in memory processes. On the other hand, sub-networks are formed when emotion, language, social cognition and reasoning processes are required. Thus, the IPC-region that is dysregulated in both depression and schizophrenia is functionally connected to a network of regions which, depending on task demands may form sub-networks. These results therefore indicate that dysregulation of left IPC in depression and schizophrenia might not only be connected to deficits in audiovisual integration, but is possibly also associated to impaired memory and deficits in emotion processing in these patient groups.

  3. Changes in Pitch with a Cochlear Implant Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Lina A.J.; Turner, Christopher W.; Erenberg, Sheryl R.; Gantz, Bruce J

    2007-01-01

    In the normal auditory system, the perceived pitch of a tone is closely linked to the cochlear place of vibration. It has generally been assumed that high-rate electrical stimulation by a cochlear implant electrode also evokes a pitch sensation corresponding to the electrode’s cochlear place (“place” code) and stimulation rate (“temporal” code). However, other factors may affect electric pitch sensation, such as a substantial loss of nearby nerve fibers or even higher-level perceptual changes...

  4. Endomorphin analog analgesics with reduced abuse liability, respiratory depression, motor impairment, tolerance, and glial activation relative to morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadina, James E; Nilges, Mark R; Morgenweck, Jenny; Zhang, Xing; Hackler, Laszlo; Fasold, Melita B

    2016-06-01

    Opioids acting at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are the most effective analgesics, however adverse side effects severely limit their use. Of particular importance, abuse liability results in major medical, societal, and economic problems, respiratory depression is the cause of fatal overdoses, and tolerance complicates treatment and increases the risk of side effects. Motor and cognitive impairment are especially problematic for older adults. Despite the host of negative side effects, opioids such as morphine are commonly used for acute and chronic pain conditions. Separation of analgesia from unwanted effects has long been an unmet goal of opioid research. Novel MOR agonist structures may prove critical for greater success. Here we tested metabolically stable analogs of the endomorphins, endogenous opioids highly selective for the MOR. Compared to morphine, the analogs showed dramatically improved analgesia-to-side-effect ratios. At doses providing equal or greater antinociception than morphine in the rat, the analogs showed reduced a) respiratory depression, b) impairment of motor coordination, c) tolerance and hyperalgesia, d) glial p38/CGRP/P2X7 receptor signaling, and e) reward/abuse potential in both conditioned place preference and self-administration tests. Differential effects on glial activation indicate a mechanism for the relative lack of side effects by the analogs compared to morphine. The results suggest that endomorphin analogs described here could provide gold standard pain relief mediated by selective MOR activation, but with remarkably safer side effect profiles compared to opioids like morphine. PMID:26748051

  5. Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation: UNICAMP Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Machado de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS is an excellent choice for people with residual hearing in low frequencies but not high frequencies and who derive insufficient benefit from hearing aids. For EAS to be effective, subjects' residual hearing must be preserved during cochlear implant (CI surgery. Methods. We implanted 6 subjects with a CI. We used a special surgical technique and an electrode designed to be atraumatic. Subjects' rates of residual hearing preservation were measured 3 times postoperatively, lastly after at least a year of implant experience. Subjects' aided speech perception was tested pre- and postoperatively with a sentence test in quiet. Subjects' subjective responses assessed after a year of EAS or CI experience. Results. 4 subjects had total or partial residual hearing preservation; 2 subjects had total residual hearing loss. All subjects' hearing and speech perception benefited from cochlear implantation. CI diminished or eliminated tinnitus in all 4 subjects who had it preoperatively. 5 subjects reported great satisfaction with their new device. Conclusions. When we have more experience with our surgical technique we are confident we will be able to report increased rates of residual hearing preservation. Hopefully, our study will raise the profile of EAS in Brazil and Latin/South America.

  6. MR imaging of cochlear implant candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the value of diagnostic imaging in the workup of patients for possible placement of a multichannel intracochlear hearing device. Forty-five candidates for cochlear implantation were examined with both CT and MR imaging. In 32 adult patients coronal and axial T2-weighted spin-echo sequences were performed. In 10 patients, we used a T2*-weighted gradient-echo three-dimensional sequence with axial presaturation instead. Three children were examined with an ultrafast snapshot sequence for scout viewing, followed by a T2-weighted axial half-Fourier spin-echo sequence. In 36 patients we found the cochlea to be patent. Thirty-three of these patients successfully received an implant device. Three patients still await surgery. Six patients showed pathologic conditions in at least one ear at CT and MR alone. In 3 patients there was evidence of bony occulsion of the cochlear duct at CT; MR revealed a reduced signal intensity in the cochlea as well. Two patients with normal CT results showed abnormal conditions at MR imaging (reduced signal on T2-weighted images) and were not operated on

  7. Fibro-vascular coupling in the control of cochlear blood flow.

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    Min Dai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transduction of sound in the cochlea is metabolically demanding. The lateral wall and hair cells are critically vulnerable to hypoxia, especially at high sound levels, and tight control over cochlear blood flow (CBF is a physiological necessity. Yet despite the importance of CBF for hearing, consensus on what mechanisms are involved has not been obtained. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report on a local control mechanism for regulating inner ear blood flow involving fibrocyte signaling. Fibrocytes in the super-strial region are spatially distributed near pre-capillaries of the spiral ligament of the albino guinea pig cochlear lateral wall, as demonstrably shown in transmission electron microscope and confocal images. Immunohistochemical techniques reveal the inter-connected fibrocytes to be positive for Na+/K+ ATPase β1 and S100. The connected fibrocytes display more Ca(2+ signaling than other cells in the cochlear lateral wall as indicated by fluorescence of a Ca(2+ sensor, fluo-4. Elevation of Ca(2+ in fibrocytes, induced by photolytic uncaging of the divalent ion chelator o-nitrophenyl EGTA, results in propagation of a Ca(2+ signal to neighboring vascular cells and vasodilation in capillaries. Of more physiological significance, fibrocyte to vascular cell coupled signaling was found to mediate the sound stimulated increase in cochlear blood flow (CBF. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1 was required for capillary dilation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The findings provide the first evidence that signaling between fibrocytes and vascular cells modulates CBF and is a key mechanism for meeting the cellular metabolic demand of increased sound activity.

  8. [Sleep in depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringuey, D; Darcourt, G

    1990-11-28

    Insomnia is a cardinal symptom of depression, side by side with alterations of mood and slowing down of psychomotor activities. It bears witness to a rupture in the built-in circadian rhythm: architectural changes in sleep betray a biological desynchronization. Insomnia is also a failed attempt at finding a solution to depression. Total deprivation of sleep for one night may damp down the depressive disorders, and so does partial sleep deprivation in the second part of the night during several days. This leads to the conclusion that the waking-sleep system participates in the expression of symptoms of depression or even contributes to the genesis of the disease. PMID:2148377

  9. Digital imaging: a valuable technique for the postoperative assessment of cochlear implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, J.T. [Department of Radiology, Belfast City Hospital Trust, Belfast (United Kingdom); Cranley, K. [Northern Ireland Regional Medical Physics Agency, Forster Green Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom); Toner, J.G. [Regional Cochlear Implant Centre, Belfast City Hospital Trust, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Cochlear implantation with a multi-channel electrode array which provides stimulation via the auditory nerve has become a standard treatment for profound deafness. Postoperative radiography demonstrates electrode position and enables confirmation of satisfactory intra-cochlear electrode placement. The number of active electrodes which have been inserted can be determined and possible complications such as electrode kinking or slippage can be assessed. We evaluated digital radiography with confirmation of electrode position by intermittent fluoroscopy and assessed the relative radiation dose of the digital technique, conventional radiography and CT scanning. Radiation dose for this method usually ranges between 40 {mu}Gy and 440 {mu}Gy compared with a single exposure on the skull stand which produces a dose to the region of the cochlea of 470 {mu}Gy and a CT exposure of 950 {mu}Gy. The digital technique is comfortable for the patient, easily reproducible and provides images of high diagnostic quality enabling each electrode to be identified, which is especially valuable in association with postoperative electrode mapping. It also involves a lower radiation dose than conventional radiography. We now use digital radiography for all postoperative cochlear implant assessment. (orig.) With 4 figs., 13 refs.

  10. The use of subtotal petrosectomy in cochlear implant candidates with chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Marcin; Ataide, Andre; Linder, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) candidates with chronic otitis media require special attention and management. The need of opening of the inner ear creates potential routes of spread of infection to subarachnoid spaces and lead to meningitis. The aim of the study was to analyse the technique and complications of subtotal petrosectomy (SP) in cochlear implant candidates with chronic otitis media at three different CI centres. A retrospective study was carried out in three Territory Referral Hospitals. The centres follow Fisch's philosophy and surgical techniques of SP. The study group consisted of 19 patients, 4 men and 15 women, aged 12-82 years. All patients underwent SP with either primary or staged CI implantation. Indications for single or a staged management, difficulties during surgery and complications were analysed. Skin and muscle flap design in primary and revision cases as well as imaging follow-up strategy are discussed. In 14 patients implantation was performed in a single stage and in 5 cases in two stages. Follow-up ranged from 8 months to 10 years. All the patients use their implants and there were no major nor minor complications. The use of subtotal petrosectomy with cochlear implants is a safe and efficient technique when strict surgical steps and rules are applied. Closure of the external ear canal after previous meatoplasty can be challenging and extreme care dissecting the skin flaps is required. In patients with extensive cholesteatoma, active discharge from the ear with resistant bacteria or an "unstable" situation, the procedure can be staged.

  11. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF ADENOSINE 5' -TRIPHOSPHATE ON COCHLEAR FUNCTION OF GUINEA PIG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨军; 李吉平; 钱敏飞; 徐秀玲; 王家东; 丁大连

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study effects of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) on cochlear function of guinea pig. Methods After perfusion of ATP into perilymphatic spaces of the guinea pig cochlea, summating potential (SP), cochlear microphonic (CM) , auditory nerve compound action potential ( CAP ) , distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) were measured. Results The results showed concentration-dependent effect of ATP on the response alterations of bioelectric activity in cochlea. Administration of lmmol/L ATP caused an increase both in the amplitude of the SP and in the threshold of ABR, a decrease in amplitude of the CAP and DPOAE. In addition, response alterations of the CAP and DPOAE showed in an intensity- and frequency-dependent manner, respectively. At levels of 20 -70dB nHL sound intensity, lmmol/L ATP caused a significant decrease in the CAP amplitude, while at moderate and high frequency ranges of 2 -8kHz it reduced DPOAE amplitude significantly. 330μmol/L ATP also increased the threshold of ABR. Conclusion ATP through perilymphatic perfusion could inhibit cochlear function of guinea pig.

  12. Cochlear function after selective spiral ganglion cells degeneration induced by ouabain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin-e; CAO Ke-li; YIN Shan-kai; WANG Zhen; CHEN Zheng-nong

    2006-01-01

    Background Ouabain, a cardiac glycoside that specifically binds to Na/K-ATPase and inhibits its activity, was applied to gerbils to develop a method for studying auditory neuropathy.Methods Ouabain was applied to the round window of the cochlea in each gerbil by using a piece of gelfoam with 3 μl or 24 μl (1 mmol/L) ouabain solution. The changes of the threshold of auditory brainstem response,cochlear function round window electrocochleography, as well as the morphological changes of the spiral ganglion cells of the cochlea were observed after application of ouabain for 24 hours or 96 hours.Results:In ouabain treated gerbils, auditory brainstem response and compound action potential thresholds showed either elevation or no response at all. However, the thresholds of cochlear microphonic and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were not affected. Degeneration and necrosis of some spiral ganglion cells in ears with applications of ouabain (24 hours, 3 μl, 1 mmol/L; 96 hours, 24 μl, 1 mmol/L ouabain). The number of spiral ganglion cells was decreased (24 hours, 3 μl, 1 mmol/L ouabain) or near to a total loss (96 hours, 24 μl, 1 mmol/L ouabain).Conclusions:These results indicate a high degree of independence between the spiral ganglion cells and the outer hair cell systems in the cochlear transduction mechanism. The method used in this study would provide a valuable tool for studying auditory neuropathy.

  13. Depression after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelstein, R C

    2001-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for increased postmyocardial infarction morbidity and mortality, even after controlling for the extent of coronary artery disease, infarct size, and the severity of left ventricular dysfunction. This risk factor takes on added significance when one considers that almost half of patients recovering from a myocardial infarction have major or minor depression and that major depression alone occurs in about one in five of these individuals. Despite the well-documented risk of depression, questions remain about the mechanism of the relationship between mood disturbance and adverse outcome. The link may be explained by an association with lower levels of social support, poor adherence to recommended medical therapy and lifestyle changes intended to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events, disturbances in autonomic tone, enhanced platelet activation and aggregation, and systemic immune activation. Unfortunately, questions about the pathophysiologic mechanism of depression in this setting are paralleled by uncertainties about the optimal treatment of depression for patients recovering from a myocardial infarction and by a lack of knowledge about whether treating depression lowers the associated increased mortality risk. Ongoing research studies will help to determine the benefits of psychosocial interventions and of antidepressant therapy for patients soon after myocardial infarction. Although the identification of depression as a risk factor may by itself be a reason to incorporate a comprehensive psychological evaluation into the routine care of patients with myocardial infarction, this practice should certainly become standard if studies show that treating depression reduces the increased mortality risk of these patients.

  14. Neural activity in relation to clinically derived personality syndromes in depression using a psychodynamic fMRI paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Svenja eTaubner; Daniel eWiswede; Henrik eKessler

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The heterogeneity between patients with depression cannot be captured adequately with existing descriptive systems of diagnosis and neurobiological models of depression. Furthermore, considering the highly individual nature of depression, the application of general stimuli in past research efforts may not capture the essence of the disorder. This study aims to identify subtypes of depression by using empirically derived personality syndromes, and to explore neural correlates of the...

  15. Can variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA-axis activity explain the relationship between depression and cognition in bipolar patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke J van der Werf-Eldering

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is thought to be associated with more mood symptoms and worse cognitive functioning. This study examined whether variation in HPA axis activity underlies the association between mood symptoms and cognitive functioning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 65 bipolar patients cognitive functioning was measured in domains of psychomotor speed, speed of information processing, attentional switching, verbal memory, visual memory, executive functioning and an overall mean score. Severity of depression was assessed by the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-self rating version. Saliva cortisol measurements were performed to calculate HPA axis indicators: cortisol awakening response, diurnal slope, the evening cortisol level and the cortisol suppression on the dexamethasone suppression test. Regression analyses of depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning on each HPA axis indicator were performed. In addition we calculated percentages explanation of the association between depressive symptoms and cognition by HPA axis indicators. Depressive symptoms were associated with dysfunction in psychomotor speed, attentional switching and the mean score, as well as with attenuation in diurnal slope value. No association was found between HPA axis activity and cognitive functioning and HPA axis activity did not explain the associations between depressive symptoms and cognition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As our study is the first one in this field specific for bipolar patients and changes in HPA-axis activity did not seem to explain the association between severity of depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning in bipolar patients, future studies are needed to evaluate other factors that might explain this relationship.

  16. Music Perception of Cochlear Implant Recipients with Implications for Music Instruction: A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Feilin; Gfeller, Kate

    2012-03-23

    This review of literature presents a systematic analysis of the capabilities and limitations of cochlear implant recipients regarding music perception. Specifically, it a) analyzes individual components of music (e.g., rhythm, timbre, and pitch) as they interface with the technical characteristics of cochlear implants and the perceptual abilities of cochlear implant recipients; and b) describes accommodations for music instruction that support successful participation of children with cochlear implants. This article consolidates research studies from various disciplines (audiology, hearing science, speech-language pathology, cochlear implants, and music therapy) to provide practical recommendations for educators in fostering the musical growth of children with cochlear implants. PMID:23469365

  17. Studying the Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Sabri leghaie

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant surgery is aimed at making a comprehensive packet of information for the deaf by mixing the data acquired by implanted device and the communicational grammar. Although language production and ability of communication are not main factors in determining the candidacy for cochlear implant surgery, they play crucial role in determining cochlear implant success. we should study the communication skills much deeper than a simple perception and production of speech to have a reasonable evaluation of development of Auditory integration and grammatical language structure. Hence in the current article we will first discuss the grammatical structure in language and then have a look at the pragmatics , semantics and phonological aspects in children with cochlear implant in Virginia college in USA.

  18. Evaluation of vestibular function following cochlear implant surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motesaddi Zandi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are contradictory reports regarding vestibular function after cochlear implant surgery. In this study, we evaluated the influence of cochlear implant surgery on vestibular function by comparing the results of caloric test in both ears of patients who received implants. Materials and Methods: 24 adult patients who had undergone cochlear implant surgery at least 6 months earlier, were participated in this study. Caloric test with the stimulus of cold and warm water was performed on both ears of each patient and results were compared with each other regarding unilateral weakness, directional preponderance and areflexia. Results: The differences between two ears regarding directional preponderance, unilateral weakness and areflexia were not statistically significant. Conclusion: It seems the pathological cause of deafness is a more influential factor on vestibular dysfunction than the damage following cochlear implant surgery.

  19. Human cochlear tuning estimates from stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Thomas; Harte, James; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Two objective measures of human cochlear tuning, using stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAE), have been proposed. One measure used SFOAE phase-gradient delay and the other twotone suppression (2TS) tuning curves. Here, it is hypothesized that the two measures lead to different frequency......-of-tuning curves was observed for experiment 2, consistent with objective and behavioural estimates from the literature. Most importantly, the absolute difference between the two tuning estimates was very large and statistically significant. It is argued that the 2TS estimates of cochlear tuning likely represents...... the underlying properties of the suppression mechanism, and not necessarily cochlear tuning. Thus the phase-gradient delay estimate is the most likely one to reflect cochlear tuning....

  20. An exploratory mixed methods study of the acceptability and effectiveness of mindfulness -based cognitive therapy for patients with active depression and anxiety in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercer Stewart W

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT is an 8-week course developed for patients with relapsing depression that integrates mindfulness meditation practices and cognitive theory. Previous studies have demonstrated that non-depressed participants with a history of relapsing depression are protected from relapse by participating in the course. This exploratory study examined the acceptability and effectiveness of MBCT for patients in primary care with active symptoms of depression and anxiety Methods 13 patients with recurrent depression or recurrent depression and anxiety were recruited to take part in the study. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted three months after completing the MBCT programme. A framework approach was used to analyse the data. Beck depression inventories (BDI-II and Beck anxiety inventories (BAI provided quantitative data and were administered before and three months after the intervention. Results The qualitative data indicated that mindfulness training was both acceptable and beneficial to the majority of patients. For many of the participants, being in a group was an important normalising and validating experience. However most of the group believed the course was too short and thought that some form of follow up was essential. More than half the patients continued to apply mindfulness techniques three months after the course had ended. A minority of patients continued to experience significant levels of psychological distress, particularly anxiety. Statistically significant reductions in mean depression and anxiety scores were observed; the mean pre-course depression score was 35.7 and post-course score was 17.8 (p = 0.001. A similar reduction was noted for anxiety with a mean pre-course anxiety score of 32.0 and mean post course score of 20.5 (p = 0.039. Overall 8/11 (72% patients showed improvements in BDI and 7/11 (63% patients showed improvements in BAI. In general the results

  1. Variability of the mental representation of the cochlear anatomy during cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Renato; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Bernardeschi, Daniele; De Seta, Daniele; Bensimon, Jean Loup; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Nguyen, Yann

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mental representation of the insertion axis of surgeons with different degrees of experience, and reproducibility of the insertion axis in repeated measures. A mastoidectomy and a posterior tympanotomy were prepared in five different artificial temporal bones. A cone-beam CT was performed for each temporal bone and the data were registered on a magnetic navigation system. In these five temporal bones, 16 surgeons (3 experts; >50 cochlear implant surgery/year; 7 fellows with few cochlear implant experience, and 6 residents) were asked to determine the optimal insertion axis according to their mental representation. Compared to a planned ideal axis, the insertion axis was better determined by the experts with higher accuracy (axial: 7° ± 1.5°, coronal: 6° ± 1.5°) than fellows (axial: 14° ± 1.7°, coronal: 13° ± 1.7°; p scala tympani can be observed due to the complexity of the temporal bone anatomy and lack of landmarks to determine scala tympani orientation. Navigation systems can be used to evaluate and improve mental representation of the insertion axis to the scala tympani for cochlear implant surgery. PMID:26324880

  2. An Internet-based program for depression using activity and physiological sensors: efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botella C

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Botella,1,2 Adriana Mira,1 Inés Moragrega,2,3 Azucena García-Palacios,1,2 Juana Bretón-López,1,2 Diana Castilla,1,2 Antonio Riera López del Amo,1 Carla Soler,1 Guadalupe Molinari,1 Soledad Quero,1,2 Verónica Guillén-Botella,2,3 Ignacio Miralles,1,2 Sara Nebot,1 Berenice Serrano,1,2 Dennis Majoe,4 Mariano Alcañiz,2,5 Rosa María Baños2,31Department of Basic, Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Universitat Jaume, Castellón, Spain; 2CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; 3Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, Spain; 4Native Systems Institute, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 5Human-Centered Technology Institute, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain Purpose: Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT has been shown to be efficacious. Moreover, CCBT can be enhanced by using physiological and activity sensors, but there is no evidence about the acceptability of all these tools. The objective of this study is to examine the efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use of an Internet-based CCBT program for preventing depression, with and without sensors (electroencephalography, electrocardiograhpy ECG, and actigraphy, in a high-risk population (unemployed men.Patients and methods: Sixty participants at risk of depression (unemployed men were randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: 1 intervention program (N=22, 2 intervention program plus sensors (N=19, and 3 control group (N=19. Participants completed depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect, and perceived stress measures. Furthermore, they also completed the measures for expectation, satisfaction, and the ease of use of the program.Results: Results showed that the two intervention groups improved significantly more than the control group on the clinical variables, and the improvements

  3. Mouse testing methods in psychoneuroimmunology: an overview of how to measure sickness, depressive/anxietal, cognitive, and physical activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Jason M; Blevins, Neil A; Baynard, Tracy; Freund, Gregory G

    2012-01-01

    The field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) aims to uncover the processes and consequences of nervous, immune, and endocrine system relationships. Behavior is a consequence of such interactions and manifests from a complex interweave of factors including immune-to-neural and neural-to-immune communication. Often the signaling molecules involved during a particular episode of neuroimmune activation are not known but behavioral response provides evidence that bioactives such as neurotransmitters and cytokines are perturbed. Immunobehavioral phenotyping is a first-line approach when examining the neuroimmune system and its reaction to immune stimulation or suppression. Behavioral response is significantly more sensitive than direct measurement of a single specific bioactive and can quickly and efficiently rule in or out relevance of a particular immune challenge or therapeutic to neuroimmunity. Classically, immunobehavioral research was focused on sickness symptoms related to bacterial infection but neuroimmune activation is now a recognized complication of diseases and disorders ranging from cancer to diabesity. Immunobehaviors include lethargy, loss of appetite, and disinterest in social activity and the surrounding environment. In addition, neuroimmune activation can precipitate feelings of depression and anxiety while negatively impacting cognitive function and physical activity. Provided is a detailed overview of behavioral tests frequently used to examine neuroimmune activation in mice with a special emphasis on preexperimental conditions that can confound or prevent successful immunobehavioral experimentation.

  4. Current status and correlated issues on cochlear implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ke-li; WANG Lin-e

    2006-01-01

    @@ Cochlear implant is a biomedical device, which can directly stimulate the auditory nerve pass-by the damaged hair cell to recover and rebuild the hearing of deaf people. The implant can also stimulate the auditory brainstem and cortex in patients whose auditory nerve is not accessible because of acoustic tumors. Cochlear implantation can make the patients generate electrical hearing (artificial hearing).The artificial hearing can recover,improve or rebuild the hearing of deaf people through electrical stimulus.

  5. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. F...

  6. Audiological outcomes of cochlear implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos; Samuel, Paola Angélica; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valeria Schimdt; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The most relevant clinical symptom in Waardenburg syndrome is profound bilateral sensorioneural hearing loss. Aim: To characterize and describe hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome to improve preoperative expectations. Method: This was an observational and retrospective study of a series of cases. Children who were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome and who received a multichannel cochlear implant between March 1999 and July...

  7. Nuclear entry of hyperbranched polylysine nanoparticles into cochlear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weikai Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Weikai Zhang1, Ya Zhang1, Marian Löbler2, Klaus-Peter Schmitz2, Aqeel Ahmad3, Ilmari Pyykkö1, Jing Zou11Department of Otolaryngology, University of Tampere, Medical School, Tampere, Finland; 2University of Rostock, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Rostock, Germany; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, Espoo, FinlandBackground: Gene therapy is a potentially effective therapeutic modality for treating sensorineural hearing loss. Nonviral gene delivery vectors are expected to become extremely safe and convenient, and nanoparticles are the most promising types of vectors. However, infrequent nuclear localization in the cochlear cells limits their application for gene therapy. This study aimed to investigate the potential nuclear entry of hyperbranched polylysine nanoparticles (HPNPs for gene delivery to cochlear targets.Methods: Rat primary cochlear cells and cochlear explants generated from newborn rats were treated with different concentrations of HPNPs. For the in vivo study, HPNPs were administered to the rats' round window membranes. Subcellular distribution of HPNPs in different cell populations was observed with confocal microscope 24 hours after administration.Results: Nuclear entry was observed in various cochlear cell types in vitro and in vivo. In the primary cochlear cell culture, concentration-dependent internalization was observed. In the cochlear organotypic culture, abundant HPNPs were found in the modiolus, including the spiral ganglion, organ of Corti, and lateral wall tissues. In the in vivo study, a gradient distribution of HPNPs through different layers of the round window membrane was observed. HPNPs were also distributed in the cells of the middle ear tissue. Additionally, efficient internalization of HPNPs was observed in the organ of Corti and spiral ganglion cells. In primary cochlear cells, HPNPs induced higher transfection efficiency than did Lipofectamine

  8. Bilingualism: A Pearl to Overcome Certain Perils of Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Humphries, Tom; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Mathur, Gaurav; Napoli, Donna Jo; Padden, Carol; Rathmann, Christian; Smith, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have demonstrated success in improving young deaf children’s speech and low-level speech awareness across a range of auditory functions, but this success is highly variable, and how this success correlates to high-level language development is even more variable. Prevalence on the success rate of CI as an outcome for language development is difficult to obtain because studies vary widely in methodology and variables of interest, and because not all cochlear implant tech...

  9. Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel J; Akil, Omar; Acevedo, Claire; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Tsai, Betty S; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Liebenberg, Ellen; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Ritchie, Robert O; Lustig, Lawrence R; Alliston, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling, a combination of bone resorption and formation, requires precise regulation of cellular and molecular signaling to maintain proper bone quality. Whereas osteoblasts deposit and osteoclasts resorb bone matrix, osteocytes both dynamically resorb and replace perilacunar bone matrix. Osteocytes secrete proteases like matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) to maintain the material quality of bone matrix through perilacunar remodeling (PLR). Deregulated bone remodeling impairs bone quality and can compromise hearing since the auditory transduction mechanism is within bone. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cochlear bone provides unique ways to assess bone quality independent of other aspects that contribute to bone mechanical behavior. Cochlear bone is singular in its regulation of remodeling by expressing high levels of osteoprotegerin. Since cochlear bone expresses a key PLR enzyme, MMP13, we examined whether cochlear bone relies on, or is protected from, osteocyte-mediated PLR to maintain hearing and bone quality using a mouse model lacking MMP13 (MMP13(-/-)). We investigated the canalicular network, collagen organization, lacunar volume via micro-computed tomography, and dynamic histomorphometry. Despite finding defects in these hallmarks of PLR in MMP13(-/-) long bones, cochlear bone revealed no differences in these markers, nor hearing loss as measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs), between wild type and MMP13(-/-) mice. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed abundant PLR by tibial osteocytes, but near absence in cochlear bone. Cochlear suppression of PLR corresponds to repression of several key PLR genes in the cochlea relative to long bones. These data suggest that cochlear bone uniquely maintains bone quality and hearing independent of MMP13-mediated osteocytic PLR. Furthermore, the cochlea employs parallel mechanisms to inhibit remodeling by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and by

  10. Maximizing Cochlear Implant Patients’ Performance with Advanced Speech Training Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Qian-Jie; Galvin, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in implant technology and speech processing have provided great benefit to many cochlear implant patients. However, some patients receive little benefit from the latest technology, even after many years’ experience with the device. Moreover, even the best cochlear implant performers have great difficulty understanding speech in background noise, and music perception and appreciation remain major challenges. Recent studies have shown that targeted auditory training can significantly i...

  11. Abnormal pitch perception produced by cochlear implant stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Gang Zeng

    Full Text Available Contemporary cochlear implants with multiple electrode stimulation can produce good speech perception but poor music perception. Hindered by the lack of a gold standard to quantify electric pitch, relatively little is known about the nature and extent of the electric pitch abnormalities and their impact on cochlear implant performance. Here we overcame this obstacle by comparing acoustic and electric pitch perception in 3 unilateral cochlear-implant subjects who had functionally usable acoustic hearing throughout the audiometric frequency range in the non-implant ear. First, to establish a baseline, we measured and found slightly impaired pure tone frequency discrimination and nearly perfect melody recognition in all 3 subjects' acoustic ear. Second, using pure tones in the acoustic ear to match electric pitch induced by an intra-cochlear electrode, we found that the frequency-electrode function was not only 1-2 octaves lower, but also 2 times more compressed in frequency range than the normal cochlear frequency-place function. Third, we derived frequency difference limens in electric pitch and found that the equivalent electric frequency discrimination was 24 times worse than normal-hearing controls. These 3 abnormalities are likely a result of a combination of broad electric field, distant intra-cochlear electrode placement, and non-uniform spiral ganglion cell distribution and survival, all of which are inherent to the electrode-nerve interface in contemporary cochlear implants. Previous studies emphasized on the "mean" shape of the frequency-electrode function, but the present study indicates that the large "variance" of this function, reflecting poor electric pitch discriminability, is the main factor limiting contemporary cochlear implant performance.

  12. Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel J; Akil, Omar; Acevedo, Claire; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Tsai, Betty S; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Liebenberg, Ellen; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Ritchie, Robert O; Lustig, Lawrence R; Alliston, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling, a combination of bone resorption and formation, requires precise regulation of cellular and molecular signaling to maintain proper bone quality. Whereas osteoblasts deposit and osteoclasts resorb bone matrix, osteocytes both dynamically resorb and replace perilacunar bone matrix. Osteocytes secrete proteases like matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) to maintain the material quality of bone matrix through perilacunar remodeling (PLR). Deregulated bone remodeling impairs bone quality and can compromise hearing since the auditory transduction mechanism is within bone. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cochlear bone provides unique ways to assess bone quality independent of other aspects that contribute to bone mechanical behavior. Cochlear bone is singular in its regulation of remodeling by expressing high levels of osteoprotegerin. Since cochlear bone expresses a key PLR enzyme, MMP13, we examined whether cochlear bone relies on, or is protected from, osteocyte-mediated PLR to maintain hearing and bone quality using a mouse model lacking MMP13 (MMP13(-/-)). We investigated the canalicular network, collagen organization, lacunar volume via micro-computed tomography, and dynamic histomorphometry. Despite finding defects in these hallmarks of PLR in MMP13(-/-) long bones, cochlear bone revealed no differences in these markers, nor hearing loss as measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs), between wild type and MMP13(-/-) mice. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed abundant PLR by tibial osteocytes, but near absence in cochlear bone. Cochlear suppression of PLR corresponds to repression of several key PLR genes in the cochlea relative to long bones. These data suggest that cochlear bone uniquely maintains bone quality and hearing independent of MMP13-mediated osteocytic PLR. Furthermore, the cochlea employs parallel mechanisms to inhibit remodeling by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and by

  13. Acoustic Trauma Increases Cochlear and Hair Cell Uptake of Gentamicin

    OpenAIRE

    Hongzhe Li; Qi Wang; Steyger, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to intense sound or high doses of aminoglycoside antibiotics can increase hearing thresholds, induce cochlear dysfunction, disrupt hair cell morphology and promote hair cell death, leading to permanent hearing loss. When the two insults are combined, synergistic ototoxicity occurs, exacerbating cochlear vulnerability to sound exposure. The underlying mechanism of this synergism remains unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sound exposure enhances the intra...

  14. Atypical Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Ertekin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atypical depression is defined as a specifier of major depressive disorder. Columbia criteria for atypical depression are commonly used to make a diagnosis. Female sex, onset at early age, chronic course, and higher rate of comorbidity (especially anxiety disorder and bipolar disorder is noteworthy in atypical depression. Although, the atypical depression seems to support the familial genetic transition, there is not any specific study supporting these data. In the treatment of atypical depression, monoamine oxidase inhibitors are reported to be more effective than tricyclic antidepressants. In recent studies, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have also proven to be efficient.

  15. The influence of comorbid personality disorder on the effects of behavioural activation vs. antidepressant medication for major depressive disorder: results from a randomized trial in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradveisi, Latif; Huibers, Marcus J H; Renner, Fritz; Arasteh, Modabber; Arntz, Arnoud

    2013-08-01

    There is a disagreement about the impact of personality disorder (PD) on treatment outcome for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). 100 out-patients with MDD were randomized to 16 sessions of behavioural activation (BA) (n = 50) or antidepressant medication (ADM) (n = 50) in Iran. Main outcome was depression severity, measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and assessed at 0, 4, 13 and 49 weeks. Participants with comorbid PDs had higher scores on BDI and HRSD at baseline and throughout the study than participants without comorbid PD. Patients with and without comorbid personality pathology responded equally to treatment on the short-and the long-term. Overall, BA was better in reducing symptoms in patients but this effect was not influenced by comorbid PD. Similar effects were found for a dimensional PD-measure. Only cluster-C PD-traits turned out to be associated with overall depression severity. Cluster-A PD-traits predicted poorer long-term treatment response to ADM and BA, but only on the BDI, not on the HRSD. No effects of cluster-B PD-traits were found. However, PD was associated with higher dropout. The general conclusion is that comorbid PD pathology, especially from cluster-C, is associated with higher depression severity, but not with less response to treatment. Comorbid PD did predict increased chance of dropout.

  16. Cochlear re-implantation: lessons learnt and the way ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Uma; Sikka, Kapil; Agarwal, Shivani; Kumar, Rakesh; Thakar, Alok; Sharma, Suresh C

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion A cochlear re-implantation procedure is undesirable; however, the cochlear implant surgeon may have to perform a re-implantation procedure occasionally for various reasons. Following standard techniques, implant performance comparable with primary implantation may be achieved. Objective To study the causes and outcomes of cochlear re-implantation in an Asian Indian population. Study design Retrospective analysis of clinical charts over an 18-year period with prospective follow-up of patients. Methods The charts of 534 patients, who underwent cochlear implant, at an Otorhinolaryngology institutional Centre, from January 1997 to January 2015 were studied. Of these, the charts of 18 patients who underwent cochlear re-implantation were studied. The causes and audiological and speech outcomes were analysed. Results Eighteen patients (3.4%) underwent cochlear re-implantation for various reasons. The commonest indication was device failure in seven patients (39%), followed by electrode extrusion in five (28%), trauma in three (11%), electrode migration in two (11%) and improper electrode placement in one (6%) patient. The audiological performance tests and speech tests either remained the same or improved from those achieved for patients undergoing primary implantation, in 87% patients. PMID:26898701

  17. The development of the Nucleus Freedom Cochlear implant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, James F; Busby, Peter A; Gibson, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Cochlear Limited (Cochlear) released the fourth-generation cochlear implant system, Nucleus Freedom, in 2005. Freedom is based on 25 years of experience in cochlear implant research and development and incorporates advances in medicine, implantable materials, electronic technology, and sound coding. This article presents the development of Cochlear's implant systems, with an overview of the first 3 generations, and details of the Freedom system: the CI24RE receiver-stimulator, the Contour Advance electrode, the modular Freedom processor, the available speech coding strategies, the input processing options of Smart Sound to improve the signal before coding as electrical signals, and the programming software. Preliminary results from multicenter studies with the Freedom system are reported, demonstrating better levels of performance compared with the previous systems. The final section presents the most recent implant reliability data, with the early findings at 18 months showing improved reliability of the Freedom implant compared with the earlier Nucleus 3 System. Also reported are some of the findings of Cochlear's collaborative research programs to improve recipient outcomes. Included are studies showing the benefits from bilateral implants, electroacoustic stimulation using an ipsilateral and/or contralateral hearing aid, advanced speech coding, and streamlined speech processor programming. PMID:17172547

  18. Cochlear precursors of neural pitch and loudness codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwislocki, J J

    1995-09-01

    It has been believed by most auditory scientists for over a century that the place of maximum vibration in the cochlea provides the main pitch code. Recently, we have obtained experimental evidence showing that this is quite unlikely, because the maximum of cochlear excitation changes its location with sound intensity, moving over the useful sound intensity range toward the cochlear base by a distance equivalent to more than one octave, whereas the pitch remains almost constant. In the presence of outer hair cell damage, the maximum is shifted toward the base by a similar distance, whereas the pitch is hardly affected. Of interest, the location of the apical cutoff of excitation is practically unaffected by sound intensity or cochlear damage. For any given sound frequency, the shift of the maximum with sound intensity precludes any single cochlear location from coding for loudness over the entire useful intensity range. The code is very likely provided by the maximum, which changes its location with the intensity, or by the whole cochlear excitation area. Of significance in this respect is our determination that the growth of the output of the whole auditory nerve parallels the growth of the excitation area. These findings may be useful for the coding of sound in cochlear implants, as well as for hearing aid dynamics. PMID:7668600

  19. Quantitative polarized light microscopy of unstained mammalian cochlear sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwani, Neil M.; Ong, Cheng Ai; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Haward, Simon J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2013-02-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in the world, and most frequently it originates in the inner ear. Yet, the inner ear has been difficult to access for diagnosis because of its small size, delicate nature, complex three-dimensional anatomy, and encasement in the densest bone in the body. Evolving optical methods are promising to afford cellular diagnosis of pathologic changes in the inner ear. To appropriately interpret results from these emerging technologies, it is important to characterize optical properties of cochlear tissues. Here, we focus on that characterization using quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) applied to unstained cochlear sections of the mouse, a common animal model of human hearing loss. We find that the most birefringent cochlear materials are collagen fibrils and myelin. Retardance of the otic capsule, the spiral ligament, and the basilar membrane are substantially higher than that of other cochlear structures. Retardance of the spiral ligament and the basilar membrane decrease from the cochlear base to the apex, compared with the more uniform retardance of other structures. The intricate structural details revealed by qPLM of unstained cochlear sections ex vivo strongly motivate future application of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to human cochlea in vivo.

  20. Prevalence, correlates and under-diagnosis of clinical depression among adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy in a Tertiary Health Institution in northeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdu Wakawa Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical depression is a highly debilitating illness, which is often under-diagnosed and negatively impacts on the quality of life of its sufferers. When it co-exists with other medical conditions, its effect is even more incapacitating. Undiagnosed depression in the context of HIV infection leads to accelerated decline in CD4+ cell counts with concomitant increase in the viral load and poor adherence to the antiretroviral medications which lead to viral mutation and the evolution of resistant strains. This study examined the prevalence of depression, its correlates and the frequency of the diagnosis of the condition among HIV+ subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART by the internists and general physicians at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital in Northeastern Nigeria. Three hundred and fifty representative samples of HIV+ adults on HAART were drawn from the Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic of the Institution. Diagnosis of depression was made using the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria based on Composite International Diagnostic Interview generated data. Socio-demographic and clinical variables were also analyzed for their correlation with depression in the subjects. About 20% of the respondents were diagnosed with clinical depression and no diagnosis of the condition was hitherto entertained in all the respondents. The independent determinants of depression in the participants were: female gender [odds ratio (OR=3.87 (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.089-7.183], past history of psychiatric illness [OR=43.81 (95% CI: 9.731-197.30] and family history of psychiatric illness in first-degree relatives of the subjects [OR=14.364 (95% CI=5.327- 38.729]. Depression is a relatively common psychiatric condition among adults on HAART, there is therefore the need for routine screening of this condition among HIV+ subjects in order to optimize patient care and improve clinical outcomes.

  1. Urethane anesthesia depresses activities of thalamocortical neurons and alters its response to nociception in terms of dual firing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeowool eHuh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics are often used to characterize the activity of single neurons in-vivo for its advantages such as reduced noise level and convenience in noxious stimulations. Of the anesthetics, urethane had been widely used in some thalamic studies under the assumption that sensory signals are still relayed to the thalamus under urethane anesthesia and that thalamic response would therefore reflect the response of the awake state. We tested whether this assumption stands by comparing thalamic activity in terms of tonic and burst firing modes during ‘the awake state’ or under ‘urethane anesthesia’ utilizing the extracellular single unit recording technique. First we have tested how thalamic relay neurons respond to the introduction of urethane and then tested how urethane influences thalamic discharges under formalin-induced nociception. Urethane significantly depressed overall firing rates of thalamic relay neurons, which was sustained despite the delayed increase of burst activity over the 4 hour recording period. Thalamic response to nociception under anesthesia was also similar overall except for the slight and transient increase of burst activity. Overall, results demonstrated that urethane suppresses the activity of thalamic relay neurons and that, despite the slight fluctuation of burst firing, formalin-induced nociception cannot significantly change the firing pattern of thalamic relay neurons that was caused by urethane.

  2. Association between chronic stress-induced structural abnormalities in Ranvier nodes and reduced oligodendrocyte activity in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shingo; Taniguchi, Manabu; Koyama, Yoshihisa; Shimizu, Shoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Yasuno, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Akihide; Iida, Hidehiro; Kudo, Takashi; Katayama, Taiichi; Tohyama, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Repeated stressful events are associated with the onset of major depressive disorder (MDD). We previously showed oligodendrocyte (OL)-specific activation of the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK)1 cascade, increased expression of axon-myelin adhesion molecules, and elaboration of the oligodendrocytic arbor in the corpus callosum of chronically stressed mice. In the current study, we demonstrate that the nodes and paranodes of Ranvier in the corpus callosum were narrower in these mice. Chronic stress also led to diffuse redistribution of Caspr and Kv 1.1 and decreased the activity in white matter, suggesting a link between morphological changes in OLs and inhibition of axonal activity. OL primary cultures subjected to chronic stress resulted in SGK1 activation and translocation to the nucleus, where it inhibited the transcription of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Furthermore, the cAMP level and membrane potential of OLs were reduced by chronic stress exposure. We showed by diffusion tensor imaging that the corpus callosum of patients with MDD exhibited reduced fractional anisotropy, reflecting compromised white matter integrity possibly caused by axonal damage. Our findings suggest that chronic stress disrupts the organization of the nodes of Ranvier by suppressing mGluR activation in OLs, and that specific white matter abnormalities are closely associated with MDD onset. PMID:26976207

  3. Aspects of Music with Cochlear Implants – Music Listening Habits and Appreciation in Danish Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Bjørn; Hansen, Mads; Sørensen, Stine Derdau; Ovesen, Therese; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implant users differ significantly from their normal hearing peerswhen it comes to perception of music. Several studies have shown thatstructural features – such as rhythm, timbre, and pitch – are transmitted lessaccurately through an implant. However, we cannot predict personalenjoyment of music solely as a function of accuracy of perception. But canmusic be pleasant with a cochlear implant at all? Our aim here was to gatherinformation of both music enjoyment and listening habits be...

  4. Correlation of within-individual fluctuation of depressed mood with prefrontal cortex activity during verbal working memory task: optical topography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Aoki, Ryuta; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies showed that interindividual variations in mood state are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity. In this study, we focused on the depressed-mood state under natural circumstances and examined the relationship between within-individual changes over time in this mood state and PFC activity. We used optical topography (OT), a functional imaging technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy, to measure PFC activity for each participant in three experimental sessions repeated at 2-week intervals. In each session, the participants completed a self-report questionnaire of mood state and underwent OT measurement while performing verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks. The results showed that changes in the depressed-mood score between successive sessions were negatively correlated with those in the left PFC activation for the verbal WM task (ρ = -0.56, p mood changes. We thus demonstrated that PFC activity during a verbal WM task varies depending on the participant's depressed mood state, independent of trait factors. This suggests that using optical topography to measure PFC activity during a verbal WM task can be used as a potential state marker for an individual's depressed mood state.

  5. Correlation of within-individual fluctuation of depressed mood with prefrontal cortex activity during verbal working memory task: optical topography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Aoki, Ryuta; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies showed that interindividual variations in mood state are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity. In this study, we focused on the depressed-mood state under natural circumstances and examined the relationship between within-individual changes over time in this mood state and PFC activity. We used optical topography (OT), a functional imaging technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy, to measure PFC activity for each participant in three experimental sessions repeated at 2-week intervals. In each session, the participants completed a self-report questionnaire of mood state and underwent OT measurement while performing verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks. The results showed that changes in the depressed-mood score between successive sessions were negatively correlated with those in the left PFC activation for the verbal WM task (ρ = -0.56, p mood changes. We thus demonstrated that PFC activity during a verbal WM task varies depending on the participant's depressed mood state, independent of trait factors. This suggests that using optical topography to measure PFC activity during a verbal WM task can be used as a potential state marker for an individual's depressed mood state.

  6. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

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    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C. (X-Ray Science Division); (Northwestern Univ.); (Diamond Light Source, Ltd.)

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  7. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lu

    Full Text Available Modern cochlear implant (CI users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  8. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  9. Deafness in cochlear and auditory nerve disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common type of hearing impairment worldwide. It arises as a consequence of damage to the cochlea or auditory nerve, and several structures are often affected simultaneously. There are many causes, including genetic mutations affecting the structures of the inner ear, and environmental insults such as noise, ototoxic substances, and hypoxia. The prevalence increases dramatically with age. Clinical diagnosis is most commonly accomplished by measuring detection thresholds and comparing these to normative values to determine the degree of hearing loss. In addition to causing insensitivity to weak sounds, sensorineural hearing loss has a number of adverse perceptual consequences, including loudness recruitment, poor perception of pitch and auditory space, and difficulty understanding speech, particularly in the presence of background noise. The condition is usually incurable; treatment focuses on restoring the audibility of sounds made inaudible by hearing loss using either hearing aids or cochlear implants.

  10. Beginnings of Song in Young Deaf Children Using Cochlear Implants: The Song They Move, the Song They Feel, the Song They Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennari, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the singing activity of prelingually deaf children under four years of age who are using cochlear implants (CIs) and presents a strand of a larger study that aimed to observe, record and analyse the musical activity of seven profoundly deaf children using CIs in the UK, for a period of one calendar year. The singing activity…

  11. Synthesis of benzimidazole based thiadiazole and carbohydrazide conjugates as glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors with anti-depressant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Tantray, Mushtaq A; Hamid, Hinna; Alam, Mohammad Sarwar; Kalam, Abul; Dhulap, Abhijeet

    2016-08-15

    A series of benzimidazole based thiadiazole and carbohydrazide conjugates have been synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and anti-depressant effect. Compounds 4f, 4j, 5b, 5g and 5i were found to be the most potent inhibitors of GSK-3β in vitro amongst the twenty-five benzimidazole based thiadiazole and carbohydrazide conjugates synthesized. Compound 5i was also found to exhibit significant antidepressant activity in vivo at 50mg/kg, when compared to fluoxetine, a known antidepressant drug. The molecular docking studies revealed multiple hydrogen bond interactions by the synthesized compounds with various amino acid residues, viz, ASP-133, LYS-183, PRO-136, VAL-135, TYR-134, or LYS-60 at the GSK-3β receptor site. PMID:27406796

  12. Influence of cochlear implantation on vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulan; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Fan; Qin, Zhaobing

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion Vestibular function in patients can be damaged following cochlear implantation. Therefore, assessing the pre-operative vestibular status, carefully choosing the side of implantation, and preserving function by using minimally invasive surgical techniques are important. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the influence of cochlear implantation on vestibular function in patients with severe and profound sensorineural hearing loss, and to analyze a possible correlation between the changes in vestibular testing and post-operative vestibular symptoms. Methods Thirty-four patients were evaluated for vestibular function using the cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP, respectively), and 29 patients underwent caloric tests pre-operatively and 4 weeks post-operatively. Results Before surgery, the cVEMPs were recorded bilaterally in 22 patients, unilaterally in eight patients, and absent bilaterally in four patients. The oVEMPs were recorded bilaterally in 19 patients, unilaterally in six patients, and absent bilaterally in nine patients. After implantation, the cVEMPs were absent in 10 patients and the oVEMPs were absent in seven patients on the implanted side. Caloric tests demonstrated canal paresis in 17 patients, and normal responses were recorded in 12 of the 29 patients pre-operatively. There was a significant decrease post-implantation in the ear implanted, with the exception of two patients. Two patients presented with vertigo and another two patients reported slight unsteadiness post-operatively, but all symptoms resolved within 7 days. The impaired vestibular function did not correlate with vestibular symptoms, age, or gender. Function on the contralateral side remained unaffected. PMID:27008103

  13. The cochlear nerve canal and internal auditory canal in children with normal cochlea but cochlear nerve deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Fei; Li, Jianhong; Xian, Junfang; Wang, Zhenchang [Dept. of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)], e-mail: cjr.wzhch@vip.163.com; Mo, Lingyan [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)

    2013-04-15

    Background: There is an increasing frequency of requests for cochlear implantation (CI) in deaf children and more detailed image information is necessary for selecting appropriate candidates. Cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) is a contraindication to CI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to evaluate the integrity of the cochlear nerve. The abnormalities of the cochlear nerve canal (CNC) and internal auditory canal (IAC) have been reported to be associated with CND. Purpose: To correlate CNC manifestation, size, and IAC diameter on high-resolution CT (HRCT) with CND diagnosed by MRI in children. Material and Methods: HRCT images from 35 sensorineurally deaf children who had normal cochlea but bilateral or unilateral CND diagnosed by MRI were studied retrospectively. The CNC and IAC manifestation and size were assessed and correlated with CND. Results: CND was diagnosed by MRI in 54/70 ears (77.1%). Thirty-two ears had an absent cochlear nerve (59.3%), while 22 ears had a small cochlear nerve (40.7%). The CNC diameter was <1.5 mm in 36 ears (66.7%). The CNC diameter ranged between 1.5 and 2.0 mm in seven ears (13.0%) and was >2.0 mm in 11 ears (20.4%). The IAC diameter was <3.0 mm in 25 ears (46.3%) and >3.0 mm in 29 ears (53.7%). Conclusion: The hypoplastic CNC might be more highly indicative of CND than that of a narrow IAC.

  14. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  15. Depression - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression may be described as feeling sad, blue, unhappy, miserable, or down in the dumps. Most of ... one time or another for short periods. Clinical depression is a mood disorder in which feelings of ...

  16. Effect of unilateral and simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zon, Alice; Smulders, Yvette E; Ramakers, Geerte G J; Stegeman, Inge; Smit, Adriana L; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Stokroos, Robert J; Hendrice, Nadia; Free, Rolien H; Maat, Bert; Frijns, Johan H M; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Huinck, Wendy J; Topsakal, Vedat; Tange, Rinze A; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus perception in patients with severe bilateral postlingual sensorineural hearing loss and to demonstrate possible differences between unilateral and bilateral cochlear implantation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. MET

  17. CT and MR imaging for pediatric cochlear implantation: emphasis on the relationship between the cochlear nerve canal and the cochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Mikiko; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Masaki, Hidekazu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Morimoto, Noriko; Taiji, Hidenobu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Cochlear implantation has become an accepted treatment for deafness. As the frequency of cochlear implantation has increased, requests for images have also increased in the work-up for candidates. An absent cochlear nerve (CN) is a contraindication to cochlear implantation. Therefore, MRI is performed to evaluate the CN in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Recently, some authors have reported the relationship between cochlear nerve canal (CNC) stenosis and CN hypoplasia. To review the relationship between CNC and CN. During a period of 78 months, 21 children (42 ears) with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss underwent both HRCT and MRI of the cochlear nerve. We retrospectively reviewed two factors: the evaluation of inner ear malformations and the relationship between CNC stenosis and CN hypoplasia. Inner ear malformations were recognized in ten ears. The mean CNC diameter was approximately 2 mm (ranging from 0.6 to 2.7 mm). CN hypoplasia was seen in eight of the 42 ears; all eight were associated with CNC stenosis ({<=}1.5 mm). Of the 34 ears with normal CN, 32 had CNC >1.5 mm in diameter and the remaining two ears, with incomplete partition type I, had CNC stenosis. Children with CNC stenosis had a high incidence of CN hypoplasia. CNC stenosis ({<=}1.5 mm) suggests CN hypoplasia. On the other hand, CN hypoplasia was not seen in children with CNC diameter >1.5 mm. Therefore, we conclude that children with CNC stenosis or malformations on HRCT should receive MR imaging of the CN. (orig.)

  18. Rumination in major depressive disorder is associated with impaired neural activation during conflict monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Alderman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD often ruminate about past experiences, especially those with negative content. These repetitive thoughts may interfere with cognitive processes related to attention and conflict monitoring. However, the temporal nature of these processes as reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs has not been well described. We examined behavioral and ERP indices of conflict monitoring during a modified flanker task and the allocation of attention during an attentional blink (AB task in 33 individuals with MDD and 36 healthy controls, and whether their behavioral performance and ERPs varied with level of rumination. N2 amplitude elicited by the flanker task was significantly reduced in participants with MDD compared to healthy controls. Level of self-reported rumination was also correlated with N2 amplitude. In contrast, P3 amplitude during the AB task was not significantly different between groups, nor was it correlated with rumination. No significant differences were found in behavioral task performance measures between groups or by rumination levels. These findings suggest that rumination in MDD is associated with select deficits in cognitive control, particularly related to conflict monitoring.

  19. The effect of passive listening versus active observation of music and dance performances on memory recognition and mild to moderate depression in cognitively impaired older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Kara; Flores, Roberto; Butterfield, Jacyln; Blackman, Melinda; Lee, Stephanie

    2012-10-01

    The study examined the effects of music therapy and dance/movement therapy on cognitively impaired and mild to moderately depressed older adults. Passive listening to music and active observation of dance accompanied by music were studied in relation to memory enhancement and relief of depressive symptoms in 100 elderly board and care residents. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Recognition Memory Test-Faces Inventory were administered to two groups (one group exposed to a live 30-min. session of musical dance observation, the other to 30 min. of pre-recorded music alone) before the intervention and measured again 3 and 10 days after the intervention. Scores improved for both groups on both measures following the interventions, but the group exposed to dance therapy had significantly lower Beck Depression scores that lasted longer. These findings suggest that active observation of Dance Movement Therapy could play a role in temporarily alleviating moderate depressive symptoms and some cognitive deficits in older adults. PMID:23234087

  20. Perinatal depression

    OpenAIRE

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes.

  1. Cochlear implantation at the ear, nose and throat clinic of the Clinical center of Vojvodina

    OpenAIRE

    Komazec Zoran; Dankuc Dragan; Vlaški Ljiljana; Lemajić-Komazec Slobodanka; Nedeljkov Spomenka; Sokolovac Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. A cochlear implant is a small electronic device that can provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. Cochlear implants bypass the damaged hearing systems and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant differs from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. Cochlear implantat...

  2. The Development of the Nucleus® Freedom™ Cochlear Implant System

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick, James F.; Busby, Peter A.; Gibson, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Cochlear Limited (Cochlear™) released the fourth-generation cochlear implant system, Nucleus® Freedom™, in 2005. Freedom is based on 25 years of experience in cochlear implant research and development and incorporates advances in medicine, implantable materials, electronic technology, and sound coding. This article presents the development of Cochlear's implant systems, with an overview of the first 3 generations, and details of the Freedom system: the CI24RE receiver-stimulator, the Contour ...

  3. The Effect of Cochlear Implantation on Education of Children with Hearing Disabilities in South Bohemia Region

    OpenAIRE

    MLÁDKOVÁ, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    The procedure of this qualitative research describes case studies of children with cochlear implants in the South Bohemia Region. It is a collection of information about their disabilities, families, social interactions and whole processes of rehabilitation before and after cochlear implantation. Its aim is to show how children with cochlear implants are successful and to facilitate the decision of each of their parents about the appropriate way of education for their own child with cochlear ...

  4. Participation in Physical, Social, and Religious Activity and Risk of Depression in the Elderly: A Community-Based Three-Year Longitudinal Study in Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Woong Roh

    Full Text Available We examined the longitudinal association between participation in individual or combinations of physical, social, and religious activity and risk of depression in the elderly.Elderly subjects aged ≥ 60 years who completed the Living Profiles of Older People Survey in Korea (n = 6,647 were included. The baseline assessment, Wave 1, was conducted in 2008, and a follow-up assessment, Wave 2, was conducted in 2011. We defined participation in frequent physical activity as ≥ 3 times weekly (at least 30 minutes per activity. Frequent participation in social and religious activity was defined as ≥ 1 activity weekly. The primary outcome was depression at 3-year follow up.Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that subjects who participated in frequent physical, social, and religious activity had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.96, 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75-1.00, and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.67-0.90, respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in each activity. Participants who participated in only one type of activity frequently and participants who participated in two or three types of activities frequently had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75-0.98 and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.52-0.79, respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in any type of physical, social, and religious activity frequently.Participation in physical, social, and religious activity was associated with decreased risk of depression in the elderly. In addition, risk of depression was much lower in the elderly people who participated in two or three of the above-mentioned types of activity than that in the elderly who did not.

  5. Glia-related mechanisms in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus of the adult rat in response to unilateral conductive hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Alvarado, Juan C.; López-Muñoz, Diego F.; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; Gabaldón-Ull, María C.; Juiz, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss causes a progressive decline in cochlear activity that may result in functional and structural modifications in auditory neurons. However, whether these activity-dependent changes are accompanied by a glial response involving microglia, astrocytes, or both has not yet been fully elucidated. Accordingly, the present study was designed to determine the involvement of glial related mechanisms in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) of adult rats at 1, 4, 7, and 15 d after removing middle ear ossicles. Quantitative immunohistochemistry analyses at light microscopy with specific markers of microglia or astroglia along with immunocytochemistry at the electron microscopy level were used. Also, in order to test whether trophic support by neurotrophins is modulated in glial cells by auditory activity, the expression and distribution of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its colocalization with microglial or astroglial markers was investigated. Diminished cochlear activity after middle ear ossicle removal leads to a significant ipsilateral increase in the mean gray levels and stained area of microglial cells but not astrocytes in the AVCN at 1 and 4 d post-lesion as compared to the contralateral side and control animals. These results suggest that microglial cells but not astrocytes may act as dynamic modulators of synaptic transmission in the cochlear nucleus immediately following unilateral hearing loss. On the other hand, NT-3 immunostaining was localized mainly in neuronal cell bodies and axons and was upregulated at 1, 4 and 7 d post-lesion. Very few glial cells expressed this neurotrophin in both control and experimental rats, suggesting that NT-3 is primarily activated in neurons and not as much in glia after limiting auditory activity in the AVCN by conductive hearing loss. PMID:25352772

  6. New Criteria of Indication and Selection of Patients to Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. L. Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous changes continue to occur in cochlear implant candidacy. In general, these have been accompanied by concomitant and satisfactory changes in surgical techniques. Together, this has advanced the utility and safety of cochlear implantation. Most devices are now approved for use in patients with severe to profound unilateral hearing loss rather then the prior requirement of a bilateral profound loss. Furthermore, studies have begun utilizing short electrode arrays for shallow insertion in patients with considerable low-frequency residual hearing. This technique will allow the recipient to continue to use acoustically amplified hearing for the low frequencies simultaneously with a cochlear implant for the high frequencies. The advances in design of, and indications for, cochlear implants have been matched by improvements in surgical techniques and decrease in complications. The resulting improvements in safety and efficacy have further encouraged the use of these devices. This paper will review the new concepts in the candidacy of cochlear implant. Medline data base was used to search articles dealing with the following topics: cochlear implant in younger children, cochlear implant and hearing preservation, cochlear implant for unilateral deafness and tinnitus, genetic hearing loss and cochlear implant, bilateral cochlear implant, neuropathy and cochlear implant and neural plasticity, and the selection of patients for cochlear implant.

  7. Image Registration of Cochlear µCT Data Using Heat Distribution Similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Vera, Sergio; Fagertun, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding of the anatomical variability of the human cochlear is important for the design and function of Cochlear Implants. Good non-rigid alignment of high-resolution cochlear μCT data is a challenging task. In this paper we study the use of heat distribution similarity between samples...

  8. Comparison of Bilateral and Unilateral Cochlear Implantation in Adults : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, Yvette E; van Zon, Alice; Stegeman, Inge; Rinia, Albert B; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Stokroos, Robert J; Hendrice, Nadia; Free, Rolien H; Maat, Bert; Frijns, Johan H M; Briaire, Jeroen J; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Huinck, Wendy J; Smit, Adriana L; Topsakal, Vedat; Tange, Rinze A; Grolman, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Importance: The cost of bilateral cochlear implantation (BCI) is usually not reimbursed by insurance companies because of a lack of well-designed studies reporting the benefits of a second cochlear implant. Objective: To determine the benefits of simultaneous BCI compared with unilateral cochlear im

  9. Stop Thinking and Start Doing: Switching from Cognitive Therapy to Behavioral Activation in a Case of Chronic Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottonari, Kathryn A.; Roberts, John E.; Thomas, Sherilyn N.; Read, Jennifer P.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent investigations have demonstrated that Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are both efficacious treatments for depression (Butler, Chapman, Forman, & Beck, 2006; Dimidjian et al., 2006; Dobson, 1989; Gloaguen, Cottraux, Cucherat, & Blackburn, 1998; Hollon, Thase, & Markowitz, 2002; Jacobson et al., 1996). This…

  10. Disability and health-related quality of life among patients with rheumatoid arthritis: association with radiographic joint damage, disease activity, pain, and depressive symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Rupp; H.C. Boshuizen; H.J. Dinant; C.E. Jacobi; G.A.M. van den Bos

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the associations between disability and health-related quality of life ( HRQoL), respectively, and radiographic joint damage, disease activity, pain, and depressive symptoms among patients with rheumatoid arthritis ( RA). Methods: Data were collected through questionnaires and cl

  11. In search of the HPA axis activity in unipolar depression patients with childhood trauma: Combined cortisol awakening response and dexamethasone suppression test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaojia; Gao, Weijia; Huang, Manli; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of childhood trauma on HPA axis activity both in depression patients and healthy controls in order to determine the role of HPA axis abnormalities in depression and to find the differences in HPA axis functioning that may lead certain individuals more susceptible to the depressogenic effects of childhood trauma. Eighty subjects aged 18-45 years were recruited into four study groups (n = 18, depression patients with childhood trauma exposures, CTE/MDD; n = 17, depression patients without childhood adversity, non-CTE/MDD; n = 23, healthy persons with childhood trauma, CTE/non-MDD; and n = 22, healthy persons without childhood adversity, non-CTE/non-MDD). Each participant collected salivary samples in the morning at four time points: immediately upon awakening, 30, 45, and 60 min after awakening for the assessment of CAR and underwent a 1 mg-dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Regardless of depression, subjects with CTE exhibited an enhanced CAR and the CAR areas under the curve to ground (AUCg) were associated with their childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) physical neglect scores and CTQ total scores. In addition, the CTE/MDD group also showed a highest post-DST cortisol concentration and a decreased glucocorticoid feedback inhibition among four groups of subjects. The present findings suggested that childhood trauma was associated with hyperactivity of HPA axis as measured with CAR, potentially reflecting the vulnerability for developing depression after early life stress exposures. Moreover, dysfunction of the GR-mediated negative feedback control might contribute to the development of depression after CTE. PMID:27049575

  12. In search of the HPA axis activity in unipolar depression patients with childhood trauma: Combined cortisol awakening response and dexamethasone suppression test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaojia; Gao, Weijia; Huang, Manli; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of childhood trauma on HPA axis activity both in depression patients and healthy controls in order to determine the role of HPA axis abnormalities in depression and to find the differences in HPA axis functioning that may lead certain individuals more susceptible to the depressogenic effects of childhood trauma. Eighty subjects aged 18-45 years were recruited into four study groups (n = 18, depression patients with childhood trauma exposures, CTE/MDD; n = 17, depression patients without childhood adversity, non-CTE/MDD; n = 23, healthy persons with childhood trauma, CTE/non-MDD; and n = 22, healthy persons without childhood adversity, non-CTE/non-MDD). Each participant collected salivary samples in the morning at four time points: immediately upon awakening, 30, 45, and 60 min after awakening for the assessment of CAR and underwent a 1 mg-dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Regardless of depression, subjects with CTE exhibited an enhanced CAR and the CAR areas under the curve to ground (AUCg) were associated with their childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) physical neglect scores and CTQ total scores. In addition, the CTE/MDD group also showed a highest post-DST cortisol concentration and a decreased glucocorticoid feedback inhibition among four groups of subjects. The present findings suggested that childhood trauma was associated with hyperactivity of HPA axis as measured with CAR, potentially reflecting the vulnerability for developing depression after early life stress exposures. Moreover, dysfunction of the GR-mediated negative feedback control might contribute to the development of depression after CTE.

  13. Activity of selected cytokines in bipolar patients during manic and depressive episodes [Ocena aktywności wybranych cytokin w epizodzie maniakalnym i depresyjnym choroby afektywnej dwubiegunowej

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remlinger-Molenda, Agnieszka

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to examine the activity of selected cytokines in bipolar patients during manic and depressive episodes and in remission. Method. The cytokine status was assessed in 76 bipolar patients, 35 with mania – and 41 with depression. For cytokine measurements blood samples were drawn from each patient twice – while in an acute episode and in remission. 78 healthy individuals were examined once. Serum samples were tested for concentrations of : IL-6, IL-10, IL-1ß, TNF-., IFN-. using the cytometric method. The patients’ mental status was assessed with Young Mania Rating Scale and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Results. Concentration of IL-6 was higher during the manic state as compared to control group. Additionally, IL-6 level was higher in mania than in remission. Concentration of IL-10 was higher in patients in remission after manic episodes than in healthy controls. In manic patients raising of IFN-. level was accompanied by more severe symptoms evaluated with YMRS. In remission after mania there was a correlation between IL-6 concentration and the intensity of the manic state. IFN-. level was higher in depressed patients comparing to remission, as well as manic patients and subjects from control group. IFN-. in remission after depression was still higher than in the healthy controls. Concentration of IL-1ß was higher in depressed patients comparing to healthy subjects. Conclusion. The results obtained in this study show disturbances of the immune system in bipolar patients. These disturbances have features of either decrease or pathological increase of the immune response. Cytokines’ profiles were different for mania and depression. Clinical improvement seems to be connected with immunomodulation process that results in changes of cytokine levels in bipolar patients in remission.

  14. Testosterone and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Kartalcı

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgens have various effects on human body and mood. Testosterone, a hormone mainly secreted from testes and adrenals, is one of the most potent androgens. Multiple studies have found that testosterone plays a role in regulating sexual activity, libido, social behaviors, aggression, cognitive functions, sleep control and well-being in men and women. Testosterone deficiency in hypogonadic or elderly men leads to neuropsychiatric problems, such as fatigue, loss of libido, irritability, insomnia and depressive mood. Testosterone replacement therapy consistently reverses these sequel in men. On the other hand, hyperandrogenic states in women are related to aggression and antisocial behavior, which might lead to depressive mood. Low testosterone levels may also result in depression among oophorectomized women. Because of such effects, a relationship between testosterone and depression has long been an issue of speculation, but yet very few studies have addressed this relation. Along with clinical studies, experimental and epidemiological studies show that testosterone is related to depression in men and women. But studies of testosterone concentrations in depression have yielded inconsistent results reporting low as well as high testosterone levels associated with depression. In this article, the physiological and psychological effects of testosterone and evidence regarding its relationship to depressive disorders and possible gender differences have been reviewed.

  15. Activity of selected cytokines in bipolar patients during manic and depressive episodes [Ocena aktywności wybranych cytokin w epizodzie maniakalnym i depresyjnym choroby afektywnej dwubiegunowej

    OpenAIRE

    Remlinger-Molenda, Agnieszka; Wójciak, Paweł; Michalak, Michał; Rybakowski, Janusz,

    2012-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the study was to examine the activity of selected cytokines in bipolar patients during manic and depressive episodes and in remission. Method. The cytokine status was assessed in 76 bipolar patients, 35 with mania – and 41 with depression. For cytokine measurements blood samples were drawn from each patient twice – while in an acute episode and in remission. 78 healthy individuals were examined once. Serum samples were tested for concentrations of : IL-6, IL-10, IL-1ß, TNF-., ...

  16. The Effect of Age of Cochlear Implantation on the Improvement of the Auditory Performance in the Children Undergoing Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Monshizadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing is one of the premier human senses. Being deprived from hearing is not only being unable to hear the sounds, but it is also the disability to gain a lot of helpful experiences. Cochlear implantation is introduced worldwide in order to treat the severe to profound hearing loss. Therefore, the present study aims to determine the effect of age of cochlear implantation on improvement of the auditory performance. Methods: The present follow-up study was conducted on 96 children who had referred to Fars Cochlear Implantation Center. The patients’ information was gathered from their profiles both before and after the operation. In addition, the auditory performance score was obtained in 3 stages – 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the implantation – through the Cap test. Also, non-parametric tests of Fridman, Willcoxon, and Mann-Withney U were utilized in order to analyze the data of the study. Results: The mean of the children’s auditory performance 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the implantation was measured as 2.8+1.03, 4.36+1.04, and 5.34+1.02, respectively. Besides, the median of their auditory performance 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the implantation was calculated as 3, 5, and 5, respectively. Also, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the independent variable of age of cochlear implantation and the auditory performance score 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the implantation. Conclusion: In line with other studies conducted on the issue, the present study showed the improvement of the auditory performance in the children who benefited from cochlear implantation. Moreover, the results of the present study revealed that the age of cochlear implantation can be of great help in determining the candidates of cochlear implantation. In other words, it can be a major prognostic factor of the response to the treatment

  17. EFFECTS OF DIABETES ON HEARING AND COCHLEAR STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xipeng; LI Ruiyu; LI Meng; ZHANG Yanzhuo; GUO Kaosan; WU Liping

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic systemic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, with various patho-genic mechanisms. From absolute or relative insulin deficiency, patients with DM often demonstrate vari-ous levels of metabolic disorders. Major clinical manifestations of DM include metabolic disorders, vascu-lar lesions, circulatory disturbances and neurologic complications. Along with advances in DM research, re-ports of DM related tinnitus and hearing impairment have increased continuously. Research on DM related auditory system dysfunction has focused on cochlear microcirculation, cellular homeostasis, genetics and ag-ing. Cochlear microcirculation plays an important role in cochlear physiology and its disorders are associat-ed with many inner ear diseases. Ischemia and subsequent reperfusion seen in cochlear microcirculation dis-orders are important factors in hearing damage. Understanding cochlear microcirculation and structural as well as functional changes in DM patients with hearing loss and their causal factors will help reveal patho-genic mechanisms in diabetic hearing loss and provide new ideas in developing interventions and preventing damages caused by diabetes.

  18. Cochlear injury and adaptive plasticity of the auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANNA R. eFETONI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that cochlear stressors as noise exposure and aging can induce homeostatic/maladaptive changes in the central auditory system from the brainstem to the cortex. Studies centered on such changes have revealed several mechanisms that operate in the context of sensory disruption after insult (noise trauma, drug- or age-related injury. The oxidative stress is central to current theories of induced sensory neural hearing loss and aging, and interventions to attenuate the hearing loss are based on antioxidant agent. The present review addresses the recent literature on the alterations in hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons due to noise-induced oxidative stress in the cochlea, as well on the impact of cochlear damage on the auditory cortex neurons. The emerging image emphasizes that noise-induced deafferentation and upward spread of cochlear damage is associated with the altered dendritic architecture of auditory pyramidal neurons. The cortical modifications may be reversed by treatment with antioxidants counteracting the cochlear redox imbalance. These findings open new therapeutic approaches to treat the functional consequences of the cortical reorganization following cochlear damage.

  19. Minimal incision access for pediatric and adult cochlear implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Danmo; Shi Ying; Su Qiaotong; Liu Ting; Han Demin; Li Yongxin

    2014-01-01

    Background Cochlear implant surgery is widely practiced.Minimal incision cochlear implant surgery has been developed with the aims of reducing the impact of surgery on the patient and improving cosmesis while maintaining the low morbidity of conventional wider access approaches.This study aimed to assess the surgical technique and complication rate of minimal incision cochlear implantation (MICI) for children and adults.Methods Data for this study were obtained via a retrospective analysis.Totally 378 patients were included in the study.All patients received minimal incision cochlear implantation,using the skin protector during the process of the operation.The surgical complications of MICI were recorded in a spreadsheet format.The incidence of major and minor complication were analyzed,and appropriate treatment was provided.Results A total of 40 (10.5%) complications were noted in the study.There were 0 life-threatening,9 major,and 31 minor complications.Of the nine major complications,five were device failures,one developed infection and extrusion,and three required receiver-stimulator repositioning.Conclusions MICI is as safe as standard cochlear implantation (SCI) and affords with it other benefits.Eliminating the scalp flap avoids devascularization and minimizes the opportunity of flap infection or necrosis.Complications not related to the flap are similar to SCI.

  20. Cochlear Implantation, Enhancements, Transhumanism and Posthumanism: Some Human Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    Biomedical engineering technologies such as brain-machine interfaces and neuroprosthetics are advancements which assist human beings in varied ways. There are exciting yet speculative visions of how the neurosciences and bioengineering may influence human nature. However, these could be preparing a possible pathway towards an enhanced and even posthuman future. This article seeks to investigate several ethical themes and wider questions of enhancement, transhumanism and posthumanism. Four themes of interest are: autonomy, identity, futures, and community. Three larger questions can be asked: will everyone be enhanced? Will we be "human" if we are not, one day, transhuman? Should we be enhanced or not? The article proceeds by concentrating on a widespread and sometimes controversial application: the cochlear implant, an auditory prosthesis implanted into Deaf patients. Cochlear implantation and its reception in both the deaf and hearing communities have a distinctive moral discourse, which can offer surprising insights. The paper begins with several points about the enhancement of human beings, transhumanism's reach beyond the human, and posthuman aspirations. Next it focuses on cochlear implants on two sides. Firstly, a shorter consideration of what technologies may do to humans in a transhumanist world. Secondly, a deeper analysis of cochlear implantation's unique socio-political movement, its ethical explanations and cultural experiences linked with pediatric cochlear implantation-and how those wary of being thrust towards posthumanism could marshal such ideas by analogy. As transhumanism approaches, the issues and questions merit continuing intense analysis. PMID:25962718

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen upregulates cochlear constitutive nitric oxide synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Ming-Ching

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is a known adjuvant for treating ischemia-related inner ear diseases. Controversies still exist in the role of HBOT in cochlear diseases. Few studies to date have investigated the cellular changes that occur in inner ears after HBOT. Nitric oxide, which is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS, is an important signaling molecule in cochlear physiology and pathology. Here we investigated the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on eardrum morphology, cochlear function and expression of NOS isoforms in cochlear substructures after repetitive HBOT in guinea pigs. Results Minor changes in the eardrum were observed after repetitive HBOT, which did not result in a significant hearing threshold shift by tone burst auditory brainstem responses. A differential effect of HBOT on the expression of NOS isoforms was identified. Upregulation of constitutive NOS (nNOS and eNOS was found in the substructures of the cochlea after HBOT, but inducible NOS was not found in normal or HBOT animals, as shown by immunohistochemistry. There was no obvious DNA fragmentation present in this HBOT animal model. Conclusions The present evidence indicates that the customary HBOT protocol may increase constitutive NOS expression but such upregulation did not cause cell death in the treated cochlea. The cochlear morphology and auditory function are consequently not changed through the protocol.

  2. Cochlear Implantation, Enhancements, Transhumanism and Posthumanism: Some Human Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    Biomedical engineering technologies such as brain-machine interfaces and neuroprosthetics are advancements which assist human beings in varied ways. There are exciting yet speculative visions of how the neurosciences and bioengineering may influence human nature. However, these could be preparing a possible pathway towards an enhanced and even posthuman future. This article seeks to investigate several ethical themes and wider questions of enhancement, transhumanism and posthumanism. Four themes of interest are: autonomy, identity, futures, and community. Three larger questions can be asked: will everyone be enhanced? Will we be "human" if we are not, one day, transhuman? Should we be enhanced or not? The article proceeds by concentrating on a widespread and sometimes controversial application: the cochlear implant, an auditory prosthesis implanted into Deaf patients. Cochlear implantation and its reception in both the deaf and hearing communities have a distinctive moral discourse, which can offer surprising insights. The paper begins with several points about the enhancement of human beings, transhumanism's reach beyond the human, and posthuman aspirations. Next it focuses on cochlear implants on two sides. Firstly, a shorter consideration of what technologies may do to humans in a transhumanist world. Secondly, a deeper analysis of cochlear implantation's unique socio-political movement, its ethical explanations and cultural experiences linked with pediatric cochlear implantation-and how those wary of being thrust towards posthumanism could marshal such ideas by analogy. As transhumanism approaches, the issues and questions merit continuing intense analysis.

  3. Does the Association between Depressive Symptomatology and Physical Activity Depend on Body Image Perception? A Survey of Students from Seven Universities in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed the association between depression and PA in university students of both genders and the role of body image perception as a potential effect modifier. Undergraduate students (N = 3706 from seven universities in the UK completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed sociodemographic information; a range of health, health behaviour and health awareness related factors; the modified version of Beck’s Depression Inventory (M-BDI; educational achievement, and different levels of physical activity (PA, such as moderate PA (at least 5 days per week moderate exercise of at least 30 minutes, and vigorous PA (at least 3 days per week vigorous exercise of at least 20 minutes. Only 12.4% of the sample achieved the international recommended level for moderate PA, and 33.1% achieved the recommendations for vigorous PA. Both moderate and vigorous PA were inversely related to the M-BDI score. Physically active students, regardless of the type of PA, were significantly more likely to perceive their health as good, to have higher health awareness, to perform strengthening exercises, and to be males. The stratified analyses indicated that the association between depression and PA differed by body image. In students perceiving their body image as ‘just right’, moderate (>4th percentile and high (>5th percentile M-BDI scores were inversely related to vigorous PA. However, in students who perceived their body image as ‘overweight’, the inverse association was only significant in those with high M-BDI scores. We conclude that the positive effect of PA on depression could be down modulated by the negative impact of a ‘distorted’ body image on depression. The practical implications of these findings are that PA programmes targeting persons with depressive symptoms should include effective components to enhance body image perception.

  4. Prevention of depression and sleep disturbances in elderly with memory-problems by activation of the biological clock with light - a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheltens Philip

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression frequently occurs in the elderly and in patients suffering from dementia. Its cause is largely unknown, but several studies point to a possible contribution of circadian rhythm disturbances. Post-mortem studies on aging, dementia and depression show impaired functioning of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN which is thought to be involved in the increased prevalence of day-night rhythm perturbations in these conditions. Bright light enhances neuronal activity in the SCN. Bright light therapy has beneficial effects on rhythms and mood in institutionalized moderate to advanced demented elderly. In spite of the fact that this is a potentially safe and inexpensive treatment option, no previous clinical trial evaluated the use of long-term daily light therapy to prevent worsening of sleep-wake rhythms and depressive symptoms in early to moderately demented home-dwelling elderly. Methods/Design This study investigates whether long-term daily bright light prevents worsening of sleep-wake rhythms and depressive symptoms in elderly people with memory complaints. Patients with early Alzheimer's Disease (AD, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and Subjective Memory Complaints (SMC, between the ages of 50 and 75, are included in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. For the duration of two years, patients are exposed to ~10,000 lux in the active condition or ~300 lux in the placebo condition, daily, for two half-hour sessions at fixed times in the morning and evening. Neuropsychological, behavioral, physiological and endocrine measures are assessed at baseline and follow-up every five to six months. Discussion If bright light therapy attenuates the worsening of sleep-wake rhythms and depressive symptoms, it will provide a measure that is easy to implement in the homes of elderly people with memory complaints, to complement treatments with cholinesterase inhibitors, sleep medication or anti-depressants or as a stand

  5. Whole-Brain Mapping of Neuronal Activity in the Learned Helplessness Model of Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yongsoo; Perova, Zinaida; Mirrione, Martine M.; Pradhan, Kith; Henn, Fritz A.; Shea, Stephen; Osten, Pavel; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Some individuals are resilient, whereas others succumb to despair in repeated stressful situations. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying such divergent behavioral responses remain unclear. Here, we employed an automated method for mapping neuronal activity in search of signatures of stress responses in the entire mouse brain. We used serial two-photon tomography to detect expression of c-FosGFP – a marker of neuronal activation – in c-fosGFP transgenic mice subjected to the learned helpl...

  6. Initial Outcomes of a Culturally Adapted Behavioral Activation for Latinas Diagnosed with Depression at a Community Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Santiago-Rivera, Azara L.; Rusch, Laura C.; Busch, Andrew M.; West, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Latinos demonstrate high rates of depression, often do not seek treatment, and terminate prematurely for a variety of reasons, including lack of sensitivity to contextual and cultural factors in treatment approaches. For decades researchers have suggested a behavioral approach to Latinos diagnosed with depression because such an approach targets…

  7. Parasympathetic nervous system activity predicts mood repair use and its effectiveness among adolescents with and without histories of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Rottenberg, Jonathan; Bylsma, Lauren M; Jennings, J Richard; George, Charles; Baji, Ildikó; Benák, István; Dochnal, Roberta; Halas, Kitti; Kapornai, Krisztina; Kiss, Enikő; Makai, Attila; Varga, Hedvig; Vetró, Ágnes; Kovacs, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Depressive disorders that onset in the juvenile years have been linked to far-reaching adverse consequences, making it imperative to elucidate key mechanisms and contributory factors. Excessive use of regulatory responses that exacerbate sadness (maladaptive mood repair) or insufficient use of regulatory responses that reduce it (adaptive mood repair) may reflect behavioral mechanisms of depression risk. Cardiac vagal control, indexed by patterns of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), has received attention as a putative physiological risk factor for depression. Although mood repair and RSA are related, the nature of this relationship is not well characterized in the context of depression risk. Therefore, we tested alternative models of the relationships between RSA patterns (at rest and in response to a sad film), trait mood repair, and the effectiveness of a mood repair response in the laboratory (state mood repair) among adolescents with depression histories (n = 210) and emotionally healthy peers (n = 161). In our data, a mediation model best explained the association between the key constructs: Adolescents with normative RSA patterns exhibited lower levels of depression and trait maladaptive mood repair, and benefited more from instructed (state) mood repair in the laboratory. By contrast, adolescents with atypical RSA patterns exhibited higher levels of depression and dispositional maladaptive mood repair, which, in turn, mediated the relations of RSA patterns and depression symptoms. Atypical RSA patterns also predicted reduced benefits from laboratory mood repair. PMID:26950752

  8. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Acute Treatment of Adults with Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimidjian, Sona; Hollon, Steven D.; Dobson, Keith S.; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Addis, Michael E.; Gallop, Robert; McGlinchey, Joseph B.; Markley, David K.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Atkins, David C.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2006-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is considered the current standard for severe depression, and cognitive therapy is the most widely investigated psychosocial treatment for depression. However, not all patients want to take medication, and cognitive therapy has not demonstrated consistent efficacy across trials. Moreover, dismantling designs have…

  9. Leisure-time physical activity in pregnancy and risk of postpartum depression: a prospective study in a large national birth cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Marin; Mortensen, Erik L; Halldorson, Thórhallur I;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the association between physical activity during pregnancy and postpartum depression (PPD) in a large, prospective cohort. METHOD: Exposure information from the Danish National Birth Cohort, a large, prospective cohort with information on more than 100,000 pregnancies (1996......, and type of physical activity were assessed by a telephone interview at approximately week 12 of gestation. Admission to hospital due to depression (PPD-admission) and prescription of an antidepressant (PPD-prescription) were treated as separate outcomes. RESULTS: Through linkage to national registers, we...... identified 157 cases of PPD-admission and 1,305 cases of PPD-prescription. Women engaging in vigorous physical activity during pregnancy had a lower risk of PPD-prescription compared to women who were not physically active (adjusted odds ratio, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-0.99). No association was observed between...

  10. Central Administration of Lipopolysaccharide Induces Depressive-like Behavior in Vivo and Activates Brain Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase In Murine Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

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    Kavelaars Annemieke

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient stimulation of the innate immune system by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS activates peripheral and central expression of the tryptophan degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO which mediates depressive-like behavior. It is unknown whether direct activation of the brain with LPS is sufficient to activate IDO and induce depressive-like behavior. Methods Sickness and depressive-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice were assessed by social exploration and the forced swim test, respectively. Expression of cytokines and IDO mRNA was measured by real-time RT-PCR and cytokine protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. Enzymatic activity of IDO was estimated as the amount of kynurenine produced from tryptophan as determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC with electrochemical detection. Results Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of LPS (100 ng increased steady-state transcripts of TNFα, IL-6 and the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in the hippocampus in the absence of any change in IFNγ mRNA. LPS also increased IDO expression and induced depressive-like behavior, as measured by increased duration of immobility in the forced swim test. The regulation of IDO expression was investigated using in situ organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs derived from brains of newborn C57BL/6J mice. In accordance with the in vivo data, addition of LPS (10 ng/ml to the medium of OHSCs induced steady-state expression of mRNA transcripts for IDO that peaked at 6 h and translated into increased IDO enzymatic activity within 8 h post-LPS. This activation of IDO by direct application of LPS was preceded by synthesis and secretion of TNFα and IL-6 protein and activation of iNOS while IFNγ expression was undetectable. Conclusion These data establish that activation of the innate immune system in the brain is sufficient to activate IDO and induce

  11. Hemodynamic depression and microthrombosis in the peripheral areas of cortical contusion in the rat: role of platelet activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, T; Katayama, Y; Kawamata, T; Aoyama, N; Mori, T

    1997-01-01

    Cerebrovascular damages leading to subsequent reductions in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) may play an important role in secondary cell damages following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent studies have demonstrated that rCBF markedly decrease in experimental model of TBI (e.g. fluid percussion injury, acute subdural hematoma, contusion). However, precise mechanisms underlying post-traumatic CBF reduction remain unclear. In the present study, the rCBF changes and microthrombosis formation were investigated in a cortical contusional model in rats, and the effects of etizolam (platelet activating factor antagonist) on microthrombosis were tested. The rCBF in the peripheral areas increased transiently, and decreased to ischemic level 3 hours post- injury. The histological examinations revealed microthrombosis formation in the contused area, extending from the center to the peripheral areas within 6 hours post-injury. The rCBF decrease and the contusion necrosis volume were significantly attenuated by etizolam administration. These results indicate that platelet activating factor is involved in microthrombosis formation and hemodynamic depression, and resultant ischemic damages within areas surrounding the contusion. PMID:9416292

  12. The Relationship Between Brain Oscillatory Activity and Therapeutic Effectiveness of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

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    Andrew Francis Leuchter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is marked by disturbances in brain functional connectivity. This connectivity is modulated by rhythmic oscillations of brain electrical activity, which enable coordinated functions across brain regions. Oscillatory activity plays a central role in regulating thinking and memory, mood, cerebral blood flow, and neurotransmitter levels, and restoration of normal oscillatory patterns is associated with effective treatment of MDD. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a robust treatment for MDD, but the mechanism of action (MOA of its benefits for mood disorders remains incompletely understood. Benefits of rTMS have been tied to enhanced neuroplasticity in specific brain pathways. We summarize here the evidence that rTMS entrains and resets thalamocortical oscillators, normalizes regulation and facilitates reemergence of intrinsic cerebral rhythms, and through this mechanism restores normal brain function. This entrainment and resetting may be a critical step in engendering neuroplastic changes and the antidepressant effects of rTMS. It may be possible to modify the method of rTMS administration to enhance this mechanism of action and achieve better antidepressant effectiveness. We propose that rTMS can be administered: 1 synchronized to a patient’s individual alpha rhythm (IAF, or synchronized rTMS (sTMS; 2 as a low magnetic field strength sinusoidal wave form; and, 3 broadly to multiple brain areas simultaneously. We present here the theory and evidence indicating that these modifications could enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of rTMS for the treatment of MDD.

  13. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Promotes Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Cell Survival and Function in Deafened, Developing Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Leake, Patricia A.; Hradek, Gary T.; Hetherington, Alexander M.; Stakhovskaya, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Postnatal development and survival of spiral ganglion (SG) neurons depend upon both neural activity and neurotrophic support. Our previous studies showed that electrical stimulation from a cochlear implant only partly prevents SG degeneration after early deafness. Thus, neurotrophic agents that might be combined with an implant to improve neural survival are of interest. Recent studies reporting that BDNF promotes SG survival after deafness, have been conducted in rodents and limited to relat...

  14. Can auditory stady-state responses reflect place-specific cochlear dispersion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Epp, Bastian; Dau, Torsten

    The cochlear travelling wave propagates from the base to the apex, resulting in an increasing phase with distance from the cochlear base. Together with the tonotopic organization of the cochlea, this results in a frequency dependent delay of the resonance, a phenomenon known as cochlear dispersion....... Previous studies showed the applicability of auditory evoked potentials (AEP) to investigate cochlear dispersion along the basilar membrane (BM) (e.g. Dau et al., 2000). In contrast to those studies, the present study maximizes the response in a given frequency region, aiming to objectively estimate local...... cochlear dispersion in humans...

  15. The Development of Intonation in Young Children with Cochlear Implants: A Preliminary Study of the Influence of Age at Implantation and Length of Implant Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, David; Ertmer, David

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the development of emerging intonation in six children who had received a cochlear implant (CI) before the age of 3 years. At the time their implant was activated, the children ranged in age from 11-37 months. Spontaneous longitudinal speech samples were recorded from 30-minute sessions in which the child interacted with his…

  16. Deafness induced by Connexin 26 (GJB2) deficiency is not determined by endocochlear potential (EP) reduction but is associated with cochlear developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2014-05-23

    Connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are the major cause of hereditary deafness and are responsible for >50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss. Mouse models show that Cx26 deficiency can cause congenital deafness with cochlear developmental disorders, hair cell degeneration, and the reduction of endocochlear potential (EP) and active cochlear amplification. However, the underlying deafness mechanism still remains undetermined. Our previous studies revealed that hair cell degeneration is not a primary cause of hearing loss. In this study we investigated the role of EP reduction in Cx26 deficiency-induced deafness. We found that the EP reduction is not associated with congenital deafness in Cx26 knockout (KO) mice. The threshold of auditory brainstem response (ABR) in Cx26 KO mice was even greater than 110 dB SPL, demonstrating complete hearing loss. However, the EP in Cx26 KO mice varied and not completely abolished. In some cases, the EP could still remain at higher levels (>70 mV). We further found that the deafness in Cx26 KO mice is associated with cochlear developmental disorders. Deletion of Cx26 in the cochlea before postnatal day 5 (P5) could cause congenital deafness. The cochlea had developmental disorders and the cochlear tunnel was not open. However, no congenital deafness was found when Cx26 was deleted after P5. The cochlea also displayed normal development and the cochlear tunnel was open normally. These data suggest that congenital deafness induced by Cx26 deficiency is not determined by EP reduction and may result from cochlear developmental disorders.

  17. Temporal Dynamics of Physical Activity and Affect in Depressed and Nondepressed Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavrakakis, Nikolaos; Booij, Sanne H.; Roest, Annelieke M.; de Jonge, Peter; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Bos, Elisabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The association between physical activity and affect found in longitudinal observational studies is generally small to moderate. It is unknown how this association generalizes to individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate interindividual differences in the bidirectional

  18. Predictors of Alzheimer's Disease Caregiver Depression and Burden: What Noncaregiving Adults Can Learn from Active Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; Han, GiBaeg; Anderson, Cristina L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined similarities and differences between active caregivers (adult children and spouses whose family member had Alzheimer's disease) and not-as-yet caregiving adults (adult children and spouses whose family members are older, but do not as yet suffer from Alzheimer's disease). The objective was to determine what factors predict…

  19. Imaging cochlear soft tissue displacement with coherent x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Christoph; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-10-01

    At present, imaging of cochlear mechanics at mid-cochlear turns has not been accomplished. Although challenging, this appears possible with partially coherent hard x-rays. The present study shows results from stroboscopic x-ray imaging of a test object at audio frequencies. The vibration amplitudes were quantified. In a different set of experiments, an intact and calcified gerbil temporal bone was used to determine displacements of the reticular lamina, tectorial membrane, and Reissner’s membrane with the Lucas and Kanade video flow algorithm. The experiments validated high frequency x-ray imaging and imaging in a calcified cochlea. The present work is key for future imaging of cochlear micromechanics at a high spatial resolution.

  20. Pre-, intra- and post-operative imaging of cochlear implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Naguib, N.N.N.; Burck, I. [University Hospital Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tawfik, A. [Mansoura Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Emam, A. [University Hospital Alexandria (Egypt). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Nour-Eldin, A. [University Hospital Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Radiology; Stoever, T. [University Hospital of Frankfurt (Germany). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to present essential imaging aspects in patients who are candidates for a possible cochlear implant as well as in postsurgical follow-up. Imaging plays a major role in providing information on preinterventional topography, variations and possible infections. Preoperative imaging using DVT, CT, MRI or CT and MRI together is essential for candidate selection, planning of surgical approach and exclusion of contraindications like the complete absence of the cochlea or cochlear nerve, or infection. Relative contraindications are variations of the cochlea and vestibulum. Intraoperative imaging can be performed by fluoroscopy, mobile radiography or DVT. Postoperative imaging is regularly performed by conventional X-ray, DVT, or CT. In summary, radiological imaging has its essential role in the pre- and post-interventional period for patients who are candidates for cochlear implants.

  1. Cochlear implants and the deaf child: a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K E; Coffin, C; Kenna, M

    1999-01-01

    Cochlear implants are no longer considered new or experimental technology and are available for children with profound sensorineural hearing loss. Pediatric cochlear implantation requires a multidisciplinary team approach with contributions from surgeons, audiologists, speech-language pathologists, psychologists, nurses, special educators, and parents. The decision to perform cochlear implantation in children must be seriously considered. Some in the deaf community voice strong objections to the procedure. Additionally, it requires an enormous commitment on the part of the family and the health care system in both personal and financial terms. The surgery has some risks, and the rehabilitation period is lengthy. Outcomes are variable, and many factors play a role in a child's successful use of implants. Nonetheless, gradual, steady improvement in speech perception, speech production, and language typically occurs. The approach of Children's Hospital in Boston to the assessment, the surgical procedure, and follow-up is detailed here.

  2. Cochlear implant electrode array misplaced in Hyrtl's fissure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzali, Amina; Ouennoughi, Kheiredidine; Haraoubia, Mohamed-Salah; Zemirli, Omar; Triglia, Jean Michel

    2011-11-01

    Hyrtl's fissure is a cleft that is present in the developing fetal petrous temporal bone and extends from the area inferior to the round window to the meninges of the posterior fossa. Persistent Hyrtl's fissure, due to incomplete ossification, is considered a rare temporal bone malformation, and is a known cause of perilabyrinthine cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Very few cases are reported as being at risk of complication of cochlear implant surgery. Here we report the case of an 8-year-old boy with misplacement of an electrode array in Hyrtl's fissure. The diagnosis was made postoperatively, since cochlear implant failure was suspected from non-auditory responses. Computed tomography (CT) revealed the extracochlear location of the electrode array. We emphasize the role of presurgical imaging CT and magnetic resonance imaging in detecting temporal bone abnormalities, and we discuss the value of intraoperative auditory nerve response telemetry and postoperative radiological evaluation in diagnosing cochlear implant misplacement.

  3. Cochlear Implantation in a Patient with Kabuki Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesseur, Annemarie; Cillessen, Eva; Mylanus, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Criteria for cochlear implants are expanding and now include children with disabilities in addition to hearing loss, such as those with Kabuki syndrome (KS). This case report describes language outcomes and changes in the quality of life of a female child with KS after cochlear implantation. The subject had a profound progressive sensorineural hearing loss, cognitive impairments, and other disabilities and communicated using vocalized sounds and the Dutch Sign Language. After cochlear implantation at an age of nine years and three months, the patient displayed no progress in speech production and minimal progress in receptive language development, but she had an increased awareness of the world and an increase in the quality of life. PMID:27341000

  4. Physical activity and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling elders from southern Brazil Atividade física e sintomas depressivos em idosos sul-brasileiros da comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César L. Reichert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the existence of a relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling elders. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional, population-based study, which included 379 community-dwelling elders from Novo Hamburgo, state of RS, Brazil. The level of physical activity was estimated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and depressive symptoms were diagnosed according to the Yesavage Geriatric Depression Scale. The association between the level of physical activity and depressive symptoms was analyzed by logistic regression. RESULTS: A tendency towards a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms was observed in individuals with higher levels of physical activity, both in the sample as a whole as well as among men, but not among women (p for linear trend 0.04, 0.03 and 0.36, respectively. The odds ratio of the presence of depressive symptoms in the very active group as compared against that of the insufficiently active group was 0.32 (95% CI: 0.12-0.86 for men and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.39-1.46 for women. CONCLUSION: In this population of aged individuals, more intense physical activity is related to a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms. As shown by gender stratification, physical activity is inversely related to depressive symptoms in men, albeit not in women.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a relação entre atividade física e sintomas depressivos em idosos da comunidade. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal de base populacional que incluiu 379 idosos da comunidade da cidade de Novo Hamburgo-RS, Brasil. O nível de atividade física foi estimado pelo Questionário Internacional de Atividade Física e os sintomas depressivos foram diagnosticados por meio da Escala de Depressão Geriátrica de Yesavage. A associação entre nível de atividade física e sintomas depressivos foi analisada por regressão logística. RESULTADOS: Foi observada uma tendência a menor prevalência de sintomas depressivos em indiv

  5. Physical activity and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling elders from southern Brazil Atividade física e sintomas depressivos em idosos sul-brasileiros da comunidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César L. Reichert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the existence of a relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling elders. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional, population-based study, which included 379 community-dwelling elders from Novo Hamburgo, state of RS, Brazil. The level of physical activity was estimated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and depressive symptoms were diagnosed according to the Yesavage Geriatric Depression Scale. The association between the level of physical activity and depressive symptoms was analyzed by logistic regression. RESULTS: A tendency towards a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms was observed in individuals with higher levels of physical activity, both in the sample as a whole as well as among men, but not among women (p for linear trend 0.04, 0.03 and 0.36, respectively. The odds ratio of the presence of depressive symptoms in the very active group, as compared against that of the insufficiently active group was 0.32 (95% CI: 0.12-0.86 for men and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.39-1.46 for women. CONCLUSION: In this population of aged individuals, more intense physical activity is related to a lower prevalence of depressive symptoms. As shown by gender stratification, physical activity is inversely related to depressive symptoms in men, albeit not in women.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a relação entre atividade física e sintomas depressivos em idosos da comunidade. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal de base populacional que incluiu 379 idosos da comunidade da cidade de Novo Hamburgo-RS, Brasil. O nível de atividade física foi estimado pelo Questionário Internacional de Atividade Física e os sintomas depressivos foram diagnosticados por meio da Escala de Depressão Geriátrica de Yesavage. A associação entre nível de atividade física e sintomas depressivos foi analisada por regressão logística. RESULTADOS: Foi observada uma tendência a menor prevalência de sintomas depressivos em indiv

  6. Factors contributing to communication skills development in cochlear implanted children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Over the last 10 years more than 300 persons received cochlear implant in Serbia and more than 90% of the recipients were children under 10 years of age. The program of cochlear implantation includes postoperative rehabilitation in which cognitive, integrative and developmental methods are used. The study was conducted to reveal factors affecting communication performance (CP of cochlear implanted (CI children. Special attention was focused on the influence of the duration and intensity of rehabilitation and hearing age on further development of communication skills. Methods. A group of 30 CI children (13 boys and 17 girls aged 2 to 5 years was enrolled in the study. All of the children had average intelligence and no other developmental disorder. They lived in families and attended rehabilitative seances 3 to 5 times a week. Their parents/ caregivers answered structured questionnaire about functioning after pediatric cochlear implantation (FAPCI and the results were the subject of detailed statistical analysis. Results. Analysis of variance did not show any difference between the boys and the girls regarding FAPCI achievements (F (1, 28 = 2.909; p = 0.099 and age aberration in CP score (F (1, 28 = 0.114, p = 0.738. Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant difference in FAPCI scores related to hearing age and duration of rehabilitation. Regression analysis (enter method showed that model consisting of indipendent variables significantly contributed to prediction of overall FAPCI scores and Adjusted R2 value could explain 32% difference in communication skills of participants in this study. Conclusion. Communication skills of CI children evaluated by FAPCI are falling behind normatives for normal hearing children 18.6 months on the average. Hearing age, duration and intensity of rehabilitation have positive predictive value for communication skills development. Later identification of hearing loss and later cochlear

  7. Localization ability with bimodal hearing aids and bilateral cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Bernhard U.; Baumann, Uwe; Fastl, Hugo

    2004-09-01

    After successful cochlear implantation in one ear, some patients continue to use a hearing aid at the contralateral ear. They report an improved reception of speech, especially in noise, as well as a better perception of music when the hearing aid and cochlear implant are used in this bimodal combination. Some individuals in this bimodal patient group also report the impression of an improved localization ability. Similar experiences are reported by the group of bilateral cochlear implantees. In this study, a survey of 11 bimodally and 4 bilaterally equipped cochlear implant users was carried out to assess localization ability. Individuals in the bimodal implant group were all provided with the same type of hearing aid in the opposite ear, and subjects in the bilateral implant group used cochlear implants of the same manufacturer on each ear. Subjects adjusted the spot of a computer-controlled laser-pointer to the perceived direction of sound incidence in the frontal horizontal plane by rotating a trackball. Two subjects of the bimodal group who had substantial residual hearing showed localization ability in the bimodal configuration, whereas using each single device only the subject with better residual hearing was able to discriminate the side of sound origin. Five other subjects with more pronounced hearing loss displayed an ability for side discrimination through the use of bimodal aids, while four of them were already able to discriminate the side with a single device. Of the bilateral cochlear implant group one subject showed localization accuracy close to that of normal hearing subjects. This subject was also able to discriminate the side of sound origin using the first implanted device alone. The other three bilaterally equipped subjects showed limited localization ability using both devices. Among them one subject demonstrated a side-discrimination ability using only the first implanted device.

  8. Noise alters hair-bundle mechanics at the cochlear apex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strimbu, C. Elliott; Fridberger, Anders

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to loud sounds can lead to both permanent and short term changes in auditory sensitivity. Permanent hearing loss is often associated with gross changes in cochlear morphology including the loss of hair cells and auditory nerve fibers while the mechanisms of short term threshold shifts are much less well understood and may vary at different locations across the cochlea. Previous reports suggest that exposure to loud sounds leads to a decrease in the cochlear microphonic potential and in the stiffness of the organ of Corti. Because the cochlear microphonic reflects changes in the membrane potential of the hair cells, this suggests that hair-bundle motion should be reversibly altered following exposure to loud sounds. Using an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig temporal bone we investigate changes in the micro-mechanical response near the cochlear apex following a brief (up to 10 - 20 minutes) exposure to loud (˜ 120 dB) tones near the best frequency at this location. We use time-resolved confocal imaging to record the motion of outer hair cell bundles before and after acoustic overstimulation. We have also recorded larger-scale structural views of the organ of Corti before and after exposure to the loud sound. Conventional electrophysiological techniques are used measure the cochlear microphonic potential. As has been previously reported, following acoustic overexposure the cochlear microphonic declines in value and typically recovers on the order of 30 - 60 minutes. Hair-bundle trajectories are affected following the loud sound and typically recover on a somewhat faster time scale than the microphonic potential, although the results vary considerably across preparations. Preliminary results also suggest reversible changes in the hair cell's resting potential following the loud sound.

  9. The mental health benefits of regular physical activity, and its role in preventing future depressive illness

    OpenAIRE

    Stanton, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Robert Stanton,1 Brenda Happell,1 Peter Reaburn2 1Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Centre for Mental Health Nursing Innovation and School of Nursing and Midwifery, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia; 2School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia Abstract: There is a large body of literature which examines the mental health benefits of physical activity. In general, studies report an inverse, dose d...

  10. Specific cognitive domains and symptoms of depression as predictors of activities of daily living in older adults with heterogeneous cognitive backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Jardim de Paula

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive functioning play an important role in the performance of activities of daily living (ADL. Although and association between this two measures are usually reported in neuropsychological studies, the results are inconsistent, especially in what aspects cognitive functioning are more or less related to each functional aspect. In addition, only a few studies investigated if depressive symptoms are associated with worse functional performance in older adults. Our objective is to investigate the role of different cognitive functions and the depressive symptoms in the performance of different groups of ADL and each activity individually. We assessed 264 older adults (96 normal aging controls, 85 patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and 93 with mild probable Alzheimer’s disease dementia with low formal education (about 4 years. We used measures of ADL with different levels of complexity: Selfcare, Instrumental-Domestic and Instrumental Complex, along with composite factors of cognitive functions and the score of the Geriatric Depression Scale. Multiple linear regression analysis showed significant predictors of Instrumental-Domestic ADL (executive functions and episodic memory and Instrumental-Complex ADL (executive functions, episodic memory and language/semantic memory, with large effect sizes (22 and 28% of explained variance. Individual analysis of each Instrumental ADL shows a heterogeneous pattern of association with different cognitive factors and depressive symptoms, with effect sizes ranging from 22 to 38% of explained variance. Our results suggest that specific measures of ADL have different cognitive predictors and that depressive symptoms are associated with activities more dependent on social contact.

  11. Factors associated with hearing loss in a normal-hearing guinea pig model of Hybrid cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Chiemi; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh; Loera, Katherine; Stark, Gemaine; Reiss, Lina

    2014-10-01

    The Hybrid cochlear implant (CI), also known as Electro-Acoustic Stimulation (EAS), is a new type of CI that preserves residual acoustic hearing and enables combined cochlear implant and hearing aid use in the same ear. However, 30-55% of patients experience acoustic hearing loss within days to months after activation, suggesting that both surgical trauma and electrical stimulation may cause hearing loss. The goals of this study were to: 1) determine the contributions of both implantation surgery and EAS to hearing loss in a normal-hearing guinea pig model; 2) determine which cochlear structural changes are associated with hearing loss after surgery and EAS. Two groups of animals were implanted (n = 6 per group), with one group receiving chronic acoustic and electric stimulation for 10 weeks, and the other group receiving no direct acoustic or electric stimulation during this time frame. A third group (n = 6) was not implanted, but received chronic acoustic stimulation. Auditory brainstem response thresholds were followed over time at 1, 2, 6, and 16 kHz. At the end of the study, the following cochlear measures were quantified: hair cells, spiral ganglion neuron density, fibrous tissue density, and stria vascularis blood vessel density; the presence or absence of ossification around the electrode entry was also noted. After surgery, implanted animals experienced a range of 0-55 dB of threshold shifts in the vicinity of the electrode at 6 and 16 kHz. The degree of hearing loss was significantly correlated with reduced stria vascularis vessel density and with the presence of ossification, but not with hair cell counts, spiral ganglion neuron density, or fibrosis area. After 10 weeks of stimulation, 67% of implanted, stimulated animals had more than 10 dB of additional threshold shift at 1 kHz, compared to 17% of implanted, non-stimulated animals and 0% of non-implanted animals. This 1-kHz hearing loss was not associated with changes in any of the cochlear measures

  12. Cochlear implants in children: surgical site infections and prevention and treatment of acute otitis media and meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lorry G; Papsin, Blake

    2010-08-01

    The use of cochlear implants is increasingly common, particularly in children younger than 3 years. Bacterial meningitis, often with associated acute otitis media, is more common in children with cochlear implants than in groups of control children. Children with profound deafness who are candidates for cochlear implants should receive all age-appropriate doses of pneumococcal conjugate and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines and appropriate annual immunization against influenza. In addition, starting at 24 months of age, a single dose of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine should be administered. Before implant surgery, primary care providers and cochlear implant teams should ensure that immunizations are up-to-date, preferably with completion of indicated vaccines at least 2 weeks before implant surgery. Imaging of the temporal bone/inner ear should be performed before cochlear implantation in all children with congenital deafness and all patients with profound hearing impairment and a history of bacterial meningitis to identify those with inner-ear malformations/cerebrospinal fluid fistulas or ossification of the cochlea. During the initial months after cochlear implantation, the risk of complications of acute otitis media may be higher than during subsequent time periods. Therefore, it is recommended that acute otitis media diagnosed during the first 2 months after implantation be initially treated with a parenteral antibiotic (eg, ceftriaxone or cefotaxime). Episodes occurring 2 months or longer after implantation can be treated with a trial of an oral antimicrobial agent (eg, amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanate at a dose of approximately 90 mg/kg per day of amoxicillin component), provided the child does not appear toxic and the implant does not have a spacer/positioner, a wedge that rests in the cochlea next to the electrodes present in certain implant models available between 1999 and 2002. "Watchful waiting" without antimicrobial

  13. Atividade física sistematizada e sintomas de depressão na demência de Alzheimer: uma revisão sistemática Systematized physical activity and depressive symptoms in Alzheimer's dementia: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Thays Martins Vital; Salma Stéphany Soleman Hernandez; Sebastião Gobbi; José Luiz Riani Costa; Florindo Stella

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão sistemática de artigos científicos que analisaram os efeitos da atividade física sistematizada nos sintomas de depressão de pacientes com demência de Alzheimer. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma busca nas seguintes bases de dados: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, MedLine e Biological Abstracts, utilizando-se as seguintes palavras-chave: "Alzheimer dementia" , "Alzheimer disease" , "Alzheimer, physical activity", "physical exercise", "motor intervention" , "physical th...

  14. Crisis-induced depression, physical activity and dietary intake among young adults: evidence from the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Muzhe

    2013-03-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we provide evidence that young adults respond to crisis-induced depression by exercising less and having breakfast less often. Exogenous variation in the crisis-induced depression is obtained through a unique event in our sample period - the 9/11 terrorist attacks. We compare those who were interviewed just before and just after 9/11 and find a significant and sharp increase in the symptoms of depression. We also provide evidence that this increase is not a September effect, but an effect of the external traumatic event.

  15. Analysis of Speech Processing Strategies in Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouachi Rouiha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implants can restore partial hearing to profoundly deaf people; the main function of these prostheses is to electrically stimulate the auditory nerve using an electrode array inserted in the cochlea. The acoustic signal is picked up by a microphone and analyzed. Then the extracted parameters of the signal are coded to generate electrical signals reconstituting the original signal. Currently all commercialized implants are multichannel they allow to stimulate the auditory nerve at different place of the cochlea, exploiting the tonotopic coding of the frequencies. This research will present an overview of various signal processing techniques that have been used for cochlear prosthesis over the years.

  16. Staphylococcus lugdunensis: novel organism causing cochlear implant infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Bhumbra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A majority of cochlear implant infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reported here is a pediatric patient with a cochlear implant infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus that has only recently been determined to be clinically relevant (1988. Unlike other coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, it is more aggressive, carrying a greater potential for tissue destruction. In pediatrics, the organism is uncommon, poorly described, and generally pan-susceptible. Described herein is the presentation and management of this unusual organism in a pediatric setting.

  17. Cochlear implant challenges encountered in tuberculous otitis media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Fang Chen; Zhao-Hui Liu; Jing Xie; Xiao-Bo Ma; Yi Li; Shu-Sheng Gong

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is rare inENT department, and is frequently misdiagnosed as otitis media. Thus early systemic treatment is very important forTOM. We reported a case report withTOM to highlight development of the disease and difficulties in clinical treatment in late stage ofTOM. Implantation of ossified and eroded cochlea poses many unique challenges to both the surgeon and programming team. With thorough preparation and complete knowledge about characters of specific issues, implantation would be performed successfully, and patients with ossified cochlear could benefit from cochlear implantation.

  18. Post-Stroke Depression Modulation and in Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Gallic Acid and Its Synthetic Derivatives in a Murine Model System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Fazel Nabavi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA is a plant secondary metabolite, which shows antioxidant activity and is commonly found in many plant-based foods and beverages. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress contributes to the development of many human chronic diseases, including cardiovascular and neurodegenerative pathologies, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and cancer. GA and its derivative, methyl-3-O-methyl gallate (M3OMG, possess physiological and pharmacological activities closely related to their antioxidant properties. This paper describes the antidepressive-like effects of intraperitoneal administration of GA and two synthetic analogues, M3OMG and P3OMG (propyl-3-O-methylgallate, in balb/c mice with post-stroke depression, a secondary form of depression that could be due to oxidative stress occurring during cerebral ischemia and the following reperfusion. Moreover, this study determined the in vivo antioxidant activity of these compounds through the evaluation of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (Cat activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS and reduced glutathione (GSH levels in mouse brain. GA and its synthetic analogues were found to be active (at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg in the modulation of depressive symptoms and the reduction of oxidative stress, restoring normal behavior and, at least in part, antioxidant endogenous defenses, with M3OMG being the most active of these compounds. SOD, TBARS, and GSH all showed strong correlation with behavioral parameters, suggesting that oxidative stress is tightly linked to the pathological processes involved in stroke and PSD. As a whole, the obtained results show that the administration of GA, M3OMG and P3OMG induce a reduction in depressive symptoms and oxidative stress.

  19. Sonic hedgehog initiates cochlear hair cell regeneration through downregulation of retinoblastoma protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Na [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Department of Otolaryngology and Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School and Eaton Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Chen, Yan [Central Laboratory, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Wang, Zhengmin [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Chen, Guoling [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Lin, Qin [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Department of Otolaryngology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Otolaryngology Institute of Fujian Province, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Zheng-Yi, E-mail: Zheng-yi_chen@meei.harvard.edu [Department of Otolaryngology and Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School and Eaton Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Li, Huawei, E-mail: hwli@shmu.edu.cn [Otology Skull Base Surgery Department, Hearing Research Institute, Eye and ENT Hospital of Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh activation in neonatal cochleae enhances sensory cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferating supporting cells can transdifferentiate into hair cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh promotes proliferation by transiently modulating pRb activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shh inhibits pRb by inhibiting transcription and increasing phosphorylation of pRb. -- Abstract: Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  20. Sonic hedgehog initiates cochlear hair cell regeneration through downregulation of retinoblastoma protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Shh activation in neonatal cochleae enhances sensory cell proliferation. ► Proliferating supporting cells can transdifferentiate into hair cells. ► Shh promotes proliferation by transiently modulating pRb activity. ► Shh inhibits pRb by inhibiting transcription and increasing phosphorylation of pRb. -- Abstract: Cell cycle re-entry by cochlear supporting cells and/or hair cells is considered one of the best approaches for restoring hearing loss as a result of hair cell damage. To identify mechanisms that can be modulated to initiate cell cycle re-entry and hair cell regeneration, we studied the effect of activating the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. We show that Shh signaling in postnatal rat cochleae damaged by neomycin leads to renewed proliferation of supporting cells and hair cells. Further, proliferating supporting cells are likely to transdifferentiate into hair cells. Shh treatment leads to inhibition of retinoblastoma protein (pRb) by increasing phosphorylated pRb and reducing retinoblastoma gene transcription. This results in upregulation of cyclins B1, D2, and D3, and CDK1. These results suggest that Shh signaling induces cell cycle re-entry in cochlear sensory epithelium and the production of new hair cells, in part by attenuating pRb function. This study provides an additional route to modulate pRb function with important implications in mammalian hair cell regeneration.