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Sample records for activity depresses cochlear

  1. Short-term synaptic depression is topographically distributed in the cochlear nucleus of the chicken.

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    Oline, Stefan N; Burger, R Michael

    2014-01-22

    In the auditory system, sounds are processed in parallel frequency-tuned circuits, beginning in the cochlea. Activity of auditory nerve fibers reflects this frequency-specific topographic pattern, known as tonotopy, and imparts frequency tuning onto their postsynaptic target neurons in the cochlear nucleus. In birds, cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) neurons encode the temporal properties of acoustic stimuli by "locking" discharges to a particular phase of the input signal. Physiological specializations exist in gradients corresponding to the tonotopic axis in NM that reflect the characteristic frequency (CF) of their auditory nerve fiber inputs. One feature of NM neurons that has not been investigated across the tonotopic axis is short-term synaptic plasticity. NM offers a rather homogeneous population of neurons with a distinct topographical distribution of synaptic properties that is ideal for the investigation of specialized synaptic plasticity. Here we demonstrate for the first time that short-term synaptic depression (STD) is expressed topographically, where unitary high CF synapses are more robust with repeated stimulation. Correspondingly, high CF synapses drive spiking more reliably than their low CF counterparts. We show that postsynaptic AMPA receptor desensitization does not contribute to the observed difference in STD. Further, rate of recovery from depression, a presynaptic property, does not differ tonotopically. Rather, we show that another presynaptic feature, readily releasable pool (RRP) size, is tonotopically distributed and inversely correlated with vesicle release probability. Mathematical model results demonstrate that these properties of vesicle dynamics are sufficient to explain the observed tonotopic distribution of STD.

  2. An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming.

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    Moore, Jan A.; Teagle, Holly F. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information about the hardware components and speech-processing strategies of cochlear implant systems. The use of assistive listening devices with cochlear implants is also discussed. A brief description of surgical procedures and the initial activation of the device are also presented, along with programming considerations.…

  3. Phase of shear vibrations within cochlear partition leads to activation of the cochlear amplifier.

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    Jessica S Lamb

    Full Text Available Since Georg von Bekesy laid out the place theory of the hearing, researchers have been working to understand the remarkable properties of mammalian hearing. Because access to the cochlea is restricted in live animals, and important aspects of hearing are destroyed in dead ones, models play a key role in interpreting local measurements. Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB models are attractive because they are analytically tractable, appropriate to the oblong geometry of the cochlea, and can predict wave behavior over a large span of the cochlea. Interest in the role the tectorial membrane (TM plays in cochlear tuning led us to develop models that directly interface the TM with the cochlear fluid. In this work we add an angled shear between the TM and reticular lamina (RL, which serves as an input to a nonlinear active force. This feature plus a novel combination of previous work gives us a model with TM-fluid interaction, TM-RL shear, a nonlinear active force and a second wave mode. The behavior we get leads to the conclusion the phase between the shear and basilar membrane (BM vibration is critical for amplification. We show there is a transition in this phase that occurs at a frequency below the cutoff, which is strongly influenced by TM stiffness. We describe this mechanism of sharpened BM velocity profile, which demonstrates the importance of the TM in overall cochlear tuning and offers an explanation for the response characteristics of the Tectb mutant mouse.

  4. Auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear responses in chinchillas.

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    Alex León

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cochlear microphonics (CM, auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments. We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the

  5. Effects of furosemide on cochlear neural activity, central hyperactivity and behavioural tinnitus after cochlear trauma in guinea pig.

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    Wilhelmina H A M Mulders

    Full Text Available Cochlear trauma causes increased spontaneous activity (hyperactivity to develop in central auditory structures, and this has been suggested as a neural substrate for tinnitus. Using a guinea pig model we have previously demonstrated that for some time after cochlear trauma, central hyperactivity is dependent on peripheral afferent drive and only later becomes generated intrinsically within central structures. Furosemide, a loop diuretic, reduces spontaneous firing of auditory afferents. We investigated in our guinea pig model the efficacy of furosemide in reducing 1 spontaneous firing of auditory afferents, using the spectrum of neural noise (SNN from round window recording, 2 hyperactivity in inferior colliculus, using extracellular single neuron recordings and 3 tinnitus at early time-points after cochlear trauma. Tinnitus was assessed using gap prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle (GPIAS. Intraperitoneal furosemide, but not saline, caused a marked decrease in both SNN and central hyperactivity. Intracochlear perfusion with furosemide similarly reversed central hyperactivity. In animals in which GPIAS measurements suggested the presence of tinnitus (reduced GPIAS, this could be reversed with an intraperitoneal injection with furosemide but not saline. The results are consistent with furosemide reducing central hyperactivity and behavioural signs of tinnitus by acting peripherally to decrease spontaneous firing of auditory afferents. The data support the notion that hyperactivity may be involved in the generation of tinnitus and further suggest that there may be a therapeutic window after cochlear trauma using drug treatments that target peripheral spontaneous activity.

  6. Cochlear power flux as an indicator of mechanical activity.

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    Diependaal, R J; de Boer, E; Viergever, M A

    1987-09-01

    The question of whether one can conclude just from basilar membrane (BM) vibration data that the cochlea is an active mechanical system is addressed. To this end, a method is developed which computes the power flux through a channel cross section of a short-wave cochlear model from a given BM vibration pattern. The power flux is an important indicator of mechanical activity because a rise in this function corresponds to creation of mechanical energy. The power flux method is applied to BM velocity patterns as measured by Johnstone and Yates [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 55, 584-587 (1974)] and by Sellick et al. [Hear. Res. 10, 101-108 (1983)] in the guinea pig and by Robles et al. [Peripheral Auditory Mechanisms, edited by J.B. Allen, J.L. Hall, A.E. Hubbard, S.T. Neely, and A. Tubis (Springer, New York, 1986a), pp. 121-128, and J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 80, 1364-1374 (1986b)] in the chinchilla. Before the calculations are performed, the BM data are interpolated and smoothed in order to avoid numerical errors as a result of too few and noisy data points. The choice of the smoothing method influences the computed power flux function considerably. Nevertheless, the calculations appear to make a clear distinction between the "old" data, showing broad BM tuning (Johnstone and Yates, 1974), and the "new" data, in which the response is much more peaked (Sellick et al., 1983; Robles et al., 1986a, b). The former do not give rise to a significant increase of the power flux; the latter do, although less convincingly for the Sellick et al. (1983) data than for the Robles et al. (1986a,b) data. It is thus concluded that the recently obtained, sharply tuned BM responses reflect the presence of mechanical activity in the cochlea.

  7. Unusual prenylated phenols with antioxidant activities from Ganoderma cochlear.

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    Peng, XingRong; Liu, JieQing; Wang, CuiFang; Han, ZhongHui; Shu, Yi; Li, XuYang; Zhou, Lin; Qiu, MingHua

    2015-03-15

    Seven new prenylated phenols, five novel phenols (1-5) with polycyclic skeleton and two new phenols (6 and 7) with a carbon chain, along with one known compound (8) were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma cochlear. The structures of new compounds were elucidated by the spectroscopic technologies, X-ray crystallography analysis and chiral HPLC chromatography. All compounds showed antioxidant effect in radical scavenging assays and a plausible biosynthetic pathway for 1-8 was proposed.

  8. Modulation of cochlear afferent response by the lateral olivocochlear system: activation via electrical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

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    Groff, J Alan; Liberman, M Charles

    2003-11-01

    The olivocochlear (OC) efferent innervation of the mammalian inner ear consists of two subdivisions, medial (MOC) and lateral (LOC), with different peripheral terminations on outer hair cells and cochlear afferent terminals, respectively. The cochlear effects of electrically activating MOC efferents are well known, i.e., response suppression effected by reducing outer hair cells' contribution to cochlear amplification. LOC peripheral effects are unknown, because their unmyelinated axons are difficult to electrically stimulate. Here, stimulating electrodes are placed in the inferior colliculus (IC) to indirectly activate the LOC system, while recording cochlear responses bilaterally from anesthetized guinea pigs. Shocks at some IC sites produced novel cochlear effects attributable to activation of the LOC system: long-lasting (5-20 min) enhancement or suppression of cochlear neural responses (compound action potentials and round window noise), without changes in cochlear responses dominated by outer hair cells (otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonics). These novel effects also differed from classic MOC effects in their lack of dependence on the level and frequency of the acoustic stimulus. These effects disappeared on sectioning the entire OC bundle, but not after selective lesioning of the MOC tracts or the cochlea's autonomic innervation. We conclude that the LOC pathway comprises two functional subdivisions, capable of inducing slow increases or decreases in response magnitudes in the auditory nerve. Such a system may be useful in maintaining accurate binaural comparisons necessary for sound localization in the face of slow changes in interaural sensitivity.

  9. Cochlear implant benefits in deafness rehabilitation: PET study of temporal voice Activations

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    Coez, A.; Zilbovicius, M. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, INSERM, Res Unit Neuroimaging and Psychiat, U797, IFR49, F-91406 Orsay (France); Zilbovicius, M.; Syrota, A.; Samson, Y. [CEA, DSV, DRM, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, F-91406 Orsay (France); Bizaguet, E. [Lab Correct Audit, Paris (France); Coez, A. [Univ Paris Sud 11, Paris (France); Ferrary, E.; Bouccara, D.; Mosnier, I.; Sterkers, O. [INSERM, Unit M 867, Paris (France); Ambert-Dahan, E. [Hop Beaujon, Serv ORL Chirurg Cervicofaciale, AP-HP, Clichy (France); Ferrary, E.; Bouccara, D.; Mosnier, I.; Sterkers, O. [Inst Fed Rech Claude Bernard Physiol et Pathol, IFR02, Paris (France); Samson, Y. [Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Serv Urgences Cerebro-vasc, AP-HP, Paris (France); Samson, Y. [Univ Paris 06, Paris (France); Sterkers, O. [Univ Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    Cochlear implants may improve the medical and social prognosis of profound deafness. Nevertheless, some patients have experienced poor results without any clear explanations. One correlate may be an alteration in cortical voice processing. To test this hypothesis, we studied the activation of human temporal voice areas (TVA) using a well-standardized PET paradigm adapted from previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies. Methods: A PET H{sub 2}{sup 15}O activation study was performed on 3 groups of adult volunteers: normal-hearing control subjects (n 6) and cochlear-implanted post-lingually deaf patients with {>=}2 y of cochlear implant experience, with intelligibility scores in the 'Lafon monosyllabic task' {>=}80% (Good group; n 6) or {<=}20% (Poor group; n 6). Relative cerebral blood flow was measured in 3 conditions: rest, passive listening to human voice, and non-voice stimuli. Results: Compared with silence, the activations induced by non-voice stimuli were bilaterally located in the superior temporal regions in all groups. However these activations were significantly and similarly reduced in both cochlear implant groups, whereas control subjects showed supplementary activations. Compared with non-voice, the voice stimuli induced bilateral activation of the TVA along the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in both the control and the Good groups. In contrast, these activations were not detected in the Poor group, which showed only left unilateral middle STS activation. Conclusion: These results suggest that PET is an adequate method to explore cochlear implant benefits and that this benefit could be linked to the activation of the TVA. (authors)

  10. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

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    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Puria, Sunil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  11. Activated depression: mixed bipolar disorder or agitated unipolar depression?

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    Swann, Alan C

    2013-08-01

    The combination of depression and activation presents clinical and diagnostic challenges. It can occur, in either bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder, as increased agitation as a dimension of depression. What is called agitation can consist of expressions of painful inner tension or as disinhibited goal-directed behavior and thought. In bipolar disorder, elements of depression can be combined with those of mania. In this case, the agitation, in addition to increased motor activity and painful inner tension, must include symptoms of mania that are related to goal-directed behavior or manic cognition. These diagnostic considerations are important, as activated depression potentially carries increased behavioral risk, especially for suicidal behavior, and optimal treatments for depressive episodes differ between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

  12. Evolution of impedance field telemetry after one day of activation in cochlear implant recipients

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    Tsai, Chia-Mi; Chen, Hsing-Yi; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Li, Lieber Po-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Changes in impedance between 24 hours and one month after cochlear implantation have never been explored due to the inability to switch on within one day. This study examined the effect of early activation (within 24 hours) on the evolution of electrode impedance with the aim of providing information on the tissue-to-electrode interface when electrical stimulation was commenced one day post implantation. Methods We performed a retrospective review at a single institution. Patients who received a Nucleus 24RECA implant system (Cochlear, Sydney, Australia) and underwent initial switch-on within 24 hours postoperatively were included. Impedance measurements were obtained intraoperatively and postoperatively at 1 day, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Results A significant drop in impedance was noted 1 day after an initial activation within 24 hours followed by a significant rise in impedance in all channels until 1 week, after which the impedance behaved differently in different segments. Basal and mid-portion electrodes revealed a slight increase while apical electrodes showed a slight decrease in impedance from 1 week to 8 weeks postoperatively. Impedance was relatively stable 4 weeks after surgery. Conclusions This is the first study to report the evolution of impedance in all channels between initial mapping 1 day and 1 month after cochlear implantation. The underlying mechanism for the differences in behavior between different segments of the electrode may be associated with the combined effect of dynamics among the interplay of cell cover formation, electrical stimulation, and fibrotic reaction. PMID:28264044

  13. Sensitivity of cochlear nucleus neurons to spatio-temporal changes in auditory nerve activity.

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    Wang, Grace I; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2012-12-01

    The spatio-temporal pattern of auditory nerve (AN) activity, representing the relative timing of spikes across the tonotopic axis, contains cues to perceptual features of sounds such as pitch, loudness, timbre, and spatial location. These spatio-temporal cues may be extracted by neurons in the cochlear nucleus (CN) that are sensitive to relative timing of inputs from AN fibers innervating different cochlear regions. One possible mechanism for this extraction is "cross-frequency" coincidence detection (CD), in which a central neuron converts the degree of coincidence across the tonotopic axis into a rate code by preferentially firing when its AN inputs discharge in synchrony. We used Huffman stimuli (Carney LH. J Neurophysiol 64: 437-456, 1990), which have a flat power spectrum but differ in their phase spectra, to systematically manipulate relative timing of spikes across tonotopically neighboring AN fibers without changing overall firing rates. We compared responses of CN units to Huffman stimuli with responses of model CD cells operating on spatio-temporal patterns of AN activity derived from measured responses of AN fibers with the principle of cochlear scaling invariance. We used the maximum likelihood method to determine the CD model cell parameters most likely to produce the measured CN unit responses, and thereby could distinguish units behaving like cross-frequency CD cells from those consistent with same-frequency CD (in which all inputs would originate from the same tonotopic location). We find that certain CN unit types, especially those associated with globular bushy cells, have responses consistent with cross-frequency CD cells. A possible functional role of a cross-frequency CD mechanism in these CN units is to increase the dynamic range of binaural neurons that process cues for sound localization.

  14. Cochlear Implant

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    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  15. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

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    Kumar N Alagramam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  16. Visualization and contractile activity of cochlear pericytes in the capillaries of the spiral ligament

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    Dai, Min; Nuttall, Alfred; Yang, Yue; Shi, Xiaorui

    2009-01-01

    Pericytes, mural cells located on microvessels, are considered to play an important role in the formation of the vasculature and the regulation of local blood flow in some organs. Little is known about the physiology of cochlear pericytes. In order to investigate the function of cochlear pericytes, we developed a method to visualize cochlear pericytes using diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA) and intravital fluorescence microscopy. This method can permit the study of the effect of vasoac...

  17. [Behavioral Activation for Depression: Theory and Practice].

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    Nakao, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) has recently attracted marked attention. While cognitive therapy focuses on the cognitive distortion of patients with depression and asks them to change their behaviors as the process of altering the cognitive distortion, BA pays attention to behavior to avoid an unpleasant situation or social situation as a key symptom that leads to persistence of the depression. Avoidance behaviors are often seen during every process of depression, from onset to recurrence. Avoidance behaviors, a decrease in pleasant phenomena, or increase in unpleasant phenomena, result in reinforcing a depressive mood. If patients can set appropriate behavioral targets and achieve them, the beneficial behaviors will be further promoted with positive feed-back. The behavioral change, as-a consequence, will result in improvement of the mood, cognition, and depression itself. In this manuscript, the author presents two clinical cases, in which BA assisted the patients in recovering from their depression. The first case was a male in his thirties who repeatedly took sick leave from his work because of maladjustment, which resulted in persistent depression. The second case was a female in her thirties who suffered from OCD and then became maladjusted to her place of work, depressive, and emotionally unstable. In both cases, avoidant behaviors caused their conditions to persist. Appropriate activities formed by BA improved their moods, and their self-efficacies were gradually regained. It was suggested that BA is markedly effective, especially in patients whose avoidant behaviors mainly cause the persistence of their depressive symptoms.

  18. Aging, Cognitive Decline and Hearing Loss: Effects of Auditory Rehabilitation and Training with Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants on Cognitive Function and Depression among Older Adults.

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    Castiglione, Alessandro; Benatti, Alice; Velardita, Carmelita; Favaro, Diego; Padoan, Elisa; Severi, Daniele; Pagliaro, Michela; Bovo, Roberto; Vallesi, Antonino; Gabelli, Carlo; Martini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    A growing interest in cognitive effects associated with speech and hearing processes is spreading throughout the scientific community essentially guided by evidence that central and peripheral hearing loss is associated with cognitive decline. For the present research, 125 participants older than 65 years of age (105 with hearing impairment and 20 with normal hearing) were enrolled, divided into 6 groups according to their degree of hearing loss and assessed to determine the effects of the treatment applied. Patients in our research program routinely undergo an extensive audiological and cognitive evaluation protocol providing results from the Digit Span test, Stroop color-word test, Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Geriatric Depression Scale, before and after rehabilitation. Data analysis was performed for a cross-sectional and longitudinal study of the outcomes for the different treatment groups. Each group demonstrated improvement after auditory rehabilitation or training on short- and long-term memory tasks, level of depression and cognitive status scores. Auditory rehabilitation by cochlear implants or hearing aids is effective also among older adults (median age of 74 years) with different degrees of hearing loss, and enables positive improvements in terms of social isolation, depression and cognitive performance.

  19. Auditory cortical activity during cochlear implant-mediated perception of spoken language, melody, and rhythm.

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    Limb, Charles J; Molloy, Anne T; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Braun, Allen R

    2010-03-01

    Despite the significant advances in language perception for cochlear implant (CI) recipients, music perception continues to be a major challenge for implant-mediated listening. Our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie successful implant listening remains limited. To our knowledge, this study represents the first neuroimaging investigation of music perception in CI users, with the hypothesis that CI subjects would demonstrate greater auditory cortical activation than normal hearing controls. H(2) (15)O positron emission tomography (PET) was used here to assess auditory cortical activation patterns in ten postlingually deafened CI patients and ten normal hearing control subjects. Subjects were presented with language, melody, and rhythm tasks during scanning. Our results show significant auditory cortical activation in implant subjects in comparison to control subjects for language, melody, and rhythm. The greatest activity in CI users compared to controls was seen for language tasks, which is thought to reflect both implant and neural specializations for language processing. For musical stimuli, PET scanning revealed significantly greater activation during rhythm perception in CI subjects (compared to control subjects), and the least activation during melody perception, which was the most difficult task for CI users. These results may suggest a possible relationship between auditory performance and degree of auditory cortical activation in implant recipients that deserves further study.

  20. Mitotic activity and specification of fibrocyte subtypes in the developing rat cochlear lateral wall.

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    Mutai, H; Nagashima, R; Fujii, M; Matsunaga, T

    2009-11-10

    Spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs) in the mammalian cochlear lateral wall participate in K(+) recycling; they are classified into five subtypes based on their morphology, distribution, and function. Regeneration of SLFs is a potential therapeutic strategy for correcting several types of hearing loss, prompting us to investigate how SLF subtypes are established during development. We compared transitional SLF-type marker expression with mitotic activity to evaluate proliferation-differentiation relationships in SLFs from postnatal rat cochleae. I.p. injection of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) demonstrated that the overall mitotic activity of SLFs decreased significantly between postnatal day 7 (P7) and P10. For all developmental periods, BrdU incorporation was weakest in the area where type I SLFs reside. The onset of expression of markers for type II/IV SLFs followed the reduced mitotic activity of the cells, whereas that of aquaporin-1, a marker for type III SLFs, was already detectable at P7, when the type III SLFs were still proliferating vigorously. Distribution of BrdU(+) cells increased in the area of type I SLFs between P7 and P10, suggesting migration of SLFs from adjacent areas. We conclude that the time course of development of SLFs is subtype-specific.

  1. Cochlear Implants

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    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  2. Measuring Levels of Stress and Depression in Mothers of Children Using Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants: A Comparative Study

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    Prakash, Santhi S; Prakash, S. G. R.; Ravichandran, Aparna; Susan, K. Y.; Alex, Winnie

    2013-01-01

    Hearing impairment is an exceptional circumstance that restricts the child's ability to communicate verbally. Depression is a common stress-related response for hearing parents of children with hearing loss. Evidence suggests that mothers are more inclined than fathers to experience depression in response to their child's hearing loss (Mavrolas,…

  3. Optogenetic stimulation of the cochlear nucleus using channelrhodopsin-2 evokes activity in the central auditory pathway

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    Darrow, Keith N.; Slama, Michaël C. C.; Owoc, Maryanna; Kozin, Elliott; Hancock, Kenneth; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert; Lacour, Stephanie; Boyden, Edward; Polley, Daniel; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics has become an important research tool and is being considered as the basis for several neural prostheses. However, few studies have applied optogenetics to the auditory brainstem. This study explored whether optical activation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) elicited responses in neurons in higher centers of the auditory pathway, and it measured the evoked response to optical stimulation. Viral-mediated gene transfer was used to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mouse CN. Blue light was delivered via an optical fiber placed near the surface of the infected CN and recordings were made in higher-level centers. Optical stimulation evoked excitatory multiunit spiking activity throughout the tonotopic axis of central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) and the auditory cortex (Actx). The pattern and magnitude of IC activity elicited by optical stimulation was comparable to that obtained with a 50 dB SPL acoustic click stimulus. This broad pattern of activity was consistent with histological confirmation of GFP label of cell bodies and axons throughout the CN. Increasing pulse rates up to 320 Hz did not significantly affect threshold or bandwidth of the IC responses, but rates higher than 50 Hz resulted in desynchronized activity. Optical stimulation also evoked an auditory brainstem response, which had a simpler waveform than the response to acoustic stimulation. Control cases showed no responses to optical stimulation. These data suggest that optogenetic control of central auditory neurons is feasible, but opsins with faster channel kinetics will be necessary to convey information in rates typical of many auditory signals. PMID:25481416

  4. Optogenetic stimulation of the cochlear nucleus using channelrhodopsin-2 evokes activity in the central auditory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Keith N; Slama, Michaël C C; Kozin, Elliott D; Owoc, Maryanna; Hancock, Kenneth; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert; Lacour, Stephanie; Boyden, Edward; Polley, Daniel; Brown, M Christian; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-03-02

    Optogenetics has become an important research tool and is being considered as the basis for several neural prostheses. However, few studies have applied optogenetics to the auditory brainstem. This study explored whether optical activation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) elicited responses in neurons in higher centers of the auditory pathway and whether it elicited an evoked response. Viral-mediated gene transfer was used to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mouse CN. Blue light was delivered via an optical fiber placed near the surface of the infected CN and recordings were made in higher-level centers. Optical stimulation evoked excitatory multiunit spiking activity throughout the tonotopic axis of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) and the auditory cortex (Actx). The pattern and magnitude of IC activity elicited by optical stimulation was comparable to that obtained with a 50dB SPL acoustic click. This broad pattern of activity was consistent with histological confirmation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) label of cell bodies and axons throughout the CN. Increasing pulse rates up to 320Hz did not significantly affect threshold or bandwidth of the IC responses, but rates higher than 50Hz resulted in desynchronized activity. Optical stimulation also evoked an auditory brainstem response, which had a simpler waveform than the response to acoustic stimulation. Control cases showed no responses to optical stimulation. These data suggest that optogenetic control of central auditory neurons is feasible, but opsins with faster channel kinetics may be necessary to convey information at rates typical of many auditory signals.

  5. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION PREVALENCE IN ELDERLY

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    A. V. Starokha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current paper describes an experience of cochlear implantation in elderly. Cochlear implantation has become a widely accepted intervention in the treatment of individuals with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implants are now accepted as a standard of care to optimize hearing and subsequent speech development in children and adults with deafness. But cochlear implantation affects not only hearing abilities, speech perception and speech production; it also has an outstanding impact on the social life, activities and self-esteem of each patient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cochlear implantation efficacy in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. There were 5 patients under our observation. Surgery was performed according to traditional posterior tympanotomy and cochleostomy for cochlear implant electrode insertion for all observed patients. The study was conducted in two stages: before speech processor’s activation and 3 months later. Pure tone free field audiometry was performed to each patient to assess the efficiency of cochlear implantation in dynamics. The aim of the study was also to evaluate quality of life in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss after unilateral cochlear implantation. Each patient underwent questioning with 36 Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. SF-36 is a set of generic, coherent, and easily administered quality-of-life measures. The SF-36 consists of eight scaled scores, which are the weighted sums of the questions in their section. Each scale is directly transformed into a 0-100 scale on the assumption that each question carries equal weight. The eight sections are: physical functioning; physical role functioning; emotional role functioning; vitality; emotional well-being; social role functioning; bodily pain; general health perceptions. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in elderly consistently improved quality of life

  6. Connexin26 (GJB2) deficiency reduces active cochlear amplification leading to late-onset hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Chen, J; Liang, C; Zong, L; Chen, J; Jones, R O; Zhao, H-B

    2015-01-22

    Connexin26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations account for >50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss. The deafness is not always congenital. A large group of these patients (∼30%) demonstrate a late-onset hearing loss, starting in childhood. They have normal hearing early in life and are therefore good candidates for applying protective and therapeutic interventions. However, the underlying deafness mechanism is unclear. In this study, we used a time-controlled, inducible gene knockout technique to knockout Cx26 expression in the cochlea after birth. We found that deletion of Cx26 after postnatal day 5 (P5) in mice could lead to late-onset hearing loss. Similar to clinical observations, the mice demonstrated progressive, mild to moderate hearing loss. The hearing loss initiated at high frequencies and then extended to the middle- and low-frequency range. The cochlea showed normal development and had no apparent hair cell loss. However, distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) was reduced. The reduction was also progressive and large at high-frequencies. Consistent with DPOAE reduction, we found that outer hair cell electromotility-associated nonlinear capacitance was shifted to the right and the slope of voltage dependence was reduced. The endocochlear potential was reduced in Cx26 conditional knockout (cKO) mice but the reduction was not associated with progressive hearing loss. These data suggest that Cx26 deficiency may impair active cochlear amplification leading to late-onset hearing loss. Our study also helps develop newer protective and therapeutic interventions to this common nonsyndromic hearing loss.

  7. Sudden gains in behavioural activation for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Ciara; Ekers, David; Gilbody, Simon; Richards, David; Toner-Clewes, Benjamin; McMillan, Dean

    2014-09-01

    Sudden gains have been linked to improved outcomes in cognitive behaviour therapy for depression. The relationship between sudden gains and outcome is less clear in other treatment modalities, including interpersonal psychotherapy and supportive expressive therapy, which may indicate different mechanisms of change between treatment modalities. The current study examined sudden gains in adults meeting diagnostic criteria for depression (N = 40) offered up to 12 sessions of behavioural activation treatment. Sudden gains were found in 42.5% of the sample. Sudden gains occurred early (median pre-gain session 2) and were related to outcome: those who experienced a sudden gain had significantly lower post-treatment scores on the PHQ-9. Furthermore, the proportion meeting the reliable and clinically significant change criteria at end of treatment was higher in the sudden gain group. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the mechanisms by which sudden gains relate to therapy outcome in behavioural activation.

  8. Prolidase activity in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Demir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prolidase enzyme, which exists in plasma, brain and various organs, is a cytosolic exopeptidase, that divisor the imidodipeptides with carboxyl terminal position of proline and hydroxyproline. The aim of the present study was to investigate serum prolidase activity level in major depressive disorder (MDD. Methods: This study included 22 patients with MDD as the study group, and 26 healthy subjects without any psychiatric disorders as the control group. Each patient underwent a detailed diagnostic evaluation by experienced psychiatrists. The sociodemographic information form given to both patients and the control subjects, while Hamilton Depression Scale Scoring (HDS, Hamilton Anxiety Scale Scoring (HAS, Clinical Global Impression Scoring (CGI applied to patients. Blood samples were obtained for biochemical analyses. Results: The mean age of the patient group was 31.3±10.1 years old, whereas the mean age of the control group was 32.3±8.8 years old. The mean duration of the education for the patient group was 8.1±6.2 years, whereas for the control group was 10.2±3.8 years. There was no significant differences in terms of the mean age of participants and the mean duration of the education between two groups (p>0.05. The level of prolidase activity of patient group was 510.3±480.8 U/L, whereas the level of prolidase activity of control group was 457.8±386.0 U/L. No significant difference was observed in serum prolidase activity between patient and the control groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: In our study similar level of prolidase activity was found in MDD and healthy subjects. We suggest that this finding may be an evidence indicating that MDD and bipolar depression may be different clinical entities. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 296-300

  9. THE EFFECT OF NIMODIPINE ON COCHLEAR POTENTIALS AND NA+/K+-ATPASE ACTIVITY IN NORMAL AND HYDROPIC COCHLEAS OF THE ALBINO GUINEA-PIG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBENTHEM, PPG; KLIS, SFL; ALBERS, FWJ; DEWILDT, DJ; VELDMAN, JE; HUIZING, EH; SMOORENBURG, GF

    1994-01-01

    In experimental endolymphatic hydrops (EEH) a decrease in the endocochlear potential (EP) has been reported and is thought to be due to decreased activity of the enzyme Na+/K+-ATPase in the stria vascularis. By stimulating Na+/K+-ATPase, the EP, and thereby cochlear function as a whole, might be res

  10. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  11. Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this text, the authors recall the main principles and data ruling cochlear implants. Then, a first circle of technical equipment for assistance is presented. This circle includes: device setting (DS), Electrically evoked Auditory Brainstem Responses (EABR), Neural Response Telemetry (NRT), Stapedial Reflex (SR) and Electrodogram Acquisition (EA). This first cycle becomes more and more important as children are implanted younger and younger; the amount of data available with this assistance makes necessary the use of models (implicit or explicit) to handle this information. Consequently, this field is more open than ever.

  12. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  13. Sexual activity and cardiac risk: is depression a contributing factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roose, S P; Seidman, S N

    2000-07-20

    There is a well-documented association between depression, ischemic heart disease, and cardiovascular mortality. This association has a number of dimensions including: (1) depressed patients have a higher than expected rate of sudden cardiovascular death; (2) over the course of a lifetime, patients with depression develop symptomatic and fatal ischemic heart disease at a higher rate compared with a nondepressed group; and (3) depression after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with increased cardiac mortality. Depression is also associated with sexual dysfunction, particularly erectile dysfunction. If depression is the primary illness, then erectile dysfunction can be considered a symptom of the depressive illness. However, if the erectile dysfunction is primary, men may develop a depressive syndrome in reaction to the loss of sexual function. Regardless of whether erectile dysfunction is a symptom of depression or depression is a consequence of erectile dysfunction, these conditions are frequently comorbid. Thus, the patient with ischemic heart disease who is depressed is more likely to have erectile difficulties. An attempt by this patient to engage in sexual activity is therefore more likely to be unsuccessful and, given the increase in cardiac mortality associated with depression, it may result in a serious cardiac event.

  14. Behavioral Activation Is an Evidence-Based Treatment for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews of evidence-based treatment for depression did not identify behavioral activation as an evidence-based practice. Therefore, this article conducted a systematic review of behavioral activation treatment of depression, which identified three meta-analyses, one recent randomized controlled trial and one recent follow-up of an earlier…

  15. A cohort study of leisure time physical activity and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Stine Schou; Tolstrup, Janne Schumann; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht;

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the role of leisure time physical activity on the risk of developing depression in a large longitudinal setting.......The objective of the study was to examine the role of leisure time physical activity on the risk of developing depression in a large longitudinal setting....

  16. Cochlear-Meningitis Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AcademyU Home Study Course Maintenance of Certification Conferences & Events ... you should know Children with cochlear implants are more likely to get bacterial meningitis than children without cochlear implants. In addition, ...

  17. Managing depression through needlecraft creative activities: A qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the personal meanings of needlecrafts and their role in the self-management of depression. Written and spoken narratives from 39 women were studied. Respondents described themselves as experiencing chronic or episodic depression (e.g. associated with stressful work situations, bereavement or caring for an ill relative). Some had received treatment for depression but most had not. When analysing the therapeutic effects of creative activity, most women describ...

  18. Generalized anxiety modulates frontal and limbic activation in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlund Michael W

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety is relatively common in depression and capable of modifying the severity and course of depression. Yet our understanding of how anxiety modulates frontal and limbic activation in depression is limited. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and two emotional information processing tasks to examine frontal and limbic activation in ten patients with major depression and comorbid with preceding generalized anxiety (MDD/GAD and ten non-depressed controls. Results Consistent with prior studies on depression, MDD/GAD patients showed hypoactivation in medial and middle frontal regions, as well as in the anterior cingulate, cingulate and insula. However, heightened anxiety in MDD/GAD patients was associated with increased activation in middle frontal regions and the insula and the effects varied with the type of emotional information presented. Conclusions Our findings highlight frontal and limbic hypoactivation in patients with depression and comorbid anxiety and indicate that anxiety level may modulate frontal and limbic activation depending upon the emotional context. One implication of this finding is that divergent findings reported in the imaging literature on depression could reflect modulation of activation by anxiety level in response to different types of emotional information.

  19. Cortical plasticity after cochlear implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B; Gjedde, A; Wallentin, M;

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic progress in the restoration of hearing takes place in the first months after cochlear implantation. To map the brain activity underlying this process, we used positron emission tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen...

  20. Physical (in)activity and depression in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink-Vossen, Sanne; Collard, Rose M; Oude Voshaar, Richard C; Comijs, Hannie C; de Vocht, Hilde M; Naarding, Paul

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge about characteristics explaining low level of physical activity in late-life depression is needed to develop specific interventions aimed at improving physical health in depressed people above the age of 60. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used data from the Netherlands Stu

  1. Behavioral Activation for Moderately Depressed University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrysiak, Michael; Nicholas, Christopher; Hopko, Derek R.

    2009-01-01

    Although depression is prevalent among university students, limited and dated research has examined the efficacy of behavioral interventions in treating this population (C. Lee, 2005). On the basis of a modified version of the Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD; D. R. Hopko & C. W. Lejuez, 2007; C. W. Lejuez, D. R. Hopko, & S. D.…

  2. Cochlear Implantation in Children with Cochlear Malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikawa, Etsuko; Takano, Kenichi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Tsubomatsu, Chieko; Takahashi, Nozomi; Shirasaki, Hideaki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) has proven to be an effective treatment for severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Inner ear malformation is a rare anomaly and occurs in approximately 20% of cases with congenital SNHL. In cases with cochlear malformation, CI can be successfully performed in nearly all patients, the exceptions being those with complete labyrinthine and cochlear aplasia. It is important to evaluate the severity of inner ear deformity and other associated anomalies during the preimplantation radiological assessment in order to identify any complication that may potentially occur during the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  3. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2015-05-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool and 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as 'low' or 'middle' had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as 'high' were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music.

  4. Activation of muscarinic receptors increases the activity of the granule neurones of the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus--a calcium imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kőszeghy, Áron; Vincze, János; Rusznák, Zoltán; Fu, Yuhong; Paxinos, George; Csernoch, László; Szücs, Géza

    2012-06-01

    Acetylcholine modulates the function of the cochlear nucleus via several pathways. In this study, the effects of cholinergic stimulation were studied on the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration of granule neurones of the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN). Ca(2+) transients were recorded in Oregon-Green-BAPTA 1-loaded brain slices using a calcium imaging technique. For the detection, identification and characterisation of the Ca(2+) transients, a wavelet analysis-based method was developed. Granule cells were identified on the basis of their size and localisation. The action potential-coupled character of the Ca(2+) transients of the granule cells was established by recording fluorescence changes and electrical activity simultaneously. Application of the cholinergic agonist carbamyl-choline (CCh) significantly increased the frequency of the Ca(2+) transients (from 0.37 to 6.31 min(-1), corresponding to a 17.1-fold increase; n = 89). This effect was antagonised by atropine, whereas CCh could still evoke an 8.3-fold increase of the frequency of the Ca(2+) transients when hexamethonium was present. Using immunolabelling, the expression of both type 1 and type 3 muscarinic receptors (M1 and M3 receptors, respectively) was demonstrated in the granule cells. Application of 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (an M3-specific antagonist) prevented the onset of the CCh effect, whereas an M1-specific antagonist (pirenzepine) was less effective. We conclude that cholinergic stimulation increases the activity of granule cells, mainly by acting on their M3 receptors. The modulation of the firing activity of the granule cells, in turn, may modify the firing of projection neurones and may adjust signal processing in the entire DCN.

  5. Activity loss and depression in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of severe vision loss in older persons and is associated with high rates of disability and depression. The authors evaluated 51 patients with bilateral AMD to investigate the interrelationships of disease severity, disability, and depression and focused on loss of valued activities as an emblematic disabling consequence of AMD. They characterized depression by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) score, a syndromal state based on the CES-D, and as a level of distress (Index of Affective Suffering; IAS). Thirty subjects (58.8%) had loss of a valued, discretionary activity. They had worse visual acuity and more depressive symptoms and were represented in higher IAS levels than other subjects. Visual acuity was significantly correlated with IAS levels, but not with CES-D scores or syndromal depression. A regression model demonstrated that activity loss mediated the relationship between visual acuity and IAS level. Affective distress occurs in AMD, largely to the extent that valued activities are relinquished because of vision loss. IAS levels best illuminated this relationship, suggesting the value of this dimension of affective functioning in studies of the consequences of chronic disease.

  6. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  7. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  8. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  9. MUSIC AND COCHLEAR IMPLANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao Yitao; Xu Li

    2013-01-01

    Currently, most people with modern multichannel cochlear implant systems can understand speech in qui-et environment very well. However, studies in recent decades reported a lack of satisfaction in music percep-tion with cochlear implants. This article reviews the literature on music ability of cochlear implant users by presenting a systematic outline of the capabilities and limitations of cochlear implant recipients with regard to their music perception as well as production. The review also evaluates the similarities and differences be-tween electric hearing and acoustic hearing regarding music perception. We summarize the research results in terms of the individual components of music (e.g., rhythm, pitch, and timbre). Finally, we briefly intro-duce the vocal singing of prelingually-deafened children with cochlear implants as evaluated by acoustic measures.

  10. [Behavioral activation and depression: a contextual treatment approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy Chartier, Isabelle; Blanchet, Valérie; Provencher, Martin D

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a widespread psychological disorder that affects approximately one in five North American. Typical reactions to depression include inactivity, isolation, and rumination. Several treatments and psychological interventions have emerged to address this problematic. Cognitive behavioural therapies have received increasingly large amounts of empirical support. A sub-component of cognitive behavioural therapy, behavioural activation, has been shown to in itself effectively treat symptoms of depression. This intervention involves efforts to re-activate the depressed client by having them engage in pleasant, gratifying, leisure, social, or physical activities, thereby counteracting the tendency to be inactive and to isolate oneself. Clients are guided through the process of establishing a list of potentially rewarding social, leisure, mastery-oriented or physical activities, to then establish a gradual hierarchy of objectives to be accomplished over the span of several weeks. Concrete action plans are devised, and solutions to potential obstacles are elaborated. The client is the asked to execute the targeted objective and to record their mood prior to and following the activity. Behavioural activation effectively reverses the downward spiral to depression. Interestingly, studies show that behavioural activation has a positive effect on cognitive activities. It has been shown to reduce rumination and favour cognitive restructuring, without requiring cognitively-based interventions. The advantage of this treatment is therefore that it is simpler to administer in comparison to full-packaged cognitive behavioural therapies, it requires a lesser number of sessions and can be disseminated in a low-intensity format. This article begins by summarizing the origins of the behavioural model of depression, which serves as a basis to the understanding of behavioural activation. This is followed by a detailed explanation of the different phases involved in a behavioural

  11. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health (NIMH)’s website ( www.nimh.nih.gov ). What causes depression? Scientists at NIMH and across the country are studying the causes of depression. Research suggests that a combination of genetic, biological, ...

  12. Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Sherry L

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health Issue Depression causes significant distress or impairment in physical, social, occupational and other key areas of functioning. Women are approximately twice as likely as men to experience depression. Psychosocial factors likely mediate the risks for depression incurred by biological influences. Key Findings Data from the 1999 National Population Health Survey show that depression is more common among Canadian women, with an annual self-reported incidence of 5.7% compared with 2.9% in men. The highest rates of depression are seen among women of reproductive age. Predictive factors for depression include previous depression, feeling out of control or overwhelmed, chronic health problems, traumatic events in childhood or young adulthood, lack of emotional support, lone parenthood, and low sense of mastery. Although depression is treatable, only 43% of depressed women had consulted a health professional in 1998/99 and only 32.4% were taking antidepressant medication. People with lower education, inadequate income, and fewer contacts with a health professional were less likely to receive depression treatment. Data Gaps and Recommendations A better understanding of factors that increase vulnerability and resilience to depression is needed. There is also a need for the collection and analysis of data pertaining to: prevalence of clinical anxiety; the prevalence of depression band 12 months after childbirth factors contributing to suicide contemplation and attempts among adolescent girls, current treatments for depression and their efficacy in depressed women at different life stages; interprovincial variation in depression rates and hospitalizations and the impact and costs of depression on work, family, individuals, and society.

  13. Behavioural activation for the treatment of depression in military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, Dean

    2013-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Depression is a common mental health problem in both civilian and military populations. Access to evidence based psychological therapies for treating common mental health problems such as depression may not be adequate at present. Behavioural Activation (BA) represents a National Institute for Clinical Excellence recommended, evidence-based treatment for depression. The aim of this review was to review the literature to determine how BA could work as a therapeutic approach for military personnel with depression. METHOD: Five specialty-specific electronic databases were searched using the key words 'behavioural activation', 'activity scheduling' and 'depression'. Emerging themes were drawn out of the literature using a long table approach to thematic analysis. RESULTS: Seven themes were identified: Clinical Effectiveness, Cultural Competence, Co-morbidity, Cost Effectiveness, Alternatives to Face-to-Face Therapy, Training and Patient Experience. CONCLUSIONS: Group based BA is a cost effective option that may build upon service personnel's cultural affinity to teamwork and peer support. Brief training workshops and supervision could be provided to military mental health nurses to deliver group based BA. However service delivery may also be enhanced by enabling some nurses to specialise as Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapists. More research is needed to understand whether this pragmatic, two pronged approach to training would result in the sustained dissemination of evidence based practice.

  14. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  15. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Cochlear Implants What are the Benefits of Cochlear Implants? For people with implants: Hearing ranges from near ...

  16. Acoustic input and efferent activity regulate the expression of molecules involved in cochlear micromechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica eLamas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromotile activity in auditory outer hair cells (OHCs is essential for sound amplification. It relies on the highly specialized membrane motor protein prestin, and its interactions with the cytoskeleton. It is believed that the expression of prestin and related molecules involved in OHC electromotility may be dynamically regulated by signals from the acoustic environment. However little is known about the nature of such signals and how they affect the expression of molecules involved in electromotility in OHCs. We show evidence that prestin oligomerization is regulated, both at short and relatively long term, by acoustic input and descending efferent activity originating in the cortex, likely acting in concert. Unilateral removal of the middle ear ossicular chain reduces levels of trimeric prestin, particularly in the cochlea from the side of the lesion, whereas monomeric and dimeric forms are maintained or even increased in particular in the contralateral side, as shown in Western blots. Unilateral removal of the auditory cortex (AC, which likely causes an imbalance in descending efferent activity on the cochlea, also reduces levels of trimeric and tetrameric forms of prestin in the side ipsilateral to the lesion, whereas in the contralateral side prestin remains unaffected, or even increased in the case of trimeric and tetrameric forms. As far as efferent inputs are concerned, unilateral ablation of the AC up-regulates the expression of α10 nAChR transcripts in the cochlea. Limited, unbalanced efferent activity after unilateral AC removal, also affects prestin and β-actin mRNA levels. These findings support that the concerted action of acoustic and efferent inputs to the cochlea is needed to regulate the expression of major molecules involved in OHC electromotility, both at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  17. Major depression in mothers predict reduced ventral striatum activation in adolescent female offspring with and without depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior research has identified reduced reward-related brain activation as a promising endophenotype for the early identification of adolescents with major depressive disorder. However, it is unclear whether reduced reward-related brain activation constitutes a true vulnerability for major depressive ...

  18. Differences between Depressed and Non-Depressed Residents of Nursing Homes on Measures of Daily Activity Involvement and Affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkl, Judith E.; Mathieu, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined how depressed and nondepressed nursing home residents differed on measures of frequency of daily activity involvement and accompanying affect. Interviews indicated the groups differed significantly on frequency of activity involvement and affect. Depressed subjects spent large portions of time watching television. Nondepressed…

  19. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  20. Treating depression and depression-like behaviour with physical activity: an immune perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Anthony Eyre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing burden of major depressive disorder makes the search for an extended understanding of aetiology, and for the development of additional treatments highly significant. Biological factors may be useful biomarkers for treatment with physical activity (PA, and neurobiological effects of PA may herald new therapeutic development in the future. This paper provides a thorough and up-to-date review of studies examining the neuroimmunomodulatory effects of PA on the brain in depression and depression-like behaviours. From a neuroimmune perspective, evidence suggests PA does enhance the beneficial and reduce the detrimental effects of the neuroimmune system. PA appears to increase the following factors: interleukin (IL-10, IL-6 (acutely, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, central nervous system-specific autoreactive CD4+ T cells, M2 microglia, quiescent astrocytes, CX3CL1 and insulin-like growth factor-1. On the other hand, PA appears to reduce detrimental neuroimmune factors such as: Th1/Th2 balance, pro-inflammatory cytokines, C-reactive protein, M1 microglia and reactive astrocytes. The effect of other mechanisms is unknown, such as: CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (T regs, CD200, chemokines, miRNA, M2-type blood-derived macrophages and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α (via receptor 2 (R2. The beneficial effects of PA are likely to occur centrally and peripherally (e.g. in visceral fat reduction. The investigation of the neuroimmune effects of PA on depression and depression-like behaviour is a rapidly developing and important field.

  1. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  2. The hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cation current (In ) adjusts the membrane properties, excitability, and activity pattern of the giant cells in the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznák, Zoltán; Pál, Balázs; Kőszeghy, Aron; Fu, Yuhong; Szücs, Géza; Paxinos, George

    2013-03-01

    Giant cells of the cochlear nucleus are thought to integrate multimodal sensory inputs and participate in monaural sound source localization. Our aim was to explore the significance of a hyperpolarization-activated current in determining the activity of giant neurones in slices prepared from 10 to 14-day-old rats. When subjected to hyperpolarizing stimuli, giant cells produced a 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimethyl-6-(methylamino) pyridinium chloride (ZD7288)-sensitive inward current with a reversal potential and half-activation voltage of -36 and -88 mV, respectively. Consequently, the current was identified as the hyperpolarization-activated non-specific cationic current (Ih ). At the resting membrane potential, 3.5% of the maximum Ih conductance was available. Immunohistochemistry experiments suggested that hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, cation non-selective (HCN)1, HCN2, and HCN4 subunits contribute to the assembly of the functional channels. Inhibition of Ih hyperpolarized the membrane by 6 mV and impeded spontaneous firing. The frequencies of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents reaching the giant cell bodies were reduced but no significant change was observed when evoked postsynaptic currents were recorded. Giant cells are affected by biphasic postsynaptic currents consisting of an excitatory and a subsequent inhibitory component. Inhibition of Ih reduced the frequency of these biphasic events by 65% and increased the decay time constants of the inhibitory component. We conclude that Ih adjusts the resting membrane potential, contributes to spontaneous action potential firing, and may participate in the dendritic integration of the synaptic inputs of the giant neurones. Because its amplitude was higher in young than in adult rats, Ih of the giant cells may be especially important during the postnatal maturation of the auditory system.

  3. Cochlear Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances in cochlear gene therapy over the past several years. Cochlear gene therapy has undergone tremendous advances over the past decade. Beginning with some groundbreaking work in 2005 documenting hair cell regeneration using virallymediated delivery of the mouse atonal 1 gene, gene therapy is now being explored as a possible treatment for a variety of causes of hearing loss.

  4. Cochlear Implant in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Samadi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the result of a great combination and collaboration of engineering and medicine. It is mainly because it has the most conflict with the human nervous system among all prosthesis. Cochlear implant helps a child with profound hearing loss to understand and articulate speech and let an adult person with hearing loss communicate with people by phone. Although these wonderful results could not be seen in all patients, will let us know about the great scientific findings.

  5. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  6. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  7. The magnitudes of hyperpolarization-activated and low-voltage-activated potassium currents co-vary in neurons of the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Jie; Oertel, Donata

    2011-08-01

    In the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), neurons have hyperpolarization-activated conductances, which in some cells are enormous, that contribute to the ability of neurons to convey acoustic information in the timing of their firing by decreasing the input resistance and speeding-up voltage changes. Comparisons of the electrophysiological properties of neurons in the VCN of mutant mice that lack the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel α subunit 1 (HCN1(-/-)) (Nolan et al. 2003) with wild-type controls (HCN1(+/+)) and with outbred ICR mice reveal that octopus, T stellate, and bushy cells maintain their electrophysiological distinctions in all strains. Hyperpolarization-activated (I(h)) currents were smaller and slower, input resistances were higher, and membrane time constants were longer in HCN1(-/-) than in HCN1(+/+) in octopus, bushy, and T stellate cells. There were significant differences in the average magnitudes of I(h), input resistances, and time constants between HCN1(+/+) and ICR mice, but the resting potentials did not differ between strains. I(h) is opposed by a low-voltage-activated potassium (I(KL)) current in bushy and octopus cells, whose magnitudes varied widely between neuronal types and between strains. The magnitudes of I(h) and I(KL) were correlated across neuronal types and across mouse strains. Furthermore, these currents balanced one another at the resting potential in individual cells. The magnitude of I(h) and I(KL) is linked in bushy and octopus cells and varies not only between HCN1(-/-) and HCN1(+/+) but also between "wild-type" strains of mice, raising the question to what extent the wild-type strains reflect normal mice.

  8. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D. [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Gao, Simon [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Hee Yoon [Department of Otolaryngology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Groves, Andrew K. [Department of Neuroscience, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, and Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Zuo, Jian [Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Applegate, Brian E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  9. Cochlear implantation in congenital cochlear abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, R L; Lokman, S

    2005-08-01

    Many children have benefited from cochlear implant device including those with congenital malformation of the inner ear. The results reported in children with malformed cochlea are very encouraging. We describe 2 cases of Mondini's malformation with severe sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implantation was performed and both of them underwent post-implantation speech rehabilitation. Post-implantation, both of them were noted to respond to external sound. But the second case developed facial twitching a few months after the device was switched on. It is important to evaluate the severity of the inner ear deformity and the other associated anomalies in pre-implantation radiological assessment in order to identify the problem that may complicate the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  10. Behavioral activation treatments of depression: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijpers, Pim; van Straten, Annemieke; Warmerdam, Lisanne

    2007-04-01

    Activity scheduling is a behavioral treatment of depression in which patients learn to monitor their mood and daily activities, and how to increase the number of pleasant activities and to increase positive interactions with their environment. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized effect studies of activity scheduling. Sixteen studies with 780 subjects were included. The pooled effect size indicating the difference between intervention and control conditions at post-test was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.60 - 1.15). This is a large effect. Heterogeneity was low in all analyses. The comparisons with other psychological treatments at post-test resulted in a non-significant pooled effect size of 0.13 in favor of activity scheduling. In ten studies activity scheduling was compared to cognitive therapy, and the pooled effect size indicating the difference between these two types of treatment was 0.02. The changes from post-test to follow-up for activity scheduling were non-significant, indicating that the benefits of the treatments were retained at follow-up. The differences between activity scheduling and cognitive therapy at follow-up were also non-significant. Activity scheduling is an attractive treatment for depression, not only because it is relatively uncomplicated, time-efficient and does not require complex skills from patients or therapist, but also because this meta-analysis found clear indications that it is effective.

  11. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  12. Von Bekesy and cochlear mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olson, Elizabeth S.; Duifhuis, Hendrikus; Steele, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Georg Bekesy laid the foundation for cochlear mechanics, foremost by demonstrating the traveling wave that is the substrate for mammalian cochlear mechanical processing. He made mechanical measurements and physical models in order to understand that fundamental cochlear response. In this tribute to

  13. The Adolescent Behavioral Activation Program: Adapting Behavioral Activation as a Treatment for Depression in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Elizabeth; Gudmundsen, Gretchen; Schloredt, Kelly; Martell, Christopher; Rhew, Isaac; Hubley, Samuel; Dimidjian, Sona

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine implementation feasibility and initial treatment outcomes of a behavioral activation (BA) based treatment for adolescent depression, the Adolescent Behavioral Activation Program (A-BAP). A randomized, controlled trial was conducted with 60 clinically referred adolescents with a depressive disorder who were randomized to receive either 14 sessions of A-BAP or uncontrolled evidenced-based practice for depression. The urban sample was 64% female, predominantly Non-Hispanic White (67%), and had an average age of 14.9 years. Measures of depression, global functioning, activation, and avoidance were obtained through clinical interviews and/or through parent and adolescent self-report at preintervention and end of intervention. Intent-to-treat linear mixed effects modeling and logistic regression analysis revealed that both conditions produced statistically significant improvement from pretreatment to end of treatment in depression, global functioning, and activation and avoidance. There were no significant differences across treatment conditions. These findings provide the first step in establishing the efficacy of BA as a treatment for adolescent depression and support the need for ongoing research on BA as a way to enhance the strategies available for treatment of depression in this population.

  14. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION: MY EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is a small, surgically implanted complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss, typically involves damage to hair cells in the cochlea, as a result sound cannot reach the auditory nerve which usually receives information from hair cells. A cochlear implant skips the damaged hair cells and to stimulate the auditory nerve directly. An implant does not restore normal hearing, instead it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech. I am here presenting this article in relation to the indications, intraoperative and postoperative complications of cochlear implantation in our institute since January 2013. Children who receive implants at earlier age, outperform their peers who are implanted at a later age. This is reflected in all the areas of speech and language development.

  15. [Bilateral cochlear implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Jona; Migirov, Lela; Taitelbaum-Swead, Rikey; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant surgery became the standard of care in hearing rehabilitation of patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This procedure may alter the lives of children and adults enabling them to integrate with the hearing population. In the past, implantation was performed only in one ear, despite the fact that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral, especially in noisy conditions. Cochlear implantation may be performed sequentially or simultaneously. The "sensitive period" of time between hearing loss and implantation and between the two implantations, when performed sequentially, significantly influences the results. Shorter time spans between implantations improve the hearing results after implantation. Hearing success after implantation is highly dependent on the rehabilitation process which includes mapping, implant adjustments and hearing training. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children is recommended as the proposed procedure in spite of the additional financial burden.

  16. Language understanding and vocabulary of early cochlear implanted children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, Lone; Busch, Georg Walter; Sandahl, Minna;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with the level of language understanding, the level of receptive and active vocabulary, and to estimate effect-related odds ratios for cochlear implanted children's language level....

  17. Activity dependence of spreading depression in the locust CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Kristin E; Mazzetti, Tom R; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2016-03-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is associated with large changes in extracellular ion concentrations and can be induced by impairing mechanisms of K(+) ion homeostasis. We tested activity dependence of SD in the locust model of ouabain-induced SD in the metathoracic ganglion. Wind activation of thoracic circuitry resulted in small increases of K(+) concentration that took 5-10 s to be cleared from the extracellular space. In the presence of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor ouabain, wind stimulation every 30 s halved the latency to the first SD event and increased its duration. Wind stimulation was able to trigger the first event, suggesting that local activity could determine the origin of successive SD events. Perfusion with calcium-free saline blocked neural activity in the ganglion and prevented the occurrence of ouabain-induced SD. We conclude that ouabain-induced SD in the locust CNS is strongly dependent on the existing level of neural activity.

  18. The multiple functions of T stellate/multipolar/chopper cells in the ventral cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Donata; Wright, Samantha; Cao, Xiao-Jie; Ferragamo, Michael; Bal, Ramazan

    2011-06-01

    Acoustic information is brought to the brain by auditory nerve fibers, all of which terminate in the cochlear nuclei, and is passed up the auditory pathway through the principal cells of the cochlear nuclei. A population of neurons variously known as T stellate, type I multipolar, planar multipolar, or chopper cells forms one of the major ascending auditory pathways through the brainstem. T Stellate cells are sharply tuned; as a population they encode the spectrum of sounds. In these neurons, phasic excitation from the auditory nerve is made more tonic by feedforward excitation, coactivation of inhibitory with excitatory inputs, relatively large excitatory currents through NMDA receptors, and relatively little synaptic depression. The mechanisms that make firing tonic also obscure the fine structure of sounds that is represented in the excitatory inputs from the auditory nerve and account for the characteristic chopping response patterns with which T stellate cells respond to tones. In contrast with other principal cells of the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), T stellate cells lack a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance and are therefore sensitive to small, steady, neuromodulating currents. The presence of cholinergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors allows the excitability of these cells to be modulated by medial olivocochlear efferent neurons and by neuronal circuits associated with arousal. T Stellate cells deliver acoustic information to the ipsilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB), periolivary regions around the lateral superior olivary nucleus (LSO), and to the contralateral ventral lemniscal nuclei (VNLL) and inferior colliculus (IC). It is likely that T stellate cells participate in feedback loops through both medial and lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons and they may be a source of ipsilateral excitation of the LSO.

  19. [Physical activity is just as good as CBT or drugs for depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Eva; Hovland, Anders; Kjellman, Bengt; Taube, Jill; Martinsen, Egil

    2015-01-01

    In this article on the effect of physical activity on depression, data have been drawn from several meta-analyses, in particular, the latest Cochrane review entitled »Exercise for depression« published in 2013. The results show that physical activity can help prevent the onset and relapse of depression. Depressed people should be recommended aerobic or muscular strength training. There is clear evidence that physical activity alone is beneficial for the treatment of mild and moderate depression and can reduce symptoms of mild to moderate depression to the same extent as standard treatments (psychotherapy and antidepressant medication). Combining physical activity with these treatments may yield additional benefits. Individuals with depression should be recommended physical activity in adjunct to psychotherapy and medication.

  20. Depression of cortical activity in humans by mild hypercapnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesen, Thomas; Leontiev, Oleg; Song, Tao; Dehghani, Nima; Hagler, Donald J; Huang, Mingxiong; Buxton, Richard; Halgren, Eric

    2012-03-01

    The effects of neural activity on cerebral hemodynamics underlie human brain imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. However, the threshold and characteristics of the converse effects, wherein the cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic milieu influence neural activity, remain unclear. We tested whether mild hypercapnia (5% CO2 ) decreases the magnetoencephalogram response to auditory pattern recognition and visual semantic tasks. Hypercapnia induced statistically significant decreases in event-related fields without affecting behavioral performance. Decreases were observed in early sensory components in both auditory and visual modalities as well as later cognitive components related to memory and language. Effects were distributed across cortical regions. Decreases were comparable in evoked versus spontaneous spectral power. Hypercapnia is commonly used with hemodynamic models to calibrate the blood oxygenation level-dependent response. Modifying model assumptions to incorporate the current findings produce a modest but measurable decrease in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen change with activation. Because under normal conditions, low cerebral pH would arise when bloodflow is unable to keep pace with neuronal activity, the cortical depression observed here may reflect a homeostatic mechanism by which neuronal activity is adjusted to a level that can be sustained by available bloodflow. Animal studies suggest that these effects may be mediated by pH-modulating presynaptic adenosine receptors. Although the data is not clear, comparable changes in cortical pH to those induced here may occur during sleep apnea, sleep, and exercise. If so, these results suggest that such activities may in turn have generalized depressive effects on cortical activity.

  1. Physical Activity of Depressed Patients and Their Motivation to Exercise: Nordic Walking in Family Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suija, Kadri; Pechter, Ulle; Kalda, Ruth; Tahepold, Heli; Maaroos, Jaak; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to find out how motivated depressed patients are to exercise regularly, to measure the physical activity of depressed patients and to find out how regular Nordic Walking affects the mood and physical fitness of depressed patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Three years after the Prediction of Primary…

  2. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  3. Acute and long-term effects of noise exposure on the neuronal spontaneous activity in cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröschel, Moritz; Ryll, Jana; Götze, Romy; Ernst, Arne; Basta, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Noise exposure leads to an immediate hearing loss and is followed by a long-lasting permanent threshold shift, accompanied by changes of cellular properties within the central auditory pathway. Electrophysiological recordings have demonstrated an upregulation of spontaneous neuronal activity. It is still discussed if the observed effects are related to changes of peripheral input or evoked within the central auditory system. The present study should describe the intrinsic temporal patterns of single-unit activity upon noise-induced hearing loss of the dorsal and ventral cochlear nucleus (DCN and VCN) and the inferior colliculus (IC) in adult mouse brain slices. Recordings showed a slight, but significant, elevation in spontaneous firing rates in DCN and VCN immediately after noise trauma, whereas no differences were found in IC. One week postexposure, neuronal responses remained unchanged compared to controls. At 14 days after noise trauma, intrinsic long-term hyperactivity in brain slices of the DCN and the IC was detected for the first time. Therefore, increase in spontaneous activity seems to develop within the period of two weeks, but not before day 7. The results give insight into the complex temporal neurophysiological alterations after noise trauma, leading to a better understanding of central mechanisms in noise-induced hearing loss.

  4. Patency of the cochlear aqueduct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muren, C.; Vignaud, J.; Wilbrand, H.; Wilbrand, S.

    The patency of the cochlear aqueduct is discussed against the background of radioanatomic studies of 225 plastic casts of temporal bone specimens and additional experimental and clinical observations. The occasional presence of a wide venous channel running parallel with the cochlear aqueduct, as well as the existence of up to three accompanying venous channels can simulate a pathologically wide cochlear aqueduct radiographically. This could constitute a diagnostic pitfall in the absence of other clinical and radiographic signs of malformation.

  5. Thyroid axis activity and suicidal behavior in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Fabrice; Mokrani, Marie-Claude; Lopera, Felix Gonzalez; Diep, Thanh Son; Rabia, Hassen; Fattah, Saïd

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between suicidal behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis activity in depressed patients. The serum levels of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were evaluated before and after 0800 and 2300 h thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenges, on the same day, in 95 medication-free DSM-IV euthyroid major depressed inpatients and 44 healthy hospitalized controls. Compared to controls: (1) patients with a positive suicide history (PSH; n=53) showed lower basal FT4 (at 0800 h: p<0.005; at 2300 h: p<0.03), but normal FT3 levels, while patients with a negative suicide history (NSH; n=42) showed normal FT4 and FT3 levels; (2) TSH responses to TRH (DeltaTSH) were blunted in NSHs (at 0800 h: p<0.03; at 2300 h: p<0.00001), but not in PSHs; (3) both NSHs and PSHs showed lower DeltaDeltaTSH values (differences between 2300 h-DeltaTSH and 0800 h-DeltaTSH) (p<0.000001 and p<0.003, respectively). Compared to NSHs, basal FT4 levels were reduced in PSHs (at 0800 h: p<0.002; at 2300h: p<0.006). HPT parameters were not significantly different between recent suicide attempters (n=32) and past suicide attempters (n=21). However, compared to controls, recent suicide attempters showed lower 2300 h-DeltaTSH (p<0.04) and DeltaDeltaTSH (p<0.002) values, and lower basal FT4 values (at 0800 h: p<0.006; at 2300 h: p<0.02). Our results, obtained in a large sample of depressed inpatients, indicate that various degrees of HPT axis dysregulation are associated with the history of suicide.

  6. Cochlear implants in genetic deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuezhong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic defects are one of the most important etiologies of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss and play an important role in determining cochlear implantation outcomes. While the pathogenic mutation types of a number of deafness genes have been cloned, the pathogenesis mechanisms and their relationship to the outcomes of cochlear implantation remain a hot research area. The auditory performance is considered to be affected by the etiology of hearing loss and the number of surviving spiral ganglion cells, as well as others. Current research advances in cochlear implantation for hereditary deafness, especially the relationship among clinic-types, genotypes and outcomes of cochlear implantation, will be discussed in this review.

  7. [Advances in the study of virtual channels of cochlear implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziyan; Guan, Tian; Ye, Datian

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses virtual channels of cochlear implant, which is produced by simultaneous or sequential activation of adjacent cochlear implant electrodes. Virtual channels create and transfer more available spectral pitch information with the limited number of fixed electrodes, which can be recognized as pitch percepts intermediate to those produced by each electrode separately. This technique not only utilizes the interaction of electrodes but also increases the number of place-pitch steps available to cochlear implant listeners. Virtual channels could be used to realize speech recognition in noisy environment, in enjoying music, and in understanding Chinese language. The study of virtual channels would significantly enhance the traditional cochlear implant therapy and benefit people suffering severe to profound hearing loss.

  8. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Rachel C.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Luo, Wen

    2011-01-01

    Following a landmark component analysis of cognitive therapy by Jacobson and colleagues (1996), there has been renewed interest in behavioral activation (BA) treatments for depression. The Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) was developed to measure when and how clients become activated over the course of BA treatment. Multiple…

  9. Modelling Cochlear Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlea plays a crucial role in mammal hearing. The basic function of the cochlea is to map sounds of different frequencies onto corresponding characteristic positions on the basilar membrane (BM. Sounds enter the fluid-filled cochlea and cause deflection of the BM due to pressure differences between the cochlear fluid chambers. These deflections travel along the cochlea, increasing in amplitude, until a frequency-dependent characteristic position and then decay away rapidly. The hair cells can detect these deflections and encode them as neural signals. Modelling the mechanics of the cochlea is of help in interpreting experimental observations and also can provide predictions of the results of experiments that cannot currently be performed due to technical limitations. This paper focuses on reviewing the numerical modelling of the mechanical and electrical processes in the cochlea, which include fluid coupling, micromechanics, the cochlear amplifier, nonlinearity, and electrical coupling.

  10. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  11. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    2007-01-01

      Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  12. Immune and hormonal activity in adults suffering from depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O.V. Nunes

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available An association between depression and altered immune and hormonal systems has been suggested by the results of many studies. In the present study we carried out immune and hormonal measurements in 40 non-medicated, ambulatory adult patients with depression determined by CID-10 criteria and compared with 34 healthy nondepressed subjects. The severity of the condition was determined with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Of 40 depressed patients, 31 had very severe and 9 severe or moderate depression, 29 (72.5% were females and 11 (27.5% were males (2.6:1 ratio. The results revealed a significant reduction of albumin and elevation of alpha-1, alpha-2 and ß-globulins, and soluble IL-2 receptor in patients with depression compared to the values obtained for nondepressed subjects (P<0.05. The decrease lymphocyte proliferation in response to a mitogen was significantly lower in severely or moderately depressed patients when compared to control (P<0.05. These data confirm the immunological disturbance of acute phase proteins and cellular immune response in patients with depression. Other results may be explained by a variety of interacting factors such as number of patients, age, sex, and the nature, severity and/or duration of depression. Thus, the data obtained should be interpreted with caution and the precise clinical relevance of these findings requires further investigation.

  13. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES AND DEPRESSION STATUS AMONG THE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrfan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at examining the correlation between physical activity levels and depression status among the university students. The study was a correlational research and was conducted with cross-sectional method. The sample of the study was composed of 906 students who studied at the Afyon Kocatepe University. The data of the study were collected using a questionnaire form consisted of items about personal information and physical activities and depression status. The data were evaluated with SPSS statistical software. First; descriptive statistical data were gathered. The correlational status among the variables was analyzed with Pearson Correlation Coefficients. The differences of depression status in terms of physical activity levels of the students were analyzed with ANOVA test. As a result of the study; it was found out that there was a statistically significant difference between physical activity levels and depression status of the students in terms of gender variable. It was identified that there was a significant difference in depression status of the students in terms of their physical activity levels (p<0.01. It was seen that there was a negative correlation between physical activity levels and depression status of the students (p<0.001. In conclusion; it was found out that physical activity MET scores of the female students were lower than male students while their depression levels were higher than male students and depression levels of the students decreased as their physical activity levels increased.

  14. Prevalence of depressive symptoms among college students and the influence of sport activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglesić, Boran; Lasić, Davor; Zuljan-Cvitanović, Marija; Buković, Damir; Karelović, Deni; Delić-Brkljacić, Diana; Buković, Nevia; Radan, Mirjana

    2014-03-01

    The present study asses the prevalence of depressive symptoms among college students in Split, Croatia, and positive influence of sport activity on decreasing the depression symptoms. Authors screened all 664 college students of the first year of study. All of them were over the 18 years and the mean age was 19.4 +/- 1.2 years. There were 466 females (70.2%) and 178 (26.8%) males. They answered The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and questionnaire about their sport activity (no sport activity, recreational and active in sports). For the purpose of the analysis depressive symptoms were defined as a score of > 11. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney test were used for data analysis. 9.4% of the students had significant depression symptoms (score > 11). No one student had score > 26 (symptoms of major depression). Statistically significant lower score on BDI have students who are active in sports (score median = 3) compared to group of recreational (score median = 4) and in correlation to group who are not active in sports (score median = 5) (Kruskal-Wallis: p sports (N = 254) there are only 5.5% with depressions symptoms, while in the group of non active in sports (N = 60) are 18 depressive (chi2-test: p = 0,005). Females are statistically more depressed than males (chi2-test: p = 0.01). In the female group 49 (10.5%) are depressed, and in the male group are 9 (5%). Compared to gender in separate analysis we did not find correlation of decreasing depression symptoms and sport activity among males (chi2-test: p = 0.47), while in females we find that sport activity has significant effect (chi2-test: p = 0.026). Our results shoved moderate values of depression symptoms among college population in Split, Croatia. More females than males experienced depressive symptoms. While sport activity did not have significant influence on the depression in male population, it has significant influence in reducing the depression symptoms among females.

  15. A study on the cochlear view in multichannel cochlear implantees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Jeong Hee; Kim, Seong Lyong; Kim, Hae Seong; Lee, Yong Woo [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    Cochlear implant poses a contraindication to the magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) process, because MRI generates artifacts, inducing an electrical current and causing device magnetization. CT is relatively expensive and the metal electrodes scatter the image. Post-implantation radiological studies using anterior-posterior transorbital, submental-vertex and lateral views, the intracochlear electrodes are not well displayed. Therefore, the authors developed a special view, which we call the cochlear view. The patient is sitting in front of a vertical device. Then the midsagittal plane is adjusted to form an angle of 15 .deg. , 30 .deg. , and 45 .deg. with the film. The flexion of the neck is adjusted to make the infraorbitomeatal line(IOML) is parallel with the transverse axis of the film. The central ray is directed to exit from the skull at point which is 3.0 cm anterior and 2.0 cm superior to the EAM(external auditory meatus). Results have shown that single radiography of the cochlear view provides sufficient information to demonstrate the position of the electrodes array and the depth of insertion in cochlear. Radiography of the cochlear view in angle of 45 .deg. is an excellent image. The cochlear view gives the greatest amount of medical information with the least radiation and lowest medical cost. It can be widely used in all cochlear implant clinics.

  16. Adolescents with Major Depression Demonstrate Increased Amygdala Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tony T.; Simmons, Alan N.; Matthews, Scott C.; Tapert, Susan F.; Frank, Guido K.; Max, Jeffrey E.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Lansing, Amy E.; Brown, Gregory; Strigo, Irina A.; Wu, Jing; Paulus, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Functional neuroimaging studies have led to a significantly deeper understanding of the underlying neural correlates and the development of several mature models of depression in adults. In contrast, our current understanding of the underlying neural substrates of adolescent depression is very limited. Although numerous studies have…

  17. Depressive Symptoms and Inductive Reasoning Performance: Findings from the ACTIVE Reasoning Training Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Parisi, Jeanine M.; Franchetti, Mary Kathryn; Rebok, George W.; Spira, Adam P.; Carlson, Michelle C.; Willis, Sherry L.; Gross, Alden L.

    2014-01-01

    Within the context of the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study, we examined the longitudinal association of baseline depressive symptoms on inductive reasoning performance over a ten-year period between the reasoning training and control conditions (N = 1,375). At baseline, 322 participants (23%) reported elevated depressive symptoms, defined by a score ≥ 9 on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (12-item). Differences in baseline dep...

  18. Behavioral Activation for Depression in Older Adults: Theoretical and Practical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    POLENICK, COURTNEY ALLYN; Flora, Stephen Ray

    2013-01-01

    Late-life depression (LLD) is a major public health concern that can have devastating effects on older individuals and their families. Behavioral theories predict that decreases in response-contingent positive reinforcement and increases in negatively reinforced avoidance behaviors, often accompanied by aversive life events, result in the selection and maintenance of depression. Based on these theories, behavioral activation treatments for depression are designed to facilitate structured incr...

  19. Depression and physical activity in a sample of nigerian adolescents: levels, relationships and predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okafor Nkechi C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity is related to many morbidities but the evidence of its link with depression in adolescents needs further investigation in view of the existing conflicting reports. Methods The data for this cross-sectional study were collected from 1,100 Nigerian adolescents aged 12-17 years. Depressive symptomatology and physical activity were assessed using the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI and the Physical Activity Questionnaire-Adolescent version (PAQ-A respectively. Independent t tests, Pearson's Moment Correlation and Multi-level logistic regression analyses for individual and school area influences were carried out on the data at p Results The mean age of the participants was 15.20 ± 1.435 years. The prevalence of mild to moderate depression was 23.8%, definite depression was 5.7% and low physical activity was 53.8%. More severe depressive symptoms were linked with lower levels of physical activity (r = -0.82, p Conclusions A sizable burden of depression and low physical activity existed among the studied adolescents and these were linked to both individual and school factors. Future studies should examine the effects of physical activity among clinical samples of adolescents with depression.

  20. Immediate and delayed cochlear neuropathy after noise exposure in pubescent mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jane Bjerg; Lysaght, Andrew C; Liberman, M Charles

    2015-01-01

    only TTS. Amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response, which reflects the summed activity of the cochlear nerve, was complemented by synaptic ribbon counts in IHCs using confocal microscopy, and by stereological counts of peripheral axons and cell bodies of the cochlear nerve from 24 hours...

  1. The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Healthy Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdorf, Virginia; Kollia, Betty; Makarec, Katherine; Alleva Szeles, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Depression and inactivity in the elderly are major health problems with significant ramifications for healthy aging. Research shows an inverse relationship between depression and physical activity levels. The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in healthy older women, first within the framework of exercise programs, and second via the impact of an intervention. Method: Two experiments were conducted. In the first, 65 women, all above the age of 60, participated. Measures of physical activity were gained by self-report using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire while the measure of depressive symptomatology was the Beck Depression Inventory. In the second, 11 women participated in a line dancing intervention, and their self-reported depressive symptomatology was measured prior to and just after the 6-week exercise intervention using the Beck Depression Inventory. In addition, during the second experiment, pedometer data were gathered during the fourth week. Results and Conclusion: The data of the first study revealed a relationship between the total amount of physical activity and scores on the Beck Depression Inventory; that is, the more active a person is, the lower her self-reported depressive symptoms. Significant correlations were found between the Beck Depression Inventory and the reports of vigorous and moderate exercise levels, but not with walking. Participants who were part of an organized exercise group exercised significantly more than those who exercised on their own. In the second study, those who participated in a line dancing intervention had significantly lower Beck Depression Inventory scores post intervention. The implications of these findings for public health are discussed.

  2. The Relationship Between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Healthy Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Overdorf EdD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Depression and inactivity in the elderly are major health problems with significant ramifications for healthy aging. Research shows an inverse relationship between depression and physical activity levels. The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in healthy older women, first within the framework of exercise programs, and second via the impact of an intervention. Method: Two experiments were conducted. In the first, 65 women, all above the age of 60, participated. Measures of physical activity were gained by self-report using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire while the measure of depressive symptomatology was the Beck Depression Inventory. In the second, 11 women participated in a line dancing intervention, and their self-reported depressive symptomatology was measured prior to and just after the 6-week exercise intervention using the Beck Depression Inventory. In addition, during the second experiment, pedometer data were gathered during the fourth week. Results and Conclusion: The data of the first study revealed a relationship between the total amount of physical activity and scores on the Beck Depression Inventory; that is, the more active a person is, the lower her self-reported depressive symptoms. Significant correlations were found between the Beck Depression Inventory and the reports of vigorous and moderate exercise levels, but not with walking. Participants who were part of an organized exercise group exercised significantly more than those who exercised on their own. In the second study, those who participated in a line dancing intervention had significantly lower Beck Depression Inventory scores post intervention. The implications of these findings for public health are discussed.

  3. [Indicators of the persistent pro-inflammatory activation of the immune system in depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubała, Wiesław Jerzy; Godlewska, Beata; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Landowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    The aetiology of depression remains tentative. Current hypotheses on the aetiology of the depressive disorder tend to integrate monoaminoergic, neuroendocrine and immunological concepts of depression. A number of research papers emphasise the altered hormonal and immune status of patients with depression with pronounced cytokine level variations. Those studies tend to link the variable course of depression in relation to the altered proinflammatory activity of the immune system. The results of the studies on the activity of the selected elements of the immune system are ambiguous indicating both increased and decreased activities of its selected elements. However, a number of basic and psychopharmacological studies support the hypothesis of the increased proinflammatory activity of the immune system in the course of depression which is the foundation for the immunological hypothesis of depression. The aim of this paper is to review the functional abnormalities that are observed in depression focusing on the monoaminoergic deficiency and increased immune activation as well as endocrine dysregulation. This paper puts together and discusses current studies related to this subject with a detailed insight into interactions involving nervous, endocrine and immune systems.

  4. A self-help behavioral activation treatment for geriatric depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Kathryn; Scogin, Forrest; Di Napoli, Elizabeth; Presnell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated behavioral activation (BA) bibliotherapy as a treatment for late-life depressive symptoms. BA bibliotherapy was administered using Addis and Martell's Overcoming depression one step at a time as a stand-alone treatment that was completed by participants (N=26) over a 4-week period [Addis, M.E., & Martell, C.R. (2004). Overcoming depression one step at a time. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.]. Results of an immediate intervention group were compared with those of a delayed treatment control group and treatment response for both groups was evaluated at 1-month follow-up. Primary outcome results showed that symptoms on a clinician-rated measure of depressive symptoms, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, were significantly lower at post-treatment for those who received immediate BA bibliotherapy compared with those who were in the delayed treatment control condition. However, self-reported depressive symptoms (a secondary outcome measured via the Geriatric Depression Scale), were not significantly different at this period. Because study control was lost after the delayed treatment group received the intervention, within-subjects analyses examining both treatment groups combined showed that clinician-rated depressive symptoms significantly decreased from pre-treatment to both post-treatment and 1-month follow-up. Self-reported depressive symptoms were significantly lower from pre-treatment to 1-month follow-up. These findings suggest that BA may be useful in treating mild or subthreshold depressive symptoms in an older adult population.

  5. Microanalysis of ozone depression of motor activity. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepper, J.L.; Weiss, B.; Cox, C.

    1982-01-01

    Ozone, the principal oxidant in photochemical smog, impairs athletic performance and induces complaints of fatigue and lethargy. It also reduces motor activity in rodents. A detailed analysis of this finding was attempted. Eight male Long-Evans rats were housed in cages attached to running wheels located within a 2-m/sup 3/ exposure chamber. Each revolution of a wheel closed a switch with the time between switch closures recorded by an attached computer. The rats were exposed for 6-hr periods during the nocturnal phase of their light cycle to ozone concentrations of 0.12, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 ppM. Ozone produced initial decrements in the number of revolutions and a progressively greater decrease with continued exposure. Statistically significant depression took place at 0.12 ppM. analysis of the individual components of wheel running revealed differential susceptibility to ozone. After termination of exposure to low concentrations of ozone, animals showed increased running. At the higher concentrations, running remained suppressed below control values for several hours. A new multivariate graphical technique, the biplot, is presented as a way to simultaneously display the relationships among many complex variables.

  6. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  7. Initial investigation of behavioral activation therapy for co-morbid major depressive disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry; Bodenlos, Jamie S; Schneider, Kristin L; Olendzki, Barbara; Spates, C Richard; Ma, Yunsheng

    2008-09-01

    More than one-third of treatment-seeking obese patients are clinically depressed. No evidence-based treatments exist for individuals with comorbid depression and obesity. Behavioral activation (BA), an effective treatment for depression, might also facilitate weight loss. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of BA plus nutrition counseling for weight loss among individuals with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) and obesity. The BA intervention targeted both weight reduction and depression in 14 obese patients (79% female; 86% Caucasian) who met criteria for MDD. At baseline, mean Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) score was 26.71, and mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score was 16.00. Significant reductions at 12-weeks in both BDI-II and HDRS were observed with 10 participants reaching full remission at post treatment. Reductions in body weight, daily caloric intake, and physical activity were observed. BA with nutrition counseling appears to have potential as a weight loss treatment in the context of depression. Results support the need for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of BA for both weight loss and depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Considering depression as a consequence of activation of the inflammatory response system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, J; Klein, HC; Versijpt, J; den Boer, J; ter Horst, GJ

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the possible interrelation between peripheral and/or cerebral inflammation and depression. Often, depression is regarded as a consequence of life events, including disabling diseases. The question addressed here is whether activation of the inflammatory response system (IRS) ca

  9. 24-Hour motor activity and autonomic cardiac functioning in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Volkers (Anita)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe studies of this thesis concern the spontaneous pattern of motor activity and autonomic cardiac functioning in major depressive disorder. The main purpose of the studies was to obtain insight in the psychomotor and autonomic cardiac dysfunction in depression by investigating the 24-ho

  10. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial of Behavioral Activation Smoking Cessation Treatment for Smokers with Elevated Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Laura; Tull, Matthew T.; Matusiewicz, Alexis K.; Rodman, Samantha; Strong, David R.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Hopko, Derek R.; Zvolensky, Michael J.; Brown, Richard A.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Depressive symptoms are associated with poor smoking cessation outcomes, and there remains continued interest in behavioral interventions that simultaneously target smoking and depressive symptomatology. In this pilot study, we examined whether a behavioral activation treatment for smoking (BATS) can enhance cessation outcomes. Method:…

  12. Spousal caregivers' activity restriction and depression : A model for changes over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, AP; Schulz, R; Matthews, KA; Scheier, MF; Ormel, J; Lindenberg, SM

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we examine the effects of increasing as well as decreasing caregiving demands on depressive symptomatology. In addition, we focus on spousal caregivers' activity restriction as an explanatory mechanism for changes in depressive symptomatology in the caregiving context. Two databases ar

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in older persons with and without a depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, D.; Korten, N. C. M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Stek, M. L.; van der Mast, R. C.; Voshaar, R. Oude; Comijs, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) has been associated with depression, but findings have been inconsistent. Among older depressed persons, both hyperactivity and hypo-activity of the HPA-axis were demonstrated. However, most studies were population

  14. Comparing Levels of Depression in Healthy Active and Inactive Elders versus Those with Knee Osteoarthritis Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Shams

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Knee osteoarthritis can have negative effects on the physical and mental conditions, social and family relations, general health and positive feelings of elders. For example, severe limitation of motion and increased depression, which are results of this disease, can have negative impacts on elders. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of depression in healthy active and inactive elders versus those with knee osteoarthritis disease. Two hundred and twenty (220 elders with knee osteoarthritis disease (110 active and 110 inactive patients and 220 healthy elders (110 active and 110 inactive were voluntarily selected, and they filled the questionnaire about elders’ personal characteristics, physical activity and depression levels. Four groups had differences with respect to education, age and gender. The results of chi-square test revealed that women with knee osteoarthritis disease had increased levels of depression compared to men with the same condition (p<0.05. Older patients had increased levels of depression and educated elders reported lower levels of depression. The results of the one way analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed that there exist a significant difference in depression scores of healthy active and healthy inactive elders and those with knee osteoarthritis disease. The results of Tukey’s test revealed that healthy active elder had lower depression scores compared to inactive elders with knee osteoarthritis disease. Carrying out exercises and physical activities can help improve the health state of patients with knee osteoarthritis problem and can also improve the elders’ mental condition and thus decrease their pain and depression.

  15. Activity/rest rhythm of depressed adolescents undergoing therapy: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugênia Mesquita

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Disorders of circadian rhythms have been reported in studies of both depressed children and of depressed adolescents. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is a relationship between the 24-hour spectral power (24h SP of the activity/rest rhythm and the clinical course of depression in adolescents. Methods: Six 14 to 17-year-old adolescents were recruited for the study. They were all suffering from major depressive disorder, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV criteria, as identified by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children: Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale - Revised (CDRS-R and clinical evaluations. Locomotor activity was monitored over a period of 13 consecutive weeks. Activity was measured for 10-minute periods using wrist-worn activity monitors. All patients were prescribed sertraline from after the first week up until the end of the study. Results: We found a relationship between high CDRS values and low 24-hour spectral power. Conclusions: The 24h SP of the activity/rest rhythm correlated significantly (negatively with the clinical ratings of depression.

  16. Post-activation depression of soleus stretch reflexes in healthy and spastic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Michael James; Klinge, Klaus; Crone, Clarissa

    2007-01-01

    Reduced depression of transmitter release from Ia afferents following previous activation (post-activation depression) has been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of spasticity. However, the effect of this mechanism on the myotatic reflex and its possible contribution to increased...... reflex excitability in spastic participants has not been tested. To investigate these effects, we examined post-activation depression in Soleus H-reflex responses and in mechanically evoked Soleus stretch reflex responses. Stretch reflex responses were evoked with consecutive dorsiflexion perturbations...... of the soleus stretch reflex and H-reflex decreased as the interval between the stimulus/perturbation was decreased. Similarly, the stretch-evoked torque decreased. In the spastic participants, the post-activation depression of both reflexes and the stretch-evoked torque was significantly smaller than...

  17. Increased activities of both superoxide dismutase and catalase were indicators of acute depressive episodes in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Chang; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2016-01-30

    Oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this study was to investigate the serum levels of oxidative stress biomarkers and S100B in patients with MDD in an acute phase, and evaluate the changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD), protein carbonyl content (PCC), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine after treatment (8-OHdG), catalase (CAT), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and S100B. We consecutively enrolled 21 MDD inpatients in an acute phase and 40 healthy subjects. Serum oxidative stress markers were measured with assay kits. Serum SOD and CAT activities in MDD patients in an acute phase were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects, and serum PCC levels were significantly lower. The HAM-D scores had a significantly positive association with S100B levels. Eighteen depressed patients were followed up, and there was no significant difference among all of the markers after treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased activities of both SOD and CAT might be indicators of acute depressive episodes in MDD patients.

  18. The role of level of functioning, life satisfaction and leisure activities in elderly depressive symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kleftaras

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Today's elderly people make up a large part of the population and depressive symptoms they show requires specialized intervention health professionals. Purpose: The purpose of the present research was to study the phenomenon of elderly depressive symptomatology and its relationship with their quality of life as judged by the performance of daily life activities, perceived life satisfaction and leisure activities. Method and material: The studied sample consisted of107 elderly, 62 men and 45 women, who lived in the community, members of Open Care Centres for the Elderly (K.A.P.I. and the Friendship Club of the wider area of Attica. They completed the Questionnaire of Depressive Symptomatology, the Life Satisfaction Index, the Satisfaction with Performance Scale Questionnaire and the Leisure Time Activities Questionnaire. The statistical analysis of the results was done with SPSS-v. 20,and more specifically with the method of correlation. Results: The results showed that there is a statistically significant negative correlation between the level of life satisfaction of the elderly and depressive symptomatology. They also showed a statistically significant negative correlation between the ability to solve social problems and depressive symptomatology. Not statistically significant relationship between the capacity to manage the home and depressive symptomatology was recorded. Of the areas related to leisure, only activities relaxing the person, social and personal hobbiesrelated negatively with depressive symptomatology but not the physical activities, a finding which supports previous results regarding the efficiency in managing the home. Conclusions: Thus, according to the results of the present study the health professionals working with older people with depressive symptomatology should, in their interventions initially encourage activities that give life satisfaction and then focus their program on strengthening the individual to perform

  19. Physical Activity in Adolescents — Barriers and Impact on Depressed Affect

    OpenAIRE

    Langguth, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a high-risk period for physical inactivity as well as depressed affect, both related to various short-, mid-, and long-term negative consequences for adolescents' physical and mental health. Therefore, this developmental period is ideally suited for studying the association between change processes of everyday physical activity and change processes of depressed affect within person by applying an intensive longitudinal design. Given that physical activity substantially decrease...

  20. Depressive symptoms and inductive reasoning performance: findings from the ACTIVE reasoning training intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Jeanine M; Franchetti, Mary Kathryn; Rebok, George W; Spira, Adam P; Carlson, Michelle C; Willis, Sherry L; Gross, Alden L

    2014-12-01

    Within the context of the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study (ACTIVE; Ball et al., 2002; Jobe et al., 2001; Willis et al., 2006), we examined the longitudinal association of baseline depressive symptoms on inductive reasoning performance over a 10-year period between the reasoning training and control conditions (N = 1,375). At baseline, 322 participants (23%) reported elevated depressive symptoms, defined by a score ≥9 on the 12-item version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D; Mirowsky & Ross, 2003; Radloff, 1977). Differences in baseline depressive status were not associated with immediate posttraining gains or with subsequent annual change in reasoning performance, suggesting that the presence of elevated baseline depressive symptoms does not impact the ability to benefit from reasoning training.

  1. Effects of chronic furosemide on central neural hyperactivity and cochlear thresholds after cochlear trauma in guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina eMulders

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased neuronal spontaneous firing rates have been observed throughout the central auditory system after trauma to the cochlea and this hyperactivity is believed to be associated with the phantom perception of tinnitus. Previously we have shown in an animal model of hearing loss, that an acute injection with furosemide can significantly decrease hyperactivity after cochlear trauma and eliminate behavioural evidence of tinnitus of early onset. However, furosemide also has the potential to affect cochlear thresholds. In this paper we measured the effects of a chronic (daily injections for 7 days furosemide treatment on the spontaneous firing rate of inferior colliculus neurons and on cochlear thresholds in order to establish whether a beneficial effect on hyperactivity can be obtained without causing additional hearing loss. Guinea pigs were exposed to a 10 kHz, 124dB, 2 hour acoustic trauma, and after 5 days of recovery, were given daily i.p. injections of 80mg/kg furosemide or an equivalent amount of saline. The activity of single IC neurons was recorded 24 hours following the last injection. The furosemide treatment had no effect on cochlear thresholds compared to saline injections but did result in significant reductions in spontaneous firing rates recorded in inferior colliculus. These results that suggest a long term beneficial effect of furosemide on hyperactivity after cochlear trauma may be achievable without detrimental effects on hearing, which is important when considering therapeutic potential.

  2. Cortisol's effects on hippocampal activation in depressed patients are related to alterations in memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Heather C; Jahn, Allison L; Davidson, Richard J; Kern, Simone; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Halverson, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Many investigators have hypothesized that brain response to cortisol is altered in depression. However, neural activation in response to exogenously manipulated cortisol elevations has not yet been directly examined in depressed humans. Animal research shows that glucocorticoids have robust effects on hippocampal function, and can either enhance or suppress neuroplastic events in the hippocampus depending on a number of factors. We hypothesized that depressed individuals would show 1) altered hippocampal response to exogenous administration of cortisol, and 2) altered effects of cortisol on learning. In a repeated-measures design, 19 unmedicated depressed and 41 healthy individuals completed two fMRI scans. Fifteen mg oral hydrocortisone (i.e., cortisol) or placebo (order randomized and double-blind) was administered 1 h prior to encoding of emotional and neutral words during fMRI scans. Data analysis examined the effects of cortisol administration on 1) brain activation during encoding, and 2) subsequent free recall for words. Cortisol affected subsequent recall performance in depressed but not healthy individuals. We found alterations in hippocampal response to cortisol in depressed women, but not in depressed men (who showed altered response to cortisol in other regions, including subgenual prefrontal cortex). In both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function were positively correlated with its effects on recall performance assessed days later. Our data provide evidence that in depressed compared to healthy women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function are altered. Our data also show that in both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on emotional memory formation and hippocampal function are related.

  3. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended.

  4. Activities of daily living, depression, and quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake J Lawrence

    Full Text Available This study examined whether activities of daily living (ADL mediate the relationship between depression and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL in people with Parkinson's disease (PD. A cross-sectional, correlational research design examined data from 174 participants who completed the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-section 2 (UPDRS-section 2 [ADL]. Multiple Regression Analysis (MRA was used to examine the mediator model. Depression and ADL significantly (p<.001 predicted HR-QOL, and depression significantly (p<.001 predicted ADL. Whilst ADL did not impact on the relationship between depression and HR-QOL, there was a significant (p<.001 indirect effect of depression on HR-QOL via ADL, suggesting both direct and indirect (via ADL effects of depression on HR-QOL. The magnitude of this effect was moderate (R2 = .13. People with PD who report depression also experience greater difficulty completing ADL, which impacts upon their HR-QOL. It is recommended that clinicians adopt a multidisciplinary approach to care by combining pharmacological treatments with psycho/occupational therapy, thereby alleviating the heterogeneous impact of motor and non-motor symptoms on HR-QOL in people with PD.

  5. Physical activity reduces the risk of subsequent depression for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, William J; Deleger, Stéphane; Roberts, Robert E; Kaplan, George A

    2002-08-15

    Previous studies assessing protective effects of physical activity on depression have had conflicting results; one recent study argued that excluding disabled subjects attenuated any observed effects. The authors' objective was to compare the effects of higher levels of physical activity on prevalent and incident depression with and without exclusion of disabled subjects. Participants were 1,947 community-dwelling adults from the Alameda County Study aged 50-94 years at baseline in 1994 with 5 years of follow-up. Depression was measured using criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Physical activity was measured with an eight-point scale; odds ratios are based upon a one-point increase on the scale. Even with adjustments for age, sex, ethnicity, financial strain, chronic conditions, disability, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking, and social relations, greater physical activity was protective for both prevalent depression (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79, 1.01) and incident depression (adjusted OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.73, 0.96) over 5 years. Exclusion of disabled subjects did not attenuate the incidence results (adjusted OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.92). Findings support the protective effects of physical activity on depression for older adults and argue against excluding disabled subjects from similar studies.

  6. [Morita Therapy to Treat Depression: When and How to Encourage Patients to Join Activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses how Morita therapy is used to treat depression, illustrated with a clinical case, and makes comparisons between Morita therapy and behavioral activation (BA). The author further examines the issue of when and how to encourage patients to join activities in clinical practice in Japan. Both Morita therapy and BA share at least a common view that it is effective to activate patients' constructive behavior at a certain point in depression treatment. However, BA therapists, compared to Morita therapists, seem to pay less attention to the necessity of resting and the appropriate timing for introducing behavioral activation. There may be some contextual differences between depressive patients in Japan and those in North America. In the case of Japanese patients, exhaustion from overwork is often considered a factor triggering the development of depression. At the same time, the Morita-based pathogenic model of depression seems different from BA's model of the same disorder. BA's approach to understanding depression may be considered a psychological (behavioristic) model. In this model, the cause of depression lies in: (a) a lack of positive reinforcement, and (b) negative reinforcement resulting from avoidance of the experience of discomfort. Therefore, the basic strategy of BA is to release depressive patients from an avoidant lifestyle, which serves as a basis for negative reinforcement, and to redirect the patients toward activities which offer the experience of positive reinforcement BA is primarily practiced by clinical psychologists in the U. S. while psychiatrists prescribe medication as a medical service. On the other hand, the clinical practice of treating depression in Japan is based primarily on medical models of depression. This is also true of Morita therapy, but in a broad sense. While those who follow medical models in a narrow sense try to identify the cause of illness and then remove it, Morita therapists pay more attention to the

  7. Mindfulness-based therapy and behavioral activation: A randomized controlled trial with depressed college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIndoo, C C; File, A A; Preddy, T; Clark, C G; Hopko, D R

    2016-02-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) manifests in 20-30% of college students, with increased incidence in recent decades. Very limited research has assessed the efficacy of evidence-based interventions for MDD in college students. Mindfulness-Based Therapy (MBT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are two interventions with significant potential to meet demands of college counseling clinics and effectively treat college students with MDD. This study utilized a randomized controlled research design (n = 50) to examine the efficacy of four-sessions of abbreviated MBT and BA relative to a wait-list control condition with depressed college students. Intent-to-treat data analyses on depression outcome measures suggested both treatments were superior to the control group. There were significant pre-post treatment improvements across measures of depression, rumination, stress, and mindfulness, gains largely maintained at 1-month follow-up. Neither active treatment effectively reduced somatic anxiety. Both treatments generally had moderate-strong effect sizes relative to the control group, and based on depression response and remission criteria, 56-79% of patients exhibited clinically significant improvement. Based on reliable change indices, 75-85% experienced clinically significant reductions in depression. There was strong therapist competence and adherence to treatment protocols and high patient satisfaction with both interventions. Study limitations and implications for the assessment and treatment of depressed college students are discussed.

  8. Mild maternal iron deficiency anemia induces DPOAE suppression and cochlear hair cell apoptosis by caspase activation in young guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Zhao, Yue; Ren, Yahao; Yang, Jun; Sun, Xiance; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) anemia (IDA) alters auditory neural normal development in the mammalian cochlea. Previous results suggest that mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation altered the hearing and nervous system development of the young offspring, but the mechanisms underlying the association are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of apoptosis in the development of sensory hair cells following mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation. We established a maternal anemia model in female guinea pigs by using a mild iron deficient diet. The offspring were weaned on postnatal day (PND) 9 and then was given the iron sufficient diet. Maternal blood samples were collected on gestational day (GD) 21, GD 42, GD 63 and PND 9, serum level of iron (SI) or hemoglobin (Hb) was measured. Blood samples of pups were collected on PND 9 for SI measurement. On PND 24, pups were examined the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) task, and then the cochleae were harvested for assessment of apoptosis by immunohistochemistry of cysteine-aspartic acid proteases 3/9 (caspase-3/9) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay, and by double immunofluorescence for the colocalization of TUNEL and caspase-3. Blood samples of pups were collected on PND 24 for SI and Hb measurements. Here we show that mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation resulted in hearing impairment, decreased hair cell number, caspase-3/9 activation and increased apoptotic cell number of young guinea pigs. These results indicate a key role for apoptosis in inhibition of hair cell development, caused by mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation.

  9. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates the association between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among psychiatrically healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Rao, Hengyi; Brennan, Lauretta; Wang, Danny J J; Detre, John A; Sankoorikal, Geena Mary V; Brodkin, Edward S; Farah, Martha J

    2011-09-30

    Recent attempts to understand the biological bases of depression vulnerability have revealed that both the short allele of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and activity in the amygdala are associated with depression. Other studies have reported amygdala hyperactivity associated with the 5-HTTLPR short allele, linking the genetic and neuroimaging lines of research and suggesting a mechanism whereby the short allele confers depression risk. However, fewer investigations have examined the associations among depression, 5-HTTLPR variability, and amygdala activation in a single study. The current study thus investigated whether 5-HTTLPR genotype modulates the association between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among psychiatrically healthy adults. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with perfusion fMRI during a task-free scan. We hypothesized differential associations between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among individuals homozygous for the short allele and individuals homozygous for the long allele. Both whole brain analyses and region-of-interest analyses confirmed this prediction, revealing a significant negative association among the long allele group and a trend of positive association among the short allele group. These results complement existing reports of short allele related amygdala hyperactivity and suggest an additional neurobiological mechanism whereby the 5-HTTLPR is associated with psychiatric outcomes.

  10. A biological pathway linking inflammation and depression: activation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christmas DM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available David M Christmas, JP Potokar, Simon JC DaviesAcademic Unit of Psychiatry, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK A presentation relating to this manuscript was made by Dr David Christmas at the 9th International Meeting on Clinical Pharmacology in Psychiatry (9th IMCPP in Copenhagen, Denmark in September 2010Abstract: This article highlights the evidence linking depression to increased inflammatory drive and explores putative mechanisms for the association by reviewing both preclinical and clinical literature. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase is induced by proinflammatory cytokines and may form a link between immune functioning and altered neurotransmission, which results in depression. Increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity may cause both tryptophan depletion and increased neurotoxic metabolites of the kynurenine pathway, two alterations which have been hypothesized to cause depression. The tryptophan-kynurenine pathway is comprehensively described with a focus on the evidence linking metabolite alterations to depression. The use of immune-activated groups at high risk of depression have been used to explore these hypotheses; we focus on the studies involving chronic hepatitis C patients receiving interferon-alpha, an immune activating cytokine. Findings from this work have led to novel strategies for the future development of antidepressants including inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, moderating the cytokines which activate it, or addressing other targets in the kynurenine pathway.Keywords: depression, inflammation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, kynurenine, serotonin, tryptophan

  11. Racemic alkaloids from the fungus Ganoderma cochlear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Long; Dou, Man; Luo, Qi; Cheng, Li-Zhi; Yan, Yong-Ming; Li, Rong-Tao; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Seven pairs of new alkaloid enantiomers, ganocochlearines C-I (1, 3-8), and three pairs of known alkaloids were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma cochlear. The chemical structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR data. The absolute configurations of compounds 1, 3-10 were assigned by ECD calculations. Biological activities of these isolates against renal fibrosis were accessed in rat normal or diseased renal interstitial fibroblast cells. Importantly, the plausible biosynthetic pathway for this class of alkaloids was originally proposed.

  12. BE-ACTIV: A Staff-Assisted Behavioral Intervention for Depression in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Suzanne; Looney, Stephen W.; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Teri, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article (a) describes a 10-week, behavioral, activities-based intervention for depression that can be implemented in nursing homes collaboratively with nursing home activities staff and (b) presents data related to its development, feasibility, and preliminary outcomes. Design and Methods: We developed BE-ACTIV, which stands for…

  13. Behavioral treatment of depression: A meta-analysis of activity scheduling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Straten, van A.; Warmerdam, E.H.

    2007-01-01

    Activity scheduling is a behavioral treatment of depression in which patients learn to monitor their mood and daily activities, and how to increase the number of pleasant activities and to increase positive interactions with their environment. We conducted a meta-analysis of randomized effect studie

  14. Technology developments to initiate a next generation of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckaerts, B; Corless, A R; Mercanzini, A; Silmon, A M; Bertsch, A; Van Himbeeck, C; Wasikiewicz, J; Vanden Bulcke, M; Vadgama, P; Renaud, P

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the EU-supported research project Healthy Aims, we developed a range of novel electrode arrays and related technologies for use in hearing prosthesis. This paper summarizes our ongoing research activities on alternative electrode manufacturing routes, functional electrode interfaces and smart intra-cochlear and intra-modiolus electrode arrays.

  15. Analgesic, antibacterial and central nervous system depressant activities of Albizia procera leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mst. Mahfuza Khatoon; Mst. Hajera Khatun; Md. Ekramul Islam; Mst. Shahnaj Parvin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain analgesic, antibacterial and central nervous system (CNS) depressant activities of ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride fractions of methanol extract of Albizia procera (A. procera) leaves. Methods: Leaves extracts of A. procera were tested for analgesic activity by acetic acid induced and formalin test method in mice. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed by agar well diffusion method. CNS depressant activity was evaluated by hole cross and open field tests. Results: All the extracts at 200 mg/kg exhibited significant (P Conclusions: It is concluded that all the extracts possess potential analgesic and CNS depressants activity. This study also showed that different fractions of methanol extract could be potential sources of new antimicrobial agents.

  16. Physical activity, depressed mood and pregnancy worries in European obese pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Wit, Linda; Jelsma, Judith G M; van Poppel, Mireille N M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between mental health status (i.e. depressed mood and pregnancy-related worries) and objectively measured physical activity levels in obese pregnant women from seven European countries. METHODS: Baseline data from the vitamin D...... with less physical activity. The combined risk of poor mental health and low physical activity levels makes women vulnerable for pregnancy complications. Whether a depressed mood may be a barrier for improving physical activity warrants further study....... and lifestyle intervention for the prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus (DALI) study were used. Time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behaviour was measured with accelerometers. Depressed mood was measured with the WHO well-being index (WHO-5) and pregnancy...

  17. The effect of physical activity on depression in adolescence and emerging adulthood: a growth-curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhie, Meghan L; Rawana, Jennine S

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the influence of physical activity on the trajectory of depression from adolescence through emerging adulthood (EA). Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Waves I to IV), latent growth curve modeling was performed to assess how physical activity and gender influenced depression across adolescence and EA. Higher levels of physical activity in mid-adolescence were associated with lower levels of depression during mid-adolescence and slower inclines and declines in depression over time. Boys had lower levels of depression in mid-adolescence and slower inclines and declines in depression over time compared to girls. Findings provide evidence that current theories on understanding depression and mental health prevention programs may be enhanced by the inclusion of physical activity.

  18. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlear implant (CI represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development.

  19. Nonlinear cochlear mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, George

    2016-05-01

    An earlier paper characterizing the linear mechanical response of the organ of Corti [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138, 1102-1121 (2015)] is extended to the nonlinear domain. Assuming the existence of nonlinear oscillators nonlocally coupled through the pressure they help create, the oscillator equations are derived and examined when the stimuli are modulated tones and clicks. The nonlinearities are constrained by the requirements of oscillator stability and the invariance of zero crossings in the click response to changes in click amplitude. The nonlinear oscillator equations for tones are solved in terms of the fluid pressure that drives them, and its time derivative, presumably a proxy for forces created by outer hair cells. The pressure equation is reduced to quadrature, the integrand depending on the oscillators' responses. The resulting nonlocally coupled nonlinear equations for the pressure, and oscillator amplitudes and phases, are solved numerically in terms of the fluid pressure at the stapes. Methods for determining the nonlinear damping directly from measurements are described. Once the oscillators have been characterized from their tone and click responses, the mechanical response of the cochlea to natural sounds may be computed numerically. Signal processing inspired by cochlear mechanics opens up a new area of nonlocal nonlinear time-frequency analysis.

  20. Microengineered hydromechanical cochlear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert D; Grosh, Karl

    2005-02-01

    Micromachined fluid-filled variable impedance waveguides intended to mimic the mechanics of the passive mammalian cochlea have been fabricated and experimentally examined. The structures were microfabricated with dimensions similar to those of the biological system. Experimental tests demonstrate acoustically excited traveling fluid-structure waves with phase accumulations between 1.5 and 3 pi radians at the location of maximum response. The resulting measured frequency-position mapping function, with similarities to that observed in the cochlea, is presented. Results for both isotropic and orthotropic membranes are reported, demonstrating that the achieved orthotropy ratio of 8:1 in tension is insufficient to produce the sharp filtering observed in animal experiments and many computational models that use higher ratios. It is also shown experimentally that high viscosity fluids must be used to provide sufficient damping to avoid the formation of a nonphysiological standing wave pattern. A mathematical model incorporating a thin-layer viscous, compressible fluid approximation coupled to an orthotropic membrane model is validated against experimental results. The work presented herein is motivated by the possibility of producing microfabricated cochlear-like filters, thus the structure is designed for production in a scalable microfabrication process.

  1. [Evidence for the Efficacy of Behavioral Activation against Depressive Disorder: A Literature Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Toshihide; Ishibashi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests the significant efficacy of behavioral activation therapy (BA) for the treatment of depression, although BA had formerly been regarded as only a part of the techniques for cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT). The aim of this article is to review the effectiveness, indications, and limitations of BA for the psychosocial treatment of depression. The research group of Washington University in St. Louis, who previously suggested the marked efficacy of BA based on component analysis of CBT, performed a large-scale study to compare the effect of BA and cognitive therapy (CT) or antidepressant medication on the acute phase of depression. As the results, BA was superior to CT and comparable to antidepressant medication in acute-phase treatment for a subgroup of patients with relatively severe depression. Moreover, a long-term follow-up study revealed a benefit of BA compared to pharmacological treatment in regard to the persistence of the effect and cost-effectiveness. More recently, a number of meta-analyses have indicated no significant difference among BA and other psychotherapies regarding their efficacy for the treatment of depression. Because BA does not require patients or therapists to learn complex skills and is also time-efficient, it is recommended as the first-line treatment for mild or moderate depression. However, further studies are needed to consider indications, the timing of induction, and variation in BA techniques if it is applied for the treatment of depression in a general clinical setting in Japan.

  2. The mental health benefits of regular physical activity, and its role in preventing future depressive illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robert Stanton,1 Brenda Happell,1 Peter Reaburn2 1Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Centre for Mental Health Nursing Innovation and School of Nursing and Midwifery, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia; 2School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia Abstract: There is a large body of literature which examines the mental health benefits of physical activity. In general, studies report an inverse, dose dependent relationship between leisure-time physical activity participation, and mental health outcomes. Studies also show a positive association between maximal aerobic capacity and general well-being. More recent studies have confirmed the positive effects of physical activity participation on cognition, including the treatment and prevention of dementia. The current exercise prescription suggested for the treatment of depression is similar to that recommended to the general population for the development and maintenance of cardiorespiratory fitness. There is also strong evidence from large population level studies that long term physical activity participation reduces the risk of future depressive illness. From the available evidence, it would appear that physical activity performed at a frequency, intensity, and duration which is substantially less than that required for the development and maintenance of cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness in the general population, may afford significant benefits in reducing the risk of future depressive illness. This may be particularly encouraging for people with prior depressive illness, or at high risk of future depressive illness, since this vulnerable population already faces significant barriers to physical activity participation over and above those encountered by the general population. Keywords: exercise, major depression, depressive disorder, preventive medicine

  3. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2008-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on cochlear implantation in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of 5 congenitally...... deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2 years of age.  Ratings of video observations were used to measure the children's early communication development with and without the use of their cochlear implants. In addition, parental interviews were used to assess the benefits...... parents perceived regarding their children's cochlear implants. Two examples are included in this article to illustrate the parents' perspectives about cochlear implantation in their deafblind children. Benefits of cochlear implantation in this cohort of children included improved attention and emotional...

  4. The efficacy of a behavioral activation intervention among depressed US Latinos with limited English language proficiency: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Collado, Anahi; Long, Katherine E; MacPherson, Laura; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is highly prevalent among Latinos with limited English language proficiency in the United States. Although major depressive disorder is highly treatable, barriers to depression treatment have historically prevented Latinos with limited English language proficiency from accessing effective interventions. The project seeks to evaluate the efficacy of behavioral activation treatment for depression, an empirically supported treatment for depression, as an inte...

  5. EFFECTS OF DISTINCT PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND MEDITATION PROGRAMS ON QUALITY OF LIFE AND DEPRESSION LEVELS IN ACTIVE ELDERLY WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    J. Corrêa; Cunha, F.A.; T. H. Pires; Giani T.; FERREIRA, M. de A.; Dantas, E.

    2010-01-01

     

    ABSTRACT

    Sedentary aging can evolve to depression which interferes both qualitatively and quantitatively on elderly’s quality of life. The present study compared quality of life and depression levels between sedentary and active elderly women. For this, a correlational ex post facto study was employed, the sample...

  6. Associations Between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms by Weight Status Among Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craike, Melinda J; Mosely, Kylie; Browne, Jessica L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine associations between physical activity (PA) and depressive symptoms among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (Type 2 DM), and whether associations varied according to weight status. METHODS: Diabetes MILES - Australia is a national survey of adults with diabetes, focused...... on behavioral and psychosocial issues. Data from 705 respondents with Type 2 DM were analyzed, including: demographic and clinical characteristics, PA (IPAQ-SF), depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), and BMI (self-reported height and weight). Data analysis was performed using ANCOVA. RESULTS: Respondents were aged 59...... with Type 2DM, however the amount of PA associated with fewer depressive symptoms varies according to weight status. Lower amounts of PA might be required for people who are obese to achieve meaningful reductions in depressive symptoms compared to those who are healthy weight or overweight. Further research...

  7. Physical activity as a treatment for depression: the TREAD randomised trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawlor Debbie A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is one of the most common reasons for consulting a General Practitioner (GP within the UK. Whilst antidepressants have been shown to be clinically effective, many patients and healthcare professionals would like to access other forms of treatment as an alternative or adjunct to drug therapy for depression. A recent systematic review presented some evidence that physical activity could offer one such option, although further investigation is needed to test its effectiveness within the context of the National Health Service. The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a randomised, controlled trial (RCT designed to evaluate an intervention developed to increase physical activity as a treatment for depression within primary care. Methods/design The TREAD study is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm RCT which targets patients presenting with a new episode of depression. Patients were approached if they were aged 18-69, had recently consulted their GP for depression and, where appropriate, had been taking antidepressants for less than one month. Only those patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a depressive episode as assessed by the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R, a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score of at least 14 and informed written consent were included in the study. Eligible patients were individually randomised to one of two treatment groups; usual GP care or usual GP care plus facilitated physical activity. The primary outcome of the trial is clinical symptoms of depression assessed using the BDI four months after randomisation. A number of secondary outcomes are also measured at the 4-, 8- and 12-month follow-up points including quality of life, attitude to and involvement in physical activity and antidepressant use/adherence. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT basis and will use linear and logistic regression models to compare treatments. Discussion The results of

  8. Physical activity in European adolescents and associations with anxiety, depression and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Elaine M; Corcoran, Paul; O'Regan, Grace; Keeley, Helen; Cannon, Mary; Carli, Vladimir; Wasserman, Camilla; Hadlaczky, Gergö; Sarchiapone, Marco; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Balint, Maria; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Cozman, Doina; Haring, Christian; Iosue, Miriam; Kaess, Michael; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Nemes, Bogdan; Podlogar, Tina; Poštuvan, Vita; Sáiz, Pilar; Sisask, Merike; Tubiana, Alexandra; Värnik, Peeter; Hoven, Christina W; Wasserman, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, physical activity, sport participation and associations with well-being, anxiety and depressive symptoms were examined in a large representative sample of European adolescents. A school-based survey was completed by 11,110 adolescents from ten European countries who took part in the SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe) study. The questionnaire included items assessing physical activity, sport participation and validated instruments assessing well-being (WHO-5), depressive symptoms (BDI-II) and anxiety (SAS). Multi-level mixed effects linear regression was used to examine associations between physical activity/sport participation and mental health measures. A minority of the sample (17.9 % of boys and 10.7 % of girls; p anxiety and depressive symptoms, up to a threshold of moderate frequency of activity. In a multi-level mixed effects model more frequent physical activity and participation in sport were both found to independently contribute to greater well-being and lower levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms in both sexes. Increasing activity levels and sports participation among the least active young people should be a target of community and school-based interventions to promote well-being. There does not appear to be an additional benefit to mental health associated with meeting the WHO-recommended levels of activity.

  9. Telephone-Based Physical Activity Counseling for Major Depression in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Ehde, Dawn M.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Wadhwani, Roini; Sullivan, Mark D.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Kraft, George H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Physical activity represents a promising treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We conducted a single-blind, two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-week physical activity counseling intervention delivered primarily by telephone (n = 44) to a wait-list control group (N = 48).…

  10. Behavioral activation therapy for remediating persistent social deficits in medication-responsive chronic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gregory; Hellerstein, David J

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the use of behavioral activation therapy in patients with medication-responsive chronic depression who continue to experience social and occupational deficits. The classification of chronic depression includes a variety of disorders that are both common and debilitating and that frequently leave patients socially impaired even after remission of mood symptoms. Medication is often only partially effective in remedying these social impairments. As a result, other interventions, including forms of psychotherapy, may be justified as an adjunct to medication to improve residual social impairment. Behavioral activation therapy is one such treatment that may be especially appropriate for such individuals. The authors offer a brief description of behavioral activation therapy and examine how to adapt this therapy for use in patients with medication-responsive chronic depression. Preliminary evidence suggests that the therapy can be easily implemented with few modifications to improve social and occupational difficulties.

  11. Reading skills after cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Agnes Maria

    2007-01-01

    It has frequently been found that profoundly deaf children with conventional hearing aids have difficulties with the comprehension of written text. Cochlear Implants (CIs) were expected to enhance the reading comprehension of these profoundly deaf children because they provide auditory access to spo

  12. Cochlear implantation in superficial siderosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chong-Sun; Song, Jae-Jun; Park, Min-Hyun; Kim, Young Ho; Koo, Ja-Won

    2006-08-01

    Superficial siderosis (SS) of the central nervous system has been thought to be a rare condition that generates progressive hearing loss, ataxia, pyramidal signs, and dementia. The main cause of hearing loss by SS is thought to be neuronal. Because there is no histopathologic report of the human temporal bone in SS, there is a debate about the possibility of cochlear involvement. We present a 25-year-old man who was investigated for bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular failure after head trauma. On brain MRI, SS of the central nervous system was detected. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) showed no response on both sides. However, integrity of the eighth nerve was proved by the electrical ABR test on the right side and the patient benefited significantly from cochlear implantation. The sensorineural hearing loss in SS seems to be related to cochlear damage as well as neuronal damage. So, cochlear implantation would be a hearing rehabilitation modality for the sensorineural hearing loss caused by SS.

  13. Chronic activation of NPFFR2 stimulates the stress-related depressive behaviors through HPA axis modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Tin; Liu, Tzu-Yu; Yang, Ching-Yao; Yu, Yu-Lian; Chen, Ting-Chun; Day, Yuan-Ji; Chang, Che-Chien; Huang, Guo-Jen; Chen, Jin-Chung

    2016-09-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) is a morphine-modulating peptide that regulates the analgesic effect of opioids, and also controls food consumption and cardiovascular function through its interaction with two cognate receptors, NPFFR1 and NPFFR2. In the present study, we explore a novel modulatory role for NPFF-NPFFR2 in stress-related depressive behaviors. In a mouse model of chronic mild stress (CMS)-induced depression, the expression of NPFF significantly increased in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and amygdala. In addition, transgenic (Tg) mice over-expressing NPFFR2 displayed clear depression and anxiety-like behaviors with hyperactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, reduced expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Furthermore, acute treatment of NPFFR2 agonists in wild-type (WT) mice enhanced the activity of the HPA axis, and chronic administration resulted in depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Chronic stimulation of NPFFR2 also decreased the expression of hippocampal GR and led to persistent activation of the HPA axis. Strikingly, bilateral intra-paraventricular nucleus (PVN) injection of NPFFR2 shRNA predominately inhibits the depressive-like behavior in CMS-exposed mice. Antidepressants, fluoxetine and ketamine, effectively relieved the depressive behaviors of NPFFR2-Tg mice. We speculate that persistent NPFFR2 activation, in particular in the hypothalamus, up-regulates the HPA axis and results in long-lasting increases in circulating corticosterone (CORT), consequently damaging hippocampal function. This novel role of NPFFR2 in regulating the HPA axis and hippocampal function provides a new avenue for combating depression and anxiety-like disorder.

  14. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity and Connectivity in Depressed Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hu

    Full Text Available Depressive symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease (PD, but the neurophysiological mechanisms of depression in PD are poorly understood. The current study attempted to examine disrupted spontaneous local brain activities and functional connectivities that underlie the depression in PD. We recruited a total of 20 depressed PD patients (DPD, 40 non-depressed PD patients (NDPD and 43 matched healthy controls (HC. All the subjects underwent neuropsychological tests and resting-state fMRI scanning. The between-group differences in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF of BOLD signals were examined using post-hoc tests after the analysis of covariance. Compared with the NDPD and HC, the DPD group showed significantly increased ALFF in the left median cingulated cortex (MCC. The functional connectivity (FC between left MCC and all the other voxels in the brain were then calculated. Compared with the HC and NDPD group, the DPD patients showed stronger FC between the left MCC and some of the major nodes of the default mode network (DMN, including the post cingulated cortex/precuneus, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, and cerebellum. Correlation analysis revealed that both the ALFF values in the left MCC and the FC between the left MCC and the nodes of DMN were significantly correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. Moreover, higher local activities in the left MCC were associated with increased functional connections between the MCC and the nodes of DMN in PD. These abnormal activities and connectivities of the limbic-cortical circuit may indicate impaired high-order cortical control or uncontrol of negative mood in DPD, which suggested a possible neural mechanism of the depression in PD.

  15. Music therapy modulates fronto-temporal activity in rest-EEG in depressed clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachner, Jörg; Gold, Christian; Erkkilä, Jaakko

    2013-04-01

    Fronto-temporal areas process shared elements of speech and music. Improvisational psychodynamic music therapy (MT) utilizes verbal and musical reflection on emotions and images arising from clinical improvisation. Music listening is shifting frontal alpha asymmetries (FAA) in depression, and increases frontal midline theta (FMT). In a two-armed randomized controlled trial (RCT) with 79 depressed clients (with comorbid anxiety), we compared standard care (SC) versus MT added to SC at intake and after 3 months. We found that MT significantly reduced depression and anxiety symptoms. The purpose of this study is to test whether or not MT has an impact on anterior fronto-temporal resting state alpha and theta oscillations. Correlations between anterior EEG, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety Subscale (HADS-A), power spectral analysis (topography, means, asymmetry) and normative EEG database comparisons were explored. After 3 month of MT, lasting changes in resting EEG were observed, i.e., significant absolute power increases at left fronto-temporal alpha, but most distinct for theta (also at left fronto-central and right temporoparietal leads). MT differed to SC at F7-F8 (z scored FAA, p improvising on emotions in MT may induce neural reorganization in fronto-temporal areas. Alpha and theta changes in fronto-temporal and temporoparietal areas indicate MT action and treatment effects on cortical activity in depression, suggesting an impact of MT on anxiety reduction.

  16. Dual Sensory Loss and Depressive Symptoms: The Importance of Hearing, Daily Functioning and Activity Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Matthew Kiely

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between dual sensory loss (DSL and mental health has been well established. However, most studies have relied on self-report data and lacked measures that would enable researchers to examine causal pathways between DSL and depression. This study seeks to extend this research by examining the effects of DSL on mental health, and identify factors that explain the longitudinal associations between sensory loss and depressive symptoms. Methods: Piecewise linear-mixed models were used to analyse 16-years of longitudinal data collected on up to five occasions from 1611 adults (51% men aged between 65 and 103 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D. Vision loss (VL was defined by corrected visual acuity greater than 0.3 logMAR in the better eye, blindness or glaucoma. Hearing loss (HL was defined by pure tone average (PTA greater than 25 dB in the better hearing ear. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, medical conditions, lifestyle behaviours, Activities of Daily Living (ADLs, cognitive function, and social engagement. Results: Unadjusted models indicated that higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with HL (B=1.16, SE=0.33 and DSL (B=2.15, SE=0.39 but not VL. Greater rates of change in depressive symptoms were also evident after the onset of HL (B=0.16, SE=0.06, p

  17. NMDA receptors mediate stimulus-timing-dependent plasticity and neural synchrony in the dorsal cochlear nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana A Stefanescu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Auditory information relayed by auditory nerve fibers and somatosensory information relayed by granule cell parallel fibers converge on the fusiform cells (FCs of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the first brain station of the auditory pathway. In vitro, parallel fiber synapses on FCs exhibit spike-timing-dependent plasticity with Hebbian learning rules, partially mediated by the NMDA receptor (NMDAr. Well-timed bimodal auditory-somatosensory stimulation, in vivo equivalent of spike-timing-dependent plasticity, can induce stimulus-timing-dependent plasticity (StTDP of the FCs spontaneous and tone-evoked firing rates. In healthy guinea pigs, the resulting distribution of StTDP learning rules across a FC neural population is dominated by a Hebbian profile while anti-Hebbian, suppressive and enhancing LRs are less frequent. In this study, we investigate in vivo, the NMDAr contribution to FC baseline activity and long term plasticity. We find that blocking the NMDAr decreases the synchronization of FC- spontaneous activity and mediates differential modulation of FC rate-level functions such that low, and high threshold units are more likely to increase, and decrease, respectively, their maximum amplitudes. Three significant alterations in mean learning-rule profiles were identified: transitions from an initial Hebbian profile towards (1 an anti-Hebbian and (2 a suppressive profile, and (3 transitions from an anti-Hebbian to a Hebbian profile. FC units preserving their learning rules showed instead, NMDAr-dependent plasticity to unimodal acoustic stimulation, with persistent depression of tone-evoked responses changing to persistent enhancement following the NMDAr antagonist. These results reveal a crucial role of the NMDAr in mediating FC baseline activity and long-term plasticity which have important implications for signal processing and auditory pathologies related to maladaptive plasticity of dorsal cochlear nucleus circuitry.

  18. Adolescents' social environment and depression: social networks, extracurricular activity, and family relationship influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michael J; Schmidt, Christopher; Abraham, Anisha; Walker, Leslie; Tercyak, Kenneth

    2009-12-01

    The present study examined components of adolescents' social environment (social network, extracurricular activities, and family relationships) in association with depression. A total of 332 adolescents presenting for a routine medical check-up were self-assessed for social network risk (i.e., smoking habits of best male and female friends), extracurricular activity level (i.e., participation in organized sports teams, clubs, etc.), family relationship quality (i.e., cohesion and conflict), and symptoms of depression (i.e., minimal, mild, moderate/severe). Results of a forward linear regression modeling indicate that social environment components were associated with a significant proportion of the variance in adolescent depression (Adjusted R (2) = .177, p social network (beta = .107, p relationships (beta = -.368, p social environment plays in adolescent depression, as well as yields new insights into socially-based intervention targets that may ameliorate adolescent depression. These intervention targets may be gender-specific, include positive social network skills training, increase adolescents' engagement in organized activities, and attend to the quality of their family relationships.

  19. EFFECTIVE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS WITH NOOTROPICS DRUG PANTOGAM ACTIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Baranov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the efficiency of the inclusion nootropic drug Pantogam Activ in the complex therapy of 82 patients with heart failure, ischemic heart diseases, anxiety and depressive disorders. It was shown that an 8-week treatment with Pantogam Activ in most patients is accompanied by a significant reduction of anxiety and depressive disorders, increase exercise tolerance, improved autonomic regulation of heart function and decrease the frequency of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, which is accompanied by a marked improvement in the quality of life. 

  20. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and depression during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Tendais

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines physical activity patterns among women, from pre-pregnancy to the second trimester of pregnancy, and the relationship between physical activity status based on physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life (HRQoL and depression over pregnancy. 56 healthy pregnant women self-reported physical activity, HRQoL and depression at 10-15 and 19-24 weeks of pregnancy and physical activity before pregnancy. Whereas vigorous leisure physical activity decreased after conception, moderate leisure physical activity and work related physical activity remained stable over time. The prevalence of recommended physical activity was 39.3% and 12.5% in the 1st and 2nd trimesters of pregnancy respectively, and 14.3% pre-pregnancy. From the 1st to the 2nd pregnancy trimester, most physical HRQoL dimensions scores decreased and only mental component increased, independently of physical activity status. No changes in mean depression scores were observed. These data suggest that physical activity patterns change with pregnancy and that physical and mental components are differentially affected by pregnancy course, independently of physical activity status.

  1. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and depression during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendais, Iva; Figueiredo, Bárbara; Mota, Jorge; Conde, Ana

    2011-02-01

    This study examines physical activity patterns among women, from pre-pregnancy to the second trimester of pregnancy, and the relationship between physical activity status based on physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depression over pregnancy. 56 healthy pregnant women self-reported physical activity, HRQoL and depression at 10-15 and 19-24 weeks of pregnancy and physical activity before pregnancy. Whereas vigorous leisure physical activity decreased after conception, moderate leisure physical activity and work related physical activity remained stable over time. The prevalence of recommended physical activity was 39.3% and 12.5% in the 1st and 2nd trimesters of pregnancy respectively, and 14.3% pre-pregnancy. From the 1st to the 2nd pregnancy trimester, most physical HRQoL dimensions scores decreased and only mental component increased, independently of physical activity status. No changes in mean depression scores were observed. These data suggest that physical activity patterns change with pregnancy and that physical and mental components are differentially affected by pregnancy course, independently of physical activity status.

  2. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B; Sweeney, Alex D; Bennett, Marc L

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly, innovative technology is discussed, including the hybrid cochlear implant and the totally implantable cochlear implant.

  3. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianying Li; Cheng Xu; Xiaohua Cao; Qiang Gao; Yan Wang; Yanfang Wang; Juyi Peng; Kerang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  4. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianying; Xu, Cheng; Cao, Xiaohua; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yanfang; Peng, Juyi; Zhang, Kerang

    2013-06-25

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  5. Stochastic beamforming for cochlear implant coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Robert P.; Holmes, Stephen D.; Shulgin, Boris; Nikitin, Alexander; Stocks, Nigel G.

    2007-06-01

    Cochlear implants are prosthetic devices used to provide hearing to people who would otherwise be profoundly deaf. The deliberate addition of noise to the electrode signals could increase the amount of information transmitted, but standard cochlear implants do not replicate the noise characteristic of normal hearing because if noise is added in an uncontrolled manner with a limited number of electrodes then it will almost certainly lead to worse performance. Only if partially independent stochastic activity can be achieved in each nerve fibre can mechanisms like suprathreshold stochastic resonance be effective. We are investigating the use of stochastic beamforming to achieve greater independence. The strategy involves presenting each electrode with a linear combination of independent Gaussian noise sources. Because the cochlea is filled with conductive salt solutions, the noise currents from the electrodes interact and the effective stimulus for each nerve fibre will therefore be a different weighted sum of the noise sources. To some extent therefore, the effective stimulus for a nerve fibre will be independent of the effective stimulus of neighbouring fibres. For a particular patient, the electrode position and the amount of current spread are fixed. The objective is therefore to find the linear combination of noise sources that leads to the greatest independence between nerve discharges. In this theoretical study we show that it is possible to get one independent point of excitation (one null) for each electrode and that stochastic beamforming can greatly decrease the correlation between the noise exciting different regions of the cochlea.

  6. Does physical activity moderate the relationship between depression symptomatology and low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübscher, Markus; Hartvigsen, Jan; Fernandez, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether depression symptomatology is associated with low back pain (LBP) in twins aged 70+ and whether this effect depends on a person's physical activity (PA) status. METHODS: This prospective cohort and nested case-control study used a nationally representative sample....... This effect is supposedly not attributable to genetic or shared environmental factors. Physical activity did not moderate the effect of depression symptomatology on LBP....... years later were investigated using logistic regression analyses adjusted for sex. To examine the moderating effect of PA, we tested its interaction with depression. Associations were analysed using the complete sample of 2446 twins and a matched case-control analysis of 97 twin pairs discordant for LBP...

  7. Anatomic considerations of cochlear morphology and its implications for insertion trauma in cochlear implant surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbist, B.M.; Ferrarini, L.; Briaire, J.J.; Zarowski, A.; Admiraal-Behloul, F.; Olofsen, H.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Frijns, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: The goal of this study is to analyze the 3-dimensional anatomy of the cochlear spiral and to investigate the consequences of its course to insertion trauma during cochlear implantation. BACKGROUND: Insertion trauma in cochlear implant surgery is a feared surgical risk, potentially causin

  8. Brain bioelectrical activity changes in patients with poststroke depression and apathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kichuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of brain bioelectrical activity in patents with poststroke apathy and depressive disorders.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 175 patients (84 men and 91 women with new-onset cerebral stroke at different sites. A total of 107 (61% patients of them were observed to have depressive disorders (n=41 (38% and apathy (n=66 (62% within a year after disease onset. A control group included 68 (39% patients without poststroke affective disorders. The mean age of the study group patients was 66±10 years and that of the control patients was 68±11 years. The severity and magnitude of neurological deficit were evaluated using the U.S. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS. The patients underwent electroencephalography (EEG, brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The investigators used diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-IV criteria to diagnose depression and the Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D and the mini-mental status examination (MMSE to evaluate the mental status. The basic rhythmic power indices in the affected and unaffected hemispheres were calculated, as well as anteroposterior alpha rhythm distribution coefficient and interhemispheric asymmetry coefficient. Results and discussion. The computer EEG analysis was shown to identify the hallmark characteristics of brain bioelectric activity in patients with different types of affective disorders in the acute, early and late recovery periods of stroke. The patients with affective disorders were found to have brain bioelectrical activity changes predominantly in the rapid frequency sub-band on EEG, suggesting midbrain structural dysfunction. In the patients with poststroke depression, depressive disorder scale scores were related to the power of bioelectric activity in the slow and alpha frequency bands manly in the acute stroke period whereas those were correlated with the EEG

  9. Neural Changes following Behavioral Activation for a Depressed Breast Cancer Patient: A Functional MRI Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Gawrysiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging is an innovative but at this stage underutilized method to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used in this case study to examine changes in brain activity in a depressed breast cancer patient receiving an 8-session Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD, based on the work of Hopko and Lejuez (2007. A music listening paradigm was used during fMRI brain scans to assess reward responsiveness at pre- and posttreatment. Following treatment, the patient exhibited attenuated depression and changes in blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD response in regions of the prefrontal cortex and the subgenual cingulate cortex. These preliminary findings outline a novel means to assess psychotherapy efficacy and suggest that BATD elicits functional brain changes in areas implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Further research is necessary to explore neurobiological mechanisms of change in BATD, particularly the potential mediating effects of reward responsiveness and associated brain functioning.

  10. Evaluation of CNS depressant activity of different plant parts of Nyctanthes arbortristis linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sanjita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the water-soluble portion of the ethanol extracts of flowers, barks, seeds and leaves of Nyctanthes arbortristis Linn. to confirm their CNS depressant activity. The ethanol extracts of the plant parts were obtained by soxhlet extraction. After performing the gross behavioral study, the CNS depressant activity was evaluated by observing the prolongation of sleeping time induced by pentobarbital sodium in mice. Attempts have been made to explore the possible mechanism behind this activity by determining their effect on brain monoamine neurotransmitters like dopamine and serotonin. The gross behavioral study showed that ethanol extracts of the leaves, flowers and seeds possess significant CNS depressant activity. The leaves, flowers, seeds and barks (600 mg/kg showed significant and dose-dependent prolongation of onset and duration of sleep and so found to cause decrease dopamine and increase serotonin level. From which it can be concluded that the CNS depressant activity of the ethanol extracts of seeds, leaves and flowers may be due to the decrease in dopamine and increase in serotonin level.

  11. Cochlear implant in incomplete partition type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrettini, S; Forli, F; De Vito, A; Bruschini, L; Quaranta, N

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, we report on 4 patients affected by incomplete partition type I submitted to cochlear implant at our institutions. Preoperative, surgical, mapping and follow-up issues as well as results in cases with this complex malformation are described. The cases reported in the present study confirm that cochlear implantation in patients with incomplete partition type I may be challenging for cochlear implant teams. The results are variable, but in many cases satisfactory, and are mainly related to the surgical placement of the electrode and residual neural nerve fibres. Moreover, in some cases the association of cochlear nerve abnormalities and other disabilities may significantly affect results.

  12. [Our experience with bilateral cochlear implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Eldar; Taitelbaum-Swead, Ricky; Migirov, Lela; Hildesheimer, Minka; Kronenberg, Jona

    2008-03-01

    Cochlear implantation is a standard method of hearing rehabilitation among patients with severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. In recent years there have been an increasing number of studies showing superior hearing with bilateral cochlear implantation in comparison with a unilateral procedure. In this study we present our experience with 15 patients, children and adults, who had bilateral cochlear implant surgery. Speech perception test results demonstrated a hearing benefit in bilateral cochlear implantation in comparison with a unilateral device, mainly by improvement in the identification of speech in noise tests.

  13. Surface biotechnology for refining cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fei; Walshe, Peter; Viani, Laura; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    The advent of the cochlear implant is phenomenal because it is the first surgical prosthesis that is capable of restoring one of the senses. The subsequent rapid evolution of cochlear implants through increasing complexity and functionality has been synchronized with the recent advancements in biotechnology. Surface biotechnology has refined cochlear implants by directly influencing the implant–tissue interface. Emerging surface biotechnology strategies are exemplified by nanofibrous polymeric materials, topographical surface modification, conducting polymer coatings, and neurotrophin-eluting implants. Although these novel developments have received individual attention in the recent literature, the time has come to investigate their collective applications to cochlear implants to restore lost hearing.

  14. Romantic and Sexual Activities, Parent-Adolescent Stress, and Depressive Symptoms among Early Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Joanne; Stroud, Catherine B.; Starr, Lisa R.; Miller, Melissa Ramsay; Yoneda, Athena; Hershenberg, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Building on evidence that romantic experiences are associated with depressive symptoms in adolescence, we examined their bidirectional association, as well as the role of sexual activity and parent-adolescent stress in their association. Data were collected from 71 early adolescent girls (M age 13.45 years; SD = 0.68) and their primary caregiver…

  15. Behavioural activation for depression; an update of meta-analysis of effectiveness and sub group analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ekers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a common, disabling condition for which psychological treatments are recommended. Behavioural activation has attracted increased interest in recent years. It has been over 5 years since our meta-analyses summarised the evidence supporting and this systematic review updates those findings and examines moderators of treatment effect. METHOD: Randomised trials of behavioural activation for depression versus controls or anti-depressant medication were identified using electronic database searches, previous reviews and reference lists. Data on symptom level and study level moderators were extracted and analysed using meta-analysis, sub-group analysis and meta-regression respectively. RESULTS: Twenty six randomised controlled trials including 1524 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. A random effects meta-analysis of symptom level post treatment showed behavioural activation to be superior to controls (SMD -0.74 CI -0.91 to -0.56, k = 25, N = 1088 and medication (SMD -0.42 CI -0.83 to-0.00, k = 4, N = 283. Study quality was low in the majority of studies and follow- up time periods short. There was no indication of publication bias and subgroup analysis showed limited association between moderators and effect size. CONCLUSIONS: The results in this meta-analysis support and strengthen the evidence base indicating Behavioural Activation is an effective treatment for depression. Further high quality research with longer term follow-up is needed to strengthen the evidence base.

  16. Poor Vision, Functioning, and Depressive Symptoms: A Test of the Activity Restriction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwala, Jamila; Lawson, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested the applicability of the activity restriction model of depressed affect to the context of poor vision in late life. This model hypothesizes that late-life stressors contribute to poorer mental health not only directly but also indirectly by restricting routine everyday functioning. Method: We used data from a national…

  17. Relationships between Discretionary Time Activities, Emotional Experiences, Delinquency and Depressive Symptoms among Urban African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Amy M.; Richards, Maryse; Kohl, Krista; Randall, Edin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM), this cross-sectional study examined mediated and moderated associations between different types of discretionary time activities and depressive symptoms and delinquency among a sample of 246 (107 boys, 139 girls) fifth through eighth grade urban African American adolescents. More time spent in passive…

  18. Associations between Physical Activity and Reduced Rates of Hopelessness, Depression, and Suicidal Behavior among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Rienzo, Barbara A.; Pigg, R. Morgan; Miller, M. David; Dodd, Virginia J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations among types of physical activity and hopelessness, depression, and suicidal behavior among college students. Participants: Participants included 43,499 college students aged 18 to 25 who completed the 2005 National College Health Assessment conducted by the American College Health Association. Methods:…

  19. Bidirectional Prospective Associations Between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms. The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavrakakis, Nikolaos; de Jonge, Peter; Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Low levels of physical activity (PA) have been shown to be associated with depression in adults. The few studies that focused on adolescents yielded mixed and inconsistent results. Efforts to examine the direction of this relationship have been inconclusive up to now. The aims of this study

  20. Reduced Sleep Spindle Activity in Early-Onset and Elevated Risk for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jorge; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Sleep disturbances are common in major depressive disorder (MDD), although polysomnographic (PSG) abnormalities are more prevalent in adults than in children and adolescents with MDD. Sleep spindle activity (SPA) is associated with neuroplasticity mechanisms during brain maturation and is more abundant in childhood and adolescence than…

  1. Behavioral Activation in the Treatment of Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulick, Patrick S.; Naugle, Amy E.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of 10-weeks of Behavioral Activation (BA) in the treatment of comorbid Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in four adults using a nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design. All participants met full "DSM-IV" criteria for both MDD and PTSD at the…

  2. Initial Open Trial of a Computerized Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spates, C. Richard; Kalata, Alyssa H.; Ozeki, Satoshi; Stanton, Cory E.; Peters, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    This article presents preliminary findings from use of a novel computer program that implements an evidence-based psychological intervention to treat depression based on behavioral activation (BA) therapy. The program is titled “Building a Meaningful Life Through Behavioral Activation”. The findings derive from an open trial with moderate to…

  3. Behavioral Activation for Comorbid PTSD and Major Depression: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulick, Patrick S.; Naugle, Amy E.

    2004-01-01

    The present investigation details the assessment and use of Behavioral Activation (BA) therapy to treat a 37-year-old male police officer/military veteran suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). This case study is an attempt to expand empirical knowledge regarding BA, comorbid PTSD and MDD, and…

  4. [Regular physical activity and mental health. The role of exercise in the prevention of, and intervention in depressive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    In our review we examine the relationship between physical activity and mental health; especially we determine the effectiveness of exercise in the prevention and treatment of depression. Over the past two decades the literature in the area of physical activity and mental health has been growing. However it seems that the findings and evidences not being utilized by mental health agencies and health practitioners. Depression is the most common disorder in the world, generally has a higher prevalence among women. In our study we overview and demonstrate that the exercise is a powerful intervention for prevention and treatment not only in non-clinical but also in clinical levels of depression. In sub-clinical levels of depression the meta-analytic findings and population surveys suggest that the exercise is associated with a significant moderate reduction of depression in different groups by gender and age; as well as a physically active lifestyle associates with lower levels of depression. In clinical levels of depression the physical activity is an effective tool in the prevention, studies support an association between higher levels of physical activity and lower levels of depression. In the treatment of clinical depression the randomized-controlled trials suggest the clear positive effects of exercise. This effect is similar to psychotherapeutic interventions and it was appeared under relatively short time (4-8 weeks). The exercise is one of the most important preventive health-related behaviors. Our review suggests a protective effect from activity on the development of clinical levels of depression and depressive symptoms. In addition the randomized controlled trials support a causal connection between exercise and reduction of depression. In sum the reviewed studies clearly support the antidepressant effect of exercise.

  5. Unilateral Cochlear Implantation Reduces Tinnitus Loudness in Bimodal Hearing: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servais, Jérôme J.; Hörmann, Karl; Wallhäusser-Franke, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Perceptive and receptive aspects of subjective tinnitus like loudness and tinnitus-related distress are partly independent. The high percentage of hearing loss in individuals with tinnitus suggests causality of hearing impairment particularly for the tinnitus percept, leading to the hypothesis that restoration of auditory input has a larger effect on tinnitus loudness than on tinnitus-related distress. Furthermore, it is assumed that high levels of depression or anxiety prevent reductions of tinnitus loudness and distress following restoration of activity in the cochlea. This prospective study investigated the influence of unilateral cochlear implant (CI) on tinnitus in 19 postlingually deafened adults during 6 months following implantation. All had bimodal provision with the other ear being continuously supported by a hearing aid. On the day before CI implantation (T1, T2), and at about 3 and 6 months postsurgery (T3, T4), participants were questioned about their current tinnitus. Loudness was rated on a Numeric Rating Scale, distress was assessed by the TQ12 Tinnitus Questionnaire, and depression and anxiety were recorded with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. At T2, 79% experienced tinnitus, one participant developed tinnitus after implantation. Following implantation, tinnitus loudness was reduced significantly by 42%, while reductions in tinnitus-related distress (−24%), depression (−20%), and anxiety (−20%) did not attain statistical significance. Significant correlations existed between tinnitus measures, and between postimplantation tinnitus-related distress and anxiety and depression scores. Moreover, improvement of hearing in the CI ear was significantly correlated with reduction in tinnitus loudness. A new aspect of this study is the particular influence of CI provision on perceptive aspects of preexisting tinnitus (hypothesis 1), with the effect size regarding postimplant reduction of perceived tinnitus loudness (1.40) being much

  6. Associations of physical activity, screen time with depression, anxiety and sleep quality among Chinese college freshmen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Feng

    Full Text Available To investigate the independent and interactive associations of physical activity (PA and screen time (ST with depression, anxiety and sleep quality among Chinese college students.A cross-sectional study was conducted in Wuhan University, China from November to December 2011. The students reported their PA, ST and socio-economic characteristics using self-administered questionnaires. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS and Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of the independent and interactive relationships of PA and ST with depression, anxiety and sleep quality.A total of 1106 freshmen (471 females and 635 males aged 18.9±0.9 years were included in the study. After adjustment for potential confounders, high PA and low ST were independently associated with significantly lower risks for poor sleep quality (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.30-0.78 and depression (OR: 0.67, 95%CI: 0.44-0.89, respectively. An interactive inverse association was observed for combined effects of PA and low ST on depression (OR: 0.62, 95%CI: 0.40-0.92 and sleep quality (OR: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.27-0.91. No statistically significant associations were found between PA, ST and anxiety among the participants.These findings suggest an independent and interactive relationship of high PA and low ST with significantly reduced prevalence of depressive problems and favorable sleep quality among Chinese college freshmen.

  7. Physical activity and onset of depression in adolescents : A prospective study in the general population cohort TRAILS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavrakakis, N.; Roest, A. M.; Verhulst, F.; Ormel, J.; de Jonge, P.; Oldehinkel, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although it has often been suggested that physical activity and depression are intertwined, only few studies have investigated whether specific aspects of physical activity predict the incidence of major depression in adolescents from the general population. Therefore the aim of this study was to in

  8. Depressed natural killer cell activity in acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, K; Pedersen, B K; Theander, T G

    1987-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity against K562 target cells was measured in patients within 24 h of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and regularly thereafter for 6 weeks. NK cell activity was suppressed on days 1, 3, and 7 (P less than 0.01), day 14 (P less than 0.05) and at 6 weeks (P = 0...

  9. Reasoning with linear orders: Differential parietal cortex activation in subclinical depression. An fMRI investigation in subclinical depression and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elanor C. Hinton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to learn new information and manipulate it for efficient retrieval has long been studied through reasoning paradigms, which also has applicability to the study of social behaviour. Humans can learn about the linear order within groups using reasoning, and the success of such reasoning may vary according to affective state, such as depression. We investigated the neural basis of these latter findings using functional neuroimaging. Using BDI-II criteria, 14 non-depressed and 12 mildly depressed volunteers took part in a linear-order reasoning task during fMRI. The hippocampus, parietal and prefrontal cortices were activated during the task, in accordance with previous studies. In the learning phase and in the test phase, greater activation of the parietal cortex was found in the depressed group, which may be a compensatory mechanism in order to reach the same behavioural performance as the non-depressed group, or evidence for a different reasoning strategy in the depressed group.

  10. Dissemination of behavioural activation for depression to mental health nurses: training evaluation and benchmarked clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekers, D M; Dawson, M S; Bailey, E

    2013-03-01

    Depression causes significant distress, disability and cost within the UK. Behavioural activation (BA) is an effective single-strand psychological approach which may lend itself to brief training programmes for a wide range of clinical staff. No previous research has directly examined outcomes of such dissemination. A 5-day training course for 10 primary care mental health workers aiming to increase knowledge and clinical skills in BA was evaluated using the Training Acceptability Rating Scale. Depression symptom level data collected in a randomized controlled trial using trainees were then compared to results from meta-analysis of studies using experienced therapists. BA training was highly acceptable to trainees (94.4%, SD 6%). The combined effect size of BA was unchanged by the addition of the results of this evaluation to those of studies using specialist therapists. BA offers a promising psychological intervention for depression that appears suitable for delivery by mental health nurses following brief training.

  11. The origins and current status of behavioral activation treatments for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimidjian, Sona; Barrera, Manuel; Martell, Christopher; Muñoz, Ricardo F; Lewinsohn, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a resurgence of interest in behavioral interventions for depression. This contemporary work is grounded in the work of Lewinsohn and colleagues, which laid a foundation for future clinical practice and science. This review thus summarizes the origins of a behavioral model of depression and the behavioral activation (BA) approach to the treatment and prevention of depression. We highlight the formative initial work by Lewinsohn and colleagues, the evolution of this work, and related contemporary research initiatives, such as that led by Jacobson and colleagues. We examine the diverse ways in which BA has been investigated over time and its emerging application to a broad range of populations and problems. We close with reflections on important directions for future inquiry.

  12. Increased frontal sleep slow wave activity in adolescents with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Tesler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep slow wave activity (SWA, the major electrophysiological characteristic of deep sleep, mirrors both cortical restructuring and functioning. The incidence of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD substantially rises during the vulnerable developmental phase of adolescence, where essential cortical restructuring is taking place. The goal of this study was to assess characteristics of SWA topography in adolescents with MDD, in order to assess abnormalities in both cortical restructuring and functioning on a local level. All night high-density EEG was recorded in 15 patients meeting DSM-5 criteria for MDD and 15 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. The actual symptom severity was assessed using the Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R. Topographical power maps were calculated based on the average SWA of the first non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep episode. Depressed adolescents exhibited significantly more SWA in a cluster of frontal electrodes compared to controls. SWA over frontal brain regions correlated positively with the CDRS-R subscore “morbid thoughts”. Self-reported sleep latency was significantly higher in depressed adolescents compared to controls whereas sleep architecture did not differ between the groups. Higher frontal SWA in depressed adolescents may represent a promising biomarker tracing cortical regions of intense use and/or restructuring.

  13. Is plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 a physiological bottleneck bridging major depressive disorder and cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, C; Van Lieshout, R J; Steiner, M

    2016-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is estimated to affect one in twenty people worldwide. MDD is highly comorbid with cardiovascular disease (CVD), itself one of the single largest causes of mortality worldwide. A number of pathological changes observed in MDD are believed to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease, although no single mechanism has been identified. There are also no biological markers capable of predicting the future risk of developing heart disease in depressed individuals. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a prothrombotic plasma protein secreted by endothelial tissue and has long been implicated in CVD. An expanding body of literature has recently implicated it in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder as well. In this study, we review candidate pathways implicating MDD in CVD and consider how PAI-1 might act as a mediator by which MDD induces CVD development: chiefly through sleep disruption, adiposity, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) metabolism, systemic inflammation and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis dysregulation. As both MDD and CVD are more prevalent in women than in men, and incidence of either condition is dramatically increased during reproductive milestones, we also explore hormonal and sex-specific associations between MDD, PAI-1 and CVD. Of special interest is the role PAI-1 plays in perinatal depression and in cardiovascular complications of pregnancy. Finally, we propose a theoretical model whereby PAI-1 might serve as a useful biomarker for CVD risk in those with depression, and as a potential target for future treatments.

  14. Meta-analysis of brain activation in depressive patients with emotional perception disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenwang Jin; Ming Zhang; Dan Li; Shaohui Ma; Yuan Wang; Min Li; Lihua Liu

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the distribution of abnormally activated brain regions in depressive patients during emotional perception processing using activation likelihood estimation, a quantitative meta-analytic technique. DATA SOURCES: Computer-based online retrieval was conducted using the PscyINFO, Pubmed and CNKI databases, searching literature from the establishment of each database until June 2010.STUDY SELECTION: Inclusion criteria: (1) studies examined emotion perception tasks using functional magnetic resonance imaging; (2) studies indicated regional brain activation abnormalities in depressive patients compared with controls in standard Talairach or MNI coordinates. Any analyzed coordinates based on the MNI system were converted to Talairach space with icbm2tal software. The map of activation likelihood estimation was finally created through the Gaussian smooth (full-width half-maximum = 8 mm), permutation test and corrected for multiple comparisons using the false discovery rate method (q = 0.05) with Ginger-ALE 2.0 software. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Activation of brain regions in patients.RESULTS: Seventeen studies were identified, involving a total of 261 patients, 273 healthy controls and 201 foci. Meta-analysis revealed a dysfunctional emotion regulation loop in depressive patients, comprised of the prefrontal cortex, the basal ganglia and the limbic lobe, in which the amygdala was a key component. During emotion processing, the left prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia were hypoactive among depressive patients, whereas the opposite change was found in the limbic lobe. CONCLUSION: Abnormal connections among the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia and limbic lobe may be involved in the pathophysiology of depressive disorder.

  15. Surgical Complications of Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Hashemi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implantation is a method used for the treatment ofpatients with profound hearing loss. This procedure may theaccompanied by some major or minor complications. Weevaluated the surgical complications of cochlear implantationin Fars province (south of Iran. A total of 150 patients withcochlear implantation were enrolled in the present study. Mostof the patients were pre-lingual children and most of our deviceswere nucleus prosthesis. We had three device failuresand four major complications, including one misplaced electrode,one case of meningitis, one case of foreign body reactionto suture and one case with extensive hematoma. Thesecomplications were managed successfully by surgical interventionor re-implantation. Facial nerve damage or woundbreakdown was not seen. Minor complications including smallhematoma, edema, stitch infection and dizziness were found in15 cases, which were managed medically. In our center, therate of minor complications was comparable to other centersin the world. But the rate of major surgical complications waslower than other centers.

  16. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Relationship of Physical Activity with Depression and Cognitive Deficit in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo T, R S; Tribess, Sheilla; Sasaki, Jeffer Eidi; Meneguci, Joilson; Martins, Cristiane A; Freitas, Ismael F; Romo-Perez, Vicente; Virtuoso, Jair S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association of physical activity with depression and cognition deficit, separately and combined, in Brazilian older adults. We analyzed data from 622 older adults. Physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale, while cognitive deficit was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Multinomial logistic regressions were used to assess associations of depression and cognitive deficit with sociodemographic, health, and behavioral variables. Prevalence of physical inactivity (physical activity/ week), depression, and cognitive deficit were 35.7%, 37.4%, and 16.7%. Physical inactivity was associated with depression (OR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.14-2.94) and with depression and cognitive deficit combined (OR: 4.23, 95% CI: 2.01-8.91). Physically inactive participants were also more likely to present limitations in orientation and language functions. Physical inactivity was associated with depression and also with depression and cognitive deficit combined in older adults.

  17. Hostility in the real world and online: the effect of internet addiction, depression, and online activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ju-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Wu, Hsiu-Yi; Huang, Chun-Jen; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2011-11-01

    Hostility online has not been evaluated by an empirical investigation. This study aims to evaluate (a) the difference between hostility in the real world and that online and (b) whether the difference is associated with Internet addiction, depression, or online activities. A total of 2,348 college students (1,124 males and 1,224 females) were recruited and completed the Chen Internet Addiction Scale, the Center for Epidemiological Studies' Depression Scale, and the questionnaire for online activity. Further, the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory-Chinese version-short form was utilized to evaluate hostility in both real and virtual worlds. The results demonstrated that the levels of all four dimensions of hostility were lower when getting online than those in the real world. Subjects with Internet addiction had higher hostility both in the real world and online as do subjects with depression. Further, college students with Internet addiction had increased expressive hostility behavior and those with depression had decreased hostility cognition, hostility affection, and suppressive hostility behavior when getting online. Lastly, the buffering effect of the Internet on hostility was attenuated among subjects paying the most online time in chatting, and those using the Internet mainly for online gaming had higher expressive hostility behavior not only in the real world but also online. These results suggest that attention should be paid to interventions concerning aggressive behavior among subjects with Internet addiction or online gaming and chatting. On the other hand, depressed college students would be less hostile after entering the Internet. It is suggested that the Internet would be one possible interactive media to provide intervention for depression.

  18. Neuroinflammation and depression: microglia activation, extracellular microvesicles and microRNA dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora eBrites

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic inflammation are often associated with the emergence of depression symptoms, while diagnosed depressed patients show increased levels of circulating cytokines. Further studies revealed the activation of the brain immune cell microglia in depressed patients with a greater magnitude in individuals that committed suicide, indicating a crucial role for neuroinflammation in depression brain pathogenesis. Rapid advances in the understanding of microglial and astrocytic neurobiology were obtained in the past fifteen to twenty years. Indeed, recent data reveal that microglia play an important role in managing neuronal cell death, neurogenesis, and synaptic interactions, besides their involvement in immune-response generating cytokines. The communication between microglia and neurons is essential to synchronize these diverse functions with brain activity. Evidence is accumulating that secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs, comprising ectosomes and exosomes with a size ranging from 0.1 to 1 μm, are key players in intercellular signaling. These EVs may carry specific proteins, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs. Transfer of exosomes to neurons was shown to be mediated by oligodendrocytes, microglia and astrocytes that may either be supportive to neurons, or instead disseminate the disease. Interestingly, several recent reports have identified changes in miRNAs in depressed patients, which target not only crucial pathways associated with synaptic plasticity, learning and memory but also the production of neurotrophic factors and immune cell modulation. In this article, we discuss the role of neuroinflammation in the emergence of depression, namely dynamic alterations in the status of microglia response to stimulation, and how their activation phenotypes may have an etiological role in neurodegeneneration, in particular in depressive-like behavior. We will overview the involvement of miRNAs, exosomes, ectosomes and microglia in regulating

  19. Imaging in cochlear implant patients [

    OpenAIRE

    Aschendorff, Antje

    2012-01-01

    [english] Imaging procedures are a mainstream tool in the daily ENT workflow. Cochlear Implant patients are representing a special population with specific demands for imaging. There are different imaging techniques available for pre-operative evaluation, surgery and postoperative controls with different indications and consequences. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are mainly used in the evaluation process. New procedures, as digital volume tomography, are i...

  20. Plasma levels of thrombomodulin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and fibrinogen in elderly, diabetic patients with depressive symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes, depression and aging have been associated with pro-inflammatory and prothrombotic state. Aim The aim of the study was to determine the plasma levels of thrombomodulin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibrinogen in elderly diabetic patients with and without depressive symptoms and to examine factors (including thrombomodulin, PAI-1, fibrinogen levels) associated with depressive symptoms in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods A total of 276 T...

  1. Cortisol’s effects on hippocampal activation in depressed patients are related to alterations in memory formation

    OpenAIRE

    Abercrombie, Heather C.; Jahn, Allison L.; Davidson, Richard J.; Kern, Simone; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Halverson, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Many investigators have hypothesized that brain response to cortisol is altered in depression. However, neural activation in response to exogenously manipulated cortisol elevations has not yet been directly examined in depressed humans. Animal research shows that glucocorticoids have robust effects on hippocampal function, and can either enhance or suppress neuroplastic events in the hippocampus depending on a number of factors. We hypothesized that depressed individuals would show 1) altered...

  2. Effects of fiber type on force depression after active shortening in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joumaa, V; Power, G A; Hisey, B; Caicedo, A; Stutz, J; Herzog, W

    2015-07-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate force depression in Type I and Type II muscle fibers. Experiments were performed using skinned fibers from rabbit soleus and psoas muscles. Force depression was quantified after active fiber shortening from an average sarcomere length (SL) of 3.2µ m to an average SL of 2.6 µm at an absolute speed of 0.115f iber length/s and at a relative speed corresponding to 17% of the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) in each type of fibers. Force decay and mechanical work during shortening were also compared between fiber types. After mechanical testing, each fiber was subjected to myosin heavy chain (MHC) analysis in order to confirm its type (Type I expressing MHC I, and Type II expressing MHC IId). Type II fibers showed greater steady-state force depression after active shortening at a speed of 0.115 fiber length/s than Type I fibers (14.5±1.5% versus 7.8±1.7%). Moreover, at this absolute shortening speed, Type I fibers showed a significantly greater rate of force decay during shortening and produced less mechanical work than Type II fibers. When active shortening was performed at the same relative speed (17% V0), the difference in force depression between fiber types was abolished. These results suggest that no intrinsic differences were at the origin of the disparate force depressions observed in Type I and Type II fibers when actively shortened at the same absolute speed, but rather their distinct force-velocity relationships.

  3. Major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depression - major; Depression - clinical; Clinical depression; Unipolar depression; Major depressive disorder ... providers do not know the exact causes of depression. It is believed that chemical changes in the ...

  4. Behavioral activation for late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Koki; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Jinnin, Ran; Mori, Asako; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Yamamura, Takanao; Yokoyama, Satoshi; Shiota, Syouichi; Okamoto, Yuri; Miyake, Yoshie; Ogata, Akiko; Kunisato, Yoshihiko; Shimoda, Haruki; Kawakami, Norito; Furukawa, Toshi A; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2016-11-01

    The main behavioral characteristic of subthreshold depression that is observed in adolescents is the low frequency of exposure to environmental rewards. Therefore, it was considered that a simple intervention conducted in short sessions, focusing on increasing access to positively reinforcing activities, would be efficacious in increasing the availability of rewards. We conduct a randomized controlled trial to examine the efficacy of such a behavioral activation program that was conducted weekly for 5 weeks in 60-min sessions. Late adolescent university students aged 18-19 years with subthreshold depression were randomly allocated to a treatment (n = 62) or a control group (n = 56). The primary outcome of the study was the Beck Depression Inventory-II score. Results indicated that late adolescent students in the treatment group showed significant improvements in their depressive symptoms (effect size -0.90, 95 % CI -1.28 to -0.51) compared to the control group. Students in the treatment group also showed significant improvements in self-reported rating of quality of life and in behavioral characteristics. It is concluded that this intervention had a large and significant effect despite being short and simple and that this low-intensity cognitive behavioral therapy program could be conducted in many different types of institutions. It is suggested that the long-term effects of the treatment program should be targeted for investigation in future studies.

  5. Smartphone-Supported versus Full Behavioural Activation for Depression: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien Hoa Ly

    Full Text Available There is need for more cost and time effective treatments for depression. This is the first randomised controlled trial in which a blended treatment--including four face-to-face sessions and a smartphone application--was compared against a full behavioural treatment. Hence, the aim of the current paper was to examine whether a blended smartphone treatment was non-inferior to a full behavioural activation treatment for depression.This was a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (NCT01819025 comparing a blended treatment (n=46 against a full ten-session treatment (n=47 for people suffering from major depression. Primary outcome measure was the BDI-II, that was administered at pre- and post-treatment, as well as six months after the treatment.Results showed significant improvements in both groups across time on the primary outcome measure (within-group Cohen's d=1.35; CI [-0.82, 3.52] to d=1.47; CI [-0.41, 3.35]; between group d=-0.13 CI [-2.37, 2.09] and d=-0.10 CI [-2.53, 2.33]. At the same time, the blended treatment reduced the therapist time with an average of 47%.We could not establish whether the blended treatment was non-inferior to a full BA treatment. Nevertheless, this study points to that the blended treatment approach could possibly treat nearly twice as many patients suffering from depression by using a smartphone application as add-on. More studies are needed before we can suggest that the blended treatment method is a promising cost-effective alternative to regular face-to-face treatment for depression.Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment of Depression With Smartphone Support NCT01819025.

  6. Amygdala activation during emotional face processing in adolescents with affective disorders: the role of underlying depression and anxiety symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca G Van Den Bulk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDepressive and anxiety disorders are often first diagnosed during adolescence and it is known that they persist into adulthood. Previous studies often tried to dissociate depressive and anxiety disorders, but high comorbidity makes this difficult and maybe even impossible. The goal of this study was to use neuroimaging to test what the unique contribution is of depression and anxiety symptomatology on emotional processing and amygdala activation, and to compare the results with a healthy control group. We included 25 adolescents with depressive and/or anxiety disorders and 26 healthy adolescents. Participants performed an emotional face processing task while in the MRI scanner. We were particularly interested in the relation between depression/anxiety symptomatology and patterns of amygdala activation. There were no significant differences in activation patterns between the control group and the clinical group on whole brain level and ROI level. However, we found that dimensional scores on an anxiety but not a depression subscale significantly predicted brain activation in the right amygdala when processing fearful, happy and neutral faces. These results suggest that anxiety symptoms are a better predictor for differentiating activation patterns in the amygdala than depression symptoms. Although the current study includes a relatively large sample of treatment naïve adolescents with depression/anxiety disorders, results might be influenced by differences between studies in recruitment strategies or methodology. Future research should include larger samples with a more equal distribution of adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of depression and/or anxiety. To conclude, this study shows that abnormal amygdala responses to emotional faces in depression and anxiety seems to be more dependent on anxiety symptoms than on depression symptoms, and thereby highlights the need for more research to better characterize clinical groups in future

  7. Activity of diltiazem and nifedipine in some animal models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostowski, W; Dyr, W; Puciłowski, O

    1990-01-01

    The effect of two calcium channel inhibitors, diltiazem and nifedipine in animal models of depression: a) behavioral despair test and b) behavioral deficit produced by uncontrollable footshock was investigated. Additionally, the influence of both drugs on mouse killing (muricide) behavior induced by chronic isolation was studied. Both drugs given in single doses increased the active behavior of rats in behavioral despair test. Nifedipine but not diltiazem was partially effective in the test when administered chronically (14 days). Both drugs also attenuated stress-induced behavioral depression in the open field and forced swim test. Diltiazem was markedly more active in the former whereas nifedipine in the latter test. Neither compound influenced killing behavior in muricidal rats. Our data support the notion that calcium channel inhibitors may possess antidepressant activity, although there appear to exist certain differences in their scope of action depending on the model applied.

  8. Antidepressant activity of standardized extract of Bacopa monniera in experimental models of depression in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, K; Dorababu, M; Goel, R K; Bhattacharya, S K

    2002-04-01

    Bacopa monniera Wettst. (syn. Herpestis monniera L.; Scrophulariaceae) is a commonly used Ayurvedic drug for mental disorders. The standardized extract was reported earlier to have significant anti-oxidant effect, anxiolytic activity and improve memory retention in Alzheimer's disease. Presently, the standardized methanolic extract of Bacopa monniera (bacoside A - 38.0+/-0.9) was investigated for potential antidepressant activity in rodent models of depression. The effect was compared with the standard antidepressant drug imipramine (15 mg/kg, ip). The extract when given in the dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg, orally once daily for 5 days was found to have significant antidepressant activity in forced swim and learned helplessness models of depression and was comparable to that of imipramine.

  9. Cochlear Delay and Medial Olivocochlear Functioning in Children with Suspected Auditory Processing Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Boothalingam

    Full Text Available Behavioral manifestations of processing deficits associated with auditory processing disorder (APD have been well documented. However, little is known about their anatomical underpinnings, especially cochlear processing. Cochlear delays, a proxy for cochlear tuning, measured using stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE group delay, and the influence of the medial olivocochlear (MOC system activation at the auditory periphery was studied in 23 children suspected with APD (sAPD and 22 typically developing (TD children. Results suggest that children suspected with APD have longer SFOAE group delays (possibly due to sharper cochlear tuning and reduced MOC function compared to TD children. Other differences between the groups include correlation between MOC function and SFOAE delay in quiet in the TD group, and lack thereof in the sAPD group. MOC-mediated changes in SFOAE delay were in opposite directions between groups: increase in delay in TD vs. reduction in delay in the sAPD group. Longer SFOAE group delays in the sAPD group may lead to longer cochlear filter ringing, and potential increase in forward masking. These results indicate differences in cochlear and MOC function between sAPD and TD groups. Further studies are warranted to explore the possibility of cochlea as a potential site for processing deficits in APD.

  10. Deafness: Cross-modal plasticity and cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Jeung-Whoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong Sun

    2001-01-01

    Hearing in profoundly deaf people can be helped by inserting an implant into the inner ear to stimulate the cochlear nerve. This also boosts the low metabolic activity of the auditory cortex, the region of the brain normally used for hearing. Other sensory modalities, such as sign language, can also activate the auditory cortex, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Here we show that when metabolism in the auditory cortex of prelingually deaf children (whose hearing was lost before they learned to talk) has been restored by cross-modal plasticity, the auditory cortex can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant installed afterwards. Neural substrates in the auditory cortex might therefore be routed permanently to other cognitive processes in prelingually deaf patients.

  11. Importance of cochlear health for implant function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfingst, Bryan E; Zhou, Ning; Colesa, Deborah J; Watts, Melissa M; Strahl, Stefan B; Garadat, Soha N; Schvartz-Leyzac, Kara C; Budenz, Cameron L; Raphael, Yehoash; Zwolan, Teresa A

    2015-04-01

    Amazing progress has been made in providing useful hearing to hearing-impaired individuals using cochlear implants, but challenges remain. One such challenge is understanding the effects of partial degeneration of the auditory nerve, the target of cochlear implant stimulation. Here we review studies from our human and animal laboratories aimed at characterizing the health of the implanted cochlea and the auditory nerve. We use the data on cochlear and neural health to guide rehabilitation strategies. The data also motivate the development of tissue-engineering procedures to preserve or build a healthy cochlea and improve performance obtained by cochlear implant recipients or eventually replace the need for a cochlear implant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  12. Cochlear implant in Hong Kong Cantonese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S O; Luk, W S; Lau, C C; So, K W; Wong, C M; Yiu, M L; Kwok, C L

    1990-11-01

    Cochlear implant surgery was performed in four Cantonese-speaking postlingually deaf Chinese adults, using the House/3M single channel device. This article outlines the methodology, including preoperative assessment and postoperative rehabilitation; and explains the necessary modifications in speech and audiologic work-up in Cantonese-speaking patients. Salient features of Cantonese phonetics, especially its tonal characteristics, are described. The findings of the study are presented. The results of the cochlear implant would suggest a performance superior to that of the hearing aid. Furthermore, the cochlear implant is able to detect tonal cues. This quality of the cochlear implant may prove to be a valuable asset to a tonal language-speaking cochlear implantee.

  13. Internet-delivered therapist-guided physical activity for mild to moderate depression: a randomized controlled trial

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    Morgan Ström

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main hypothesis, and the objective of the study, was to test if the participants allocated to the treatment group would show a larger reduction in depressive symptoms than those in the control group. Methods. This study was a randomized nine week trial of an Internet-administered treatment based on guided physical exercise for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. A total of 48 participants with mild to moderate depression, diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, were randomized either to a treatment intervention or to a waiting-list control group. The main outcome measure for depression was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and physical activity level was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. The treatment program consisted of nine text modules, and included therapist guidance on a weekly basis. Results. The results showed significant reductions of depressive symptoms in the treatment group compared to the control group, with a moderate between-group effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.67; 95% confidence interval: 0.09–1.25. No difference was found between the groups with regards to increase of physical activity level. For the treatment group, the reduction in depressive symptoms persisted at six months follow-up. Conclusions. Physical activity as a treatment for depression can be delivered in the form of guided Internet-based self-help. Trial Registration. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01573130.

  14. Effects of Parental Depressive Symptoms on Child Adjustment Moderated by Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Activity: Within- and between-Family Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Leve, Leslie D.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Fisher, Philip A.; Marceau, Kristine; Harold, Gordon T.; Reiss, David

    2013-01-01

    Child hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) activity was investigated as a moderator of parental depressive symptom effects on child behavior in an adoption sample ("n" = 210 families). Adoptive parents' depressive symptoms and child internalizing and externalizing were assessed at 18, 27, and 54 months, and child morning and evening HPA…

  15. A Mixed Mode Cochlear Amplifier Including Neural Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Matthew R.; Holmes, W. Harvey

    2011-11-01

    The mixed mode cochlear amplifier (MMCA) model is derived from the physiology of the cochlea. It is comprised of three main elements of the peripheral hearing system: the cochlear mechanics, hair cell motility, and neurophysiology. This model expresses both active compression wave and active traveling wave modes of operation. The inclusion of a neural loop with a time delay, and a new paradigm for the mechanical response of the outer hair cells, are believed to be unique features of the MMCA. These elements combine to form an active feedback loop to constitute the cochlear amplifier, whose input is a passive traveling wave vibration. The result is a cycle-by-cycle amplifier with nonlinear response. This system can assume an infinite number of different operating states. The stable state and the first few amplitude-limited unstable (Hopf-bifurcated) states are significant in describing the operation of the peripheral hearing system. A hierarchy of models can be constructed from this concept, depending on the amount of detail included. The simplest model of the MMCA is a nonlinear delay line resonator. It was found that even this simple MMCA version can explain a large number of hearing phenomena, at least qualitatively. This paper concentrates on explaining the fractional octave shift from the living to postmortem response in terms of the new model. Other mechanical, hair cell and neurological phenomena can also be accounted for by the MMCA, including two-tone suppression behavior, distortion product responses, otoacoustic emissions and neural spontaneous rates.

  16. Effect of Physical Activity on Anxiety and Depression Among Women: Risk Profiles

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    Aurelio Olmedilla-Zafra**

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific literature indicates that there is a positive relationship between exercise and various psychological aspects such as anxiety and depression. Some sociodemographic variables also seem to be involved in this relationship, and socio-cultural factors can be important. The objectives of the present study were to find out the influence of the practice of physical activity on anxiety and depression and to determine the profiles at greater risk with regard to certain sociodemographic variables (age, level of studies, occupation, and children. The sample was composed of 200 women from the city of Cartagena, Spain, between 18 and 65 years of age. Results show that the most vulnerable groups of women for suffering greater levels of anxiety and depression are characterized by the following profiles: anxiety (sedentary women, between 18-24 years of age or older than 54 years, who have not completed studies or those with secondary studies, housewives or those who work outside the home, and those without children and depression (sedentary women, older than 54 years of age or between 18-24 years, those with secondary studies, and housewives.

  17. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  18. Alterations in plasma dipeptidyl peptidase IV enzyme activity in depression and schizophrenia: effects of antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; De Meester, I; Scharpe, S; Desnyder, R; Ranjan, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1996-01-01

    Recently, our laboratory reported that the activity of dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP IV) was significantly lower in the peripheral blood of major depressed patients than in normal controls. The present study examines plasma DPP IV activity in 43 major depressed and 13 schizophrenic subjects versus 21 normal controls and the effects of antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs on plasma DPP IV activity. DPP IV activity was significantly lower in major depressed subjects than in normal controls and schizophrenic subjects. There was a trend towards higher DPP IV activity in schizophrenic patients than in normal controls. There were no significant effects of antidepressants or neuroleptics on plasma DPP IV activity in depressed and schizophrenic patients, respectively. There were no significant relationships between plasma DPP IV activity and plasma cortisol or immune-inflammatory markers, such as serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) or soluble IL-2 receptor. A significant and positive correlation was found between plasma DPP IV and prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) enzyme activity in the study group as a whole and in schizophrenic subjects. The results support the hypothesis that lower and higher plasma DPP IV activities are trait markers of major depression and schizophrenia, respectively. It is concluded that alterations in the enzyme activity of peptidases, such as DPP IV and PEP, play a role in the pathophysiology of major depression and schizophrenia.

  19. Targets of polyamine dysregulation in major depression and suicide: Activity-dependent feedback, excitability, and neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Agenor; Mamdani, Firoza; Hjelm, Brooke E; Vawter, Marquis P; Sequeira, Adolfo

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide characterized by altered neuronal activity in brain regions involved in the control of stress and emotion. Although multiple lines of evidence suggest that altered stress-coping mechanisms underlie the etiology of MDD, the homeostatic control of neuronal excitability in MDD at the molecular level is not well established. In this review, we examine past and current evidence implicating dysregulation of the polyamine system as a central factor in the homeostatic response to stress and the etiology of MDD. We discuss the cellular effects of abnormal metabolism of polyamines in the context of their role in sensing and modulation of neuronal, electrical, and synaptic activity. Finally, we discuss evidence supporting an allostatic model of depression based on a chronic elevation in polyamine levels resulting in self-sustained stress response mechanisms maintained by maladaptive homeostatic mechanisms.

  20. Efficacy of physical activity in the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorders: preliminary results

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    Velluti Claudio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No controlled trials have evaluated the long term efficacy of exercise activity to improve the treatment of patients with Major Depressive Disorders. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of the adjunctive physical activity in the treatment of major depressive disorders, with a long term follow up (8 months. Methods Trial with randomized naturalistic control. Patients selected from the clinical activity registries of the Psychiatric Unit of the University of Cagliari, Italy. Inclusion criteria: female, between 40 and 60 years, diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorders (DSM-IV TR resistant to the ongoing treatment. Exclusion criteria: diagnosis of psychotic disorders; any contraindications to physical activity. 30 patients (71.4% of the eligible participated to the study. Cases: 10 randomized patients undergoing pharmacological treatment plus physical activity. Controls: 20 patients undergoing only pharmacological therapy. The following tools were collected from each patient by two different psychiatric physicians at baseline and 8 month after the beginning of exercise program: SCID-I, HAM-D, CGI (Clinical Global Impression, GAF. Results The patients that made physical activity had their HAM-D, GAF and CGI score improved from T0 to T8, all differences were statistically significant. In the control group HAM-D, GAF and CGI scores do not show any statistically significant differences between T0 and T8. Limits Small sample size limited to female in adult age; control group was not subject to any structured rehabilitation activity or placebo so it was impossible to evaluate if the improvement was due to a non specific therapeutic effect associated with taking part in a social activity. Conclusion Physical activity seems a good adjunctive treatment in the long term management of patients with MDD. Randomized placebo controlled trials are needed to confirm the results.

  1. Neural activity in relation to clinically derived personality syndromes in depression using a psychodynamic fMRI paradigm

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    Svenja eTaubner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The heterogeneity between patients with depression cannot be captured adequately with existing descriptive systems of diagnosis and neurobiological models of depression. Furthermore, considering the highly individual nature of depression, the application of general stimuli in past research efforts may not capture the essence of the disorder. This study aims to identify subtypes of depression by using empirically-derived personality-syndromes, and to explore neural correlates of the derived personality syndromes.Method: In the present exploratory study an individually tailored and psychodynamically based fMRI paradigm using dysfunctional relationship patterns was presented to 20 chronically depressed patients. Results from the Shedler-Westen-Assessment-Procedure (SWAP-200 were analyzed by Q-factor analysis to identify clinically relevant subgroups of depression and related brain activation.Results: The principle component analysis of SWAP-200 items from all 20 patients lead to a 2-factor solution: Depressive Personality and Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality. Both factors were used in a whole-brain correlational analysis but only the second factor yielded significant positive correlations in four regions: A large cluster in the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, the left ventral striatum, a small cluster in the left temporal pole and another small cluster in the right middle frontal gyrus. Discussion: The degree to which patients with depression score high on the factor Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality correlated with relatively higher activity in three key areas involved in emotion processing, evaluation of reward/punishment, negative cognitions, depressive pathology and social knowledge (OFC, ventral striatum, temporal pole. Results may contribute to an alternative description of neural correlates of depression showing differential brain activation dependent on the extent of specific personality syndromes in

  2. CNS Depressant and Antiepileptic Activities of the Methanol Extract of the Leaves of Ipomoea Aquatica Forsk

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanasekaran Sivaraman; Palayan Muralidaran

    2010-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) depressant and antiepileptic activities of the methanol extract of the leaves of Ipomoea aquatica Forsk (IAF) were investigated on various animal models including pentobarbitone sleeping time and hole-board exploratory behavior for sedation tests and strychnine, picrotoxin and pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in mice. IAF (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.), like chlorpromazine HCl (1 mg/kg, i.m.), produced a dose-dependent prolongation of pentobarbitone sleeping ...

  3. Physical activity, quality of life and symptoms of depression in community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salguero, Alfonso; Martínez-García, Raquel; Molinero, Olga; Márquez, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate in a sample of Spanish elderly whether measures of physical activity are related to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptoms of depression in community dwelling and institutionalized elderly. The sample was a cohort of 436 elderly (234 women and 202 men, aged 60-98 years) from the North of Spain. 58% were community-dwellers and 42% were institutionalized in senior residences. Participants completed measures of physical activity (Yale Physical Activity Survey, YPAS), HRQoL (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey, SF-36) and symptoms of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS). All SF-36 domains, except role-emotional, were significantly correlated with the YPAS activity dimension summary index. Physical function, role-physical, general health and vitality correlated with total time activity, and correlations were observed between weekly energy expenditure and physical function, role physical, vitality and mental health. Depressive symptom scores correlated significantly with the YPAS activity dimension summary index and the weekly energy expenditure. Scores for various domains of the SF-36 and for depressive symptoms significantly differed among less and more active individuals of the same sex and institutionalization category. Differences generally reached a higher extent in institutionalized subjects in comparison to community dwellers. In conclusion, physical activity was related to different domains of both the physical and mental components of HRQoL and to decreased depressive symptoms. Results emphasize the positive effects of physical activity in both community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults.

  4. Depression symptoms reduce physical activity in COPD patients: a prospective multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueñas-Espín I

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Iván Dueñas-Espín,1–5 Heleen Demeyer,6 Elena Gimeno-Santos,1–3 Michael I Polkey,7 Nicholas S Hopkinson,7 Roberto A Rabinovich,8 Fabienne Dobbels,9 Niklas Karlsson,10 Thierry Troosters,6,11 Judith Garcia-Aymerich1–3 On behalf of the PROactive Consortium 1ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL, 2Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF, 3CIBEREpidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain; 4Secretaría Nacional de Educación Superior, Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación del Ecuador (SENESCYT, Quito, Ecuador; 5Institut d’investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain; 6Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 7NIHR Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust and Imperial College, London, UK; 8ELEGI Colt Laboratory, Centre for Inflammation Research, The Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 9Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Academic Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 10Health Economics and Outcomes Research, AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden; 11Department of Respiratory Diseases, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Background: The role of anxiety and depression in the physical activity (PA of patients with COPD is controversial. We prospectively assessed the effect of symptoms of anxiety and depression on PA in COPD patients.Methods: We evaluated anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS], PA (Dynaport® accelerometer, and other relevant characteristics in 220 COPD patients from five European countries at baseline and at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. HADS score was categorized as: no symptoms (score 0–7, suggested (8–10, and probable (>11 anxiety or depression. We estimated the association between anxiety and depression at t (baseline and 6 months and PA at t+1 (6 and 12 months using

  5. Changes in tinnitus after cochlear implantation and its relation with psychological functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloostra, Francka J J; Arnold, Rosemarie; Hofman, Rutger; Van Dijk, Pim

    2015-01-01

    This study retrospectively assessed the prevalence of tinnitus in cochlear implant patients and the changes after implantation in 212 patients implanted between 2000 and 2009. Patients were included at least 6 months after implantation and received 2 sets of questionnaires, one about the situation before implantation and one about the situation after implantation. Mostly standardized questionnaires assessed tinnitus handicap (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, THI, and Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire, THQ), tinnitus characteristics, hearing loss (Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit) and anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Of the approached patients, 117 completed the full sets of questionnaires and 35 completed a short version. Preoperative tinnitus was reported by 51.3% of these patients, of which 55.6% reported a reduction or cessation of their tinnitus after implantation. However, 8.2% of the patients with tinnitus reported a postoperative deterioration of their tinnitus. In addition, among the patients without preoperative tinnitus, 19.6% reported the start of tinnitus after implantation. The self-reported change of tinnitus correlated with the pre- and postoperative scores on the THI and THQ. The THQ showed slightly more changes in scores after cochlear implantation compared to the THI. Overall hearing handicap and feelings of anxiety and depression decreased after implantation. In conclusion, tinnitus is reduced after cochlear implantation in an important part of the patients, but in a small part implantation has a negative effect on tinnitus. When tinnitus starts after implantation, the tinnitus handicap is mild.

  6. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why. Depression symptoms in children and teens Common signs and ... interest. However, major depression can occur with ADHD. Depression symptoms in older adults Depression is not a ...

  7. Association between quality of life and anxiety, depression, physical activity and physical performance in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Nan Li; Bryan Shapiro; Jun Chul Kim; Min Zhang; Janos Porszasz; Rachelle Bross; Usama Feroze

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients often have impaired quality of life (QOL), anxiety, depression, and reduced daily physical activity (DPA) and physical performance. The contributions of these latter factors to reduced QOL in MHD are poorly understood. We examined the association of QOL with anxiety, depression, DPA, and physical performance.Methods: Seventy-two relatively healthy adult MHD patients, vintage≥6 months, and 39 normals of similar age range and gender distribution were studied. QOL was assessed using the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form (KDQOL-SF). Anxiety and depression were each evaluated with two questionnaires. DPA and physical performance were assessed with a physical activity monitor, Human Activity Profile, and 6-minute walk, sit-to-stand, and stair-climbing tests. Results: Most KDQOL components were reduced in MHD patients versus normals. KDQOL components in patients were commonly inversely correlated with measures of anxiety and depression (P<0.05) and were more reduced in patients with both anxiety and depression. KDQOL was often impaired in patients with either anxiety or depression. However, most KDQOL scores did not differ between patients and normals without anxiety or depression. DPA, Human Activity Profile, and physical per-formance often correlated with KDQOL scores in adjusted models, but after further adjustment for anxiety and depression, DPA, Human Activity Profile, and physical performance correlated less frequently with KDQOL scores. This reduction in significant correlations after adjustment for anxiety and depression was particularly pronounced for the association between KDQOL and DPA. Conclusion: In relatively healthy MHD patients, KDQOL scores are usually decreased in those with anxiety and/or depression but are usually normal in those without anxiety or depression. Lower DPA in MHD patients with reduced KDQOL scores often appears to be associated with anxiety and depression. The relationship

  8. Behavioral sexual dimorphism in models of anxiety and depression due to changes in HPA axis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokras, Nikolaos; Dalla, Christina; Sideris, Antonios C; Dendi, Artemis; Mikail, Hudu G; Antoniou, Katerina; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zeta

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are considered as stress-related disorders, which present considerable sex differentiation. In animal models of anxiety and depression sex differences have been described and linked to the sexually dimorphic hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenals (HPA) axis. The present study aimed to adjust corticosterone, the main HPA axis stress hormone, in male and female adrenalectomized rats with oral (25 μg/ml) corticosterone replacement (ADXR). Subsequently we investigated the behavioral performance of ADXR rats in the open field, light/dark and forced swim test (FST). Male ADXR rats showed less anxiety-like behavior when compared to sham-operated controls, despite adequate corticosterone replacement. They further showed increased swimming and reduced climbing behavior in the FST, while immobility duration did not differ from sham-operated males. On the contrary, adrenalectomy and corticosterone replacement did not have significant effects on the female behavioral response. Females were generally more active and presented less anxiety-like behavior than males, while they exhibited higher depressive-like symptomatology in the FST. ADXR affected behavioral responses predominantly in males, which in turn modified sex differences in the behavioral profile. Females in proestrous and estrous did not differ from females in diestrous and methestrous in any measured behavioral response. Present results suggest that the male and not the female behavioral responses in models of anxiety and depression were mainly affected by ADXR. These findings may play a significant role in explaining the differential coping strategy of the two sexes in response to stressful experiences. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  9. Audiovisual segregation in cochlear implant users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Landry

    Full Text Available It has traditionally been assumed that cochlear implant users de facto perform atypically in audiovisual tasks. However, a recent study that combined an auditory task with visual distractors suggests that only those cochlear implant users that are not proficient at recognizing speech sounds might show abnormal audiovisual interactions. The present study aims at reinforcing this notion by investigating the audiovisual segregation abilities of cochlear implant users in a visual task with auditory distractors. Speechreading was assessed in two groups of cochlear implant users (proficient and non-proficient at sound recognition, as well as in normal controls. A visual speech recognition task (i.e. speechreading was administered either in silence or in combination with three types of auditory distractors: i noise ii reverse speech sound and iii non-altered speech sound. Cochlear implant users proficient at speech recognition performed like normal controls in all conditions, whereas non-proficient users showed significantly different audiovisual segregation patterns in both speech conditions. These results confirm that normal-like audiovisual segregation is possible in highly skilled cochlear implant users and, consequently, that proficient and non-proficient CI users cannot be lumped into a single group. This important feature must be taken into account in further studies of audiovisual interactions in cochlear implant users.

  10. Increasing enjoyable activities to treat depression in nursing home residents with dementia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a behavioral activities intervention (BE-ACTIV) in Australian nursing homes. BE-ACTIV was developed by researchers at the University of Louisville, USA, to improve mood and quality of life (QOL) in nursing home residents with mild to moderate dementia. An eight-week trial was conducted and 10 residents with mild to moderate dementia received the BE-ACTIV intervention while eight residents received a Walking and Talking intervention. Measures of depression (GDS-12R) and QOL (QOL-AD-NH) were administered prior to and following the interventions. Qualitative feedback indicated residents benefited from BE-ACTIV, evident by improved mood, although no statistically significant treatment effect was found. Moreover, the intervention was found to be feasible and acceptable to Australian nursing home staff and our findings highlight the importance of individualizing activities for people with dementia, of which 1:1 staff attention was a key component.

  11. Exploring sudden gains in behavioral activation therapy for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt-Ferguson, Kallio; Hoxha, Denada; Gollan, Jackie

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the onset and course of sudden gains in treatment provides clinical information to the patient and clinician, and encourages clinicians to strive for these sudden clinical gains with their patients. This study characterizes the occurrence of sudden gains with Behavioral Activation (BA; Martell, Addis, & Jacobson, 2001), and the extent to which pre-treatment dysfunctional depressive thinking predicts sudden gains during treatment. We enrolled a sample of adults (n = 42) between ages 18-65 diagnosed with primary Major Depressive Disorder. All participants completed a 16-week course of BA, with clinical and self-report assessments at pre-, mid- and post-treatment. Results indicated that sudden gain and non-sudden gain participants showed differential improvement across treatment. No significant effects emerged for the dysfunctional cognitive style as a predictor of sudden gain status. Sudden gains may result from interaction of non-specific factors with the BA techniques implemented during early phases of therapy.

  12. The Effects of Unilateral Adaptation of Hearing Aids on Symptoms of Depression and Social Activity Constraints of Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Fernanda Dutra dos; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in the elderly population. Besides compromising oral communication, it directly affects social relations and prevents elderly patients from living actively in society, possibly leading to the onset of depression or other conditions. Objective To analyze the effects of unilateral adaptation of hearing aids on symptoms of depression and the social activity constraints of elderly subjects with hearing impairment. Methods The samp...

  13. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  14. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira

    2015-05-01

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane.

  15. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Venail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement, electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device. The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = −0.11 ± 0.02, P<0.01, the scalar placement of the electrodes (β = −8.50 ± 1.97, P<0.01, and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF. Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas.

  16. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venail, Frederic; Mura, Thibault; Akkari, Mohamed; Mathiolon, Caroline; Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie; Piron, Jean Pierre; Sicard, Marielle; Sterkers-Artieres, Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Uziel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement), electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device). The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry) algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = -0.11 ± 0.02, P < 0.01), the scalar placement of the electrodes (β = -8.50 ± 1.97, P < 0.01), and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF). Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas.

  17. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira [Faculty of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane.

  18. Antidepressant Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy Correlate With Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Activity and Connectivity in Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Du, Lian; Li, Yongmei; Liu, Haixia; Zhao, Wenjing; Liu, Dan; Zeng, Jinkun; Li, Xingbao; Fu, Yixiao; Qiu, Haitang; Li, Xirong; Qiu, Tian; Hu, Hua; Meng, Huaqing; Luo, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underlying the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depressive disorder (MDD) are not fully understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) is a new tool to study the effects of brain stimulation interventions, particularly ECT. The authors aim to investigate the mechanisms of ECT in MDD by rs-fMRI. They used rs-fMRI to measure functional changes in the brain of first-episode, treatment-naive MDD patients (n = 23) immediately before and then following 8 ECT sessions (brief-pulse square-wave apparatus, bitemporal). They also computed voxel-wise amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) as a measure of regional brain activity and selected the left subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) to evaluate functional connectivity between the sgACC and other brain regions. Increased regional brain activity measured by ALFF mainly in the left sgACC following ECT. Functional connectivity of the left sgACC increased in the ipsilateral parahippocampal gyrus, pregenual ACC, contralateral middle temporal pole, and orbitofrontal cortex. Importantly, reduction in depressive symptoms were negatively correlated with increased ALFF in the left sgACC and left hippocampus, and with distant functional connectivity between the left sgACC and contralateral middle temporal pole. That is, across subjects, as depression improved, regional brain activity in sgACC and its functional connectivity increased in the brain. Eight ECT sessions in MDD patients modulated activity in the sgACC and its networks. The antidepressant effects of ECT were negatively correlated with sgACC brain activity and connectivity. These findings suggest that sgACC-associated prefrontal-limbic structures are associated with the therapeutic effects of ECT in MDD. PMID:26559309

  19. Depressant effect of active shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelund, M C

    1983-03-01

    The effect of shortening during activity, previously characterized in vertebrate striated muscle, was investigated in the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of the mollusc Mytilus edulis. This muscle is considered to have an essentially myosin-linked Ca2+-regulatory system. Release steps of different amplitude were performed during isometric phasic contraction, and force redevelopment was recorded at a muscle length L1, defined as 90% of the muscle length at which a slight resting tension, approximately 1 mN, appeared in the presence of 2.5 X 10(-5) M 5-HT. Active shortening caused a graded depression of the contractile force without affecting the total duration of the mechanical response. Peak redeveloped force after muscle shortening of 0.06 L1 and 0.18 L1 was reduced by approximately 1.5% and 7.0%, respectively, of the isometric tension value at L1. The shortening effect was fully reversible, and had a lifetime of approximately 8 to 9 s. The depressant effect of active shortening was augmented at a reduced degree of activation of the muscle. The presence of caffeine and dantrolene and altered tonicity of the extracellular medium (0.9 T-1.2 T) did not significantly affect the shortening induced depression obtained at maximum phasic activation of the preparation. The nature of the shortening effect is compared to that obtained in vertebrate striated muscle and is discussed on the basis of differences in Ca2+-regulation of the contractile system in these two muscles.

  20. Alterations in plasma prolyl endopeptidase activity in depression, mania, and schizophrenia: effects of antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and antipsychotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Goossens, F; Scharpé, S; Calabrese, J; Desnyder, R; Meltzer, H Y

    1995-10-16

    The activity of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), a serine proteinase, has been found to be significantly lower in the blood of patients with major depression than in normal volunteers. The present study investigates plasma PEP activity in 25 major depressed, 10 manic, and 14 schizophrenic subjects versus 30 normal volunteers. It also examines the effects of antidepressants, valproate, and neuroleptic drugs on plasma PEP activity. PEP activity was significantly lower in major depressed subjects than in normal volunteers and in patients with mania and schizophrenia. In depressed subjects, plasma PEP activity was significantly increased during treatment with antidepressant drugs, such as fluoxetine. Plasma PEP activity was significantly increased in manic and schizophrenic subjects compared with normal volunteers. In manic subjects, short-term treatment with valproate had a significant suppressive effect on PEP activity. No significant effects of neuroleptics on PEP activity could be found in the schizophrenic patients. The results support the hypothesis that lower PEP activity could play a role in the pathophysiology of major depression, while increased PEP activity may be related to psychotic conditions, such as mania and schizophrenia.

  1. Integration of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD) into a College Orientation Program: Depression and Alcohol Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; MacPherson, Laura; Tull, Matthew T.; Baruch, David E.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    College freshmen face a variety of academic and social challenges as they adjust to college life that can place them at risk for a number of negative outcomes, including depression and alcohol-related problems. Orientation classes that focus on teaching incoming students how to better cope with college-oriented stress may provide an opportunity to…

  2. Chronic unpredicted mild stress-induced depression alter saxagliptin pharmacokinetics and CYP450 activity in GK rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengchao Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study was to explore the pharmacokinetics of saxagliptin (Sax in Goto–Kakizaki (GK rats complicated with depression induced by chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS. The comorbidity of diabetic patients with depression is becoming more and more epidemic. Whether depression mental disorder alters the pharmacokinetics of hypoglycemic drugs in diabetes patients is not clear.Methods. Five-week-old male GK rats were kept in the cage for 7 weeks in a specific pathogen free (SPF-grade lab until the emergence of diabetes and were then divided into two groups: control group and depression model group. Rats in the CUMS-induced depression group were exposed to a series of stressors for 8 weeks. Plasma serotonin and dopamine levels and behavior of open-field test were used to confirm the establishment of the depression model. All rats were given 0.5 mg/kg Sax orally after 8 weeks and blood samples were collected at different time points. The Sax concentration was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS. The CYP450 activity of the liver microsomes was determined by using cocktails of probe drugs in which the activities of CYP enzymes were assessed through the determination of the production of the probe drugs.Results. Statistically significant differences in Sax pharmacokinetics were observed for area under curve, clearance, peak concentration, peak time and mean residence time between the depression rats and the control rats, while no statistical differences were observed for half-time and distribution volume by HPLC-MS/MS analysis. The CYP450 activity had different changes in the depression group.Conclusions. These results indicated that CUMS-induced depression alters the drug metabolic process of Sax and CYP450 activity of the liver microsomal enzymes in GK rats.

  3. Using behavioural activation in the treatment of depression: a control theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, P; Law, A; Bates, R; Hylton, K; Mansell, W

    2013-12-01

    Behavioural activation is an intervention that can be used to counteract the typical patterns of withdrawal, avoidance and inactivity that characterize depression. This paper examines the processes of change that may occur during behavioural activation from the perspective of control theory. Some of the key concepts that are associated with control theory are introduced and the process of change that may occur during behavioural activation is illustrated using two case studies. The case studies provide anecdotal evidence which supports the hypothesis that the effective implementation of behavioural activation may depend upon clients being able to retain or regain the sense of control that they value. The differences between a control-theory-based approach and more orthodox behavioural and cognitive approaches are highlighted and the implications of these differences are discussed. Flexible approaches that are informed by control theory, may offer a useful alternative to the more established behavioural and cognitive approaches towards behavioural activation.

  4. Neural activity to intense positive versus negative stimuli can help differentiate bipolar disorder from unipolar major depressive disorder in depressed adolescents: a pilot fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diler, Rasim Somer; de Almeida, Jorge Renner Cardoso; Ladouceur, Cecile; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Phillips, Mary

    2013-12-30

    Failure to distinguish bipolar depression (BDd) from the unipolar depression of major depressive disorder (UDd) in adolescents has significant clinical consequences. We aimed to identify differential patterns of functional neural activity in BDd versus UDd and employed two (fearful and happy) facial expression/ gender labeling functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to study emotion processing in 10 BDd (8 females, mean age=15.1 ± 1.1) compared to age- and gender-matched 10 UDd and 10 healthy control (HC) adolescents who were age- and gender-matched to the BDd group. BDd adolescents, relative to UDd, showed significantly lower activity to both intense happy (e.g., insula and temporal cortex) and intense fearful faces (e.g., frontal precentral cortex). Although the neural regions recruited in each group were not the same, both BDd and UDd adolescents, relative to HC, showed significantly lower neural activity to intense happy and mild happy faces, but elevated neural activity to mild fearful faces. Our results indicated that patterns of neural activity to intense positive and negative emotional stimuli can help differentiate BDd from UDd in adolescents.

  5. Towards clinically useful neuroimaging in depression treatment: Is subgenual cingulate activity robustly prognostic for depression outcome in Cognitive Therapy across studies, scanners, and patient characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Greg J.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Collier, Amanda; Berman, Susan R.; Feldmiller, Joshua; Thase, Michael E.; Friedman, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Context 40–60% of unmedicated depressed individuals respond to Cognitive Therapy (CT) in controlled trials. Multiple previous studies suggest that activity in the subgenual anterior cingulate predicts outcome in CT for depression, but there have been no prospective replications. Objective This study prospectively examined whether subgenual cingulate activity is a reliable and robust prognostic outcome marker for CT for depression and whether its activity changes in treatment. Design Two inception cohorts were assessed with fMRI on different scanners on a task sensitive to sustained emotional information processing before and after 16–20 sessions of CT, along with a sample of control participants tested at comparable intervals. Setting Therapy took place in a hospital outpatient clinic. Patients Participants included 49 unmedicated depressed adults and 35 healthy control participants. Main Outcome Measures Pre-treatment subgenual anterior cingulate activity in an a priori region in response to negative words was correlated with residual severity and used to classify response and remission. Results As expected, in both samples, participants with the lowest pre-treatment sustained subgenual cingulate (sgACC; BA25) reactivity in response to negative words displayed the most improvement in CT (R2=.29, >75% correct classification of response, >70% correct classification of remission). Other a priori regions explained additional variance. Response/Remission in Cohort 2 was predicted based on thresholds from Cohort 1. sgACC activity remained low for remitters following treatment. Conclusions Neuroimaging provides a quick, valid, and clinically applicable way of assessing neural systems associated with treatment response/remission. sgACC activity, in particular, may reflect processes which interfere with treatment, e.g,. emotion generation in addition to its putative regulatory role; alternately, its absence may facilitate treatment response. PMID:22945620

  6. Physical activity patterns of people affected by depressive and anxiety disorders as measured by accelerometers: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björg Helgadóttir

    Full Text Available Exercise can relieve both depressive and anxiety disorders and it is therefore of importance to establish movement patterns of mildly to moderately affected sufferers to estimate the treatment potential. The aim is to describe the physical activity patterns of people affected by mild to moderate depressive and/or anxiety symptoms using objective measures of physical activity.The design of the study was cross-sectional using data from 165 people aged 18-65 years, with mild to moderate depressive and/or anxiety disorder symptoms (scoring ≥ 10 on the PHQ-9. Diagnoses were made using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI and symptom severity was measured with the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS. The participants wore accelerometers for a week to evaluate physical activity patterns.No statistically significant differences were detected between different diagnoses, though depressed participants tended to be less active and more sedentary. Only one-fifth of the sample followed public health guidelines regarding physical activity. Each one point increase in MADRS was associated with a 2.4 minute reduction in light physical activity, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time. MADRS was positively associated with number of sedentary bouts.The physical activity pattern of people with depressive and/or anxiety disorders was characterized by large amounts of sedentary time and low fulfillment of physical activity guidelines. There is therefore a large treatment potential for this group by increasing exercise. The results suggest that instead of focusing exclusively on high intensity exercise for treating depressive and anxiety disorders, health care providers might encourage patients to reduce sedentary time by increasing light physical activity and decreasing the number of sedentary bouts, though further studies are needed that can determine directionality.

  7. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Delage Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition.

  8. Cochlear implant in an ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Aimee M; Lassen, L Frederick

    2013-02-01

    Presbycusis, or sensorineural hearing loss in the elderly population, affects approximately 40% to 50% of people over the age of 75. A variety of devices are available to those with hearing loss. Cochlear implants, for example, are especially useful for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss. The population is aging, so the demand for cochlear implantation in ambulatory surgery centers will likely increase. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASC) can provide a more convenient and less expensive location for cochlear implant surgery than hospital-based operating facilities. Patient selection using standard ASC criteria, coupled with an understanding of the unique surgical and anesthetic needs of cochlear implant patients, are key to bringing this once exotic inpatient procedure into the ASC.

  9. Actigraphic registration of motor activity reveals a more structured behavioural pattern in schizophrenia than in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oedegaard Ketil J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disturbances in motor activity pattern are seen in both schizophrenia and depression. However, this activity has rarely been studied objectively. The purpose of the present study has been to study the complexity of motor activity patterns in these patients by using actigraphy. Findings Motor activity was recorded using wrist-worn actigraphs for periods of 2 weeks in patients with schizophrenia and major depression and compare them to healthy controls. Average motor activity was recorded and three non-parametric variables, interdaily stability (IS, intradaily variability (IV, and relative amplitude (RA were calculated on the basis of these data. The motor activity was significantly lower both in patients with schizophrenia (153 ± 61, mean ± SD, p Conclusions Motor activity was significantly reduced in both schizophrenic and depressed patients. However, schizophrenic patients differed from both depressed patients and controls, demonstrating motor activity patterns marked by less complexity and more structured behaviour. These findings may indicate that disturbances in motor activity reflect different pathophysiological mechanisms in schizophrenia compared to major depression.

  10. A Systematic Review of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Behavioral Activation Apps for Depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Huguet

    Full Text Available Depression is a common mental health condition for which many mobile apps aim to provide support. This review aims to identify self-help apps available exclusively for people with depression and evaluate those that offer cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT or behavioural activation (BA. One hundred and seventeen apps have been identified after searching both the scientific literature and the commercial market. 10.26% (n = 12 of these apps identified through our search offer support that seems to be consistent with evidence-based principles of CBT or BA. Taking into account the non existence of effectiveness/efficacy studies, and the low level of adherence to the core ingredients of the CBT/BA models, the utility of these CBT/BA apps are questionable. The usability of reviewed apps is highly variable and they rarely are accompanied by explicit privacy or safety policies. Despite the growing public demand, there is a concerning lack of appropiate CBT or BA apps, especially from a clinical and legal point of view. The application of superior scientific, technological, and legal knowledge is needed to improve the development, testing, and accessibility of apps for people with depression.

  11. A randomized hybrid efficacy and effectiveness trial of behavioral activation for Latinos with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jonathan W; Santiago-Rivera, Azara L; Santos, María M; Nagy, Gabriela; López, Marisela; Hurtado, Gabriela Diéguez; West, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Depression presents a significant public health burden for Latinos, the largest and fastest-growing minority group in the United States. The current study performed a randomized controlled trial of Behavioral Activation (BA) for Latinos (BAL, n=21), with relatively minor modifications, compared to treatment as usual (TAU, n=22) in a community mental health clinic setting with a sample of depressed, Spanish-speaking Latinos. TAU was a strong comparison condition, taking place at the same clinic, under the same guidelines and clinic protocols, with similar levels of ongoing consultation, and using the same pool of therapists as BAL. Results indicated that BAL performed well with respect to treatment engagement and retention. Regarding acute treatment outcomes, an interaction emerged between number of sessions attended and condition. Specifically, only BAL clients who were engaged in treatment and attended more sessions demonstrated significant reductions in depression and improvements in quality of life and mental health functioning. Results are discussed in terms of the balance of efficacy and effectiveness issues addressed in this trial.

  12. A rest-activity biomarker to predict response to SSRIs in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, W Vaughn

    2015-05-01

    Most adults with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will not experience a remission with the first antidepressant trial. No practical biomarkers presently exist to predict responsiveness to antidepressants. Herein we report pilot data for a rest-activity biomarker of antidepressant response. Fifty-eight medication-free adults with MDD underwent a week-long collection of actigraphic data before beginning a 9 week open label trial of fluoxetine, coupled with blinded randomized assignment to eszopiclone/placebo. Depression severity was repeatedly measured with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Baseline actigraphic data was analyzed with functional data analysis to create smoothed 24-h curves of activity. The time of the lowest point of activity (the bathyphase) was calculated for each patient, as well the mean difference between bedtime and the bathyphase (BBD). At the end of treatment, patients were characterized as treatment responders (50% reduction in HRSD) or non-responders, and receiver operating curves were calculated to find the optimal cut point of the BBD for prediction of treatment response. The best cut point for BBD was at 260.2 min, resulting in an effect size of 1.45, and with a positive predictive value of 0.75 and a negative predictive value of 0.88. We conclude that actigraphically-determined measures of rest-activity patterns show promise as potential biomarker predictors of antidepressant response. However, this conclusion is based upon a small number of patients who received only one choice of antidepressant, for a single trial. Replication with a larger sample is needed.

  13. Effects of the behavioral inhibition system (BIS), behavioral activation system (BAS), and emotion regulation on depression: A one-year follow-up study in Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanzhang; Xu, Yun; Chen, Zi

    2015-12-15

    Depression is a worldwide mental health problem among adolescents. The current study aimed to examine the roles of the behavioral inhibition system (BIS), behavioral activation system (BAS), and emotion regulation on adolescent depression. A total of 330 Chinese adolescents were recruited to complete initial assessments of BIS/BAS, emotion regulation, and depression, with a follow-up after one year. Depression on these two occasions was positively correlated with gender, age, initial scores of BIS/BAS activity, and with Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire scores for self-blame, rumination, putting into perspective, catastrophizing, and blaming others, and negatively correlated with initial positive reappraisal scores. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that higher BIS activity, catastrophizing, rumination, and lower positive reappraisal predicted depression after one year. However, after controlling for initial depression, these variables were indirectly related to subsequent depression. Implications are discussed for assessments of depression and interventions targeted at the BIS, BAS, and emotion regulation.

  14. Social inclusion of children with cochlear implants

    OpenAIRE

    Tomič, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades the progress of science has enabled the development of cochlear implant, which is suitable for persons who have defected inner ear, so hearing amplification is no longer enough for them. It allows them to perceive sound and develop verbal language, which provide better quality of life. Because of that, around the world and also in Slovenia, more and more children with cochlear implants are being placed in mainstream school settings. Recently, researchers are paying mor...

  15. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-05-24

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators.

  16. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  17. SAD-B Phosphorylation of CAST Controls Active Zone Vesicle Recycling for Synaptic Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiko Mochida

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Short-term synaptic depression (STD is a common form of activity-dependent plasticity observed widely in the nervous system. Few molecular pathways that control STD have been described, but the active zone (AZ release apparatus provides a possible link between neuronal activity and plasticity. Here, we show that an AZ cytomatrix protein CAST and an AZ-associated protein kinase SAD-B coordinately regulate STD by controlling reloading of the AZ with release-ready synaptic vesicles. SAD-B phosphorylates the N-terminal serine (S45 of CAST, and S45 phosphorylation increases with higher firing rate. A phosphomimetic CAST (S45D mimics CAST deletion, which enhances STD by delaying reloading of the readily releasable pool (RRP, resulting in a pool size decrease. A phosphonegative CAST (S45A inhibits STD and accelerates RRP reloading. Our results suggest that the CAST/SAD-B reaction serves as a brake on synaptic transmission by temporal calibration of activity and synaptic depression via RRP size regulation.

  18. The relationship between physical activity, sleep duration and depressive symptoms in older adults: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA

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    Victoria Garfield

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research to date suggests that physical activity (PA is associated with distinct aspects of sleep, but studies have predominantly focused on sleep quality, been carried out in younger adults, and have not accounted for many covariates. Of particular interest is also the reported relationship between physical activity and depression in older adults and as such, their associations with sleep duration. Here we examine the cross-sectional relation between physical activity and sleep duration in a community-dwelling sample of 5265 older adults from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. We analysed the data using multiple regression, with physical activity as a categorical exposure and sleep duration a continuous outcome, as well as testing the interaction between physical activity and depressive symptoms, which was significant (p  0.05. Our findings suggest that a potentially effective way of improving sleep in older adults with depressive symptoms is via physical activity interventions.

  19. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding.

  20. Relationship between depression and physical activity, disability, burden, and health-related quality of life among patients with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Namita; Khanna, Rahul; Shah, Ruchit M

    2015-04-01

    This study purports to examine the relationship of depression with physical activity, disability, arthritis-attributable burden (joint limitation, work limitation, social activity limitation, and joint pain), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among arthritis patients. Data from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized adults in the United States, was used for the purpose of this study. Multivariable logistic regression was employed to address the study objectives. The final study sample included 167,068 arthritis patients, 45,459 of whom had comorbid depression. Arthritis patients with depression had lower odds of engaging in physical activity (odds ratio [OR]=1.070, confidence interval [CI] 1.006-1.139) and higher odds of being disabled (OR=1.411, CI 1.306-1.524). Arthritis patients with depression also had greater odds of arthritis-attributable joint limitations (OR=1.551, CI 1.460-1.648), work limitations (OR=1.506, CI 1.414-1.604), social activity limitations (OR=1.647, CI 1.557-1.742), and pain (OR=1.438, CI 1.364-1.517) as compared to those without depression. Arthritis patients with versus without depression had greater odds of poor general health status (OR=1.698, CI 1.586-1.819), physical HRQOL (OR=1.592, CI 1.486-1.704), mental HRQOL (OR=6.225, CI 5.768-6.718), and activity limitations (OR=2.345, CI 2.168-2.537). Study results indicate toward a negative functional impact of depression among arthritis patients. Policy makers should consider incorporating screening and management of depression into routine clinical care of arthritis patients.

  1. Cochlear implantation in children with complex needs: The perceptions of professionals at cochlear implant centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archbold, S.M.; Athalye, S.; Mulla, I.; Harrigan, S.; Wolters, N.; Isarin, J.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the views of cochlear implant centre teams about the process of referral, assessment and rehabilitation for children with complex needs. Methods An on-line survey of cochlear implant centres in the UK and in the Netherlands was carried out, with both quantitative and qualitative

  2. Systematized physical activity and depressive symptoms in Alzheimer's dementia: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Thays Martins Vital; Salma Stéphany Soleman Hernandez; Sebastião Gobbi; José Luiz Riani Costa; Florindo Stella

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão sistemática de artigos científicos que analisaram os efeitos da atividade física sistematizada nos sintomas de depressão de pacientes com demência de Alzheimer. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma busca nas seguintes bases de dados: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, MedLine e Biological Abstracts, utilizando-se as seguintes palavras-chave: "Alzheimer dementia" , "Alzheimer disease" , "Alzheimer, physical activity", "physical exercise", "motor intervention" , "physical th...

  3. Antidepressant versus neuroleptic activities of sulpiride isomers on four animal models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccheri, A; Dall'Olio, R; Gaggi, R; Gandolfi, O; Montanaro, N

    1984-01-01

    The atypical neuroleptic sulpiride is also prescribed for depression because of its activating effect. However, such an effect does not necessarily imply an action identical to that of classical antidepressants, and a laboratory comparison of the neuroleptic and antidepressant activities of sulpiride may contribute to a better definition of its psychotherapeutic profile. Sulpiride isomers were studied in the rat in four behavioural models of depression which are thought to be influenced by neuroleptics in different ways. Desipramine (imipramine) and haloperidol were employed in each test as a standard antidepressant and neuroleptic, respectively. The four tests were: 1) prevention of apomorphine-induced sedation: 2) antagonism of apomorphine-induced hypothermia; 3) behavioural despair (swim test); 4) learned helplessness ( FR2 lever pressing escape). Desipramine ameliorated behaviour in all tests; haloperidol ameliorated the response to test 1, influenced that to test 2 in a neuroleptic-like way and worsened the responses to tests 3 and 4. (-)-Sulpiride worked in a similar way to haloperidol in all tests. (+)-Sulpiride significantly and dose-dependently ameliorated the responses to test 3 and was inactive in the others. No conclusion was drawn from test 1 owing to its lack of specificity; the results of the remaining tests indicated a neuroleptic profile of (-)-sulpiride and suggested a potential "antidepressant" activity of (+)-sulpiride which merits further investigation.

  4. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase in metabolic depression in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a highly conserved eukaryotic protein serine/threonine kinase that controls cellular and whole body energy homoeostasis. AMPK is activated during energy stress by a rise in AMP:ATP ratio and maintains energy balance by phosphorylating targets to switch on catabolic ATP-generating pathways, while at the same time switching off anabolic ATP-consuming processes. Metabolic depression is a strategy used by many animals to survive environmental stress and has been extensively studied across phylogeny by comparative biochemists and physiologists, but the role of AMPK has only recently been addressed. This review first deals with the evolution of AMPK in eukaryotes (excluding plants and fungi) and its regulation. Changes in adenine nucleotides and AMPK activation are described in animals during environmental energy stress, before considering the involvement of AMPK in controlling β-oxidation, fatty acid synthesis, triacylglycerol mobilization and protein synthesis. Lastly, strategies are presented to validate the role of AMPK in mediating metabolic depression by phosphorylating downstream targets.

  5. Labile cochlear tuning in the mustached bat. II. Concomitant shifts in neural tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, R F; Henson, O W

    1993-01-01

    Acoustic stimuli near 60 kHz elicit pronounced resonance in the cochlea of the mustached bat (Pteronotus parnellii parnellii). The cochlear resonance frequency (CRF) is near the second harmonic, constant frequency (CF2) component of the bat's biosonar signals. Within narrow bands where CF2 and third harmonic (CF3) echoes are maintained, the cochlea has sharp tuning characteristics that are conserved throughout the central auditory system. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of temperature-related shifts in the CRF on the tuning properties of neurons in the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Eighty-two single and multi-unit recordings were characterized in 6 awake bats with chronically implanted cochlear microphonic electrodes. As the CRF changed with body temperature, the tuning curves of neurons sharply tuned to frequencies near the CF2 and CF3 shifted with the CRF in every case, yielding a change in the unit's best frequency. The results show that cochlear tuning is labile in the mustached bat, and that this lability produces tonotopic shifts in the frequency response of central auditory neurons. Furthermore, results provide evidence of shifts in the frequency-to-place code within the sharply tuned CF2 and CF3 regions of the cochlea. In conjunction with the finding that biosonar emission frequency and the CRF shift concomitantly with temperature and flight, it is concluded that the adjustment of biosonar signals accommodates the shifts in cochlear and neural tuning that occur with active echolocation.

  6. Cellular and molecular bases of neuroplasticity: brainstem effects after cochlear damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Loyzaga, Pablo; Carricondo, Francisco; Bartolomé, Maria V; Iglesias, Mari C; Rodríguez, Fernando; Poch-Broto, Joaquin

    2010-03-01

    After a cochlear lesion or auditory nerve damage, afferent connections from auditory ganglia can be highly altered. This results in a clear reduction of auditory input and an alteration of connectivity of terminals on cochlear nuclei neurons. Such a process could stimulate the reorganization of the neural circuits and neuroplasticity. Cochlea removal has been demonstrated to be a good model in which to analyse brainstem neuroplasticity, particularly with regard to the cochlear nuclei. After cochlea removal three main periods of degeneration and regeneration were observed. Early effects, during the first week post lesion, involved acute degeneration with nerve ending oedema and degeneration. During the second and, probably, the third post lesion weeks, degeneration was still present, even though a limited and diffuse expression of GAP-43 started. Around 1 month post lesion, degeneration at the cochlear nuclei progressively disappeared and a relevant GAP-43 expression was found. We conclude that neuroplasticity leads neurons to modify their activity and/or their synaptic tree as a consequence of animal adaptation to learning and memory. For the human being neuroplasticity is involved in language learning and comprehension, particularly the acquisition of a second language. Neuroplasticity is important for therapeutic strategies, such as hearing aids and cochlear implants.

  7. Technological, biological, and acoustical constraints to music perception in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limb, Charles J; Roy, Alexis T

    2014-02-01

    Despite advances in technology, the ability to perceive music remains limited for many cochlear implant users. This paper reviews the technological, biological, and acoustical constraints that make music an especially challenging stimulus for cochlear implant users, while highlighting recent research efforts to overcome these shortcomings. The limitations of cochlear implant devices, which have been optimized for speech comprehension, become evident when applied to music, particularly with regards to inadequate spectral, fine-temporal, and dynamic range representation. Beyond the impoverished information transmitted by the device itself, both peripheral and central auditory nervous system deficits are seen in the presence of sensorineural hearing loss, such as auditory nerve degeneration and abnormal auditory cortex activation. These technological and biological constraints to effective music perception are further compounded by the complexity of the acoustical features of music itself that require the perceptual integration of varying rhythmic, melodic, harmonic, and timbral elements of sound. Cochlear implant users not only have difficulty perceiving spectral components individually (leading to fundamental disruptions in perception of pitch, melody, and harmony) but also display deficits with higher perceptual integration tasks required for music perception, such as auditory stream segregation. Despite these current limitations, focused musical training programs, new assessment methods, and improvements in the representation and transmission of the complex acoustical features of music through technological innovation offer the potential for significant advancements in cochlear implant-mediated music perception.

  8. Effect of pediatric bilateral cochlear implantation on language development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boons, Tinne; Brokx, Jan; Frijns, Johan; Peeraer, Louis; Philips, Birgit; Vermeulen,; Wouters,; Wieringen, van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine spoken language outcomes in children undergoing bilateral cochlear implantation compared with matched peers undergoing unilateral implantation. Design: Case-control, frequency-matched, retrospective cross-sectional multicenter study. Setting: Two Belgian and 3 Dutch cochlear im

  9. Cochlear Implants Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Cochlear Implants Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... right, and Isabelle Jeppsen meet with Mia's cochlear implant surgeon, John Niparko, M.D., of Johns Hopkins ...

  10. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  11. Microglial CR3 activation triggers long-term synaptic depression in the hippocampus via NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingfei; Malik, Aqsa; Choi, Hyun B; Ko, Rebecca W Y; Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; MacVicar, Brian A

    2014-04-02

    Complement receptor 3 (CR3) activation in microglia is involved in neuroinflammation-related brain disorders and pruning of neuronal synapses. Hypoxia, often observed together with neuroinflammation in brain trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases, is thought to exacerbate inflammatory responses and synergistically enhance brain damage. Here we show that when hypoxia and an inflammatory stimulus (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) are combined, they act synergistically to trigger long-term synaptic depression (LTD) that requires microglial CR3, activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase), and GluA2-mediated A-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) internalization. Microglial CR3-triggered LTD is independent of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), or patterned synaptic activity. This type of LTD may contribute to memory impairments and synaptic disruptions in neuroinflammation-related brain disorders.

  12. Visual Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Children with Cochlear Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Campbell

    Full Text Available Visual cross-modal re-organization is a neurophysiological process that occurs in deafness. The intact sensory modality of vision recruits cortical areas from the deprived sensory modality of audition. Such compensatory plasticity is documented in deaf adults and animals, and is related to deficits in speech perception performance in cochlear-implanted adults. However, it is unclear whether visual cross-modal re-organization takes place in cochlear-implanted children and whether it may be a source of variability contributing to speech and language outcomes. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if visual cross-modal re-organization occurs in cochlear-implanted children, and whether it is related to deficits in speech perception performance.Visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded via high-density EEG in 41 normal hearing children and 14 cochlear-implanted children, aged 5-15 years, in response to apparent motion and form change. Comparisons of VEP amplitude and latency, as well as source localization results, were conducted between the groups in order to view evidence of visual cross-modal re-organization. Finally, speech perception in background noise performance was correlated to the visual response in the implanted children.Distinct VEP morphological patterns were observed in both the normal hearing and cochlear-implanted children. However, the cochlear-implanted children demonstrated larger VEP amplitudes and earlier latency, concurrent with activation of right temporal cortex including auditory regions, suggestive of visual cross-modal re-organization. The VEP N1 latency was negatively related to speech perception in background noise for children with cochlear implants.Our results are among the first to describe cross modal re-organization of auditory cortex by the visual modality in deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. Our findings suggest that, as a group, children with cochlear implants show evidence of visual cross

  13. Physical activity, health-related quality of life and depression during pregnancy Atividade física, qualidade de vida e depressão durante a gravidez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Tendais

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines physical activity patterns among women, from pre-pregnancy to the second trimester of pregnancy, and the relationship between physical activity status based on physical activity guidelines and health-related quality of life (HRQoL and depression over pregnancy. 56 healthy pregnant women self-reported physical activity, HRQoL and depression at 10-15 and 19-24 weeks of pregnancy and physical activity before pregnancy. Whereas vigorous leisure physical activity decreased after conception, moderate leisure physical activity and work related physical activity remained stable over time. The prevalence of recommended physical activity was 39.3% and 12.5% in the 1st and 2nd trimesters of pregnancy respectively, and 14.3% pre-pregnancy. From the 1st to the 2nd pregnancy trimester, most physical HRQoL dimensions scores decreased and only mental component increased, independently of physical activity status. No changes in mean depression scores were observed. These data suggest that physical activity patterns change with pregnancy and that physical and mental components are differentially affected by pregnancy course, independently of physical activity status.Este estudo examina os padrões de atividade física antes da concepção até o segundo trimestre de gravidez e a relação entre o nível de atividade física, com base nas recomendações de atividade física, a qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde (QVRS e depressão ao longo da gravidez. Cinquenta e seis grávidas saudáveis reportaram nível de atividade física, QVRS e depressão às 10-15 e 19-24 semanas de gravidez, além de atividade física antes da concepção. Enquanto a atividade física vigorosa no lazer diminuiu depois da concepção, as atividades físicas moderadas no lazer e no trabalho mantiveram-se estáveis. A prevalência de atividade física recomendada foi de 39,3%, 12,5% e 14,3% antes, no primeiro e no segundo trimestres de gravidez, respectivamente

  14. THE COCHLEAR AMPLIFIER:IS IT HAIR BUNDLE MOTION OF OUTER HAIR CELLS?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi; He David Z

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are involved in a mechanical feedback loop in which the fast somatic motility of OHCs is required for cochlear amplification. Alternatively, amplification is thought to arise from active hair bundle movements ob-served in non-mammalian hair cells. We measured the voltage-evoked hair bundle motions in the gerbil cochlea to determine if such movements are also present in mammalian OHCs. The OHCs displayed a large hair bundle movement that was not based on mechanotransducer channels but based on somatic motility. Significantly, bundle movements were able to generate radial motion of the tectorial membrane in situ. This result implies that the motility-associated hair bundle motion may be part of the cochlear amplifier.

  15. Activation of the kynurenine pathway is associated with striatal volume in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, Jonathan; Dantzer, Robert; Meier, Timothy B; Wurfel, Brent E; Victor, Teresa A; McIntosh, Scott A; Ford, Bart N; Morris, Harvey M; Bodurka, Jerzy; Teague, T Kent; Drevets, Wayne C

    2015-12-01

    Inflammation, which may be present in a subgroup of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD), activates the kynurenine metabolic pathway to produce kynurenine metabolites kynurenic acid (KynA) and quinolinic acid (QA). We have previously reported an association between the ratio of KynA to QA and hippocampal volume in MDD. In animals, inflammation leads to deficits in incentive motivation. Given the central role of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and other regions of the striatum in motivated behavior, reward processing, and anhedonia, we hypothesized that abnormalities in the concentrations of kynurenine pathway metabolites would be associated with striatal volumes. As previously reported, after controlling for relevant confounds, the KynA/QA ratio was reduced in the serum of unmedicated patients with MDD (n=53) versus healthy controls (HC, n=47) and there was a non-significant trend in the correlation between KynA/QA and severity of anhedonia (r=-0.27, pDepression Rating Scale. Our results raise the possibility that activation of the kynurenine pathway is a marker of an inflammatory process that leads to reductions in striatal volume. However, unlike the hippocampus, the association does not appear to be mediated by the relative balance between KynA and QA.

  16. Whole-brain mapping of neuronal activity in the learned helplessness model of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo eKim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some individuals are resilient, whereas others succumb to despair in repeated stressful situations. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying such divergent behavioral responses remain unclear. Here, we employed an automated method for mapping neuronal activity in search of signatures of stress responses in the entire mouse brain. We used serial two-photon tomography to detect expression of c-FosGFP – a marker of neuronal activation – in c-fosGFP transgenic mice subjected to the learned helplessness (LH procedure, a widely used model of stress-induced depression-like phenotype in laboratory animals. We found that mice showing helpless behavior had an overall brain-wide reduction in the level of neuronal activation compared with mice showing resilient behavior, with the exception of a few brain areas, including the locus coeruleus, that were more activated in the helpless mice. In addition, the helpless mice showed a strong trend of having higher similarity in whole brain activity profile among individuals, suggesting that helplessness is represented by a more stereotypic brain-wide activation pattern. This latter effect was confirmed in rats subjected to the LH procedure, using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography to assess neural activity. Our findings reveal distinct brain activity markings that correlate with adaptive and maladaptive behavioral responses to stress, and provide a framework for further studies investigating the contribution of specific brain regions to maladaptive stress responses.

  17. The Relationship Between Sexual Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Effects of Gender and Family Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Janna A; Huebner, David M

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable debate over whether adolescent sexual activity is maladaptive and associated with worse mental health outcomes versus a positive developmental milestone that is associated with better mental health outcomes. Although these perspectives are often pitted against one another, the current study employed a more integrative perspective: adolescent sexual activity may be maladaptive in certain contexts, but healthy in other contexts. We investigated whether family support and gender moderated the relation between sexual activity and mental health outcomes in a diverse sample of 519 lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth. Specifically, we examined whether youth who engaged in more sexual activity would have fewer depressive symptoms in the context of a more supportive family environment, but more depressive symptoms in the context of a less supportive family environment and whether this effect was stronger for sexual minority girls. Consistent with the sexual health perspective, we found that among girls with more family support, those who engaged in more frequent same-sex sexual contact had lower levels of depressive symptoms. Unexpectedly, we found that among boys with more family support, those who engaged in more frequent same-sex sexual contact had higher levels of depressive symptoms. In contrast, girls and boys with less family support showed no relation between sexual activity and depressive symptoms. Overall, results suggest that context is critical when determining whether same-sex sexual contact among LGB youth should be considered maladaptive or beneficial.

  18. Cortical maturation in children with cochlear implants: Correlation between electrophysiological and behavioral measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliane Aparecida Fagundes; Couto, Maria Inês Vieira; Magliaro, Fernanda C. L.; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Carvalho, Ana Claudia Martinho; Matas, Carla Gentile

    2017-01-01

    Central auditory pathway maturation in children depends on auditory sensory stimulation. The objective of the present study was to monitor the cortical maturation of children with cochlear implants using electrophysiological and auditory skills measurements. The study was longitudinal and consisted of 30 subjects, 15 (8 girls and 7 boys) of whom had a cochlear implant, with a mean age at activation time of 36.4 months (minimum, 17 months; maximum, 66 months), and 15 of whom were normal-hearing children who were matched based on gender and chronological age. The auditory and speech skills of the children with cochlear implants were evaluated using GASP, IT-MAIS and MUSS measures. Both groups underwent electrophysiological evaluation using long-latency auditory evoked potentials. Each child was evaluated at three and nine months after cochlear implant activation, with the same time interval adopted for the hearing children. The results showed improvements in auditory and speech skills as measured by IT-MAIS and MUSS. Similarly, the long-latency auditory evoked potential evaluation revealed a decrease in P1 component latency; however, the latency remained significantly longer than that of the hearing children, even after nine months of cochlear implant use. It was observed that a shorter P1 latency corresponded to more evident development of auditory skills. Regarding auditory behavior, it was observed that children who could master the auditory skill of discrimination showed better results in other evaluations, both behavioral and electrophysiological, than those who had mastered only the speech-detection skill. Therefore, cochlear implant auditory stimulation facilitated auditory pathway maturation, which decreased the latency of the P1 component and advanced the development of auditory and speech skills. The analysis of the long-latency auditory evoked potentials revealed that the P1 component was an important biomarker of auditory development during the

  19. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viggiano E

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Emanuela Viggiano,1,2 Vincenzo Monda,1 Antonietta Messina,1 Fiorenzo Moscatelli,3 Anna Valenzano,3 Domenico Tafuri,4 Giuseppe Cibelli,3 Bruno De Luca,1 Giovanni Messina,1,3 Marcellino Monda1 1Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, 4Department of Motor Sciences and Wellness, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy Abstract: Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD, which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. Keywords: cortical spreading depression, neuroprotective effect, uncoupling protein-5

  20. In vivo Study on Depressant Effects and Muscle Coordination Activity of Galphimia glauca Stem Methanol Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garige, Baba Shankar Rao; Keshetti, Srisailam; Vattikuti, Uma Maheshwara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galphimia glauca is an evergreen shrub found across peninsular India, belonging to family Malpighiaceae. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the in vivo depressant effects and muscle coordination activity of G. glauca stem methanol extract (GGSME). Materials and Methods: The stem methanol extract was administered in Swiss albino mice in 1 day to study the central nervous system (CNS) depressant and muscle coordination activity employing animal models such as sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep test, hole-board test, open field test, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions, picrotoxin-induced convulsions, grip strengthening test in mice, and Rota-rod test. Results: The LD50 of GGSME was found to be >2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Mice treated with stem methanol extract at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, b.w. doses extended the sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg. b.w., i.p.). The stem methanol extract at 400 mg/kg dose showed a significant (P ≤ 0.001) dose-dependent decrease in the number of rears and head dipping number in the hole-board test. The extract exhibited a significant (P ≤ 0.001) effect on the ambulatory behavior of mice in the open field test and also extended the onset of seizures induced by PTZ (90 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) and picrotoxin (10 mg/kg, b.w., i.p.). The extract also exhibited significant (P ≤ 0.001) effects on muscle coordination in rota-rod and grip strengthening test in mice. Conclusion: The study results conclude that the GGSME has a potential CNS depressant and muscle relaxant effects compared to the standard drugs. SUMMARY Anxiety is implicated in the number of psychiatric disordersIn vivo depressant activity is studied employing animal models like Sodium pentobarbital-.induced sleep test, Hole-board test, Open field test, Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions and Picrotoxin-induced convulsions tests.Muscle coordination activity is studied employing animal models like Grip strengthening

  1. The Effects of Unilateral Adaptation of Hearing Aids on Symptoms of Depression and Social Activity Constraints of Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Fernanda Dutra dos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in the elderly population. Besides compromising oral communication, it directly affects social relations and prevents elderly patients from living actively in society, possibly leading to the onset of depression or other conditions. Objective To analyze the effects of unilateral adaptation of hearing aids on symptoms of depression and the social activity constraints of elderly subjects with hearing impairment. Methods The sample consisted of elderly subjects with hearing loss who did not use hearing aids. Data were collected in two phases. Initially, all participants underwent an audiological assessment and answered the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Elderly (summarized version and the Geriatric Depression Scale. All subjects participated in the selection and hearing aid adaptation processes and became monaural hearing aid users. After 30 days of hearing aid use, they were assessed with the same instruments. The results of the questionnaires before and after hearing aid adaptation were compared. Results The sample consisted of 13 individuals, between 60 and 90 years old (mean 72.85 ± 11.05 years. Data analysis showed that there was significant improvement in social activity constraints (p < 0.001 and in symptoms of depression (p = 0.031. Conclusion Results show that, in the sample studied, unilateral hearing aid adaptation reduced social activity constraints and depression symptoms.

  2. The Effects of Unilateral Adaptation of Hearing Aids on Symptoms of Depression and Social Activity Constraints of Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fernanda Dutra Dos; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro

    2015-07-01

    Introduction Hearing loss is one of the most common problems in the elderly population. Besides compromising oral communication, it directly affects social relations and prevents elderly patients from living actively in society, possibly leading to the onset of depression or other conditions. Objective To analyze the effects of unilateral adaptation of hearing aids on symptoms of depression and the social activity constraints of elderly subjects with hearing impairment. Methods The sample consisted of elderly subjects with hearing loss who did not use hearing aids. Data were collected in two phases. Initially, all participants underwent an audiological assessment and answered the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Elderly (summarized version) and the Geriatric Depression Scale. All subjects participated in the selection and hearing aid adaptation processes and became monaural hearing aid users. After 30 days of hearing aid use, they were assessed with the same instruments. The results of the questionnaires before and after hearing aid adaptation were compared. Results The sample consisted of 13 individuals, between 60 and 90 years old (mean 72.85 ± 11.05 years). Data analysis showed that there was significant improvement in social activity constraints (p depression (p = 0.031). Conclusion Results show that, in the sample studied, unilateral hearing aid adaptation reduced social activity constraints and depression symptoms.

  3. DEPRESSIVE AND ANXIETY DISORDERS AND THE ASSOCIATION WITH OBESITY, PHYSICAL, AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Leonore M.; Fokkema, Marjolein; van Straten, Annemieke; Lamers, Femke; Cuijpers, Pim; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There is evidence of more obesity among persons with depressive and depressive and anxiety disorders. However, the nature and the underlying mechanisms of the association are still unclear. This study examines the association between depressive and anxiety disorders and obesity, physical

  4. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course.

  5. Cochlear implantation in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Frank R; Chien, Wade W; Li, Lingsheng; Clarrett, Danisa M; Niparko, John K; Francis, Howard W

    2012-09-01

    Cochlear implants allow individuals with severe to profound hearing loss access to sound and spoken language. The number of older adults in the United States who are potential candidates for cochlear implantation (CI) is approximately 150,000 and will continue to increase with the aging of the population. Should CI be routinely recommended for these older adults, and do these individuals benefit from CI? We reviewed our 12-year experience with CI in adults aged ≥60 years (n = 445) at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions to investigate the impact of CI on speech understanding and to identify factors associated with speech performance. Complete data on speech outcomes at baseline and 1 year post-CI were available for 83 individuals. Our results demonstrate that CI in adults aged ≥60 years consistently improved speech understanding scores, with a mean increase of 60.0% (SD 24.1) on HINT (Hearing in Noise Test) sentences in quiet. The magnitude of the gain in speech scores was negatively associated with age at implantation, such that for every increasing year of age at CI the gain in speech scores was 1.3 percentage points less (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.6-1.9) after adjusting for age at hearing loss onset. Conversely, individuals with higher pre-CI speech scores (HINT scores between 40% and 60%) had significantly greater post-CI speech scores by a mean of 10.0 percentage points (95% CI, 0.4-19.6) than those with lower pre-CI speech scores (HINT speech scores obtain the highest speech understanding scores after CI, with possible implications for current United States Medicare policy. Finally, we provide an extended discussion of the epidemiology and impact of hearing loss in older adults. Future research of CI in older adults should expand beyond simple speech outcomes to take into account the broad cognitive, social, and physical functioning outcomes that are likely detrimentally affected by hearing loss and may be mitigated by CI.

  6. Reduction in ventral striatal activity when anticipating a reward in depression and schizophrenia: a replicated cross-diagnostic finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo eArrondo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the research domain framework (RDoC, dysfunctional reward expectation has been proposed to be a cross-diagnostic domain in psychiatry, which may contribute to symptoms common to various neuropsychiatric conditions, such as anhedonia or apathy/avolition. We used a modified version of the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID paradigm to obtain functional MRI images from 22 patients with schizophrenia, 24 with depression and 21 controls. Anhedonia and other symptoms of depression, and overall positive and negative symptomatology were also measured. We hypothesized that the two clinical groups would have a reduced activity in the ventral striatum when anticipating reward (compared to anticipation of a neutral outcome and that striatal activation would correlate with clinical measures of motivational problems and anhedonia. Results were consistent with the first hypothesis: two clusters in both the left and right ventral striatum were found to differ between the groups in reward anticipation. Post-hoc analysis showed that this was due to higher activation in the controls compared to the schizophrenia and the depression groups in the right ventral striatum, with activation differences between depression and controls also seen in the left ventral striatum. No differences were found between the two patient groups, and there were no areas of abnormal cortical activation in either group that survived correction for multiple comparisons. Reduced ventral striatal activity was related to greater anhedonia and overall depressive symptoms in the schizophrenia group, but not in the participants with depression. Findings are discussed in relation to previous literature but overall are supporting evidence of reward system dysfunction across the neuropsychiatric continuum, even if the specific clinical relevance is still not fully understood. We also discuss how the RDoC approach may help to solve some of the replication problems in psychiatric fMRI research.

  7. Perceptual space induced by cochlear implant all-polar stimulation mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; Mckay, Colette M.

    2015-01-01

    It has often been argued that a main limitation of the cochlear implant is the spread of current induced by each electrode, which activates an inappropriately large range of sensory neurons. In order to reduce this spread, a new stimulation mode, the all-polar mode, was tested with 5 participants...

  8. Immediate and delayed cochlear neuropathy after noise exposure in pubescent mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Bjerg Jensen

    Full Text Available Moderate acoustic overexposure in adult rodents is known to cause acute loss of synapses on sensory inner hair cells (IHCs and delayed degeneration of the auditory nerve, despite the completely reversible temporary threshold shift (TTS and morphologically intact hair cells. Our objective was to determine whether a cochlear synaptopathy followed by neuropathy occurs after noise exposure in pubescence, and to define neuropathic versus non-neuropathic noise levels for pubescent mice. While exposing 6 week old CBA/CaJ mice to 8-16 kHz bandpass noise for 2 hrs, we defined 97 dB sound pressure level (SPL as the threshold for this particular type of neuropathic exposure associated with TTS, and 94 dB SPL as the highest non-neuropathic noise level associated with TTS. Exposure to 100 dB SPL caused permanent threshold shift although exposure of 16 week old mice to the same noise is reported to cause only TTS. Amplitude of wave I of the auditory brainstem response, which reflects the summed activity of the cochlear nerve, was complemented by synaptic ribbon counts in IHCs using confocal microscopy, and by stereological counts of peripheral axons and cell bodies of the cochlear nerve from 24 hours to 16 months post exposure. Mice exposed to neuropathic noise demonstrated immediate cochlear synaptopathy by 24 hours post exposure, and delayed neurodegeneration characterized by axonal retraction at 8 months, and spiral ganglion cell loss at 8-16 months post exposure. Although the damage was initially limited to the cochlear base, it progressed to also involve the cochlear apex by 8 months post exposure. Our data demonstrate a fine line between neuropathic and non-neuropathic noise levels associated with TTS in the pubescent cochlea.

  9. A Comparative Study of Group Behavioral Activation and Cognitive Therapy in Reducing Subsyndromal Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Soleimani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study compared the effectiveness of two group treatments, behavioral activation (BA and cognitive therapy (CT, in reducing subsyndromal anxiety and depressive symptoms in a sample of Iranian university students.Method: Twenty-seven Iranian university students who scored 18 or higher on the depression subscale and 16 or higher on the anxiety subscale of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-42 were randomly assigned into treatment groups. One group received 8 sessions of BA (n = 14, and the other received 8 sessions of group CT (n = 13.Result: Analysis of covariance revealed that the BA group had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms than the CT group. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the levels of anxiety, stress symptoms or functional impairment after treatment.Conclusion: This study found evidence for the effectiveness of BA in reducing anxiety, depressive and stress symptoms and functional impairment compared to CT. BA was more effective than CT in improving depressive symptoms and was as effective as CT in decreasing anxiety, stress and functional impairment. BA is also a cost-effective intervention, particularly in group formats.

  10. A facilitator of leisure activities for stress-related growth experience among middle-aged Korean women with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Leisure may serve as a coping resource following negative life events that facilitate positive changes. Previous studies on leisure have mainly focused on stress-related growth among individuals living in Western cultures. This study aimed to capture the role of leisure involvement as a facilitator of stress-related growth among middle-aged Korean women with depression. Three main themes were identified as an outcome of participation in leisure activities: (a) strengthening meaningful relationships, (b) improving positive emotions, and (c) facilitating personal strength. By participating in leisure activities, individuals with depression may develop the ability to cope with stress and experience positive changes.

  11. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  12. Amplitude recruitment of cochlear potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingqi; SUN Wei; SUN Jianhe; YU Ning; JIANG Sichang

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from outer hair cells (OHC) and the cochlear microphonics (CM) were recorded from scala media (SM) in three turn of guinea pig cochlea,the compound action potential (CAP) were recorded at the round window (RW) before and after the animal were exposed to white noise. The results suggest that the nonlinear properties with “saduration” of Input/output (I/O) function of OHC AC recepter potential and CM were founded; the nonlinear properties with “Low”, “Platean” and “high” of CAP also were investigated. After explosion, the threshold shift of CAP has about 10 dB. The I/O of OHC responses and CM were changed in a linearizing (i.e., nonlinearity loss), the “platean” of I/O CAP disappeared and the growth rate of CAP amplitude were larger than before explosion. The response amplitude recruitment of OHC appears to result from reduction in gain (i.e., hearing loss); It was due to the nonlinear growth function of OHC receptor potentials was changed in linearzing that the basilar membrance motion was changed in linearizing. Since intensity coding in the inner ear depends on an interactions of nonlinear basilar membrance and nerve fibers. So that it must lead to a linearizing of CAP as input responses.

  13. Musical experience sharpens human cochlear tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Nelms, Caitlin; Bhagat, Shaum P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian cochlea functions as a filter bank that performs a spectral, Fourier-like decomposition on the acoustic signal. While tuning can be compromised (e.g., broadened with hearing impairment), whether or not human cochlear frequency resolution can be sharpened through experiential factors (e.g., training or learning) has not yet been established. Previous studies have demonstrated sharper psychophysical tuning curves in trained musicians compared to nonmusicians, implying superior peripheral tuning. However, these findings are based on perceptual masking paradigms, and reflect engagement of the entire auditory system rather than cochlear tuning, per se. Here, by directly mapping physiological tuning curves from stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs)-cochlear emitted sounds-we show that estimates of human cochlear tuning in a high-frequency cochlear region (4 kHz) is further sharpened (by a factor of 1.5×) in musicians and improves with the number of years of their auditory training. These findings were corroborated by measurements of psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) derived via simultaneous masking, which similarly showed sharper tuning in musicians. Comparisons between SFOAE and PTCs revealed closer correspondence between physiological and behavioral curves in musicians, indicating that tuning is also more consistent between different levels of auditory processing in trained ears. Our findings demonstrate an experience-dependent enhancement in the resolving power of the cochlear sensory epithelium and the spectral resolution of human hearing and provide a peripheral account for the auditory perceptual benefits observed in musicians. Both local and feedback (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent) mechanisms are discussed as potential mechanisms for experience-dependent tuning.

  14. Local community intervention through depression screening and group activity for elderly suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Ono, Yutaka; Watanabe, Naoki; Tanaka, Eriko; Kudoh, Seijiro; Sakashita, Tomoe; Sakamoto, Shinji; Neichi, Keiko; Satoh, Kyoko; Nakamura, Kenji; Yoshimura, Kimio

    2006-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate outcomes of a community-based program to prevent suicide among the elderly (>or=65 years old) using a quasi-experimental design with two neighboring references. During 1999-2004, the program including depression screening and group activity was conducted by the public health nurses in the Minami district (population 1685) of Nagawa town, rural Japan. Pre-post changes in the risk of completing suicide were estimated by the incidence rate ratios (IRR). The risk for Minami's elderly females was reduced by 74% (age-adjusted IRR, 0.26; 90% CI, 0.07-0.98) more than the historical trend, while there was no change in the risk of Minami's males and nor in the male or female references. The local intervention using public health nursing would be effective against suicide for elderly females without diffusing to the surroundings.

  15. Disturbances in Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis and Immunological Activity Differentiating between Unipolar and Bipolar Depressive Episodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlijn Becking

    Full Text Available Differentiating bipolar depression (BD from unipolar depression (UD is difficult in clinical practice and, consequently, accurate recognition of BD can take as long as nine years. Research has therefore focused on the discriminatory capacities of biomarkers, such as markers of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis or immunological activity. However, no previous study included assessments of both systems, which is problematic as they may influence each other. Therefore, this study aimed to explore whether cortisol indicators and inflammatory markers were a independently associated with and/or b showed effect modification in relation to a lifetime (hypomanic episode in a large sample of depressed patients.Data were derived from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety and comprised 764 patients with a DSM-IV depressive disorder at baseline, of which 124 (16.2% had a lifetime (hypomanic episode at the 2-year assessment, or a more recent episode at the 4-year or 6-year assessment. Baseline cortisol awakening response, evening cortisol and diurnal cortisol slope were considered as cortisol indicators, while baseline C-reactive Protein (CRP, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α were included as inflammatory markers.In depressed men and women, none of the cortisol indicators and inflammatory markers were (independently associated with a (hypomanic episode. However, effect modification was found of diurnal cortisol slope and CRP in relation to a (hypomanic episode. Further analyses showed that depressed men with high levels of diurnal cortisol slope and CRP had an increased odds (OR=10.99, p=.001 of having a (hypomanic episode. No significant differences were found in women.Our findings suggest that the combination of high diurnal cortisol slope and high CRP may differentiate between UD and BD. This stresses the importance of considering HPA-axis and immunological activity simultaneously, but more research is needed

  16. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  17. Medial olivocochlear efferent reflex inhibition of human cochlear nerve responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenhan, J T; Wilson, U S; Hancock, K E; Guinan, J J

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of cochlear amplifier gain by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system has several putative roles: aiding listening in noise, protection against damage from acoustic overexposure, and slowing age-induced hearing loss. The human MOC reflex has been studied almost exclusively by measuring changes in otoacoustic emissions. However, to help understand how the MOC system influences what we hear, it is important to have measurements of the MOC effect on the total output of the organ of Corti, i.e., on cochlear nerve responses that couple sounds to the brain. In this work we measured the inhibition produced by the MOC reflex on the amplitude of cochlear nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) in response to moderate level (52-60 dB peSPL) clicks from five, young, normal hearing, awake, alert, human adults. MOC activity was elicited by 65 dB SPL, contralateral broadband noise (CAS). Using tympanic membrane electrodes, approximately 10 h of data collection were needed from each subject to yield reliable measurements of the MOC reflex inhibition on CAP amplitudes from one click level. The CAS produced a 16% reduction of CAP amplitude, equivalent to a 1.98 dB effective attenuation (averaged over five subjects). Based on previous reports of efferent effects as functions of level and frequency, it is possible that much larger effective attenuations would be observed at lower sound levels or with clicks of higher frequency content. For a preliminary comparison, we also measured MOC reflex inhibition of DPOAEs evoked from the same ears with f2's near 4 kHz. The resulting effective attenuations on DPOAEs were, on average, less than half the effective attenuations on CAPs.

  18. "COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH INNER EAR MALFORMATIONS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Borghei S. Abdi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Performing cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformation has always been a matter of dispute. This study was designed to analyze the operative findings,complications, and postoperative performance of patients with inner ear anomalies who underwent cochlear implantation. Six patients with inner ear malformations underwent implantation in our academic tertiary referral center from 1997 to 2002. The average follow-up period was 27 months. Malformations included one incomplete partition, one common cavity, one narrow internal acoustic canal (IAC in a patient with Riley-Day syndrome and 3 cases of large vestibular aqueduct. All received multi-channel implants either Nucleus 22 or Clarion device. Facial nerve was anomalous in 2 cases. CSF gusher occurred in 4 patients, which was controlled with packing the cochleostomy site. In all cases, the full length of electrode array was inserted, except one with Mondini's dysplasia where insertion failed in the first operation and was referred to another center for a successful surgery on the opposite ear. No other surgical complications were encountered. In 4 cases, all the 22 electrodes could be activated. All patients showed improved hearing performance after implantation. Four showed open-set speech recognition. The one with narrow IAC showed improved awareness to environmental sounds. In the other case (common cavity, the perception tests could not be performed because of very young age. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformations is a successful way of rehabilitation, although complications should be expected and auditory responses may be highly variable and relatively moderate.

  19. Ototoxicity of paclitaxel in rat cochlear organotypic cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yang [Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan [Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Shi, Jian-rong [Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Salvi, Richard [Center for Hearing and Deafness, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Roth, Jerome A., E-mail: jaroth@buffalo.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University at Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used antineoplastic drug employed alone or in combination to treat many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel blocks microtubule depolymerization thereby stabilizing microtubules and suppressing cell proliferation and other cellular processes. Previous reports indicate that paclitaxel can cause mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and some histopathologic changes in the mouse cochlea; however, damage to the neurons and the underlying cell death mechanisms are poorly understood. To evaluate the ototoxicity of paclitaxel in more detail, cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal day 3 rats were treated with paclitaxel for 24 or 48 h with doses ranging from 1 to 30 μM. No obvious histopathologies were observed after 24 h treatment with any of the paclitaxel doses employed, but with 48 h treatment, paclitaxel damaged cochlear hair cells in a dose-dependent manner and also damaged auditory nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) near the base of the cochlea. TUNEL labeling was negative in the organ of Corti, but positive in SGN with karyorrhexis 48 h after 30 μM paclitaxel treatment. In addition, caspase-6, caspase-8 and caspase-9 labeling was present in SGN treated with 30 μM paclitaxel for 48 h. These results suggest that caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways are involved in paclitaxel-induced damage of SGN, but not hair cells in cochlea. - Highlights: • Paclitaxel was toxic to cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. • Paclitaxel-induced spiral ganglion degeneration was apoptotic. • Paclitaxel activated caspase-6, -8 and -8 in spiral ganglion neurons.

  20. Depression - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  1. Restudy of malformations of the internal auditory meatus, cochlear nerve canal and cochlear nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Youjin; YANG, Jun; Liu, Jinfen; Wu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to restudy the correlation between the internal auditory meatus (IAM), the cochlear nerve canal (CNC), the cochlear nerve (CN) and inner ear malformations. In this retrospective study design, the abnormal diameter of the IAM, CNC and CN in patients with any kind of inner ear malformations was evaluated using multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) (37 patients) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (18 patients). Of 37 MSCT-diagnosed patients, 2 had IAM atresia, 11...

  2. A speech processing study using an acoustic model of a multiple-channel cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying

    1998-10-01

    A cochlear implant is an electronic device designed to provide sound information for adults and children who have bilateral profound hearing loss. The task of representing speech signals as electrical stimuli is central to the design and performance of cochlear implants. Studies have shown that the current speech- processing strategies provide significant benefits to cochlear implant users. However, the evaluation and development of speech-processing strategies have been complicated by hardware limitations and large variability in user performance. To alleviate these problems, an acoustic model of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy is implemented in this study, in which a set of acoustic stimuli whose psychophysical characteristics are as close as possible to those produced by a cochlear implant are presented on normal-hearing subjects. To test the effectiveness and feasibility of this acoustic model, a psychophysical experiment was conducted to match the performance of a normal-hearing listener using model- processed signals to that of a cochlear implant user. Good agreement was found between an implanted patient and an age-matched normal-hearing subject in a dynamic signal discrimination experiment, indicating that this acoustic model is a reasonably good approximation of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy. The acoustic model was then used to examine the potential of the SPEAK strategy in terms of its temporal and frequency encoding of speech. It was hypothesized that better temporal and frequency encoding of speech can be accomplished by higher stimulation rates and a larger number of activated channels. Vowel and consonant recognition tests were conducted on normal-hearing subjects using speech tokens processed by the acoustic model, with different combinations of stimulation rate and number of activated channels. The results showed that vowel recognition was best at 600 pps and 8 activated channels, but further increases in stimulation rate and

  3. Fear of falling and depressive symptoms in Chinese elderly living in nursing homes: fall efficacy and activity level as mediator or moderator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K-L; Yeung, F K C; Wong, E C H

    2005-05-01

    Depression is a common problem for many Hong Kong Chinese elderly, especially those living in nursing homes. This study examines the relationship between fear of falling and depressive symptoms as well as the role of participation in physical activity and fall efficacy in the linkage between the fear of falling and depression. A sample of 100 residents living in nursing homes were interviewed. Using multiple regression models, we found that elderly persons who had greater fear of falling tended to report depressive symptoms more frequently after controlling socio-demographic and physical health status variables. In addition, activity involvement and fall efficacy acted as mediators and moderators in the link between the fear of falling and depression. Policy makers and aged care professional practitioners should find these findings valuable in promoting activity to aid in the prevention of depression amongst the elderly population.

  4. Electronic monitoring of psychomotor activity as a supplementary objective measure of depression severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Brage, Søren; Vinberg, Maj

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rating scales used to assess the severity of depression e.g. the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 17-item (HDRS-17) partly rely on the patient's subjective experience and reporting. Such subjective measures tend to have low reliability and adding objective measures to complement the a......-experimental daily life could be an objective supplementary method to measure the severity of depression and perhaps indicate presence of insomnia....

  5. Which type of social activities decrease depression in the elderly? An analysis of a population-based study in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hee Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine whether formal and informal social activities are associated with a lower risk of depression. Besides, we investigated which type of social activities may protect against late-life depression by gender using data from a population-based study of older Korean adults.Data for analysis were drawn from the 2010 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging. Study sample included 3968 Korean adults aged ≥ 65 years. Depression was measured using the 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies. Depression scale. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used.Among the informal activities, frequent contact by phone or letters with adult children is significantly associated with a lower risk of depression among older Korean adults, even after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. Face to face contact with close friends was negatively associated with depression in women, but not in men. Face to face contacts with adult children were not significantly associated with depression. All of formal social activities (attending religious activities, volunteering, and participating in alumni society or family councils, political or interest groups were not significantly associated with depression in both men and women.Informal social activities (contact by phone/letters with children and contact with friends may have a greater impact on geriatric depression than formal social activities in this population. Researchers need to consider gender differences when examining the relationship between social activity and depression. More research is warranted to examine the direction of associations between particular types of social activities and late-life depression across time.

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-Behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Behavioral Activation for Depression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Gregory Gahm, PhD, PI CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Geneva Foundation Tacoma, WA 98402...DATES COVERED 28 Feb 2011 - 27 Feb 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele- behavioral 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Health

  7. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Keith S.; Hollon, Steven D.; Dimidjian, Sona; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert J.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2008-01-01

    This study followed treatment responders from a randomized controlled trial of adults with major depression. Patients treated with medication but withdrawn onto pill-placebo had more relapse through 1 year of follow-up compared to patients who received prior behavioral activation, prior cognitive therapy, or continued medication. Prior…

  8. The contribution of active medication to combined treatments of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression: A meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Straten, van A.; Hollon, S.D.; Andersson, G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective:  Although there is sufficient evidence that combined treatments of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are more effective for depression in adults than each of the treatments alone, it remains unclear what the exact contribution of active medication is to the overall effects of combined tre

  9. Behavioral Activation as an Early Intervention for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression among Physically Injured Trauma Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy W.; Zatzick, Douglas F.; Ghesquiere, Angela; Jurkovich, Gregory J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptation of behavioral activation (BA) for the early intervention of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among physically injured survivors of traumatic injury, and presents pilot data on a small randomized effectiveness trial (N = 8). The application of BA to PTSD is based on the theory that increases in…

  10. The relationship between postnatal depression, sociodemographic factors, levels of partner support, and levels of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam eSaligeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: postnatal depression (PND is defined as a psychological mood disorder that occurs in a mother within six weeks of her giving birth. It refers to an episode that causes mood disturbance and it could begin in, or extend into, the postpartum period. It is thought to have a high impact upon the mother’s health as well as the family’s functioning and the child’s development. Socio-demographic, psych-social, and physical activity factors may all contribute to postpartum mood and ability to cope with responsibilities. The primary aim of this study was to determine which of these factors predicted PND in postpartum women. A secondary aim was to identify the socio-demographic and psycho-social predictors of physical activity in postpartum women . Methods: The study used a cross-sectional correlational design. A sample of 150 postpartum women was sent a package of six standardised questionnaires. Results: There was no association between physical activity and PND; however, older mothers, mothers of younger children, mothers who are less reluctant to ask for help, and mothers who are more satisfied with the help they get experience lower levels of PND. Mothers of older babies, mothers with more children, and less educated mothers are more likely to engage in caregiving activities, whereas mothers with fewer children and higher levels of partner support are more likely to engage in occupational activities. None of the socio-demographic factors or any of the parenting factors predicted levels of sporting activity.

  11. Peer Relationships of Children with Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat-Chava, Yael; Deignan, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of interviews with parents of children with cochlear implants found that, although implants have the potential to improve deaf children's relationships with hearing peers, these children still face communication obstacles which impede their social relationships. Results are discussed from the viewpoints of…

  12. Cochlear implants: our experience and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins, Mariane Barreto Brandão

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cochlear Implants are important for individuals with severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Objective: Evaluate the experience of cochlear implant center of Otorhinolaryngology through the analysis of records of 9 patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective study performed with the patients records. Number 0191.0.107.000-11 ethics committee approval. We evaluated gender, etiology, age at surgery, duration of deafness, classification of deafness, unilateral or bilateral surgery, intraoperative and postoperative neural response and impedance of the electrodes in intraoperative and preoperative tests and found those that counter-indicated surgery. Results: There were 6 pediatric and 3 adult patients. Four male and 5 female. Etiologies: maternal rubella, cytomegalovirus, ototoxicity, meningitis, and sudden deafness. The age at surgery and duration of deafness ranged from 2 - 46 years and 2 - 18 years, respectively. Seven patients were pre-lingual. All had profound bilateral PA. There were 7 bilateral implants. Intraoperative complications: hemorrhage. Complications after surgery: vertigo and internal device failure. In 7 patients the electrodes were implanted through. Telemetry showed satisfactory neural response and impedance. CT and MRI was performed in all patients. We found enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct in a patient and incudomalleolar malformation. Conclusion: The cochlear implant as a form of auditory rehabilitation is well established and spreading to different centers specialized in otoaudiology. Thus, the need for structured services and trained professionals in this type of procedure is clear.

  13. Cochlear implants: our experience and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Mariane Barreto Brandão; de Lima, Francis Vinicius Fontes; Santos, Ronaldo Carvalho; Santos, Arlete Cristina Granizo; Barreto, Valéria Maria Prado; de Jesus, Eduardo Passos Fiel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Cochlear Implants are important for individuals with severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Objective: Evaluate the experience of cochlear implant center of Otorhinolaryngology through the analysis of records of 9 patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective study performed with the patients records. Number 0191.0.107.000-11 ethics committee approval. We evaluated gender, etiology, age at surgery, duration of deafness, classification of deafness, unilateral or bilateral surgery, intraoperative and postoperative neural response and impedance of the electrodes in intraoperative and preoperative tests and found those that counter-indicated surgery. Results: There were 6 pediatric and 3 adult patients. Four male and 5 female. Etiologies: maternal rubella, cytomegalovirus, ototoxicity, meningitis, and sudden deafness. The age at surgery and duration of deafness ranged from 2–46 years and 2–18 years, respectively. Seven patients were pre-lingual. All had profound bilateral PA. There were 7 bilateral implants. Intraoperative complications: hemorrhage. Complications after surgery: vertigo and internal device failure. In 7 patients the electrodes were implanted through. Telemetry showed satisfactory neural response and impedance. CT and MRI was performed in all patients. We found enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct in a patient and incudomalleolar malformation. Conclusion: The cochlear implant as a form of auditory rehabilitation is well established and spreading to different centers specialized in otoaudiology. Thus, the need for structured services and trained professionals in this type of procedure is clear. PMID:25991976

  14. THE IMPACT OF MINING ACTIVITIES ON THE WEST OF PETROŞANI DEPRESSION AND IDENTIFICATION OF AFFECTED GEOMORPHOLOGICAL RESOURCES. CASE STUDY: ANINOASA-VULCAN-LUPENI SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. NIMARĂ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Impact of Mining Activities on the West of Petroşani Depression and Identification of Affected Geomorphological Resources. Case Study: Aninoasa- Vulcan-Lupeni Sector. The west region of Petroşani Depression, like the whole depression, suffered some changes in the geomorphologic environment as a result of coal mining activities. Following displacement processes of mass materials and relocation of it, changes in shape are brought to the original territory that contrast with the natural landscape. The human impact on the West of Petroşani Depression and hence to the analyzed sector is especially highlighted as it materializes into waste dumps and coal pits.

  15. Structured pro-active care for chronic depression by practice nurses in primary care: a qualitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Bennett

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This qualitative study explored the impact and appropriateness of structured pro-active care reviews by practice nurses for patients with chronic or recurrent depression and dysthymia within the ProCEED trial. ProCEED (Pro-active Care and its Evaluation for Enduring Depression was a United Kingdom wide randomised controlled trial, comparing usual general practitioner care with structured 'pro-active care' which involved 3 monthly review appointments with practice nurses over 2 years for patients with chronic or recurrent depression. METHOD: In-depth interviews were completed with 41 participants: 26 patients receiving pro-active care and 15 practice nurses providing this care. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using a 'framework' approach. RESULTS: Patients perceived the practice nurses to be appropriate professionals to engage with regarding their depression and most nurses felt confident in a case management role. The development of a therapeutic alliance between the patient and nurse was central to this model and, where it appeared lacking, dissatisfaction was felt by both patients and nurses with a likely negative impact on outcomes. Patient and nurse factors impacting on the therapeutic alliance were identified and nurse typologies explored. DISCUSSION: Pro-active care reviews utilising practice nurses as case managers were found acceptable by the majority of patients and practice nurses and may be a suitable way to provide care for patients with long-term depression in primary care. Motivated and interested practice nurses could be an appropriate and valuable resource for this patient group. This has implications for resource decisions by clinicians and commissioners within primary care.

  16. Microglial NLRP3 inflammasome activation mediates IL-1β-related inflammation in prefrontal cortex of depressive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Chen, Xu-Yang; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2014-10-01

    Depression is an inflammatory disorder. Pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) may play a pivotal role in the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation of depression. Here, we investigated IL-1β alteration in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-exposed rats, a well-documented model of depression, and further explored the molecular mechanism by which CUMS procedure induced IL-1β-related CNS inflammation. We showed that 12-week CUMS procedure remarkably increased PFC IL-1β mRNA and protein levels in depressive-like behavior of rats, without significant alteration of serum and CSF IL-1β levels. We found that CUMS procedure significantly caused PFC nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway activation in rats. The intriguing finding in this study was the induced activation of nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome with the increased IL-1β maturation in PFC of CUMS rats, suggesting a new grade of regulatory mechanism for IL-1β-related CNS inflammation. Moreover, microglial activation and astrocytic function impairment were observed in PFC of CUMS rats. The increased co-location of NLRP3 and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) protein expression supported that microglia in glial cells was the primary contributor for CUMS-induced PFC NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats. These alterations in CUMS rats were restored by chronic treatment of the antidepressant fluoxetine, indicating that fluoxetine-mediated rat PFC IL-1β reduction involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. These findings provide in vivo evidence that microglial NLRP3 inflammasome activation is a mediator of IL-1β-related CNS inflammation during chronic stress, and suggest a new therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of depression.

  17. Brain activation predicts treatment improvement in patients with major depressive disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samson, Andrea C

    2012-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with alterations in brain function that might be useful for therapy evaluation. The current study aimed to identify predictors for therapy improvement and to track functional brain changes during therapy. Twenty-one drug-free patients with MDD underwent functional MRI twice during performance of an emotional perception task: once before and once after 4 weeks of antidepressant treatment (mirtazapine or venlafaxine). Twelve healthy controls were investigated once with the same methods. A significant difference between groups was a relative greater activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in the patients vs. controls. Before treatment, patients responding better to pharmacological treatment showed greater activation in the dorsomedial PFC (dmPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (pCC) and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) when viewing of negative emotional pictures was compared with the resting condition. Activations in the caudate nucleus and insula contrasted for emotional compared to neutral stimuli were also associated with successful treatment. Responders had also significantly higher levels of activation, compared to non-responders, in a range of other brain regions. Brain activation related to treatment success might be related to altered self-referential processes and a differential response to external emotional stimuli, suggesting differences in the processing of emotionally salient stimuli between those who are likely to respond to pharmacological treatment and those who will not. The present investigation suggests the pCC, dmPFC, SFG, caudate nucleus and insula may have a key role as a biological marker for treatment response and predictor for therapeutic success.

  18. Assessment of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimichalis, Michail; Sim, Jae Hoon; Huber, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the functional results of a new, active, acoustic-mechanical hearing implant, the Direct Acoustic Cochlear Stimulation Partial Implant (DACS PI), in a preclinical study. The DACS PI is an electromagnetic device fixed to the mastoid by screws and coupled to a standard stapes prosthesis by an artificial incus (AI). The function of the DACS PI-aided reconstruction was assessed by determining: (1) the maximum equivalent sound pressure level (SPL) of the implant, which was obtained from measurements of the volume displacement at the round window in normal and implanted ears, and (2) the quality at the coupling interface between the AI of the DACS and the stapes prosthesis, which was quantified from measurements of relative motions between the AI and the prosthesis. Both measurements were performed with fresh temporal bones using a scanning laser Doppler interferometry system. The expected maximum equivalent SPL with a typical driving voltage of 0.3 V was about 115-125 dB SPL up to 1.5 kHz in reconstruction with the DACS PI, and decreased with a roll-off slope of about 65 dB/decade, reaching 90 dB SPL at 8 kHz. The large roll-off relative to a normal ear was presumed to be a relatively high inductive impedance of the coil of the DACS PI actuator at higher frequencies. Good coupling quality between the AI and the prosthesis was achieved below the resonance (∼1.5 kHz) of the DACS PI for all tested stapes prostheses. Above the resonance, the SMart Piston, which is composed of a shape-memory alloy, had the best coupling quality.

  19. Specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms as predictors of activities of daily living in older adults with heterogeneous cognitive backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Jonas J; Diniz, Breno S; Bicalho, Maria A; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Nicolato, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Edgar N; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive functioning influences activities of daily living (ADL). However, studies reporting the association between ADL and neuropsychological performance show inconsistent results regarding what specific cognitive domains are related to each specific functional domains. Additionally, whether depressive symptoms are associated with a worse functional performance in older adults is still under explored. We investigated if specific cognitive domains and depressive symptoms would affect different aspects of ADL. Participants were 274 older adults (96 normal aging participants, 85 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 93 patients probable with mild Alzheimer's disease dementia) with low formal education (∼4 years). Measures of ADL included three complexity levels: Self-care, Instrumental-Domestic, and Instrumental-Complex. The specific cognitive functions were evaluated through a factorial strategy resulting in four cognitive domains: Executive Functions, Language/Semantic Memory, Episodic Memory, and Visuospatial Abilities. The Geriatric Depression Scale measured depressive symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis showed executive functions and episodic memory as significant predictors of Instrumental-Domestic ADL, and executive functions, episodic memory and language/semantic memory as predictors of Instrumental-Complex ADL (22 and 28% of explained variance, respectively). Ordinal regression analysis showed the influence of specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms on each one of the instrumental ADL. We observed a heterogeneous pattern of association with explained variance ranging from 22 to 38%. Different instrumental ADL had specific cognitive predictors and depressive symptoms were predictive of ADL involving social contact. Our results suggest a specific pattern of influence depending on the specific instrumental daily living activity.

  20. Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Atypical Depression: A Pilot Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Lauren M.; Munroe, Mary K.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions for atypical depression (AD) have been relatively ignored in the clinical research literature, despite evidence that the atypical subtype of major depression is marked by earlier age of onset, longer duration of mood episode, greater symptom severity, and poorer response to pharmacologic treatment. Given the symptom…

  1. Mediators of synaptic activity in anxiety- and depression-related behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselycznyk, Carly

    2012-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are leading causes of years lost to disability, despite antidepressants being among the most commonly prescribed medications. Most currently prescribed antidepressants were found serendipitously rather than from an understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying depression. Recent evidence supports instead the antidepressant efficacy of glutamate-targeting drugs, such as ketamine, which promote plastic changes in synaptic structure and function. ...

  2. Expanding Behavioral Activation to Depressed Adolescents: Lessons Learned in Treatment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Elizabeth; Schloredt, Kelly; Gudmundsen, Gretchen; Martell, Christopher; Dimidjian, Sona

    2011-01-01

    Depression during adolescence represents a significant public health concern. It is estimated that up to 20% of adolescents experience an episode of depression that interferes with academic and social functioning and is associated with an increased risk for self-harm. Although significant progress has been made in the last decade in treating…

  3. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Depression: Description and Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Baruch, David E.; Gaynor, Scott T.

    2006-01-01

    The field of clinical behavior analysis is growing rapidly and has the potential to affect and transform mainstream cognitive behavior therapy. To have such an impact, the field must provide a formulation of and intervention strategies for clinical depression, the "common cold" of outpatient populations. Two treatments for depression have emerged:…

  4. Effects of Delayed Second Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Rui-ming; WU Xi-hong; JANG Zi-gang; JING Yuan-yuan; LIN Yun-juan; YU Li-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective Since Helms' successful bilateral cochlear implantation with good results in 1996, there have been increasing number of reports on bilateral cochlear implantation. Most second device have been implantated within one year after the first. Considering effects of long time auditory deprivation, it is not clear whether a delayed second cochlear implant serves to add additional benefits and how it may interact with central nervous system plasticity. Methods Three cases who received delayed second cochlear implants at People's Hospital of Peking University from 2002 to 2005 were reviewed. The interval between the first and second implants was longer than 2 years in all three patients. Sound perception, and unilateral/bilateral speech discrimination in quiet and noise were evaluated. In addition, GAP detection test was conducted in one patient. Results In one case,having both implants on provided improved performance compared to using only one implant both in quiet and noise. Presumably due to visual interference from lip-reading or short interval between second implant and testing,one patient showed no improvement from using the second implant either in quiet or noise, while the last case demonstrated additional benefits from the second implant only in quiet. In all three patients, performance in recognizing the four tones in Mandarin was superior over word recognition. Conclusions Considerable plasticity in the cerebral auditory center is preserved, despite long acoustic deprivation in some children who have received unilateral cochlear implant. Delayed second implants can result in significant improvements in some of these children. Visual interference from lip-reading may be an obstacle during retraining. The better recognition of tones in the Mandarin language may represent a different sound discrimination mechanism in the auditory system,although it may also be related to the signal processing mechanisms of the implant used (MED-EL COMBI 40+).

  5. The effect of muscle length on force depression after active shortening in soleus muscle of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Isometric muscle force after active shortening is reduced [force depression (FD)]. The mechanism is incompletely understood but work delivered during shortening has been suggested to be the main determinant of FD. However, whether muscle length affects the sensitivity of FD to work is unknown, although this information might add to the understanding of the phenomenon. The aim of this study is to investigate the length dependence of the FD/work ratio (Q). Therefore, isometric force production (ISO) of 10 incubated mouse soleus muscles was compared to isometric force after 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mm shortening (IAS) at different end lengths ranging from L(0) - 3 to L(0) + 1.8 mm in steps of 0.6 mm. FD was calculated as the force difference between an ISO and IAS contraction at the same activation time (6 s) and end length. We confirm the strong relation between FD and work at L(0) (R² = 0.92) and found that FD is length dependent with a maximum of 8.8 ± 0.3% at L(0) + 1.2 mm for 0.6 mm shortening amplitude. Q was only constant for short muscle lengths (muscle length. The observed length dependence of Q indicates that FD is not only determined by work produced during shortening but also by a length-dependent factor, possibly actin compliance, which should be incorporated in any mechanism explaining FD.

  6. Activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC)α or PKCε as an Approach to Increase Morphine Tolerance in Respiratory Depression and Lethal OverdoseS⃞

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Long-term use of opioids is hindered by respiratory depression and the possibility for fatal overdose in drug abusers. This is attributed to higher levels of tolerance that develops against antinociception than to respiratory depression. Identifying important mechanisms that would increase morphine respiratory depression and overdose tolerance could lead to the safer use of opioids. Because protein kinase C (PKC) activity mediates the development and maintenance of morphine antinociceptive to...

  7. Cochlear compression: effects of low-frequency biasing on quadratic distortion product otoacoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lin

    2004-12-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are generated from the nonlinear transduction n cochlear outer hair cells. The transducer function demonstrating a compressive nonlinearity can be estimated from low-frequency modulation of DPOAEs. Experimental results from the gerbils showed that the magnitude of quadratic difference tone (QDT, f2-f1) was either enhanced or suppressed depending on the phase of the low-frequency bias tone. Within one period of the bias tone, QDT magnitudes exhibited two similar modulation patterns, each resembling the absolute value of the second derivative of the transducer function. In the time domain, the center notches of the modulation patterns occurred around the zero crossings of the bias pressure, whereas peaks corresponded to the increase or decrease in bias pressure. Evaluated with respect to the bias pressure, modulated QDT magnitude displayed a double-modulation pattern marked by a separation of the center notches. Loading/unloading of the cochlear transducer or rise/fall in bias pressure shifted the center notch to positive or negative sound pressures, indicating a mechanical hysteresis. These results suggest that QDT arises from the compression that coexists with the active hysteresis in cochlear transduction. Modulation of QDT magnitude reflects the dynamic regulation of cochlear transducer gain and compression.

  8. Electrokinetic shape changes of cochlear outer hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachar, Bechara; Brownell, William E.; Altschuler, Richard; Fex, Jörgen

    1986-07-01

    Rapid mechanical changes have been associated with electrical activity in a variety of non-muscle excitable cells1-5. Recently, mechanical changes have been reported in cochlear hair cells6-8. Here we describe electrically evoked mechanical changes in isolated cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) with characteristics which suggest that direct electrokinetic phenomena are implicated in the response. OHCs make up one of two mechanosensitive hair cell populations in the mammalian cochlea; their role may be to modulate the micromechanical properties of the hearing organ through mechanical feedback mechanisms6-10. In the experiments described here, we applied sinusoidally modulated electrical potentials across isolated OHCs; this produced oscillatory elongation and shortening of the cells and oscillatory displacements of intracellular organdies. The movements were a function of the direction and strength of the electrical field, were inversely related to the ionic concentration of the medium, and occurred in the presence of metabolic uncouplers. The cylindrical shape of the OHCs and the presence of a system of membranes within the cytoplasm-laminated cisternae11-may provide the anatomical substrate for electrokinetic phenomena such as electro-osmosis12,13.

  9. Allele-specific programming of Npy and epigenetic effects of physical activity in a genetic model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melas, P A; Lennartsson, A; Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, H; Wei, Y; Åberg, E; Werme, M; Rogdaki, M; Mannervik, M; Wegener, G; Brené, S; Mathé, A A; Lavebratt, C

    2013-05-07

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been implicated in depression, emotional processing and stress response. Part of this evidence originates from human single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) studies. In the present study, we report that a SNP in the rat Npy promoter (C/T; rs105431668) affects in vitro transcription and DNA-protein interactions. Genotyping studies showed that the C-allele of rs105431668 is present in a genetic rat model of depression (Flinders sensitive line; FSL), while the SNP's T-allele is present in its controls (Flinders resistant line; FRL). In vivo experiments revealed binding of a transcription factor (CREB2) and a histone acetyltransferase (Ep300) only at the SNP locus of the FRL. Accordingly, the FRL had increased hippocampal levels of Npy mRNA and H3K18 acetylation; a gene-activating histone modification maintained by Ep300. Next, based on previous studies showing antidepressant-like effects of physical activity in the FSL, we hypothesized that physical activity may affect Npy's epigenetic status. In line with this assumption, physical activity was associated with increased levels of Npy mRNA and H3K18 acetylation. Physical activity was also associated with reduced mRNA levels of a histone deacetylase (Hdac5). Conclusively, the rat rs105431668 appears to be a functional Npy SNP that may underlie depression-like characteristics. In addition, the achieved epigenetic reprogramming of Npy provides molecular support for the putative effectiveness of physical activity as a non-pharmacological antidepressant.

  10. The Effect of Reminiscence Therapy on Cognition, Depression, and Activities of Daily Living for Patients With Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru Aşiret, Güler; Kapucu, Sevgisun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was, conducted with experimental design, to investigate the effect of reminiscence therapy on cognition, depression, activities of daily living of institutionalized mild and moderate Alzheimer patients. The study was conducted with a total of 62 patients (31 intervention group and 31 control group) in four home care in Ankara, Turkey. Study was done between the July 1, 2013 and December 20, 2014. Reminiscence therapy sessions were held with groups consists of 4-5 patients, once a week with 30-35 minute duration for 12 weeks. Standardized Mini Mental Test was used in sample selection. Patients were listed through their mini mental test scores, and randomized as odd numbers to control group and even numbers to intervention group. Data were collected with forms developed by researcher 'Data Sheet' and 'Activities of Daily Living Follow-up Form' as well as scales 'Standardized Mini Mental Test' and 'Geriatric Depression Scale'. Chi-square, Mann Whitney-U test, variance analyses in repeated measures and Bonferroni tests were used for analysis. The increase in mean Standardized Mini Mental Test score and the decrease in mean Geriatric Depression Scale score of the individuals in the intervention group compared to the control group at the end of the reminiscence therapy was statistically significant (P < 0.05). At the end of reminiscence therapy sessions, increase in cognition and decrease in depression were found statistically significant in intervention group.

  11. Validation of the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS)-Psychometric properties of the long and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhr, Kristina; Hautzinger, Martin; Krisch, Katharina; Berking, Matthias; Ebert, David Daniel

    2016-04-01

    With the development of the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale (BADS) by Kanter, et al. [1], different behavioral aspects of depression like activation, rumination or avoidance, and functional impairment can be measured. The long and the short versions of the BADS, however, show differences in the quality of psychometric properties. We wanted to validate the short and long forms of the BADS. We therefore evaluated the factor structure, the psychometric properties, and the construct validity of the long version and the subscales in a clinically depressed German sample (n=258) in study 1. In study 2, we explored the factor structure and the psychometric properties of the short version of the BADS in a subsyndromal sample with elevated depressive symptoms (n=406). In study 1, our results replicated the four factor solution of the BADS-25 original version and showed good psychometric properties. However, with regard to the BADS-9 only the French factor solution of the short BADS-9 demonstrated acceptable fit with low internal consistency of the subscale Avoidance. Thus, only the total score of the short form can be recommended.

  12. Comparação dos níveis de ansiedade e depressão entre idosos ativos e sedentários Comparison of levels of anxiety and depression among active and sedentary elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Minghelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A ansiedade e a depressão constituem um problema de saúde pública nos idosos. Atualmente, tem-se demonstrado uma associação positiva entre a prática de atividade física e a boa saúde mental. OBJETIVO: Comparar a relação entre os níveis de ansiedade e depressão entre idosos ativos e sedentários. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi constituída por 72 idosos, divididos num grupo de 38 idosos sedentários (GS e outro grupo (GA de 34 fisicamente ativos. Estes responderam a um questionário com características sociodemográficas e a Escala de Ansiedade e Depressão para Hospital Geral. RESULTADOS: As variáveis que influenciaram a presença de ansiedade ou depressão foram o nível de atividade física (p BACKGROUND: The anxiety and depression are a public health problem in the elderly. Currently some studies have been shown a positive association between physical activity and good mental health. OBJECTIVE: To compare the possible relationship between levels of anxiety and depression among active and sedentary elderly. METHODS: The sample comprised a total of 72 patients divided into one group of 38 elderly subjects (GS and another group of 34 physically assets (GA. These answered a questionnaire with socio-demographic characteristics and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. RESULTS: The variables that influenced the presence of anxiety and depression were the level of physical activity (p < 0,001 and the level of instruction (p < 0,01. The GS showed 38 more probability to develop symptoms of anxiety and depression and subjects without qualifications had 11 more probability to develop these symptoms. For the GS 35 (92,1% patients had levels of anxiety or depression and 3 (7,9% did not. In GA, the presence of anxiety or depression were observed only in 8 (23,5% and the remaining 26 (76,5% revalidates not any kind of these symptoms (p < 0,05. DISCUSSION: Practicing physical activity may represent a very important factor to reduce

  13. Handling Depression | Smokefree 60+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everyone feels blue now and then. It's a part of life. But if your feelings last more than few days and interfere with your normal daily activities, you may be suffering from depression. On this page: Symptoms of depression Who gets depressed and why?

  14. Addition of exogenous NAD+ prevents mefloquine-induced neuroaxonal and hair cell degeneration through reduction of caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in cochlear organotypic cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalian Ding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mefloquine is widely used for the treatment of malaria. However, this drug is known to induce neurological side effects including depression, anxiety, balance disorder, and sensorineural hearing loss. Yet, there is currently no treatment for these side effects. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we show that the coenzyme NAD(+, known to play a critical role in maintaining the appropriate cellular redox environment, protects cochlear axons and sensory hair cells from mefloquine-induced degeneration in cultured rat cochleae. Mefloquine alone destroyed hair cells and nerve fiber axons in rat cochlear organotypics cultures in a dose-dependent manner, while treatment with NAD(+ protected axons and hair cells from mefloquine-induced degeneration. Furthermore, cochlear organs treated with mefloquine showed increased oxidative stress marker levels, including superoxide and protein carbonyl, and increased apoptosis marker levels, including TUNEL-positive nuclei and caspases-3. Treatment with NAD(+ reduced the levels of these oxidative stress and apoptosis markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings suggest that that mefloquine disrupts the cellular redox environment and induces oxidative stress in cochlear hair cells and nerve fibers leading to caspases-3-mediated apoptosis of these structures. Exogenous NAD(+ suppresses mefloquine-induced oxidative stress and prevents the degeneration of cochlear axons and sensory hair cells caused by mefloquine treatment.

  15. Lower Odds of Poststroke Symptoms of Depression When Physical Activity Guidelines Met: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Chris M.; Simpson, Annie N.

    2017-01-01

    Background One-third of individuals with stroke report symptoms of depression, which has a negative impact on recovery. Physical activity (PA) is a potentially effective therapy. Our objective was to examine the associations of subjectively assessed PA levels and symptoms of depression in a nationally representative stroke sample. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 175 adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012 cycle. Moderate, vigorous, and combination equivalent PA metabolic equivalent (MET)-minutes per week averages were derived from the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire, and .the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines/American College of Sports Medicine recommendations of ≥500 MET-minutes per week of moderate, vigorous, or combination equivalent PA were used as cut points. Depression symptoms were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Results Meeting moderate PA guidelines resulted in 74% lower odds of having depression symptoms (P < .0001) and 89% lower odds of major symptoms of depression (P = .0003). Meeting vigorous guidelines showed a 91% lower odds of having mild symptoms of depression (P = .04). Participating in some moderate, vigorous, or combination equivalent PA revealed the odds of depression symptoms 13 times greater compared with meeting guidelines (P = .005); odds of mild symptoms of depression were 9 times greater (P = .01); and odds of major symptoms of depression were 15 times greater (P = .006). Conclusions There is a lower risk of developing mild symptoms of depression when vigorous guidelines for PA are met and developing major symptoms of depression when moderate guidelines met. Participating in some PA is not enough to reduce the risk of depression symptoms. PMID:27145542

  16. A case study in treating chronic comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression with behavioral activation and pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arco, Lucius

    2015-06-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is difficult to treat, and more so when comorbid with major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of the present case study was to examine effects of behavioral activation (BA) and pharmacotherapy with an adult with chronic comorbid OCD and MDD. BA aimed at increasing approach behaviors in life activities and decreasing avoidant and inactive behaviors. After 21 months of treatment at a community mental health clinic, OCD and MDD symptoms, including compulsive checking behaviors, were no longer at clinical levels. Symptom alleviation and psychological health improved in line with increases in activities of living such as self-care, domestic, social, and studying, and decreases in medications from a regimen of mood stabilizers and anxiolytics to a sole antidepressant. The participant was satisfied with treatment procedures and outcome. The results add to growing evidence of effective BA treatments for comorbid disorders that include depression.

  17. Prevalence of inner ear anomalies among cochlear implant candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Aldhafeeri, Ahmad M.; Alsanosi, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of inner ear anomalies and the frequency of different anomaly types among cochlear implant recipients. Methods: This study included a retrospective chart review of all patients who received cochlear implants between January 2009 and January 2013 in King Abdulaziz University Hospital cochlear implant program in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All subjects underwent thin-cut CT of the temporal bone and MRI. The collected data included age, gender, and CT and MRI fi...

  18. INDICATION AND SURGICAL CONSIDERATION OF COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION AT WAHIDIN HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Savitri, Eka

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To demonstrate selection criteria for cochlear implant candidates as well as the outcome of quality of life (QoL) after cochlearimplant surgery. MATERIAL AND METHOD Retrospective review was performed of all cochlear implants at Wahidin Hospital. A total number of 5 cochlear implantations were performed during the period of April 2003 to April 2004. Inclusion criteria were established and the audiological criteria were then evaluated using the OAE, BERA and ASSR test. The e...

  19. Inverse Effects of Oxytocin on Attributing Mental Activity to Others in Depressed and Healthy Subjects: A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pincus

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxytocin is a stress-attenuating and pro-social neuropeptide. To date, no study has looked at the effects of oxytocin in modulating brain activity in depressed individuals nor attempted to correlate this activity with attribution of mental activity in others. Method: We enrolled 10 unmedicated depressed adults and 10 matched healthy controls in a crossover, double blind placebo controlled fmri 40 i.u. intra-nasal oxytocin study (20 i.u. per nostril. Each subject performed Reading the Mind in the Eyes task (RMET before and after inhalation of oxytocin or placebo control for a total of 80 scans. Results: Before oxytocin administration, RMET engaged medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, amygdala, insula and associative areas. Depressed subjects showed increased anterior ventral activation for the RMET minus gender identification contrast whereas matched controls showed increased dorsal and frontal activity. Compared to placebo, oxytocin in depressed subjects showed increased activity in the superior middle frontal gyrus and insula, while controls exhibited more activity in ventral regions. Oxytocin also led to inverse effects in reaction times on attribution task between groups, with controls getting faster and depressed individuals slower to respond. Conclusion: Depression is associated with increased paralimbic activity during emotional mental attribution of others, appearing to be distinctly modulated by oxytocin when compared to healthy controls. Further studies are needed to explore long-term exposure to pro-social neuropeptides on mood in depressed populations and assess their clinical relevance.

  20. Synaptophysin 1 Clears Synaptobrevin 2 from the Presynaptic Active Zone to Prevent Short-Term Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajit Rajappa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Release site clearance is an important process during synaptic vesicle (SV recycling. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism. Here we identify self-assembly of exocytosed Synaptobrevin 2 (Syb2 and Synaptophysin 1 (Syp1 by homo- and hetero-oligomerization into clusters as key mechanisms mediating release site clearance for preventing cis-SNARE complex formation at the active zone (AZ. In hippocampal neurons from Syp1 knockout mice, neurons expressing a monomeric Syb2 mutant, or after acute block of the ATPase N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF, responsible for cis-SNARE complex disassembly, we found strong frequency-dependent short-term depression (STD, whereas retrieval of Syb2 by compensatory endocytosis was only affected weakly. Defects in Syb2 endocytosis were stimulus- and frequency-dependent, indicating that Syp1 is not essential for Syb2 retrieval, but for its efficient clearance upstream of endocytosis. Our findings identify an SV protein as a release site clearance factor.

  1. CNS Depressant and Antiepileptic Activities of the Methanol Extract of the Leaves of Ipomoea Aquatica Forsk

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    Dhanasekaran Sivaraman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system (CNS depressant and antiepileptic activities of the methanol extract of the leaves of Ipomoea aquatica Forsk (IAF were investigated on various animal models including pentobarbitone sleeping time and hole-board exploratory behavior for sedation tests and strychnine, picrotoxin and pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in mice. IAF (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o., like chlorpromazine HCl (1 mg/kg, i.m., produced a dose-dependent prolongation of pentobarbitone sleeping time and suppression of exploratory behavior. IAF (200 and 400 mg/kg produced dose-dependent and significant increases in onset to clonic and tonic convulsions and at 400 mg/kg, showed complete protection against seizures induced by strychnine and picrotoxin but not with pentylenetetrazole. Acute oral toxicity test, up to 14 days, did not produce any visible signs of toxicity. These results suggest that potentially antiepileptic compounds are present in leaf extract of IAF that deserve the study of their identity and mechanism of action.

  2. Experiences of a guided smartphone-based behavioral activation therapy for depression: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien Hoa Ly

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a number of studies have investigated treatments administered via smartphones showing that this treatment format has a potential to be effective. However, we still have limited knowledge of how patients experience this treatment format. The objective of this study was to explore participants' views of a smartphone-based behavioral activation treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 strategically (participants with different overall experiences selected participants, suffering from major depression according to the DSM-IV. The interview data were processed with the aid of thematic analysis. The analysis generated the three main themes: Commitment, Treatment and Lack of important components, with attached subthemes. In conclusion, the findings from the current study correspond with existing knowledge in the field of internet-based treatment. Considering that this kind of treatment is still quite new, the need for further research and development is considerable. Nevertheless, its availability, assimilation into users' everyday lives and possible motivational qualities speak of its potential.

  3. Method of treating depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, Fritz

    2013-04-09

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  4. Method of treating depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Fritz [East Patchogue, NY

    2012-01-24

    Methods for treatment of depression-related mood disorders in mammals, particularly humans are disclosed. The methods of the invention include administration of compounds capable of enhancing glutamate transporter activity in the brain of mammals suffering from depression. ATP-sensitive K.sup.+ channel openers and .beta.-lactam antibiotics are used to enhance glutamate transport and to treat depression-related mood disorders and depressive symptoms.

  5. Behavioral Activation and Therapeutic Exposure: An Investigation of Relative Symptom Changes in PTSD and Depression during the Course of Integrated Behavioral Activation, Situational Exposure, and Imaginal Exposure Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Daniel F.; Price, Matthew; Strachan, Martha; Yuen, Erica K.; Milanak, Melissa E.; Acierno, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Effectiveness of exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be adversely influenced by comorbid disorders. The present study investigated behavioral activation and therapeutic exposure (BA-TE), a new integrated treatment designed specifically for comorbid symptoms of PTSD and depression. Combat veterans with PTSD (N = 117)…

  6. Platelet activating factors are associated with depressive symptoms in coronary artery disease patients: a hypothesis-generating study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazereeuw G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Graham Mazereeuw,1,2,4 Nathan Herrmann,1,5 Hongbin Xu,3,4 Alexandre P Blanchard,3,4 Daniel Figeys,3,4 Paul I Oh,6 Steffany AL Bennett,3,4 Krista L Lanctôt1,2,4–61Hurvitz Brain Sciences Program, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Ottawa Institute of Systems Biology and Neural Regeneration Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 4CIHR  Training Program in Neurodegenerative Lipidomics, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 5Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 6UHN Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, ON, CanadaIntroduction: Depression is a frequent complication of coronary artery disease (CAD with an unknown etiology. Platelet activating factor (PAF lipids, which are associated with CAD, have recently been linked with novel proposed etiopathological mechanisms for depression such as inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and vascular endothelial dysfunction.Methods and results: This hypothesis-generating study investigated the relationships between various PAF species and depressive symptoms in 26 CAD patients (age: 60.6±9.2 years, 69% male, mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAM-D] score: 11.8±5.2, HAM-D range: 3–20. Plasma PAF analyses were performed using high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in precursor ion scan. Significant associations between depressive symptom severity (HAM-D score and a greater plasma abundance of the PAFs phosphocholine (PC PC(O-12:0/2:0 (r=0.49, P=0.01, PC(O-14:1/2:0 (r=0.43, P=0.03, PC(O-17:3/2:0 (r=0.44, P=0.04, and PC(O-18:3/2:0 (r=0.50, P=0.01 were observed. Associations between those PAFs and HAM-D score persisted after adjusting for age and sex.Conclusion: These

  7. The Temporal Order of Changes in Physical Activity and Subjective Sleep in Depressed Versus Nondepressed Individuals : Findings From the MOOVD Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Mara E J; Oude Oosterik, Nicole A M; Bos, Elisabeth H; de Groot, Izaäk W; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; de Jonge, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between physical activity and sleep, but it is unclear what the temporal order of this association is and whether it differs for depressed patients and healthy controls. Using a multiple repeated observations design, 27 depressed and 27 pair-matched

  8. Atypical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Atypical depression By Mayo Clinic Staff Any type of depression can make you feel sad and keep you from enjoying life. However, atypical depression — also called depression with atypical features — means that ...

  9. Postpartum depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression. Alternative Names Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions References American Psychiatric Association. Depressive disorders. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American ...

  10. The parents as assessors of the quality of life of their cochlear implanted children

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    Silvia Andrea BORKOSKI-BARREIRO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Quality of life refers to the hability of an individual to enjoy normal life activities, including aspects of functional capacity and well-being. The concept of quality of life has been increasingly used in the field of health assessments. Only recently have the effects of Cochlear implantation from the perspective of emotional and social development begun to be investigate. To examine the results of health-related quality of life in cochlear implanted children between 11 and 12 years of age and their parents. Method: Observational, transversal descriptive study .24 unilateral or successive bilateral children implanted prelingually between 11 and 12 years of age and their parents. The pediatric quality of life questionnaire Persil ™ (Version 4.0, Spanish for Spain was used to measure health-related quality of life. It was completed independently by children and parents. Results: The results were analyzed by means of a T -Student test. The outcomes of children and parents at different scales evaluated show that statistically significant results appear on scales of emotional and academic functioning (p < 0.05. When comparing the overall result of the questionnaire with the different scales evaluated, all show statistically significant results (p < 0.05. Discussion: It has been proven the success of a cochlear implant in speech and language field, this leads us calls into question beyond these areas; yield at home, at school and in different social contexts. There are few studies that explain through parental questionnaires expectations and their perception of the quality of life in cochlear implanted in children. Conclusions: The results of the study show that children enjoy the benefits of using a cochlear implant. They report benefits in all areas studied (physical, emotional, social and academic. Parents are reliable reporters about the state of the overall quality of life of their children since their answers were

  11. Encoding and decoding amplitude-modulated cochlear implant stimuli--a point process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwyn, Joshua H; Shea-Brown, Eric; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant speech processors stimulate the auditory nerve by delivering amplitude-modulated electrical pulse trains to intracochlear electrodes. Studying how auditory nerve cells encode modulation information is of fundamental importance, therefore, to understanding cochlear implant function and improving speech perception in cochlear implant users. In this paper, we analyze simulated responses of the auditory nerve to amplitude-modulated cochlear implant stimuli using a point process model. First, we quantify the information encoded in the spike trains by testing an ideal observer's ability to detect amplitude modulation in a two-alternative forced-choice task. We vary the amount of information available to the observer to probe how spike timing and averaged firing rate encode modulation. Second, we construct a neural decoding method that predicts several qualitative trends observed in psychophysical tests of amplitude modulation detection in cochlear implant listeners. We find that modulation information is primarily available in the sequence of spike times. The performance of an ideal observer, however, is inconsistent with observed trends in psychophysical data. Using a neural decoding method that jitters spike times to degrade its temporal resolution and then computes a common measure of phase locking from spike trains of a heterogeneous population of model nerve cells, we predict the correct qualitative dependence of modulation detection thresholds on modulation frequency and stimulus level. The decoder does not predict the observed loss of modulation sensitivity at high carrier pulse rates, but this framework can be applied to future models that better represent auditory nerve responses to high carrier pulse rate stimuli. The supplemental material of this article contains the article's data in an active, re-usable format.

  12. A web delivered intervention for depression combining Behavioural Activation with physical activity promotion: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

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    Jeffrey David Lambert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity (PA yields moderate effect sizes for treating depression (Cooney et al., 2013. PA may also help reduce depressive relapse, providing additional psychological benefits such as positive self-regard and a sense of competence (Babyak et al., 2000. Behavioural Activation (BA is an evidence-based psychological therapy for depression, which aims to get people more engaged with activities that provide positive reinforcement for non-depressed behaviours (Hopko, Lejuez, LePage, Hopko, & McNeil, 2003. The structured nature of BA is consistent with the use of good behaviour change techniques (specific goal-setting, self-regulation offering a potential platform for promoting PA alongside depression treatment. BA may also be useful for gradually increasing PA in people who are more sedentary than the general population. Aims: This pilot randomised controlled trial aims to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and fidelity of a web-delivered intervention combining BA and PA (eBAcPAc to enhance mental and physical health, and assess the trial methods. Method: A community sample of 120 people exhibiting symptoms of depression and who are participating in less than 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week will be randomized to receive eBAcPAc or be put on a wait list control group. eBAcPAc is informed by previous work (Farrand et al., 2014; Pentecost et al., 2015 and further developed using the Centre for eHealth Research and Disease management Roadmap (CeHReS (van Gemert-Pijnen et al., 2011 in order to be applied in an web-based setting. A platform hosted by the University of Glasgow which has been used to deliver a wide range of successful web-delivered interventions for mental health, will be used to deliver eBAcPAc. Feasibility measures will include data on recruitment, attrition and acceptability. Pre-post outcome measures will include the PHQ-9, and self-reported and accelerometer measured PA. Process and

  13. Force depression and relaxation kinetics after active shortening and deactivation in mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, P; Van Leemputte, M

    2013-03-15

    After active shortening, isometric force production capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD). The mechanism is incompletely understood but increasing cross-bridge detachment and/or decreasing attachment rate might be involved. Therefore we aimed to investigate the relation between work delivered during shortening (W), and change in half-relaxation time (Δ0.5RT) and change in the slow phase of muscle relaxation (Δkslow), considered as a marker for cross-bridge detachment rate, after shortening and after a short (0.7s) interruption of activation (deactivation). We hypothesized that shortening induces an accelerated relaxation related to W which is, similar to FD, largely abolished by a short deactivation. In 10 incubated supra-maximally stimulated mouse soleus muscles, we varied the amount of FD at L0 by varying shortening amplitude (0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm). We found that W not only induces FD (R(2)=0.92) but also a dose dependent accelerated relaxation (R(2)=0.88 and R(2)=0.77 for respectively Δkslow and Δ0.5RT). In cyclic movements this is of functional significance, because the loss in force generating capacity might be (partially) compensated by faster relaxation. After a short deactivation, both FD and Δkslow were largely abolished but Δ0.5RT remained largely present. Under the assumption that Δkslow reflects a change in cross-bridge detachment rate, these results support the idea that FD is an intrinsic sarcomeric property originating from a work induced reduction of the number of force generating cross-bridges, however not via decreased attachment but via increased detachment rate.

  14. Transdiagnostic group behavioral activation and exposure therapy for youth anxiety and depression: Initial randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Brian C; Crocco, Sofia T; Esseling, Petra; Areizaga, Margaret J; Lindner, Alison M; Skriner, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are debilitating and commonly co-occurring in young adolescents, yet few interventions are designed to treat both disorder classes together. Initial efficacy is presented of a school-based transdiagnostic group behavioral activation therapy (GBAT) that emphasizes anti-avoidance in vivo exposure. Youth (N = 35; ages 12-14; 50.9% male) were randomly assigned to either GBAT (n = 21) or WL (n = 14) after completing a double-gated screening process. Multi-reporter, multi-domain outcomes were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and four-month follow-up (FU). GBAT was associated with greater posttreatment remission rates than WL in principal diagnosis (57.1% vs. 28.6%; X1(2) = 2.76, p = .09) and secondary diagnosis (70.6% vs. 10%; X1(2) = 9.26, p = .003), and greater improvement in Clinical Global Impairment - Severity ratings, B = -1.10 (0.42), p = .01. Symptom outcomes were not significantly different at posttreatment. GBAT produced greater posttreatment behavioral activation (large effect size) and fewer negative thoughts (medium effect), two transdiagnostic processes, both at the trend level. Most outcomes showed linear improvement from pretreatment to FU that did not differ depending on initial condition assignment. Sample size was small, but GBAT is a promising transdiagnostic intervention for youth anxiety and unipolar mood disorders that can feasibly and acceptably be applied in school settings.

  15. The role of daily mobility in mental health inequalities: the interactive influence of activity space and neighbourhood of residence on depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Julie; Cadot, Emmanuelle; Roustit, Christelle; Parizot, Isabelle; Chauvin, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    The literature reports an association between neighbourhood deprivation and individual depression after adjustment for individual factors. The present paper investigates whether vulnerability to neighbourhood features is influenced by individual "activity space" (i.e., the space within which people move about or travel in the course of their daily activities). It can be assumed that a deprived residential environment can exert a stronger influence on the mental health of people whose activity space is limited to their neighbourhood of residence, since their exposure to their neighbourhood would be greater. Moreover, we studied the relationship between activity space size and depression. A limited activity space could indeed reflect spatial and social confinement and thus be associated with a higher risk of being depressed, or, conversely, it could be linked to a deep attachment to the neighbourhood of residence and thus be associated with a lower risk of being depressed. Multilevel logistic regression analyses of a representative sample consisting of 3011 inhabitants surveyed in 2005 in the Paris, France metropolitan area and nested within 50 census blocks showed, after adjusting for individual-level variables, that people living in deprived neighbourhoods were significantly more depressed that those living in more advantaged neighbourhoods. We also observed a statistically significant cross-level interaction between activity space and neighbourhood deprivation, as they relate to depression. Living in a deprived neighbourhood had a stronger and statistically significant effect on depression in people whose activity space was limited to their neighbourhood than in those whose daily travels extended beyond it. In addition, a limited activity space appeared to be a protective factor with regard to depression for people living in advantaged neighbourhoods and a risk factor for those living in deprived neighbourhoods. It could therefore be useful to take activity space

  16. Behavioural activation for the treatment of low-income, African American adolescents with major depressive disorder: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Maryann; Keeley, Mary L; Ritschel, Lorie; Craighead, W Edward

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural activation (BA) is a psychosocial treatment that has shown promise in the treatment of adults suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent studies have shown that BA may also be effective for treating depressed adolescents. There are no studies that have reported on the BA treatment of depressed and low-income African American adolescents; thus, the current study reports on the effectiveness of a version of BA adapted for the treatment of African American adolescents who were diagnosed with MDD (n = 3). Participants were allowed to attend a maximum of 17 sessions of weekly psychotherapy. Based on results taken from structured interviews, two of the three participants no longer met criteria for MDD at the end of treatment, and the severity of clinician-rated depressive symptoms and impairment decreased for all participants at post-treatment assessment. Additionally, all participants and their caregivers reported satisfaction with treatment. Implications of these findings, study limitations and suggestions for future directions are discussed.

  17. The Effects of DPPH on Cochlear Microcirculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔维佳; 陈敏

    2003-01-01

    Summary: To investigate the effects of the free radical, 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picylhydrazyl, on cochlearblood flow, 20 guinea pigs were divided into 3 groups at random, 6 for control group, 6 for 1 mmol/L group and 8 for 0. 1 mmol/L group. 2μl vehicle or drugs were dropped into round window mem-brane (RWM). Cochlear microcirculation was monitored by laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF), andmean arterial blood flow (MABP), which was transferred by pressure conductor sensor and preampli-fier, was simultaneously recorded on the computer. Our results showed that MABP was stablethroughout the experiment. Cochlear blood flow (CBF) increased by 10. 32 % (P<0. 05) in 1mmol/L group, and decreased by 4. 89 % in 0. 1 mmol/L group (P<0. 05). In control groupcochlear microcirculation showed no significant changes. It is concluded that DPPH exerted effects oncochlear microcirculation.

  18. Post-activation Depression in Spasticity (review)%激活后抑制与痉挛的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖娟; 张京; 杨远滨

    2014-01-01

    近几年有研究发现,中枢神经系统损伤患者脊髓H反射激活后抑制的减少与痉挛严重程度相关性较高,可能对中枢神经系统损伤后痉挛的客观评价有潜在意义。本文介绍激活后抑制的概念、机制以及其影响因素。%Recent studies show that post-activation depression is highly correlated with the severity of spasticity in patients with stroke or cerebral palsy, which may be potentially used in the evaluation of spasticity. This article reviewed the concept, mechanism and related fac-tors of post-activation depression.

  19. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Delage Gomes; Caroline Laurita Batista Couto; Juliana Oggioni Gaiotti; Ana Maria Doffemond Costa; Marcelo Almeida Ribeiro; Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira Diniz

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantat...

  20. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  1. Improving physical quality of life with group physical activity in the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannu Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to compare the change in quality of life over 32 weeks in depressed women assuming antidepressant drug with (experimental group or without (control group physical exercise from a study which results on objective dimension of outcome were already published. Methods Trial with randomized naturalistic control. Patients selected from the clinical activity registries of a Psychiatric University Unit. Inclusion criteria: female, between 40 and 60 years, diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorders (MMD, DSM-IV TR resistant to ongoing treatment. Exclusion criteria: diagnosis of psychotic disorders; any contraindications to physical activity. 30 patients (71.4% of the eligible participated to the study. Cases: 10 randomized patients undergoing pharmacological treatment plus physical activity. Controls: 20 patients undergoing only pharmacological therapy. Quality of life was measured by means of WHOQOL-Bref. Results The patients that made physical activity had their WHOQOL-Bref physical score improved from T0 to T8, the differences was statistically significant. In the control group WHOQOL-Bref physical remains the same and, consequentially, the difference between T0 and T8 do not reach any statistical significance. The perceived quality of life in the other domains did not change during the treatment in both groups. Thus no other differences were found between and within groups. Discussion and Conclusion The data presented in the previous paper found that physical activity seems a good adjunctive treatment in the long term management of patients with MDD. These new data indicated that physical activity may also improve the perceived physical quality of life. The dimensions related with social functioning, environment and psychical well being seem do not improved, unexpectedly, during the trial. Two objective dimension not strictly related to the depressive symptoms improved: social functioning and Clinical Global

  2. Hearing Preservation in Cochlear Implant Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Carvalho Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, it was thought that hearing loss patients with residual low-frequency hearing would not be good candidates for cochlear implantation since insertion was expected to induce inner ear trauma. Recent advances in electrode design and surgical techniques have made the preservation of residual low-frequency hearing achievable and desirable. The importance of preserving residual low-frequency hearing cannot be underestimated in light of the added benefit of hearing in noisy atmospheres and in music quality. The concept of electrical and acoustic stimulation involves electrically stimulating the nonfunctional, high-frequency region of the cochlea with a cochlear implant and applying a hearing aid in the low-frequency range. The principle of preserving low-frequency hearing by a “soft surgery” cochlear implantation could also be useful to the population of children who might profit from regenerative hair cell therapy in the future. Main aspects of low-frequency hearing preservation surgery are discussed in this review: its brief history, electrode design, principles and advantages of electric-acoustic stimulation, surgical technique, and further implications of this new treatment possibility for hearing impaired patients.

  3. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CARDIAC VAGAL ACTIVITY AND MOOD CONGRUENT MEMORY BIAS IN MAJOR DEPRESSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ronald G.; Valenza, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that autonomic reactivity during encoding of emotional information could modulate the neural processes mediating mood-congruent memory. In this study, we use a point-process model to determine dynamic autonomic tone in response to negative emotions and its influence on long-term memory of major depressed subjects. Methods Forty-eight patients with major depression and 48 healthy controls were randomly assigned to either neutral or emotionally arousing audiovisual stimuli. An adaptive point-process algorithm was applied to compute instantaneous estimates of the spectral components of heart rate variability [Low frequency (LF), 0.04 to 0.15 Hz; High frequency (HF), 0.15 to 0.4 Hz]. Three days later subjects were submitted to a recall test. Results A significant increase in HF power was observed in depressed subjects in response to the emotionally arousing stimulus (p=0.03). The results of a multivariate analysis revealed that the HF power during the emotional segment of the stimulus was independently associated with the score of the recall test in depressed subjects, after adjusting for age, gender and educational level (Coef. 0.003, 95%CI, 0.0009-0.005, p=0.008). Limitations These results could only be interpreted as responses to elicitation of specific negative emotions, the relationship between HF changes and encoding/recall of positive stimuli should be further examined. Conclusions Alterations on parasympathetic response to emotion are involved in the mood-congruent cognitive bias observed in major depression. These findings are clinically relevant because it could constitute the mechanism by which depressed patients maintain maladaptive patterns of negative information processing that trigger and sustain depressed mood. PMID:26480207

  4. The effect of passive listening versus active observation of music and dance performances on memory recognition and mild to moderate depression in cognitively impaired older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Kara; Flores, Roberto; Butterfield, Jacyln; Blackman, Melinda; Lee, Stephanie

    2012-10-01

    The study examined the effects of music therapy and dance/movement therapy on cognitively impaired and mild to moderately depressed older adults. Passive listening to music and active observation of dance accompanied by music were studied in relation to memory enhancement and relief of depressive symptoms in 100 elderly board and care residents. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Recognition Memory Test-Faces Inventory were administered to two groups (one group exposed to a live 30-min. session of musical dance observation, the other to 30 min. of pre-recorded music alone) before the intervention and measured again 3 and 10 days after the intervention. Scores improved for both groups on both measures following the interventions, but the group exposed to dance therapy had significantly lower Beck Depression scores that lasted longer. These findings suggest that active observation of Dance Movement Therapy could play a role in temporarily alleviating moderate depressive symptoms and some cognitive deficits in older adults.

  5. Feasibility of Pairing Behavioral Activation With Exercise for Women With Type 2 Diabetes and Depression: The Get It Study Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristin L; Panza, Emily; Handschin, Barbara; Ma, Yunsheng; Busch, Andrew M; Waring, Molly E; Appelhans, Bradley M; Whited, Matthew C; Keeney, Jacey; Kern, Daniel; Blendea, Mihaela; Ockene, Ira; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is often comorbid with diabetes and associated with worse glycemic control. Exercise improves glycemic control and depression, and thus could be a parsimonious intervention for patients with comorbid diabetes and major depression. Because patients with diabetes and comorbid depression are often sedentary and lack motivation to exercise, we developed a group exercise intervention that integrates strategies from behavioral activation therapy for depression to increase motivation for and enjoyment of exercise. We conducted a 6-month pilot randomized controlled trial to test the feasibility of the behavioral activation exercise intervention (EX) for women with diabetes and depression. Of the 715 individuals who contacted us about the study, 29 participants were randomized to the EX condition or an enhanced usual care condition (EUC), which represents 4.1% of participants who initially contacted us. Inclusion criteria made recruitment challenging and limits the feasibility of recruiting women with diabetes and depression for a larger trial of the intervention. Retention was 96.5% and 86.2% at 3 and 6months. Participants reported high treatment acceptability; use of behavioral activation strategies and exercise class attendance was acceptable. No condition differences were observed for glycemic control, depressive symptoms, and physical activity, though depressive symptoms and self-reported physical activity improved over time. Compared to participants in the EUC condition, participants in the EX condition reported greater exercise enjoyment and no increase in avoidance behavior over time. Using behavioral activation strategies to increase exercise is feasible in a group exercise setting. However, whether these strategies can be delivered in a less intensive manner to a broader population of sedentary adults, for greater initiation and maintenance of physical activity, deserves further study.

  6. Hollows on Mercury: Bright-haloed depressions imply recent endogenic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, D. T.; Fontanella, N. R.; Peel, S. E.; Zhong, E. D.; Pashai, P.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.; Izenberg, N. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Xiao, Z.; Braden, S.; Baker, D. M.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Head, J. W.; McCoy, T. J.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft began orbital observations of Mercury in March 2011. The Mercury Dual Imaging System is acquiring global monochrome and multispectral image maps. Complementing the global maps are special targeted observations with resolutions as good as 10 m/pixel for monochrome and 80 m/pixel for multispectral images. These high-resolution morphology and color images reveal an unusual landform on Mercury, characterized by small (tens of meters to a few kilometers), fresh-appearing, irregularly shaped, shallow, rimless depressions, often occurring in clusters and in association with high-reflectance materials. The features ("hollows") are commonly found on the central peaks, floors, walls, and rims of impact craters or basins, implying a link to material brought near the surface from depth during crater formation. Hollows occur in both rayed (Kuiperian) craters as well as older degraded craters. They have been identified over a range of latitudes (approximately 54 deg. S to 66 deg. N) and at longitudes for which images with adequate spatial resolution and appropriate illumination and viewing conditions have been collected. The hollows are found in locations known from prior flyby observations to have characteristic high reflectance and a shallow slope of spectral reflectance versus wavelength relative to the global average. The most likely formation mechanisms for the hollows involve recent loss of volatiles through some combination of sublimation, sputtering, outgassing, or pyroclastic volcanism. A hollow found on the south-facing inner wall of a crater at a high northern latitude suggests a correlation with peak diurnal temperatures. The involvement of volatiles in formation mechanisms for the hollows fits with growing evidence that Mercury's interior contains higher abundances of volatile materials than predicted by most scenarios for the formation of the Solar System's innermost planet. Mercury is a small rocky-metal world whose internal geological

  7. An Internet-based program for depression using activity and physiological sensors: efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Cristina; Mira, Adriana; Moragrega, Inés; García-Palacios, Azucena; Bretón-López, Juana; Castilla, Diana; Riera López del Amo, Antonio; Soler, Carla; Molinari, Guadalupe; Quero, Soledad; Guillén-Botella, Verónica; Miralles, Ignacio; Nebot, Sara; Serrano, Berenice; Majoe, Dennis; Alcañiz, Mariano; Baños, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT) has been shown to be efficacious. Moreover, CCBT can be enhanced by using physiological and activity sensors, but there is no evidence about the acceptability of all these tools. The objective of this study is to examine the efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use of an Internet-based CCBT program for preventing depression, with and without sensors (electroencephalography, electrocardiograhpy ECG, and actigraphy), in a high-risk population (unemployed men). Patients and methods Sixty participants at risk of depression (unemployed men) were randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: 1) intervention program (N=22), 2) intervention program plus sensors (N=19), and 3) control group (N=19). Participants completed depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect, and perceived stress measures. Furthermore, they also completed the measures for expectation, satisfaction, and the ease of use of the program. Results Results showed that the two intervention groups improved significantly more than the control group on the clinical variables, and the improvements were greater in the group that used sensors than in the group that did not use them. Furthermore, participants in both intervention groups scored high on expectations and satisfaction with the CCBT program (with and without sensors). The mean score for usability was 88 out of 100 (standard deviation =12.32). No significant differences were found between groups on any of these variables. Conclusion This is the first study to analyze the efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use of an Internet-based program using physiological and activity sensors. These results suggest that an Internet program for depression with or without physiological and activity sensors is effective, satisfactory, and easy to use. PMID:27042067

  8. Recreational Physical Activity Ameliorates Some of the Negative Impact of Major Depression on Health-Related Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Burton Patten

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Major depressive episodes (MDEs have a negative effect on health-related quality of life (HRQoL. The objective of this study was to determine whether recreational physical activity can ameliorate some of this negative impact. Methods: The data source for the study was the Canadian National Population Health Survey (NPHS. The NPHS is a longitudinal study that has collected data from a representative cohort of 15,254 community residents. Sixteen years of follow-up data are available. The NPHS included: an instrument to assess MDE (the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form for Major Depression, an inventory of recreational activities (each associated with hours of participation and estimated metabolic expenditures and a HRQoL instrument (the Health Utility Index, Mark 3 or HUI3. Proportional hazard and linear regression models were used in this study to determine whether MDE-related declines in HRQoL were lessened by participation in an active recreational lifestyle. Results: Consistent with expectation, major depression was associated with a significant decline in HRQoL over time. While no statistical interactions were observed, the risk of diminished HRQoL in association with MDE was reduced by physical activity. In a proportional hazards model, the hazard ratio for transition to poor HRQoL was 0.7 (95% CI: 0.6 – 0.8, p < 0.0001. In linear regression models, physical activity was significantly associated with more positive HRQoL (β = 0.019, 95% CI 0.004 to – 0.034, p =0.02.Conclusions: Recreational physical activity appears to ameliorate some of the decline in HRQoL seen in association with MDE. Physical activity may be an effective tertiary preventive strategy for this condition.

  9. Short term depression unmasks the ghost frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd V Olde Scheper

    Full Text Available Short Term Plasticity (STP has been shown to exist extensively in synapses throughout the brain. Its function is more or less clear in the sense that it alters the probability of synaptic transmission at short time scales. However, it is still unclear what effect STP has on the dynamics of neural networks. We show, using a novel dynamic STP model, that Short Term Depression (STD can affect the phase of frequency coded input such that small networks can perform temporal signal summation and determination with high accuracy. We show that this property of STD can readily solve the problem of the ghost frequency, the perceived pitch of a harmonic complex in absence of the base frequency. Additionally, we demonstrate that this property can explain dynamics in larger networks. By means of two models, one of chopper neurons in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus and one of a cortical microcircuit with inhibitory Martinotti neurons, it is shown that the dynamics in these microcircuits can reliably be reproduced using STP. Our model of STP gives important insights into the potential roles of STP in self-regulation of cortical activity and long-range afferent input in neuronal microcircuits.

  10. Atividade física sistematizada e sintomas de depressão na demência de Alzheimer: uma revisão sistemática Systematized physical activity and depressive symptoms in Alzheimer's dementia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thays Martins Vital

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão sistemática de artigos científicos que analisaram os efeitos da atividade física sistematizada nos sintomas de depressão de pacientes com demência de Alzheimer. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada uma busca nas seguintes bases de dados: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, MedLine e Biological Abstracts, utilizando-se as seguintes palavras-chave: "Alzheimer dementia" , "Alzheimer disease" , "Alzheimer, physical activity", "physical exercise", "motor intervention" , "physical therapy" , "exercise" , "aerobic" , "strength" , "fitness" , "depression" , "dysphoria" , "depressive symptoms" e "depressive episodes". Além da busca nas bases de dados, foi realizada também uma busca manual nas listas de referências dos artigos selecionados. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados quatro estudos que preencheram todos os critérios de inclusão adotados para o presente trabalho. Dois estudos apresentaram reduções dos sintomas depressivos, e outros dois não encontraram redução desses sintomas. CONCLUSÃO: Com a realização desta revisão sistemática, observou-se que não há consenso em relação aos benefícios da atividade física aos sintomas depressivos em pacientes com demência de Alzheimer.OBJECTIVE: To develop a systematic review of scientific articles that have been analyzed the effects of systematic physical activity in depression of patients with Alzheimer's disease. METHODS: We performed a search in the following databases: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, MedLine and Biological Abstracts, we used the following keywords: "Alzheimer dementia", "Alzheimer disease", "Alzheimer's, physical activity", "physical exercise", "motor intervention", "physical therapy", "exercise", "aerobic", "strength", "fitness", "depression", "dysphoria", "depressive symptoms" and "depressive episodes", and also a manual search in references of the selected articles. RESULTS: Have been found four studies that met all criteria of this study. Two

  11. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  12. Exploring Perspectives on Cochlear Implants and Language Acquisition within the Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implants generated intense debate almost immediately following their introduction in the 1980s. Today, with a vast number of deaf individuals with cochlear implants, the debate about the cochlear implant device and mode of communication continues. Q-methodology was used in this study to explore cochlear implants and language acquisition…

  13. A Literature Analysis of Themes in Paediatric Cochlear Implant Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendar, Nils Ola Ebbe; Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2015-01-01

    Research on children with cochlear implants (CI) has documented positive outcomes, but also that many still experience language delays. The aim of this article is to explore how research on children with cochlear implants cover topics of early language development compared to research on children...

  14. Acoustic trauma increases cochlear and hair cell uptake of gentamicin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exposure to intense sound or high doses of aminoglycoside antibiotics can increase hearing thresholds, induce cochlear dysfunction, disrupt hair cell morphology and promote hair cell death, leading to permanent hearing loss. When the two insults are combined, synergistic ototoxicity occurs, exacerbating cochlear vulnerability to sound exposure. The underlying mechanism of this synergism remains unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sound exposure enhances the intra-cochlear trafficking of aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin, leading to increased hair cell uptake of aminoglycosides and subsequent ototoxicity. METHODS: Juvenile C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to moderate or intense sound levels, while fluorescently-conjugated or native gentamicin was administered concurrently or following sound exposure. Drug uptake was then examined in cochlear tissues by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: Prolonged sound exposure that induced temporary threshold shifts increased gentamicin uptake by cochlear hair cells, and increased gentamicin permeation across the strial blood-labyrinth barrier. Enhanced intra-cochlear trafficking and hair cell uptake of gentamicin also occurred when prolonged sound, and subsequent aminoglycoside exposure were temporally separated, confirming previous observations. Acute, concurrent sound exposure did not increase cochlear uptake of aminoglycosides. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged, moderate sound exposures enhanced intra-cochlear aminoglycoside trafficking into the stria vascularis and hair cells. Changes in strial and/or hair cell physiology and integrity due to acoustic overstimulation could increase hair cell uptake of gentamicin, and may represent one mechanism of synergistic ototoxicity.

  15. Surgical Management of the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Seth M.; Haynes, David S.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the surgical management of children receiving cochlear implants. It identifies preoperative considerations to select patients likely to benefit, contraindications, some new surgical techniques, complications, special considerations (otitis media, meningitis, head growth, inner ear malformations, and cochlear obstruction).…

  16. Evaluation of Evoked Potentials to Dyadic Tones after Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Pascale; Eichele, Tom; Buechler, Michael; Debener, Stefan; Jancke, Lutz; Dillier, Norbert; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Meyer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Auditory evoked potentials are tools widely used to assess auditory cortex functions in clinical context. However, in cochlear implant users, electrophysiological measures are challenging due to implant-created artefacts in the EEG. Here, we used independent component analysis to reduce cochlear implant-related artefacts in event-related EEGs of…

  17. Speech Intelligibility and Prosody Production in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Steven B.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Phan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to examine the relation between speech intelligibility and prosody production in children who use cochlear implants. Methods: The Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and Prosodic Utterance Production (PUP) task were administered to 15 children who use cochlear implants and 10 children with normal…

  18. Evaluating the Feasibility of Using Remote Technology for Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of remote technology to provide cochlear implant services has gained popularity in recent years. This article contains a review of research evaluating the feasibility of remote service delivery for recipients of cochlear implants. To date, published studies have determined that speech-processor programming levels and other objective tests…

  19. Serving Deaf Students Who Have Cochlear Implants. PEPNet Tipsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searls, J. Matt, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are complex electronic devices surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear. These devices utilize electrodes placed in the inner ear (the cochlea) to stimulate the auditory nerve of individuals with significant permanent hearing loss. Cochlear implants may not be suitable for everyone. They are designed to provide…

  20. Activation of brainstem serotoninergic pathways decreases homosynaptic depression of monosynaptic responses of frog spinal motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A; Rudomin, P

    1983-12-05

    In the isolated neuraxis of the frog, low frequency stimulation (0.5-2 Hz) of the lateral columns produces monosynaptic responses in the ventral roots which are depressed with an exponential time course. Serotonin (10 mumol/liter) added to the bath, or stimulation of the brain-stem midline raphe nuclei, but not of the lateral reticular formation, reduced the magnitude of the low frequency depression of the responses. The above actions were abolished by methysergide (1 mumol/liter), a specific antagonist of serotonin. These observations show that the magnitude of the homosynaptic depression of monosynaptic responses of motoneurons can be controlled by descending serotonergic mechanisms. This action is considered to be an important component of the arousal behavior mediated by the brain-stem raphe nuclei.

  1. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression: psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Modinos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We used Support Vector Machine (SVM to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. Two groups were subsequently formed: (i subclinical (mild mood disturbance (n = 17 and (ii no mood disturbance (n = 17. Participants also completed a self-report questionnaire on subclinical psychotic symptoms, the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences Questionnaire (CAPE positive subscale. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI paradigm entailed passive viewing of negative emotional and neutral scenes. The pattern of brain activity during emotional processing allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 77% (p = 0.002, within a network of regions including the amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex. However, further analysis suggested that the classification accuracy could also be explained by subclinical psychotic symptom scores (correlation with SVM weights r = 0.459, p = 0.006. Psychosis proneness may thus be a confounding factor for neuroimaging studies in subclinical depression.

  2. Dopamine D2-like receptor activation antagonizes long-term depression of orofacial sensorimotor processing in anesthetized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellrich, Jens

    2005-02-21

    Long-term depression (LTD) of orofacial sensorimotor processing recently has been demonstrated in anesthetized mice. Due to the remarkable role of dopamine in central nervous system LTD, the influence of dopamine D2 receptor activation on LTD of the jaw-opening reflex (JOR) was investigated. Electric low-frequency stimulation (LFS, 1 Hz) of the tongue suppressed the JOR integral by 43% for at least 1 h. After systemic administration of the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole, LTD was significantly attenuated to 14%. JOR decreased for only about 15 min after LFS according to a short-term depression. Under systemic application of the dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride, LTD significantly increased to 64%, again for at least 1 h. Thus, D2-like receptor activation prevented LTD, and D2-like receptor blockade amplified LTD of the reflex. The time course of inhibition may be due to a dopaminergic D2-like receptor mechanism that antagonizes the transfer from short-term into long-term depression. Considering a putative mediation of LTD by the endogenous pain control system, the results correspond to the known inhibitory control of this system by a D2-like receptor mechanism.

  3. Design and methods for a pilot randomized clinical trial involving exercise and behavioral activation to treat comorbid type 2 diabetes and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristin L; Pagoto, Sherry L; Handschin, Barbara; Panza, Emily; Bakke, Susan; Liu, Qin; Blendea, Mihaela; Ockene, Ira S; Ma, Yunsheng

    2011-06-01

    BACKGROUND: The comorbidity of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and depression is associated with poor glycemic control. Exercise has been shown to improve mood and glycemic control, but individuals with comorbid T2DM and depression are disproportionately sedentary compared to the general population and report more difficulty with exercise. Behavioral activation, an evidence-based depression psychotherapy, was designed to help people with depression make gradual behavior changes, and may be helpful to build exercise adherence in sedentary populations. This pilot randomized clinical trial will test the feasibility of a group exercise program enhanced with behavioral activation strategies among women with comorbid T2DM and depression. METHODS/DESIGN: Sedentary women with inadequately controlled T2DM and depression (N=60) will be randomly assigned to one of two conditions: exercise or usual care. Participants randomized to the exercise condition will attend 38 behavioral activation-enhanced group exercise classes over 24 weeks in addition to usual care. Participants randomized to the usual care condition will receive depression treatment referrals and print information on diabetes management via diet and physical activity. Assessments will occur at baseline and 3-, 6-, and 9-months following randomization. The goals of this pilot study are to demonstrate feasibility and intervention acceptability, estimate the resources and costs required to deliver the intervention and to estimate the standard deviation of continuous outcomes (e.g., depressive symptoms and glycosylated hemoglobin) in preparation for a fully-powered randomized clinical trial. DISCUSSION: A novel intervention that combines exercise and behavioral activation strategies could potentially improve glycemic control and mood in women with comorbid type 2 diabetes and depression. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01024790.

  4. Factors Affecting Open-Set Word Recognition in Adults with Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Holden, Laura K.; Finley, Charles C.; Firszt, Jill B.; Holden, Timothy A.; Brenner, Christine; Potts, Lisa G.; Gotter, Brenda D.; Vanderhoof, Sallie S.; Mispagel, Karen; Heydebrand, Gitry; Skinner, Margaret W.

    2013-01-01

    A monosyllabic word test was administered to 114 postlingually-deaf adult cochlear implant (CI) recipients at numerous intervals from two weeks to two years post-initial CI activation. Biographic/audiologic information, electrode position, and cognitive ability were examined to determine factors affecting CI outcomes. Results revealed that Duration of Severe-to-Profound Hearing Loss, Age at Implantation, CI Sound-field Threshold Levels, Percentage of Electrodes in Scala Vestibuli, Medio-later...

  5. Mitochondrial proteome analysis reveals depression of the Ndufs3 subunit and activity of complex I in diabetic rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurino, Federica; Stanca, Eleonora; Siculella, Luisa; Trentadue, Raffaella; Papa, Sergio; Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio

    2012-04-18

    Type-1 diabetes resulting from defective insulin secretion and consequent hyperglycemia, is associated with "diabetic encephalopathy." This is characterized by brain neurophysiological and structural changes resulting in impairment of cognitive function. The present proteomic analysis of brain mitochondrial proteins from streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetic rats, shows a large decrement of the Ndufs3 protein subunit of complex I, decreased level of the mRNA and impaired catalytic activity of the complex in the diabetic rats as compared to controls. The severe depression of the expression and enzymatic activity of complex I can represent a critical contributing factor to the onset of the diabetic encephalopathy in type-1 diabetes.

  6. Volume and social context of physical activity in association with mental health, anxiety and depression among youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doré, Isabelle; O'Loughlin, Jennifer L; Beauchamp, Guy; Martineau, Marc; Fournier, Louise

    2016-10-01

    There is growing interest in physical activity (PA) to prevent mental disorders in youth. However, few studies examine the association between PA and mental health. Further, how PA volume and context relate to mental health and mental disorders remains unclear, especially among youth in transition to adulthood. This study examined the cross-sectional associations among PA volume and context, mental health, and symptoms of anxiety and depression in post-secondary students. A total of 1527 post-secondary students (97.4% were age 16-24years) recruited in a CEGEP in Quebec, Canada completed a self-report questionnaire during class-time in October 2013. Multivariate linear regression was used to model the associations between PA volume and context and mental health, anxiety and depression controlling for sex, age and perceived socioeconomic status. Volume of moderate-to-vigorous leisure time PA (MVPA) was positively associated with mental health (β (95% CI)=0.072 (0.045, 0.099)) and inversely associated with symptoms of anxiety (-0.011 (-0.020, -0.001)) and depression (-0.010 (-0.017, -0.003)). Volume including all PA intensities was associated with mental health (0.052 (0.028, 0.076)). After controlling for PA volume, active youth involved in team sports had better mental health than those who engaged in PA individually. PA volume and the social context of PA are independently associated with mental health among youth. MVPA is inversely associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms.

  7. What the Research Says: Depression, Immunizations, and Activity's Benefits. Research Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Debra J.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews research on feelings of dependency and self-criticism (correlates of depression) among adolescents at camp, on the importance of adolescents being immunized, and on benefits of exercise. Implications for camp involve developing strategies to help adolescents be less self-critical, requiring complete vaccination records from campers and…

  8. The Effect of Hypericum Perforarum on Anxiety and Depressant Activity in Wistar Rats Exposed to Phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Modhej

    2015-02-01

    Results: The statistic findings indicated that there were no significant differences between behavior tests with respect to the treatments (P> 0.05. Conclusion: The study results proposed that the used levels of Hypericum Perforarum extract did not show any significant effects on reduction of anxious and depressant behaviors in phenol exposed Wistar rats.

  9. MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, B L; Olson, R L; Brush, C J; Shors, T J

    2016-02-02

    Mental and physical (MAP) training is a novel clinical intervention that combines mental training through meditation and physical training through aerobic exercise. The intervention was translated from neuroscientific studies indicating that MAP training increases neurogenesis in the adult brain. Each session consisted of 30 min of focused-attention (FA) meditation and 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Fifty-two participants completed the 8-week intervention, which consisted of two sessions per week. Following the intervention, individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=22) reported significantly less depressive symptoms and ruminative thoughts. Typical healthy individuals (n=30) also reported less depressive symptoms at follow-up. Behavioral and event-related potential indices of cognitive control were collected at baseline and follow-up during a modified flanker task. Following MAP training, N2 and P3 component amplitudes increased relative to baseline, especially among individuals with MDD. These data indicate enhanced neural responses during the detection and resolution of conflicting stimuli. Although previous research has supported the individual beneficial effects of aerobic exercise and meditation for depression, these findings indicate that a combination of the two may be particularly effective in increasing cognitive control processes and decreasing ruminative thought patterns.

  10. Ten Year Revision of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression: Revised Treatment Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejuez, C. W.; Hopko, Derek R.; Acierno, Ron; Daughters, Stacey B.; Pagoto, Sherry L.

    2011-01-01

    Following from the seminal work of Ferster, Lewinsohn, and Jacobson, as well as theory and research on the Matching Law, Lejuez, Hopko, LePage, Hopko, and McNeil developed a reinforcement-based depression treatment that was brief, uncomplicated, and tied closely to behavioral theory. They called this treatment the brief behavioral activation…

  11. Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depressed Cancer Patients: Factors Associated with Treatment Outcome and Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopko, D. R.; Robertson, S. M. C.; Colman, L.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been increased focus on evaluating the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for cancer patients. Among the several limitations inherent to these programs of research, few studies have targeted patients with well-diagnosed clinical depression and little is known about factors that best predict treatment outcome and…

  12. Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopko, Derek R.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Robertson, Sarah M. C.; Ryba, Marlena M.; Carvalho, John P.; Colman, Lindsey K.; Mullane, Christen; Gawrysiak, Michael; Bell, John L.; McNulty, James K.; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with…

  13. 多巴胺对豚鼠听觉传入神经的抑制作用及其频率选择性%Suppressive effect and its frequency selection of dopamine on the cochlear auditory afferent nerve activity in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯志强; 余力生; 李兴启; 刘军

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the suppressive effect and its frequency selection of dopamine on the cochlear auditory afferent nerve activity. To offer an important step in understanding the modulation of dopamine in the inner cell synaptic complex. Methods Forty guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups and the whole intracochlear perfusions were performed: (1) perfused with artificial perilymph solutions; (2) perfused with artifical perilymph solutions containing 10 mmol/L dopamine; (3) perfused with artificial perilymph solutions containing 30 mmol/L dopamine; (4) perfused with artifical perilymph solutions containing 50 mmol/L dopamine. Compound action potential (CAP)evoked by different frequencies (250 Hz,500 Hz, 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, 4000 Hz, 8000 Hz, 16 000 Hz) and cochlear microphonics (CM) evoked by4000 Hz tone burst were recorded from the roud window of guinea pigs before perfusion and 1 hours, 2 hours after perfusions. Results There was no significant difference in CAP threshold before and after perfusion in the artificial perilymph solutions group (P > 0.05) . An increase of CAP threshold of most detecting frequencies were observed in the three dopamine-perfused groups(P 0.05);灌流多巴胺后大部分频率的CAP阈值提高,与灌流前相比差异具有统计学意义(P值均0.05).结论 多巴胺对豚鼠听觉传入神经具有抑制性作用,而对外毛细胞无影响;这种抑制作用具有频率选择性,对高频纤维的抑制作用较强,而对低频的抑制作用较弱.

  14. Auditory Cortical Maturation in a Child with Cochlear Implant: Analysis of Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliane Aparecida Fagundes; Couto, Maria Inês Vieira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Carvalho, Ana Claudia Martinho; Matas, Carla Gentile

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to longitudinally assess the behavioral and electrophysiological hearing changes of a girl inserted in a CI program, who had bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss and underwent surgery of cochlear implantation with electrode activation at 21 months of age. She was evaluated using the P1 component of Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (LLAEP); speech perception tests of the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure (GASP); Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS); and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS). The study was conducted prior to activation and after three, nine, and 18 months of cochlear implant activation. The results of the LLAEP were compared with data from a hearing child matched by gender and chronological age. The results of the LLAEP of the child with cochlear implant showed gradual decrease in latency of the P1 component after auditory stimulation (172 ms–134 ms). In the GASP, IT-MAIS, and MUSS, gradual development of listening skills and oral language was observed. The values of the LLAEP of the hearing child were expected for chronological age (132 ms–128 ms). The use of different clinical instruments allow a better understanding of the auditory habilitation and rehabilitation process via CI. PMID:26881163

  15. Auditory Cortical Maturation in a Child with Cochlear Implant: Analysis of Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures

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    Liliane Aparecida Fagundes Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to longitudinally assess the behavioral and electrophysiological hearing changes of a girl inserted in a CI program, who had bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss and underwent surgery of cochlear implantation with electrode activation at 21 months of age. She was evaluated using the P1 component of Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (LLAEP; speech perception tests of the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure (GASP; Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS; and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS. The study was conducted prior to activation and after three, nine, and 18 months of cochlear implant activation. The results of the LLAEP were compared with data from a hearing child matched by gender and chronological age. The results of the LLAEP of the child with cochlear implant showed gradual decrease in latency of the P1 component after auditory stimulation (172 ms–134 ms. In the GASP, IT-MAIS, and MUSS, gradual development of listening skills and oral language was observed. The values of the LLAEP of the hearing child were expected for chronological age (132 ms–128 ms. The use of different clinical instruments allow a better understanding of the auditory habilitation and rehabilitation process via CI.

  16. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL), activity of daily living (ADL) and depressive mood disorder in temporal lobe epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrner, J; Kalchmayr, R; Serles, W; Olbrich, A; Pataraia, E; Aull, S; Bacher, J; Leutmezer, F; Gröppel, G; Deecke, L; Baumgartner, C

    1999-04-01

    We determined the interrelations of chronological age, age at seizure onset, duration of seizure disorder, cognitive functioning (IQ), scales of activities of daily living, depressive mood disorder and measures of health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Furthermore, we investigated the association of the laterality of seizure onset zone and absence/presence of hippocampal atrophy and/or sclerosis (HA/HS) with measures of HRQOL, activities of daily living (ADL) and depressive mood disorder. In the setting of pre-surgical epilepsy evaluation, a sample of 56 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was studied using the Bonner Skalen für Epilepsie (BPSE) and the depression inventory D-S of von Zerssen. Patients reported high levels of dependency on others and poor coping capabilities. Our data also showed specific ADL-behaviour suggesting social withdrawal and isolation. Our results indicate emotional impairment as a major problem in TLE, because 45% of our patients scored in the depressive range of the D-S depression scale. Depression score was found to be a powerful predictor of self-reported quality of life after adjusting for seizure-related variables, demographic variables and cognitive functioning (IQ). The only scale showing a significant laterality effect was ADL-home. No relationship between the dependent measures of HRQOL, ADL-social, ADL-cultural, depressive mood disorder and laterality of the epileptogenic zone or absence/presence of HA/HS was found. HRQOL and depressive mood disorder are strongly interrelated indicating that patients with depressive symptoms report lower quality of life and specific patterns of ADL. HRQOL, ADL and depressive mood disorder are largely independent of biological markers such as laterality of seizure onset zone and absence/presence of HA/HS in TLE.

  17. A Physiological Signal Transmission Model to be Used for Specific Diagnosis of Cochlear Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, Amin; Stenfelt, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Many of the sophisticated characteristics of human auditory system are attributed to cochlea. Also, most of patients with a hearing loss suffer from impairments that originate from cochlea (sensorineural). Despite this, today's clinical diagnosis methods do not probe the specific origins of such cochlear lesions. The aim of this research is to introduce a physiological signal transmission model to be clinically used as a tool for diagnosis of cochlear losses. This model enables simulation of different bio-mechano-electrical processes which occur in the auditory organ of Corti inside the cochlea. What makes this model different from many available computational models is its loyalty to physiology since the ultimate goal is to model each single physiological phenomenon. This includes passive BM vibration, outer hair cells' performances such as nonlinear mechanoelectrical transduction (MET), active amplifications by somatic motor, as well as vibration to neural conversion at the inner hair cells.

  18. Chronic intermittent hypoxia depresses afferent neurotransmission in NTS neurons by a reduction in the number of active synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almado, Carlos Eduardo L; Machado, Benedito H; Leão, Ricardo M

    2012-11-21

    Long-term synaptic plasticity has been recently described in brainstem areas associated to visceral afferent sensory integration. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), an animal model for studying obstructive sleep apnea in humans, depresses the afferent neurotransmission in nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) neurons, which affect respiratory and autonomic regulation. Here we identified the synaptic mechanisms of CIH-induced depression of the afferent neurotransmission in NTS neurons in juvenile rats. We verified that CIH reduced the amplitude of both NMDA and non-NMDA glutamatergic excitatory currents (eEPSCs) evoked by tractus solitarii stimulation (TS-eEPSC) of second-order neurons in the NTS. No changes were observed in release probability, evidenced by absence of any CIH-elicited effects on short-term depression and failures in EPSCs evoked in low calcium. CIH also produced no changes in TS-eEPSC quantal size, since the amplitudes of both low calcium-evoked EPSCs and asynchronous TS-eEPSCs (evoked in the presence of Sr(2+)) were unchanged. Using single TS afferent fiber stimulation in slices from control and CIH rats we clearly show that CIH reduced the quantal content of the TS-eEPSCs without affecting the quantal size or release probability, suggesting a reduction in the number of active synapses as the mechanism of CIH induced TS-eEPSC depression. In accordance with this concept, the input-output relationship of stimulus intensity and TS-eEPSC amplitude shows an early saturation in CIH animals. These findings open new perspectives for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the synaptic plasticity in the brainstem sensory neurons under challenges such as those produced by CIH in experimental and pathological conditions.

  19. Brooding and Pondering: Isolating the Active Ingredients of Depressive Rumination with Exploratory Factor Analysis and Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armey, Michael F.; Fresco, David M.; Moore, Michael T.; Mennin, Douglas S.; Turk, Cynthia L.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Kecmanovic, Jelena; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2009-01-01

    Depressive rumination, as assessed by Nolen-Hoeksema's Response Styles Questionnaire (RSQ), predicts the onset, chronicity, and duration of depressed mood. However, some RSQ items contain depressive content and result in a heterogeneous factor structure. After the a priori elimination of items potentially confounded with depressed item content,…

  20. Caregiver Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  1. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... starts about 1–3 weeks after childbirth. What causes postpartum depression? Postpartum depression probably is caused by a combination ... better. Can antidepressants cause side effects? Antidepressants can ... If your depression worsens soon after starting medication or if you ...

  2. CSF gusher in cochlear implantation: The risk of missing CT evidence of a cochlear base defect in the presence of otherwise normal cochlear anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabbarzade, Cavid; Sennaroglu, Levent; Süslü, Nilda

    2015-07-01

    Intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakages from the cochleostomy site - known as gushers - are a serious complication of cochlear implantation surgery in cases of congenital deafness. They occur as the result of abnormal communication between CSF in the internal auditory canal and perilymph in the cochlea. Gushers are well recognized as occurring in a proportion of cases in which there is a clearly visible congenital malformation of the cochlea. In this report, we describe two cases in which pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scanning of the cochlea was initially reported as normal but gushers occurred during cochlear implant surgery. In both cases, more detailed review of the CT scans (peroperatively in the first case, pre-operatively in the second case) showed a defect at the cochlear base, in the absence of any other cochlear malformation. The aim of this paper is to draw attention to the risk of missing this abnormality and to encourage careful inspection of the cochlear base on CT scans in all cases, even when the rest of the cochlear appears normal.

  3. Effects of type of physical exercise and leisure activities on the depression scores of obese Brazilian adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella S.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have indicated that depressive states may lead to hypokinesia with diminished metabolic rate and energy use. Hypokinesia associated with certain eating behaviors may lead to an unfavorable energy balance that can contribute to the emergence and prevalence of obesity among children and adults. The purpose of the present study was to examine the possibility of reducing depression inventory scores in female adolescents with third-degree obesity while testing the effectiveness of different exercise programs in reducing anxiety and depression scores. The sample consisted of 40 female subjects (mean age 16 ± 1.56 years divided into 4 groups (aerobic training, anaerobic training, leisure activities, and control. Subjects had a body mass index of 95% or more in relation to the 50th percentile. The aerobic program consisted of three ergometric bicycle sessions per week over a 3-month period (12 weeks and the activities were prescribed after determining the anaerobic ventilatory threshold (VO2 threshold. Anaerobic training was based on the Wingate anaerobic power test. The leisure program consisted of a varied range of activities (games, exercises, etc.. A nutritionist interviewed the members of these two groups and the control group every week in order to adapt them to the nutritional guidelines proposed for the study. The study showed that all three programs (aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise and leisure activities were effective in reducing body mass. However, we found a significant reduction when analyzing the depression scores only for aerobic exercise (18.9 ± 9.33 to 10.6 ± 9.56 or 43.9% but no significant alterations for anaerobic exercise (11.36 ± 5.23 to 9.63 ± 4.78 or 15.22% and leisure (17.28 ± 7.55 to 15.07 ± 7.54 or 12.78%, thus indicating that in principle this type of activity could be included to improve emotional well-being of obese adolescent girls.

  4. Alterations in visual cortical activation and connectivity with prefrontal cortex during working memory updating in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thang M; Borghi, John A; Kujawa, Autumn J; Klein, Daniel N; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the impacts of major depressive disorder (MDD) on visual and prefrontal cortical activity as well as their connectivity during visual working memory updating and related them to the core clinical features of the disorder. Impairment in working memory updating is typically associated with the retention of irrelevant negative information which can lead to persistent depressive mood and abnormal affect. However, performance deficits have been observed in MDD on tasks involving little or no demand on emotion processing, suggesting dysfunctions may also occur at the more basic level of information processing. Yet, it is unclear how various regions in the visual working memory circuit contribute to behavioral changes in MDD. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 18 unmedicated participants with MDD and 21 age-matched healthy controls (CTL) while they performed a visual delayed recognition task with neutral faces and scenes as task stimuli. Selective working memory updating was manipulated by inserting a cue in the delay period to indicate which one or both of the two memorized stimuli (a face and a scene) would remain relevant for the recognition test. Our results revealed several key findings. Relative to the CTL group, the MDD group showed weaker postcue activations in visual association areas during selective maintenance of face and scene working memory. Across the MDD subjects, greater rumination and depressive symptoms were associated with more persistent activation and connectivity related to no-longer-relevant task information. Classification of postcue spatial activation patterns of the scene-related areas was also less consistent in the MDD subjects compared to the healthy controls. Such abnormalities appeared to result from a lack of updating effects in postcue functional connectivity between prefrontal and scene-related areas in the MDD group. In sum, disrupted working memory updating in MDD was revealed by

  5. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  6. Jiawei Wendan decoction affects mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in the hippocampus of depression rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Zhang; Man Zhang; Li Wu; Meng Xia; Guangbin Li

    2011-01-01

    A previous study from our group showed that Jiawei Wendan decoction inhibits protein expression of interleukin-1β, 2, and 6, as well as plasma neuropeptide Y, P substance and somatostatin in the hippocampus of depression rat models. The present study analyzed the influence of Jiawei Wendan decoction on the mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway in the hippocampus. Results demonstrated that Jiawei Wendan decoction effectively upregulated expression of small molecular G proteins, extracellular regulated kinase 1/2, and activated ribosomal S6 kinase protein in the rat hippocampus. In addition, Jiawei Wendan decoction exhibits antidepressant effects similar to fluoxetine. The underlying mechanisms were shown to be dependent on increased mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway activity.

  7. Pilot of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Latinos with Limited English Proficiency: Preliminary Evaluation of Efficacy and Acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Anahi; Castillo, Soraida D.; Maero, Fabian; Lejuez, C. W.; MacPherson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) experience multiple barriers to accessing efficacious mental health treatments. Using a stage model of behavioral therapies research, this Stage 1b investigation evaluated the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), an intervention which may be well-equipped to address existing treatment barriers. A sample of 10 Latinos with LEP and depressive symptomatology participated in a 10-session,direct (i.e., literal) Spanish-language translation of BATD, with no other cultural modifications. Participants were assessed at each session for depressive symptomatology and for the proposed BATD mechanisms: activity engagement and environmental reward. One month after treatment, participants were reassessed and interviewed to elicit feedback about BATD. Hierarchical Linear Model analyses were used to measure BATD outcomes. Results showed depressive symptomatology decreased (p<.001), while both activation (p = .04) and environmental reward (p = .02) increased over the course of BATD. Increases in activation corresponded concurrently with decreases in depression (p = .01), while environmental reward preceded decreases in depressive symptomatology (all p’s≤ .04). Follow-up analyses revealed sustained clinical gains in depression and activation, and an increase in environmental reward at follow-up. Participant interviews conducted one month after treatment conclusion indicated that BATD is an acceptable treatment for our sample of interest. Despite the limitations inherent to a study restricted to sample of ten, preliminary outcomes of this Stage I research suggest that members of this otherwise underserved group showed improvements in depressive symptomatology and are willing to participate in and adhere to BATD. The study’s positive outcomes suggest that a Stage II randomized clinical trial is a logical next step. PMID:24411118

  8. Anti-depressant activity of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study assesses the protective effect of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis (Nyctaginaceae extracts and in combination with fluoxetine on stress-induced depression in mice. Leaves were extracted using different solvents (petroleum ether, chloroform and hydroethanol and administered orally for 14 days. These extracts showed significant improvement in the mobility percentage but among these, hydroethanol extract showed better protective effect from day 1 to 14 in both forced swimming and tail suspension test model. Hydroethanol (100 mg/kg and chloroform (100 mg/kg extracts with fluoxetine showed synergistic effect when compared with fluoxetine treated group (10 mg/kg alone at day 7 and 14. Among monoamine levels only hydroethanol extract (400 mg/kg restored the 5-HT level near to level of fluoxetine-treated group. Hydroethanol extracts with two higher doses showed significant decrease in glucose and triglycerides levels. Clinically, it may useful as anti-depressant drug.

  9. Chronic Conductive Hearing Loss Leads to Cochlear Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Charles Liberman

    Full Text Available Synapses between cochlear nerve terminals and hair cells are the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear in both noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, and this neuropathy is exacerbated in the absence of efferent feedback from the olivocochlear bundle. If age-related loss is dominated by a lifetime of exposure to environmental sounds, reduction of acoustic drive to the inner ear might improve cochlear preservation throughout life. To test this, we removed the tympanic membrane unilaterally in one group of young adult mice, removed the olivocochlear bundle in another group and compared their cochlear function and innervation to age-matched controls one year later. Results showed that tympanic membrane removal, and the associated threshold elevation, was counterproductive: cochlear efferent innervation was dramatically reduced, especially the lateral olivocochlear terminals to the inner hair cell area, and there was a corresponding reduction in the number of cochlear nerve synapses. This loss led to a decrease in the amplitude of the suprathreshold cochlear neural responses. Similar results were seen in two cases with conductive hearing loss due to chronic otitis media. Outer hair cell death was increased only in ears lacking medial olivocochlear innervation following olivocochlear bundle cuts. Results suggest the novel ideas that 1 the olivocochlear efferent pathway has a dramatic use-dependent plasticity even in the adult ear and 2 a component of the lingering auditory processing disorder seen in humans after persistent middle-ear infections is cochlear in origin.

  10. Developmental minocycline treatment reverses the effects of neonatal immune activation on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, hippocampal inflammation, and HPA axis activity in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Jafar; Kosari-Nasab, Morteza; Salari, Ali-Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal infection is associated with increased lifetime risk for neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression, with evidence showing that dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-(HPA)-axis system may be partly responsible. Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that minocycline exhibits antidepressant effects through inhibition of microglial activation and anti-inflammatory actions, and of interest is that recent studies suggest that minocycline alleviates the behavioral abnormalities induced by early-life insults. The current study was designed to determine if developmental minocycline treatment attenuates the neonatal immune activation-induced anxiety- and depression-like symptoms and HPA-axis-dysregulation later in life. To this end, neonatal mice were treated to either lipopolysaccharide or saline on postnatal days (PND) 3-5, then dams during lactation (PND 6-20) and male offspring during adolescence (PND 21-40) received oral administration of minocycline or water via regular drinking bottles. Anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, HPA-axis-reactivity (corticosterone), and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and IL-1β) after exposure to stress were evaluated. The results indicated that neonatal immune activation resulted in increased anxiety and depression-like symptoms, HPA-axis-hyperactivity, and elevated the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the hippocampus in response to stress in adulthood. Interestingly, developmental minocycline treatment significantly reduced the abnormalities induced by neonatal inflammation in adult mice. In addition, minocycline, regardless of postnatal inflammation, did not have any detrimental effects on the above measured parameters. Considering that minocycline is currently under exploration as an alternative or adjunctive therapy for reducing the symptoms of neurological disorders, our findings suggest that minocycline during development can decrease the behavioral abnormalities induced by early

  11. Effects of paternal and maternal depressive symptoms on child internalizing symptoms and asthma disease activity: mediation by interparental negativity and parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L; Miller, Bruce D; Simmens, Samuel J

    2011-02-01

    This study tested a hypothesized model of the relationships among parental depressive symptoms, family process (interparental negativity and negative parenting behavior), child internalizing symptoms, and asthma disease activity. A total of 106 children with asthma, aged 7 to 17, participated with their fathers and mothers. Parental depressive symptoms were assessed by self-report. Interparental and parenting behaviors were observed and rated during family discussion tasks. Child internalizing symptoms were assessed by self-report and by clinician interview and rating. Asthma disease activity was assessed according to National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute guidelines. Results of structural equation modeling generally supported interparental negativity and negative parenting behavior as mediators linking parental depressive symptoms and child emotional and physical dysfunction. However, paternal and maternal depressive symptoms play their role through different pathways of negative family process. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Genetic variation in Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels and its relationship with neuroticism, cognition and risk of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Mcintosh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are encoded by four genes (HCN1-4 and, through activation by cyclic AMP (cAMP, represent a point of convergence for several psychosis risk genes. On the basis of positive preliminary data, we sought to test whether genetic variation in HCN1-4 conferred risk of depression or cognitive impairment in the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study. HCN1, HCN2, HCN3 and HCN4 were genotyped for 43 haplotype-tagging SNPs and tested for association with DSM-IV depression, neuroticism and a battery of cognitive tests assessing cognitive ability, memory, verbal fluency and psychomotor performance. No association was found between any HCN channel gene SNP and risk of depression, neuroticism or on any cognitive measure. The current study does not support a genetic role for HCN channels in conferring risk of depression or cognitive impairment in human subjects within the Scottish population.

  13. The effect of brief behavioral activation treatment on symptoms of depression, mental health and quality of life among the patients with opioid abuse

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders comorbid with with substance use disorder. This research was aimed to evaluate the effect of brief behavioral activation treatment on the symptoms of depression, mental health and quality of life among the patients with opioid use disorders. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest control group design, 24 patients taking opiates were selected through convenience sampling method and randomly assigned int...

  14. Pilot of the brief behavioral activation treatment for depression in latinos with limited english proficiency: preliminary evaluation of efficacy and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Anahi; Castillo, Soraida D; Maero, Fabian; Lejuez, C W; Macpherson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) experience multiple barriers to accessing efficacious mental health treatments. Using a stage model of behavior therapy research, this Stage I investigation evaluated the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), an intervention that may be well equipped to address existing treatment barriers. A sample of 10 Latinos with LEP and depressive symptomatology participated in a 10-session, direct (i.e., literal) Spanish-language translation of BATD, with no other cultural modifications. Participants were assessed at each session for depressive symptomatology and for the proposed BATD mechanisms: activity engagement and environmental reward. One month after treatment, participants were reassessed and interviewed to elicit feedback about BATD. Hierarchical linear model analyses were used to measure BATD outcomes. Results showed depressive symptomatology decreased (pactivation (p=.04) and environmental reward (p=.02) increased over the course of BATD. Increases in activation corresponded concurrently with decreases in depression (p=.01), while environmental reward preceded decreases in depressive symptomatology (all p's ≤ .04). Follow-up analyses revealed sustained clinical gains in depression and activation, and an increase in environmental reward at follow-up. Participant interviews conducted 1 month after treatment conclusion indicated that BATD is an acceptable treatment for our sample of interest. Despite the limitations inherent in a study restricted to a sample of 10, preliminary outcomes of this Stage I research suggest that members of this otherwise underserved group showed improvements in depressive symptomatology and are willing to participate in and adhere to BATD. The study's positive outcomes suggest that a Stage II randomized clinical trial is a logical next step.

  15. Evaluation of a system of structured, pro-active care for chronic depression in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beecham Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with chronic depression are frequently lost from effective care, with resulting psychological, physical and social morbidity and considerable social and financial societal costs. This randomised controlled trial will evaluate whether regular structured practice nurse reviews lead to better mental health and social outcomes for these patients and will assess the cost-effectiveness of the structured reviews compared to usual care. The hypothesis is that structured, pro-active care of patients with chronic depression in primary care will lead to a cost-effective improvement in medical and social outcomes when compared with usual general practitioner (GP care. Methods/Design Participants were recruited from 42 general practices throughout the United Kingdom. Eligible participants had to have a history of chronic major depression, recurrent major depression or chronic dsythymia confirmed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. They also needed to score 14 or above on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II at recruitment. Once consented, participants were randomised to treatment as usual from their general practice (controls or the practice nurse led intervention. The intervention includes a specially prepared education booklet and a comprehensive baseline assessment of participants' mood and any associated physical and psycho-social factors, followed by regular 3 monthly reviews by the nurse over the 2 year study period. At these appointments intervention participants' mood will be reviewed, together with their current pharmacological and psychological treatments and any relevant social factors, with the nurse suggesting possible amendments according to evidence based guidelines. This is a chronic disease management model, similar to that used for other long-term conditions in primary care. The primary outcome is the BDI-II, measured at baseline and 6 monthly by self-complete postal questionnaire

  16. Glycine immunoreactivity of multipolar neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, J R; Ross, A T; Gillespie, M B; Ryugo, D K

    1999-06-14

    Certain distinct populations of neurons in the dorsal cochlear nucleus are inhibited by a neural source that is responsive to a wide range of acoustic frequencies. In this study, we examined the glycine immunoreactivity of two types of ventral cochlear nucleus neurons (planar and radiate) in the rat which project to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and thus, might be responsible for this inhibition. Previously, we proposed that planar neurons provided a tonotopic and narrowly tuned input to the DCN, whereas radiate neurons provided a broadly tuned input and thus, were strong candidates as the source of broadband inhibition (Doucet and Ryugo [1997] J. Comp. Neurol. 385:245-264). We tested this idea by combining retrograde labeling and glycine immunohistochemical protocols. Planar and radiate neurons were first retrogradely labeled by injecting biotinylated dextran amine into a restricted region of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. The labeled cells were visualized using streptavidin conjugated to indocarbocyanine (Cy3), a fluorescent marker. Sections that contained planar or radiate neurons were then processed for glycine immunocytochemistry using diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. Immunostaining of planar neurons was light, comparable to that of excitatory neurons (pyramidal neurons in the DCN), whereas immunostaining of radiate neurons was dark, comparable to that of glycinergic neurons (cartwheel cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus and principal cells in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radiate neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus subserve the wideband inhibition observed in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

  17. Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation: UNICAMP Outcomes

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    Guilherme Machado de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS is an excellent choice for people with residual hearing in low frequencies but not high frequencies and who derive insufficient benefit from hearing aids. For EAS to be effective, subjects' residual hearing must be preserved during cochlear implant (CI surgery. Methods. We implanted 6 subjects with a CI. We used a special surgical technique and an electrode designed to be atraumatic. Subjects' rates of residual hearing preservation were measured 3 times postoperatively, lastly after at least a year of implant experience. Subjects' aided speech perception was tested pre- and postoperatively with a sentence test in quiet. Subjects' subjective responses assessed after a year of EAS or CI experience. Results. 4 subjects had total or partial residual hearing preservation; 2 subjects had total residual hearing loss. All subjects' hearing and speech perception benefited from cochlear implantation. CI diminished or eliminated tinnitus in all 4 subjects who had it preoperatively. 5 subjects reported great satisfaction with their new device. Conclusions. When we have more experience with our surgical technique we are confident we will be able to report increased rates of residual hearing preservation. Hopefully, our study will raise the profile of EAS in Brazil and Latin/South America.

  18. Insula and striatum activity in effort-related monetary reward processing in gambling disorder: The role of depressive symptomatology

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    Mira Fauth-Bühler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurobiological underpinnings of effort-related monetary reward processing of gambling disorder have not been previously studied. To date neuroimaging studies lack in large sample sizes and as a consequence less attention has been given to brain reward processing that could potentially be attributed to comorbid conditions such as depressive mood state. We assessed monetary reward processing using an effort-dependent task during 3 tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated a large sample of male, right-handed, slot-machine-playing disordered gamblers (DGs; N = 80 as well as age- and smoking-matched male healthy controls (HCs; N = 89. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. DGs and HCs were divided into subgroups (“high” and “low” based on their BDI scores. Effort-related monetary reward processing did not differ between the complete groups of HCs and DGs. Brain activation during receipt of monetary reward though revealed a significant Group × BDI interaction: DGs with higher BDI scores compared to DGs with lower BDI scores showed greater brain activity in the right insula cortex and dorsal striatum while no differences were observed for HCs with higher versus lower BDI scores. Our results suggest that effort-related aspects of monetary motivation, i.e. when monetary output is tied to performance, are not altered in DG. Additionally, our findings strengthen the need for subgroup comparisons in future investigations of the disorder as part of a personalized medicine approach.

  19. Order reduction and efficient implementation of nonlinear nonlocal cochlear response models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filo, Maurice; Karameh, Fadi; Awad, Mariette

    2016-12-01

    The cochlea is an indispensable preliminary processing stage in auditory perception that employs mechanical frequency-tuning and electrical transduction of incoming sound waves. Cochlear mechanical responses are shown to exhibit active nonlinear spatiotemporal response dynamics (e.g., otoacoustic emission). To model such phenomena, it is often necessary to incorporate cochlear fluid-membrane interactions. This results in both excessively high-order model formulations and computationally intensive solutions that limit their practical use in simulating the model and analyzing its response even for simple single-tone inputs. In order to address these limitations, the current work employs a control-theoretic framework to reformulate a nonlinear two-dimensional cochlear model into discrete state space models that are of considerably lower order (factor of 8) and are computationally much simpler (factor of 25). It is shown that the reformulated models enjoy sparse matrix structures which permit efficient numerical manipulations. Furthermore, the spatially discretized models are linearized and simplified using balanced transformation techniques to result in lower-order (nonlinear) realizations derived from the dominant Hankel singular values of the system dynamics. Accuracy and efficiency of the reduced-order reformulations are demonstrated under the response to two fixed tones, sweeping tones and, more generally, a brief speech signal. The corresponding responses are compared to those produced by the original model in both frequency and spatiotemporal domains. Although carried out on a specific instance of cochlear models, the introduced framework of control-theoretic model reduction could be applied to a wide class of models that address the micro- and macro-mechanical properties of the cochlea.

  20. Fibro-vascular coupling in the control of cochlear blood flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Dai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transduction of sound in the cochlea is metabolically demanding. The lateral wall and hair cells are critically vulnerable to hypoxia, especially at high sound levels, and tight control over cochlear blood flow (CBF is a physiological necessity. Yet despite the importance of CBF for hearing, consensus on what mechanisms are involved has not been obtained. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report on a local control mechanism for regulating inner ear blood flow involving fibrocyte signaling. Fibrocytes in the super-strial region are spatially distributed near pre-capillaries of the spiral ligament of the albino guinea pig cochlear lateral wall, as demonstrably shown in transmission electron microscope and confocal images. Immunohistochemical techniques reveal the inter-connected fibrocytes to be positive for Na+/K+ ATPase β1 and S100. The connected fibrocytes display more Ca(2+ signaling than other cells in the cochlear lateral wall as indicated by fluorescence of a Ca(2+ sensor, fluo-4. Elevation of Ca(2+ in fibrocytes, induced by photolytic uncaging of the divalent ion chelator o-nitrophenyl EGTA, results in propagation of a Ca(2+ signal to neighboring vascular cells and vasodilation in capillaries. Of more physiological significance, fibrocyte to vascular cell coupled signaling was found to mediate the sound stimulated increase in cochlear blood flow (CBF. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1 was required for capillary dilation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The findings provide the first evidence that signaling between fibrocytes and vascular cells modulates CBF and is a key mechanism for meeting the cellular metabolic demand of increased sound activity.

  1. Multi-channel cochlear implantation in patients with a post-traumatic sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A; Cheshire, I M

    1999-01-01

    There are few accounts of cochlear implantation in adults with post-traumatic sensorineural hearing loss. We report our experience with multichannel implantation in three such patients. Two patients experienced no cognitive or communication deficits as a result of their head injury. At nine months post-implant, compared with our experience of non-head-injured implantees, these patients achieved average or above average scores on audiological performance tests. The third patient presented with cognitive, behavioural and communicative deficits. The level of improvement achieved by this patient, when lip-reading was supplemented with electrical stimulation, in both BKB sentence and connected discourse tracking (CDT) tests was comparable with that of the non-head-injured group. However, his absolute performance at nine months post-implant was well below average. Performance at 18 months on BKB sentences and environmental sound recognition showed little change, and was again well below average, however his score on CDT with lip-reading and electrical stimulation improved considerably and was similar to the average achieved by the non-head-injured group. The major difficulties experienced with this patient were increasing depression and low implant use. Considerably more time was spent in the assessment and rehabilitation of this patient and involved liaison with a number of other agencies. When considering such patients for cochlear implantation it is strongly recommended that these additional requirements are taken into account.

  2. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF ADENOSINE 5' -TRIPHOSPHATE ON COCHLEAR FUNCTION OF GUINEA PIG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨军; 李吉平; 钱敏飞; 徐秀玲; 王家东; 丁大连

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study effects of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) on cochlear function of guinea pig. Methods After perfusion of ATP into perilymphatic spaces of the guinea pig cochlea, summating potential (SP), cochlear microphonic (CM) , auditory nerve compound action potential ( CAP ) , distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) were measured. Results The results showed concentration-dependent effect of ATP on the response alterations of bioelectric activity in cochlea. Administration of lmmol/L ATP caused an increase both in the amplitude of the SP and in the threshold of ABR, a decrease in amplitude of the CAP and DPOAE. In addition, response alterations of the CAP and DPOAE showed in an intensity- and frequency-dependent manner, respectively. At levels of 20 -70dB nHL sound intensity, lmmol/L ATP caused a significant decrease in the CAP amplitude, while at moderate and high frequency ranges of 2 -8kHz it reduced DPOAE amplitude significantly. 330μmol/L ATP also increased the threshold of ABR. Conclusion ATP through perilymphatic perfusion could inhibit cochlear function of guinea pig.

  3. Digital imaging: a valuable technique for the postoperative assessment of cochlear implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, J.T. [Department of Radiology, Belfast City Hospital Trust, Belfast (United Kingdom); Cranley, K. [Northern Ireland Regional Medical Physics Agency, Forster Green Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom); Toner, J.G. [Regional Cochlear Implant Centre, Belfast City Hospital Trust, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Cochlear implantation with a multi-channel electrode array which provides stimulation via the auditory nerve has become a standard treatment for profound deafness. Postoperative radiography demonstrates electrode position and enables confirmation of satisfactory intra-cochlear electrode placement. The number of active electrodes which have been inserted can be determined and possible complications such as electrode kinking or slippage can be assessed. We evaluated digital radiography with confirmation of electrode position by intermittent fluoroscopy and assessed the relative radiation dose of the digital technique, conventional radiography and CT scanning. Radiation dose for this method usually ranges between 40 {mu}Gy and 440 {mu}Gy compared with a single exposure on the skull stand which produces a dose to the region of the cochlea of 470 {mu}Gy and a CT exposure of 950 {mu}Gy. The digital technique is comfortable for the patient, easily reproducible and provides images of high diagnostic quality enabling each electrode to be identified, which is especially valuable in association with postoperative electrode mapping. It also involves a lower radiation dose than conventional radiography. We now use digital radiography for all postoperative cochlear implant assessment. (orig.) With 4 figs., 13 refs.

  4. The use of subtotal petrosectomy in cochlear implant candidates with chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Marcin; Ataide, Andre; Linder, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) candidates with chronic otitis media require special attention and management. The need of opening of the inner ear creates potential routes of spread of infection to subarachnoid spaces and lead to meningitis. The aim of the study was to analyse the technique and complications of subtotal petrosectomy (SP) in cochlear implant candidates with chronic otitis media at three different CI centres. A retrospective study was carried out in three Territory Referral Hospitals. The centres follow Fisch's philosophy and surgical techniques of SP. The study group consisted of 19 patients, 4 men and 15 women, aged 12-82 years. All patients underwent SP with either primary or staged CI implantation. Indications for single or a staged management, difficulties during surgery and complications were analysed. Skin and muscle flap design in primary and revision cases as well as imaging follow-up strategy are discussed. In 14 patients implantation was performed in a single stage and in 5 cases in two stages. Follow-up ranged from 8 months to 10 years. All the patients use their implants and there were no major nor minor complications. The use of subtotal petrosectomy with cochlear implants is a safe and efficient technique when strict surgical steps and rules are applied. Closure of the external ear canal after previous meatoplasty can be challenging and extreme care dissecting the skin flaps is required. In patients with extensive cholesteatoma, active discharge from the ear with resistant bacteria or an "unstable" situation, the procedure can be staged.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 Effects on Creatine Kinase Activity and Mood in Geriatric Bipolar Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester, Brent P.; Zuo, Chun S.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Harper, David G.; Du, Fei; Kim, Susan; Cohen, Bruce M.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the prevalence, associated comorbidities, and functional consequences of bipolar depression (BPD), underlying disease mechanisms remain unclear. Published studies of individuals with bipolar disorder implicate abnormalities in cellular energy metabolism. This study tests the hypotheses that the forward rate constant (kfor) of creatine kinase (CK) is altered in older adults with BPD and that CoEnzyme Q10 (CoQ10), known to have properties that enhance mitochondrial function, increases kfor in elderly individuals with BPD treated with CoQ10 compared with untreated age- and sex-matched controls. Methods Ten older adults (ages 55 and above) with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition [DSM IV]) bipolar disorder, current episode depressed and 8 older controls underwent two 4 Tesla 31Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31PMRS) scans 8 weeks apart using a magnetization transfer (MT) acquisition scheme to calculate kfor. The BPD group was treated with open-label CoEnzyme Q10 400 mg/d titrated up by 400 mg/d every 2 weeks to a maximum of 1200 mg/d. The Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was used to measure depression symptom severity. Baseline kfor and changes in kfor were compared between individuals with BPD and controls, not receiving CoQ. Clinical ratings were compared across time and associated with kfor changes using repeated measures linear regression. Results The kfor of CK was non-significantly lower for BPD than healthy controls at baseline (BPD mean (standard deviation [SD]) = 0.19 (0.02), control mean (SD) = 0.20 (0.02), Wilcoxon rank sum exact P = .40). The kfor for both CoQ10-treated BPD and controls increased after 8 weeks (mean increase (SD) = 0.03 (0.04), Wilcoxon signed rank exact P = .01), with no significant difference in 8-week changes between groups (BPD mean change (SD) = 0.03 (0.03), control mean change (SD) = 0.03 (0.05), Wilcoxon rank sum exact P = .91). In an exploratory

  6. Dysregulated left inferior parietal activity in schizophrenia and depression: functional connectivity and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika I. Müller

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The inferior parietal cortex (IPC is a heterogeneous region that is known to be involved in a multitude of diverse different tasks and processes, though its contribution to these often-complex functions is yet poorly understood. In a previous study we demonstrated that patients with depression failed to deactivate the left IPC during processing of congruent audiovisual information. We now found the same dysregulation (same region and condition in schizophrenia. By using task-independent (resting state and task-dependent (MACM analyses we aimed at characterizing this particular region with regard to its connectivity and function. Across both approaches, results revealed functional connectivity of the left inferior parietal seed region with bilateral IPC, precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PrC/PCC, medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC, left middle frontal (MFG as well as inferior frontal (IFG gyrus. Network-level functional characterization further revealed that on the one hand, all interconnected regions are part of a network involved in memory processes. On the other hand, sub-networks are formed when emotion, language, social cognition and reasoning processes are required. Thus, the IPC-region that is dysregulated in both depression and schizophrenia is functionally connected to a network of regions which, depending on task demands may form sub-networks. These results therefore indicate that dysregulation of left IPC in depression and schizophrenia might not only be connected to deficits in audiovisual integration, but is possibly also associated to impaired memory and deficits in emotion processing in these patient groups.

  7. Restudy of malformations of the internal auditory meatus, cochlear nerve canal and cochlear nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youjin; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jinfen; Wu, Hao

    2015-07-01

    The present study aims to restudy the correlation between the internal auditory meatus (IAM), the cochlear nerve canal (CNC), the cochlear nerve (CN) and inner ear malformations. In this retrospective study design, the abnormal diameter of the IAM, CNC and CN in patients with any kind of inner ear malformations was evaluated using multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) (37 patients) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (18 patients). Of 37 MSCT-diagnosed patients, 2 had IAM atresia, 11 IAM stenosis, 22 enlarged IAM, and 2 normal IAM with an abnormal CN. MRI diagnoses of 18 patients revealed 8 cases of aplastic CN, 6 hypoplastic CN, and 4 normal CN. CNC stenosis was associated with CN hypoplasia (P malformations of the IAM, CNC and CN.

  8. Antidepressant Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy Correlate With Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Activity and Connectivity in Depression

    OpenAIRE

    LIU Yi; DU, LIAN; Li, Yongmei; Liu, Haixia; Zhao, Wenjing; Liu, Dan; Zeng, Jinkun; Li, Xingbao; FU, YIXIAO; QIU, HAITANG; Li, Xirong; Qiu, Tian; Hu, Hua; Meng, Huaqing; Luo, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mechanisms underlying the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depressive disorder (MDD) are not fully understood. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) is a new tool to study the effects of brain stimulation interventions, particularly ECT. The authors aim to investigate the mechanisms of ECT in MDD by rs-fMRI. They used rs-fMRI to measure functional changes in the brain of first-episode, treatment-naive MDD patients (n = 23) immediately be...

  9. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC)α or PKCε as an approach to increase morphine tolerance in respiratory depression and lethal overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Yiou; Law, Ping-Yee; Loh, Horace H

    2012-04-01

    Long-term use of opioids is hindered by respiratory depression and the possibility for fatal overdose in drug abusers. This is attributed to higher levels of tolerance that develops against antinociception than to respiratory depression. Identifying important mechanisms that would increase morphine respiratory depression and overdose tolerance could lead to the safer use of opioids. Because protein kinase C (PKC) activity mediates the development and maintenance of morphine antinociceptive tolerance, we hypothesized that activating PKCα or PKCε at the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC) can increase morphine tolerance in respiration and overdose. Laser microdissection and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction were used to compare the relative mRNA abundances of PKCα, γ, and ε between ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) and preBötC. To test whether PKCα or ε could enhance morphine tolerance in respiratory depression and overdose, lentivirus carrying the wild type, constitutively activated mutants, and small interference RNA against PKCα or ε was stereotaxically injected into the preBötC. Expression of constitutively active PKC (CAPKC) α or ε, but not wild-type PKC (WTPKC) α or ε, at the preBötC allowed rats to develop tolerance to morphine respiratory depression. In terms of lethality, expression of WTPKCε, CAPKCα, or CAPKCε at preBötC increased morphine tolerance to lethal overdose. CAPKCε-expressing rats developed the highest level of respiratory depression tolerance. Furthermore, when CAPKCε lentivirus was injected into the vlPAG, rats were able to develop significant antinociceptive tolerance at low doses of morphine that normally do not cause tolerance. The approach of increasing morphine respiratory depression and lethality tolerance by increasing PKCα or ε activity at preBötC could be used to make opioids safer for long-term use.

  10. Audiological findings from an adult with thin cochlear nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Shivaswamy, Jyothi

    2017-01-01

    Summary Reported here are audiological findings from an adult with thin cochlear nerves. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that he had a thinner cochlear nerve in the left ear than in the right ear. He had a higher degree of hearing loss in the left ear and poor speech recognition scores for both ears. He had normal middle ear and cochlear functioning. The auditory brainstem response and acoustic reflexes were absent, indicating a retrocochlear pathology. Long latency responses (LLR) revealed normal cortical functioning. Hence, implantation of an auditory brainstem implant might be an option, but the patient would need to be aware of its limitations. This case highlights the importance of MRI in evaluating congenital malformations of the cochlear nerve when audiological findings indicate a retrocochlear pathology. PMID:28357188

  11. Cochlear implant outcomes in patients with superior canal dehiscence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puram, Sidharth V.; Roberts, Daniel S.; Niesten, Marlien E F; Dilger, Amanda E.; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether adult cochlear implant (CI) users with superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) or asymptomatic superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) have different surgical, vestibular, and audiologic outcomes when compared to CI users with normal temporal bone anatomy. Meth

  12. Sound localization ability of young children with bilateral cochlear implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijen, J.W.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefit of bilateral cochlear implantation in young children. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical trial comparing a group of bilaterally implanted children with a group of unilaterally implanted children. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Five bilaterally implanted children

  13. Studying the Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Sabri leghaie

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant surgery is aimed at making a comprehensive packet of information for the deaf by mixing the data acquired by implanted device and the communicational grammar. Although language production and ability of communication are not main factors in determining the candidacy for cochlear implant surgery, they play crucial role in determining cochlear implant success. we should study the communication skills much deeper than a simple perception and production of speech to have a reasonable evaluation of development of Auditory integration and grammatical language structure. Hence in the current article we will first discuss the grammatical structure in language and then have a look at the pragmatics , semantics and phonological aspects in children with cochlear implant in Virginia college in USA.

  14. "COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH INNER EAR MALFORMATIONS"

    OpenAIRE

    P. Borghei S. Abdi; M. Motesaddi Zari; Khalessi MH

    2004-01-01

    Performing cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformation has always been a matter of dispute. This study was designed to analyze the operative findings,complications, and postoperative performance of patients with inner ear anomalies who underwent cochlear implantation. Six patients with inner ear malformations underwent implantation in our academic tertiary referral center from 1997 to 2002. The average follow-up period was 27 months. Malformations included one incomplete par...

  15. Cochlear abnormality in a case of Pallister-Hall syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Shivaram; Alam, Nusrat; Roberts, Elaine

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS) is a rare condition characterised by anomalies including hypothalamic hamartoma, bifid epiglottis and postaxial polydactyly. Hearing loss has been recognised in this condition. Cochlear abnormalities have been described in mouse models of PHS, but there are no reports of similar findings in humans to date. This report describes a case of PHS with bilateral cochlear hypoplasia as seen on MRI.

  16. Facial nerve stimulation after cochlear implantation: our experience

    OpenAIRE

    BERRETTINI, S.; De Vito, A.; Bruschini, L.; PASSETTI, S.; Forli, F.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-implantation facial nerve stimulation is one of the best known and most frequent complications of the cochlear implant procedure. Some conditions, such as otosclerosis and cochlear malformations, as well as high stimulation levels that may be necessary in patients with long auditory deprivation, expose patients to a higher risk of developing post-implant facial nerve stimulation. Facial nerve stimulation can frequently be resolved with minimal changes in speech processor fitting ...

  17. Nuclear entry of hyperbranched polylysine nanoparticles into cochlear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weikai Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Weikai Zhang1, Ya Zhang1, Marian Löbler2, Klaus-Peter Schmitz2, Aqeel Ahmad3, Ilmari Pyykkö1, Jing Zou11Department of Otolaryngology, University of Tampere, Medical School, Tampere, Finland; 2University of Rostock, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Rostock, Germany; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, Espoo, FinlandBackground: Gene therapy is a potentially effective therapeutic modality for treating sensorineural hearing loss. Nonviral gene delivery vectors are expected to become extremely safe and convenient, and nanoparticles are the most promising types of vectors. However, infrequent nuclear localization in the cochlear cells limits their application for gene therapy. This study aimed to investigate the potential nuclear entry of hyperbranched polylysine nanoparticles (HPNPs for gene delivery to cochlear targets.Methods: Rat primary cochlear cells and cochlear explants generated from newborn rats were treated with different concentrations of HPNPs. For the in vivo study, HPNPs were administered to the rats' round window membranes. Subcellular distribution of HPNPs in different cell populations was observed with confocal microscope 24 hours after administration.Results: Nuclear entry was observed in various cochlear cell types in vitro and in vivo. In the primary cochlear cell culture, concentration-dependent internalization was observed. In the cochlear organotypic culture, abundant HPNPs were found in the modiolus, including the spiral ganglion, organ of Corti, and lateral wall tissues. In the in vivo study, a gradient distribution of HPNPs through different layers of the round window membrane was observed. HPNPs were also distributed in the cells of the middle ear tissue. Additionally, efficient internalization of HPNPs was observed in the organ of Corti and spiral ganglion cells. In primary cochlear cells, HPNPs induced higher transfection efficiency than did Lipofectamine

  18. Current status and correlated issues on cochlear implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ke-li; WANG Lin-e

    2006-01-01

    @@ Cochlear implant is a biomedical device, which can directly stimulate the auditory nerve pass-by the damaged hair cell to recover and rebuild the hearing of deaf people. The implant can also stimulate the auditory brainstem and cortex in patients whose auditory nerve is not accessible because of acoustic tumors. Cochlear implantation can make the patients generate electrical hearing (artificial hearing).The artificial hearing can recover,improve or rebuild the hearing of deaf people through electrical stimulus.

  19. Abnormal pitch perception produced by cochlear implant stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Gang Zeng

    Full Text Available Contemporary cochlear implants with multiple electrode stimulation can produce good speech perception but poor music perception. Hindered by the lack of a gold standard to quantify electric pitch, relatively little is known about the nature and extent of the electric pitch abnormalities and their impact on cochlear implant performance. Here we overcame this obstacle by comparing acoustic and electric pitch perception in 3 unilateral cochlear-implant subjects who had functionally usable acoustic hearing throughout the audiometric frequency range in the non-implant ear. First, to establish a baseline, we measured and found slightly impaired pure tone frequency discrimination and nearly perfect melody recognition in all 3 subjects' acoustic ear. Second, using pure tones in the acoustic ear to match electric pitch induced by an intra-cochlear electrode, we found that the frequency-electrode function was not only 1-2 octaves lower, but also 2 times more compressed in frequency range than the normal cochlear frequency-place function. Third, we derived frequency difference limens in electric pitch and found that the equivalent electric frequency discrimination was 24 times worse than normal-hearing controls. These 3 abnormalities are likely a result of a combination of broad electric field, distant intra-cochlear electrode placement, and non-uniform spiral ganglion cell distribution and survival, all of which are inherent to the electrode-nerve interface in contemporary cochlear implants. Previous studies emphasized on the "mean" shape of the frequency-electrode function, but the present study indicates that the large "variance" of this function, reflecting poor electric pitch discriminability, is the main factor limiting contemporary cochlear implant performance.

  20. Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel J; Akil, Omar; Acevedo, Claire; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Tsai, Betty S; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Liebenberg, Ellen; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Ritchie, Robert O; Lustig, Lawrence R; Alliston, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling, a combination of bone resorption and formation, requires precise regulation of cellular and molecular signaling to maintain proper bone quality. Whereas osteoblasts deposit and osteoclasts resorb bone matrix, osteocytes both dynamically resorb and replace perilacunar bone matrix. Osteocytes secrete proteases like matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) to maintain the material quality of bone matrix through perilacunar remodeling (PLR). Deregulated bone remodeling impairs bone quality and can compromise hearing since the auditory transduction mechanism is within bone. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cochlear bone provides unique ways to assess bone quality independent of other aspects that contribute to bone mechanical behavior. Cochlear bone is singular in its regulation of remodeling by expressing high levels of osteoprotegerin. Since cochlear bone expresses a key PLR enzyme, MMP13, we examined whether cochlear bone relies on, or is protected from, osteocyte-mediated PLR to maintain hearing and bone quality using a mouse model lacking MMP13 (MMP13(-/-)). We investigated the canalicular network, collagen organization, lacunar volume via micro-computed tomography, and dynamic histomorphometry. Despite finding defects in these hallmarks of PLR in MMP13(-/-) long bones, cochlear bone revealed no differences in these markers, nor hearing loss as measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs), between wild type and MMP13(-/-) mice. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed abundant PLR by tibial osteocytes, but near absence in cochlear bone. Cochlear suppression of PLR corresponds to repression of several key PLR genes in the cochlea relative to long bones. These data suggest that cochlear bone uniquely maintains bone quality and hearing independent of MMP13-mediated osteocytic PLR. Furthermore, the cochlea employs parallel mechanisms to inhibit remodeling by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and by

  1. Depression after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelstein, R C

    2001-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for increased postmyocardial infarction morbidity and mortality, even after controlling for the extent of coronary artery disease, infarct size, and the severity of left ventricular dysfunction. This risk factor takes on added significance when one considers that almost half of patients recovering from a myocardial infarction have major or minor depression and that major depression alone occurs in about one in five of these individuals. Despite the well-documented risk of depression, questions remain about the mechanism of the relationship between mood disturbance and adverse outcome. The link may be explained by an association with lower levels of social support, poor adherence to recommended medical therapy and lifestyle changes intended to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events, disturbances in autonomic tone, enhanced platelet activation and aggregation, and systemic immune activation. Unfortunately, questions about the pathophysiologic mechanism of depression in this setting are paralleled by uncertainties about the optimal treatment of depression for patients recovering from a myocardial infarction and by a lack of knowledge about whether treating depression lowers the associated increased mortality risk. Ongoing research studies will help to determine the benefits of psychosocial interventions and of antidepressant therapy for patients soon after myocardial infarction. Although the identification of depression as a risk factor may by itself be a reason to incorporate a comprehensive psychological evaluation into the routine care of patients with myocardial infarction, this practice should certainly become standard if studies show that treating depression reduces the increased mortality risk of these patients.

  2. Depression - older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slowly than in younger adults. To better manage depression at home: Exercise regularly, if the provider says it is OK. Surround yourself with caring, positive people and do fun activities. ... signs of depression, and know how to react if these occur. ...

  3. Clinical, cognitive, and functional connectivity correlations of resting-state intrinsic brain activity alterations in unmedicated depression

    OpenAIRE

    Tadayonnejad, Reza; Yang, Shaolin; Kumar, Anand; Ajilore, Olusola

    2014-01-01

    The pervasive and persistent nature of depressive symptoms has made resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) an appropriate approach for understanding the underlying mechanisms of major depressive disorder. The majority of rs-fMRI research has focused on depression-related alterations in the interregional coordination of brain baseline low frequency oscillations (LFOs). However, alteration of the regional amplitude of LFOs in depression, particularly its clinical, cogniti...

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-Behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    conditioning (Mower, 1960; Pavlov, 1927; Skinner, 1938) and the behavioral component of cognitive therapy for depression (Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery...Crits-Christoph P, Beck AT: The clinical effectiveness of cognitive therapy for depression in an outpatient clinic. J Affect Disorders 2010, 125:169...technologies in psychotherapy for depression : A meta - analysis . Depression and Anxiety, 30, 1058-1067. doi: 10.1002/da.22165 Pruitt, L.D., Luxton

  5. Can variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA-axis activity explain the relationship between depression and cognition in bipolar patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke J van der Werf-Eldering

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis is thought to be associated with more mood symptoms and worse cognitive functioning. This study examined whether variation in HPA axis activity underlies the association between mood symptoms and cognitive functioning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 65 bipolar patients cognitive functioning was measured in domains of psychomotor speed, speed of information processing, attentional switching, verbal memory, visual memory, executive functioning and an overall mean score. Severity of depression was assessed by the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-self rating version. Saliva cortisol measurements were performed to calculate HPA axis indicators: cortisol awakening response, diurnal slope, the evening cortisol level and the cortisol suppression on the dexamethasone suppression test. Regression analyses of depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning on each HPA axis indicator were performed. In addition we calculated percentages explanation of the association between depressive symptoms and cognition by HPA axis indicators. Depressive symptoms were associated with dysfunction in psychomotor speed, attentional switching and the mean score, as well as with attenuation in diurnal slope value. No association was found between HPA axis activity and cognitive functioning and HPA axis activity did not explain the associations between depressive symptoms and cognition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As our study is the first one in this field specific for bipolar patients and changes in HPA-axis activity did not seem to explain the association between severity of depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning in bipolar patients, future studies are needed to evaluate other factors that might explain this relationship.

  6. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) promotes the differentiation of mouse cochlear neural progenitors via the Math1-Brn3.1 signaling pathway in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaohua; Huang, Jianmin; Feng, Ling; Fukudome, Shinji; Hamajima, Yuki; Lin, Jizhen

    2010-04-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is essential for the development of the cochlear duct that harbors the organ of Corti. However, little is known about the molecular signaling pathway through which SHH promotes the development of the organ of Corti, especially cochlear sensory epithelial cells. In this study, we demonstrated that SHH contributes to the differentiation of cochlear neural progenitors (CNPs), which are derived from the postnatal day 1 organ of Corti in mice. Addition of SHH to CNPs increased the formation of epithelial cell islands, simultaneously activated the expression of Math1 that is a transcription factor for the initial differentiation of auditory hair cells. The increased expression of Math1 then regulated the promoter activity of Brn3.1, another transcription factor that controls the further differentiation and survival of auditory hair cells. Taken together, our data suggest that SHH plays an important role in the promotion of auditory hair cell differentiation via the Math1-Brn3.1 signaling pathway.

  7. Characterization of the phospholemman knockout mouse heart: depressed left ventricular function with increased Na-K-ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James R; Kennington, Erika; Fuller, William; Dighe, Kushal; Donoghue, Pamela; Clark, James E; Jia, Li-Guo; Tucker, Amy L; Moorman, J Randall; Marber, Michael S; Eaton, Philip; Dunn, Michael J; Shattock, Michael J

    2008-02-01

    Phospholemman (PLM, FXYD1), abundantly expressed in the heart, is the primary cardiac sarcolemmal substrate for PKA and PKC. Evidence supports the hypothesis that PLM is part of the cardiac Na-K pump complex and provides the link between kinase activity and pump modulation. PLM has also been proposed to modulate Na/Ca exchanger activity and may be involved in cell volume regulation. This study characterized the phenotype of the PLM knockout (KO) mouse heart to further our understanding of PLM function in the heart. PLM KO mice were bred on a congenic C57/BL6 background. In vivo conductance catheter measurements exhibited a mildly depressed cardiac contractile function in PLM KO mice, which was exacerbated when hearts were isolated and Langendorff perfused. There were no significant differences in action potential morphology in paced Langendorff-perfused hearts. Depressed contractile function was associated with a mild cardiac hypertrophy in PLM KO mice. Biochemical analysis of crude ventricular homogenates showed a significant increase in Na-K-ATPase activity in PLM KO hearts compared with wild-type controls. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis of ventricular homogenates revealed small, nonsignificant changes in Na- K-ATPase subunit expression, with two-dimensional gel (isoelectric focusing, SDS-PAGE) analysis revealing minimal changes in ventricular protein expression, indicating that deletion of PLM was the primary reason for the observed PLM KO phenotype. These studies demonstrate that PLM plays an important role in the contractile function of the normoxic mouse heart. Data are consistent with the hypothesis that PLM modulates Na-K-ATPase activity, indirectly affecting intracellular Ca and hence contractile function.

  8. Quantitative polarized light microscopy of unstained mammalian cochlear sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalwani, Neil M.; Ong, Cheng Ai; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Haward, Simon J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2013-02-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in the world, and most frequently it originates in the inner ear. Yet, the inner ear has been difficult to access for diagnosis because of its small size, delicate nature, complex three-dimensional anatomy, and encasement in the densest bone in the body. Evolving optical methods are promising to afford cellular diagnosis of pathologic changes in the inner ear. To appropriately interpret results from these emerging technologies, it is important to characterize optical properties of cochlear tissues. Here, we focus on that characterization using quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) applied to unstained cochlear sections of the mouse, a common animal model of human hearing loss. We find that the most birefringent cochlear materials are collagen fibrils and myelin. Retardance of the otic capsule, the spiral ligament, and the basilar membrane are substantially higher than that of other cochlear structures. Retardance of the spiral ligament and the basilar membrane decrease from the cochlear base to the apex, compared with the more uniform retardance of other structures. The intricate structural details revealed by qPLM of unstained cochlear sections ex vivo strongly motivate future application of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to human cochlea in vivo.

  9. ANALYSIS OF OBSERVED BEHAVIORS DISPLAYED BY DEPRESSED-PATIENTS DURING A CLINICAL INTERVIEW - RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BEHAVIORAL-FACTORS AND CLINICAL CONCEPTS OF ACTIVATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOUHUYS, AL; JANSEN, CJ; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    1991-01-01

    In 61 drug-free depressed patients, relationships were studied between observed behaviors and measures of common clinical concepts of activation. The behaviors were observed during a clinical interview and analyzed with ethological methods. Activation was assessed by means of self-ratings (Thayer, A

  10. Effect of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Yong; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Song, Hyun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined the effects of virtual reality dance exercise on the balance, activities of daily living and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients. [Subjects] Twenty patients were assigned either the experimental group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). All participants received 30 minutes of neurodevelopment treatment and 15 minutes of functional electrical stimulation 5 times per week for 6 weeks. The experimental group additionally performed 30 minutes of dance exercise. Balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status were assessed before and after the 6-week treatment period using the Berg balance scale, the Modified Barthel Index, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The paired t-test was used to detect differences before and after treatment, and the independent t-test was used to detect differences between the treatment groups. [Results] The values for balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status significantly differed between before and after treatment in the experimental group, and significantly differed between the experimental group and control group. [Conclusion] Virtual reality dance exercise has a positive effect on balance, activities of daily living, and depressive disorder status of Parkinson's disease patients.

  11. Striatal dopaminergic activity (FDOPA-PET) associated with cognitive items of a depression scale (MADRS) in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerts, Janneke; Leenders, Klaus L.; Koning, Marthe; Portman, Axel T.; van Beilen, Marije

    2007-01-01

    Motor symptoms form the hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), although other features such as depression are often present. Currently-used depression rating scales measure affective and somatic symptoms. These somatic symptoms of depression can also be core PD symptoms, suggesting an overlap of symp

  12. The systematic activation method as a nursing intervention in depressed elderly : a protocol for a multi - centre cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clignet, Frans; Meijel, Berno van; Straten, Annemiek van; Cuijpers, Pim

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression in later life is a common mental disorder with a prevalence rate of between 3% and 35% for minor depression and approximately 2% for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The most common treatment modalities for MDD are antidepressant medication and psychological interventions. Rec

  13. An exploratory mixed methods study of the acceptability and effectiveness of mindfulness -based cognitive therapy for patients with active depression and anxiety in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercer Stewart W

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT is an 8-week course developed for patients with relapsing depression that integrates mindfulness meditation practices and cognitive theory. Previous studies have demonstrated that non-depressed participants with a history of relapsing depression are protected from relapse by participating in the course. This exploratory study examined the acceptability and effectiveness of MBCT for patients in primary care with active symptoms of depression and anxiety Methods 13 patients with recurrent depression or recurrent depression and anxiety were recruited to take part in the study. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted three months after completing the MBCT programme. A framework approach was used to analyse the data. Beck depression inventories (BDI-II and Beck anxiety inventories (BAI provided quantitative data and were administered before and three months after the intervention. Results The qualitative data indicated that mindfulness training was both acceptable and beneficial to the majority of patients. For many of the participants, being in a group was an important normalising and validating experience. However most of the group believed the course was too short and thought that some form of follow up was essential. More than half the patients continued to apply mindfulness techniques three months after the course had ended. A minority of patients continued to experience significant levels of psychological distress, particularly anxiety. Statistically significant reductions in mean depression and anxiety scores were observed; the mean pre-course depression score was 35.7 and post-course score was 17.8 (p = 0.001. A similar reduction was noted for anxiety with a mean pre-course anxiety score of 32.0 and mean post course score of 20.5 (p = 0.039. Overall 8/11 (72% patients showed improvements in BDI and 7/11 (63% patients showed improvements in BAI. In general the results

  14. Physical self-concept and self-esteem mediate cross-sectional relations of physical activity and sport participation with depression symptoms among adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Rod K; Hales, Derek P; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Felton, Gwen A; Saunders, Ruth; Ward, Dianne S; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R

    2006-05-01

    The authors tested whether physical self-concept and self-esteem would mediate cross-sectional relations of physical activity and sport participation with depression symptoms among 1,250 girls in 12th grade. There was a strong positive relation between global physical self-concept and self-esteem and a moderate inverse relation between self-esteem and depression symptoms. Physical activity and sport participation each had an indirect, positive relation with global physical self-concept that was independent of objective measures of cardiorespiratory fitness and body fatness. These correlational findings provide initial evidence suggesting that physical activity and sport participation might reduce depression risk among adolescent girls by unique, positive influences on physical self-concept that operate independently of fitness, body mass index, and perceptions of sports competence, body fat, and appearance.

  15. An Internet-based program for depression using activity and physiological sensors: efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botella C

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Botella,1,2 Adriana Mira,1 Inés Moragrega,2,3 Azucena García-Palacios,1,2 Juana Bretón-López,1,2 Diana Castilla,1,2 Antonio Riera López del Amo,1 Carla Soler,1 Guadalupe Molinari,1 Soledad Quero,1,2 Verónica Guillén-Botella,2,3 Ignacio Miralles,1,2 Sara Nebot,1 Berenice Serrano,1,2 Dennis Majoe,4 Mariano Alcañiz,2,5 Rosa María Baños2,31Department of Basic, Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Universitat Jaume, Castellón, Spain; 2CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; 3Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, Spain; 4Native Systems Institute, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 5Human-Centered Technology Institute, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain Purpose: Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT has been shown to be efficacious. Moreover, CCBT can be enhanced by using physiological and activity sensors, but there is no evidence about the acceptability of all these tools. The objective of this study is to examine the efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use of an Internet-based CCBT program for preventing depression, with and without sensors (electroencephalography, electrocardiograhpy ECG, and actigraphy, in a high-risk population (unemployed men.Patients and methods: Sixty participants at risk of depression (unemployed men were randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: 1 intervention program (N=22, 2 intervention program plus sensors (N=19, and 3 control group (N=19. Participants completed depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect, and perceived stress measures. Furthermore, they also completed the measures for expectation, satisfaction, and the ease of use of the program.Results: Results showed that the two intervention groups improved significantly more than the control group on the clinical variables, and the improvements

  16. Mouse testing methods in psychoneuroimmunology: an overview of how to measure sickness, depressive/anxietal, cognitive, and physical activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Jason M; Blevins, Neil A; Baynard, Tracy; Freund, Gregory G

    2012-01-01

    The field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) aims to uncover the processes and consequences of nervous, immune, and endocrine system relationships. Behavior is a consequence of such interactions and manifests from a complex interweave of factors including immune-to-neural and neural-to-immune communication. Often the signaling molecules involved during a particular episode of neuroimmune activation are not known but behavioral response provides evidence that bioactives such as neurotransmitters and cytokines are perturbed. Immunobehavioral phenotyping is a first-line approach when examining the neuroimmune system and its reaction to immune stimulation or suppression. Behavioral response is significantly more sensitive than direct measurement of a single specific bioactive and can quickly and efficiently rule in or out relevance of a particular immune challenge or therapeutic to neuroimmunity. Classically, immunobehavioral research was focused on sickness symptoms related to bacterial infection but neuroimmune activation is now a recognized complication of diseases and disorders ranging from cancer to diabesity. Immunobehaviors include lethargy, loss of appetite, and disinterest in social activity and the surrounding environment. In addition, neuroimmune activation can precipitate feelings of depression and anxiety while negatively impacting cognitive function and physical activity. Provided is a detailed overview of behavioral tests frequently used to examine neuroimmune activation in mice with a special emphasis on preexperimental conditions that can confound or prevent successful immunobehavioral experimentation.

  17. Evaluation of Malondialdehyde, Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activity in Fetal Cord Blood of Depressed Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Ebru; Bakacak, Murat; Tolun, Fatma İnanç; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Objective The umbilical cord consists of two arteries and one vein and it functions in the transport between the maternal and fetal circulation. Biochemical analysis of fetal cord blood (FCB) during delivery could be beneficial in terms of understanding the fetal environment. In this study, we aimed to investigate oxidative parameters like malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) levels in FCB during delivery. Methods We collected FCB samples during caesarean section. Our study included 33 depressed mothers and 37 healthy controls. We investigated MDA, SOD, and CAT levels in FCB samples. Results We found no significant difference between groups in terms of MDA (p=0.625), SOD (p=0.940), and CAT (p=0.413) levels. Conclusion Our study reveals probable protective effects of the placenta from oxidative stress. Future studies should include larger samples. PMID:28138108

  18. Ultra-Wideband Transceivers for Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reisenzahn Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-wideband (UWB radio offers low power consumption, low power spectral density, high immunity against interference, and other benefits, not only for consumer electronics, but also for medical devices. A cochlear implant (CI is an electronic hearing apparatus, requiring a wireless link through human tissue. In this paper we propose an UWB link for a data rate of Mbps and a propagation distance up to 500 mm. Transmitters with step recovery diode and transistor pulse generators are proposed. Two types of antennas and their filter characteristics in the UWB spectrum will be discussed. An ultra-low-power back tunnel diode receiver prototype is described and compared with conventional detector receivers.

  19. Deafness in cochlear and auditory nerve disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common type of hearing impairment worldwide. It arises as a consequence of damage to the cochlea or auditory nerve, and several structures are often affected simultaneously. There are many causes, including genetic mutations affecting the structures of the inner ear, and environmental insults such as noise, ototoxic substances, and hypoxia. The prevalence increases dramatically with age. Clinical diagnosis is most commonly accomplished by measuring detection thresholds and comparing these to normative values to determine the degree of hearing loss. In addition to causing insensitivity to weak sounds, sensorineural hearing loss has a number of adverse perceptual consequences, including loudness recruitment, poor perception of pitch and auditory space, and difficulty understanding speech, particularly in the presence of background noise. The condition is usually incurable; treatment focuses on restoring the audibility of sounds made inaudible by hearing loss using either hearing aids or cochlear implants.

  20. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C. (X-Ray Science Division); (Northwestern Univ.); (Diamond Light Source, Ltd.)

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  1. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lu

    Full Text Available Modern cochlear implant (CI users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  2. Correlation of within-individual fluctuation of depressed mood with prefrontal cortex activity during verbal working memory task: optical topography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Aoki, Ryuta; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies showed that interindividual variations in mood state are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity. In this study, we focused on the depressed-mood state under natural circumstances and examined the relationship between within-individual changes over time in this mood state and PFC activity. We used optical topography (OT), a functional imaging technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy, to measure PFC activity for each participant in three experimental sessions repeated at 2-week intervals. In each session, the participants completed a self-report questionnaire of mood state and underwent OT measurement while performing verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks. The results showed that changes in the depressed-mood score between successive sessions were negatively correlated with those in the left PFC activation for the verbal WM task (ρ = -0.56, p < 0.05). In contrast, the PFC activation for the spatial WM task did not co-vary with participants' mood changes. We thus demonstrated that PFC activity during a verbal WM task varies depending on the participant's depressed mood state, independent of trait factors. This suggests that using optical topography to measure PFC activity during a verbal WM task can be used as a potential state marker for an individual's depressed mood state.

  3. Beginnings of Song in Young Deaf Children Using Cochlear Implants: The Song They Move, the Song They Feel, the Song They Share

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennari, Maria

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the singing activity of prelingually deaf children under four years of age who are using cochlear implants (CIs) and presents a strand of a larger study that aimed to observe, record and analyse the musical activity of seven profoundly deaf children using CIs in the UK, for a period of one calendar year. The singing activity…

  4. Social Media Utilization in the Cochlear Implant Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Rajeev C.; Lehmann, Ashton E.; Hight, A. Ed; Darrow, Keith; Remenschneider, Aaron; Kozin, Elliott D.; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 200,000 individuals worldwide have received a cochlear implant (CI). Social media Websites may provide a paramedical community for those who possess or are interested in a CI. The utilization patterns of social media by the CI community, however, have not been thoroughly investigated. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate participation of the CI community in social media Websites. Research Design We conducted a systematic survey of online CI-related social media sources. Using standard search engines, the search terms cochlear implant, auditory implant, forum, and blog identified relevant social media platforms and Websites. Social media participation was quantified by indices of membership and posts. Study Sample Social media sources included Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, blogs, and online forums. Each source was assigned one of six functional categories based on its description. Intervention No intervention was performed. Data Collection and Analysis We conducted all online searches in February 2014. Total counts of each CI-related social media source were summed, and descriptive statistics were calculated. Results More than 350 sources were identified, including 60 Facebook groups, 36 Facebook pages, 48 Twitter accounts, 121 YouTube videos, 13 forums, and 95 blogs. The most active online communities were Twitter accounts, which totaled 35,577 members, and Facebook groups, which totaled 17,971 members. CI users participated in Facebook groups primarily for general information/support (68%). Online forums were the next most active online communities by membership. The largest forum contained approximately 9,500 topics with roughly 127,000 posts. CI users primarily shared personal stories through blogs (92%), Twitter (71%), and YouTube (62%). Conclusions The CI community engages in the use of a wide range of online social media sources. The CI community uses social media for support, advocacy, rehabilitation information, research

  5. The cochlear nerve canal and internal auditory canal in children with normal cochlea but cochlear nerve deficiency

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    Yan, Fei; Li, Jianhong; Xian, Junfang; Wang, Zhenchang [Dept. of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)], e-mail: cjr.wzhch@vip.163.com; Mo, Lingyan [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)

    2013-04-15

    Background: There is an increasing frequency of requests for cochlear implantation (CI) in deaf children and more detailed image information is necessary for selecting appropriate candidates. Cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) is a contraindication to CI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to evaluate the integrity of the cochlear nerve. The abnormalities of the cochlear nerve canal (CNC) and internal auditory canal (IAC) have been reported to be associated with CND. Purpose: To correlate CNC manifestation, size, and IAC diameter on high-resolution CT (HRCT) with CND diagnosed by MRI in children. Material and Methods: HRCT images from 35 sensorineurally deaf children who had normal cochlea but bilateral or unilateral CND diagnosed by MRI were studied retrospectively. The CNC and IAC manifestation and size were assessed and correlated with CND. Results: CND was diagnosed by MRI in 54/70 ears (77.1%). Thirty-two ears had an absent cochlear nerve (59.3%), while 22 ears had a small cochlear nerve (40.7%). The CNC diameter was <1.5 mm in 36 ears (66.7%). The CNC diameter ranged between 1.5 and 2.0 mm in seven ears (13.0%) and was >2.0 mm in 11 ears (20.4%). The IAC diameter was <3.0 mm in 25 ears (46.3%) and >3.0 mm in 29 ears (53.7%). Conclusion: The hypoplastic CNC might be more highly indicative of CND than that of a narrow IAC.

  6. The Association between Post-Stroke Depression and the Activities of Daily Living/Gait Balance in Patients with First-Onset Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geun-Young; Im, Sun; Lee, Soo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between post-stroke depression (PSD) and clinical outcomes, including activities of daily living (ADL) and gait balance, in patients with first-onset stroke. One hundred and eighty inpatients were recruited and followed-up for a 6-month. The depressive, cognitive, and stroke symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the modified Rankin Scale (MRS), and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). All patients were assessed at baseline and at the end of the observation (6-month). Among 180 patients, 127 (70.6%) were diagnosed with minimal-to-mild depression (MMD) while 53 (29.4%) were diagnosed with moderate-to-severe depression (MSD). The odd ratio (OR) for poor outcome in the MSD group was approximately 3.7 relative to the MMD group. The proportion of patients with better balance classified by the BBS score at 6-month was significantly higher in the MMD group than in the MSD group (OR=1.375). Our findings demonstrate the potential relationship between PSD and rehabilitation outcomes measured by different rating scales in Korean stroke patients. Our study suggests that clinicians should carefully evaluate depressive symptoms in patients with stroke during routine clinical practice. Adequately-powered and well-controlled further studies are necessary to confirm and fully characterize this relationship. PMID:27909458

  7. The influence of comorbid personality disorder on the effects of behavioural activation vs. antidepressant medication for major depressive disorder: results from a randomized trial in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradveisi, Latif; Huibers, Marcus J H; Renner, Fritz; Arasteh, Modabber; Arntz, Arnoud

    2013-08-01

    There is a disagreement about the impact of personality disorder (PD) on treatment outcome for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). 100 out-patients with MDD were randomized to 16 sessions of behavioural activation (BA) (n = 50) or antidepressant medication (ADM) (n = 50) in Iran. Main outcome was depression severity, measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and assessed at 0, 4, 13 and 49 weeks. Participants with comorbid PDs had higher scores on BDI and HRSD at baseline and throughout the study than participants without comorbid PD. Patients with and without comorbid personality pathology responded equally to treatment on the short-and the long-term. Overall, BA was better in reducing symptoms in patients but this effect was not influenced by comorbid PD. Similar effects were found for a dimensional PD-measure. Only cluster-C PD-traits turned out to be associated with overall depression severity. Cluster-A PD-traits predicted poorer long-term treatment response to ADM and BA, but only on the BDI, not on the HRSD. No effects of cluster-B PD-traits were found. However, PD was associated with higher dropout. The general conclusion is that comorbid PD pathology, especially from cluster-C, is associated with higher depression severity, but not with less response to treatment. Comorbid PD did predict increased chance of dropout.

  8. Prevalence, correlates and under-diagnosis of clinical depression among adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy in a Tertiary Health Institution in northeastern Nigeria

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    Abdu Wakawa Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical depression is a highly debilitating illness, which is often under-diagnosed and negatively impacts on the quality of life of its sufferers. When it co-exists with other medical conditions, its effect is even more incapacitating. Undiagnosed depression in the context of HIV infection leads to accelerated decline in CD4+ cell counts with concomitant increase in the viral load and poor adherence to the antiretroviral medications which lead to viral mutation and the evolution of resistant strains. This study examined the prevalence of depression, its correlates and the frequency of the diagnosis of the condition among HIV+ subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART by the internists and general physicians at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital in Northeastern Nigeria. Three hundred and fifty representative samples of HIV+ adults on HAART were drawn from the Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic of the Institution. Diagnosis of depression was made using the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria based on Composite International Diagnostic Interview generated data. Socio-demographic and clinical variables were also analyzed for their correlation with depression in the subjects. About 20% of the respondents were diagnosed with clinical depression and no diagnosis of the condition was hitherto entertained in all the respondents. The independent determinants of depression in the participants were: female gender [odds ratio (OR=3.87 (95% confidence interval, CI: 2.089-7.183], past history of psychiatric illness [OR=43.81 (95% CI: 9.731-197.30] and family history of psychiatric illness in first-degree relatives of the subjects [OR=14.364 (95% CI=5.327- 38.729]. Depression is a relatively common psychiatric condition among adults on HAART, there is therefore the need for routine screening of this condition among HIV+ subjects in order to optimize patient care and improve clinical outcomes.

  9. CT and MR imaging for pediatric cochlear implantation: emphasis on the relationship between the cochlear nerve canal and the cochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Mikiko; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Masaki, Hidekazu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Morimoto, Noriko; Taiji, Hidenobu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Cochlear implantation has become an accepted treatment for deafness. As the frequency of cochlear implantation has increased, requests for images have also increased in the work-up for candidates. An absent cochlear nerve (CN) is a contraindication to cochlear implantation. Therefore, MRI is performed to evaluate the CN in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Recently, some authors have reported the relationship between cochlear nerve canal (CNC) stenosis and CN hypoplasia. To review the relationship between CNC and CN. During a period of 78 months, 21 children (42 ears) with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss underwent both HRCT and MRI of the cochlear nerve. We retrospectively reviewed two factors: the evaluation of inner ear malformations and the relationship between CNC stenosis and CN hypoplasia. Inner ear malformations were recognized in ten ears. The mean CNC diameter was approximately 2 mm (ranging from 0.6 to 2.7 mm). CN hypoplasia was seen in eight of the 42 ears; all eight were associated with CNC stenosis ({<=}1.5 mm). Of the 34 ears with normal CN, 32 had CNC >1.5 mm in diameter and the remaining two ears, with incomplete partition type I, had CNC stenosis. Children with CNC stenosis had a high incidence of CN hypoplasia. CNC stenosis ({<=}1.5 mm) suggests CN hypoplasia. On the other hand, CN hypoplasia was not seen in children with CNC diameter >1.5 mm. Therefore, we conclude that children with CNC stenosis or malformations on HRCT should receive MR imaging of the CN. (orig.)

  10. Effect of unilateral and simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zon, Alice; Smulders, Yvette E; Ramakers, Geerte G J; Stegeman, Inge; Smit, Adriana L; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Stokroos, Robert J; Hendrice, Nadia; Free, Rolien H; Maat, Bert; Frijns, Johan H M; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Huinck, Wendy J; Topsakal, Vedat; Tange, Rinze A; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus perception in patients with severe bilateral postlingual sensorineural hearing loss and to demonstrate possible differences between unilateral and bilateral cochlear implantation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. MET

  11. Effect of unilateral and simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zon, A. van; Smulders, Y.E.; Ramakers, G.G.; Stegeman, I.; Smit, A.L.; Zanten, G.A.; Stokroos, R.J.; Hendrice, N.; Free, R.H.; Maat, B.; Frijns, J.H.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Huinck, W.J.; Topsakal, V.; Tange, R.A.; Grolman, W.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus perception in patients with severe bilateral postlingual sensorineural hearing loss and to demonstrate possible differences between unilateral and bilateral cochlear implantation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. MET

  12. Urethane anesthesia depresses activities of thalamocortical neurons and alters its response to nociception in terms of dual firing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeowool eHuh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics are often used to characterize the activity of single neurons in-vivo for its advantages such as reduced noise level and convenience in noxious stimulations. Of the anesthetics, urethane had been widely used in some thalamic studies under the assumption that sensory signals are still relayed to the thalamus under urethane anesthesia and that thalamic response would therefore reflect the response of the awake state. We tested whether this assumption stands by comparing thalamic activity in terms of tonic and burst firing modes during ‘the awake state’ or under ‘urethane anesthesia’ utilizing the extracellular single unit recording technique. First we have tested how thalamic relay neurons respond to the introduction of urethane and then tested how urethane influences thalamic discharges under formalin-induced nociception. Urethane significantly depressed overall firing rates of thalamic relay neurons, which was sustained despite the delayed increase of burst activity over the 4 hour recording period. Thalamic response to nociception under anesthesia was also similar overall except for the slight and transient increase of burst activity. Overall, results demonstrated that urethane suppresses the activity of thalamic relay neurons and that, despite the slight fluctuation of burst firing, formalin-induced nociception cannot significantly change the firing pattern of thalamic relay neurons that was caused by urethane.

  13. Locus Coeruleus Stimulation Facilitates Long-Term Depression in the Dentate Gyrus That Requires Activation of β-Adrenergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Niels; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity comprises a cellular mechanism through which the hippocampus most likely enables memory formation. Neuromodulation, related to arousal, is a key aspect in information storage. The activation of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons by novel experience leads to noradrenaline release in the hippocampus at the level of the dentate gyrus (DG). We explored whether synaptic plasticity in the DG is influenced by activation of the LC via electrical stimulation. Coupling of test-pulses that evoked stable basal synaptic transmission in the DG with stimulation of the LC induced β-adrenoreceptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) at perforant path–DG synapses in adult rats. Furthermore, persistent LTD (>24 h) induced by perforant path stimulation also required activation of β-adrenergic receptors: Whereas a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist (propranolol) prevented, an agonist (isoproterenol) strengthened the persistence of LTD for over 24 h. These findings support the hypothesis that persistent LTD in the DG is modulated by β-adrenergic receptors. Furthermore, LC activation potently facilitates DG LTD. This suggests in turn that synaptic plasticity in the DG is tightly regulated by activity in the noradrenergic system. This may reflect the role of the LC in selecting salient information for subsequent synaptic processing in the hippocampus. PMID:24464942

  14. [Recited depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucci, M; Cossio, M

    1984-01-01

    Several subjects who tell their depression and play a part of it in front of the doctor without being really depressed are reported. Some of them try to hide the symptoms (irritability or erethism, ceremonials of obsessive neurosis, shunning of phobia) which, in their opinion, might be detrimental to their reputation. Others neglect to describe some of the symptoms of their polymorphous clinical picture only underlining the depressive signs. Some others play a part of depression because they have believed to recognize themselves in persons presented by mass media, because it seems to them a duty to show an adequate depression in case of mournful event, or because they "convert" their problem into a depression. Some others use depression as a blackmail, or to obtain an advantage from doctor's conviction about their illness. The reason for the high frequency of similar cases in the present time are examined: the scientific divulgation and the acceptance of depression by the modern society are among the most important ones. The peculiar semantic vicissitudes of the word depression are also reviewed. A widening of the boundaries of depression has contributed to an increase in the number of the cases. Finally, in addition to patients who are depressed without being aware of it, the authors focus the inverse possibility: patients who believed or try to make their doctor believe (playing the part of depression in front of them) that they are depressed.

  15. Correlation of within-individual fluctuation of depressed mood with prefrontal cortex activity during verbal working memory task: optical topography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Aoki, Ryuta; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies showed that interindividual variations in mood state are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity. In this study, we focused on the depressed-mood state under natural circumstances and examined the relationship between within-individual changes over time in this mood state and PFC activity. We used optical topography (OT), a functional imaging technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy, to measure PFC activity for each participant in three experimental sessions repeated at 2-week intervals. In each session, the participants completed a self-report questionnaire of mood state and underwent OT measurement while performing verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks. The results showed that changes in the depressed-mood score between successive sessions were negatively correlated with those in the left PFC activation for the verbal WM task (ρ = -0.56, p mood changes. We thus demonstrated that PFC activity during a verbal WM task varies depending on the participant's depressed mood state, independent of trait factors. This suggests that using optical topography to measure PFC activity during a verbal WM task can be used as a potential state marker for an individual's depressed mood state.

  16. Psychometric properties of the French translation of the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form (BADS-SF) in non-clinical adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Aurélie; Van der Linden, Martial; Blairy, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    A decrease in the level of engagement in activities ("behavioral activation") is usually observed in major depressive disorder. Because behavioral treatments of depression aim to counteract that mechanism, assessing changes in behavioral activation during treatment is of great interest. Therefore, Manos et al. (2011) developed a scale that assesses these changes, which was called the Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form (BADS-SF). The aim of this study is to present a French version of this scale and to discuss its psychometric properties. The BADS-SF was translated into French, and 504 non-clinical adults completed an online survey that was composed of that scale and convergent measures. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed in two independent samples, and a two-factor solution was recommended, which references two functions of the engagement in activities (i.e., "activation" and "avoidance"). The results showed high levels of internal consistency and satisfying scores in terms of skewness and kurtosis. Moreover, relationships with measures of depression and behavioral systems indicated a good convergent validity. Therefore, the French BADS-SF can be seen as a reliable and valid instrument.

  17. Postpartum Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  18. Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3286 After hours (404) 639-2888 Contact Media Depression Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... How Do I Know if I Am Experiencing Depression? The following questions may help you determine if ...

  19. Depression Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Centers Diseases + Condition Centers Mental Health Medical Library Depression Screening (PHQ-9) - Instructions The following questions are ... this tool, there is also text-only version . Depression Screening - Manual Instructions The following questions are a ...

  20. Teen Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... something you did wrong Learn more Share Teen Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... get back to being yourself. Regular sadness and depression are not the same Regular sadness Feeling moody, ...

  1. Costs involved in using a cochlear implant in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Robyn Kerr

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implantation is an expensive but effective lifelong intervention for individuals with a severe-to-profound hearing loss. The primary aim of this study was to survey the short- and long-term costs of cochlear implantation. Individuals (N=154 using cochlear implants obtained from the University of Stellenbosch-Tygerberg Hospital Cochlear Implant Unit in Cape Town, South Africa were surveyed using a questionnaire and patient record review. The questionnaire used a combination of closed and open-ended questions to gather both quantitative and qualitative information. Costs were categorised as short- and long-term costs. All costs were converted to constant rands (June 2010 using the Consumer Price Index to allow for comparison in real terms over time. In the first 10 years of implantation the average estimated costs incurred by adults totalled R379 626, and by children R455 225. The initial purchase of the implant system was the most substantial cost, followed by upgrading of the processor. Travel and accommodation costs peaked in the first 2 years. On average the participants spent R2 550 per year on batteries and spares. Rehabilitation for children cost an average of R7 200. Insurance costs averaged R4 040 per year, and processor repairs R3 000 each. In addition to the upfront expense of obtaining the cochlear implant system, individuals using a cochlear implant in South Africa should be prepared for the long-term costs of maintenance, accessing the unit, support services and additional costs associated with use. Knowledge of these costs is important to ensure that individuals are successful users of their cochlear implants in the long term.

  2. HPA-axis hormone modulation of stress response circuitry activity in women with remitted major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsen, L M; Lancaster, K; Klibanski, A; Whitfield-Gabrieli, S; Cherkerzian, S; Buka, S; Goldstein, J M

    2013-10-10

    Decades of clinical and basic research indicate significant links between altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis hormone dynamics and major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent neuroimaging studies of MDD highlight abnormalities in stress response circuitry regions which play a role in the regulation of the HPA-axes. However, there is a dearth of research examining these systems in parallel, especially as related to potential trait characteristics. The current study addresses this gap by investigating neural responses to a mild visual stress challenge with real-time assessment of adrenal hormones in women with MDD in remission and controls. Fifteen women with recurrent MDD in remission (rMDD) and 15 healthy control women were scanned on a 3T Siemens MR scanner while viewing neutral and negative (stress-evoking) stimuli. Blood samples were obtained before, during, and after scanning for the measurement of HPA-axis hormone levels. Compared to controls, rMDD women demonstrated higher anxiety ratings, increased cortisol levels, and hyperactivation in the amygdala and hippocampus, pHPA-axis hormone dynamics on hyperactivity in stress response circuitry regions elicited by a well-validated stress paradigm in women with recurrent MDD in remission.

  3. Rumination in major depressive disorder is associated with impaired neural activation during conflict monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Brandon L; Olson, Ryan L; Bates, Marsha E; Selby, Edward A; Buckman, Jennifer F; Brush, Christopher J; Panza, Emily A; Kranzler, Amy; Eddie, David; Shors, Tracey J

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) often ruminate about past experiences, especially those with negative content. These repetitive thoughts may interfere with cognitive processes related to attention and conflict monitoring. However, the temporal nature of these processes as reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs) has not been well-described. We examined behavioral and ERP indices of conflict monitoring during a modified flanker task and the allocation of attention during an attentional blink (AB) task in 33 individuals with MDD and 36 healthy controls, and whether their behavioral performance and ERPs varied with level of rumination. N2 amplitude elicited by the flanker task was significantly reduced in participants with MDD compared to healthy controls. Level of self-reported rumination was also correlated with N2 amplitude. In contrast, P3 amplitude during the AB task was not significantly different between groups, nor was it correlated with rumination. No significant differences were found in behavioral task performance measures between groups or by rumination levels. These findings suggest that rumination in MDD is associated with select deficits in cognitive control, particularly related to conflict monitoring.

  4. Rumination in major depressive disorder is associated with impaired neural activation during conflict monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Alderman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD often ruminate about past experiences, especially those with negative content. These repetitive thoughts may interfere with cognitive processes related to attention and conflict monitoring. However, the temporal nature of these processes as reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs has not been well described. We examined behavioral and ERP indices of conflict monitoring during a modified flanker task and the allocation of attention during an attentional blink (AB task in 33 individuals with MDD and 36 healthy controls, and whether their behavioral performance and ERPs varied with level of rumination. N2 amplitude elicited by the flanker task was significantly reduced in participants with MDD compared to healthy controls. Level of self-reported rumination was also correlated with N2 amplitude. In contrast, P3 amplitude during the AB task was not significantly different between groups, nor was it correlated with rumination. No significant differences were found in behavioral task performance measures between groups or by rumination levels. These findings suggest that rumination in MDD is associated with select deficits in cognitive control, particularly related to conflict monitoring.

  5. Dopaminergic modulation of the voltage-gated sodium current in the cochlear afferent neurons of the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Valdés-Baizabal

    Full Text Available The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs. Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway.

  6. Dopaminergic modulation of the voltage-gated sodium current in the cochlear afferent neurons of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Baizabal, Catalina; Soto, Enrique; Vega, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear inner hair cells synapse onto type I afferent terminal dendrites, constituting the main afferent pathway for auditory information flow. This pathway receives central control input from the lateral olivocochlear efferent neurons that release various neurotransmitters, among which dopamine (DA) plays a salient role. DA receptors activation exert a protective role in the over activation of the afferent glutamatergic synapses, which occurs when an animal is exposed to intense sound stimuli or during hypoxic events. However, the mechanism of action of DA at the cellular level is still not completely understood. In this work, we studied the actions of DA and its receptor agonists and antagonists on the voltage-gated sodium current (INa) in isolated cochlear afferent neurons of the rat to define the mechanisms of dopaminergic control of the afferent input in the cochlear pathway. Experiments were performed using the voltage and current clamp techniques in the whole-cell configuration in primary cultures of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recordings of the INa showed that DA receptor activation induced a significant inhibition of the peak current amplitude, leading to a significant decrease in cell excitability. Inhibition of the INa was produced by a phosphorylation of the sodium channels as shown by the use of phosphatase inhibitor that produced an inhibition analogous to that caused by DA receptor activation. Use of specific agonists and antagonists showed that inhibitory action of DA was mediated both by activation of D1- and D2-like DA receptors. The action of the D1- and D2-like receptors was shown to be mediated by a Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA and Gαq/PLC/PKC pathways respectively. These results showed that DA receptor activation constitutes a significant modulatory input to SGNs, effectively modulating their excitability and information flow in the auditory pathway.

  7. Glia-related mechanisms in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus of the adult rat in response to unilateral conductive hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Alvarado, Juan C.; López-Muñoz, Diego F.; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; Gabaldón-Ull, María C.; Juiz, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Conductive hearing loss causes a progressive decline in cochlear activity that may result in functional and structural modifications in auditory neurons. However, whether these activity-dependent changes are accompanied by a glial response involving microglia, astrocytes, or both has not yet been fully elucidated. Accordingly, the present study was designed to determine the involvement of glial related mechanisms in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) of adult rats at 1, 4, 7, and 15 d after removing middle ear ossicles. Quantitative immunohistochemistry analyses at light microscopy with specific markers of microglia or astroglia along with immunocytochemistry at the electron microscopy level were used. Also, in order to test whether trophic support by neurotrophins is modulated in glial cells by auditory activity, the expression and distribution of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its colocalization with microglial or astroglial markers was investigated. Diminished cochlear activity after middle ear ossicle removal leads to a significant ipsilateral increase in the mean gray levels and stained area of microglial cells but not astrocytes in the AVCN at 1 and 4 d post-lesion as compared to the contralateral side and control animals. These results suggest that microglial cells but not astrocytes may act as dynamic modulators of synaptic transmission in the cochlear nucleus immediately following unilateral hearing loss. On the other hand, NT-3 immunostaining was localized mainly in neuronal cell bodies and axons and was upregulated at 1, 4 and 7 d post-lesion. Very few glial cells expressed this neurotrophin in both control and experimental rats, suggesting that NT-3 is primarily activated in neurons and not as much in glia after limiting auditory activity in the AVCN by conductive hearing loss. PMID:25352772

  8. New Criteria of Indication and Selection of Patients to Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. L. Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous changes continue to occur in cochlear implant candidacy. In general, these have been accompanied by concomitant and satisfactory changes in surgical techniques. Together, this has advanced the utility and safety of cochlear implantation. Most devices are now approved for use in patients with severe to profound unilateral hearing loss rather then the prior requirement of a bilateral profound loss. Furthermore, studies have begun utilizing short electrode arrays for shallow insertion in patients with considerable low-frequency residual hearing. This technique will allow the recipient to continue to use acoustically amplified hearing for the low frequencies simultaneously with a cochlear implant for the high frequencies. The advances in design of, and indications for, cochlear implants have been matched by improvements in surgical techniques and decrease in complications. The resulting improvements in safety and efficacy have further encouraged the use of these devices. This paper will review the new concepts in the candidacy of cochlear implant. Medline data base was used to search articles dealing with the following topics: cochlear implant in younger children, cochlear implant and hearing preservation, cochlear implant for unilateral deafness and tinnitus, genetic hearing loss and cochlear implant, bilateral cochlear implant, neuropathy and cochlear implant and neural plasticity, and the selection of patients for cochlear implant.

  9. Comparison of Bilateral and Unilateral Cochlear Implantation in Adults : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, Yvette E; van Zon, Alice; Stegeman, Inge; Rinia, Albert B; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Stokroos, Robert J; Hendrice, Nadia; Free, Rolien; Maat, Bert; Frijns, Johan H M; Briaire, Jeroen J; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Huinck, Wendy J; Smit, Adriana L; Topsakal, Vedat; Tange, Rinze A; Grolman, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Importance: The cost of bilateral cochlear implantation (BCI) is usually not reimbursed by insurance companies because of a lack of well-designed studies reporting the benefits of a second cochlear implant. Objective: To determine the benefits of simultaneous BCI compared with unilateral cochlear im

  10. Can auditory stady-state responses reflect place-specific cochlear dispersion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paredes Gallardo, Andreu; Epp, Bastian; Dau, Torsten

    The cochlear travelling wave propagates from the base to the apex, resulting in an increasing phase with distance from the cochlear base. Together with the tonotopic organization of the cochlea, this results in a frequency dependent delay of the resonance, a phenomenon known as cochlear dispersion...

  11. Hearing Experience and Receptive Vocabulary Development in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Mary K.; Pisoni, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated receptive vocabulary delay in deaf children with cochlear implants. Participants were 23 children with profound hearing loss, ages 6-14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1.4 and 6 years. Duration of cochlear implant use ranged from 3.7 to 11.8 years. "Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third…

  12. Participation in Physical, Social, and Religious Activity and Risk of Depression in the Elderly: A Community-Based Three-Year Longitudinal Study in Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Woong Roh

    Full Text Available We examined the longitudinal association between participation in individual or combinations of physical, social, and religious activity and risk of depression in the elderly.Elderly subjects aged ≥ 60 years who completed the Living Profiles of Older People Survey in Korea (n = 6,647 were included. The baseline assessment, Wave 1, was conducted in 2008, and a follow-up assessment, Wave 2, was conducted in 2011. We defined participation in frequent physical activity as ≥ 3 times weekly (at least 30 minutes per activity. Frequent participation in social and religious activity was defined as ≥ 1 activity weekly. The primary outcome was depression at 3-year follow up.Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that subjects who participated in frequent physical, social, and religious activity had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69-0.96, 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75-1.00, and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.67-0.90, respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in each activity. Participants who participated in only one type of activity frequently and participants who participated in two or three types of activities frequently had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75-0.98 and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.52-0.79, respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in any type of physical, social, and religious activity frequently.Participation in physical, social, and religious activity was associated with decreased risk of depression in the elderly. In addition, risk of depression was much lower in the elderly people who participated in two or three of the above-mentioned types of activity than that in the elderly who did not.

  13. Participation in Physical, Social, and Religious Activity and Risk of Depression in the Elderly: A Community-Based Three-Year Longitudinal Study in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hyun Woong; Hong, Chang Hyung; Lee, Yunhwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Lee, Kang Soo; Chang, Ki Jung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Jinhee; Lee, SooJin; Back, Joung Hwan; Chung, Young Ki; Lim, Ki Young; Noh, Jai Sung; Kim, Dongsoo; Son, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the longitudinal association between participation in individual or combinations of physical, social, and religious activity and risk of depression in the elderly. Methods Elderly subjects aged ≥60 years who completed the Living Profiles of Older People Survey in Korea (n = 6,647) were included. The baseline assessment, Wave 1, was conducted in 2008, and a follow-up assessment, Wave 2, was conducted in 2011. We defined participation in frequent physical activity as ≥3 times weekly (at least 30 minutes per activity). Frequent participation in social and religious activity was defined as ≥1 activity weekly. The primary outcome was depression at 3-year follow up. Results Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that subjects who participated in frequent physical, social, and religious activity had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69–0.96), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75–1.00), and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.67–0.90), respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in each activity. Participants who participated in only one type of activity frequently and participants who participated in two or three types of activities frequently had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75–0.98) and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.52–0.79), respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in any type of physical, social, and religious activity frequently. Conclusion Participation in physical, social, and religious activity was associated with decreased risk of depression in the elderly. In addition, risk of depression was much lower in the elderly people who participated in two or three of the above-mentioned types of activity than that in the elderly who did not. PMID:26172441

  14. When Hearing Is Tricky: Speech Processing Strategies in Prelingually Deafened Children and Adolescents with Cochlear Implants Having Good and Poor Speech Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Magdalene; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Knief, Arne; Baare, Johanna; Brinkheetker, Stephanie; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette; Dobel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear implants provide individuals who are deaf with access to speech. Although substantial advancements have been made by novel technologies, there still is high variability in language development during childhood, depending on adaptation and neural plasticity. These factors have often been investigated in the auditory domain, with the mismatch negativity as an index for sensory and phonological processing. Several studies have demonstrated that the MMN is an electrophysiological correlate for hearing improvement with cochlear implants. In this study, two groups of cochlear implant users, both with very good basic hearing abilities but with non-overlapping speech performance (very good or very poor speech performance), were matched according to device experience and age at implantation. We tested the perception of phonemes in the context of specific other phonemes from which they were very hard to discriminate (e.g., the vowels in /bu/ vs. /bo/). The most difficult pair was individually determined for each participant. Using behavioral measures, both cochlear implants groups performed worse than matched controls, and the good performers performed better than the poor performers. Cochlear implant groups and controls did not differ during time intervals typically used for the mismatch negativity, but earlier: source analyses revealed increased activity in the region of the right supramarginal gyrus (220–260 ms) in good performers. Poor performers showed increased activity in the left occipital cortex (220–290 ms), which may be an index for cross-modal perception. The time course and the neural generators differ from data from our earlier studies, in which the same phonemes were assessed in an easy-to-discriminate context. The results demonstrate that the groups used different language processing strategies, depending on the success of language development and the particular language context. Overall, our data emphasize the role of neural plasticity and use

  15. 光学记录蜗核和前庭核核团神经元电活动%Optical Recording of Population Neuronal Activity in Cochlear Nucleus and Vestibular Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨仕明; 杨伟炎; 顾瑞; 韩东一; 山下敏夫

    2003-01-01

    目的在神经细胞群的水平上研究脑干蜗核(cochlear nucleus,CN)和前庭核(vestibular nucleus,VN)神经元电活动.方法自新生小鼠(1~5天)制备离体脑干切片,用吸光性电压敏感染料RH155染色20分钟.采用光学记录膜电位(optical recording membrane potential)技术,观察电刺激位听神经(第8颅神经,nⅧ)后脑干CN和VN的神经电活动.结果①电刺激nⅧ断端后光学记录显示兴奋传导至CN和VN核团(n=40);②CN和VN神经兴奋有激发延迟(onset latency)和高峰延迟(peak latency);③所记录的光学信号具有光吸收波长特性,表明光学记录的可靠性;④光学信号包括峰样快反应信号(spike-likefast signal)和持续较长时间的慢反应信号(slow signal);⑤连续刺激nⅧ后发现慢反应信号大小递减,为突触疲劳(synaptic faiigue)现象.结论本研究表明光学记录膜电位方法可以在神经细胞群的水平上直观观察脑干蜗核和前庭核神经电活动的时空二维方式及其兴奋性突触传递过程,为听觉和平衡觉中枢生理研究提供了新的手段.

  16. Early life stress in depressive patients: role of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors and of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juruena, Mario Francisco; Werne Baes, Cristiane Von; Menezes, Itiana Castro; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a chronic, recurrent and long-term disorder characterized by high rates of impairment and several comorbidities. Early life stress (ELS) is associated with the increased risk for developing depression in adulthood, influences its clinical course and predicts a poorer treatment outcome. Stressful life events play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression, being well established as acute triggers of psychiatric illness. The vulnerability for developing depression is associated to changes in neurobiological systems related to stress regulation. The hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal (HPA) axis responds to external and internal stimuli. Reported results indicate that stress in early phases of development can induce persistent changes in the response of the HPA axis to stress in adulthood, leading to a raised susceptibility to depression. These abnormalities appear to be related to the HPA axis deregulation in depression, partially due to an imbalance between glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and mineral ocorticoid receptors (MR). While most studies have consistently demonstrated that GR function is impaired in major depression (reduced GR-mediated feedback in HPA axis), data about the MR role in depression are still limited and contr oversial. Thus, in this review article we summarize the main reported findings about the consequences of ELS in HPA axis functioning and in the responsivity of MR/GR receptors in depression.

  17. Stop Thinking and Start Doing: Switching from Cognitive Therapy to Behavioral Activation in a Case of Chronic Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottonari, Kathryn A.; Roberts, John E.; Thomas, Sherilyn N.; Read, Jennifer P.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent investigations have demonstrated that Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are both efficacious treatments for depression (Butler, Chapman, Forman, & Beck, 2006; Dimidjian et al., 2006; Dobson, 1989; Gloaguen, Cottraux, Cucherat, & Blackburn, 1998; Hollon, Thase, & Markowitz, 2002; Jacobson et al., 1996). This…

  18. Pilot of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Latinos with Limited English Proficiency: Preliminary Evaluation of Efficacy and Acceptability

    OpenAIRE

    Collado, Anahi; Castillo, Soraida D.; Maero, Fabian; Lejuez, C.W.; MacPherson, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Latinos with limited English proficiency (LEP) experience multiple barriers to accessing efficacious mental health treatments. Using a stage model of behavioral therapies research, this Stage 1b investigation evaluated the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD), an intervention which may be well-equipped to address existing treatment barriers.

  19. Disability and health-related quality of life among patients with rheumatoid arthritis: association with radiographic joint damage, disease activity, pain, and depressive symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Rupp; H.C. Boshuizen; H.J. Dinant; C.E. Jacobi; G.A.M. van den Bos

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the associations between disability and health-related quality of life ( HRQoL), respectively, and radiographic joint damage, disease activity, pain, and depressive symptoms among patients with rheumatoid arthritis ( RA). Methods: Data were collected through questionnaires and cl

  20. Cochlear Implantation, Enhancements, Transhumanism and Posthumanism: Some Human Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    Biomedical engineering technologies such as brain-machine interfaces and neuroprosthetics are advancements which assist human beings in varied ways. There are exciting yet speculative visions of how the neurosciences and bioengineering may influence human nature. However, these could be preparing a possible pathway towards an enhanced and even posthuman future. This article seeks to investigate several ethical themes and wider questions of enhancement, transhumanism and posthumanism. Four themes of interest are: autonomy, identity, futures, and community. Three larger questions can be asked: will everyone be enhanced? Will we be "human" if we are not, one day, transhuman? Should we be enhanced or not? The article proceeds by concentrating on a widespread and sometimes controversial application: the cochlear implant, an auditory prosthesis implanted into Deaf patients. Cochlear implantation and its reception in both the deaf and hearing communities have a distinctive moral discourse, which can offer surprising insights. The paper begins with several points about the enhancement of human beings, transhumanism's reach beyond the human, and posthuman aspirations. Next it focuses on cochlear implants on two sides. Firstly, a shorter consideration of what technologies may do to humans in a transhumanist world. Secondly, a deeper analysis of cochlear implantation's unique socio-political movement, its ethical explanations and cultural experiences linked with pediatric cochlear implantation-and how those wary of being thrust towards posthumanism could marshal such ideas by analogy. As transhumanism approaches, the issues and questions merit continuing intense analysis.