WorldWideScience

Sample records for activity complex-formation reactions

  1. G protein activation by G protein coupled receptors: ternary complex formation or catalyzed reaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David J; Waelbroeck, Magali

    2004-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors catalyze the GDP/GTP exchange on G proteins, thereby activating them. The ternary complex model, designed to describe agonist binding in the absence of GTP, is often extended to G protein activation. This is logically unsatisfactory as the ternary complex does not accumulate when G proteins are activated by GTP. Extended models taking into account nucleotide binding exist, but fail to explain catalytic G protein activation. This review puts forward an enzymatic model of G protein activation and compares its predictions with the ternary complex model and with observed receptor phenomenon. This alternative model does not merely provide a new set of formulae but leads to a new philosophical outlook and more readily accommodates experimental observations. The ternary complex model implies that, HRG being responsible for efficient G protein activation, it should be as stable as possible. In contrast, the enzyme model suggests that although a limited stabilization of HRG facilitates GDP release, HRG should not be "too stable" as this might trap the G protein in an inactive state and actually hinder G protein activation. The two models also differ completely in the definition of the receptor "active state": the ternary complex model implies that the active state corresponds to a single active receptor conformation (HRG); in contrast, the catalytic model predicts that the active receptor state is mobile, switching smoothly through various conformations with high and low affinities for agonists (HR, HRG, HRGGDP, HRGGTP, etc.).

  2. Redox, disproportionation, and complex formation reactions of neptunium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction-oxidation, complex formation, and disproportionation reactions of neptunium ions in various aqueous media were investigated by electrochemical method in combination with the spectrophotometric measurement. By flow-coulometry with multi-step column electrodes, electrolytic redox potentials, number of electrons involved in the electrode processes, and reversibilities of the processes were determined, from which the complex formation of neptunium ions and the species participating in the reactions were discussed. Based on the characteristics of the redox behavior of neptunium in sulfuric acid media, the procedure for the flow-coulometric determination and differentiation of neptunium ions was developed. The redox potentials of neptunium in concentrated carbonate solutions were determined by means of controlled-potential electrolysis and spectrophotometry, and formations of NpO2(CO3)35- and NpO2(CO3)34- complexes were evaluated. The disproportionation rate of NpO2+ in concentrated acid solutions with and without such complexing agents as SO42- and Cl- was measured and the reaction mechanism was predicted. (author)

  3. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  4. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama Meguroku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  5. The Vtc proteins in vacuole fusion: coupling NSF activity to V(0) trans-complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Oliver; Bayer, Martin J; Peters, Christopher;

    2002-01-01

    The fusion of cellular membranes comprises several steps; membrane attachment requires priming of SNAREs and tethering factors by Sec18p/NSF (N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor) and LMA1. This leads to trans-SNARE pairing, i.e. formation of SNARE complexes between apposed membranes. The yeast...... vacuole system has revealed two subsequent molecular events: trans-complex formation of V-ATPase proteolipid sectors (V(0)) and release of LMA1 from the membrane. We have now identified a hetero-oligomeric membrane integral complex of vacuolar transporter chaperone (Vtc) proteins integrating these events....... The Vtc complex associates with the R-SNARE Nyv1p and with V(0). Subunits Vtc1p and Vtc4p control the initial steps of fusion. They are required for Sec18p/NSF activity in SNARE priming, membrane binding of LMA1 and V(0) trans-complex formation. In contrast, subunit Vtc3p is required for the latest step...

  6. Mapping of contact sites in complex formation between light-activated rhodopsin and transducin by covalent crosslinking: Use of a chemically preactivated reagent

    OpenAIRE

    ITOH, Yoshiki; Cai, Kewen; Khorana, H. Gobind

    2001-01-01

    Contact sites in interaction between light-activated rhodopsin and transducin (T) have been investigated by using a chemically preactivated crosslinking reagent, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate. The 3 propionyl-N-succinimidyl group in the reagent was attached by a disulfide exchange reaction to rhodopsin mutants containing single reactive cysteine groups in the cytoplasmic loops. Complex formation between the derivatized rhodopsin mutants and T was ...

  7. Cerimetric determination of simvastatin in pharmaceuticals based on redox and complex formation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basavaiah, K.; Devi, O.Z [University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore (India). Dept. of Chemistry]. E-mail: basavaiahk@yahoo.co.in

    2008-07-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of simvastatin (SMT) in bulk drug and in tablets. The methods are based on the oxidation of SMT by a measured excess of cerium (IV) in acid medium followed by determination of unreacted oxidant by two different reaction schemes. In one procedure (method A), the residual cerium (IV) is reacted with a fixed concentration of ferroin and the increase in absorbance is measured at 510 nm. The second approach (method B) involves the reduction of the unreacted cerium (IV) with a fixed quantity of iron (II), and the resulting iron (III) is complexed with thiocyanate and the absorbance measured at 470 nm. In both methods, the amount of cerium (IV) reacted corresponds to SMT concentration. The experimental conditions for both methods were optimized. In method A, the absorbance is found to increase linearly with SMT concentration (r = 0.9995) whereas in method B, the same decreased (r = -0.9943). The systems obey Beer's law for 0.6-7.5 and 0.5-5.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1} for method A and method B, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity values are 2.7 X 104 and 1.06 X 105 Lmol{sup -1} cm{sup -1}, respectively; and the corresponding sandel sensitivity values are 0.0153 and 0.0039 {mu}g cm{sup -2}, respectively. The limit of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) are reported for both methods. Intra-day and inter-day precision, and accuracy of the methods were established as per the current ICH guidelines. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of SMT in tablets and the results were statistically compared with those of the reference method by applying the Student's t-test and F-test. No interference was observed from the common excipients added to tablets. The accuracy and validity of the methods were further ascertained by performing recovery experiments via standard addition procedure. (author)

  8. Collectin-11/MASP complex formation triggers activation of the lectin complement pathway--the fifth lectin pathway initiation complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    complement pathway regulator MAP-1. Furthermore, we found that complex formation between recombinant collectin-11 and recombinant MASP-2 on Candida albicans leads to deposition of C4b. Native collectin-11 in serum mediated complement activation and deposition of C4b and C3b, and formation of the terminal...... complement complex on C. albicans. Moreover, spiking collectin-11-depleted serum, which did not mediate complement activation, with recombinant collectin-11 restored the complement activation capability. These results define collectin-11 as the fifth recognition molecule in the lectin complement pathway...

  9. DNA topoisomerase II structures and anthracycline activity: insights into ternary complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Ben, D; Palumbo, M; Zagotto, G; Capranico, G; Moro, S

    2007-01-01

    DNA Topoisomerase II (Top2) is an essential nuclear enzyme that regulates the topological state of the DNA, and a target of very effective anticancer drugs including anthracycline antibiotics. Even though several aspects of drug activity against Top2 are understood, the drug receptor site is not yet known. Several Top2 mutants have altered drug sensitivity and have provided information of structural features determining drug action. Here, we have revised the published crystal structures of eukaryotic and prokaryotic Top2s and relevant biochemical investigations of enzyme activity and anthracycline action. In particular, we have considered Top2 mutations conferring resistance to anthracyclines and related agents. Following a previous study (Moro et al, Biochemistry, 2004; 43: 7503-13), we have then re-built a molecular model of the entire enzyme in complex with DNA after the cleavage reaction, and used it to define the receptor site of anthracyclines. The results suggest a model wherein the drug specifically contacts the cleaved DNA as well as amino acid residues of the enzyme CAP-like domain. The findings can explain several established structure-activity relationships of antitumour anthracyclines, and provide a framework for further developments of effective Top2 poison. PMID:17897022

  10. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions and Coronal Holes in their Causal Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Golubeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    North-south asymmetry of sunspot activity resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields in the current cycle. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study a causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the...

  11. Arsenic-Lipid Complex Formation During the Active Transport of Arsenate in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbón, Jorge

    1969-01-01

    In studying formation of an arsenic-lipid complex during the active transport of 74As-arsenate in yeast, it was found that adaptation of yeast to arsenate resulted in cell populations which showed a deficient inflow of arsenate as compared to the nonadapted yeast. Experiments with both types of cells showed a direct correlation between the arsenate taken up and the amount of As-lipid complex formed. 74As-arsenate was bound exclusively to the phosphoinositide fraction of the cellular lipids. When arsenate transport was inhibited by dinitrophenol and sodium azide, the formation of the As-lipid complex was also inhibited. Phosphate did not interfere with the arsenate transport at a non-inhibitory concentration of external arsenate (10−9m). The As-adapted cells but not the unadapted cells were able to take up phosphate when growing in the presence of 10−2m arsenate. PMID:5773018

  12. Complex formation reactions of uranyl(VI) with neutral N-donors in dimethyl sulfoxide. Influence of small amounts of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative information about the existence and thermodynamic stability of uranyl(VI) ion complexes based solely upon nitrogen coordination has been obtained in the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide. Calorimetric, potentiometric, and FT-IR investigations, under controlled anhydrous conditions, show that the uranyl(VI) ion can form both mono and bis chelates with the ethylenediamine ligand and only a mono chelate of rather low stability with propylenediamine. With the monodentate ligand n-butylamine only a very weak metal-ligand interaction has been detected. The stability constants and the enthalpy and entropy changes have been calculated for the identified coordinated species. All data refer to 25.0 degree C and a tetraethylammonium perchlorate medium of ionic strength 0.1 M. All the complexes are enthalpy stabilized whereas the entropy contributions oppose the complex formation. Calorimetric and FT-IR measurements carried out to investigate the effects of small amounts of water present show that a very low water concentration, comparable to that of the coordinating metal ion, can give rise to hydrolysis reactions that may compete with complex formation. This is due to the combined action of different factors that are discussed. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  13. The citric acid-Mn III,IVO 2(birnessite) reaction. Electron transfer, complex formation, and autocatalytic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Stone, Alan T.

    2006-09-01

    Citrate released by plants, bacteria, and fungi into soils is subject to abiotic oxidation by MnO 2(birnessite), yielding 3-ketoglutarate, acetoacetate, and Mn II. Citrate loss and generation of products as a function of time all yield S-shaped curves, indicating autocatalysis. Increasing the citrate concentration decreases the induction period. The maximum rate ( rmax) along the reaction coordinate follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on citrate concentration. Increases in pH decrease rmax and increase the induction time. Adding Mn II, Zn II, orthophosphate, or pyrophosphate at the onset of reaction decreases rmax. Mn II addition eliminates the induction period, while orthophosphate and pyrophosphate addition increase the induction period. These findings indicate that two parallel processes are responsible. The first, relatively slow process involves the oxidation of free citrate by surface-bound Mn III,IV, yielding Mn II and citrate oxidation products. The second process, which is subject to strong positive feedback, involves electron transfer from Mn II-citrate complexes to surface-bound Mn III,IV, generating Mn III-citrate and Mn II. Subsequent intramolecular electron transfer converts Mn III-citrate into Mn II and citrate oxidation products.

  14. VEGF-A/NRP1 stimulates GIPC1 and Syx complex formation to promote RhoA activation and proliferation in skin cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Yoshida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuropilin-1 (NRP1 has been identified as a VEGF-A receptor. DJM-1, a human skin cancer cell line, expresses endogenous VEGF-A and NRP1. In the present study, the RNA interference of VEGF-A or NRP1 suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. Furthermore, the overexpression of the NRP1 wild type restored shNRP1-treated DJM-1 cell proliferation, whereas NRP1 cytoplasmic deletion mutants did not. A co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that VEGF-A induced interactions between NRP1 and GIPC1, a scaffold protein, and complex formation between GIPC1 and Syx, a RhoGEF. The knockdown of GIPC1 or Syx reduced active RhoA and DJM-1 cell proliferation without affecting the MAPK or Akt pathway. C3 exoenzyme or Y27632 inhibited the VEGF-A-induced proliferation of DJM-1 cells. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active form of RhoA restored the proliferation of siVEGF-A-treated DJM-1 cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of VEGF-A/NRP1 signaling upregulated p27, a CDK inhibitor. A cell-penetrating oligopeptide that targeted GIPC1/Syx complex formation inhibited the VEGF-A-induced activation of RhoA and suppressed DJM-1 cell proliferation. In conclusion, this new signaling pathway of VEGF-A/NRP1 induced cancer cell proliferation by forming a GIPC1/Syx complex that activated RhoA to degrade the p27 protein.

  15. Competition between Decapping Complex Formation and Ubiquitin-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation Controls Human Dcp2 Decapping Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Stacy L.; Corpuz, Elizabeth O.; Maloy, Jeffrey P.; Fillman, Christy; Webb, Kristofer; Bennett, Eric J.; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    mRNA decapping is a central step in eukaryotic mRNA decay that simultaneously shuts down translation initiation and activates mRNA degradation. A major complex responsible for decapping consists of the decapping enzyme Dcp2 in association with decapping enhancers. An important question is how the activity and accumulation of Dcp2 are regulated at the cellular level to ensure the specificity and fidelity of the Dcp2 decapping complex. Here, we show that human Dcp2 levels and activity are contr...

  16. TGF-β induces p53/Smads complex formation in the PAI-1 promoter to activate transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Yuki; Inoue, Yasumichi; Kawasaki, Fumihiro; Fukuura, Keishi; Sato, Koichi; Tanaka, Takahito; Itoh, Yuka; Hayashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling facilitates tumor development during the advanced stages of tumorigenesis, but induces cell-cycle arrest for tumor suppression during the early stages. However, the mechanism of functional switching of TGF-β is still unknown, and it is unclear whether inhibition of TGF-β signaling results amelioration or exacerbation of cancers. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 cooperates with Smad proteins, which are TGF-β signal transducers, to selectively activate plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) transcription. p53 forms a complex with Smad2/3 in the PAI-1 promoter to recruit histone acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein (CBP) and enhance histone H3 acetylation, resulting in transcriptional activation of the PAI-1 gene. Importantly, p53 is required for TGF-β-induced cytostasis and PAI-1 is involved in the cytostatic activity of TGF-β in several cell lines. Our results suggest that p53 enhances TGF-β-induced cytostatic effects by activating PAI-1 transcription, and the functional switching of TGF-β is partially caused by p53 mutation or p53 inactivation during cancer progression. It is expected that these findings will contribute to optimization of TGF-β-targeting therapies for cancer. PMID:27759037

  17. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  18. Electrode kinetics and double layer structure IV. The Eu(II)/Eu(III) electrode reaction at the DME in 1 M KSCN; Influence of complex formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreuk, C.W. de; Sluyters-Rehbach, M.; Sluyters, J.H.

    1971-01-01

    A detailed study has been made of the kinetics of the Eu(III)/Eu(II) reaction at the DME in 1 M KSCN by means of impedance measurements. The data were analyzed according to the complex-plane method. Because of the considerable complexation of the europium ions in this medium, it appeared to be neces

  19. Enhanced uptake and translocation of arsenic in Cretan brake fern (Pteris cretica L.) through siderophorearsenic complex formation with an aid of rhizospheric bacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seulki; Moon, Hee Sun; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2014-09-15

    Siderophores, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, released slightly more Fe (53.6 μmol) than that chelated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA; i.e. 43.7 μmol) in batch experiment using As-adsorbed ferrihydrite. More importantly, about 1.79 μmol of As was found to be associated with siderophores in the aqueous phase due to siderophore-As complex formation when siderophores were used to release As from ferrihydrite. In contrast, As was not detected in the aqueous phase when EDTA was used, probably due to the readsorption of released As to ferrihydrite. A series of pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of siderophores as a microbial iron-chelator on As uptake by Cretan brake fern (Pteris cretica L.) during phtoextraction. Results revealed that P. cretica, a known As hyperaccumulator, grown in the siderophore-amended soil showed about 3.7 times higher As uptake (5.62 mg-Asg(-1)-plant) than the plant grown in the EDTA-treated soil (1.51 mg-Asg(-1)-plant). In addition, As taken up by roots of P. cretica in the presence of siderophores seemed to be favorably translocated to shoots (i.e. stems and leaves). About 79% of the accumulated As was detected in the shoots in the presence of siderophores after ten weeks. Fluorescence microscopic analysis confirmed that As in the roots was delivered to the leaves of P. cretica as a siderophore-As complex. PMID:25215655

  20. Inhibition of E-cadherin/catenin complex formation by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase is partially independent of its catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Yuchao; Qi, Jieqiong; Han, Cuifang; Zhang, Xinling; Bi, Chuanlin; Yu, Wengong

    2016-02-01

    p120-catenin (p120) contains a large central armadillo repeat domain, via which it binds to E‑cadherin to stabilize the latter, thereby regulating cell‑to‑cell adhesion. A previous study by our group demonstrated that O‑linked N‑acetylglucosamine (O‑GlcNAc) is involved in the regulation of the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. As O‑GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is able to directly bind to the majority of its target proteins, the present study hypothesized that OGT may additionally regulate the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. To verify this hypothesis, a catalytically inactive OGT mutant was expressed in H1299 cells, and its effects on the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex were assessed. A cytoskeleton‑binding protein extraction assay confirmed that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. In addition, co‑immunoprecipitation and pull‑down assays were used to evaluate the interaction between OGT and p120. Immunoblotting indicated that OGT was able to directly bind to p120. To determine the domain of p120 involved in binding to OGT, a series of deletion mutants of p120 were constructed and subjected to protein binding assays by pull‑down assays. Immunoblotting showed that OGT bound to the regulatory and armadillo domains of p120, which might interfere with the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. Finally, OGT, p120 and E‑cadherin cytoplasmic domains (ECD) were recombinantly expressed in BL21 (DE3) recombinant E. coli cells, and a glutathione S‑transferase (GST) pull‑down assay was performed to assess the interactions among the purified recombinant proteins. Immunoblotting indicated that maltose‑binding protein (MBP)‑OGT inhibited the binding of His‑p120 to GST‑ECD in a dose‑dependent manner. All of these results suggested that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex

  1. EGF-stimulated activation of Rab35 regulates RUSC2-GIT2 complex formation to stabilize GIT2 during directional lung cancer cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Biao; Cui, Jie; Sun, Shixiu; Zheng, Jianchao; Zhang, Yujie; Ye, Bixing; Chen, Yan; Deng, Wenjie; Du, Jun; Zhu, Yichao; Chen, Yongchang; Gu, Luo

    2016-08-28

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains one of the most metastasizing tumors, and directional cell migration is critical for targeting tumor metastasis. GIT2 has been known to bind to Paxillin to control cell polarization and directional migration. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying roles of GIT2 in controlling cell polarization and directional migration remain elusive. Here we demonstrated GIT2 control cell polarization and direction dependent on the regulation of Golgi through RUSC2. RUSC2 interacts with SHD of GIT2 in various lung cancer cells, and stabilizes GIT2 (Mazaki et al., 2006; Yu et al., 2009) by decreasing degradation and increasing its phosphorylation. Silencing of RUSC2 showed reduced stability of GIT2, defective Golgi reorientation toward the wound edge and decreased directional migration. Moreover, short-term EGF stimulation can increase the interaction between RUSC2 and GIT2, prolonged stimulation leads to a decrease of their interaction through activating Rab35. Silencing of Rab35 also reduced stability and phosphorylation of GIT2 and decreased cell migration. Taken together, our study indicated that RUSC2 participates in EGFR signaling and regulates lung cancer progression, and may be a new therapeutic target against lung cancer metastasis. PMID:27238570

  2. Stereoregularity Drives Precipitation in Polyelectrolyte Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirrell, Matthew; Perry, Sarah; Leon, Lorraine; Kade, Matthew; Priftis, Dimitris; Black, Katie; Hoffman, Kyle; Whitmer, Jonathan; Qin, Jian; de Pablo, Juan

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of stereoregularity on the formation of polypeptide-based complex formation and assembly into micelles, hydrogels and ordered phases. We demonstrate that fluid complex coacervate formation (rather than solid complex precipitation) between oppositely charged polypeptides requires at least one racemic partner in order to disrupt backbone hydrogen bonding networks and prevent the hydrophobic collapse of the polymers into compact, fibrillar secondary structures. Computer simulations bear this out and enable visualization of the molecular structure of the complexes. The ability to choose between conditions of fluid phase formation and solid phase formation is a useful tool in developing new self-assembled materials based on polyelectrolyte complex formation. Support from the Argonne National Laboratory Laboratory Research and Development Program (2011-217) is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Pinacol Coupling Reactions Catalyzed by Active Zinc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui ZHAO; Wei DENG; Qing Xiang GUO

    2005-01-01

    Pinacol coupling reactions catalyzed by active zinc revealed high activity and extensive suitability. The efficiency of the reaction was improved apparently owing to decreasing reductive potential of zinc. In addition, the results indicated that the zinc activity has a direct relation to the coupling reactivity compared to untreated zinc or other general active zinc.

  4. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric acid......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  5. Ligand exchange and complex formation kinetics studied by NMR exemplified on fac-[(CO)3M(H2O)]+ (M = Mn, Tc, Re)

    OpenAIRE

    Helm, Lothar

    2008-01-01

    In this review ligand exchange and complex formation reactions on fac-[(CO)3M(H2O)3]+ (M = Mn, Tc, Re) and on fac-[(CO)2(NO)Re(H2O)3]2+ are presented. A variety of experimental NMR techniques are described and it is shown that sometimes combinations of techniques applied at variable temperature or variable pressure allowed to measure exchange rate constants and their activation parameters as well as thermodynamic parameters. Furthermore, the use of uncommon nuclei for NMR like 17O or 99Tc ext...

  6. Single Site Mutations in the Hetero-oligomeric Mrp Antiporter from Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 That Affect Na+/H+ Antiport Activity, Sodium Exclusion, Individual Mrp Protein Levels, or Mrp Complex Formation*

    OpenAIRE

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Ono, Tomohiro; Swartz, Talia H.; Krulwich, Terry A.; Ito, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Mrp systems are widely distributed and structurally complex cation/proton antiporters. Antiport activity requires hetero-oligomeric complexes of all six or seven hydrophobic Mrp proteins (MrpA–MrpG). Here, a panel of site-directed mutants in conserved or proposed motif residues was made in the Mrp Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter from an alkaliphilic Bacillus. The mutant operons were expressed in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc and assessed for antiport properties, support of sodium resista...

  7. Zinc isotope effects in complex formation with a crown ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope effects for zinc upon complex formation with dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 were investigated. The single stage separation factor for unit mass difference (α = 1.013) was great compared with that of calcium isotopes. One of the isotopes, 67Zn, showed a larger isotope effect than the other isotopes of even mass number. 7 refs., 1 fig

  8. REACTION AROILMETHYLENTRIPHENILPHOSPHRILIDES WITH ARILDIASONIY BORPHTORIDES AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY PHOSPHONIYHIDROSONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malanchuk SG

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of electrophilic accession borftoryds aryldizoniy by P-C connection aroyilmetylentryphenylfosforilids were studied. Found that the reaction formed borftoryds hidrazonofosfoniy salts. Studied the chemical and physical properties and antimicrobial activity of synthesized compounds.

  9. Liesegang patterns: Complex formation of precipitate in an electric field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    István Lagzi

    2005-02-01

    Formation of 1D Liesegang patterns was studied numerically in precipitation and reversible complex formation of precipitate scenarios in an electric field. The Ostwald’s supersaturation model reported by Büki, Kárpáti-Smidróczki and Zrínyi (BKZ model) was extended further. In the presence of an electric field the position of the first and the last bands () measured from the junction point of the outer and the inner electrolytes can be described by the function = 1 $_{}^{1/2}$ + 2 + 3 , where is the time elapsed until the nth band formation, 1, 2 and 3 are constants. The variation of the total number of bands with different electric field strengths () has a maximum. For higher one can observe a moving precipitation zone that becomes wider due to precipitation and reversible complex formation.

  10. Complexometric determination: Part I - EDTA and complex formation with the Cu2+ ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Compounds forming very stable complexes - chelates, have a wide field of application in analytical chemistry. The most famous group of these compounds are complexons. Complexons represent organic polyaminocarbonic acids as for example ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and its salts. The EDTA molecule has six coordinative sites. It is a hexadentate ligands i.e. it has two binding nitrogen atoms and four oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups and it forms complexes with almost all metal ions. EDTA as a tetraprotonic acid, H4Y disociates through four steps, yielding the ions HsY-, H2Y2-, HY3- and Y4-. Which of the EDTA forms will be encountered in a solution, depends on the pH. Due to the poor solubility of EDTA in pure water, as well as in most organic solvents, the disodium salt of EDTA Na2H2Y-2H2O, under the commercial name complexon III, is utilized for analytical determinations. In water, EDTA forms soluble, stabile chelate complexes with all cations, at the molar ratio 1:1, regardless of the charge of the metal ion. In contrast to other equilibria, which are mainly defined by Le Chatellier's principle, equilibria related to metal-EDTA complex formation are also dependent on the influence of the secondary equilibria of EDTA complex formation. Complexing reactions, which are equilibrium reactions, are simultaneously influenced by the following factors: solution pH and the presence of complexing agents which may also form a stabile complex with metal ions. The secondary reaction influence may be viewed and monitored through conditional stability constants. In the first part of the paper, the reaction of the formation of the Cu2+-ion complex with EDTA is analyzed beginning from the main reaction through various influences of secondary reactions on the complex Cu2+-EDTA: pH effect, complexation effect and hydrolysis effect. The equations are given for conditional stability constants, which include equilibrium reactions under actual conditions.

  11. Activation entropy of electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Milischuk, A A; Newton, M D; Milischuk, Anatoli A.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Newton, Marshall D.

    2005-01-01

    We report microscopic calculations of free energies and entropies for intramolecular electron transfer reactions. The calculation algorithm combines the atomistic geometry and charge distribution of a molecular solute obtained from quantum calculations with the microscopic polarization response of a polar solvent expressed in terms of its polarization structure factors. The procedure is tested on a donor-acceptor complex in which ruthenium donor and cobalt acceptor sites are linked by a four-proline polypeptide. The reorganization energies and reaction energy gaps are calculated as a function of temperature by using structure factors obtained from our analytical procedure and from computer simulations. Good agreement between two procedures and with direct computer simulations of the reorganization energy is achieved. The microscopic algorithm is compared to the dielectric continuum calculations. We found that the strong dependence of the reorganization energy on the solvent refractive index predicted by conti...

  12. Enhancing Activity for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Rasmus; Busch, Michael; Halck, Niels Bendtsen;

    2014-01-01

    of all reaction intermediates cannot be optimized individually. However, experimental investigations have shown that drastic improvements can be realized for manganese and cobalt-based oxides if gold is added to the surface or used as substrate. We propose an explanation for these enhancements based...... that the oxygen evolution reaction overpotential decreases by 100–300 mV for manganese oxides and 100 mV for cobalt oxides....... on a hydrogen acceptor concept. This concept comprises a stabilization of an *-OOH intermediate, which effectively lowers the potential needed for breaking bonds to the surface. On this basis, we investigate the interactions between the oxides and gold by using DFT calculations. The results suggest...

  13. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  14. Complex formation between uranyl and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between hexavalent uranium and salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L), salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q), S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide(H/sub 2/Z), and thiosemicarbazidodiacetic acid (H/sub 2/R) has been studied spectrophotometrically in solution. Stability constants for complexes having the composition UO/sub 2/A have been calculated. Solid uranyl derivatives having the composition UO/sub 2/L x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Q x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Z x 2H/sub 2/O, and UO/sub 2/R x 2H/sub 2/O have been obtained. These derivatives were isolated and their IR spectroscopic behavior and thermal properties were investigated.

  15. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC STUDIES OF SANGUINARINE-Β-CYCLODEXTRIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veaceslav Boldescu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pH and the presence of hydrophilic polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone on the formation of sanguinarine-β-cyclodextrin (SANG-β-CD inclusion complex. Spectrophotometric studies of the SANG-β-CD systems in the presence and without 0.1 % PVP at the pH 5.0 did not show any evidence of the complex formation. However, the same systems showed several obvious evidences at the pH 8.0: the hyperchromic and the hypochromic effects and the presence of the isosbestic point in the region of 200 – 210 nm. The association constants calculated by three linear methods: Benesi-Hildebrand, Scott and Scatchard, were two times higher for the systems with addition of 0.1% PVP than for the systems without it.

  16. Synthesis and reactions of optically active cyanohydrins

    OpenAIRE

    Effenberger, Franz

    1994-01-01

    Cyanohydrins have always held a place of importance both as technical products and as reagents in organic chemistry. It is surprising, therefore, that optically active Cyanohydrins have been extensively investigated and employed for syntheses relatively recently. This can be explained by the fact that only in the past few years have enzymatic methods made chiral Cyanohydrins readily available in high optical purity. Chiral Cyanohydrins are widespread in nature in the form of the respective gl...

  17. Stereo and regioselectivity in ''Activated'' tritium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the stereo and positional selectivity of the microwave discharge activation (MDA) method, the tritium labeling of several amino acids was undertaken. The labeling of L-valine and the diastereomeric pair L-isoleucine and L-alloisoleucine showed less than statistical labeling at the α-amino C-H position mostly with retention of configuration. Labeling predominated at the single β C-H tertiary (methyne) position. The labeling of L-valine and L-proline with and without positive charge on the α-amino group resulted in large increases in specific activity (greater than 10-fold) when positive charge was removed by labeling them as their sodium carboxylate salts. Tritium NMR of L-proline labeled both as its zwitterion and sodium salt showed also large differences in the tritium distribution within the molecule. The distribution preferences in each of the charge states are suggestive of labeling by an electrophilic like tritium species(s). 16 refs., 5 tabs

  18. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1980-February 14, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stereochemistry of high energy 18F, /sup 34m/Cl, and 76Br substitution reactions involving enantiomeric molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving chlorine, bromine, and iodine activated by the (n,γ) and (I.T.) processes in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons is being investigated in more detail. Special attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. High energy halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of organic and biomolecular solutes are studied in an attempt to learn more about these reactions. The applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Special attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as indicators of solute-solute interactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are being developed. Experiments are designed to explain the mechanisms of the radioprotection offered biomolecular solutes trapped within the frozen ice lattice. Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are studied. The high energy reactions of iodine with the isomers of pentene have been studied in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators and liquid systems. Reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on the pi-bond systems are studied

  19. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1979-February 14, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) Reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure, and liquid systems. Special attention was given to the reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on various pi-bond systems. (2) The gas-to-condensed phase transition in halogen high energy chemistry. Current interest involves the study of caging effects of an ice lattice on recombination reactions involving neutron-irradiated frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated organic and biochemical solutes in order to learn more about kinetic energy effects, halogen size, solute molecule size, steric effects and hydrogen bonding within an ice lattice cage. (3) Systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of /sup 80m/Br, 80Br, /sup 82m/Br + 82Br, 82Br, 82Br, 128I, 130I, and /sup 130m/I + 130I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators are currently being studied. (4) Mathematical and computer simulation studies of caging events within an ice lattice are being investigated. (5) At Brookhaven National Laboratory, cyclotron-produced chlorine and fluorine hot atoms substitution reactions with molecules possessing a single chiral center are under investigation. (6) The applications of high energy techniques and concepts to neutron activation analysis for trace elements and trace molecule determinations in biological systems was continued

  20. Complex formation between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged oligoelectrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiajia; Barz, Matthias; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    We study the complex formation between one long polyanion chain and many short oligocation chains by computer simulations. We employ a coarse-grained bead-spring model for the polyelectrolyte chains and model explicitly the small salt ions. We systematically vary the concentration and the length of the oligocation and examine how the oligocations affects the chain conformation, the static structure factor, the radial and axial distribution of various charged species, and the number of bound ions in the complex. At low oligocation concentration, the polyanion has an extended structure. Upon increasing the oligocation concentration, the polyanion chain collapses and forms a compact globule, but the complex still carries a net negative charge. Once the total charge of the oligocations is equal to that of the polyanion, the collapse stops and is replaced by a slow expansion. In this regime, the net charge on the complexes is positive or neutral, depending on the microion concentration in solution. The expansion can be explained by the reduction of the oligocation bridging. We find that the behavior and the structure of the complex are largely independent of the length of oligocations, and very similar to that observed when replacing the oligocations by multivalent salt cations, and conclude that the main driving force keeping the complex together is the release of monovalent counterions and coions. We speculate on the implications of this finding for the problem of controlled oligolyte release and oligolyte substitution.

  1. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatimah, Is, E-mail: isfatimah@uii.ac.id; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang [Chemistry Department, Islamic University of Indonesia Kampus Terpadu UII, Jl. Kaliurang Km 14, Sleman, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  2. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Is; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  3. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chakravarty

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U and bound (B forms of protein structures from the Protein–Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA, secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69% of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered residues in the U form which are observed (ordered in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial.

  4. Theoretical Study on Catalyst Activation of Palladacycles in Heck Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chen; FU Yao; LI Zhe; GUO Qing-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    A computational study with the B3PW91 density functional theory was carried out on the activation process of palladacycles as catalysts in the Heck reaction.Two possible pathways (i.e.anion reductive cleavage of the Pd-C bond,and olefin insertion into the Pd-C bond followed by β-H elimination)were taken into consideration.Computational results indicate that the palladacycles are activated via olefin insertion into the Pd-C bond followed by β-H elimination in the reaction conditions.

  5. Spectrophotometric Determination of 6-Propyl-2-Thiouracil in Pharmaceutical Formulations Based on Prussian Blue Complex Formation: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Robert; Skowron, Monika; Ciesielski, Witold; Rembisz, Zaneta

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory experiment challenges students to determine 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) based on Prussian blue complex formation. Prussian blue is formed by ferricyanide and Fe(II) ions which are generated in situ from Fe(III) ions reduced by PTU. The absorbance of this product was measured at a wavelength of 840 nm, after a reaction time of 30…

  6. Functional cooperation between FACT and MCM is coordinated with cell cycle and differential complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional cooperation between FACT and the MCM helicase complex constitutes an integral step during DNA replication initiation. However, mode of regulation that underlies the proper functional interaction of FACT and MCM is poorly understood. Methods & Results Here we present evidence indicating that such interaction is coordinated with cell cycle progression and differential complex formation. We first demonstrate the existence of two distinct FACT-MCM subassemblies, FACT-MCM2/4/6/7 and FACT-MCM2/3/4/5. Both complexes possess DNA unwinding activity and are subject to cell cycle-dependent enzymatic regulation. Interestingly, analysis of functional attributes further suggests that they act at distinct, and possibly sequential, steps during origin establishment and replication initiation. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation profile of the FACT-associated MCM4 undergoes a cell cycle-dependent change, which is directly correlated with the catalytic activity of the FACT-MCM helicase complexes. Finally, at the quaternary structure level, physical interaction between FACT and MCM complexes is generally dependent on persistent cell cycle and further stabilized upon S phase entry. Cessation of mitotic cycle destabilizes the complex formation and likely leads to compromised coordination and activities. Conclusions Together, our results correlate FACT-MCM functionally and temporally with S phase and DNA replication. They further demonstrate that enzymatic activities intrinsically important for DNA replication are tightly controlled at various levels, thereby ensuring proper progression of, as well as exit from, the cell cycle and ultimately euploid gene balance.

  7. Complex formation in the system double charged metal cation-Stenhouse base in water-alcohol solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the method of potentiometric titration complex formation reaction of the system metal(II) salt cation (Me2+ = Fe2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+) Stenhouse base in water-alcohol solution has been studied. Compositions of equilibrium complexes, the constants of their formation and instability have been determined. CoCl2 x 6H2O, NiCl2 x 6H2O and Mn(NO3)2 x 6H2O have been shown to have the most stabilizing effect on Stenhouse base

  8. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi, E-mail: tajima@nirs.go.jp

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  9. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation

  10. From PII signaling to metabolite sensing: a novel 2-oxoglutarate sensor that details PII-NAGK complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lüddecke

    Full Text Available The widespread PII signal transduction proteins are known for integrating signals of nitrogen and energy supply and regulating cellular behavior by interacting with a multitude of target proteins. The PII protein of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus forms complexes with the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK in a 2-oxoglutarate- and ATP/ADP-dependent manner. Fusing NAGK and PII proteins to either CFP or YFP yielded a FRET sensor that specifically responded to 2-oxoglutarate. The impact of the fluorescent tags on PII and NAGK was evaluated by enzyme assays, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and isothermal calorimetric experiments. The developed FRET sensor provides real-time data on PII - NAGK interaction and its modulation by the effector molecules ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate in vitro. Additionally to its utility to monitor 2-oxoglutarate levels, the FRET assay provided novel insights into PII - NAGK complex formation: (i It revealed the formation of an encounter-complex between PII and NAGK, which holds the proteins in proximity even in the presence of inhibitors of complex formation; (ii It revealed that the PII T-loop residue Ser49 is neither essential for complex formation with NAGK nor for activation of the enzyme but necessary to form a stable complex and efficiently relieve NAGK from arginine inhibition; (iii It showed that arginine stabilizes the NAGK hexamer and stimulates PII - NAGK interaction.

  11. Localization and dynamics of amylose-lipophilic molecules inclusion complex formation in starch granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Mura, Andrea; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion complex formation between lipophilic dye molecules and amylose polymers in starch granules is investigated using laser spectroscopy and microscopy. By combining confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with spatial resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we are able to discriminate

  12. Complex formation of platelet thrombospondin with histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, L L; Nachman, R L; Harpel, P C

    1984-01-01

    Thrombospondin and histidine-rich glycoprotein are two proteins with diverse biological activities which have been associated with human platelets and other cell systems. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we have demonstrated that purified human platelet thrombospondin formed a complex with purified human plasma histidine-rich glycoprotein. The formation of the thrombospondin-histidine-rich glycoprotein complex was specific, concentration dependent, and saturable. Significant bindin...

  13. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Michael D

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  14. Acceptors in II-IV Semiconductors - Incorporation and Complex Formation

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A strong effort is currently devoted to the investigation of defects and the electrical activation of dopant atoms in II-VI semiconductors. In particular, the knowledge about the behaviour of acceptors, prerequisite for the fabrication of p-type semiconductors, is rather limited. The perturbed $\\,{\\gamma\\gamma}$ -angular correlation technique (PAC) and the photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) using the radioactive isotopes $^{77}\\!$Br and $^{111}\\!$Ag will be applied for investigating the behaviour of acceptor dopant atoms and their interactions with defects in II-VI semiconductors. The main topic will be the identification of the technical conditions for the incorporation of electrically active acceptors in the II-VI semiconductors ~ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe with particular emphasis on the compounds~ CdTe, ZnSe, and ZnTe. The investigations will be supplemented by first exploratory PL experiments with the group V acceptors $^{71}\\!$As and $^{121}\\!$Sb. With help of the probe $^{111}\\!$Ag, the pos...

  15. Structural basis of complement membrane attack complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Marina; Giles, Joanna L.; Morgan, B. Paul; Bubeck, Doryen

    2016-02-01

    In response to complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC) assembles from fluid-phase proteins to form pores in lipid bilayers. MAC directly lyses pathogens by a `multi-hit' mechanism; however, sublytic MAC pores on host cells activate signalling pathways. Previous studies have described the structures of individual MAC components and subcomplexes; however, the molecular details of its assembly and mechanism of action remain unresolved. Here we report the electron cryo-microscopy structure of human MAC at subnanometre resolution. Structural analyses define the stoichiometry of the complete pore and identify a network of interaction interfaces that determine its assembly mechanism. MAC adopts a `split-washer' configuration, in contrast to the predicted closed ring observed for perforin and cholesterol-dependent cytolysins. Assembly precursors partially penetrate the lipid bilayer, resulting in an irregular β-barrel pore. Our results demonstrate how differences in symmetric and asymmetric components of the MAC underpin a molecular basis for pore formation and suggest a mechanism of action that extends beyond membrane penetration.

  16. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  17. Oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt{111} surface alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Ye, Jin-Yu; Morgan, David; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2014-07-21

    PtM overlayers (where M=Fe, Co or Ni) supported on Pt{111} are prepared via thermal annealing in either a nitrogen/water or hydrogen ambient of dilute aqueous droplets containing M(Z+) cations directly attached to the electrode. Two different PtM phases are detected depending on the nature of the post-annealing cooling environment. The first of these consists of small (hydroxides. The second type of PtM phase is prepared by cooling in a stream of hydrogen gas. Although this second phase also consists of numerous microcrystals covering the Pt{111} electrode surface, these are both flatter than before and moreover are entirely metallic in character. A positive shift in the onset of PtM oxide formation correlates with increased activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which we ascribe to the greater availability of platinum metallic sites under ORR conditions. PMID:24986646

  18. Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima: Structural Insights into Complex Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morar, Mariya; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E. (MIT); (Cornell)

    2008-10-02

    In the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway, formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) amidotransferase, also known as PurL, catalyzes the conversion of FGAR, ATP, and glutamine to formyl glycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM), ADP, P{sub i}, and glutamate. Two forms of PurL have been characterized, large and small. Large PurL, present in most Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes, consists of a single polypeptide chain and contains three major domains: the N-terminal domain, the FGAM synthetase domain, and the glutaminase domain, with a putative ammonia channel located between the active sites of the latter two. Small PurL, present in Gram-positive bacteria and archaea, is structurally homologous to the FGAM synthetase domain of large PurL, and forms a complex with two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS. The structure of the PurS dimer is homologous with the N-terminal domain of large PurL, while PurQ, whose structure has not been reported, contains the glutaminase activity. In Bacillus subtilis, the formation of the PurLQS complex is dependent on glutamine and ADP and has been demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. In this work, a structure of the PurLQS complex from Thermotoga maritima is described revealing a 2:1:1 stoichiometry of PurS:Q:L, respectively. The conformational changes observed in TmPurL upon complex formation elucidate the mechanism of metabolite-mediated recruitment of PurQ and PurS. The flexibility of the PurS dimer is proposed to play a role in the activation of the complex and the formation of the ammonia channel. A potential path for the ammonia channel is identified.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation on the inclusion complex formation between amisulpride and γ-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Jeetendra Singh; Singh, Shivpal

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this research was to investigate inclusion complex formation between poorly soluble drug amisulpride (AMI) and γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD). The solubility of AMI was enhanced by formation of inclusion complex of AMI with nano-hydrophobic cavity of γ-CD. The stoichiometry of inclusion complex was studied by continuous variation Job's plot method and found 1:1. The binding constant was found 1166.65 M(-1) by Benesi-Hildebrand plot. The molecular docking of AMI and γ-CD was done to investigate complexation. The inclusion complex formation was further confirmed by (1)H NMR and FT-IR, DSC and XRD analysis. The solubility of AMI was increased 3.74 times after inclusion complex formation with γ-CD.

  20. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States); Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  1. Alkaline activated slag cements. Determination of reaction degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Jiménez, A.

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to evaluate the validity of non-calorimetric different methods, used in the determination of reaction degree of alkaline activated slag pastes. The methods used were: (a chemical separation by methanol-salicylic acid; (b determination of the weight loss mass between 100-600°C in TG curves, associated to chemically combined water; (c quantification of the -74 ppm signal in 29Si MAS-NMR spectra. The parameters considered in the process were: nature of the alkaline activator (Waterglass, Na2CO3 and NaOH, activator concentration (4% and 3% Na2O in mass with respect to the slag, curing temperature (25 and 45°C, slag specific surface (460 and 900 m2/kg and time of reaction (from 7 days to 18 months. The results obtained indicate that none of the three methods is definitive but complementary and they provide to follow the reactive evolution of the alkaline activated slag cements. The method based on the quantification of the -74 ppm signal in the 29Si MAS NMR is the most suitable method.

    El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar la validez de diferentes métodos, no calorimétricos, utilizados en la determinación del grado de reacción de pastas de escoria activada alcalinamente. Los métodos utilizados fueron: (a método de separación química por disolución en metanol ácido-salicílico; (b determinación de las pérdidas de masa entre 100-600°C en las curvas de TG, pérdidas asociadas a la cantidad de agua químicamente combinada: (c cuantificación de la señal de -74 ppm de los espectros de 29Si RMN MAS. Las variables consideradas en el proceso fueron: naturaleza del activador alcalino (Waterglass, Na2CO3 y NaOH, concentración del activador (4% y 3% de Na2O en masa respecto a la escoria, temperatura de curado (25 y 45°C, superficie específica de la escoria (460 y 900 m2/kg y

  2. Sensitive NADH detection in a tumorigenic cell line using a nano-biosensor based on the organic complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mahmood H; Mir, Tanveer A; Gurudatt, N G; Chung, Saeromi; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-11-15

    A robust amperometric sensor for β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) detection was developed through the organic complex formation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) bonded on the polyethylenimine (PEI)/activated graphene oxide (AGO) layer. The EDTA immobilized sensor probe (GCE/AGO/PEI-EDTA) revealed a catalytic property towards NADH oxidation that allows for the highly sensitive electrochemical detection of NADH at a low oxidation potential. Surface characterization demonstrated that the negatively charged AGO acted as nanofillers in the positively charged PEI matrix through the charge interaction. The immobilization of EDTA on the polymer layer provided more surface area for NADH to interact with through the enhanced chemical interlocking between them. We observed the strong interaction between NADH and EDTA on the AGO/PEI layer using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the calculation of the minimized energy for complex formation. The dynamic range of NADH was determined to be between 0.05μM and 500μM with a detection limit (LD) of 20.0±1.1nM. The reliability of the developed sensor for biomedical applications was examined by detecting NADH in tumorigenic lung epithelial cells using the standard addition method. PMID:27209575

  3. Complex formation and solubility of Pu(IV) with malonic and succinic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Takagi, I.; Moriyama, H. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Fujiwara, A. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Kulyako, Y.M.; Perevalov, S.A.; Myasoedov, B.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (RU). V.I. Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (GEOKHI)

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation constants of tetravalent plutonium ion with malonic and succinic acids in aqueous solution were determined by the solvent-extraction method. Also, by taking the known values of the solubility products, the hydrolysis constants and the formation constants, the experimental solubility data of plutonium in the presence of carboxylates were analyzed. (orig.)

  4. PECULIARITIES OF LITTER INVERTEBRATES’ MULTISPECIES COMPLEXES FORMATION ON THE KHORTITSA ISLAND (ZAPORIZHZHYA PROVINCE)

    OpenAIRE

    D. О. Fedorchenko; V. V. Brygadyrenko

    2008-01-01

    Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ complexes formation under conditions of the Khortitsa National Reserve (Zaporizhzhya province) are studied. The dispersion of taxonomic groups of different levels (families and species) in litter mesofauna is swayed by the inter- and intrasystem factors; the largest influence has the power of litter and its humidity. The rate of ecological factors’ influence at different taxonomic levels may diverge.

  5. Comparative thermodynamic study on complex formation of native and hydroxypropylated cyclodextrins with benzoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terekhova, Irina V., E-mail: ivt@isc-ras.ru [Institute of Solution Chemistry of RAS, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparative calorimetric study on complexation of benzoic acid by native and modified cyclodextrins was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Van der Waals interactions are responsible for complex formation with {alpha}-cyclodextrins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complex formation of {beta}-cyclodextrins is governed by dehydration and hydrophobic interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of two benzoic acid molecules by {gamma}-cyclodextrins is driven by van der Waals interactions and solvent reorganization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydroxypropyl groups favor binding of benzoic acid only with hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin. - Abstract: Complex formation of native and hydroxypropylated {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrins with benzoic acid in water was studied by means of calorimetry of solution at 298.15 K. The 1:1 complexes are formed with {alpha}- and {beta}-cyclodextrins, while 1:2 binding stoichiometry was observed for {gamma}-cyclodextrins. Thermodynamic parameters of complex formation of hydroxypropylated cyclodextrins were determined for the first time and analyzed. Comparison of binding affinity of native and modified cyclodextrins was carried out.

  6. Development of various reaction abilities and their relationships with favorite play activities in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Kazuyoshi; Demura, Shinich; Sugiura, Hiroki; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Noda, Masahiro

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the development of various reaction movements in preschool children and the relationship between reaction times and favorite play activities. The subjects were 167 healthy preschool children aged 4-6 (96 boys and 71 girls). This study focused on the reaction times of the upper limbs (reaction 1: release; reaction 2: press) and the whole body (reaction 3: forward jump). The activities frequently played in preschools are largely divided into dynamic play activities (tag, soccer, gymnastics set, dodge ball, and jump rope) and static play activities (drawing, playing house, reading, playing with sand, and building blocks). The subjects chose 3 of 10 cards picturing their favorite play activities, depicting 10 different activities. All intraclass correlation coefficients of measured reaction times were high (0.73-0.79). In addition, each reaction time shortened with age. Reaction 1 showed a significant and low correlation with reaction 3 (r = 0.37). The effect size of the whole body reaction time was the largest. Whole body reaction movement, which is largely affected by the exercise output function, develops remarkably in childhood. Children who liked "tag" were faster in all reaction times. The children who chose "soccer" were faster in reactions 2 and 3. In contrast, children who liked "playing house" tended to have slower reaction times. Dynamic activities, such as tag and soccer, promote development of reaction speed and agility in movements involving the whole body. Preschool teachers and physical educators should re-examine the effect of tag and use it periodically as one of the exercise programs to avoid unexpected falls and injuries in everyday life. PMID:23302758

  7. Measurement of the activation cross section for the (p,xn) reactions in niobium with potential applications as monitor reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila-Rodriguez, M.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada)], E-mail: miguel.avila-rodriguez@utu.fi; Wilson, J.S. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Schueller, M.J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); McQuarrie, S.A. [Edmonton PET Centre, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2008-08-15

    Excitation functions of the {sup 93}Nb(p,n){sup 93m}Mo, {sup 93}Nb(p,pn){sup 92m}Nb and {sup 93}Nb(p,{alpha}n){sup 89}Zr nuclear reactions were measured up to 17.4 MeV by the conventional activation method using the stacked-foil technique. Stacks were irradiated at different incident energies on the TR19/9 cyclotron at the Edmonton PET Centre. The potential of the measured excitation functions for use as monitor reactions was evaluated and tested by measuring activity ratios at a different facility. Single Nb foils were irradiated at incident energies in the range from 12 to 19 MeV on the TR19/9 cyclotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Results are compared with the published data and with theoretical values as determined by the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE.

  8. Actinide complexation kinetics: rate and mechanism of dioxoneptunium (V) reaction with chlorophosphonazo III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates of complex formation and dissociation in NpO2+- Chlorophosphonazo III (2,7-bis(4-chloro-2-phosphonobenzeneazo)-1,8- dihydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid)(CLIII) were investigated by stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Also, limited studies were made of the rates of reaction of La3+, Eu3+, Dy3+, and Fe3+ with CLIII. Rate determining step in each system is an intramolecular process, the NpO2+-CLIII reaction proceeding by a first order approach to equilibrium in the acid range from 0.1 to 1.0 M. Complex formation occurs independent of acidity, while both acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are observed. Activation parameters for the complex formation reaction are ΔH=46.2±0.3 kJ/m and ΔS=7± J/mK (I=1.0 M); these for the acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are ΔH=38.8±0.6 kJ/m, ΔS=-96±18 J/mK, ΔH=70.0± kJ/m, and ΔS=17±1 J/mK, respectively. An isokinetic relationship is observed between the activation parameters for CLIII complex formation with NpO2+, UO22+, Th4+, and Zr4+. Rates of CLIII complex formation reactions for Fe3+, Zr4+, NpO2+, UO22+, Th4+, La3+, Eu3+, and Dy3+ correlate with cation radius rather than charge/radius ratio

  9. Study of thermodynamics of complex formation of flavonoids of steviа (Stevіa rebaudіana Bertonі) leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsova, Inga

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have studied the mechanisms of forming complexes between flavonoids of  different plants and ions of iron and copper. Stevia is one of many plants, rich in biologically active substances and which is practically uninvestigated. In particular, the antioxidant effect of flavonoids of stevia leaves is not studied and there are no data on its thermodynamic properties, namely the possibility of natural flow of the complex formation process. There are no data on the possibility of formin...

  10. Hair dye-incorporated poly-γ-glutamic acid/glycol chitosan nanoparticles based on ion-complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HY

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hye-Young Lee1,*, Young-IL Jeong2,*, Ki-Choon Choi31Anyang Science University, Anyang, Gyeonggi, South Korea; 2Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Jeonnam, South Korea; 3Grassland and Forages Research Center, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration, Chungnam, South Korea*These authors contributed equally to this work.Background: p-Phenylenediamine (PDA or its related chemicals are used more extensively than oxidative hair dyes. However, permanent hair dyes such as PDA are known to have potent contact allergy reactions in humans, and severe allergic reactions are problematic.Methods: PDA-incorporated nanoparticles were prepared based on ion-complex formation between the cationic groups of PDA and the anionic groups of poly(γ-glutamic acid (PGA. To reinforce PDA/PGA ion complexes, glycol chitosan (GC was added. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD.Results: Nanoparticles were formed by ion-complex formation between the amine groups of PDA and the carboxyl groups of PGA. PDA-incorporated nanoparticles are small in size (<100 nm, and morphological observations showed spherical shapes. FT-IR spectra results showed that the carboxylic acid peak of PGA decreased with increasing PDA content, indicating that the ion complexes were formed between the carboxyl groups of PGA and the amine groups of PDA. Furthermore, the intrinsic peak of the carboxyl groups of PGA was also decreased by the addition of GC. Intrinsic crystalline peaks of PDA were observed by XRD. This crystalline peak of PDA was completely nonexistent when nanoparticles were formed by ion complex between PDA, PGA, and GC, indicating that PDA was complexed with PGA and no free drug existed in the formulation. During the drug-release experiment, an initial burst release of PDA was

  11. Activated by Combined Magnrtic Field Gravitropic Reaction Reply on Nanodose of Biologicaly Active Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykina, Nadezhda; Bogatina, Nina

    The new science direction nanotechnologies initiated a big jump in the pharmacology and medicine. This leads to the big development of homeopathy. The most interest appeared while investigating of the reaction of biological object on the nano dose of iologically substances. The changing of concentration (in nmol/l) of biologically active material is also possible during weak energy action. For instance, weak combined magnetic field may change a little the concentration of ions that are oriented parallel to the external magnetic field and, by the analogy with said above, lead to the similar effects. Simple estimations give the value for the threshold to the magnetic field by two orders smaller than the geomagnetic field. By this investigation we wanted to understand whether the analogy in the action of nano dose of biologically active substances and weak combined magnetic field presents and whether the action of one of these factors may be replaced by other one. The effect of one of biologically active substances NPA (Naphtyl-Phtalame Acid) solution with the concentration 0.01 mol/l on the gravitropic reaction of cress roots was investigated. It was shown that its effect was the inhibition of cress roots gravitropic reaction. The same inhibition was achieved by the combined magnetic field action on the cress roots, germinated in water. The alternative component of the combined magnetic field coincided formally with the cyclotron frequency of NPA ions. So the analogy in the action of nano dose of biologically active substances and weak combined magnetic field was shown. The combined magnetic field using allows to decrease sufficiently the dose of biologically active substances. This fact can be of great importance in pharmacy and medicine.

  12. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Xiang, Wenpei [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yinna [Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 10051-5A BST 3, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Zhang, Xiaoying [Department of Medicine/Endocrinology Division, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Billiar, Timothy R., E-mail: billiartr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-06-22

    that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  13. Brain Activity, Personality Traits and Affect: Electrocortical Activity in Reaction to Affective Film Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makvand Hosseini, Sh.; Azad Fallah, P.; Rasoolzadeh Tabatabaei, S. K.; Ghannadyan Ladani, S. H.; Heise, C.

    We studied the patterns of activation over the cerebral cortex in reaction to affective film stimuli in four groups of extroverts, introverts, neurotics and emotionally stables. Measures of extraversion and neuroticism were collected and resting EEG was recorded from 40 right handed undergraduate female students (19-23) on one occasion for five 30s periods in baseline condition and in affective states. Mean log-transformed absolute alpha power was extracted from 12 electrode sites and analyzed. Patterns of activation were different in personality groups. Different patterns of asymmetries were observed in personality groups in reaction to affective stimuli. Results were partly consistent with approach and withdrawal model and provided supportive evidence for the role of right frontal asymmetry in negative affects in two groups (introverts and emotionally stables) as well as the role of right central asymmetry (increase on right and decrease on left) in active affective states (anxiety and happiness) in all personality groups. Results were also emphasized on the role of decrease activity relative to baseline in cortical regions (bilaterally in frontal and unilaterally in left parietal and temporal regions) in moderating of positive and negative emotion.

  14. Events during Initiation of Archaeal Transcription: Open Complex Formation and DNA-Protein Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Transcription in Archaea is initiated by association of a TATA box binding protein (TBP) with a TATA box. This interaction is stabilized by the binding of the transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) orthologue TFB. We show here that the RNA polymerase of the archaeon Methanococcus, in contrast to polymerase II, does not require hydrolysis of the β-γ bond of ATP for initiation of transcription and open complex formation on linearized DNA. Permanganate probing revealed that the archaeal open complex s...

  15. Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ multispecies complexes formation on the Khortitsa island (Zaporizhzhya province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. О. Fedorchenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ complexes formation under conditions of the Khortitsa National Reserve (Zaporizhzhya province are studied. The dispersion of taxonomic groups of different levels (families and species in litter mesofauna is swayed by the inter- and intrasystem factors; the largest influence has the power of litter and its humidity. The rate of ecological factors’ influence at different taxonomic levels may diverge.

  16. The Element Effect Revisited: Factors Determining Leaving Group Ability in Activated Nucleophilic Aromatic Substitution Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Senger, Nicholas A.; Bo, Bo; Cheng, Qian; Keeffe, James R.; Gronert, Scott; Wu, Weiming

    2012-01-01

    The “element effect” in nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions (SNAr) is characterized by the leaving group order, F > NO2 > Cl ≈ Br > I, in activated aryl halides. Multiple causes for this result have been proposed. Experimental evidence shows that the element effect order in the reaction of piperidine with 2,4-dinitrophenyl halides in methanol is governed by the differences in enthalpies of activation. Computational studies of the reaction of piperidine and dimethylamine with the same...

  17. Reactions of 3-Formylchromone with Active Methylene and Methyl Compounds and Some Subsequent Reactions of the Resulting Condensation Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lácova

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a survey of the condensations of 3-formylchromone with various active methylene and methyl compounds, e.g. malonic or barbituric acid derivatives, five-membered heterocycles, etc. The utilisation of the condensation products for the synthesis of different heterocyclic systems, which is based on the ability of the γ-pyrone ring to be opened by the nucleophilic attack is also reviewed. Finally, the applications of microwave irradiation as an unconventional method of reaction activation in the synthesis of condensation products is described and the biological activity of some chromone derivatives is noted.

  18. Activation cross-section measurement of deuteron induced reactions on cerium for biomedical applications and for development of reaction theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Ditrói, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Csikai, J. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-01

    Highlights: • Excitation function measurement of deuteron induced reactions on natural Ce up to 50 MeV. • Model code calculations with EMPIRE-D, ALICE-D and TALYS (TENDL-2012). • Integral production yield calculation. • Discussion of medically relevant radioisotopes {sup 143}Pr, {sup 142}Pr, {sup 141}Ce and {sup 139}Ce. -- Abstract: In the frame of a systematic study of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on lanthanides we have measured the excitation functions on natural cerium for production of {sup 142,139,138m,137}Pr, {sup 143,141,139,137m,137,135}Ce and {sup 140}La up to 50 MeV deuteron energy using the activation method with stacked-foil irradiation technique and high-resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The cross-sections of the investigated reactions were calculated using the modified pre-compound model codes ALICE-IPPE-D and EMPIRE-II-D. A comparison was made also with the data retrieved from the TENDL-2012 library, based on the latest version of the TALYS code system. The measured cross-section data are important for further improvement of nuclear reaction models and for practical applications in nuclear medicine and other labeling and activation studies.

  19. A novel high throughput biochemical assay to evaluate the HuR protein-RNA complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito G D'Agostino

    Full Text Available The RNA binding protein HuR/ELAVL1 binds to AU-rich elements (AREs promoting the stabilization and translation of a number of mRNAs into the cytoplasm, dictating their fate. We applied the AlphaScreen technology using purified human HuR protein, expressed in a mammalian cell-based system, to characterize in vitro its binding performance towards a ssRNA probe whose sequence corresponds to the are present in TNFα 3' untranslated region. We optimized the method to titrate ligands and analyzed the kinetic in saturation binding and time course experiments, including competition assays. The method revealed to be a successful tool for determination of HuR binding kinetic parameters in the nanomolar range, with calculated Kd of 2.5±0.60 nM, k on of 2.76±0.56*10(6 M(-1 min(-1, and k off of 0.007±0.005 min(-1. We also tested the HuR-RNA complex formation by fluorescent probe-based RNA-EMSA. Moreover, in a 384-well plate format we obtained a Z-factor of 0.84 and an averaged coefficient of variation between controls of 8%, indicating that this biochemical assay fulfills criteria of robustness for a targeted screening approach. After a screening with 2000 small molecules and secondary verification with RNA-EMSA we identified mitoxantrone as an interfering compound with rHuR and TNFα probe complex formation. Notably, this tool has a large versatility and could be applied to other RNA Binding Proteins recognizing different RNA, DNA, or protein species. In addition, it opens new perspectives in the identification of small-molecule modulators of RNA binding proteins activity.

  20. Effect of Ionic Liquids on Organic Reactions Based on Activity Coefficients at Infinite Dilution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马征; 董晓霞; 胡玉峰; 张柏松; 徐长英; 刘艳升

    2013-01-01

    It is important to know how ILs (ionic liquids) influence organic reaction. In this paper, activity coeffi-cients at infinite dilution of more than 80 organic compounds in ILs are collected and analyzed systematically. Through the study on typical organic reactions happened in ILs, such as Diels-Alder, esterification and Friedel-Crafts reaction, the ratio of activity coefficients at infinite dilution of products and reactants is employed to estimate different effects of different structural ILs on the rate and selectivity of reactions.

  1. Energetic Mechanism of Cytochrome c-Cytochrome c Oxidase Electron Transfer Complex Formation under Turnover Conditions Revealed by Mutational Effects and Docking Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Hitaoka, Seiji; Inoue, Kaoru; Imai, Mizue; Saio, Tomohide; Uchida, Takeshi; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-07-15

    Based on the mutational effects on the steady-state kinetics of the electron transfer reaction and our NMR analysis of the interaction site (Sakamoto, K., Kamiya, M., Imai, M., Shinzawa-Itoh, K., Uchida, T., Kawano, K., Yoshikawa, S., and Ishimori, K. (2011) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108, 12271-12276), we determined the structure of the electron transfer complex between cytochrome c (Cyt c) and cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) under turnover conditions and energetically characterized the interactions essential for complex formation. The complex structures predicted by the protein docking simulation were computationally selected and validated by the experimental kinetic data for mutant Cyt c in the electron transfer reaction to CcO. The interaction analysis using the selected Cyt c-CcO complex structure revealed the electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions of each amino acid residue to the free energy required for complex formation. Several charged residues showed large unfavorable (desolvation) electrostatic interactions that were almost cancelled out by large favorable (Columbic) electrostatic interactions but resulted in the destabilization of the complex. The residual destabilizing free energy is compensated by the van der Waals interactions mediated by hydrophobic amino acid residues to give the stabilized complex. Thus, hydrophobic interactions are the primary factors that promote complex formation between Cyt c and CcO under turnover conditions, whereas the change in the electrostatic destabilization free energy provides the variance of the binding free energy in the mutants. The distribution of favorable and unfavorable electrostatic interactions in the interaction site determines the orientation of the binding of Cyt c on CcO. PMID:27226541

  2. Power Installations based on Activated Nuclear Reactions of Fission and Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoriev, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The general scheme of power installations based on nuclear reactions of fission and synthesis activated by external sources is analyzed. The external activation makes possible to support nuclear reactions at temperatures and pressures lower than needed for chain reactions, so simplifies considerably practical realization of power installations. The possibility of operation on subcritical masses allows making installations compact and safe at emergency situations. Installations are suitable for transmutation of radioactive nuclides, what solves the problem of utilization of nuclear waste products. It is proposed and considered schemes of power installations based on nuclear reactions of fission and fusion, activated by external sources, different from ADS systems. Variants of activation of nuclear reactions of fission (U-235, 238, Pu-239) and fusion (Li-6,7, B-10,11) are considered.

  3. Complex Formation of Adenosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate with β-Cyclodextrin: Kinetics and Mechanism by Ultrasonic Relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is a second messenger responsible for a multitude of cellular responses. In this study, we utilized β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) as an artificial receptor with a hydrophobic cavity to elucidate the inclusion kinetics of cAMP in a hydrophobic environment using the ultrasonic relaxation method. The results revealed that the interaction of cAMP with β-CD followed a single relaxation curve as a result of host-guest interactions. The inclusion of cAMP into the β-CD cavity was found to be a diffusion-controlled reaction. The dissociation of cAMP from the β-CD cavity was slower than that of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP). The syn and anti glycosyl conformations of adenine nucleotides are considered to play an important role in formation of the inclusion complex. Taken together, our findings indicate that hydrophobic interactions are involved in the inclusion complex formation of cAMP with β-CD and provide insight into the interactions of cAMP with cAMP-binding proteins

  4. Chemical equilibrium constants of rare earth nitrates and tri-n-butyl phosphate complex formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kalaya Changkrueng; Deacha Chatsiriwech

    2011-01-01

    Mixed rare earth nitrates (REi(NO3)3) in the aqueous solution was mixed with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP,(n-C4H9O)3PO) dissolved in kerosene for the formation of their corresponding complexes (REi(NO3)3·n1(n-C4H9O)3PO) at 303 K.The effects of initial concentrations of both TBP and mixed rare earth nitrates on the equilibrium constants of their complex formations were investigated.The complexes were formed almost immediately after mixing.The simultaneous formations reached their chemical equilibria within a few minutes by shaking the mixture at 200 r/min.The chemical equilibrium constants of the complex formations were independent of the initial TBP concentrations.However,they were decreased by reducing the concentration of REi(NO3)3.All equilibrium constants of the simultaneous complex formations were less than 0.7,while the average molar ratio of TBP to REi(NO3)3 of the complexes varied between 1.0 and 1.6.The chemical equilibrium constant for the formation of La(NO3)3·(n-C4HgO)3PO was 0.09,while that of Dy(NO3)3·(n-CaH9O)3PO was 0.68.The ascending sequence of chemical equilibrium constants for the simultaneous formations was La,Ce,Pr,Nd,Eu,Y,Srn,Gd,and Dy.

  5. Layered metal laurates as active catalysts in the methyl/ethyl esterification reactions of lauric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisboa, Fabio da Silva; Cordeiro, Claudiney S.; Wypych, Fernando, E-mail: wypych@ufpr.br [Centro de Pesquisas em Quimica Aplicada (CEPESQ), Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Gardolinski, Jose Eduardo F. da Costa [Laboratorio de Analise de Minerais e Rochas (LAMIR), Departamento de Geologia, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In this work we report the synthesis, characterization and investigation of the catalytic activity of layered copper(II), manganese(II), lanthanum(III) and nickel(II) laurates in the methyl and ethyl esterification reactions of lauric acid. In the methyl esterification, conversions between 80 and 90% were observed for all catalysts, while for the ethyl esterification only manganese laurate showed reasonable catalytic activity, with conversions close to 75%. Reuse of copper and lanthanum laurates in three cycles of reaction was also investigated and both catalysts preserved the structure and retained catalytic activity close to that observed for the first reaction cycle. (author)

  6. Bands separation in fluorescence spectra of ketocyanine dyes: evidence for their complex formation with monohydric alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarenko, V. G.; Klueva, A. V.; Doroshenko, A. O.; Demchenko, A. P.

    2000-07-01

    In the studies of binary solvent systems containing non-polar (toluene) and polar proton-donating components (monohydric alcohols) using ketocyanine dyes of 2,5-di-benzylidene-cyclopentanone-1 type as solvent polarity probes, we found that in addition to common solvent polarity-dependent shifts of fluorescence spectra, at low alcohol concentrations there appear two new well-resolved spectral bands. They are attributed to the emission of hydrogen bonded complexes of 1:1 and 1:2 type. Effective constants for hydrogen bond complex formation were estimated for them from the fluorescence titration data.

  7. Temperature induced complex formation-deformation behavior of collagen model peptides and polyelectrolytes in aqueous solution

    OpenAIRE

    Terao, Ken; Kanenaga, Ryoko; Yoshida, Tasuku; Mizuno, Kazunori; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2015-01-01

    Since the triple-helical collagen model peptides with a free N-terminus have three cationic groups at one end, it may have strong interactions with polyelectrolytes. In this study, complex formation behavior was investigated for sodium carboxymethyl amylose (NaCMA) + H-(Pro-Pro-Gly)10-OH (PPG10), a collagen model peptide, in aqueous NaCl with ionic strength of 10 mM and 100 mM by means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and circular dichroism at different temperatures. The previously repo...

  8. Self-activated, self-limiting reactions on Si surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Per; Hvam, Jeanette; Bahari, Ali;

    limited transport of oxygen to the oxide/silicon interface. For thin oxides the deal-Grove growth rate is initially constant, but for ultrathin oxides (a couple of nm thick) this is not true and the Deal-Grove model does not explain the mechanism. In a series of recent reports we have found a new...... mechanism for the direct growth of ultrathin films (0-3 nm) of oxides and nitrides under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Neutral oxygen and a microwave excited nitrogen plasma interact directly with Si surfaces kept at different temperatures during the reaction. The gas pressures are around 10-6 Torr......, and the temperatures vary from room temperature to 10000C.The growth is in these cases self-limiting, with the optimal oxide thickness around 0.7-0.8 nm, at 5000C, and up to a few nm for nitride. The self-limiting oxide case was recently predicted by Alex Demkov in a structural optimization to minimise the total...

  9. Activation of pozzolanic and latent-hydraulic reactions by Alkalis in order to repair concrete cracks

    OpenAIRE

    Gruyaert, Elke; Van Tittelboom, Kim; Rahier, Hubert; De Belie, Nele

    2015-01-01

    The low degree of hydration of fly ash (FA) and slag (BFS) particles in high-volume FA and BFS concrete offers the possibility to activate the unreacted particles upon crack formation to close the crack. In this paper, a preliminary study is performed to evaluate the use of alkaline activators to stimulate the formation of reaction products in the crack. First, the reaction rates of crushed pastes mixed with alkaline solutions or water were monitored by calorimetry. These tests showed that al...

  10. Mechanism of anti-influenza virus activity of Maillard reaction products derived from Isatidis roots

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Lijing

    2011-01-01

    The cyto-protective compositions and effects of antiviral Maillard reaction products (MRPs) derived from roots of Isatis indigotica F. were examined using biochemical and biophysical methods. The Maillard reaction was identified as the main source of compounds with antiviral activity, an observation which has led to the proposal of a new class of active compounds that protect cells from influenza virus infection. In the roots, arginine and glucose were revealed to be the predom...

  11. A mini review on NiFe-based materials as highly active oxygen evolution reaction electrocatalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Ming; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrolysis, as an important reaction involved in water splitting and rechargeable metal-air battery, has attracted increasing attention for clean energy generation and efficient energy storage. Nickel/iron (NiFe)-based compounds have been known as active OER catalysts since the last century, and renewed interest has been witnessed in recent years on developing advanced NiFe-based materials for better activity and stability. In this review, we present the earl...

  12. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  13. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program, which has been supported for twenty-four years by the Us Atomic Energy Commission and its successor agencies, has produced significant advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of chemical activation by nuclear processes; the stereochemistry of radioactivity for solution of specific problems. This program was contributed to the training of approximately seventy scientists at various levels. This final report includes a review of the areas of research and chronological tabulation of the publications

  14. Evaluation of complex formation ability of dissolved organic matter with radionuclide in ground water based on loading capacity (LC) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to evaluate complex formation ability of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with radionuclide, in terms of long-term safety assessment of nuclear waste. In this review, the dependence of the complex stability on environmental factors such as pH, ionic strength, and characteristics of humic substances was described based on Loading Capacity (LC) method. The effects of humic concentration on actinide speciation and its solubility in a groundwater were evaluated with consideration of mixed complex formation. (author)

  15. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  16. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties. PMID:27516309

  17. Traveling Wave Solutions in a Reaction-Diffusion Model for Criminal Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Berestycki, H.; Rodríguez, N.; Ryzhik, L

    2013-01-01

    We study a reaction-diffusion system of partial differential equations, which can be taken to be a basic model for criminal activity. We show that the assumption of a populations natural tendency towards crime significantly changes the long-time behavior of criminal activity patterns. Under the right assumptions on these natural tendencies we first show that there exists traveling wave solutions connecting zones with no criminal activity and zones with high criminal activity, known as hotspot...

  18. Can arsenic-phytochelatin complex formation be used as an indicator for toxicity in Helianthus annuus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Andrea; Ferreira, Katia; Meharg, Andrew A; Feldmann, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The formation of arsenic-phytochelatin (As-PC) complexes is thought to be part of the plant detoxification strategy for arsenic. This work examines (i) the arsenic (As) concentration-dependent formation of As-PC complex formation and (ii) redistribution and metabolism of As after arrested As uptake in Helianthus annuus. HPLC with parallel ICP-MS/ES-MS detection was used to identify and quantify the species present in plant extracts exposed to arsenate (As(V)) (between 0 and 66.7 micromol As l-1 for 24 h). At As concentrations below the EC50 value for root growth (22 micromol As l-1) As uptake is exponential, but it is reduced at concentrations above. Translocation between root and shoot seemed to be limited to the uptake phase of arsenic. No redistribution of As between root and shoot was observed after arresting As exposure. The formation of As-PC complexes was concentration-dependent. The amount and number of As-PC complexes increased exponentially with concentration up to 13.7 micromol As l-1. As(III)-PC3 and GS-As(III)-PC2 complexes were the dominant species in all samples. The ratio of PC-bound As to unbound As increased up to 1.3 micromol As l-1 and decreased at higher concentrations. Methylation of inorganic As was only a minor pathway in H. annuus with about 1% As methylated over a 32 d period. The concentration dependence of As-PC complex formation, amount of unbound reduced and oxidized PC2, and the relative uptake rate showed that As starts to influence the cellular metabolism of H. annuus negatively at As concentrations well below the EC50 value determined by more traditional means. Generally, As-PC complexes and PC-synthesis rate seem to be the more sensitive parameters to be studied when As toxicity values are to be estimated. PMID:17283372

  19. Dynamics of nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation: analytical results from population balance equations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryad Darabi Sahneh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. METHOD: This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. RESULTS: The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. CONCLUSION: The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid.

  20. Can arsenic-phytochelatin complex formation be used as an indicator for toxicity in Helianthus annuus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Andrea; Ferreira, Katia; Meharg, Andrew A; Feldmann, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The formation of arsenic-phytochelatin (As-PC) complexes is thought to be part of the plant detoxification strategy for arsenic. This work examines (i) the arsenic (As) concentration-dependent formation of As-PC complex formation and (ii) redistribution and metabolism of As after arrested As uptake in Helianthus annuus. HPLC with parallel ICP-MS/ES-MS detection was used to identify and quantify the species present in plant extracts exposed to arsenate (As(V)) (between 0 and 66.7 micromol As l-1 for 24 h). At As concentrations below the EC50 value for root growth (22 micromol As l-1) As uptake is exponential, but it is reduced at concentrations above. Translocation between root and shoot seemed to be limited to the uptake phase of arsenic. No redistribution of As between root and shoot was observed after arresting As exposure. The formation of As-PC complexes was concentration-dependent. The amount and number of As-PC complexes increased exponentially with concentration up to 13.7 micromol As l-1. As(III)-PC3 and GS-As(III)-PC2 complexes were the dominant species in all samples. The ratio of PC-bound As to unbound As increased up to 1.3 micromol As l-1 and decreased at higher concentrations. Methylation of inorganic As was only a minor pathway in H. annuus with about 1% As methylated over a 32 d period. The concentration dependence of As-PC complex formation, amount of unbound reduced and oxidized PC2, and the relative uptake rate showed that As starts to influence the cellular metabolism of H. annuus negatively at As concentrations well below the EC50 value determined by more traditional means. Generally, As-PC complexes and PC-synthesis rate seem to be the more sensitive parameters to be studied when As toxicity values are to be estimated.

  1. Direct Electrochemical Reaction of Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilized on the Surface of Active Carbon Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Mei SUN; Chen Xin CAI; Wei XING; Tian Hong LU

    2004-01-01

    It is reported for the first time that horseradish peroxidase(HRP)immobilized on the active carbon can undergo a direct quasi-reversible electrochemical reaction. In addition,the immobilized HRP showed the stable bioelectrocatalytic activity for the reduction of H2O2.

  2. Improved radical scavenging activity of β-lactoglobulin-xylobiose modified by the Maillard reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Yajima, Kensuke; Onodera, Shuichi; Takeda, Yasuyuki; Shiomi, Norio

    2007-01-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG) was modified and conjugated to xylobiose using the Maillard reaction. The antioxidant activity of the Maillard reaction product, β-LG-xylobiose, was measured in vitro and compared to that of conjugated β-LG-lactose. The reaction for 7 days led to conjugated β-LG-xylobiose with a relative molecular mass ranging between 19 and 22 kDa based on SDS-PAGE analysis. It is confirmed that xylobiose bound to β-LG by gas-liquid chromatography. One milligram of conjugated β-LG-xylo...

  3. Solvent-Induced Reversal of Activities between Two Closely Related Heterogeneous Catalysts in the Aldol Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, Kapil [Ames Laboratory; Althaus, Stacey M [Ames Laboratory; Peeraphatdit, Chorthip [Ames Laboratory; Kobayashi, Takeshi [Ames Laboratory; Trewyn, Brian G [Ames Laboratory; Pruski, Marek [Ames Laboratory; Slowing, Igor I [Ames Laboratory

    2013-01-11

    The relative rates of the aldol reaction catalyzed by supported primary and secondary amines can be inverted by 2 orders of magnitude, depending on the use of hexane or water as a solvent. Our analyses suggest that this dramatic shift in the catalytic behavior of the supported amines does not involve differences in reaction mechanism, but is caused by activation of imine to enamine equilibria and stabilization of iminium species. The effects of solvent polarity and acidity were found to be important to the performance of the catalytic reaction. This study highlights the critical role of solvent in multicomponent heterogeneous catalytic processes.

  4. Acridine orange staining reaction as an index of physiological activity in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFeters, G. A.; Singh, A.; Byun, S.; Callis, P. R.; Williams, S.

    1991-01-01

    The assumption that the acridine orange (AO) color reaction may be used as an index of physiological activity was investigated in laboratory grown Escherichia coli. Spectrofluorometric observations of purified nucleic acids, ribosomes and the microscopic color of bacteriophage-infected cells stained with AO confirmed the theory that single-stranded nucleic acids emit orange to red fluorescence while those that are double-stranded fluoresce green in vivo. Bacteria growing actively in a rich medium could be distinguished from cells in stationary phase by the AO reaction. Cells from log phase appeared red, whereas those in stationary phase were green. However, this differentiation was not seen when the bacteria were grown in a minimal medium or when a variation of the staining method was used. Also, shifting bacteria in stationary phase to starvation conditions rapidly changed their AO staining reaction. Boiling and exposure to lethal concentrations of azide and formalin resulted in stationary-phase cells that appeared red after staining but bacteria killed with chlorine remained green. These findings indicate that the AO staining reaction may be suggestive of physiological activity under defined conditions. However, variables in staining and fixation procedures as well as uncertainties associated with mixed bacterial populations in environmental samples may produce results that are not consistent with the classical interpretation of this reaction. The importance of validating the putative physiological implications of this staining reaction is stressed.

  5. Complex formation reactions of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), thorium(IV), dioxouranyl(IV) complexes with tricine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mahmoud M A

    2007-08-01

    Equilibrium studies for the heavy metal ions La(III), Ce(III), Th(IV) and UO2(IV) (M) complexes of the zwitterionic buffer tricine (L) in aqueous solution are investigated. Stoichiometry and stability constants for the different complexes formed as well as hydrolysis products of the metal cations are determined at 25 degrees C and ionic strength 0.1 M NaNO3. The stability of the formed complexes are discussed in terms of the nature of the heavy metal cation. The solid complexes are synthesized and characterized by means of elemental analysis, FTIR, and TG analysis. The general molecular formulae of the obtained complexes is suggested to be [M(L)2](NO3)n-2(H2O)x, where n = the charge of the metal cation, x = no. of water molecules.

  6. The reaction of iodoplatination of triple bond by platinum(4) complexes: formation of σ-vinyl derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to IR and 1H NMR data, propargyl alcohol reacts with platinum(4) iodide complexes in aqueous solution at 10-15 deg C to yield the product of the addition of platinum(4) and iodine to the triple bond, which has been isolated in the form of Pt(CH=CI-CH2OH)2I2(CH3OH). The σ-vinyl ligands in the complex are situated in cis-position. The complex obtained decomposed at 80 deg C to form products of reductive elimination - E,E-2,5-diiodo-1,6-diolhexadiene-2,4 and PtI2. 3 refs

  7. Analysis of the total activation cross section of all possible reactions producing the same radioactive nuclide for the%Analysis of the total activation cross section of all possible reactions producing the same radioactive nuclide for the

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丰群; 宋月丽; 拓飞; 孔祥忠

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, according to the regulation of growth and decay of radioactive nuclides produced in reactions, a formula used to calculate the total activation cross section of all possible reactions producing the same radioactive nuclide for the same element is

  8. Rate of pozzolanic reaction of two kinds of activated coal gangue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shuang-xi

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of activated ways are used to prepare activated coal gangue fine powder,one is calcining coal gangue at 800 ℃ (gangue A),and the other is calcining coal gangue with a certain calcite at 800 ℃ (gangue B).The experiment shows that strengths of blended cement mortar with coal gangue B are higher than that of blended cement with coal gangue A.Hydration of cements with the two kinds of activated coal gangue is investigated through a differential thermal analysis.The weight loss due to Ca(OH)2 decomposition of hydration products by differential thermal anaiysis/thermo gravimetric (DTA/TG) can be used to quantify the pozzolanic reaction.A new method based on the composition of hydration cement is proposed to determine the degree of pozzolanic reaction.The results obtained suggest that the degree of pozzolanic reaction of gangue B is faster than that of gangue A.

  9. Structure, activity, and stability of platinum alloys as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    In this thesis I present our work on theoretical modelling of platinum alloys as catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). The losses associated with the kinetics of the ORR is the main bottleneck in low-temperature fuel cells for transport applications, and more active catalysts...... are essential for wide-spread use of this technology. platinum alloys have shown great promise as more active catalysts, which are still stable under reaction conditions. We have investigated these systems on multiple scales, using either Density Functional Theory (DFT) or Effective Medium Theory (EMT...

  10. Assessment of DFT methods for computing activation energies of Mo/W-mediated reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lianrui; Chen, Hui

    2015-10-13

    Using high level ab initio coupled cluster calculations as reference, the performances of 15 commonly used density functionals (DFs) on activation energy calculations for typical Mo/W-mediated reactions have been systematically assessed for the first time in this work. The selected representative Mo/W-mediated reactions cover a wide range from enzymatic reactions to organometallic reactions, which include Mo-catalyzed aldehyde oxidation (aldehyde oxidoreductase), Mo-catalyzed dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reduction (DMSO reductase), W-catalyzed acetylene hydration (acetylene hydratase), Mo/W-mediated olefin metathesis, Mo/W-mediated olefin epoxidation, W-mediated alkyne metathesis, and W-mediated C-H bond activation. Covering both Mo- and W-mediated reactions, four DFs of B2GP-PLYP, M06, B2-PLYP, and B3LYP are uniformly recommended with and without DFT empirical dispersion correction. Among these four DFs, B3LYP is notably improved in performance by DFT empirical dispersion correction. In addition to the absolute value of calculation error, if the trend of DFT results is also a consideration, B2GP-PLYP, B2-PLYP, and M06 keep better performance than other functionals tested and constitute our final recommendation of DFs for both Mo- and W-mediated reactions. PMID:26574251

  11. Increase of rutin antioxidant activity by generating Maillard reaction products with lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ru; Zhang, Bian-Ling; He, Ting; Yi, Ting; Yang, Ji-Ping; He, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Rutin exists in medicinal herbs, fruits, vegetables, and a number of plant-derived sources. Dietary sources containing rutin are considered beneficial because of their potential protective roles in multiple diseases related to oxidative stresses. In the present study, the change and antioxidation activity of rutin in Maillard reaction with lysine through a heating process were investigated. There is release of glucose and rhamnose that interact with lysine to give Maillard reaction products (MRPs), while rutin is converted to less-polar quercetin and a small quantity of isoquercitrin. Because of their high cell-membrane permeability, the rutin-lysine MRPs increase the free radical-scavenging activity in HepG2 cells, showing cellular antioxidant activity against Cu(2+)-induced oxidative stress higher than that of rutin. Furthermore, the MRPs significantly increased the Cu/Zn SOD (superoxide dismutase) activity and Cu/Zn SOD gene expression of HepG2 cells, consequently enhancing antioxidation activity. PMID:27106712

  12. Ranking the importance of nuclear reactions for activation and transmutation events

    CERN Document Server

    Arter, Wayne; Relton, Samuel D; Higham, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Pathways-reduced analysis is one of the techniques used by the Fispact-II nuclear activation and transmutation software to study the sensitivity of the computed inventories to uncertainties in reaction cross-sections. Although deciding which pathways are most important is very helpful in for example determining which nuclear data would benefit from further refinement, pathways-reduced analysis need not necessarily define the most critical reaction, since one reaction may contribute to several different pathways. This work examines three different techniques for ranking reactions in their order of importance in determining the final inventory, viz. a pathways based metric (PBM), the direct method and one based on the Pearson correlation coefficient. Reasons why the PBM is to be preferred are presented.

  13. Thermally activated reaction–diffusion-controlled chemical bulk reactions of gases and solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Möller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical kinetics of the reaction of thin films with reactive gases is investigated. The removal of thin films using thermally activated solid–gas to gas reactions is a method to in-situ control deposition inventory in vacuum and plasma vessels. Significant scatter of experimental deposit removal rates at apparently similar conditions was observed in the past, highlighting the need for understanding the underlying processes. A model based on the presence of reactive gas in the films bulk and chemical kinetics is presented. The model describes the diffusion of reactive gas into the film and its chemical interaction with film constituents in the bulk using a stationary reaction–diffusion equation. This yields the reactive gas concentration and reaction rates. Diffusion and reaction rate limitations are depicted in parameter studies. Comparison with literature data on tokamak co-deposit removal results in good agreement of removal rates as a function of pressure, film thickness and temperature.

  14. Investigation of molecular interactions in the complex formation of tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Bin; ZHAI Zheng; LUO GuangSheng; WANG JiaDing

    2008-01-01

    The molecular interactions in the complex formation of two tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid are investigated. The complex formation with a 1:1 stoichiometry between tartaric acid derivatives and D2EHPA can be obtained through UV-Vis titration, NMR chemical shifts and molecular dynamic simulations. Furthermore, the differences of the two complexes on the binding constants and strength of hydrogen bonds can also be determined. Such research will ideally provide insight into ways of regulating the complex forming properties of tartaric acid derivatives for composing or syn-thesizing new chiral resolving agents.

  15. Investigation of molecular interactions in the complex formation of tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The molecular interactions in the complex formation of two tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid are investigated. The complex formation with a 1:1 stoichiometry between tartaric acid derivatives and D2EHPA can be obtained through UV-Vis titration, NMR chemical shifts and molecular dynamic simulations. Furthermore, the differences of the two complexes on the binding constants and strength of hydrogen bonds can also be determined. Such research will ideally provide insight into ways of regulating the complex forming properties of tartaric acid derivatives for composing or syn- thesizing new chiral resolving agents.

  16. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ciemat, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Brey, J.J. [Hynergreen Technologies, Av. Buhaira 2, 41018 Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H{sub 2} per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming. (author)

  17. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodríguez, L.; Brey, J. J.; Daza, L.

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 °C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2 per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 °C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming.

  18. The activity of nanocrystalline Fe-based alloys as electrode materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christian Immanuel; Sellschopp, Kai; Tegel, Marcus; Rauscher, Thomas; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In view of alkaline water electrolysis, the activities for the hydrogen evolution reaction of nanocrystalline Fe-based electrode materials were investigated and compared with the activities of polycrystalline Fe and Ni. Electrochemical methods were used to elucidate the overpotential value, the charge transfer resistance and the double layer capacity. Structural properties of the electrode surface were determined with SEM, XRD and XPS analyses. Thus, a correlation between electrochemical and structural parameters was found. In this context, we report on a cyclic voltammetric activation procedure which causes a significant increase of the surface area of Fe-based electrodes leading to a boost in effective activity of the activated electrodes. It was found that the intrinsic activity of activated Fe-based electrodes is very high due to the formation of a nanocrystalline surface layer. In contrast, the activation procedure influences only the intrinsic activity of the Ni electrodes without the formation of a porous surface layer.

  19. Study of radionuclides complexes formation by organic compounds in intermediate and low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the general framework of the safety of nuclear wastes of low and intermediate activity, we have studied the effects of organic compounds on the solubilization of metallic cations. Organic compounds originate from the degradation of cellulose in concrete interstitial waters. Degradation reactions generate a number of products, among which carboxylic acids. These acids are known for their chelating properties. We have first analysed the degradation of cellulose in alkaline conditions: we have qualitatively and quantitatively determined the degradation products for various reaction progress indices, including a dozen of carboxylic acids. The principal goal of our work was the prediction of the behaviour of metallic cations in such cellulose degradation solutions. Owing the complexity of the system, a priori theoretical calculation are not possible. We have thus decided to choose tetra hydroxy pentanoic acid as a reference compound in order to simulate as accurately as possible the behaviour of more complex acids which contain similar functional groups. We have experimentally determined the complexing properties of this reference acid toward divalent cobalt and copper, and trivalent samarium and europium. Simple and mixed complex (hydroxyl) have been evidenced in alkaline medium. Their stability constants have been determined and extrapolated at zero ionic strength using the SIT theory. These results allowed us to theoretically predict the behaviour of our four reference cations in cellulose degradation products formed in concrete interstitial waters. In parallel, we have measured their solubility in real cellulose degradation solutions. Solubility predictions are correct for transition metals, but not for rare earth cations. In this case the complexes which have been identified with tetra hydroxy pentanoic acid are not stable enough to dissolve metallic hydroxides. In real degradation solutions, other compounds would account for the enhancement of rare earth

  20. Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in solution has been studied spectrophotometrically in the pH range 4-10. Stepwise formation of three types of complexes, with composition NpO2HA, NpO2A-, and NpOHA2-, has been demonstrated with salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H2L) and salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H2Q) at t = 25 +/- 10C and μ = 0.05. The logarithmic stability constants of the first two complexes are 5.14 +/- 0.06, 11.85 +/- 0.04 and 8.42 +/- 0.09, 13.33 +/- 0.015 for H2L and H2Q, respectively; equilibrium constants for the formation of hydroxo complexes of the form NpO2OHL2- and NpO2OHQ2- were also determined, and found to be equal to (2.23 +/-0.37) x 10-5 and (5.02 +/- 0.9) x 10-5, respectively. In the case of S-methyl-N1,N4-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide (H2Z), only one type of complex is formed under these experimental conditions, namely, NpO2Z-, with a logarithmic stability constant of 4.78 +/- 0.03. Dissociation constants for H2Q and H2Z were also determined

  1. Protein complex formation and intranuclear dynamics of NAC1 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Naomi; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Urano, Takeshi

    2016-09-15

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a cancer-related transcription regulator protein that is also involved in the pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. NAC1 is overexpressed in various carcinomas including ovarian, cervical, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. NAC1 knock-down was previously shown to result in the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cell lines and to rescue their sensitivity to chemotherapy, suggesting that NAC1 may be a potential therapeutic target, but protein complex formation and the dynamics of intranuclear NAC1 in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, analysis of HeLa cell lysates by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a sizing column showed that the NAC1 peak corresponded to an apparent molecular mass of 300-500 kDa, which is larger than the estimated molecular mass (58 kDa) of the protein. Furthermore, live cell photobleaching analyses with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NAC1 proteins revealed the intranuclear dynamics of NAC1. Collectively our results demonstrate that NAC1 forms a protein complex to function as a transcriptional regulator in cancer cells.

  2. Protein complex formation and intranuclear dynamics of NAC1 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Naomi; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Urano, Takeshi

    2016-09-15

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a cancer-related transcription regulator protein that is also involved in the pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. NAC1 is overexpressed in various carcinomas including ovarian, cervical, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. NAC1 knock-down was previously shown to result in the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cell lines and to rescue their sensitivity to chemotherapy, suggesting that NAC1 may be a potential therapeutic target, but protein complex formation and the dynamics of intranuclear NAC1 in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, analysis of HeLa cell lysates by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a sizing column showed that the NAC1 peak corresponded to an apparent molecular mass of 300-500 kDa, which is larger than the estimated molecular mass (58 kDa) of the protein. Furthermore, live cell photobleaching analyses with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NAC1 proteins revealed the intranuclear dynamics of NAC1. Collectively our results demonstrate that NAC1 forms a protein complex to function as a transcriptional regulator in cancer cells. PMID:27424155

  3. A spectrophotometric investigation of the complex formation between lanthanum (III) and eriochrome cyanine R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex formation between La(III) and Eriochrome Cyanine R has been investigated. Three complexes have been detected. A first one (Complex I) in the pH range of 5.3-5.5 with lambda sub(max) = 460nm. a second one (Complex II) in the pH range of 6.2-6.5 with lambda sub(max) = 490nm and a third one (complex III) in the pH range of 8.2 - 9.0 with lambda sub(max) = 545nm and a shoulder between 570-580nm. The composition and stability constants of the complexes, respectively: complex I: La(ECR)2 and 4.9 x 107, complex II: La(ECR)2 and 7.0 x 107, complex III: La.ECR and 1.0 x 104. All measurements were taken at 25.0 +- 0.10C and μ = 0.2 (NaClO4). (Author)

  4. Substrate-Na{sup +} complex formation: Coupling mechanism for {gamma}-aminobutyrate symporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallo, Anna; Simon, Agnes [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Bencsura, Akos [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Structural Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Heja, Laszlo [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Kardos, Julianna, E-mail: jkardos@chemres.hu [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary)

    2009-07-24

    Crystal structures of transmembrane transport proteins belonging to the important families of neurotransmitter-sodium symporters reveal how they transport neurotransmitters across membranes. Substrate-induced structural conformations of gated neurotransmitter-sodium symporters have been in the focus of research, however, a key question concerning the mechanism of Na{sup +} ion coupling remained unanswered. Homology models of human glial transporter subtypes of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid were built. In accordance with selectivity data for subtype 2 vs. 3, docking and molecular dynamics calculations suggest similar orthosteric substrate (inhibitor) conformations and binding crevices but distinguishable allosteric Zn{sup 2+} ion binding motifs. Considering the occluded conformational states of glial human {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transporter subtypes, we found major semi-extended and minor ring-like conformations of zwitterionic {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion. The existence of the minor ring-like conformation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion may be attributed to the strengthening of the intramolecular H-bond by the electrostatic effect of Na{sup +} ion. Coupling substrate uptake into cells with the thermodynamically favorable Na{sup +} ion movement through substrate-Na{sup +} ion complex formation may be a mechanistic principle featuring transmembrane neurotransmitter-sodium symporter proteins.

  5. EPR study of complex formation between copper (II) ions and sympathomimetic amines in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preoteasa, E.A. [Inst. of Atomic Physics, IFIN, Bucharest (Romania); Duliu, O.G.; Grecu, V.V. [Bucharest, Univ. (Romania). Dept. of Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    1997-07-01

    The complex formation between sympathomimetic amines (SA): adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), ephedrine (ED) and p-tyramine (pTA), and Cu(II) ion in aqueous solution has been studied by X-band EPR at room temperature. Excepting pTA, all investigated SA yielded two types of complexes in different pH domains. All complexes consistent with a ligand fields having a distorted octahedral symmetry, i.e., hexacoordination of Cu(II). The covalence coefficient calculated from the isotropic g and A values has shown strong ionic sigma-type ligand bonds. A structural model with the Cu(II) ion bound by four catecholic O(hydroxy) atoms for the low pH complexes of AD, NA and DA is proposed. For the high pH complexes of the former compounds as well as for both Ed complexes, the authors suppose Cu(II) bound by two N (amino) and two O (hydroxy) atoms. The spectra are consistent to water binding on the longitudinal octahedron axis in all compounds excepting the high pH complex of Ed, where OH2- ions are bound. Possible implications for the SA-cell receptors interactions are discussed.

  6. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina;

    1999-01-01

    as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide varies. By combination of solubility and electromotive force measurements, a model is constructed assuming the dissolution involves complex formation. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)(2)](-2) and/or [Pb(CO3)(3)](-4). A similar complex......Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubilities of NiO and PbO decrease while those of Fe2O3 and Bi2O3 remain approximately constant as the lithium mole fraction increases from 0.43 to 0.62 in the melt. At a fixed composition of the melt, NiO and PbO display both acidic and basic dissolution...

  7. Thermodynamics of mixed-ligand complex formation of mercury (II) ethylenediaminetetraacetate with amino acids in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyreu, Dmitrii, E-mail: pyreu@mail.ru [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State University, Ermak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Kozlovskii, Eugenii [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State University, Ermak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, Matvei; Kumeev, Roman [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable mixed ligand complexes of HgEdta with amino acids at physiological pH value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermodynamic and NMR data evident the ambidentate coordination mode of arginine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of the guanidinic group of Arg in coordination process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binuclear complexes (HgEdta){sub 2}L with the bridging function of amino acid. - Abstract: The mixed-ligand complex formation in the systems Hg{sup 2+} - Edta{sup 4-} - L{sup -}(L = Arg, Orn, Ser) has been studied by means of calorimetry, pH-potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and the ionic strength of I = 0.5 (KNO{sub 3}). The thermodynamic parameters of formation of the HgEdtaL, HgEdtaHL and (HgEdta){sub 2}L complexes have been determined. The most probable coordination mode for the complexone and the amino acid in the mixed-ligand complexes was discussed.

  8. Spectroscopic Study on the Ternary Complex Formation of U(VI) with Salicylic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the nuclear chemical point of view, ternary complex formation of actinide ions with ligands has attracted attention for understanding radionuclides' migration in the environment. There are various ligands in natural aquatic systems which can form stable ternary actinide complexes. Humic substance in a near-neutral groundwater is one of them and carboxylic groups in a humic substance are considered as the most likely functional group which interacts with actinides. In this work, the formation of the ternary complex of U(VI) with salicylic acid (SAH2) was investigated by two different laser-based spectroscopic methods, i.e., laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The notable features are as follows: (i) the breakdown probability increases slightly, (ii) the absorbance of U(VI) increases, whereas the fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing salicylic acid concentration. The increase of the breakdown probability indicates that insoluble species are formed due to the complexation of U(VI) with SAH2. The decrease of the fluorescence intensity is due to the quenching effect of the SAH2 in the complexes. With regards to the instrumentation, the characteristics of a newly developed LIBD system adopting a probe beam deflection method are presented. We report also on the improved speciation sensitivity (∼10-9M for UO22+) of the TRLFS system

  9. Organocatalytic chemo- and regioselective oxyarylation of styrenes via a cascade reaction: remote activation of hydroxyl groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Chen; Jiang, Fei; Wang, Shu-Liang; Shi, Feng; Tu, Shu-Jiang

    2014-07-01

    The first organocatalytic oxyarylation of styrenes has been established through a cascade of vinylogous Michael addition/alkoxyl transfer reactions of o- or p-hydroxylstyrenes with quinone imine ketals. The process leads to a highly chemo- and regioselective oxyarylation of styrenes and provides access to m-alkylated anilines in generally high yields and excellent diastereoselectivity (up to 99% yield, >95:5 dr). An investigation of the reaction pathway revealed that the existence and position of the hydroxyl group of styrene played crucial roles in the cascade reaction, suggesting that the two reactants were simultaneously activated by binaphthyl-derived phosphoric acid via hydrogen bonding interactions and long-distance conjugative effects. In addition, the activating group of the hydroxyl functionality in the products can be easily removed or transformed, demonstrating the applicability and utility of this strategy in styrene oxyarylation and in the synthesis of styrene-based compounds.

  10. Cross-section studies of relativistic deuteron reactions on copper by activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross-sections of relativistic deuteron reactions on natural copper were studied in detail by means of activation method. The copper foils were irradiated during experiments with the model spallation targets in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The irradiation of activation samples was performed by beams in the energy range from 1 to 8 GeV. Residual nuclides were measured by the gamma spectrometry. While the EXFOR database contains sets of data for relativistic proton reactions, data for deuteron reactions in this energy range are almost missing. Lack of such experimental cross-section values prevents the use of copper foils from beam integral monitoring. For this reason our experiments focused on their measurement and completely new data were obtained in the energy region where no experimental data have been available so far. The copper monitors with their low sensitivity to fast neutrons will contribute to improvement of the beam integral determination during accelerator-driven system studies

  11. Catalytic Activity of Iridium Dioxide With Different Morphologies for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guangjin; HUANG Fei; XU Tian; YU Yi; CHENG Feng; ZHANG Yue; PAN Mu

    2015-01-01

    Iridium dioxide with different morphologies (nanorod and nanogranular) is successfully prepared by a modiifed sol-gel and Adams methods. The catalytic activity of both samples for oxygen reduction reaction is investigated in an alkaline solution. The electrochemical results show that the catalytic activity of the nanogranular IrO2 sample is superior to that of the nanorod sample due to its higher onset potential for oxygen reduction reaction and higher electrode current density in low potential region. The results of Koutecky-Levich analysis indicate that the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by both samples is a mixture transfer pathway. It is dominated by four electron transfer pathway for both samples in high overpotential area, while it is controlled by two electron transfer process for both samples in low overpotential area.

  12. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen-Popper, Dion-Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  13. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  14. Antibacterial Characteristics and Activity of Water-Soluble Chitosan Derivatives Prepared by the Maillard Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chien Chung

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of water-soluble chitosan derivatives prepared by Maillard reactions against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, and Salmonella typhimurium was examined. Relatively high antibacterial activity against various microorganisms was noted for the chitosan-glucosamine derivative as compared to the acid-soluble chitosan. In addition, it was found that the susceptibility of the test organisms to the water-soluble chitosan derivative was higher in deionized water than in saline solution. Metal ions were also found to reduce the antibacterial activity of the water-soluble chitosan derivative on S. aureus. The marked increase in glucose level, protein content and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity was observed in the cell supernatant of S. aureus exposed to the water-soluble chitosan derivative in deionized water. The results suggest that the water-soluble chitosan produced by Maillard reaction may be a promising commercial substitute for acid-soluble chitosan.

  15. Thin layer activation analysis of α induced reactions for surface wear studies in some natural isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thin layer activation technique is widely used to study surface wear and erosion by employing medium energy, light charged particle accelerators in the micrometer range. In the present work, TLA technique has been explored using gamma spectroscopy for a large number of reactions in several isotopes, which may be of interest for the reactor technology

  16. Employing Magnetic Levitation to Monitor Reaction Kinetics and Measure Activation Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Lauren; Cesafsky, Karen E.; Le, Tran; Park, Aileen; Malicky, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive undergraduate-level kinetics experiment that uses magnetic levitation to monitor the progress and determine the activation energy of a condensation reaction on a polymeric solid support. The method employs a cuvette filled with a paramagnetic solution positioned between two strong magnets. The…

  17. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  18. MSU SINP CDFE nuclear data activities in the nuclear reaction data centres network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the progress report of the Centre for Photonuclear Experiments Data, Moscow. It is a short review of the works carried out by the CDFE concerning the IAEA nuclear reaction data centers network activities from May 2001 until May 2002. and the description of the main results obtained. (a.n.)

  19. Antibacterial Characteristics and Activity of Water-Soluble Chitosan Derivatives Prepared by the Maillard Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-Chien Chung; Cheng-Fang Tsai; Jan-Ying Yeh

    2011-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of water-soluble chitosan derivatives prepared by Maillard reactions against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, and Salmonella typhimurium was examined. Relatively high antibacterial activity against various microorganisms was noted for the chitosan-glucosamine derivative as compared to the acid-soluble chitosan. In addition, it was found that the susceptibility of the test organisms to the water-s...

  20. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Hua [School of Urban Rail Transportation, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Li, Zhihu [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China); Xu, Yanhui, E-mail: xuyanhui@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  1. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm−2 for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm−2 (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10−7–10−6 cm s−1. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER

  2. Measurement of high-threshold-energy activation reaction rates in combined materials with 14 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-threshold-energy activation reaction rates were measured in cylindric combined materials bombarded by D-T neutrons with 6 threshold-energy detectors Fe, Al, Nb, F, Zr and Cu. The experimental results are discussed. MCNP/4B code was used to calculate the activation reaction rates on the experimental device. The calculated results are compared with the experimental ones. It shows that the discrepancies are 10%-30% except for the F activation reaction rate. (authors)

  3. Tandem Reactions Using Nitrile Imines: Synthesis of Some Novel Heterocyclic Compounds with Expected Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil A. H. Gobouri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available New functionalized 7,9-dimethylpyrimido[4,5-d][1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrimidine-5,6,8(1H,7H,9H-trione derivatives were synthesized via reaction of the hydrazonoyl halides with 7,8-dihydro-1,3-dimethyl-7-thioxopyrimido[4,5-d]pyrimidine-2,4,5(1H,3H,6Htrione. The biological activity of the products has been evaluated. The mechanism and the regioselectivity of the studied reactions have been discussed.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation in the reaction rate's calculation with neutron-activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With MCNP/4B code, the influence of cut-off energy, flux tallies, nuclear databases and perturbation on the reaction rate's calculation with neutron-activation method are analysed. When the effective reaction threshold is chosen as the cut-off energy, calculation time is considerably reduced and yet the results are not changed. Comparing calculations with cell tallies (F4) with those performed with detector tallies (F5), the counting efficiency of cell tallies is higher and the results are slightly higher, but still credible. With different nuclear databases, calculated results can be different. The perturbation among the detectors doesn't effect on the calculated results. (authors)

  5. Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.; Gerbeleu, N.V.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between neptunium(V) and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives in solution has been studied spectrophotometrically in the pH range 4-10. Stepwise formation of three types of complexes, with composition NpO/sub 2/HA, NpO/sub 2/A/sup -/, and NpOHA/sup 2 -/, has been demonstrated with salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L) and salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q) at t = 25 +/- 1/sup 0/C and ..mu.. = 0.05. The logarithmic stability constants of the first two complexes are 5.14 +/- 0.06, 11.85 +/- 0.04 and 8.42 +/- 0.09, 13.33 +/- 0.015 for H/sub 2/L and H/sub 2/Q, respectively; equilibrium constants for the formation of hydroxo complexes of the form NpO/sub 2/OHL/sup 2 -/ and NpO/sub 2/OHQ/sup 2 -/ were also determined, and found to be equal to (2.23 +/-0.37) x 10/sup -5/ and (5.02 +/- 0.9) x 10/sup -5/, respectively. In the case of S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide (H/sub 2/Z), only one type of complex is formed under these experimental conditions, namely, NpO/sub 2/Z/sup -/, with a logarithmic stability constant of 4.78 +/- 0.03. Dissociation constants for H/sub 2/Q and H/sub 2/Z were also determined.

  6. Chemistry of phosphorus ylides 31: Reaction of azidocoumarin with active phosphonium ylides, synthesis and antitumour activities of chromenones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soher S Maigali; Mansoura A Abd-El-Maksoud; Fouad M Soliman

    2013-11-01

    The reaction of 4- azidochromen-2-one (1) with the nucleophilic phosphacumulene ylides 2, 8, and 12 afforded the new heterocyclic triazoles, triazepines, aziridine, pyrrolone containing a coumarin moiety. Cycloaddition reactions took place first to give triazoline 3 and 9. The triazolines rearranged to the triazepines 4, 10, and 13 accompanied by elimination of triphenylphosphine leading to the phosphorus-free triazepines 5, 11, and moreover, aziridine 6 was produced via nitrogen extrusion from the triazoline 3, followed by ring expansion to the pyrrolone 7. On the other hand, the reaction of the azidocoumarin 1 with the phosphallene yield 15 behaves differently and afforded the triazine 17 and azetone 18. The antitumour activity of compounds 3, 4, 6, and 11 was evaluated, in vitro, against (breast: MCF-7 and liver: HPEG2) human solid tumour cell lines. They showed values closed to that recorded by the reference drug doxorubicin.

  7. Variability of single trial brain activation predicts fluctuations in reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Stephan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Roessner, Veit; Klein, Christoph; Rietschel, Marcella; Feige, Bernd; Brandeis, Daniel; Laucht, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    Brain activation stability is crucial to understanding attention lapses. EEG methods could provide excellent markers to assess neuronal response variability with respect to temporal (intertrial coherence) and spatial variability (topographic consistency) as well as variations in activation intensity (low frequency variability of single trial global field power). We calculated intertrial coherence, topographic consistency and low frequency amplitude variability during target P300 in a continuous performance test in 263 15-year-olds from a cohort with psychosocial and biological risk factors. Topographic consistency and low frequency amplitude variability predicted reaction time fluctuations (RTSD) in a linear model. Higher RTSD was only associated with higher psychosocial adversity in the presence of the homozygous 6R-10R dopamine transporter haplotype. We propose that topographic variability of single trial P300 reflects noise as well as variability in evoked cortical activation patterns. Dopaminergic neuromodulation interacted with environmental and biological risk factors to predict behavioural reaction time variability.

  8. Effect of denitrifying bacteria on the electrochemical reaction of activated carbon fiber in electrochemical biofilm system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Diwen; JIA Jinping; ZHANG Lehua

    2007-01-01

    An electrochemical-activated denitrifying biofilm system consisting of activated carbon fiber electrodes immobilized with denitrifying bacteria film as cathode was studied.A revised model for an electrochemical-activated denitrifying biofilm was developed and validated by electrochemical analysis of cathodal polarization curves and nitrate consumption rate.The cathodal polarization curve and nitrate consumption rate were introduced to verify the rate of electrochemical reaction and the activity of denitrifying bacteria,respectively.It was shown that the denitrification process effectively strengthened the electrochemical reaction while the electron also intensified denitrification activity.Electron was transferred between electrochemical process and biological process not only by hydrogen molecule but also by new produced active hydrogen atom.Additionally,a parameter of apparent exchange current density was deprived from the cathodal polarization curve with high overpotential,and a new bio-effect current density was defined through statistical analysis,which was linearly dependent to the activity of denitrification bacteria.Activated carbon fiber (ACF) electrode was also found to be more suitable to the electrochemical denitrifying system compared with graphite and platinum.

  9. Benchmarking of activation reaction distribution in an intermediate energy neutron field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Morev, Mikhail N; Hirota, Masahiro; Abe, Takuya; Koike, Yuya; Iwai, Satoshi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction rate depth profiles inside concrete shield irradiated by intermediate energy neutron were calculated using a Monte-Carlo code and compared with an experiment. An irradiation field of intermediate neutron produced in the forward direction from a thick (stopping length) target bombarded by 400 MeV nucleon(-1) carbon ions was arranged at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. Ordinary concrete shield of 90 cm thickness was installed 50 cm downstream the iron target. Activation detectors of aluminum, gold and gold covered with cadmium were inserted at various depths. Irradiated samples were extracted after exposure and gamma-ray spectrometry was performed for each sample. Comparison of experimental and calculated shows good agreement for both low- and high-energy neutron-induced reaction except for (27)Al(n,X)(24)Na reaction at the surface. PMID:21515619

  10. Search for reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Gary; Rundberg, Robert; Tonchev, Anton; Fowler, Malcolm; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Archuleta, Tom; Bionta, Richard; Boswell, Mitzi; Gostic, Julie; Griego, Jeff; Knittel, Kenn; Klein, Andi; Moody, Ken; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Wilde, Carl; Yeamans, Charles

    2013-10-01

    We report on measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons at the National Ignition Facility. RIF neutrons are produced in cryogenically layered implision by up-scattered deuterium, or tritium ions that undergo subsequent fusion reactions. The rate of RIF neutron production is proportional to the fuel areal density (| | R) and ion-stopping length in the dense fuel assembly. Thus, RIF neutrons provide information on charge particle stopping in a strongly coupled plasma, where perturbative modeling breaks down. To measure RIF neutrons, a set of thulium activation foils was placed 50 cm from layered cryogenic implosions at the NIF. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a neutron kinetic energy threshold of 14.96 MeV. We will present results from initial experiments performed during the spring of 2013. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA, LA-UR-13-22085.

  11. Catalytic Activity of Dual Metal Cyanide Complex in Multi-component Coupling Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anaswara RAVINDRAN; Rajendra SRIVASTAVA

    2011-01-01

    Several dual metal cyanide catalysts were prepared from potassium ferrocyanide,metal chloride (where metal =Zn2+,Mn2+,Ni2+,Co2+ and Fe2+),t-butanol (complexing agent) and PEG-4000 (co-complexing agent).The catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis (CHN and X-ray fluorescence),X-ray diffraction,N2 adsorption-desorption,scanning electron microscopy,Fourier-transform infiared spectroscopy,and UV-Visible spectroscopy.The dual metal cyanide catalysts were used in several acid catalyzed multi-component coupling reactions for the synthesis of pharmaceutically important organic derivatives.In all these reactions,the Fe-Fe containing dual metal cyanide catalyst was the best catalyst.The catalysts can be recycled without loss in catalytic activity.The advantage of this method is the use of mild,efficient and reusable catalysts for various reactions,which makes them candidates for commercial use.

  12. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO. PMID:15901543

  13. Effect of mechanical activation on TiC synthesis reaction in Al-Ti-C powder mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    After milling in a high-energy ball miller for various times, the synthesis reaction process of the Al-Ti-C powder mixture were investigated by difference thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). According to the patterns of reaction peaks on the DTA curves, the activation energy of each reaction was calculated. The experimental results of DTA show that the synthesis reaction of Al-Ti-C powder mixture can be enhanced after high-energy milling. The longer the milling time, the lower the reaction temperature. The synthesis reaction of TiC is transformed from Ti+C→TiC to Al3Ti+C→TiC+3Al with long period milling. Meanwhile, the activation energy of the reaction reduces with increasing milling time. The effect of milling time on reduced activation energy for low temperature region is more significant than that for high temperature region.

  14. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particles located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.

  15. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  16. Size-Dependent Electrocatalytic Activity of Free Gold Nanoparticles for the Glucose Oxidation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebié, Seydou; Napporn, Teko W; Morais, Cláudia; Kokoh, K Boniface

    2016-05-18

    Understanding the fundamental relationship between the size and the structure of electrode materials is essential to design catalysts and enhance their activity. Therefore, spherical gold nanoparticles (GNSs) with a mean diameter from 4 to 15 nm were synthesized. UV/Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and under-potential deposition of lead (UPDPb ) were used to determine the morphology, size, and surface crystallographic structure of the GNSs. The UPDPb revealed that their crystallographic facets are affected by their size and the growth process. The catalytic properties of these GNSs toward glucose electrooxidation were studied by cyclic voltammetry, taking into account the scan rate and temperature effects. The results clearly show the size-dependent electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation reactions that are controlled by diffusion. Small GNSs with an average size of 4.2 nm exhibited high catalytic activity. This drastic increase in activity results from the high specific area and reactivity of the surface electrons induced by their small size. The reaction mechanism was investigated by in situ Fourier transform infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Gluconolactone and gluconate were identified as the intermediate and the final reaction product, respectively, of the glucose electrooxidation.

  17. Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebeni, Janos

    2014-10-01

    Intravenous injection of a variety of nanotechnology enhanced (liposomal, micellar, polymer-conjugated) and protein-based (antibodies, enzymes) drugs can lead to hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), also known as infusion, or anaphylactoid reactions. The molecular mechanism of mild to severe allergy symptoms may differ from case to case and is mostly not known, however, in many cases a major cause, or contributing factor is activation of the complement (C) system. The clinical relevance of C activation-related HSRs, a non-IgE-mediated pseudoallergy (CARPA), lies in its unpredictability and occasional lethal outcome. Accordingly, there is an unmet medical need to develop laboratory assays and animal models that quantitate CARPA. This review provides basic information on CARPA; a short history, issues of nomenclature, incidence, classification of reactogenic drugs and symptoms, and the mechanisms of C activation via different pathways. It is pointed out that anaphylatoxin-induced mast cell release may not entirely explain the severe reactions; a "second hit" on allergy mediating cells may also contribute. In addressing the increasing requirements for CARPA testing, the review evaluates the available assays and animal models, and proposes a possible algorithm for the screening of reactogenic drugs and hypersensitive patients. Finally, an analogy is proposed between CARPA and the classic stress reaction, suggesting that CARPA represents a "blood stress" reaction, a systemic fight of the body against harmful biological and chemical agents via the anaphylatoxin/mast-cell/circulatory system axis, in analogy to the body's fight of physical and emotional stress via the hypothalamo/pituitary/adrenal axis. In both cases the response to a broad variety of noxious effects are funneled into a uniform pattern of physiological changes. PMID:25124145

  18. Some Investigations of the Reaction of Activated Charcoal with Fluorine and Uranium Hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Fiedor, J.N.; Simmons, D.W.; Toth, L.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Williams

    1998-09-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969, when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N drain tanks at the reactor site. Over time, fluorine (F{sub 2}) and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) moved from the salt through the gas piping to a charcoal bed, where they reacted with the activated charcoal. Some of the immediate concerns related to the migration of F{sub 2} and UF{sub 6} to the charcoal bed were the possibility of explosive reactions between the charcoal and F{sub 2}, the existence of conditions that could induce a criticality accident, and the removal and recovery of the fissile uranium from the charcoal. This report addresses the reactions and reactivity of species produced by the reaction of fluorine and activated charcoal and between charcoal and F{sub 2}-UF{sub 6} gas mixtures in order to support remediation of the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) and the recovery of the fissile uranium. The chemical identity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and potential for explosive decomposition of the primary reaction product, fluorinated charcoal, was determined.

  19. Age and physical activity effects on reaction time and digit symbol substitution performance in cognitively active adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupinacci, N S; Rikli, R E; Jones, C J; Ross, D

    1993-06-01

    University professors (N = 56), divided into two age groups ( 50 years) and two physical activity level groups (high and low), were tested on three tasks requiring increasingly complex cognitive processing--simple reaction time (SRT), choice reaction time (CRT), and on a digit symbol substitution test (DSST). A significant main effect for exercise, with high active subjects performing better than low active subjects, was found for SRT (p effects for age, with younger subjects performing better than older subjects, were found on DSST (p effect of age was more pronounced with increasing task complexity is consistent with previous research. However, the tendency for exercise effects to decrease with increasing task complexity is not consistent with former findings, suggesting that perhaps the controlled high level of cognitive activity of subjects in this study may have offset the usual effects of exercise on information processing speed. No significant Age x Activity Level interactions were found on any of the dependent raw score data. However, compared to normative scores of the population at large, there was a slight increase in DSST percentile ranks with age for the older aerobically active professors, whereas a decrease occurred for the inactive subjects. PMID:8341837

  20. Nanoporous molybdenum carbide wires as an active electrocatalyst towards the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lei; Bian, Xiaojun; Xiao, Jingjing; Liu, Baohong; Scanlon, Micheál D; Girault, Hubert H

    2014-06-01

    A non-precious metal electrocatalyst has been developed for the oxygen reduction reaction based on nanoporous molybdenum carbide (nano-Mo2C) wires through a facile calcination of sub-nanometer periodic organic-inorganic hybrid nanowires. The highly dispersed Mo2C wires were composed of 10-15 nm nanocrystals with a mesopore size of 3.3 nm. The properties of nano-Mo2C wires were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption/desorption porosimetry. The highly active surface area and enriched nanoporosity for nano-Mo2C wires are unique features that make them a high-performance electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction in an alkaline medium. The electrocatalysis and reaction kinetics results show that nano-Mo2C-based materials can be developed as new catalysts with high activity at low cost for electrochemical energy conversion applications.

  1. ASYMPTOTIC SOLUTION OF ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR SYSTEMS FOR NONLINEAR REACTION DIFFUSION EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi MO; Wantao LIN

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear reaction diffusion equations for activator inhibitor systems is considered. Under suitable conditions, firstly, the outer solution of the original problem is obtained, secondly, using the variables of multiple scales and the expanding theory of power series the formal asymptotic expansions of the solution are constructed, and finally, using the theory of differential inequalities the uniform validity and asymptotic behavior of the solution are studied.

  2. Implantable biodegradable sponges: effect of interpolymer complex formation of chitosan with gelatin on the release behavior of tramadol hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Nagwa H; El-laithy, Hanan M; Tadros, Mina I

    2007-01-01

    The effect of interpolymer complex formation between positively charged chitosan and negatively charged gelatin (Type B) on the release behavior of tramadol hydrochloride from biodegradable chitosan-gelatin sponges was studied. Mixed sponges were prepared by freeze-drying the cross-linked homogenous stable foams produced from chitosan and gelatin solutions where gelatin acts as a foam builder. Generation of stable foams was optimized where concentration, pH of gelatin solution, temperature, speed and duration of whipping process, and, chitosan-gelatin ratio drastically affect the properties and the stability of the produced foams. The prepared sponges were evaluated for their morphology, drug content, and microstructure using scanning electron microscopy, mechanical properties, uptake capacity, drug release profile, and their pharmacodynamic activity in terms of the analgesic effect after implantation in Wistar rats. It was revealed that whipping 7% (w/w) gelatin solution, of pH 5.5, for 15 min at 25 degrees C with a stirring speed of 1000 rpm was the optimum conditions for stable gelatin foam generation. Moreover, homogenous, uniform chitosan-gelatin foam with small air bubbles were produced by mixing 2.5% w/w chitosan solution with 7% w/w gelatin solution in 1:5 ratio. Indeed, polyionic complexation between chitosan and gelatin overcame the drawbacks of chitosan sponge mechanical properties where, pliable, soft, and compressible sponge with high fluid uptake capacity was produced at 25 degrees C and 65% relative humidity without any added plasticizer. Drug release studies showed a successful retardation of the incorporated drug where the t50% values of the dissolution profiles were 0.55, 3.03, and 4.73 hr for cross-linked gelatin, un-cross-linked chitosan-gelatin, and cross-linked chitosan-gelatin sponges, respectively. All the release experiments followed Higuchi's diffusion mechanism over 12 hr. The achieved drug prolongation was a result of a combined effect

  3. Direct monitoring of the strand passage reaction of DNA topoisomerase II triggers checkpoint activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L Furniss

    Full Text Available By necessity, the ancient activity of type II topoisomerases co-evolved with the double-helical structure of DNA, at least in organisms with circular genomes. In humans, the strand passage reaction of DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II is the target of several major classes of cancer drugs which both poison Topo II and activate cell cycle checkpoint controls. It is important to know the cellular effects of molecules that target Topo II, but the mechanisms of checkpoint activation that respond to Topo II dysfunction are not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a checkpoint mechanism monitors the strand passage reaction of Topo II. In contrast, cells do not become checkpoint arrested in the presence of the aberrant DNA topologies, such as hyper-catenation, that arise in the absence of Topo II activity. An overall reduction in Topo II activity (i.e. slow strand passage cycles does not activate the checkpoint, but specific defects in the T-segment transit step of the strand passage reaction do induce a cell cycle delay. Furthermore, the cell cycle delay depends on the divergent and catalytically inert C-terminal region of Topo II, indicating that transmission of a checkpoint signal may occur via the C-terminus. Other, well characterized, mitotic checkpoints detect DNA lesions or monitor unattached kinetochores; these defects arise via failures in a variety of cell processes. In contrast, we have described the first example of a distinct category of checkpoint mechanism that monitors the catalytic cycle of a single specific enzyme in order to determine when chromosome segregation can proceed faithfully.

  4. Structure-activity relationship in high-performance iron-based electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Wang, Ying; Pan, Jing; Xu, Weilin; Zhuang, Lin

    2015-12-01

    A sustainable Iron (Fe), Nitrogen (N) co-doped high performance Fe-Nx/C electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is synthesized simply based on nitric acid oxidation of cheap carbon black. The obtained optimal nonprecious metal electrocatalyst shows high ORR performance in both alkaline and acidic conditions and possesses appreciable performance/price ratio due to its low cost. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationship of different active sites on Fe-Nx/C is revealed systematically: Fe-N4/2-C > Fe4-N-C > N-C >> Fe4-C ≥ C, from both experimental and theoretical points of view.

  5. Proline catalyzed α-aminoxylation reaction in the synthesis of biologically active compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Dwivedi, Namrata

    2013-02-19

    The search for new and efficient ways to synthesize optically pure compounds is an active area of research in organic synthesis. Asymmetric catalysis provides a practical, cost-effective, and efficient method to create a variety of complex natural products containing multiple stereocenters. In recent years, chemists have become more interested in using small organic molecules to catalyze organic reactions. As a result, organocatalysis has emerged both as a promising strategy and as an alternative to catalysis with expensive proteins or toxic metals. One of the most successful and widely studied secondary amine-based organocatalysts is proline. This small molecule can catalyze numerous reactions such as the aldol, Mannich, Michael addition, Robinson annulation, Diels-Alder, α-functionalization, α-amination, and α-aminoxylation reactions. Catalytic and enantioselective α-oxygenation of carbonyl compounds is an important reaction to access a variety of useful building blocks for bioactive molecules. Proline catalyzed α-aminoxylation using nitrosobenzene as oxygen source, followed by in situ reduction, gives enantiomerically pure 1,2-diol. This molecule can then undergo a variety of organic reactions. In addition, proline organocatalysis provides access to an assortment of biologically active natural products including mevinoline (a cholesterol lowering drug), tetrahydrolipstatin (an antiobesity drug), R(+)-α-lipoic acid, and bovidic acid. In this Account, we present an iterative organocatalytic approach to synthesize both syn- and anti-1,3-polyols, both enantio- and stereoselectively. This method is primarily based on proline-catalyzed sequential α-aminoxylation and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) olefination of aldehyde to give a γ-hydroxy ester. In addition, we briefly illustrate the broad application of our recently developed strategy for 1,3-polyols, which serve as valuable, enantiopure building blocks for polyketides and other structurally diverse and

  6. Thermochemical study of processes of complex formation of Cu2+ ions with L-glutamine in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorboletova, G. G.; Gridchin, S. N.; Lutsenko, A. A.

    2010-11-01

    Heats of the interaction of Cu(NO3)2 solutions with L-glutamine solutions were measured directly by calorimetry at a temperature of 298.15 K and ionic strength values of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 (KNO3). Using RRSU universal software, the experimental data were subjected to rigorous mathematical treatment with allowances made for several concurrent processes in the system. The heats of formation of the CuL+ and CuL2 complexes were calculated from the calorimetric measurements. The standard heats of the complex formation of Cu2+ with L-glutamine were obtained by extrapolation to zero ionic strength. The complete thermodynamic characteristic (Δr H o, Δr G o, Δr S o) of the complex formation processes in a Cu2+—L-glutamine system was obtained.

  7. Study of Activation and Inhibition of Certain Metal Ions to Amylase Catalyzed Reaction by Microcalorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪林; 于秀芳; 聂毅; 刘晓静; 张刚

    2003-01-01

    With or without activation or inhibition of metal ion, the power-time curves of amylase catalyzed reaction were determined by a 2277 thermal activity monitor (Sweden). The Michaelis constant ( K ), apparent Michaelis constant ( Km ), maximum velocity (vm) and apparent maximum velocity ( vam) of amylase catalyzed reaction were obtained using thermokinetic theory and reduced extent method. On the basis of data obtained, the following relationships between Km and concentration of metal ion (c) were established:for inhibitor of Ni2+ Km= 2.9648 × 10-3 - 1.3912 × 10-4c R = 0.9998 for inhibitor of Co2+ Km = 1.0227 × 10-3 + 8.2676 × 10-6c R = 0.9955 for activator of Ca2+ Km= 1.0630 × 10-7c2 - 1.8311 × 10-6c + 9.3058 × 10-6 R = 0.9999 for activator of Li+ Km= 5.6300 × 10-8c2 - 1.5329 × 10-6c + 1.2662 × 10-5 R =0.9999 The Km-c relationships show a strenuous inhibitory effect for Ni2+ and a strenuous active effect for Ca2+ .

  8. Characterization for Binding Complex Formation with Site-Directly Immobilized Antibodies Enhancing Detection Capability of Cardiac Troponin I

    OpenAIRE

    Il-Hoon Cho; Sung-Min Seo; Jin-Woo Jeon; Se-Hwan Paek

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced analytical performances of immunoassays that employed site-directly immobilized antibodies as the capture binders have been functionally characterized in terms of antigen-antibody complex formation on solid surfaces. Three antibody species specific to cardiac troponin I, immunoglobulin G (IgG), Fab, and F(ab′)2 were site-directly biotinylated within the hinge region and then immobilized via a streptavidin-biotin linkage. The new binders were more efficient capture antibodies ...

  9. Complex formation constants and thermodynamic parameters for La(III) and Y(III) L-serine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stoichiometric stability constants for La(III) and Y(III) L-serine complexes were determined by potentiometric methods at different ionic strenghts adjusted with NaClO4 and at different temperatures. The overall changes in free energy (ΔGO), enthalpy (ΔHO), and entropy (ΔSO) during the protonation of L-serine and that accompanying the complex formation with the metal ions have been evaluated. (author)

  10. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F [Leland Stanford Junior University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-04-20

    In this project, we have employed a systematic approach to develop active, selective, and stable catalyst materials for important electrochemical reactions involving energy conversion. In particular, we have focused our attention on developing active catalyst materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). HER: We have synthesized and investigated several highly active and acid stable non-precious metal HER catalysts, including: [Mo3S13]2- nanoclusters (Nature Chemistry, 2014) and molybdenum phosphosulfide (MoP|S) (Angewandte Chemie, 2014). We have also aimed to engineer these catalyst formulations in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for fundamental studies of water electrolysis at high current densities, approximately 1 A/cm2 (ChemSusChem, 2015). We furthermore investigated transition metal phosphide (TMP) catalysts for HER by a combined experimental–theoretical approach (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). By synthesizing different TMPs and comparing experimentally determined HER activities with the hydrogen adsorption free energies, ΔGH, calculated by density functional theory, we showed that the TMPs follow a volcano relationship for the HER. Using our combined experimental–theoretical model, we predicted that the mixed metal TMP, Fe0.5Co0.5P, should have a near-optimal ΔGH. We synthesized several mixtures of Co and Fe phosphides alloys and confirmed that Fe0.5Co0.5P exhibits the highest HER activity of the investigated TMPs (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). The understanding gained as to how to improve catalytic activity for the HER, particularly for non-precious metal materials, is important to DOE targets for sustainable H2 production. OER: We have developed a SrIrO3/IrOx catalyst for acidic conditions (submitted, 2016). The SrIrO3/IrOx catalyst significantly outperforms rutile IrO2 and RuO2, the only other OER catalysts to have reasonable stability and activity in

  11. Lipid Peroxidation Inhibitation Activity of Maillard Reaction Products Derived from Sugar-amino Acid Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjing Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the lipid peroxidation inhibitation activity of Maillard Reaction Products (MRPs derived from sugar (glucose, fructose, lactose and maltose and 18 amino acid model systems in soybean oil. MRPs were produced by heating at 130°C for 2 h. Of the 18 amino acids-fructose model systems studied, MRPs derived from fructose-leucine, fructose-methionine, fructose-phenylalanine and fructose-isoleucine model sytems showed high lipid peroxidation inhibitation activity and best performance was observed from fructose-phenylalanine MRPs. Interestingly, glucose-phenylalanine MRPs also exhibited high inhibitation activity and inhibitation activity of both glucose-phenylalanine and fructose-phenylalanine MRPs exceeded 87% even with concentration at 1.1 wt % after 8 days storage.

  12. Catalyst activation, deactivation, and degradation in palladium-mediated Negishi cross-coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böck, Katharina; Feil, Julia E; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Koszinowski, Konrad

    2015-03-27

    Pd-mediated Negishi cross-coupling reactions were studied by a combination of kinetic measurements, electrospray-ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, (31)P NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The kinetic measurements point to a rate-determining oxidative addition. Surprisingly, this step seems to involve not only the Pd catalyst and the aryl halide substrate, but also the organozinc reagent. In this context, the ESI-mass spectrometric observation of heterobimetallic Pd-Zn complexes [L2 PdZnR](+) (L=S-PHOS, R=Bu, Ph, Bn) is particularly revealing. The inferred presence of these and related neutral complexes with a direct Pd-Zn interaction in solution explains how the organozinc reagent can modulate the reactivity of the Pd catalyst. Previous theoretical calculations by González-Pérez et al. (Organometallics- 2012, 31, 2053) suggest that the complexation by the organozinc reagent lowers the activity of the Pd catalyst. Presumably, a similar effect also causes the rate decrease observed upon addition of ZnBr2 . In contrast, added LiBr apparently counteracts the formation of Pd-Zn complexes and restores the high activity of the Pd catalyst. At longer reaction times, deactivation processes due to degradation of the S-PHOS ligand and aggregation of the Pd catalyst come into play, thus further contributing to the appreciable complexity of the title reaction. PMID:25709062

  13. Fabrication of aggregation induced emission active luminescent chitosan nanoparticles via a "one-pot" multicomponent reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qing; Liu, Meiying; Xu, Dazhuang; Mao, Liucheng; Tian, Jianwen; Huang, Hongye; Gao, Peng; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-11-01

    Chitosan based nanomaterials have been extensively examined for biomedical applications for their biodegradability, low toxicity, biological activity and low cost. In this work, a novel strategy for fabrication of luminescent polymeric nanoparticles (LPNs) based on aggregation induced emission (AIE) dye and water soluble chitosan (WS-Chitosan) were firstly developed via a highly efficient mercaptoacetic acid (MA) locking imine reaction. In this multicomponent reaction (MCR), MA serves as "lock" to connect 9,10-Bis(aldehydephenl)anthracene dye (An-CHO) and amino-containing WS-Chitosan under mild reaction conditions. The obtained WS-Chitosan@An-CHO LPNs show strong yellow emission and great water dispersibility. Biological evaluation results demonstrated that synthetic luminescent polymeric nanoparticles possess desirable cytocompatibility and distinct imaging properties. Therefore, we have developed a facile and useful method to fabricate AIE active nanoprobes with desirable properties for various biomedical applications. This strategy should be a general and easy handling tool to fabricate many other AIE dye based materials. PMID:27516264

  14. Assessment of the apparent activation energies for gas/solid reactions-carbonate decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The guidelines for assessing the apparent activation energies of gas/solid reactions have been proposed based on the ex-perimental results from literatures. In CO2 free inlet gas flow, CaCO3 decomposition between 950 and 1250 K with thin sample layercould be controlled by the interfacial chemical reaction with apparent activation energy E = (215+10) kJ/mol and E = (200±10)kJ/mol at T = 813 to 1020 K, respectively. With relatively thick sample layer between 793 and 1273 K, the CaCO3 decompositioncould be controlled by one or more steps involving self-cooling, nucleation, intrinsic diffusion and heat transfer of gases, and E couldvary between 147 andl90 kJ/mol. In CO2 containing inlet gas flow (5%-100% of CO2), E was determined to be varied from 949 to2897 kJ/mol. For SrCO3 and BaCO3 decompositions controlled by the interfacial chemical reaction, E was (213+15) kJ/mol (1000-1350 K) and (305+15) kJ/mol (1260-1400 K), respectively.

  15. Method for Determining the Activation Energy Distribution Function of Complex Reactions by Sieving and Thermogravimetric Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalo, Gennaro; Ambrosone, Luigi

    2016-01-14

    A method for studying the kinetics of thermal degradation of complex compounds is suggested. Although the method is applicable to any matrix whose grain size can be measured, herein we focus our investigation on thermogravimetric analysis, under a nitrogen atmosphere, of ground soft wheat and ground maize. The thermogravimetric curves reveal that there are two well-distinct jumps of mass loss. They correspond to volatilization, which is in the temperature range 298-433 K, and decomposition regions go from 450 to 1073 K. Thermal degradation is schematized as a reaction in the solid state whose kinetics is analyzed separately in each of the two regions. By means of a sieving analysis different size fractions of the material are separated and studied. A quasi-Newton fitting algorithm is used to obtain the grain size distribution as best fit to experimental data. The individual fractions are thermogravimetrically analyzed for deriving the functional relationship between activation energy of the degradation reactions and the particle size. Such functional relationship turns out to be crucial to evaluate the moments of the activation energy distribution, which is unknown in terms of the distribution calculated by sieve analysis. From the knowledge of moments one can reconstruct the reaction conversion. The method is applied first to the volatilization region, then to the decomposition region. The comparison with the experimental data reveals that the method reproduces the experimental conversion with an accuracy of 5-10% in the volatilization region and of 3-5% in the decomposition region. PMID:26671287

  16. Catalytic activity of pyrite for coal liquefaction reaction; Tennen pyrite no shokubai seino ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, K.; Kozu, M.; Okada, T.; Kobayashi, M. [Nippon Coal Oil Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Since natural pyrite is easy to obtain and cheap as coal liquefaction catalyst, it is to be used for the 150 t/d scale NEDOL process bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant. NEDO and NCOL have investigated the improvement of catalytic activity of pulverized natural pyrite for enhancing performance and economy of the NEDOL process. In this study, coal liquefaction tests were conducted using natural pyrite catalyst pulverized by dry-type bowl mill under nitrogen atmosphere. Mechanism of catalytic reaction of the natural pyrite was discussed from relations between properties of the catalyst and liquefaction product. The natural pyrite provided an activity to transfer gaseous hydrogen into the liquefaction product. It was considered that pulverized pyrite promotes the hydrogenation reaction of asphaltene because pulverization increases its contact rate with reactant and the amount of active points on its surface. It was inferred that catalytic activity of pyrite is affected greatly by the chemical state of Fe and S on its surface. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Metal and carbene organocatalytic relay activation of alkynes for stereoselective reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namitharan, Kayambu; Zhu, Tingshun; Cheng, Jiajia; Zheng, Pengcheng; Li, Xiangyang; Yang, Song; Song, Bao-An; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2014-01-01

    Transition metal and organic catalysts have established their own domains of excellence. It has been expected that merging the two unique domains should provide complimentary or unprecedented opportunities in converting simple raw materials to functional products. N-heterocyclic carbenes alone are excellent organocatalysts. When used with transition metals such as copper, N-heterocyclic carbenes are routinely practiced as strong-coordinating ligands. Combination of an N-heterocyclic carbene and copper therefore typically leads to deactivation of either or both of the two catalysts. Here we disclose the direct merge of copper as a metal catalyst and N-heterocyclic carbenes as an organocatalyst for relay activation of alkynes. The reaction involves copper-catalysed activation of alkynes to generate ketenimine intermediates that are subsequently activated by an N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalyst for stereoselective reactions. Each of the two catalysts (copper metal catalyst and N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalyst) accomplishes its own missions in the activation steps without quenching each other. PMID:24865392

  18. STUDIES ON THE CATALYTIC REACTION OF NITROGEN OXIDE ON METAL MODIFIED ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ruowen; DU Xiuying; LIN Yuansheng; XU Hao; HU Yiongjun

    2003-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of NO with CO and decomposition of NO over metal modified ACFs were investigated and compared with other carriers supported catalysts. It is demonstrated that Pd/ACF and Pd/Cu/ACF have high catalytic activity for the reaction of NO/CO, while Pt/ACF.Pt/Cu/ACF and Co/Cu/ACF have very Iow catalytic activity in similar circumstance. Pd-modified ACF possesses high catalytic decomposition of NO at 300 ℃. Pd/CB and Pd/GAC present good catalytic decomposition ability for NO only at low flowrate. Pd/G, Pd/ZMS and Pd/A however, do not show any catalytic activity for NO decomposition even at 400 ℃. Catalytic temperature, NO flowrate and loading of metal components affect the decomposition rate of NO. The coexistence of Cu with Pd on Cu/Pd/ACF leads to crystalline of palladium to more unperfected so as to that increase the catalytic activity.

  19. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, S; Baba, M

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80 MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of ${}^{104m,104g,105}$${}^{g,106m,110m}$Ag, ${}^{100,101}$Pd, ${}^{99m,99g,100,}$${}^{101m}$${}^{,101g,102m,102g,105}$Rh and ${}^{103,}$${}^{97}$Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed.

  20. Measurement of the ^241Am(n,2n) Reaction Cross Section with the Activation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, A.; Crowell, A.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Hutcheson, A.; Tornow, W.; Kelley, J.; Angell, C.; Karwowski, H.; Pedroni, R.; Becker, J.; Dashdorj, D.; Macri, R.; Wilhelmy, J.; Bond, E.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Slemmons, A.; Vieira, D.

    2006-10-01

    High-precision measurements of the ^241Am(n,2n)^240Am reaction have been performed with neutron energies from 8.8 to 14.0 MeV. The monoenergetic neutron beams were produced via the ^2H(d,n)^3He reaction using the 10 MV Tandem accelerator at TUNL. The radioactive targets consisted of 1mg highly-enriched ^241Am sandwiched between four different thin monitor foils. They were irradiated with a neutron flux of 3x10^7 n cm-2 s-1. After each irradiation the induced activity in the targets and monitors was measured off-line with 60% HPGe detectors. Our preliminary neutron induced cross sections will be compared with recent literature results and statistical model calculations using the GNASH and EMPIRE codes.

  1. Alpha capture reaction cross section measurements on Sb isotopes by activation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Fülöp, Zs; Güray, R. T.; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Török, Zs; Yalçin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha induced reactions on natural and enriched antimony targets were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range from 9.74 MeV to 15.48 MeV, close to the upper end of the Gamow window at a temperature of 3 GK relevant to the γ-process. The experiments were carried out at the Institute for Nuclear Research, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki). 121Sb(α,γ)125I, 121Sb(α,n)124I and 123Sb(α,n)126I reactions were measured using a HPGe detector. In this work, the 121Sb(α,n)124 cross section results and the comparison with the theoretical predictions (obtained with standard settings of the statistical model codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS) were presented.

  2. Scaling in Aggregation Process with a Kernel Related to the Reaction Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯见洪; 林娟娟; 林振权

    2003-01-01

    We study the kinetics of a reversible aggregation model in which an aggregation reaction occurs between any two clusters and the fragmentation of the larger clusters occurs simultaneously. By investigating the mean-field rate equation of the process with a kernel related to the reaction activities we obtain the asymptotic solution of the cluster-mass distribution. It is found that the kinetic evolution behaviour of the clusters depends crucially on the details of the rate kernel. The duster-mass distribution in the irreversible aggregation system obeys a conventional scaling law; while for the reversible case, the conventional scaling description of the cluster-mass distribution breaks down and the system falls in a modified scaling region.

  3. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80MeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, M S; Baba, M

    2016-08-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of (104m,104g,105g,106m,110m)Ag, (100,101)Pd, (99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102g,105)Rh and (103,97)Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed. PMID:27235887

  4. Temperature dependence of bromine activation due to reaction with ozone in a proxy for organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edebeli, Jacinta; Ammann, Markus; Gilgen, Anina; Eichler, Anja; Schneebeli, Martin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of boundary layer ozone depletion events in the Polar Regions [1] and in the mid-latitudes [2], two areas of very different temperature regimes, begs the question of temperature dependence of reactions responsible for these observations [3]. These ODEs have been attributed to ozone reacting with halides leading to reactive halogens (halogen activation) of which bromide is extensively studied, R1 - R3 [4, 5] (R1 is a multiphase reaction). O3 + Br‑→ O2 + OBr‑ (R1) OBr‑ + H+ ↔ HOBr (R2) HOBr + H+ + Br‑→ Br2 + H2O (R3) Despite extensive studies of ozone-bromide interactions, the temperature dependence of bromine activation is not clear [3]. This limits parameterization of the involved reactions and factors in atmospheric models [3, 6]. Viscosity changes in the matrix (such as organic aerosols) due to temperature have been shown to influence heterogeneous reaction rates and products beyond pure temperature effect [7]. With the application of coated wall flow-tubes, the aim of this study is therefore to investigate the temperature dependence of bromine activation by ozone interaction while attempting to characterize the contributions of the bulk and surface reactions to observed ozone uptake. Citric acid is used in this study as a hygroscopically characterized matrix whose viscosity changes with temperature and humidity. Here, we present reactive ozone uptake measured between 258 and 289 K. The data show high reproducibility. Comparison of measured uptake with modelled bulk uptake at different matrix compositions (and viscosities) indicate that bulk reactive uptake dominates, but there are other factors which still need further consideration in the model. References 1. Barrie, L.A., et al., Nature, 1988. 334: p. 138 - 141. 2. Hebestreit, K., et al., Science, 1999. 283: p. 55-57. 3. Simpson, W.R., et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2007. 7: p. 4375 - 4418. 4. Haag, R.W. and J. Hoigné, Environ Sci Technol, 1983. 17: p. 261-267. 5. Oum

  5. Ru complexes of Hoveyda-Grubbs type immobilized on lamellar zeolites: activity in olefin metathesis reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcar, Hynek; Žilková, Naděžda; Kubů, Martin; Mazur, Michal; Bastl, Zdeněk; Čejka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Hoveyda-Grubbs type catalysts with cationic tags on NHC ligands were linker-free immobilized on the surface of lamellar zeolitic supports (MCM-22, MCM-56, MCM-36) and on mesoporous molecular sieves SBA-15. The activity of prepared hybrid catalysts was tested in olefin metathesis reactions: the activity in ring-closing metathesis of citronellene and N,N-diallyltrifluoroacetamide decreased in the order of support MCM-22 ≈ MCM-56 > SBA-15 > MCM-36; the hybrid catalyst based on SBA-15 was found the most active in self-metathesis of methyl oleate. All catalysts were reusable and exhibited low Ru leaching (<1% of Ru content). XPS analysis revealed that during immobilization ion exchange between Hoveyda-Grubbs type catalyst and zeolitic support occurred in the case of Cl(-) counter anion; in contrast, PF6 (-) counter anion underwent partial decomposition. PMID:26664629

  6. Electrocatalytic activity of non-precious metal catalyst Co-N/C toward oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jun Si; Chang Guo Chen; Wei Yin; Hui Cai

    2010-01-01

    Metallic cobalt was deposited on acetylene black to synthesize a composite Co/C by chemical reduction method.A platinum-free electrocatalyst Co-N/C(8 0 0)for oxygen reduction reaction(ORR)was synthesized by mixing the composite Co/C with urea and heat-treating at 800 ℃.The results from linear sweep voltammograms indicated that the Co-N/C(800)is active to ORR.Theβ-Co and cobalt oxides are not the active site of the catalyst Co-N/C.However,the existence of cobalt facilitated the modification of nitrogen to carbon black and led to the formation of active site of catalyst Co-N/C(800).

  7. Ru complexes of Hoveyda-Grubbs type immobilized on lamellar zeolites: activity in olefin metathesis reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcar, Hynek; Žilková, Naděžda; Kubů, Martin; Mazur, Michal; Bastl, Zdeněk; Čejka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Hoveyda-Grubbs type catalysts with cationic tags on NHC ligands were linker-free immobilized on the surface of lamellar zeolitic supports (MCM-22, MCM-56, MCM-36) and on mesoporous molecular sieves SBA-15. The activity of prepared hybrid catalysts was tested in olefin metathesis reactions: the activity in ring-closing metathesis of citronellene and N,N-diallyltrifluoroacetamide decreased in the order of support MCM-22 ≈ MCM-56 > SBA-15 > MCM-36; the hybrid catalyst based on SBA-15 was found the most active in self-metathesis of methyl oleate. All catalysts were reusable and exhibited low Ru leaching (<1% of Ru content). XPS analysis revealed that during immobilization ion exchange between Hoveyda-Grubbs type catalyst and zeolitic support occurred in the case of Cl(-) counter anion; in contrast, PF6 (-) counter anion underwent partial decomposition.

  8. Ru complexes of Hoveyda–Grubbs type immobilized on lamellar zeolites: activity in olefin metathesis reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hynek Balcar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hoveyda–Grubbs type catalysts with cationic tags on NHC ligands were linker-free immobilized on the surface of lamellar zeolitic supports (MCM-22, MCM-56, MCM-36 and on mesoporous molecular sieves SBA-15. The activity of prepared hybrid catalysts was tested in olefin metathesis reactions: the activity in ring-closing metathesis of citronellene and N,N-diallyltrifluoroacetamide decreased in the order of support MCM-22 ≈ MCM-56 > SBA-15 > MCM-36; the hybrid catalyst based on SBA-15 was found the most active in self-metathesis of methyl oleate. All catalysts were reusable and exhibited low Ru leaching (− counter anion; in contrast, PF6− counter anion underwent partial decomposition.

  9. Ru complexes of Hoveyda–Grubbs type immobilized on lamellar zeolites: activity in olefin metathesis reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žilková, Naděžda; Kubů, Martin; Mazur, Michal; Bastl, Zdeněk; Čejka, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hoveyda–Grubbs type catalysts with cationic tags on NHC ligands were linker-free immobilized on the surface of lamellar zeolitic supports (MCM-22, MCM-56, MCM-36) and on mesoporous molecular sieves SBA-15. The activity of prepared hybrid catalysts was tested in olefin metathesis reactions: the activity in ring-closing metathesis of citronellene and N,N-diallyltrifluoroacetamide decreased in the order of support MCM-22 ≈ MCM-56 > SBA-15 > MCM-36; the hybrid catalyst based on SBA-15 was found the most active in self-metathesis of methyl oleate. All catalysts were reusable and exhibited low Ru leaching (<1% of Ru content). XPS analysis revealed that during immobilization ion exchange between Hoveyda–Grubbs type catalyst and zeolitic support occurred in the case of Cl− counter anion; in contrast, PF6 − counter anion underwent partial decomposition. PMID:26664629

  10. Catalytic activity trends of oxygen reduction reaction for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-11-30

    We report the intrinsic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline palladium, platinum, ruthenium, gold, and glassy carbon surfaces in 0.1 M LiClO(4) 1,2-dimethoxyethane via rotating disk electrode measurements. The nonaqueous Li(+)-ORR activity of these surfaces primarily correlates to oxygen adsorption energy, forming a "volcano-type" trend. The activity trend found on the polycrystalline surfaces was in good agreement with the trend in the discharge voltage of Li-O(2) cells catalyzed by nanoparticle catalysts. Our findings provide insights into Li(+)-ORR mechanisms in nonaqueous media and design of efficient air electrodes for Li-air battery applications. PMID:22044022

  11. Biographic radiation-induced defect formation as a method of red phosphorus activation in its reaction with arylalkenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of preliminary irradiation on reaction ability of red phosphorus, prepared by radiation-induced polymerization of white phosphorus in benzene under 60Co radiation was studied. It was shown that red phosphorus containing radiation-induced defects of P-P-R type (R - fragments of benzene) in reactions with arylalkenes manifests a high reaction activity, which exceeds largely the reactive capability of industrially produced red phosphorus, and of white phosphorus in some cases

  12. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  13. Preparation of Pt-Ru hydrophobic catalysts and catalytic activities for liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pt/C and Pt-Ru/C catalysts with different ratios of Pt to Ru were synthesized, using ethylene glycol as both the dispersant and reducing agent at 1-2 MPa by microwave-assisted method. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, TEM and XPS. The mean particle sizes of the Pt/C and Pt-Ru/C catalysts were 1.9-2.0 nm. Pt and Ru existed as Pt(0), Pt(II), Pt(IV), Ru(0) and Ru(IV) for Pt-Ru/C catalysts, respectively. The face-centered cubic structure of the active mental particles would be changed upon the addition of Ru gradually. Then polytetrafluoroethylene and carbon-supported Pt and Pt-Ru catalysts were supported on foamed nickel to obtain hydrophobic catalysts. The catalytic activity was increased for liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) when uniform Pt based hydrophobic catalysts was mixed into appropriate Ru. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction occurs between hydration layer(H2O)nH+(ads)(n≥2) and D atoms due to intact water molecules being on Pt surface for LPCE. Water molecules have a tendency to dissociate to OH(ads) and H(ads) on metal Ru surface, and there is the other reaction path for Pt-Ru binary catalysts, which is probably the main reason of the increase of the catalytic activity of the hydrophobic Pt-Ru catalyst. (authors)

  14. Linear free energy relationships between aqueous phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and free energy of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2011-04-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites on organic compounds and initiates complex radical chain reactions in aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Computer based kinetic modeling requires a reaction pathway generator and predictions of associated reaction rate constants. Previously, we reported a reaction pathway generator that can enumerate the most important elementary reactions for aliphatic compounds. For the reaction rate constant predictor, we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) between aqueous phase literature-reported HO(•) reaction rate constants and theoretically calculated free energies of activation for H-atom abstraction from a C-H bond and HO(•) addition to alkenes. The theoretical method uses ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, Gaussian 1-3, for gas phase reactions and a solvation method, COSMO-RS theory, to estimate the impact of water. Theoretically calculated free energies of activation are found to be within approximately ±3 kcal/mol of experimental values. Considering errors that arise from quantum mechanical calculations and experiments, this should be within the acceptable errors. The established LFERs are used to predict the HO(•) reaction rate constants within a factor of 5 from the experimental values. This approach may be applied to other reaction mechanisms to establish a library of rate constant predictions for kinetic modeling of AOPs. PMID:21410278

  15. Heat and mass transfer in unsteady rotating fluid flow with binary chemical reaction and activation energy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz G Awad

    Full Text Available In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations.

  16. Heat and mass transfer in unsteady rotating fluid flow with binary chemical reaction and activation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Faiz G; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  17. Cross-section studies of relativistic deuteron reactions obtained by activation method

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, V; Svoboda, O; Vrzalová, J; Majerle, M; Krása, A; Chudoba, P; Honusek, M; Kugler, A; Adam, J; Baldin, A; Furman, W; Kadykov, M; Khushvaktov, J; Sol-nyskhin, A; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V; Závorka, L; Tyutyunnikov, S; Vladimirova, N

    2014-01-01

    The cross-sections of relativistic deuteron reactions on natural copper were studied in detail by means of activation method. The copper foils were irradiated during experiments with the big Quinta uranium target at Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. The deuteron beams with energies ranging from 1 GeV up to 8 GeV were produced by JINR Nuclotron. Residual nuclides were identified by the gamma spectrometry. Lack of such experimental cross-section values prevents the usage of copper foils from beam integral monitoring.

  18. Benzylic Phosphates in Friedel-Crafts Reactions with Activated and Unactivated Arenes: Access to Polyarylated Alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallikonda, Gangaram; Chakravartya, Manab

    2016-03-01

    Easily reachable electron-poor/rich primary and secondary benzylic phosphates are suitably used as substrates for Friedel-Crafts benzylation reactions with only 1.2 equiv activated/deactivated arenes (no additional solvent) to access structurally and electronically diverse polyarylated alkanes with excellent yields and selectivities at room temperature. Specifically, diversely substituted di/triarylmethanes are generated within 2-30 min using this approach. A wide number of electron-poor polyarylated alkanes are easily accomplished through this route by just tuning the phosphates. PMID:26835977

  19. Characterization and development of an active scintillating target for nuclear reaction studies on actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the development of a new kind of active actinide target, based on organic liquid scintillators containing the dissolved isotope. Amongst many advantages one can mention the very high detection efficiency, the Pulse Shape Discrimination capability, the fast response allowing high count rates and good time resolution and the ease of fabrication. The response of this target to fission fragments has been studied. The discrimination of alpha, fission and proton recoil events is demonstrated. The alpha decay and fission detection efficiencies are simulated and compared to measurements. Finally the use of such a target in the context of fast neutron induced reactions is discussed.

  20. Selective molecular recognition, C-H bond activation, and catalysis in nanoscale reaction vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Leung, Dennis H.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2004-11-27

    Supramolecular chemistry represents a way to mimic enzyme reactivity by using specially designed container molecules. We have shown that a chiral self-assembled M{sub 4}L{sub 6} supramolecular tetrahedron can encapsulate a variety of cationic guests, with varying degrees of stereoselectivity. Reactive iridium guests can be encapsulated and the C-H bond activation of aldehydes occurs, with the host cavity controlling the ability of substrates to interact with the metal center based upon size and shape. In addition, the host container can act as a catalyst by itself. By restricting reaction space and preorganizing the substrates into reactive conformations, it accelerates the sigmatropic rearrangement of enammonium cations.

  1. An Investigation onγinduced activation reactions on human essential elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕翠娟; 马春旺; 刘一璞; 张文岗; 左嘉旭

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy, the energy of theγrays used could be larger than 10 MeV, which would potentially activate stable nucleus into a radioactive one. Theγinduced reactions on some of the human essential elements are studied to show the probability of changes of nuclei. The Talys 1.4 toolkit was adopted as the theoretical model for calculation. The reactions investigated include the (γ, n) and (γ, p) channels for the stable Na, Mg, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe isotopes, with the incident energy ofγranging from 1 to 30 MeV. It was found that the cross sections for the reactions are very low, and the maximum cross section is no larger than 100 mb. By considering the threshold energy of the channel, the half-life time of the residue nucleus, and the percentage of the element accounting for the weight and its importance in the body, it is suggested to track the radioactive nuclei 22Na, 41Ca, and 42,43K afterγtherapy. The results might be useful for medical diagnosis and disease treatment.

  2. Assessment of released acrosin activity as a measurement of the sperm acrosome reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Zhi Liu; Wan-Li Na; Hong-Guo Zhang; Zhi-Yong Lin; Bai-Oong Xue; Zong-Oe Xu

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To develop a method for assessing sperm function by measuring released acrosin activity during the acrosome reaction (AR). Methods: Human semen samples were obtained from 24 healthy donors with proven fertility after 3-7 days of sexual abstinence. After collection, samples were liquefied for 30 min at room temperature. Standard semen parameters were evaluated according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Calcium ionophore A23187 and progesterone (P4) were used to stimulate the sperm to undergo AR. After treatment, sperm were incubated with the supravital dye Hoechst33258, fixed in a glutaraldehyde-phosphate-buffered saline solution, and the acrosomal status was determined by fluorescence microscopy with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin (FITC-PSA). The percentage of sperm undergoing AR (AR%) was compared to sperm acrosin activities as assessed by spectrocolorimetry. The correlation between AR% and acrosin activity was determined by statistical analysis. Results: The AR% and released acrosin activity were both markedly increased with A23187 and P4 stimulation. Sperm motility and viability were significantly higher after stimulation with P4 versus stimula-tion with A23187 (P < 0.001). There was a significant positive correlation between released acrosin activity and AR% determined by FITC-PSA staining (r = 0.916, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Spectrocolorimetric measurement of released acrosin activity might serve as a reasonable alternative method to evaluate AR.

  3. Size-selective electrocatalytic activity of (Pt)n/MoS2for oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothra, Pallavi; Pandey, Mohnish; Pati, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we have investigated the electrocatalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), O2 + 4H+ + 4e− → 2H2O, for (Pt)n clusters (n = 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12) adsorbed on semiconducting (2H) and metallic (1T) MoS2 monolayers using first principles density functional theory...... predicting (Pt)7/2H-MoS2 as the best ORR catalyst amongst the (Pt)n/MoS2 heterosystems with an overpotential value of 0.33 V has been established. Our finding proposes a new promising electrocatalyst towards better activity for ORR with very small amount of Pt loading....

  4. Platinum-coated copper nanowires with high activity for hydrogen oxidation reaction in base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia, Shaun M; Pivovar, Bryan S; Yan, Yushan

    2013-09-11

    Platinum (Pt)-coated copper (Cu) nanowires (Pt/CuNWs) are synthesized by the partial galvanic displacement of CuNWs and have a 100 nm diameter and are 25-40 μm length. Pt/CuNWs are studied as a hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) catalyst in base along with Cu templated Pt nanotubes (PtNT (Cu)), a 5% Cu monolayer on a bulk polycrystalline Pt electrode (5% ML Cu/BPPt), BPPt, and carbon supported Pt (Pt/C). Comparison of these catalysts demonstrates that the inclusion of Cu benefited the HOR activity of Pt/CuNWs likely by providing compressive strain on Pt; surface Cu further aids in hydroxyl adsorption, thereby improving the HOR activity of Pt/CuNWs. Pt/CuNWs exceed the area and mass exchange current densities of carbon supported Pt by 3.5 times and 1.9 times. PMID:23952885

  5. Relative activities of siloxane monomers toward the cation exchange resin-catalyst in the equilibration reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. GOVEDARICA

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The relative activities of a number of siloxane monomers, both cyclic and linear, toward the cation exchange resin-equilibration catalyst were determined. The determination was based on the fact that when a particular siloxane compound is added to an arbitrarily chosen equilibrate, it takes part in the equilibration process, provoking certain viscosity changes of the reaction mixture. Taking these viscosity changes as a measure of activities, the following order was obtained: hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane > hexamethyldisiloxane > octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane > one linear all-methyl oligosiloxane of number average molecular weight of approximately 800 > decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. The results obtained by using the described viscosimetrical determination method were controlled by measuring the number average molecular weights of the reaction mixtures at the beginning and at the end of the equilibration process. The deviations of the experimentally measured from the calculated values were less than 20 %, as was found in one equilibration system. In most other systems the deviations were about 10 % which is a very good result which strengthens the validity of the applied determination method.

  6. EFFECT OF FLUORINE AND CHLORINE IONS ON THE REACTION SINTERING OF MECHANICALLY ACTIVATED ZIRCON-ALUMINA MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zamani Foroshani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the effect of fluorine and chlorine ions on the formation of mullite during the reaction sintering of mechanically activated zircon-alumina powder mixture. The results showed that mechanical activation of zirconalumina powder mixture for 20 h led to grain refinement and partial amorphization. In the presence of fluorine and chlorine ions, complete formation of mullite in the mechanically activated sample occurred after 2 h of reaction sintering at 1300oC and 1400oC, respectively. In the sample lacking fluorine and chlorine ions, mullitization was not completed even after 2 h of reaction sintering at 1400oC. It was concluded that presence of fluorine and chlorine ions enhance the dissociation of zircon and formation of mullite during the reaction sintering of mechanically activated zircon-alumina mixture.

  7. Complex Formation of Myrosinase Isoenzymes in Oilseed Rape Seeds Are Dependent on the Presence of Myrosinase-Binding Proteins1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Susanna; Andréasson, Erik; Ekbom, Barbara; Granér, Georg; Pontoppidan, Bo; Taipalensuu, Jan; Zhang, Jiaming; Rask, Lars; Meijer, Johan

    2002-01-01

    The enzyme myrosinase (EC 3.2.3.1) degrades the secondary compounds glucosinolates upon wounding and serves as a defense to generalist pests in Capparales. Certain myrosinases are present in complexes together with other proteins such as myrosinase-binding proteins (MBP) in extracts of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) seeds. Immunhistochemical analysis of wild-type seeds showed that MBPs were present in most cells but not in the myrosin cells, indicating that the complex formation observed in extracts is initiated upon tissue disruption. To study the role of MBP in complex formation and defense, oilseed rape antisense plants lacking the seed MBPs were produced. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining confirmed depletion of MBP in the transgenic seeds. The exclusive expression of myrosinase in idioblasts (myrosin cells) of the seed was not affected by the down-regulation of MBP. Using size-exclusion chromatography, we have shown that myrosinases with subunit molecular masses of 62 to 70 kD were present as free dimers from the antisense seed extract, whereas in the wild type, they formed complexes. In accordance with this, MBPs are necessary for myrosinase complex formation of the 62- to 70-kD myrosinases. The product formed from sinalbin hydrolysis by myrosinase was the same whether MBP was present or not. The performance of a common beetle generalist (Tenebrio molitor) fed with seeds, herbivory by flea beetles (Phyllotreta undulata) on cotyledons, or growth rate of the Brassica fungal pathogens Alternaria brassicae or Lepthosphaeria maculans in the presence of seed extracts were not affected by the down-regulation of MBP, leaving the physiological function of this protein family open. PMID:12177471

  8. Complex formation of myrosinase isoenzymes in oilseed rape seeds are dependent on the presence of myrosinase-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Susanna; Andréasson, Erik; Ekbom, Barbara; Granér, Georg; Pontoppidan, Bo; Taipalensuu, Jan; Zhang, Jiaming; Rask, Lars; Meijer, Johan

    2002-08-01

    The enzyme myrosinase (EC 3.2.3.1) degrades the secondary compounds glucosinolates upon wounding and serves as a defense to generalist pests in Capparales. Certain myrosinases are present in complexes together with other proteins such as myrosinase-binding proteins (MBP) in extracts of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) seeds. Immunhistochemical analysis of wild-type seeds showed that MBPs were present in most cells but not in the myrosin cells, indicating that the complex formation observed in extracts is initiated upon tissue disruption. To study the role of MBP in complex formation and defense, oilseed rape antisense plants lacking the seed MBPs were produced. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining confirmed depletion of MBP in the transgenic seeds. The exclusive expression of myrosinase in idioblasts (myrosin cells) of the seed was not affected by the down-regulation of MBP. Using size-exclusion chromatography, we have shown that myrosinases with subunit molecular masses of 62 to 70 kD were present as free dimers from the antisense seed extract, whereas in the wild type, they formed complexes. In accordance with this, MBPs are necessary for myrosinase complex formation of the 62- to 70-kD myrosinases. The product formed from sinalbin hydrolysis by myrosinase was the same whether MBP was present or not. The performance of a common beetle generalist (Tenebrio molitor) fed with seeds, herbivory by flea beetles (Phyllotreta undulata) on cotyledons, or growth rate of the Brassica fungal pathogens Alternaria brassicae or Lepthosphaeria maculans in the presence of seed extracts were not affected by the down-regulation of MBP, leaving the physiological function of this protein family open. PMID:12177471

  9. Activity diagrams for clinoptilolite: Susceptibility of this zeolite to further diagenetic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinoptilolite is the predominant zeolite in diagenetically altered volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, having formed by posteruptive reactions of ground water with vitric tuffs in the pyroclastic deposits. Compositional variations of clinoptilolites in the fractured and zeolitized tuffs not presently in contact with ground water and the vulnerability of zeolites to burial diagenesis raise questions about the long-term stability of clinoptilolite. Equilibrium activity diagrams were calculated for clinoptilolite solid solutions in the seven-component system Ca-Na-K-Mg-Fe-Al-Si plus H2O, employing available thermodynamic data for related minerals, aqueous species, and water. Stability fields are portrayed graphically, assuming the presence of potassium feldspar, saponite, and hematite, and using ranges of activities for SiO2 and Al3+ defined by the saturation limits for several silica polymorphs, gibbsite, kaolinite, and pyrophyllite. The clinoptilolite stability field broadens with increasing atomic substitution of Ca for Na, and K for Ca, reaches a maximum for intermediate activities of dissolved Al, and decreases with increasing temperature. The thermodynamic calculations show that ground water of the sodium-bicarbonate type is approximately in equilibrium at 25C with calcite and several zeolites, including heulandite and calcic clinoptilolite. Mg-rich clinoptilolites are stabilized in ground water depleted in Ca2+. The activity diagrams indicate that prolonged diagenetic reactions with ground water depleted in Al, enriched in Na or Ca, and heated by the thermal envelope surrounding buried nuclear waste may eliminate sorptive calcic clinoptilolites in fractured tuffs and underlying basal vitrophyre

  10. [Plasma antioxidant activity--a test for impaired biological functions of endoecology, exotrophy, and inflammation reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N; Krylin, V V; Dmitriev, V A; Iashin, Ia I

    2010-07-01

    The authors discuss the diagnostic value of a test for total serum antioxidant activity determined by an electrochemistry method on a liquid chromatograph (without a column), by using an amperometric detector, as well as the composition of the endogenously synthesized hydrophilic and hydrophobic acceptors of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid is a major hydrophilic acceptor of ROS; monoenic oleic fatty acid acts as its major lipophilic acceptor. The constant determined by the authors for of 03 oleic acid oxidation during automatic titration in the organic medium is an order of magnitude higher than that for alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene and linoleic fatty acid; its concentration is also an order of magnitude higher. In oxidative stress, the adrenal steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone initiates oleic acid synthesis via expression of palmitoyl elongase and steatoryl desaturase. In early steps of phylogenesis in primates, spontaneous mutation resulted in ascorbic acid synthesis gene knockout; phylogenetically, further other mutation knocked out the gene encoding the synthesis of uricase and the conversion of uric acid to alantoin. In primates, uric acid became not only a catabolite of purine bases in vivo, but also the major endogenous hydrophilic acceptor of ROS. This philogenetic order makes it clear why the epithelium in the proximal nephron tubule entirely reabsorbs uric acid (a catabolite?) from primary urine and then secretes it again to urine depending on the impairment of biological functions of endoecology (the intercellular medium being contaminated with biological rubbish), the activation of a biological inflammatory reaction, the cellular production of ROS, and the reduction in serum total antioxidant activity. With each biological reaction, there was an increase in the blood content of uric acid as a hydrophilic acceptor of ROS, by actively lowering its secretion into urine. Uric acid is a diagnostic test of inflammation, or rather compensatory

  11. Investigating 13C +12C reaction by the activation method. Sensitivity tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesneanu, Daniela; Trache, L.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Blebea-Apostu, A. M.; Gomoiu, C. M.; Tang, X.

    2015-02-01

    We have performed experiments to check the limits of sensitivity of the activation method using the new 3 MV Tandetron accelerator and the low and ultra-low background laboratories of the "Horia Hulubei" National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). We have used the 12C +13C reaction at beam energies Elab= 6, 7 and 8 MeV. The knowledge of this fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies is of interest for astrophysical applications, as it provides an upper limit for the fusion cross section of 12C +12C over a wide energy range. A 13C beam with intensities 0.5-2 particleμA was provided by the accelerator and used to bombard graphite targets, resulting in activation with 24Na from the 12C (13C ,p) reaction. The 1369 and 2754 keV gamma-rays from 24Na de-activation were clearly observed in the spectra obtained in two different laboratories used for measurements at low and ultralow background: one at the surface and one located underground in the Unirea salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania. In the underground laboratory, for Elab = 6 MeV we have measured an activity of 0.085 ± 0.011 Bq, corresponding to cross sections of 1-3 nb. This demonstrates that it is possible to measure 12C targets irradiated at lower energies for at least 10 times lower cross sections than before β-γ coincidences will lead us another factor of 10 lower, proving that this installations can be successfully used for nuclear astrophysics measurements.

  12. Activity and stability of the oxygen evolution reaction on electrodeposited Ru and its thermal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Choi, Jihui; Kim, Ho Young; Hwang, Eunkyoung; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2015-12-01

    The activity and stability of Ru metal and its thermal oxide films for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) were investigated. The metallic Ru films were prepared by electrodeposition on a Ti substrate and then thermally oxidized at various temperatures under atmospheric conditions. During long-term operation of the OER with cyclic voltammetry (CV) in H2SO4 electrolyte, changes in the properties of the Ru and its thermal oxides were monitored in terms of their morphology, crystal structure, and electronic structure. In the initial stages of the OER, all of the Ru thermal oxide films underwent an activation process that was related to the continuous removal of low-activity Ru oxides from the surface. With further cycling, the OER activity decreased. The rate of decrease was different for each Ru film and was related to the annealing temperatures. Monitoring of material properties indicates that the amount of stable anhydrous RuO2 is important for OER stability because it prevents both the severe dissolution of metallic Ru beneath the oxide surface and the formation of a less active hydrous RuO2 at the surface.

  13. Design Insights for Tuning the Electrocatalytic Activity of Perovskite Oxides for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Manivannan, A; Balasubramanian, M; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2015-04-16

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers based on aqueous alkaline electrolytes hold the potential to be sustainable solutions to address the challenge of storing large amounts of electrical energy generated from solar and wind resources. For these batteries and electrolyzers to be economically viable, it is essential to have efficient, durable, and inexpensive electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction. In this article, we describe new insights for predicting and tuning the activity of inexpensive transition metal oxides for designing efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts. We have focused on understanding the factors determining the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in a strong alkaline medium. To this end, we have conducted a systematic investigation of nanophase calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt manganese oxide, an example of a mixed metal oxide that can be tuned for its electrocatalytic activity by varying the transition metal composition. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical polarization experiments, and analysis of mechanisms, we have identified the key determinants of electrocatalytic activity. We have found that the Tafel slopes are determined by the oxidation states and the bond energy of the surface intermediates of Mn-OH and Co-OH bonds while the catalytic activity increased with the average d-electron occupancy of the sigma* orbital of the M-OH bond. We anticipate that such understanding will be very useful in predicting the behavior of other transition metal oxide catalysts.

  14. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts.

  15. Solution phase synthesis of halogenated graphene and the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuang-Hsu Wu; Da-Wei Wang; Qingcong Zeng; Yang Li; Ian R. Gentle

    2014-01-01

    Metal-free carbon electrocatalyts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are attractive for their high activity and economic advantages. However, the origin of the activity has never been clearly elucidated in a systematic manner. Halogen group elements are good candidates for elucidating the effect, although it has been a difficult task due to safety issues. In this report, we demonstrate the synthesis of Cl-, Br-and I-doped reduced graphene oxide through two solution phase syntheses. We have evaluated the effectiveness of doping and performed electrochemical measurements of the ORR activity on these halogenated graphene materials. Our results suggest that the high electroneg-ativity of the dopant is not the key factor for high ORR activity;both Br-and I-doped graphene pro-moted ORR more efficiently than Cl-doped graphene. Furthermore, an unexpected sulfur-doping in acidic conditions suggests that a high level of sulfide can degrade the ORR activity of the graphene material.

  16. Charge-transfer complex formation in gelation: the role of solvent molecules with different electron-donating capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Shibaji; Bhattacharya, Sumantra; Datta, Ayan; Banerjee, Arindam

    2014-05-01

    A naphthalenediimide (NDI)-based synthetic peptide molecule forms gels in a particular solvent mixture (chloroform/aromatic hydrocarbon, 4:1) through charge-transfer (CT) complex formation; this is evident from the corresponding absorbance and fluorescence spectra at room temperature. Various aromatic hydrocarbon based solvents, including benzene, toluene, xylene (ortho, meta and para) and mesitylene, have been used for the formation of the CT complex. The role of different solvent molecules with varying electron-donation capacities in the formation of CT complexes has been established through spectroscopic and computational studies. PMID:24677404

  17. Study of inclusion complex formation between chlorpromazine hydrochloride, as an antiemetic drug, and β-cyclodextrin, using conductometric technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of micellization of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPH) as an antiemetic drug and its inclusion complex formation with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was studied using conductometric technique. The binding or association constant of the complexation equilibrium is evaluated from conductometric measurements by using a nonlinear regression method. The resulting K values for micellization as well as complexation are analyzed. The experiments were carried out at different temperatures. It has been found that CPH form only the 1:1 complex. The association constant values are used for evaluation of thermodynamic parameters of complexation, such as ΔGcomplexo, ΔHcomplexo and ΔScomplexo.

  18. SIMPL enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-α dependent p65-MED1 complex formation is required for mammalian hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Zhao

    Full Text Available Significant insight into the signaling pathways leading to activation of the Rel transcription factor family, collectively termed NF-κB, has been gained. Less well understood is how subsets of NF-κB-dependent genes are regulated in a signal specific manner. The SIMPL protein (signaling molecule that interacts with mouse pelle-like kinase is required for full Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα induced NF-κB activity. We show that SIMPL is required for steady-state hematopoiesis and the expression of a subset of TNFα induced genes whose products regulate hematopoietic cell activity. To gain insight into the mechanism through which SIMPL modulates gene expression we focused on the Tnf gene, an immune response regulator required for steady-state hematopoiesis. In response to TNFα SIMPL localizes to the Tnf gene promoter where it modulates the initiation of Tnf gene transcription. SIMPL binding partners identified by mass spectrometry include proteins involved in transcription and the interaction between SIMPL and MED1 was characterized in more detail. In response to TNFα, SIMPL is found in p65-MED1 complexes where SIMPL enhances p65/MED1/SIMPL complex formation. Together our results indicate that SIMPL functions as a TNFα-dependent p65 co-activator by facilitating the recruitment of MED1 to p65 containing transcriptional complexes to control the expression of a subset of TNFα-induced genes.

  19. Heating Treated Carbon Nanotubes As Highly Active Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Heating treatment for multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the air introduces abundant structure defects which improve catalytic performances for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). There is a positive correlation between the defect levels and ORR activities. The product shows better methanol tolerance and long-term durability than commercial Pt/C which makes it applicable in fuel cells. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely developed for electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices for replacement of high-cost Pt-based catalysts. In this paper, a simple and convenient method is developed for improving the catalytic activity of CNTs in a controlled way. By simple heating treatment in the air, the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) change with special morphologies, compositions and abundant defects (denoted as h-CNT). Those defects significantly improve the electrocatalytic performances for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) which proceeds in a nearly four-electron pathway. The heating conditions have important effects on the structures and defect properties of h-CNTs which show a positive correlation between the defect levels and ORR performances. The small amounts of iron residues originated from nanotube growth and nitrogen doping during heating treatment also contribute to some catalytic activity. The inner walls of h-CNT remain intact during heating treatment and provide sufficient conductivity which facilitates charge transport during ORR. The h-CNT electrocatalyst shows better methanol tolerance and long-term durability than commercial Pt/C in alkaline media which makes it an alternative cathode catalyst in fuel cells

  20. O2 activation by binuclear Cu sites: Noncoupled versus exchange coupled reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Solomon, Edward I.

    2004-09-01

    Binuclear Cu proteins play vital roles in O2 binding and activation in biology and can be classified into coupled and noncoupled binuclear sites based on the magnetic interaction between the two Cu centers. Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase. These proteins have two Cu centers strongly magnetically coupled through direct bridging ligands that provide a mechanism for the 2-electron reduction of O2 to a µ-2:2 side-on peroxide bridged species. This side-on bridged peroxo-CuII2 species is activated for electrophilic attack on the phenolic ring of substrates. Noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins include peptidylglycine -hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine -monooxygenase. These proteins have binuclear Cu active sites that are distant, that exhibit no exchange interaction, and that activate O2 at a single Cu center to generate a reactive CuII/O2 species for H-atom abstraction from the C-H bond of substrates. O2 intermediates in the coupled binuclear Cu enzymes can be trapped and studied spectroscopically. Possible intermediates in noncoupled binuclear Cu proteins can be defined through correlation to mononuclear CuII/O2 model complexes. The different intermediates in these two classes of binuclear Cu proteins exhibit different reactivities that correlate with their different electronic structures and exchange coupling interactions between the binuclear Cu centers. These studies provide insight into the role of exchange coupling between the Cu centers in their reaction mechanisms.

  1. Directed surfaces structures and interfaces for enhanced electrocatalyst activity, selectivity, and stability for energy conversion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, Thomas F. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Shriram Center

    2016-04-20

    In this project, we have employed a systematic approach to develop active, selective, and stable catalyst materials for important electrochemical reactions involving energy conversion. In particular, we have focused our attention on developing active catalyst materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). HER: We have synthesized and investigated several highly active and acid stable non-precious metal HER catalysts, including: [Mo3S13]2- nanoclusters (Nature Chemistry, 2014) and molybdenum phosphosulfide (MoP|S) (Angewandte Chemie, 2014). We have also aimed to engineer these catalyst formulations in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for fundamental studies of water electrolysis at high current densities, approximately 1 A/cm2 (ChemSusChem, 2015). We furthermore investigated transition metal phosphide (TMP) catalysts for HER by a combined experimental–theoretical approach (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). By synthesizing different TMPs and comparing experimentally determined HER activities with the hydrogen adsorption free energies, ΔGH, calculated by density functional theory, we showed that the TMPs follow a volcano relationship for the HER. Using our combined experimental–theoretical model, we predicted that the mixed metal TMP, Fe0.5Co0.5P, should have a near-optimal ΔGH. We synthesized several mixtures of Co and Fe phosphides alloys and confirmed that Fe0.5Co0.5P exhibits the highest HER activity of the investigated TMPs (Energy & Environmental Science, 2015). The understanding gained as to how to improve catalytic activity for the HER, particularly for non-precious metal materials, is important to DOE targets for sustainable H2 production. OER: We have developed a SrIrO3/IrOx catalyst for acidic conditions (submitted, 2016). The Sr

  2. A simplified method for detecting macroamylasemia by measuring serum amylase activity at different reaction temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, T; Kuratsune, H; Kurahori, T

    1983-06-01

    Amylase activity in serum and urine, and isoamylase, were measured in 300 patients with abdominal pain to detect cases of macroamylasemia. Of these patients, 9 had hyperamylasemia and 2 were diagnosed as cases of macroamylasemia on the basis of their amylase/creatinine clearance ratio, the gel filtration pattern of their amylase on a dextran column, and results of immunological analysis. Amylase activity in macroamylasemia is reported to show an anomalous response to increase in reaction-temperature. In this report, measurements of the temperature-activity relationships of serum amylase confirmed that the ratio of serum amylase activity at 50 degrees C to that at 25 degrees C (AMY-50 degrees C/AMY-25 degrees C ratio) in patients with macroamylasemia was higher than that in normal subjects or patients with pancreatitis. Moreover, when macromolecular amylase in the sera of patients with macroamylasemia was separated from amylase of normal molecular weight by dextran gel chromatography, it showed a significantly higher AMY-50 degrees C/AMY-25 degrees C ratio than the latter. Measurement of this AMY-50 degrees C/AMY-25 degrees C ratio seems to be a convenient and useful method for differential diagnosis of hyperamylasemia.

  3. Mixed ligand complex formation of FeIII with boric acid and typical N-donor multidentate ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G N Mukherjee; Ansuman Das

    2002-06-01

    Equilibrium study of the mixed ligand complex formation of FeIII with boric acid in the absence and in the presence of 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine (L) in different molar ratios provides evidence of formation of Fe(OH)2+, Fe(OH)$^{+}_{2}$, Fe(L)3+, Fe(H2BO4), Fe(OH)(H2BO4)-, Fe(OH)2(H2BO4)2-, Fe(L)(H2BO4) and Fe2(L)2(BO4)+ complexes. Fe(L)$^{3+}_{2}$, Fe(L)2(H2BO4) and Fe2(L)4(BO4)+ complexes are also indicated with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex formation equilibria and stability constants of the complexes at 25 ± 0 × 1° C in aqueous solution at a fixed ionic strength, = 0.1 mol -3 (NaNO3) have been determined by potentiometric method.

  4. Coimmobilization of acetylcholinesterase and choline oxidase on gold nanoparticles: stoichiometry, activity, and reaction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Åkesson, Sebastian; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2014-09-30

    Hybrid structures constructed from biomolecules and nanomaterials have been used in catalysis and bioanalytical applications. In the design of many chemically selective biosensors, enzymes conjugated to nanoparticles or carbon nanotubes have been used in functionalization of the sensor surface for enhancement of the biosensor functionality and sensitivity. The conditions for the enzyme:nanomaterial conjugation should be optimized to retain maximal enzyme activity, and biosensor effectiveness. This is important as the tertiary structure of the enzyme is often altered when immobilized and can significantly alter the enzyme catalytic activity. Here we show that characterization of a two-enzyme:gold nanoparticle (AuNP) conjugate stoichiometry and activity can be used to gauge the effectiveness of acetylcholine detection by acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO). This was done by using an analytical approach to quantify the number of enzymes bound per AuNP and monitor the retained enzyme activity after the enzyme:AuNP synthesis. We found that the amount of immobilized enzymes differs from what would be expected from bulk solution chemistry. This analysis was further used to determine the optimal ratio of AChE:ChO added at synthesis to achieve optimum sequential enzyme activity for the enzyme:AuNP conjugates, and reaction efficiencies of greater than 70%. We here show that the knowledge of the conjugate stoichiometry and retained enzyme activity can lead to more efficient detection of acetylcholine by controlling the AChE:ChO ratio bound to the gold nanoparticle material. This approach of optimizing enzyme gold nanoparticle conjugates should be of great importance in the architecture of enzyme nanoparticle based biosensors to retain optimal sensor sensitivity. PMID:25167196

  5. SABER: a computational method for identifying active sites for new reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-05-01

    A software suite, SABER (Selection of Active/Binding sites for Enzyme Redesign), has been developed for the analysis of atomic geometries in protein structures, using a geometric hashing algorithm (Barker and Thornton, Bioinformatics 2003;19:1644-1649). SABER is used to explore the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to locate proteins with a specific 3D arrangement of catalytic groups to identify active sites that might be redesigned to catalyze new reactions. As a proof-of-principle test, SABER was used to identify enzymes that have the same catalytic group arrangement present in o-succinyl benzoate synthase (OSBS). Among the highest-scoring scaffolds identified by the SABER search for enzymes with the same catalytic group arrangement as OSBS were L-Ala D/L-Glu epimerase (AEE) and muconate lactonizing enzyme II (MLE), both of which have been redesigned to become effective OSBS catalysts, demonstrated by experiments. Next, we used SABER to search for naturally existing active sites in the PDB with catalytic groups similar to those present in the designed Kemp elimination enzyme KE07. From over 2000 geometric matches to the KE07 active site, SABER identified 23 matches that corresponded to residues from known active sites. The best of these matches, with a 0.28 Å catalytic atom RMSD to KE07, was then redesigned to be compatible with the Kemp elimination using RosettaDesign. We also used SABER to search for potential Kemp eliminases using a theozyme predicted to provide a greater rate acceleration than the active site of KE07, and used Rosetta to create a design based on the proteins identified.

  6. Reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanxuan; Wan, Jinquan; Ma, Yongwen; Wang, Yan

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by persulfate (PS) activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI). The DBP degradation was studied at three pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the presence of different organic scavengers. Using a chemical probe method, both sulfate radical (SO4(-)) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) were found to be primary oxidants at pH3.0 and pH7.0, respectively while ·OH was the major specie to oxidize DBP at pH11.0. A similar result was found in an experiment of Electron Spin Resonance spin-trapping where in addition to OH, superoxide radical (O2(-)) was detected at pH11.0. The transformation of degradation products including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), phthalic anhydride, and acetophenone exhibited diverse variation during the reaction processes. The phthalic anhydride concentration appeared to be maximum at all pHs. Another eleven intermediate products were also found at pH3.0 by GC-MS and HPLC analysis, and their degradation mechanisms and pathways were proposed. It was suggested that dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation and hydrogen extraction were the dominant degradation mechanisms of DBP at pH3.0. PMID:27125682

  7. Screening of catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity of metal-doped graphene by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Shuangjing; Wang, Jinyu

    2016-08-01

    Graphene doping is a promising direction for developing effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. In this paper, we computationally investigated the ORR performance of 10 kinds of metal-doped graphene (M-G) catalysts, namely, Al-, Si-, Mn-, Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Au-G. The results shown that the binding energies of the metal atoms incorporated into the graphene vacancy are higher than their bulk cohesive energies, indicating the formed M-G catalysts are even more stable than the corresponding bulk metal surfaces, and thus avoid the metals dissolution in the reaction environment. We demonstrated that the linear relation among the binding energies of the ORR intermediates that found on metal-based materials does not hold for the M-G catalysts, therefore a single binding energy of intermediate alone is not sufficient to evaluate the ORR activity of an arbitrary catalyst. By analysis of the detailed ORR processes, we predicted that the Au-, Co-, and Ag-G materials can be used as the ORR catalysts.

  8. Temperature dependent halogen activation by N2O5 reactions on halide-doped ice surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Thornton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the reaction of N2O5 on frozen halide salt solutions as a function of temperature and composition using a coated wall flow tube technique coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS. The molar yield of photo-labile halogen compounds was near unity for almost all conditions studied, with the observed reaction products being nitryl chloride (ClNO2 and/or molecular bromine (Br2. The relative yield of ClNO2 and Br2 depended on the ratio of bromide to chloride ions in the solutions used to form the ice. At a bromide to chloride ion molar ratio greater than 1/30 in the starting solution, Br2 was the dominant product otherwise ClNO2 was primarily produced on these near pH-neutral brines. We demonstrate that the competition between chlorine and bromine activation is a function of the ice/brine temperature presumably due to the preferential precipitation of NaCl hydrates from the brine below 250 K. Our results provide new experimental confirmation that the chemical environment of the brine layer changes with temperature and that these changes can directly affect multiphase chemistry. These findings have implications for modeling air-snow-ice interactions in polar regions and likely in polluted mid-latitude regions during winter as well.

  9. Palladium- and copper-mediated N-aryl bond formation reactions for the synthesis of biological active compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Koenig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Arylated aliphatic and aromatic amines are important substituents in many biologically active compounds. In the last few years, transition-metal-mediated N-aryl bond formation has become a standard procedure for the introduction of amines into aromatic systems. While N-arylation of simple aromatic halides by simple amines works with many of the described methods in high yield, the reactions may require detailed optimization if applied to the synthesis of complex molecules with additional functional groups, such as natural products or drugs. We discuss and compare in this review the three main N-arylation methods in their application to the synthesis of biologically active compounds: Palladium-catalysed Buchwald–Hartwig-type reactions, copper-mediated Ullmann-type and Chan–Lam-type N-arylation reactions. The discussed examples show that palladium-catalysed reactions are favoured for large-scale applications and tolerate sterically demanding substituents on the coupling partners better than Chan–Lam reactions. Chan–Lam N-arylations are particularly mild and do not require additional ligands, which facilitates the work-up. However, reaction times can be very long. Ullmann- and Buchwald–Hartwig-type methods have been used in intramolecular reactions, giving access to complex ring structures. All three N-arylation methods have specific advantages and disadvantages that should be considered when selecting the reaction conditions for a desired C–N bond formation in the course of a total synthesis or drug synthesis.

  10. Dynamics of activity free radical oxidation reactions in students with cerebral palsy results over the course of the educational process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova E.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of changes activity of reactions is studied freely radical oxidize for students with the consequences of child's cerebral paralysis. 20 students took part in an experiment. Found that the course of study they have more active free radical oxidation reactions and decreases the activity of antiradical protection. Given the use of additional physical activity in aerobic training indicators intracellular antioxidant defense system increased, decreased content of reaction products of lipid peroxidation. However, increased rates of maximum oxygen consumption and increased tolerance of students with cerebral palsy to the consequences of physical activity. It is set that the pathological changes of metabolism for students ground the necessity of application of the differentiated physical loadings. The optimum forms of physical rehabilitation of the aerobic training is the dosed walking, medical swimming, dosed after distance, sometimes and by the corner of getting up pedestrian ascents. Loading is increased due to a volume, but not intensity of exercises.

  11. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on gold up to 65 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-01-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced reactions on gold for production of $^{197m,197g,195m,195g, 193m,193g,192}$Hg, $^{196m,196g(cum),195g(cum),194,191(cum)}$Au, $^{191(cum)}$Pt and $^{192}$Ir were measured up to 65 MeV proton energy, some of them for the first time. The new data are in acceptably good agreement with the recently published earlier experimental data in the overlapping energy region. The experimental data are compared with the predictions of the TALYS 1.6 (results in TENDL-2015 on-line library) and EMPIRE 3.2 code.

  12. The Olefin Metathesis Reactions Combined with Organo-Iron Arene Activation Towards Dendrimers, and Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astruc, Didier; Martinez, Victor

    The subjects treated in the two lectures of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) summer course are (1) the combination of arene activation and perfunctionalization using organo-iron chemistry with olefin metathesis incuding metathesis of dendritic polyolefin molecules; (2) the synthesis of metallodendritic benzylidene complexes that catalyse ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) under ambient conditions and the formation of dendritic stars; (3) the use of stoichiometric and catalytic electron-transfer processes with standard reservoirs of electrons (reductants) or electron holes (oxidants) iron complexes to achieve noteworthy metathesis reactions or synthesize compounds that are useful in metathesis. Only the two first topics are treated in this chapter, and interested readers can find references concerning the third aspect called in the introduction and subsequently cited in the reference list.

  13. Singular characteristics and unique chemical bond activation mechanisms of photocatalytic reactions on plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Phillip; Xin, Hongliang; Marimuthu, Andiappan; Linic, Suljo

    2012-12-01

    The field of heterogeneous photocatalysis has almost exclusively focused on semiconductor photocatalysts. Herein, we show that plasmonic metallic nanostructures represent a new family of photocatalysts. We demonstrate that these photocatalysts exhibit fundamentally different behaviour compared with semiconductors. First, we show that photocatalytic reaction rates on excited plasmonic metallic nanostructures exhibit a super-linear power law dependence on light intensity (rate ∝intensityn, with n > 1), at significantly lower intensity than required for super-linear behaviour on extended metal surfaces. We also demonstrate that, in sharp contrast to semiconductor photocatalysts, photocatalytic quantum efficiencies on plasmonic metallic nanostructures increase with light intensity and operating temperature. These unique characteristics of plasmonic metallic nanostructures suggest that this new family of photocatalysts could prove useful for many heterogeneous catalytic processes that cannot be activated using conventional thermal processes on metals or photocatalytic processes on semiconductors.

  14. Palladium nanoparticle anchored polyphosphazene nanotubes: preparation and catalytic activity on aryl coupling reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Devi; A Ashok Kumar; S Sankar; K Dinakaran

    2015-06-01

    Highly accessible-supported palladium (Pd) nanoparticles anchored polyphosphazene (PPZ) nanotubes (NTs) having average diameter of 120 nm were synthesized rapidly at room temperature and homogeneously decorated with Pd nanoparticles. The resultant PPZ–Pd nanocomposites were morphologically and structurally characterized by means of transmission electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Characterization results showed that the Pd nanoparticles with good dispersibility could be well anchored onto the surfaces of the PPZ NTs. The PPZ–Pd NTs show enhanced catalytic activity for the Suzuki coupling of aryl bromides with arylboronic acid. In addition, these PPZ–Pd NTs show excellent behaviour as reusable catalysts of the Suzuki and Heck coupling reactions.

  15. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of MoSx on TCNQ-treated electrode for hydrogen evolution reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yunghuang

    2014-10-22

    Molybdenum sulfide has recently attracted much attention because of its low cost and excellent catalytical effects in the application of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). To improve the HER efficiency, many researchers have extensively explored various avenues such as material modification, forming hybrid structures or modifying geometric morphology. In this work, we reported a significant enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity of the MoSx via growing on Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) treated carbon cloth, where the MoSx was synthesized by thermolysis from the ammonium tetrathiomolybdate ((NH4)2MoS4) precursor at 170 °C. The pyridinic N- and graphitic N-like species on the surface of carbon cloth arising from the TCNQ treatment facilitate the formation of Mo5+ and S2 2- species in the MoSx, especially with S2 2- serving as an active site for HER. In addition, the smaller particle size of the MoSx grown on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth reveals a high ratio of edge sites relative to basal plane sites, indicating the richer effective reaction sites and superior electrocatalytic characteristics. Hence, we reported a high hydrogen evolution rate for MoSx on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth of 6408 mL g-1 cm-2 h-1 (286 mmol g-1 cm-2 h-1) at an overpotential of V = 0.2 V. This study provides the fundamental concepts useful in the design and preparation of transition metal dichalcogenide catalysts, beneficial in the development in clean energy.

  16. DETECTION OF PHENOL DEGRADING BACTERIA AND PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Movahedyan ، H. Khorsandi ، R. Salehi ، M. Nikaeen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is one of the organic pollutants in various industrial wastewaters especially petrochemical and oil refining. Biological treatment is one of the considerable choices for removing of phenol present in these wastewaters. Identification of effective microbial species is considered as one of the important priorities for production of the biomass in order to achieve desirable kinetic of biological reactions. Basic purpose of this research is identification of phenol-degrading Pseudomonas Putida in activated sludge by polymerase chain reaction (PCR that has high speed and specificity. In this research, 10 various colonies of phenol-degrading bacteria were isolated from municipal activated sludge and the rate of phenol removal and growth rate of these bacteria were assessed in different concentrations of phenol (200 – 900 mg/L. Confirmation of the largest subunit of multicomponent phenol hydroxylase (LmPH gene and gene coding the N fragment in Pseudomonas Putida-derived methyl phenol operon (DmpN gene through PCR were used for general identification of phenol-degrading bacteria and Pseudomonas Putida, respectively. Presence of a 600 bp (base pairs bond in all of isolated strains indicated that they contain phenol hydroxylase gene. 6 of 10 isolated bacteria were Pseudomonas Putida because they produced a 199 bp PCR product by DmpN primers. According to PCR results in this study, the best phenol-degrading bacteria that can utilize 500 – 600 mg/L phenol completely after 48 hours incubation, belong to Pseudomonas Putida strains. It is clear that use of isolated bacteria can lead to considerable decrease of treatment time as well as promotion of phenol removal rate.

  17. Taste-Active Maillard Reaction Products in Roasted Garlic (Allium sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, Junichiro; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas

    2016-07-27

    In order to gain first insight into candidate Maillard reaction products formed upon thermal processing of garlic, mixtures of glucose and S-allyl-l-cysteine, the major sulfur-containing amino acid in garlic, were low-moisture heated, and nine major reaction products were isolated. LC-TOF-MS, 1D/2D NMR, and CD spectroscopy led to their identification as acortatarin A (1), pollenopyrroside A (2), epi-acortatarin A (3), xylapyrroside A (4), 5-hydroxymethyl-1-[(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furanyl)methyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carbalde-hyde (5), 3-(allylthio)-2-(2-formyl-5-hydroxymethyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)propanoic acid (6), (4S)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-3,4-dihydro-3-oxo-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine-6-carbaldehyde (7), (2R)-3-(allylthio)-2-[(4R)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-6-formyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrazin-2(1H)-yl]propanoic acid (8), and (2R)-3-(allylthio)-2-((4S)-4-(allylthiomethyl)-6-formyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrrolo-[1,2-a]pyrazin-2(1H)-yl)propanoic acid (9). Among the Maillard reaction products identified, compounds 5-9 have not previously been published. The thermal generation of the literature known spiroalkaloids 1-4 is reported for the first time. Sensory analysis revealed a bitter taste with thresholds between 0.5 and 785 μmol/kg for 1-5 and 7-9. Compound 6 did not show any intrinsic taste (water) but exhibited a strong mouthfullness (kokumi) enhancing activity above 186 μmol/kg. LC-MS/MS analysis showed 1-9 to be generated upon pan-frying of garlic with the highest concentration of 793.7 μmol/kg found for 6, thus exceeding its kokumi threshold by a factor of 4 and giving evidence for its potential taste modulation activity in processed garlic preparations. PMID:27381763

  18. Interaction between mosquito-larvicidal Lysinibacillus sphaericus binary toxin components: analysis of complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Avinash; Hire, Ramesh S; Hadapad, Ashok B; D'Souza, Stanislaus F; Kumar, Vinay

    2013-11-01

    The two components (BinA and BinB) of Lysinibacillus sphaericus binary toxin together are highly toxic to Culex and Anopheles mosquito larvae, and have been employed world-wide to control mosquito borne diseases. Upon binding to the membrane receptor an oligomeric form (BinA2.BinB2) of the binary toxin is expected to play role in pore formation. It is not clear if these two proteins interact in solution as well, in the absence of receptor. The interactions between active forms of BinA and BinB polypeptides were probed in solution using size-exclusion chromatography, pull-down assay, surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism, and by chemically crosslinking BinA and BinB components. We demonstrate that the two proteins interact weakly with first association and dissociation rate constants of 4.5×10(3) M(-1) s(-1) and 0.8 s(-1), resulting in conformational change, most likely, in toxic BinA protein that could kinetically favor membrane translocation of the active oligomer. The weak interactions between the two toxin components could be stabilized by glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The cross-linked complex, interestingly, showed maximal Culex larvicidal activity (LC50 value of 1.59 ng mL(-1)) reported so far for combination of BinA/BinB components, and thus is an attractive option for development of new bio-pesticides for control of mosquito borne vector diseases. PMID:23974012

  19. Surfactant induced complex formation and their effects on the interfacial properties of seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Eduardo; Santini, Eva; Benedetti, Alessandro; Ravera, Francesca; Ferrari, Michele; Liggieri, Libero

    2014-11-01

    The effect of a cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), on the interfacial properties of seawater has been studied by dynamic and equilibrium surface tension and by dilational rheology essays. Important modifications of the surface tension and dilational rheology response have been observed already at the very low CTAB concentrations, where the effects due to the high ionic strength are negligible. The comparison with the effects of CTAB in different seawater models, or in natural seawater fractions, points out the establishment of strong interactions between the surfactant molecules and the lipophilic fraction of organic material dispersed/dissolved in seawater, affecting the interfacial activity of the molecules. Considering the biochemical richness of seawater, these results can be explained assuming interaction mechanisms and adsorption schemes similar to those speculated for protein and other macromolecules in the presence of surfactants, which in fact show similar features. Thus already at the low concentrations the surfactant molecules form highly surface-active complexes with part of the organic fraction of seawater. At the larger surfactant concentrations these complexes compete for adsorption with an excess of free CTAB molecules which, according to the thermodynamic conditions, are most favoured to occupy the liquid interface. The results of this study underline the important role of the sea organic content in enhancing the surface-activity of surfactants, which is relevant for a deeper understand of the direct and indirect effects of these types of pollutants on the physico-chemical environment in the sea coastal areas and develop mitigation strategies.

  20. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of 3-indolyl pyridine derivatives through one-pot multi component reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakasam Thirumurugan; S Mahalaxmi; Paramasivan T Perumal

    2010-11-01

    A simple protocol for the efficient preparation of 2-(1-Indol-3-yl)-6-methoxy-4-arylpyridine-3,5-dicarbonitrile has been achieved through one-pot multi-component reaction under reflux condition. These compounds showed a good anti-inflammatory activity. Also a series of bis-Hantzsch dihydropyridine derivatives were synthesized and they exhibit analgesic activity.

  1. Mechanically activated SHS reaction in the Fe-Al system: in-situ time resolved diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical activation self propagating high temperature synthesis (M.A.S.H.S.) processing is a new way to produce nanocrystalline iron aluminide intermetallic compounds. This process is maily the combination of two steps; in the one hand, a mechanical activation where the Fe - Al powder mixture was milled during a short time at given energy and frequency of shocks and in the other hand, a self propagating high temperature synthesis (S.H.S.) reaction, for which the exothermicity of the Fe + Al reaction is used. This fast propagated MASHS reaction has been in-situ investigated using the time resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXRD) using a X-ray synchrotron beam and an infrared thermography camera, allowing the coupling of the materials structure and the temperature field. The effects of the initial mean compositions, of the milling conditions as well as of the compaction parameters on the MASHS reaction are reported. (orig.)

  2. Activity-Directed Synthesis with Intermolecular Reactions: Development of a Fragment into a Range of Androgen Receptor Agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Karageorgis, George; Dow, Mark; Aimon, Anthony; Warriner, Stuart; Nelson, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Activity-directed synthesis (ADS), a novel discovery approach in which bioactive molecules emerge in parallel with associated syntheses, was exploited to develop a weakly binding fragment into novel androgen receptor agonists. Harnessing promiscuous intermolecular reactions of carbenoid compounds enabled highly efficient exploration of chemical space. Four substrates were prepared, yet exploited in 326 reactions to explore diverse chemical space; guided by bioactivity alone, the products of j...

  3. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on natural Ni up to 65 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production cross-sections of the natNi(p,x)60,61Cu, 56,57Ni, 55,56,57,58Co nuclear reactions were measured in five experiments up to 65 MeV by using a stacked foil activation technique. The results were compared with the available literature values, predictions of the nuclear reaction model codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS-1.4, and extracted data from the TENDL-2012 library. Spline fits were made on the basis of selected data, from which physical yields were calculated and compared with the literature values. The applicability of the natNi(p,x)57Ni, 57Co reactions for thin layer activation (TLA) was investigated. The production rate for 55Co was compared for proton and deuteron induced reactions on Ni. - Highlights: • Production cross-sections of natNi(p,x)60,61Cu, 56,57Ni, 55,56,57,58Co reactions up to 65 MeV. • Comparison of results with theoretical codes ALICE-IPPE, TALYS 1.4 and TENDL-2012 library. • Calculation and comparison of physical yields with literature experiments. • Thin layer activation (TLA) curves for57Ni and 57Co for industrial applications. • The production rate for 55Co was compared for proton and deuteron induced reactions on Ni

  4. Effect of pH and chemical mechanical planarization process conditions on the copper–benzotriazole complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Jin-Yong; Hamada, Satomi; Shima, Shohei; Park, Jin-Goo

    2016-06-01

    Benzotriazole (BTA) has been used to protect copper (Cu) from corrosion during Cu chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) processes. However, an undesirable Cu–BTA complex is deposited after Cu CMP processes and it should be completely removed at post-Cu CMP cleaning for next fabrication process. Therefore, it is very important to understand of Cu–BTA complex formation behavior for its applications such as Cu CMP and post-Cu CMP cleaning. The present study investigated the effect of pH and polisher conditions on the formation of Cu–BTA complex layers using electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and the surface contact angle. The wettability was not a significant factor for the polishing interface, as no difference in the contact angles was observed for these processes. Both electrochemical techniques revealed that BTA had a unique advantage of long-term protection for Cu corrosion in an acidic condition (pH 3).

  5. The Synthesis and Electrocatalytic Activities of Molybdenum Sulfide for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhengxing

    2014-07-01

    In the context of the future hydrogen economy, effective production of hydrogen (H2) from readily available and sustainable resources is of crucial importance. Hydrogen generation via water splitting by solar energy or electricity has attracted great attention in recent years. In comparison with photocatalytic water-splitting directly using solar light, which is ideal but the relevant technologies are not yet mature, electrolysis of water with catalyst is more practical at the current stage. The Pt-group noble metals are the most effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water, but their high costs limit their applications. Due to the earth-abundance and low price, MoS2 is expected to be a good alternative of the Pt-group metals for HER. Plenty of researches have been conducted for improving the HER activities of MoS2 by optimizing its synthesis method. However, it remains challenging to prepare MoS2 catalysts with high and controllable activity, and more investigations are still needed to better understand the structure-performance correlation in this system. In this thesis, we report a new strategy for fabricating MoS2 eletrocatalysts which gives rise to much improved HER performance and allows us to tune the electrocatalytic activity by varying the preparation conditions. Specifically, we sulfurized molybdenum oxide on the surface of a Ti foil electrode via a facile chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and directly used the electrode for HER testing. Depending on the CVD temperature, the MoO2-MoS2 nanocomposites show different HER activities. Under the optimal synthesis condition (400ºC), the resulting catalyst exhibited excellent HER activity: an onset potential (overpotential) of 0.095 V versus RHE and the Tafel slope of 40 mv/dec. Such a performance exceeds those of most reported MoS2 based HER electrocatalysts. We demonstrated that the CVD temperature has significant influence on the catalysts in crystallinity degree, particle

  6. ParB Partition Proteins: Complex Formation and Spreading at Bacterial and Plasmid Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnell, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, active partition systems contribute to the faithful segregation of both chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids. Each system depends on a site-specific DNA binding protein to recognize and assemble a partition complex at a centromere-like site, commonly called parS. Many plasmid, and all chromosomal centromere-binding proteins are dimeric helix-turn-helix DNA binding proteins, which are commonly named ParB. Although the overall sequence conservation among ParBs is not high, the proteins share similar domain and functional organization, and they assemble into similar higher-order complexes. In vivo, ParBs "spread," that is, DNA binding extends away from the parS site into the surrounding non-specific DNA, a feature that reflects higher-order complex assembly. ParBs bridge and pair DNA at parS and non-specific DNA sites. ParB dimers interact with each other via flexible conformations of an N-terminal region. This review will focus on the properties of the HTH centromere-binding protein, in light of recent experimental evidence and models that are adding to our understanding of how these proteins assemble into large and dynamic partition complexes at and around their specific DNA sites. PMID:27622187

  7. Dynamic Modelling Reveals 'Hotspots' on the Pathway to Enzyme-Substrate Complex Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane E Gordon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS catalyzes the first committed step in the diaminopimelate pathway of bacteria, yielding amino acids required for cell wall and protein biosyntheses. The essentiality of the enzyme to bacteria, coupled with its absence in humans, validates DHDPS as an antibacterial drug target. Conventional drug design efforts have thus far been unsuccessful in identifying potent DHDPS inhibitors. Here, we make use of contemporary molecular dynamics simulation and Markov state models to explore the interactions between DHDPS from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and its cognate substrate, pyruvate. Our simulations recover the crystallographic DHDPS-pyruvate complex without a priori knowledge of the final bound structure. The highly conserved residue Arg140 was found to have a pivotal role in coordinating the entry of pyruvate into the active site from bulk solvent, consistent with previous kinetic reports, indicating an indirect role for the residue in DHDPS catalysis. A metastable binding intermediate characterized by multiple points of intermolecular interaction between pyruvate and key DHDPS residue Arg140 was found to be a highly conserved feature of the binding trajectory when comparing alternative binding pathways. By means of umbrella sampling we show that these binding intermediates are thermodynamically metastable, consistent with both the available experimental data and the substrate binding model presented in this study. Our results provide insight into an important enzyme-substrate interaction in atomistic detail that offers the potential to be exploited for the discovery of more effective DHDPS inhibitors and, in a broader sense, dynamic protein-drug interactions.

  8. Shatter Complex Formation in the Twin Craters Lava Flow, Zuni-Bandera Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Bleacher, J. E.; Brand, B. D.; deWet, A.; Samuels, R.; Hamilton, C.; Garry, W. B.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    . Prominent ';a';a channels travel around the bluff, leaving a 'wake' of uncovered ground on the downstream side. We interpret this shatter area to have been a branching tube network within an active sheet. The limestone bluff acted as an obstacle that caused a backup of lava within the tubes, driving episodes of shattering. The mounds likely represent earlier solidified sections between active, possibly braided, tube branches, which remained as mounds within the shatter area after the adjacent crust subsided. When lava broke out from the pressurized sheet-like lobe, it formed the ';a';a channels. This section of the flow field is interpreted using inferences from shatter ring formation, but is perhaps better termed a shatter sheet or shatter complex. This study has implications for understanding lava flow dynamics at constriction points, as well as the evolution and morphology of shatter rings.

  9. Studies of the Catalytic Activity and Deactivation of Calcined Layered Double Hydroxides in the Reaction of Ethanol with Propylene Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The reaction of ethanol with propylene oxide over calcined layered double hydroxides(CLDH) was investigated. The results show that CLDH has a good activity and a good selectivity, but the activity and the selectivity of CLDH decrease when CLDH reforms LDH- the so called "memory effect". The influence of the "memory effect" on the CLDH returning to LDH was studied by the hydration reaction. It is shown that the "memory effect" is not complete, and the decreases of the Mg/Al molar ratio of LDH and the crystallite size due to the increase of the hydration reaction time result in the drop of the activity and the selectivity.Keyworcds Ethanol, Propylene oxide, Calcined layered double hydroxide, "Memory effect", Hydration

  10. Cationic Pd(II)-catalyzed C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions at room temperature: synthetic and mechanistic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikata, Takashi; Abela, Alexander R; Huang, Shenlin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cationic palladium(II) complexes have been found to be highly reactive towards aromatic C–H activation of arylureas at room temperature. A commercially available catalyst [Pd(MeCN)4](BF4)2 or a nitrile-free cationic palladium(II) complex generated in situ from the reaction of Pd(OAc)2 and HBF4, effectively catalyzes C–H activation/cross-coupling reactions between aryl iodides, arylboronic acids and acrylates under milder conditions than those previously reported. The nature of the directing group was found to be critical for achieving room temperature conditions, with the urea moiety the most effective in promoting facile coupling reactions at an ortho C–H position. This methodology has been utilized in a streamlined and efficient synthesis of boscalid, an agent produced on the kiloton scale annually and used to control a range of plant pathogens in broadacre and horticultural crops. Mechanistic investigations led to a proposed catalytic cycle involving three steps: (1) C–H activation to generate a cationic palladacycle; (2) reaction of the cationic palladacycle with an aryl iodide, arylboronic acid or acrylate, and (3) regeneration of the active cationic palladium catalyst. The reaction between a cationic palladium(II) complex and arylurea allowed the formation and isolation of the corresponding palladacycle intermediate, characterized by X-ray analysis. Roles of various additives in the stepwise process have also been studied. PMID:27340491

  11. Circadian oscillations of KaiA-KaiC and KaiB-KaiC complex formations in an in vitro reconstituted KaiABC clock oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Reiko; Mutoh, Risa; Ishii, Ketaro; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological mechanism that generates autonomous daily cycles in physiological activities. The phosphorylation levels of KaiC oscillated with a period of 24 h in an ATP-dependent clock oscillator reconstituted in vitro from KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. We examined the complex formations of KaiA and KaiB with KaiC in the KaiABC clock oscillator by fluorescence correlation spectrometry (FCS) analysis. The formation of KaiB-containing protein complex(es) oscillated in a circadian manner, with a single peak at 12 h and single trough at 24 h in the circadian cycle, whereas that of KaiA-containing protein complex(es) oscillated with two peaks at 12 and 24 h. FCS and surface plasmon resonance analyses showed that the binding affinity of KaiA for a mutant KaiC with Ala substitutions at the two phosphorylation sites considered to mimic the nonphosphorylated form of KaiC (np-KaiC) was higher than that for a mutant KaiC with Asp substitutions at the two phosphorylation sites considered to mimic the completely phosphorylated form of KaiC (cp-KaiC). The results from the study suggest that a KaiA-KaiB-cp-KaiC ternary complex and a KaiA-np-KaiC complex were formed at 12 and 24 h, respectively.

  12. Systems biology of lignin biosynthesis in Populus trichocarpa: heteromeric 4-coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligase protein complex formation, regulation, and numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Song, Jina; Wang, Jack P; Lin, Ying-Chung; Ducoste, Joel; Shuford, Christopher M; Liu, Jie; Li, Quanzi; Shi, Rui; Nepomuceno, Angelito; Isik, Fikret; Muddiman, David C; Williams, Cranos; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2014-03-01

    As a step toward predictive modeling of flux through the pathway of monolignol biosynthesis in stem differentiating xylem of Populus trichocarpa, we discovered that the two 4-coumaric acid:CoA ligase (4CL) isoforms, 4CL3 and 4CL5, interact in vivo and in vitro to form a heterotetrameric protein complex. This conclusion is based on laser microdissection, coimmunoprecipitation, chemical cross-linking, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and mass spectrometry. The tetramer is composed of three subunits of 4CL3 and one of 4CL5. 4CL5 appears to have a regulatory role. This protein-protein interaction affects the direction and rate of metabolic flux for monolignol biosynthesis in P. trichocarpa. A mathematical model was developed for the behavior of 4CL3 and 4CL5 individually and in mixtures that form the enzyme complex. The model incorporates effects of mixtures of multiple hydroxycinnamic acid substrates, competitive inhibition, uncompetitive inhibition, and self-inhibition, along with characteristic of the substrates, the enzyme isoforms, and the tetrameric complex. Kinetic analysis of different ratios of the enzyme isoforms shows both inhibition and activation components, which are explained by the mathematical model and provide insight into the regulation of metabolic flux for monolignol biosynthesis by protein complex formation.

  13. Method for increasing -SiC yield on solid state reaction of coal fly ash and activated carbon powder

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sulardjaka; Jamasri; M W Wildan; Kusnanto

    2011-07-01

    A novel process for increasing -SiC yield on solid state reaction of coal fly ash and micro powder activated carbon powder has been proposed. -SiC powder was synthesized at temperature 1300°C for 2 h under vacuum condition with 1 l/min argon flow. Cycling synthesis process has been developed for increasing -SiC yield on solid state reaction of coal fly ash and activated carbon powder. Synthesized products were analyzed by XRD with Cu-K radiation, FTIR spectrometer and SEM fitted with EDAX. The results show that the amount of relative -SiC is increased with the number of cycling synthesis.

  14. Comparative Study Using Different Infrared Zones of the Solventless Activation of Organic Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    René Miranda Ruvalcaba; Vladimir Carranza Tellez; Francisco J. Pérez Flores; Gabriel A. Arroyo Razo; María Olivia Noguez Córdova; Benjamín Velasco Bejarano; Carlos I. Flores Ramírez

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the results of a study comparing the use of irradiation from different regions of the infrared spectrum for the promotion of several organic reactions, are presented and discussed. This use of eco-conditions provides a green approach to chemical synthesis. A set of ten different organic reactions were evaluated, including the Knoevenagel, Hantzsch, Biginelli and Meldrum reactions. It is important to highlight the use of a commercial device that produces infrared irradiation in t...

  15. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements. PMID:27250872

  16. Acute effects of exercise and active video games on adults' reaction time and perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, José F; López-García, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute effects of resting, aerobic exercise practised alone, and aerobic exercise with active video games (AVG), on complex reaction time (CRT) and the post-exercise acute rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in young healthy adults. The experimental group was composed of 92 healthy young adults, 78 males and 13 females (age M = 21.9 ± 2.7 years) who completed two sessions, A and B. In session A, participants rode 30 min on an ergometer, while in session B they exercised for 30 min on an ergometer while playing an AVG on a Wii. The control group was composed of 30 young adults, 26 males and 4 females (age M = 21.4 ± 2.9 years) who rested for 30 min. In each session, a CRT task was performed before and after exercising or resting, and post-exercise global RPE was noted. Repeated measures general linear model (GLM) and Wilcoxon tests were performed. (1) Both aerobic exercise alone and aerobic exercise combined with AVG improved CRT, while resting did not; (2) aerobic exercise combined with AVG did not improve CRT more than aerobic exercise only; and (3) RPE was lower after aerobic exercise combined with AVG compared with aerobic exercise only. In young adults, exercise produces acute benefits on CRT, and practising exercise with AVG helps to decrease RPE.

  17. Si-H bond activation on Cu: Reaction of silane on Cu(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, B.C.; Lohokare, S.P.; Nuzzo, R.G. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

    1993-11-04

    The activation and decomposition of silane on Cu(111) have been studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger electron (AES), and temperature-programmed reaction (TPRS) spectroscopies, as well as low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Silane dissociatively chemisorbs on Cu(111) at 90 K. Cleavage of the Si-H bond yields two structurally distinct adsorbed silyl fragments. Infrared spectroscopy identifies the predominant intermediates formed under these conditions as being adsorbed SiH[sub 2] and SiH species. The relative and absolute concentrations of these intermediates depend sensitively on the surface coverage of both Si and H, which themselves depend upon the silane exposure. SiH[sub 2] is stable over a wide range of coverage up to 180 K, where it then undergoes Si-H bond cleavage to form surface bound SiH. At higher temperatures, bond scission in the Si-H moiety results in the formation of adsorbed silicon atoms and the desorption of dihydrogen in a peak centered at [approximately]330 K. Auger electron spectra show that the amount of silicon deposited on the Cu(111) surface in this way is approximately one-third of the amount deposited on a stable Cu[sub 3]Si surface. This latter surface is readily formed by carrying out the silane exposure at temperatures above 300 K. 39 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The DNA Binding Activity of p53 Displays Reaction-Diffusion Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinow, Peter; Rogers, Carl E.; Barbieri, Christopher E.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Kenworthy, Anne K.; DiBenedetto, Emmanuele

    2006-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in maintaining the genomic stability of mammalian cells and preventing malignant transformation. In this study, we investigated the intracellular diffusion of a p53-GFP fusion protein using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We show that the diffusion of p53-GFP within the nucleus is well described by a mathematical model for diffusion of particles that bind temporarily to a spatially homogeneous immobile structure with binding and release rates k1 and k2, respectively. The diffusion constant of p53-GFP was estimated to be Dp53-GFP = 15.4 μm2 s−1, significantly slower than that of GFP alone, DGFP = 41.6 μm2 s−1. The reaction rates of the binding and unbinding of p53-GFP were estimated as k1 = 0.3 s−1 and k2 = 0.4 s−1, respectively, values suggestive of nonspecific binding. Consistent with this finding, the diffusional mobilities of tumor-derived sequence-specific DNA binding mutants of p53 were indistinguishable from that of the wild-type protein. These data are consistent with a model in which, under steady-state conditions, p53 is latent and continuously scans DNA, requiring activation for sequence-specific DNA binding. PMID:16603489

  19. Acute effects of exercise and active video games on adults' reaction time and perceived exertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, José F; López-García, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute effects of resting, aerobic exercise practised alone, and aerobic exercise with active video games (AVG), on complex reaction time (CRT) and the post-exercise acute rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in young healthy adults. The experimental group was composed of 92 healthy young adults, 78 males and 13 females (age M = 21.9 ± 2.7 years) who completed two sessions, A and B. In session A, participants rode 30 min on an ergometer, while in session B they exercised for 30 min on an ergometer while playing an AVG on a Wii. The control group was composed of 30 young adults, 26 males and 4 females (age M = 21.4 ± 2.9 years) who rested for 30 min. In each session, a CRT task was performed before and after exercising or resting, and post-exercise global RPE was noted. Repeated measures general linear model (GLM) and Wilcoxon tests were performed. (1) Both aerobic exercise alone and aerobic exercise combined with AVG improved CRT, while resting did not; (2) aerobic exercise combined with AVG did not improve CRT more than aerobic exercise only; and (3) RPE was lower after aerobic exercise combined with AVG compared with aerobic exercise only. In young adults, exercise produces acute benefits on CRT, and practising exercise with AVG helps to decrease RPE. PMID:27239681

  20. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1978--February 14, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy reactions of halogen atoms or ions, activated by nuclear transformations, were studied in gaseous, high pressure and condensed phase saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halomethanes and other organic systems in order to better understand the mechanisms and dynamics of high energy monovalent species. The experimental and theoretical program consists of six interrelated areas: (1) the reactions of iodine with alkenes and alkynes activated by radiative neutron capture and isomeric transition in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators, high pressure and liquid systems; (2) the gas to condensed state transition in halogen high chemistry, involving bromine activated by the (n,γ) and (I.T.) processes in ethane was investigated in more detail; (3) systematics of halogen hot atom reactions. The reactions of 80Br/sup m/, 80Br, 82Br/sup m/ + 82Br, 82Br, 128I, 130I, and 130I/sup m/ + 130I activated by radiative neutron capture or isomeric transition in hydrocarbons and halo-substituted alkanes in low pressure and high pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators; (4) kinetic theory applications of high energy reactions and mathematical development of caging mechanisms were developed; (5) the sterochemistry of 38Cl substitution reactions involving diastereomeric 1,2-dichloro-1,2-difluorethane in liquid mixtures was completed, suggesting that the stereochemical course of the substitution process is controlled by the properties of the solvent molecules; and (6) the applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems was continued, especially involving aluminum and vanadium trace determinations

  1. Study of activation cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditroi, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Excitation function measurement of deuteron induced reactions on rhodium up to 40 MeV. {yields} Model code calculations with EMPIRE, ALICE and TALYS. {yields} Integral production yield calculation. {yields} Thin layer activation (TLA) with the produced isotopes. - Abstract: In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the {sup 103}Rh(d,x) {sup 100,101,103}Pd, {sup 100g,101m,101g,102m,102g}Rh and {sup 103g}Ru reactions were determined up to 40 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. Excitation functions of the contributing reactions were calculated using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated and compared with experimental integral yield data reported in the literature. From the measured cross-sections and previous data, activation curves were deduced to support thin layer activation (TLA) on rhodium and Rh containing alloys.

  2. Enhancement of reaction conditions for the radiolabelling of DOTA-peptides with high activities of yttrium-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardelli, Anna, E-mail: a.nardelli@libero.i [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Naples (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomorfologiche e Funzionali, Universita ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); Castaldi, Elena; Ortosecco, Giovanni; Speranza, Antonio [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [IRCCS-CROB, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Pace, Leonardo; Salvatore, Marco [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomorfologiche e Funzionali, Universita ' Federico II' , Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has recently expanded due to radiolabelling of DOTA-peptides, such as the somatostatin analogues [DOTA{sup 0}, Tyr{sup 3}]octreotate (DOTATATE). The achievement of high specific activities during procedures has been indicated as the critical factor to consent effective therapy. Several radiochemical factors may negatively impact reaction procedures such as pH, temperature and time of reaction. Our study was undertaken to explore the influence of radiochemical parameters, such as time of incubation, on reaction kinetics during the radiolabelling of DOTATATE with {sup 90}Y. Methods: Forty-five radiolabelling procedures were carried out using small volumes of yttrium-90, typically 60-78 {mu}L. At nearly constant pH and temperature two different settings of radiolabelling procedures were implemented, removing the products from the heating water bath approximately after 30 min (group E, early; n=20) and after 39 min (group L, later; n=25). Quality controls were performed by means of both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Results: Reaction kinetics for {sup 90}Y were found to a provide suitable percentage of incorporation at pH 4.5 for both groups. Reaction temperature was not different between groups E and L. A significant difference was found between the two groups in radiochemical yield, which was 95.6%{+-}0.8 for group E and 98.2%{+-}1.1 for group L (p<0.0001). The specific activity of the final product was 46.9 MBq/nmol. Conclusion: In order to achieve optimal specific activities, pH, temperature and time of reaction necessitate careful evaluation and setting. A statistically significant difference in labelling yield was found between a set of procedures completed at 39 min as compared to that executed at 30 min, keep the reaction pH and temperature constant.

  3. NI (II AND PB (II INHIBIT THE ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY OF DNA IN AN ELECTRON TRANSFER REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B FARZAMI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ni and Pb are metals with several suggested mechanisms for their toxicity on the biological systems. We have recently investigated involvement of DNA in an electron transfer reaction as an enzyme. In this reaction non- fluorescent dichlorofluorescin (LDCF is converted to the dichlorofluorescein (DCF in the presence of peroxides and hematin. Methods. The fluorometric technique was used in this study. The pH effect on the reaction rate was investigated. The results showed that DCF has the maximum emission on tris buffer 0.05 Mat pH 8.4. Results. DNA and carnosine catalyze the reaction, which proceeds by the electron transfer mechanism. The presence of carnosine is necessary for the catalytic action of DNA as a cofactor. Ni (II and Pb (11 are the potent inhibitors of the reaction. The kinetic parameters and determined in the presence and absence of the above ligands. Discussion. DNA, which has the electrical properties only in the double helical forms, acts as a catalyst in the conversion of LDCF to DCF. The existence of the carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide with antioxidant and free radical scavenging roles, is an important factor for the progress of the reaction. Both Ni (11 and Pb (II inhibit the reaction. These metals could act as the electron pool to cause inhibition in such electron transfer reaction. This phenomenon could be related to the carcinogenic effect of these metals.

  4. Particle size dependence on oxygen reduction reaction activity of electrodeposited TaOx catalysts in acidic media

    KAUST Repository

    Seo, J.

    2013-11-13

    The size dependence of the oxygen reduction reaction activity was studied for TaOx nanoparticles electrodeposited on carbon black for application to polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Compared with a commercial Ta2O5 material, the ultrafine oxide nanoparticles exhibited a distinctively high onset potential different from that of the bulky oxide particles.

  5. Zeolite H-BEA catalysed multicomponent reaction: One-pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols - Biologically active drug-like molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil R Mistry; Rikesh S Joshi; Kalpana C Maheria

    2011-07-01

    Zeolite has been used as an efficient and a novel heterogeneous catalyst for one-pot synthesis of biologically active drug-like molecules, amidoalkyl naphthols. This green route involves multicomponent reaction of 2-naphthol, aromatic aldehydes and amide in the presence of a catalytic amount of zeolite H-Beta (H-BEA) under solvent reflux as well as solvent-free conditions.

  6. Promotional effect of phosphorus doping on the activity of the Fe-N/C catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Zhu, Jianbin; Lv, Qing;

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective, active and stable electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highly desirable for the wide-spread adoption of technologies such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Among the already reported non-precious metal catalysts, carbon-supported transition metal-nitro...

  7. Activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on neodymium up to 50 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Ditrói, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Experimental excitation function of deuteron induced reactions on natural Nd. • Model code calculations with EMPIRE-D, ALICE-D and TALYS (TENDL-2012). • Physical yield calculation and comparison. • Discussion of medical and industrial applications. - Abstract: In the frame of a systematic study of activation cross sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rare earths, the reactions on neodymium for production of therapeutic radionuclides were measured for the first time. The excitation functions of the {sup nat}Nd(d,x) {sup 151,150,149,148m,148g,146,144,143}Pm, {sup 149,147,139m}Nd, {sup 142}Pr and {sup 139g}Ce nuclear reactions were assessed by using the stacked foil activation technique and high resolution γ-spectrometry. The experimental excitation functions were compared to the theoretical predictions calculated with the modified model codes ALICE-IPPE-D and EMPIRE-II-D and with the data in the TENDL-2012 library based on latest version of the TALYS code. The application of the data in the field of medical isotope production and nuclear reaction theory is discussed.

  8. Electrocatalytic Activity of Carbonized Nanostructured Polyanilines for Oxidation Reactions: Sensing of Nitrite Ions and Ascorbic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbonized PANIs prepared from various nanostructured PANI precursors • Electroanalytical performances of carbonized PANIs evaluated using voltammetry • Study of carbonized PANIs physico-chemical properties related to electroactivity • The lowest over-potential for NO2− oxidation at c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE) • The lowest over-potential for ascorbic acid oxidation at both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA - Abstract: A comparative study of the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-containing carbon nanomaterials, prepared by the carbonization of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) salts, for the electrooxidation reactions is presented. Nanostructured PANI salts were synthesized by the oxidative polymerization of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an aqueous solution in the presence of 5-sulfosalicylic acid (PANI-SSA), 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (PANI-DNSA) as well as without added acid (PANI), and subsequently carbonized to c-PANI-SSA, c-PANI-DNSA and c-PANI, respectively. Glassy carbon tip was modified with nanostructured c-PANIs and used for the investigation of sensing of nitrite and ascorbic acid in aqueous solutions as model analytes by linear sweep voltammetry. All three types of the investigated c-PANIs gave excellent response to the nitrite ions and ascorbic acid electrooxidation. The lowest peak potential for nitrite ion oxidation exhibited c-PANI (+0.87 V vs. SCE), and for ascorbic acid oxidation both c-PANI and c-PANI-SSA (ca. + 0.13 V vs. SCE). Electrochemical data were correlated with structural and textural data obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental and nitrogen sorption analysis

  9. Potassium-decorated active carbon supported Co-Mo-based catalyst for water-gas shift reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixin Lian; RuiFen Xiao; Weiping Fang; Yiquan Yang

    2011-01-01

    The effect of potassium-decoration was studied on the activity of water-gas shift(WGS)reaction over the Co-Mo-based catalysts supported on active carbon(AC),which was prepared by incipient wetness co-impregnation method.The decoration of potassium on active carbon in advance enhances the activities of the CoMo-K/AC catalysts for WGS reaction.Highest activity(about 92% conversion)was obtained at250 ℃ for the catalyst with an optimum K2O/AC weight ratio in the range from 0.12 to 0.15.The catalysts were characterized by TPR and EPR,and the results show that activated carbon decorated with potassium makes Co-Mo species highly dispersed,and thus easily reduced and sulfurized.XRD results show that an appropriate content of potassium-decoration on active carbon supports may favors the formation of highly dispersed Co9Ss-type structures which are situated on the edge or a site in contact with MoS2,K-Mo-O-S,Mo-S-K phase.Those active species are responsible for the high activity of CoMo-K/AC catalysts.

  10. Mixed-ligand complex formation equilibria of CuII with biguanide in presence of glycine as the auxiliary ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tannistha Roy Barman; G N Mukherjee

    2006-09-01

    Equilibrium study on the mixed ligand complex formation of CuII with biguanide(Bg) and glycine (HG), indicated the formation of the complexes: Cu(Bg)2+, Cu(Bg)$_{2}^{2+}$, Cu(Bg-H)(Bg)+, Cu(Bg-H)2, Cu(Bg)(OH)+, Cu(Bg-H)(OH); Cu(G)+, Cu(G)(OH), Cu(G)2; Cu(G)(Bg)+, Cu(G)(Bg-H); (G)Cu(Bg)Cu(G)2+, (G)Cu(Bg-H)Cu(G)+, and (G)Cu(Bg-2H)Cu(G). From the deprotonation constants of coordinated biguanide (Bg) in the complexes Cu(Bg)(OH)+, Cu(Bg-H)(Bg)+ and Cu(G)(Bg)+, the Lewis basicities of the coordinated ligand species (Bg-H)-, OH- and glycinate (G-) were found to be of the order: (Bg-H)- >> OH- > G-. Bridging (N1-N4, N2-N5) tetradentate mode of coordination by biguanide species Bg, (Bg-H)- and (Bg-2H)2- was indicated from the occurrence of biguanide-bridged dinuclear mixed ligand complexes (G)Cu(Bg)Cu(G)2+, (G)Cu(Bg-H)Cu(G)+, (G)Cu(Bg-2H)Cu(G) in the complexation equilibria.

  11. Thermodynamics of mixed-ligand complex formation of zinc nitrilotriacetate with amino acids and dipeptides in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Stable mixed ligand complexes of ZnNta with amino acids and dipeptides. • Histamine-like coordination mode of His in the complex ZnNtaHis. • Glycine-like coordination of Lys and Orn in the complexes ZnNtaL and ZnNtaHL • NH2, CO-coordination mode of GlyGly in the complex ZnNtaGG. • NH2, N− or NH2, N−, COO-coordination modes of GlyGly in the complex ZnNtaGGH−1. - Abstract: The isothermal calorimetry, pH-potentiometric titration and 1H and 13C NMR methods has been used to study the mixed-ligand complex formation in the systems Zn2+–Nta3––L− (L = His, Orn, Lys, GlyGly, AlaAla) in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and the ionic strength of I = 0.5 (KNO3). The thermodynamic parameters of formation of the mixed complexes have been determined. The relationship between the probable coordination modes of the complexone and amino acid or dipeptide molecules in the mixed-ligand complex and the thermodynamic parameters has been discussed

  12. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.

  13. FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiong; Song, Xu; Wang, Jun; Gu, Jia; Zhang, Weijian; Hu, Jinxia; Zhou, Xiuping; Yu, Rutong

    2015-01-01

    Fyn-related kinase (FRK), a member of Src-related tyrosine kinases, is recently reported to function as a potent tumor suppressor in several cancer types. Our previous study has also shown that FRK over-expression inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. However, the mechanism of FRK effect on glioma cell migration and invasion, a feature of human malignant gliomas, is still not clear. In this study, we found that FRK over-expression increased the protein level of N-cadherin, but not E-cadherin. Meanwhile, FRK over-expression promoted β-catenin translocation to the plasma membrane, where it formed complex with N-cadherin, while decreased β-catenin level in the nuclear fraction. In addition, down-regulation of N-cadherin by siRNA promoted the migration and invasion of glioma U251 and U87 cells and abolished the inhibitory effect of FRK on glioma cell migration and invasion. In summary, these results indicate that FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

  14. Thermodynamics of mixed-ligand complex formation of zinc nitrilotriacetate with amino acids and dipeptides in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyreu, Dmitrii, E-mail: pyreu@mail.ru [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State UniversityErmak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, Matvey; Kumeev, Roman [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Gridchin, Sergei [Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-20

    Highlights: • Stable mixed ligand complexes of ZnNta with amino acids and dipeptides. • Histamine-like coordination mode of His in the complex ZnNtaHis. • Glycine-like coordination of Lys and Orn in the complexes ZnNtaL and ZnNtaHL • NH{sub 2}, CO-coordination mode of GlyGly in the complex ZnNtaGG. • NH{sub 2}, N{sup −} or NH2, N{sup −}, COO-coordination modes of GlyGly in the complex ZnNtaGGH{sub −1}. - Abstract: The isothermal calorimetry, pH-potentiometric titration and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR methods has been used to study the mixed-ligand complex formation in the systems Zn{sup 2+}–Nta{sup 3–}–L{sup −} (L = His, Orn, Lys, GlyGly, AlaAla) in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and the ionic strength of I = 0.5 (KNO{sub 3}). The thermodynamic parameters of formation of the mixed complexes have been determined. The relationship between the probable coordination modes of the complexone and amino acid or dipeptide molecules in the mixed-ligand complex and the thermodynamic parameters has been discussed.

  15. A Modified activation method for reaction total cross section and yield measurements at low astrophysically relevant energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemov, S. V.; Igamov, S. B.; Karakhodjaev, A. A.; Radyuk, G. A.; Tojiboyev, O. R.; Salikhbaev, U. S.; Ergashev, F. Kh.; Nam, I. V.; Aliev, M. K.; Kholbaev, I.; Rumi, R. F.; Khalikov, R. I.; Eshkobilov, Sh. Kh.; Muminov, T. M.

    2016-07-01

    The activation method is proposed for collection of the sufficient statistics during the investigation of the nuclear astrophysical reactions at low energies with the short-living residual nuclei formation. The main feature is a multiple cyclical irradiation of a target by an ion beam and measurement of the radioactivity decay curve. The method was tested by the yield measurement of the 12C(p,γ)13N reaction with detecting the annihilation γγ- coincidences from 13N(β+ν)13C decay at the two-arm scintillation spectrometer.

  16. Activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on manganese up to 40 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditroi, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-01

    In the frame of a systematic study on activation cross-sections of deuteron induced reactions experimental excitation functions on {sup 55}Mn were measured with the activation method using the stacked foil irradiation technique up to 40 MeV. By using high resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometry, cross-section data for the production of {sup 56,54,52}Mn and {sup 51}Cr were determined. Comparison with the earlier published data and with the results predicted by the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-II theoretical codes - improved for more reliable calculations for d-induced reactions - and with data in the TENDL 2010 libraries are also included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and implications for practical applications in industrial (Thin Layer Activation) accelerator technology are discussed.

  17. Activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on rhenium up to 40 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditrói, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Excitation function measurement of deuteron induced reactions on rhenium up to 40 MeV. ► Model code calculations with EMPIRE-D, ALICE-D and TALYS (TENDL-2011). ► Integral production yield calculation. ► Thin layer activation (TLA) curves; {sup 185}Os and {sup 186}Re. -- Abstract: As a part of a thorough work of excitation functions on deuteron induced reactions, experimental cross-sections of {sup 185,183m,183g,182}Os and {sup 188,186,184m,184g,183}Re activation products on {sup nat}Re were measured up to 40 MeV for the first time with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution γ-spectrometry. Comparison with the former results of other laboratories and with the predictions of the ALICE-IPPE and EMPIRE-3 model codes, modified for improved calculations for deuteron reactions, and with data in the TENDL-2011 library are also presented. Thick target yields were given deduced from our experimental cross-sections and compared with the few literature values. For practical applications (thin layer activation) also activity versus depth distributions were calculated for selected isotopes.

  18. Mechanistic study on the activity of manganese oxide catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in an aprotic electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite a large effort in catalyst research over the past decade, the benefit of electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and especially the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the aprotic Li/air battery system has not yet been clarified. Here, three nanostructured manganese oxide catalysts – namely Mn3O4, Mn5O8 and α-Mn2O3 – are investigated with regard to their activity for the ORR in a LiTFSI/DMSO electrolyte. In cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements an overall decrease of potential gaps and an increase of re-oxidation efficiencies on carbon powder-based electrodes in comparison to glassy carbon (GC) was observed, which is attributed to the presence of more active centers, e.g. edges and kinks. Increased ORR potentials and the kinetic evaluation of the rate-determining step, namely the one-electron reduction of oxygen, point to a significantly enhanced activity of α-Mn2O3/C compared to pure carbon powder, Mn3O4/C and Mn5O8/C electrodes. This is discussed in terms of the electrocatalytic effect of α-Mn2O3 for aprotic ORR processes. The ORR activity is proposed to originate from a different reaction pathway due to coordinatively unsaturated Mn3+ ions on the surface of α-Mn2O3, which act as active centers for associative adsorption and reduction of molecular O2

  19. Active MnO{sub x} electrocatalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrahn, Katie L.; Park, Sang Wook; Gorlin, Yelena; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Bent, Stacey F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5025 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    The ability to deposit conformal catalytic thin films enables opportunities to achieve complex nanostructured designs for catalysis. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is capable of creating conformal thin films over complex substrates. Here, ALD-MnO{sub x} on glassy carbon is investigated as a catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), two reactions that are of growing interest due to their many applications in alternative energy technologies. The films are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, ellipsometry, and cyclic voltammetry. The as-deposited films consist of Mn(II)O, which is shown to be a poor catalyst for the ORR, but highly active for the OER. By controllably annealing the samples, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with good activity for both the ORR and OER are synthesized. Hypotheses are presented to explain the large difference in the activity between the MnO and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts for the ORR, but similar activity for the OER, including the effects of surface oxidation under experimental conditions. These catalysts synthesized though ALD compare favorably to the best MnO{sub x} catalysts in the literature, demonstrating a viable way to produce highly active, conformal thin films from earth-abundant materials for the ORR and the OER. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Novel sesquiterpenes from Schisandra grandiflora: isolation, cytotoxic activity and synthesis of their triazole derivatives using "click" reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornima, B; Siva, Bandi; Shankaraiah, G; Venkanna, A; Nayak, V Lakshma; Ramakrishna, Sistla; Venkat Rao, C; Babu, K Suresh

    2015-03-01

    Phytochemical investigation of hexane extract from the fruits of Schisandra grandiflora afforded three novel sesquiterpenes (1-3) along with the three known compounds (4-6). The structures of these isolates were determined by extensive analysis of spectroscopic data (1D, 2D NMR). Further, a series of triazole analogues of 3 and 4 were prepared using "Click" reaction protocol. The reaction scheme involving one-carbon homologation of 3 and 4 using the Bestmann-Ohira reagent followed by regioselective Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of various azides leading to the formation of triazole analogues (20a-20k &21a-21c) which is being reported for the first time. All the triazole products were characterized using spectral data analysis. The anti-proliferative activity of the isolates and the synthetic analogues were studied against Hela (Cervical cancer), A549 (Lung cancer), DU-145 (Prostate cancer), MCF-7 (Breast cancer) and B-16 (Mouse melanoma) cancer cell lines.

  1. Heavy ion induced nuclear reactions: cross-section measurements and its applicability in thin layer activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming to investigate the surface wear study, we have measured the cross-sections of various reactions from the 16O induced reactions on isotopically pure targets 130Te, 159Tb, 169Tm and 181Ta in order to apply HI activation in the TLA technique. The experimental cross-sections of nuclear reactions leading to residues are very important to be known for the yields of the products before its application in a particular material. The experiments have been performed, employing energetic 16O7+ beam, from the 15UD-Pelletron accelerator, of the IUAC, New Delhi, India. For the measurement of cross-sections, targets of 130Te, 159Tb, 169Tm and 181Ta of thicknesses ≈1.5-2.0 mg/cm2 have been used

  2. Metal halide hydrates as lewis acid catalysts for the conjugated friedel-crafts reactions of indoles and activated olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalm, Cristiane S.; Ceschi, Marco Antonio; Russowsky, Dennis, E-mail: dennis@iq.ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IQ/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    Metal halide hydrates such as SnCl{sub 2{center_dot}}2H{sub 2}O, MnCl{sub 2{center_dot}}4H{sub 2}O, SrCl{sub 2{center_dot}}6H{sub 2}O, CrCl{sub 2{center_dot}}6H{sub 2}O, CoCl{sub 2{center_dot}}6H{sub 2}O e CeCl{sub 3{center_dot}}7H{sub 2}O were investigated as mild Lewis acids catalysts for the conjugate Friedel-Crafts reaction between indoles and activated olefins. The reactions were carried out with aliphatic unsaturated ketones over a period of days at room temperature, while chalcones reacted only under reflux conditions. The reactions with nitrostyrene s were either performed in solvent or under solventless conditions. In all cases reasonable to good yields were obtained. (author)

  3. Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, G. P.; Rundberg, R.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, G.; Boswell, M.; Klein, A.; Wilhelmy, J.; Tonchev, A.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2014-09-01

    We report on the first observation of tertiary reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons produced in compressed deuterium and tritium filled capsules using the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA. RIF neutrons are produced by third-order, out of equilibrium ("in-flight") fusion reactions, initiated by primary fusion products. The rate of RIF reactions is dependent upon the range of the elastically scattered fuel ions and therefore a diagnostic of Coulomb physics within the plasma. At plasma temperatures of ˜5 keV, the presence of neutrons with kinetic energies greater than 15 MeV is a unique signature for RIF neutron production. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a threshold of 15.0 MeV, and a unique decay scheme making it a suitable diagnostic for observing RIF neutrons. RIF neutron production is quantified by the ratio of 167Tm/168Tm observed in a 169Tm foil, where the reaction 169Tm(n,2n)168Tm samples the primary neutron fluence. Averaged over 4 implosions1-4 at the NIF, the 167Tm/168Tm ratio is measured to be 1.5 +/- 0.3 x 10-5, leading to an average ratio of RIF to primary neutron ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10-4. These ratios are consistent with the predictions for charged particle stopping in a quantum degenerate plasma.

  4. Investigation of CO2 induced biogeochemical reactions and active microorganisms of two German gas fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, N.; Kassahun, A.; Seifert, J.; Krüger, M.; Bretschneider, H.; Gniese, C.; Frerichs, J.; Simon, A.; Simon, E.; Muschalle, T.

    2009-04-01

    can be summarised, that mainly the differences between wells treated with chemical foams (to enhance the gas lift) and such without this treatment have to take into account. The autoclave experiments for the Schneeren site show the importance of biogeochemical reactions for the long-term pressure behaviour of the storage unit. During autotrophic (CO2 consuming) metabolic activities a CO2 turnover into the liquid and solid phase takes place (DOC increase, carbonate phase formation). Without the knowledge of these biogeochemical induced processes the accompanied decreasing pressure can be interpreted wrongly as a leaky storage unit. That's why a well-founded biogeochemical process understanding is important.

  5. Source-term analysis for Hanford low-activity tank waste using the reaction-transport code AREST-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general, integrated performance assessment code, AREST-CT, was used to analyze the influence of various factors on the release rates of radionuclides from a proposed facility for disposal of low-activity tank wastes. The code couples various process models together based on the framework of reaction-transport theory. The disposal facility was modeled as a 1-D column surrounded by soil. A borosilicate waste glass, LD6-5412 was the waste form considered in the analysis. Included in the simulations were 38 aqueous species, 14 minerals, 21 equilibrium reactions, and 16 kinetic reactions. Dissolution rate of the glass and the release rates of Tc, Pu, U, Np, I. Se under different conditions were calculated for 50,000 years. The simulations revealed that (1) open exchange between the atmosphere and pore-water within the vault significantly improves the performance; (2) an ion-exchange reaction between the glass and aqueous phase increases the release rates significantly; and (3) at the hydrogeologic conditions under consideration, variation of the pore-water velocity has little effect on the release rate of radionuclides. These results provide a scientific basis for formulation of waste forms and engineering design of the disposal facility. Reaction-transport modeling can provide information on the long-term performance of disposal systems that are not obtainable from laboratory experiments alone or by conventional decoupled process models

  6. Production of Medical Radioisotopes with High Specific Activity in Photonuclear Reactions with $\\gamma$ Beams of High Intensity and Large Brilliance

    CERN Document Server

    Habs, D

    2010-01-01

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in $(\\gamma,x{\\rm n}+y{\\rm p})$ photonuclear reactions or ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) photoexcitation reactions with high flux [($10^{13}-10^{15}$)$\\gamma$/s], small diameter $\\sim (100 \\, \\mu$m$)^2$ and small band width ($\\Delta E/E \\approx 10^{-3}-10^{-4}$) $\\gamma$ beams produced by Compton back-scattering of laser light from relativistic brilliant electron beams. We compare them to (ion,$x$n$ + y$p) reactions with (ion=p,d,$\\alpha$) from particle accelerators like cyclotrons and (n,$\\gamma$) or (n,f) reactions from nuclear reactors. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow $\\gamma$ beam the energy deposition in the target can be managed by using a stack of thin target foils or wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton and pair electrons (positrons). $(\\gamma,\\gamma')$ isomer production via specially selected $\\gamma$ cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground st...

  7. Increased metabolic activity detected by FLIM in human breast cancer cells with desmoplastic reaction: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natal, Rodrigo de Andrade; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Bondarik, Caroline; Mendonça, Guilherme R.; Derchain, Sophie F.; Lima, Carmen P.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Sarian, Luís. O.; Vassallo, José

    2015-07-01

    Introduction: In breast cancer (BC), desmoplastic reaction, assembled primarily by fibroblasts, is associated with unfavorable prognosis, but the reason of this fact remains still unclear. In this context, nonlinear optics microscopy, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), has provided advancement in cellular metabolism research. In this paper, our purpose is to differentiate BC cells metabolism with or without contact to desmoplastic reaction. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded samples were used at different points of hematoxylin stained sections. Methodology: Sections from 14 patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma were analyzed with FLIM methodology to NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetime on a Confocal Upright LSM780 NLO device (Carl Zeiss AG, Germany). Quantification of the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence intensity was evaluated by SPC Image software (Becker &Hickl) and ImageJ (NIH), respectively. Optical redox ratio was calculated by dividing the FAD fluorescence intensity by NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity. Data value for FLIM measurements and fluorescence intensities were calculated using Wilcoxon test; p< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: BC cells in contact with desmoplastic reaction presented a significantly lower NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetime. Furthermore, optical redox ratio was also lower in these tumor cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that contact of BC cells with desmoplastic reaction increase their metabolic activity, which might explain the adverse prognosis of cases associated with higher peritumoral desmoplastic reaction.

  8. IgG antibodies in food allergy influence allergen-antibody complex formation and binding to B cells: a role for complement receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroek, L.A.; Jong, R.J.; Hartog Jager, den C.F.; Monsuur, H.N.; Wouters, D.; Nauta, A.; Knippels, L.M.; Neerven, van R.J.J.; Ruiter, B.; Leusen, J.H.; Hack, C.E.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.; Knulst, A.C.; Garssen, J.; Hoffen, van E.

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-IgE complexes are more efficiently internalized and presented by B cells than allergens alone. It has been suggested that IgG Abs induced by immunotherapy inhibit these processes. Food-allergic patients have high allergen-specific IgG levels. However, the role of these Abs in complex format

  9. Influence of the overall charge and local charge density of pectin on the complex formation between pectin and beta-lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperber, Bram L. H. M.; Schols, Henk A.; Stuart, Martien A. Cohen; Norde, Willem; Voragen, Alphons G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The complex formation between beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and pectin is studied using pectins with different physicochemical characteristics. Pectin allows for the control of both the overall charge by degree of methyl-esterification as well as local charge density by the degree of blockiness. Vary

  10. Ternary complex formation between AmtB, GlnZ and the nitrogenase regulatory enzyme DraG reveals a novel facet of nitrogen regulation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, Luciano F; Merrick, Mike; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S; Araujo, Luíza M; Souza, Emanuel M

    2007-12-01

    Ammonium movement across biological membranes is facilitated by a class of ubiquitous channel proteins from the Amt/Rh family. Amt proteins have also been implicated in cellular responses to ammonium availability in many organisms. Ammonium sensing by Amt in bacteria is mediated by complex formation with cytosolic proteins of the P(II) family. In this study we have characterized in vitro complex formation between the AmtB and P(II) proteins (GlnB and GlnZ) from the diazotrophic plant-associative bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. AmtB-P(II) complex formation only occurred in the presence of adenine nucleotides and was sensitive to 2-oxoglutarate when Mg(2+) and ATP were present, but not when ATP was substituted by ADP. We have also shown in vitro complex formation between GlnZ and the nitrogenase regulatory enzyme DraG, which was stimulated by ADP. The stoichiometry of this complex was 1:1 (DraG monomer : GlnZ trimer). We have previously reported that in vivo high levels of extracellular ammonium cause DraG to be sequestered to the cell membrane in an AmtB and GlnZ-dependent manner. We now report the reconstitution of a ternary complex involving AmtB, GlnZ and DraG in vitro. Sequestration of a regulatory protein by the membrane-bound AmtB-P(II) complex defines a new regulatory role for Amt proteins in Prokaryotes.

  11. Surface Acidity as Descriptor of Catalytic Activity for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Li-O2 Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinzhen; Wang, Fan; Wang, Beizhou; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-10-28

    Unraveling the descriptor of catalytic activity, which is related to physical properties of catalysts, is a major objective of catalysis research. In the present study, the first-principles calculations based on interfacial model were performed to study the oxygen evolution reaction mechanism of Li2O2 supported on active surfaces of transition-metal compounds (TMC: oxides, carbides, and nitrides). Our studies indicate that the O2 evolution and Li(+) desorption energies show linear and volcano relationships with surface acidity of catalysts, respectively. Therefore, the charging voltage and desorption energies of Li(+) and O2 over TMC could correlate with their corresponding surface acidity. It is found that certain materials with an appropriate surface acidity can achieve the high catalytic activity in reducing charging voltage and activation barrier of rate-determinant step. According to this correlation, CoO should have as active catalysis as Co3O4 in reducing charging overpotential, which is further confirmed by our comparative experimental studies. Co3O4, Mo2C, TiC, and TiN are predicted to have a relatively high catalytic activity, which is consistent with the previous experiments. The present study enables the rational design of catalysts with greater activity for charging reactions of Li-O2 battery.

  12. Spectroscopic investigations of organic aerosol and its reaction with halogens, released by sea-salt activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, J.; Zetzsch, C.

    2009-04-01

    The release of reactive halogen species from sea-salt aerosol offers a class of reactants for heterogeneous reactions of utmost importance. These heterogeneous reactions have been overlooked so far, although they may occur with internal and external mixtures of sea-salt aerosol and organic aerosol or organic matter. Such reactions might constitute sources of gaseous organohalogen compounds or halogenated organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer. Infrared and UV/VIS spectroscopy provide an insight into chemical processes at reactive sites of the organic phase on a molecular level. Model studies of heterogeneous reactions of halogens with different kinds of (secondary) organic aerosols and organic matter were performed using a 700L smog chamber with a solar simulator. The model compounds alpha-pinene, catechol and humic acid have been chosen as precursors/material for the condensed, organic phase of the aerosol. After formation of the secondary organic aerosol or preparation of the organic material and the sea-salt solution the reaction was carried out using molecular chlorine and bromine in the presence of simulated sunlight. Chemical transformation of the organic material was studied using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) on a ZnSe crystal and diffuse reflectance UV/VIS spectroscopy. An electrostatic precipitator was developed to deposit the aerosol particles on the ATR crystal as a thin film. On the other hand, longpath-FTIR spectroscopy with a 40m White-cell allows us to monitor both the condensed and gas phase of the aerosol in situ in the smog chamber directly. These spectroscopic techniques enable us to characterize different organic aerosol particles and their functional groups at reactive sites on these particles as well as to study aerosol formation and transformation directly. The heterogeneous reaction of reactive halogen species with organic material at atmospheric conditions leads to small reactive

  13. Remarkable fluorescence enhancement versus complex formation of cationic porphyrins on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2014-06-12

    Fluorescence enhancement of organic fluorophores shows tremendous potential to improve image contrast in fluorescence-based bioimaging. Here, we present an experimental study of the interaction of two cationic porphyrins, meso-tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin chloride (TMPyP) and meso-tetrakis(4-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium)porphyrin chloride (TMAP), with cationic surfactant-stabilized zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) based on several steady-state and time-resolved techniques. We show the first experimental measurements demonstrating a clear transition from pronounced fluorescence enhancement to charge transfer (CT) complex formation by simply changing the nature and location of the positive charge of the meso substituent of the cationic porphyrins. For TMPyP, we observe a sixfold increase in the fluorescence intensity of TMPyP upon addition of ZnO NPs. Our experimental results indicate that the electrostatic binding of TMPyP with the surface of ZnO NPs increases the symmetry of the porphyrin macrocycle. This electronic communication hinders the rotational relaxation of the meso unit and/or decreases the intramolecular CT character between the cavity and the meso substituent of the porphyrin, resulting in the enhancement of the intensity of the fluorescence. For TMAP, on the other hand, the different type and nature of the positive charge resulting in the development of the CT band arise from the interaction with the surface of ZnO NPs. This observation is confirmed by the femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, which provides clear spectroscopic signatures of photoinduced electron transfer from TMAP to ZnO NPs. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  14. Algebraic structures generating reaction-diffusion models: the activator-substrate system

    OpenAIRE

    Palese, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    We shall construct a class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations starting from an infinitesimal algebraic skeleton. Our aim is to explore the possibility of an algebraic foundation of integrability properties and of stability of equilibrium states associated with nonlinear models describing patterns formation.

  15. Solvent-free Reactions of Formylferrocene with Active Methylene Containing Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yin-Juan; GAN Hai-Ying; LU Jun; SHI Zhen

    2003-01-01

    @@ Since ferrocene was synthesized, derivatives of ferrocene have attracted the attention of chemists, and recently solvent-free organic reaction has been an important new dimension in preparative organic chemistry. [1] Solventless synthesis without the use of supporting reagents which can avoid the risk of high pressure development and volatile toxic solvent employment is very amaizing and eco-friendly.

  16. Active sites in Cu-SSZ-13 deNOx catalyst under reaction conditions: a XAS/XES perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomachenko, Kirill A.; Borfecchia, Elisa; Bordiga, Silvia; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Beato, Pablo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 is a highly active catalyst for the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of the harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx, x=1, 2). Since the catalytically active sites for this reaction are mainly represented by isolated Cu ions incorporated into the zeolitic framework, element-selective studies of Cu local environment are crucial to fully understand the enhanced catalytic properties of this material. Herein, we highlight the recent advances in the characterization of the most abundant Cu-sites in Cu-SSZ-13 upon different reaction-relevant conditions made employing XAS and XES spectroscopies, complemented by computational analysis. A concise review of the most relevant literature is also presented.

  17. Conformational changes of active site of copper zinc superoxide dismutase can be detected sensitively by electron-transfer reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒占永

    1996-01-01

    The electron-transfer (ET) reaction between Fe(CN)64- and copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) occurs at the active site of the enzyme. The ET parameters which are sensitive to the denaturation have been used to determine the conformational changes of the active site induced by guanidine hydrochloride and thermal denaturation. The decreases of ET rates for all the denatured enzyme samples reflect the collapse of the active cavity of enzyme in the unfolding processes. The interesting changes of ET amplitude for the enzyme denatured at different pH values suggest that electrostatic interaction plays an important role in the conformational changes of active site. From the results of the kinetic analyses, it is concluded that the conformational changes of the active site are parallel with the inactivation.

  18. Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Serum Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction Are Complementary Methods for Monitoring Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Transplant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cytomegalovirus is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR has proven to be a sensitive and effective technique in defining active cytomegalovirus infection, in addition to having low cost and being a useful test for situations in which there is no need for quantification. Real-time PCR has the advantage of quantification; however, the high cost of this methodology makes it impractical for routine use.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature.

  20. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on natSm up to 65 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Proton induced reactions on natural samarium up to 65 MeV. •Stacked foil irradiation technique. •Comparison of experimental results with the ALICE, EMPIRE and TALYS theoretical model codes. •Calculation and comparison of thick target integral yields. -- Abstract: Activation cross sections for proton induced reactions on Sm are presented for the first time for natSm(p,xn)154,152m2,152m1,152g,150m,150g,149,148,147,146,145Eu, natSm(p,x)153,145Sm, natSm(p,x)151,150,149,148g,148m,146,144,143Pm and natSm(p,x)141Nd up to 65 MeV. The cross sections were measured via activation method by using a stacked-foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy. The results were compared with results of the nuclear reaction codes ALICE, EMPIRE and TALYS (results taken from TENDL libraries). Integral yields of the activation products were calculated from the excitation functions

  1. Activity and Stability of Rare Earth-Based Hydride Alloys as Catalysts of Hydrogen Absorption-Oxidation Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Taokai(应桃开); Gao Xueping(高学平); Hu Weikang(胡伟康); Noréus Dag

    2004-01-01

    Rare earth-based AB5-type hydrogen storage alloys as catalysts of hydrogen-diffusion electrodes for hydrogen absorption and oxidation reactions in alkaline fuel cells were investigated. It is demonstrated that the meta-hydride hydrogen-diffusion electrodes could be charged by hydrogen gas and electrochemically discharged at the same time to retain a stable oxidation potential for a long period. The catalytic activities and stability are almost comparable with a Pt catalyst on the active carbon. Further improvement of performances is expected via reduction of catalyst size into nanometers.

  2. Catalytic activities enhanced by abundant structural defects and balanced N distribution of N-doped graphene in oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaogong; Shi, Yantao; Guo, Jiahao; Gao, Liguo; Wang, Kai; Du, Yi; Ma, Tingli

    2016-02-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) is a promising candidate for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of fuel cells. However, the catalytic activity of NG is lower than that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline and acidic media. In this study, NG samples were obtained using urea as N source. The structural defects and N distribution in the samples were adjusted by regulating the pyrolysis temperature. The new NG type exhibited remarkable catalytic activities for ORR in both alkaline and acidic media.

  3. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on ytterbium up to 70 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkanyi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Takacs, S.; Ditroi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary); Kiraly, B. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), 4026 Debrecen, Bem ter 18/c (Hungary)], E-mail: kiralyb@atomki.hu; Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk 249020 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-01

    Cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on ytterbium were measured up to 70 MeV by using the standard stacked foil irradiation technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Experimental cross sections and derived integral yields are reported for the first time for the {sup nat}Yb(p,xn){sup 173,172mg,171mg,170,167}Lu, {sup nat}Yb(p,x){sup 175cum,166cum}Yb and {sup nat}Yb(p,x){sup 173ind,172ind,168,167cum,165cum}Tm reactions. No earlier experimental cross section data were found in the literature. The experimental data were compared to and analyzed with the results of the theoretical model code ALICE-IPPE. Production routes of medical radioisotope {sup 167}Tm are discussed.

  4. DETECTION OF PHENOL DEGRADING BACTERIA AND PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    OpenAIRE

    H. Movahedyan ، H. Khorsandi ، R. Salehi ، M. Nikaeen

    2009-01-01

    Phenol is one of the organic pollutants in various industrial wastewaters especially petrochemical and oil refining. Biological treatment is one of the considerable choices for removing of phenol present in these wastewaters. Identification of effective microbial species is considered as one of the important priorities for production of the biomass in order to achieve desirable kinetic of biological reactions. Basic purpose of this research is identification of phenol-degrading Pseudomonas Pu...

  5. Gas-Phase Reactions of (n, γ) and Isomeric Transition-Activated Br80 with Alkanes and Haloalkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data are presented on the gas-phase reactions of alkanes and haloalkanes with bromine atoms and ions activated by nuclear transformations. The target molecules include CH4 CD4, C2H6, C2D6, CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCI3, CCl4, CH2F2, CHF3, CF4, C2F6, CF3Br, and CH3Br. The nuclear reactions and transformations used in producing the energetic recoil atoms and ions were Br80m (isomeric transition), Br80, and Br79 (n, γ) Br80. The percentage of the radioactivity found in organic combination (the organic yield, O. Y.) was determined as a function of the concentration of the target molecule in the mole-fraction range of about 0.95 to 1.00. Elemental Br2 served both as a source of hot atoms and as a scavenger. Usually 20-50 separate samples of each reaction system were examined and the data of O.Y. as a function of the concentration of scavenger were plotted and extrapolated to unit mole fraction of target molecule. In all cases, die O.Y. decreased with increasing halogen concentration. Data on the (n, γ) activated reactions of Br80 with isotopic alkanes suggest a comparable extrapolated O.Y. for C2H6 and C2D6, but an O.Y. for CD4 about half of the O.Y. with CH4. Gas chromatographic analysis of the organic products indicates that about 90% of the O.Y. in CH4 is caused by CH3Br and 10% by CH2Br2 For CD4 as the target the distribution of organic activity is approx. 75% CD3Br and 25% CD2Br2. These various data are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms involving hot halogen atoms and ions

  6. Psychosocial versus physiological stress - Meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogler, Lydia; Müller, Veronika I; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Gur, Ruben C; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended. PMID:26123376

  7. Psychosocial versus physiological stress - Meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogler, Lydia; Müller, Veronika I; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T; Gur, Ruben C; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended.

  8. ACTIVATION REACTION ON THE ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM IN SUBSTANCE DEPENDENT PATIENTS: LINKS TO ADDICTION STUDIES AND PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS AND CHANGES IN NEUROFEEDBACK TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. e Melnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Depth of activation reaction (α-activity suppression during the eyes-opening task is considered to be an important quantitative characteristic of α-band brainwaves. Activation reaction was assessed from O1 and O2 leads in 31 male substance dependent subjects. In 7 cases it was measured twice: before and after α- or β-brainwave biofeedback training. The correlations were found between grade of α suppression in eyes-opening task and attitude towards disease and treatment, personality maturity, and level of pathological personality traits. Activation reaction was significantly improved by α-training and non-significantly diminished after β-1-training.

  9. Boron-doped graphene as promising support for platinum catalyst with superior activity towards the methanol electrooxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongrong; Du, Chunyu; An, Meichen; Du, Lei; Tan, Qiang; Liu, Chuntao; Gao, Yunzhi; Yin, Geping

    2015-12-01

    We report the synthesis of boron-doped graphene by thermally annealing the mixture of graphene oxide and boric acid, and its usage as the support of Pt catalyst towards the methanol oxidation reaction. The composition, structure and morphology of boron-doped graphene and its supported Pt nanoparticles (Pt/BG) are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is revealed that boron atoms are doped into graphene network in the form of BC2O and BCO2 bonds, which lead to the increase in defect sites and facilitate the subsequent deposition of Pt nanoparticles. Therefore, the Pt/BG catalyst presents smaller particle size and narrower size distribution than the graphene supported Pt (Pt/G) catalyst. When evaluated as the electrocatalyst for the methanol oxidation reaction, the Pt/BG catalyst exhibits excellent electrochemical activity and stability demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests. The enhanced activity is mainly ascribed to the electronic interaction between boron-doped graphene and Pt nanoparticles, which lowers the d-band center of Pt and thus weakens the absorption of the poisoning intermediate CO. Our work provides an alternative approach of improving the reaction kinetics for the oxidation of small organic molecules.

  10. Sol–gel synthesis of palladium nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide: an active electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fereshteh Chekin

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the synthesis and characterization of palladium nanoparticle-reduced graphene oxide hybrid (Pd–rGO) material is reported. Techniques of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and cyclic voltammetry were used to characterize the structure and properties of the Pd–rGO. Results demonstrate the effect of Pd on the reduced GO. The average particle size of the Pd nanoparticles supported on rGO obtained from TEM is about 12–18 nm. Moreover, glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with palladium nanoparticle–graphene oxide hybrid (Pd–rGO/GCE) was prepared by casting of the Pd–rGO solution on GCE. The electrochemical and catalytic activity of the Pd–rGO/GCE was studied in 0.1 M H2SO4 solution. The Pd–rGO/GCE electrode exhibited remarkable electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). At potential more negative than −0.4 V vs. Ag|AgCl|KCl3M, the current is mainly due to hydrogen evolution reaction. Finally, the kinetic parameters of hydrogen evolution reaction are also discussed on the Pd–rGO/GCE.

  11. High-flux white neutron source based on p(35)-Be reactions for activation experiments at NPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is based on the d(40)-Li neutron source reaction which produces the white neutron spectrum with mean energy of 14 MeV, energy range with high intensity of neutron beam up to 35 MeV, and weak tail up to 55 MeV. At the Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR in Rez near Prague, the source reaction of p+Be was investigated for proton energy of 35 MeV and beam current intensity of 9.2μA. The produced white spectrum with neutron flux up to 1011 cm−2 s−1 was determined by the dosimetry foils activation technique at two sample-to-target distances and validated against the Monte Carlo predictions. The neutron field of these high-flux p(35)-Be white neutron source represents the useful tool for experimental simulation of the spectrum of the IFMIF facility, validating the activation cross-section data in the energy range relevant to the IFMIF, studying the radiation hardness of electronics against the high-energy neutron fields, and various activation experiments. - Highlights: • Development of accelerator-driven neutron sources. • Fast neutron spectrometry. • Multi-foil activation technique. • Nuclear data measurement and validation in the energy range of IFMIF

  12. Enhancement in the Catalytic Activity of Pd/USY in the Heck Reaction Induced by H2 Bubbling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Niwa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pd was loaded on ultra stable Y (USY zeolites prepared by steaming NH4-Y zeolite under different conditions. Heck reactions were carried out over the prepared Pd/USY. We found that H2 bubbling was effective in improving not only the catalytic activity of Pd/USY, but also that of other supported Pd catalysts and Pd(OAc2. Moreover, the catalytic activity of Pd/USY could be optimized by choosing appropriate steaming conditions for the preparation of the USY zeolites; Pd loaded on USY prepared at 873 K with 100% H2O gave the highest activity (TOF = 61,000 h−1, which was higher than that of Pd loaded on other kinds of supports. The prepared Pd/USY catalysts were applicable to the Heck reactions using various kinds of substrates including bromo- and chloro-substituted aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds. Characterization of the acid properties of the USY zeolites revealed that the strong acid site (OHstrong generated as a result of steaming had a profound effect on the catalytic activity of Pd.

  13. Bimolecular reactions of activated species: An analysis of problematic HC(O)C(O) chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin J.; Robertson, Struan H.; Blitz, Mark A.; Seakins, Paul W.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated the importance of non-thermal bimolecular association chemistry. Recently a fully reversible method for incorporating any number of such non-thermal reactions into a single master equation has been developed (Green and Robertson, 2014) [10]. Using this methodology experimental results for the system: (1) (CHO)2 + OH → HC(O)C(O) + H2O, (2) HC(O)C(O) → HCO + CO, (3) HC(O)C(O) + O2 → OH + CO + CO2, are modeled, reproducing the temperature and pressure dependence of the OH yield. An issue remains as to how to model energy partition into HC(O)C(O).

  14. Activity and Durability of Iridium Nanoparticles in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alia, Shaun M.; Rasimick, Brian; Ngo, Chilan; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Xu, Hui; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2016-07-15

    Unsupported iridium (Ir) nanoparticles, that serve as standard oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts in acidic electrolyzers, were investigated for electrochemical performance and durability in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells. Fixed potential holds and potential cycling were applied to probe the durability of Ir nanoparticles, and performance losses were found to be driven by particle growth (coarsening) at moderate potential (1.4 to 1.6 V) and Ir dissolution at higher potential (>/=1.8 V). Several different commercially available samples were evaluated and standardized conditions for performance comparison are reported. The electrocatalyst RDE results have also been compared to results obtained for performance and durability in electrolysis cells.

  15. Activation cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on gold up to 40 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarkanyi, F. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Ditroi, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Takacs, S.; Kiraly, B. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15

    Cross-sections of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on gold were measured up to 40 MeV by using the standard stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. Experimental cross-sections and derived integral yields are reported for the {sup 197}Au(d,xn){sup 197m,197g,195m,195g}Hg and {sup 197}Au(d,x){sup 198g,196m,196g,195,194}Au nuclear reactions. The experimental data are analyzed and compared to literature and predictions of the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS theoretical model codes. The application of the new cross-sections for accelerator technology, medical radioisotope production, thin layer activation and dose calculation is discussed.

  16. Study on the reaction activity of CuO/y-Al2O3 for dry flue gas desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; ZHANG Chao; ZHENG Ying; ZHENG Chu-guang

    2004-01-01

    The copper oxide bed regenerable adsorber process can efficiently remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) and reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas with no solid or liquid byproducts. This paper investigates the dry flue gas desulfurization activities of the CuO/γ-Al2O3 under different operation conditions finding that the dispersion degree of copper oxide can achieve a threshold value, which is 0.47mg/m2 carriers. The conclusion confirms that the sulfur capacity of desulfurizer is associated with flue gas' space velocity, reaction temperature, copper content and the structure of sorbent pellet, etc. And with the condition of the desulfurization reaction temperature 673 K, the space velocity 11 200 h-1 and the S/Cu mole ratio under 1, the sulfur removal efficiency can go upwards to 95%.

  17. Measurement of the activation energy for the reaction of the hydroxyl radical with hydrogen in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, K.H.

    1977-06-30

    The rate constant, k/sub 1/, for the reaction OH + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + H in aqueous solution was measured at temperatures between 15 and 90/sup 0/C. This was achieved by using a new signal averaging technique, combined with a flow system, to record the transient absorption of the OH radical during repetitive pulsing of the solution with the electron beam from a linear accelerator. From the data, the activation energy, E/sub a/, for the above reaction was calculated. The results, with their 90 percent confidence limits, are k/sub 1/ (25/sup 0/C) = 3.96 x 10/sup 7/ L mol/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ +- 10 percent and E/sub a/ = 3.18 +- 0.5 kcal mol/sup -1/.

  18. The effect of activating solution on the mechanical strength, reaction rate, mineralogy, and microstructure of alkali-activated fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.; Hu. J.; Ye, G.

    2012-01-01

    Alkali-activated fly ash (AAF) is a promising material that exhibits comparable material properties as cement-based materials but with much less CO2 emission. In the present work, the effect of activating solution (SiO2 and Na2O content) on the performance of AAF was studied by means of isothermal c

  19. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul P; Eichler, Anja; Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C-H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations.

  20. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul P. Kelly

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C–H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations.

  1. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul P; Eichler, Anja; Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C-H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations. PMID:26664590

  2. Sea urchin-like cobalt-iron phosphide as an active catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Garcia, Adriana; Su, Dong; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-02-01

    Sea urchin-like (CoxFe1-x)2P shows Co/Fe-composition dependent catalysis for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1 M KOH. The (Co0.54Fe0.46)2P is the most efficient OER catalyst, reaching 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 0.37 V (vs. RHE). The report offers a new synergistic approach to tune and optimize the electrocatalysis of OER.Sea urchin-like (CoxFe1-x)2P shows Co/Fe-composition dependent catalysis for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1 M KOH. The (Co0.54Fe0.46)2P is the most efficient OER catalyst, reaching 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 0.37 V (vs. RHE). The report offers a new synergistic approach to tune and optimize the electrocatalysis of OER. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08763e

  3. Changes in brain activation patterns according to cross-training effect in serial reaction time task An functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Hyun Kwon; Jung Won Kwon; Ji Won Park

    2013-01-01

    Cross-training is a phenomenon related to motor learning, where motor performance of the untrained limb shows improvement in strength and skill execution following unilateral training of the homologous contralateral limb. We used functional MRI to investigate whether motor performance of the untrained limb could be improved using a serial reaction time task according to motor sequential learning of the trained limb, and whether these skill acquisitions led to changes in brain activation patterns. We recruited 20 right-handed healthy subjects, who were randomly allocated into training and control groups. The training group was trained in performance of a serial reaction time task using their non-dominant left hand, 40 minutes per day, for 10 days, over a period of 2 weeks. The control group did not receive training. Measurements of response time and percentile of response accuracy were performed twice during pre- and post-training, while brain functional MRI was scanned during performance of the serial reaction time task using the untrained right hand. In the training group, prominent changes in response time and percentile of response accuracy were observed in both the untrained right hand and the trained left hand between pre- and post-training. The control group showed no significant changes in the untrained hand between pre- and post-training. In the training group, the activated volume of the cortical areas related to motor function (i.e., primary motor cortex, premotor area, posterior parietal cortex) showed a gradual decrease, and enhanced cerebellar activation of the vermis and the newly activated ipsilateral dentate nucleus were observed during performance of the serial reaction time task using the untrained right hand, accompanied by the cross-motor learning effect. However, no significant changes were observed in the control group. Our findings indicate that motor skills learned over the 2-week training using the trained limb were transferred to the

  4. Reaction invariant-based reduction of the activated sludge model ASM1 for batch applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santa Cruz, Judith A.; Mussati, Sergio F.; Scenna, Nicolás J.;

    2016-01-01

    to batch activated sludge processes described by the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1) for carbon and nitrogen removal. The objective of the model reduction is to describe the exact dynamics of the states predicted by the original model with a lower number of ODEs. This leads to a reduction...

  5. Highly active and reusable catalyst from Fe-Mg-hydrotalcite anionic clay for Friedel-Crafts type benzylation reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasant R Choudhary; Rani Jha; Pankaj A Choudhari

    2005-11-01

    Fe-Mg-hydrotalcite (Mg/Fe = 3) anionic clay with or without calcination (at 200-800°C) has been used for the benzylation of toluene and other aromatic compounds by benzyl chloride. Hydrotalcite before and after its calcination was characterized for surface area, crystalline phases and basicity. Both the hydrotalcite, particularly after its use in the benzylation reaction, and the catalyst derived from it by its calcination at 200-800°C show high catalytic activity for the benzylation of toluene and other aromatic compounds. The catalytically active species present in the catalyst in its most active form are the chlorides and oxides of iron on the catalyst surface.

  6. Pt monolayer shell on hollow Pd core electrocatalysts: Scale up synthesis, structure, and activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukmirovic Miomir B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on synthesis, characterization and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR kinetics of Pt monolayer shell on Pd(hollow, or Pd-Au(hollow core electrocatalysts. Comparison between the ORR catalytic activity of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores and those of Pt solid and Pt hollow nanoparticles has been obtained using the rotating disk electrode technique. Hollow nanoparticles were made using Ni or Cu nanoparticles as sacrificial templates. The Pt ORR specific and mass activities of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores were found considerably higher than those of the electrocatalysts with the solid cores. We attribute this enhanced Pt activity to the smooth surface morphology and hollow-induced lattice contraction, in addition to the mass-saving geometry of hollow particles.

  7. Science Letters: Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 and activity in carbon-nitric oxide reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Xian-kai; ZOU Xue-quan; SHI Hui-xiang; WANG Da-hui

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 was performed by annealing in ammonia, and the activity of the modified carbon for NO reduction was studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that Fe2O3 enhances the amount of surface oxygen complexes and facilitates nitrogen incorporation in the carbon, especially in the form of pyridinic nitrogen. The modified carbon shows excellent activity for NO reduction in the low temperature regime (<500 ℃) because of the cooperative effect of Fe2O3 and the surface nitrogen species.

  8. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namratha Pai Kotebagilu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%, methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%, and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55% in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r=0.816 and low-density lipoprotein (r=0.948 and Costus speciosus in brain (r=0.977, polyphenols, and r=0.949, flavonoids correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates.

  9. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  10. Identifying the active site in nitrogen-doped graphene for the VO2+/VO2(+) redox reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jutao; Fu, Xiaogang; Liu, Qiao; Liu, Yanru; Wei, Zhiyang; Niu, Kexing; Zhang, Junyan

    2013-06-25

    Nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (NGS), synthesized by annealing graphite oxide (GO) with urea at 700-1050 °C, were studied as positive electrodes in a vanadium redox flow battery. The NGS, in particular annealed at 900 °C, exhibited excellent catalytic performance in terms of electron transfer (ET) resistance (4.74 ± 0.51 and 7.27 ± 0.42 Ω for the anodic process and cathodic process, respectively) and reversibility (ΔE = 100 mV, Ipa/Ipc = 1.38 at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1)). Detailed research confirms that not the nitrogen doping level but the nitrogen type in the graphene sheets determines the catalytic activity. Among four types of nitrogen species doped into the graphene lattice including pyridinic-N, pyrrolic-N, quaternary nitrogen, and oxidic-N, quaternary nitrogen is verified as a catalytic active center for the [VO](2+)/[VO2](+) couple reaction. A mechanism is proposed to explain the electrocatalytic performance of NGS for the [VO](2+)/[VO2](+) couple reaction. The possible formation of a N-V transitional bonding state, which facilitates the ET between the outer electrode and reactant ions, is a key step for its high catalytic activity.

  11. Fused triazoles via tandem reactions of activated Cinchona alkaloids with azide ion. Second Cinchona rearrangement exemplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röper, S; Franz, M H; Wartchow, R; Hoffmann, H M R

    2003-08-01

    [reaction: see text] Intramolecular 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of cinchona azides to the C10-C11 alkyne and C10-C11 olefin unit of the alkaloid have been designed via tandem strategy. A variety of fused triazoles and triazolines with a bis-azahomotwistane skeleton have been prepared. In trifluoroethanol, O-mesylcinchonidine 7-OMs and NaN(3) furnish triazole 8 as well as cage-expanded 1,5-diazatricyclo[4.4.1.0(3,8)]undecane derivative 10. Both fused triazoles 8 and 10 are formed with retention of configuration at C9 and C3, respectively. 1-Azabicyclo[3.2.2]cage expansion is shown to be reversible. PMID:12889871

  12. Morphological transformation during activation and reaction of an iron Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, N.B.; Kohler, S.; Harrington, M. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to support the development of slurry-phase bubble column processes being studied at the La Porte Alternative Fuel Development Unit. This paper describes the aspects of Sandia`s recent work regarding the advancement and understanding of the iron catalyst used in the slurry phase process. A number of techniques were used to understand the chemical and physical effects of pretreatment and reaction on the attrition and carbon deposition characteristics of iron catalysts. Unless otherwise stated, the data discussed was derived form experiments carried out on the catalyst chosen for the summer 1994 Fischer-Tropsch run at LaPorte, UCI 1185-78-370, (an L 3950 type) that is 88% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11% CuO, and 0.052%K{sub 2}O.

  13. Substituent group effects on reorganization and activation energies: Theoretical study of charge transfer reaction through DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arshad

    2010-02-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP) with aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets on various substituted neutral and radical cationic guanine-cytosine (GC ∗+) base pairs suggest that an electron-withdrawing ring deactivating substituent group like -NO 2, -COOH attached to a G ring lowers the reorganization/activation energy values whereas an electron releasing ring activating group like -OH increases these values. An electron releasing , but a ring deactivating group -F, exhibits its effect in between the above two extreme cases. A weak electron releasing, ring activating methyl group, as well as substituent groups attached to C (cytosine)-ring show almost no effect.

  14. Surface chemistry of Au/TiO2: Thermally and photolytically activated reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayotov, Dimitar A.; Morris, John R.

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating particle size dependence to the physical, photophysical, and chemical properties of gold has motivated thousands of studies focused on exploring the ability of supported gold nanoparticles to catalyze chemical transformations. In particular, titanium dioxide-supported gold (Au/TiO2) nanoparticles may provide the right combination of electronic structure, structural dynamics, and stability to affect catalysis in important practical applications from environmental remediation to selective hydrogenation to carbon monoxide oxidation. Harnessing the full potential of Au/TiO2 will require a detailed atomic-scale understanding of the thermal and photolytic processes that accompany chemical conversion. This review describes some of the unique properties exhibited by particulate gold before delving into how those properties affect chemistry on titania supports. Particular attention is given first to thermally driven reactions on single crystal system. This review then addresses nanoparticulate samples in an effort begin to bridge the so-called materials gap. Building on the foundation provided by the large body of work in the field of thermal catalysis, the review describes new research into light-driven catalysis on Au/TiO2. Importantly, the reader should bear in mind throughout this review that thermal chemistry and thermal effects typically accompany photochemistry. Distinguishing between thermally-driven stages of a reaction and photo-induced steps remains a significant challenge, but one that experimentalists and theorists are beginning to decipher with new approaches. Finally, a summary of several state-of-the-art studies describes how they are illuminating new frontiers in the quest to exploit Au/TiO2 as an efficient catalyst and low-energy photocatalyst.

  15. Highly active and stable Pt electrocatalysts promoted by antimony-doped SnO2 supports for oxygen reduction reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Min; Xu, Junyuan; Li, Qingfeng;

    2014-01-01

    Alternative composite supports for platinum catalysts were synthesized from antimony doped tin dioxide (ATO) nanoparticles. In the range of the antimony content from 0 to 11mol%, the highest electrical conductivity of 1.1Scm-1 at 130°C was obtained for the 5mol% Sb ATO, from which composite...... supports composed of oxides and carbon and supported platinum catalysts were prepared. Using the pure oxide support, the Pt/ATO catalyst displayed superior specific activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs). Low surface area of ATO caused poor dispersion of Pt particles compared...

  16. Activation measurement of the 3He(a,g)7Be reaction cross section at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Bordeanu, C; Halász, Z; Szücs, T; Kiss, G G; Elekes, Z; Farkas, J; Fülöp, Zs; Somorjai, E; 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2013.03.012

    2013-01-01

    The astrophysically important 3He(a,g)7Be reaction was studied at high energies where the available experimental data are in contradiction. A thin window 3He gas cell was used and the cross section was measured with the activation method. The obtained cross sections at energies between Ec.m. = 1.5 and 2.5 MeV are compared with the available data and theoretical calculations. The present results support the validity of the high energy cross section energy dependence observed by recent experiments.

  17. Synthesis and Some Reactions of 1-aryl-4-acetyl-5-methyl-1,2,3-triazole Derivatives with Anticonvulsant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Ekhlass M; Abdelrazek, Fathy M; Ayyad, Rezk R; El-Farargy, Ahmed F

    2016-01-01

    The triazoles 3a-d underwent condensation reactions with 4-(piperidin-1-yl)-benzaldehyde to afford the chalcones 5a-d. Chalcone derivatives 5a-d were reacted with 2,3-diaminomaleonitrile, thiourea and hydrazine hydrate to afford the novel diazepine-dicarbonitrile derivatives 7a-d, the pyrimidine-2-thiol derivatives 9a-d and hydrazino-pyrimidines 10a-d respectively. Structures of the prepared compounds were elucidated by physical and spectral data like FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and mass spectroscopy. Some of the synthesized compounds were screened for their anticonvulsant activity and SAR. PMID:26776225

  18. Biogenic synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using Pulicaria glutinosa extract and their catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mujeeb; Khan, Merajuddin; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Adil, Syed Farooq; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H

    2014-06-28

    Green synthesis of nanomaterials finds the edge over chemical methods due to its environmental compatibility. Herein, we report a facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) using an aqueous solution of Pulicaria glutinosa, a plant widely found in a large region of Saudi Arabia, as a bioreductant. The as-prepared Pd NPs were characterized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The hydroxyl groups of the plant extract (PE) molecules were found mainly responsible for the reduction and growth of Pd NPs. FT-IR analysis confirmed the dual role of the PE, both as a bioreductant as well as a capping ligand, which stabilizes the surface of Pd NPs. The crystalline nature of the Pd NPs was identified using XRD analysis which confirmed the formation of a face-centered cubic structure (JCPDS: 87-0641, space group: Fm3m (225)). Furthermore, the as-synthesized Pd NPs demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions. Kinetic studies of the catalytic reaction monitored using GC confirmed that the reaction completes in less than 5 minutes.

  19. Measurement of activation cross-sections for high-energy neutron-induced reactions of Bi and Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Muhammad; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Naik, Haladhara; Shahid, Muhammad; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-08-01

    The cross-sections for 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi, 209Bi(n, 5n)205Bi, natPb(n, xn)204mPb, natPb(n, xn)203Pb, natPb(n, xn)202mPb,natPb(n, xn)201Pb, natPb(n, xn)200Pb, natPb(n, αxn)203Hg and natPb(n, p xn)202Tl reactions were determined at the Korean Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Korea in the neutron energy range of 15.2 to 37.2 MeV. The above cross-sections were obtained by using the activation and off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. The quasi-monoenergetic neutron used for the above reactions are based on the 9Be(p, n) reaction. Simulations of the spectral flux from the Be target were done using the MCNPX program. The cross-sections were estimated with the TALYS 1.6 code using the default parameter. The data from the present work and literature were compared with the data from the EAF-2010 and the TENDL-2013 libraries, and calculated values of TALYS 1.6 code. It shows that appropriate level density model, the γ-ray strength function, and the spin cut-off parameter are needed to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theoretical values from TALYS 1.6 code.

  20. New activation cross section data on longer lived radio-nuclei produced in proton induced nuclear reaction on zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excitation functions of 96Nb, 95mNb, 95gNb, 92mNb, 91mNb, 90Nb, 95Zr, 89Zr, 88Zr, 86Zr, 88Y, 87mY, 87gY, 86Y were measured up to 70 MeV proton energy by using the stacked foil technique and the activation method. The new data were compared with the critically analyzed experimental data in the literature and with the TALYS based model results in TENDL-2013 library. The possible role of the investigated reactions in the production of medically relevant 90Nb, 95mNb, 89Zr, and 88Y radionuclides is discussed. - Highlights: • Proton induced reactions on natural zirconium up to 65 MeV. • Stacked foil irradiation technique coupled with gamma-spectrometry. • Comparison of experimental data with the nuclear reaction model results in the TENDL-2013 library. • Calculation and comparison of thick target integral yields. • Comparison of the production routes of 90Nb, 95mNb, 89Zr and 88Y medically relevant radioisotopes

  1. Activation of 112Cd by deuteron induced reactions up to 50 MeV: An alternative for 111In production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Enriched 112Cd targets were irradiated with 50 MeV deuterons. • Reaction cross sections for activation products 109,110g,111In and 111,110g,106Ag. • Comparisons with the results of the TENDL-2013 library based on TALYS 1.4 code. • Weighted sums of cross sections from TENDL-2013 were compared to literature results on natCd. • Production capabilities for 111In are compared to the 112Cd(p,2n)111In route. - Abstract: In stacked foil irradiations with an incident 50 MeV deuteron beam on highly enriched 112Cd targets, the excitation functions for 109,110g,111In and 111,110g,106Ag were determined, relative to the monitor reactions natAl(d,x)22,24Na. The results were compared to the scarce literature values on enriched Cd isotopes. Through combination of reaction cross section data on all stable Cd isotopes listed in the on-line library TENDL-2013 (calculated with the TALYS 1.4 theoretical code) a comparison with our earlier study on natCd is made. The possible production of 111In through 112Cd(d,3n), as an alternative to 112Cd(p,2n), is discussed

  2. Measurement of activation reaction rate distributions in a lead assembly bombarded with 500-MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Takada, H; Sasa, T; Tsujimoto, K; Yasuda, H

    2000-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions of various activation detectors such as the /sup nat/Ni(n, x)/sup 58/Co, /sup 197/Au(n,2n)/sup 196/Au, and /sup 197/Au(n,4n)/sup 194/Au reactions were measured to study the production and the transport of spallation neutrons in a lead assembly bombarded with protons of 500 MeV. The measured data were analyzed with the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC/JAERI combined with the MCNP4A code using the nuclide production cross sections based on the JENDL Dosimetry File and those calculated with the ALICE-F code. It was found that the NMTC/JAERI-MCNP4A calculations agreed well with the experiments for the low-energy-threshold reaction of /sup nat/Ni(n, x)/sup 58/Co. With the increase of threshold energy, however, the calculation underestimated the experiments, especially above 20 MeV. The reason for the disagreement can be attributed to the underestimation of the neutron yield in the tens of mega-electron-volt regions by the NMTC/JAERI code. (32 refs).

  3. Bimolecular recombination reactions: K-adiabatic and K-active forms of the bimolecular master equations and analytic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Expressions for a K-adiabatic master equation for a bimolecular recombination rate constant krec are derived for a bimolecular reaction forming a complex with a single well or complexes with multiple well, where K is the component of the total angular momentum along the axis of least moment of inertia of the recombination product. The K-active master equation is also considered. The exact analytic solutions, i.e., the K-adiabatic and K-active steady-state population distribution function of reactive complexes, g(EJK) and g(EJ), respectively, are derived for the K-adiabatic and K-active master equation cases using properties of inhomogeneous integral equations (Fredholm type). The solutions accommodate arbitrary intermolecular energy transfer models, e.g., the single exponential, double exponential, Gaussian, step-ladder, and near-singularity models. At the high pressure limit, the krec for both the K-adiabatic and K-active master equations reduce, respectively, to the K-adiabatic and K-active bimolecular Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory (high pressure limit expressions). Ozone and its formation from O + O2 are known to exhibit an adiabatic K. The ratio of the K-adiabatic to the K-active recombination rate constants for ozone formation at the high pressure limit is calculated to be ˜0.9 at 300 K. Results on the temperature and pressure dependence of the recombination rate constants and populations of O3 will be presented elsewhere.

  4. The effect of activating solution on the mechanical strength, reaction rate, mineralogy, and microstructure of alkali-activated fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Y.; Hu J.; Ye, G.

    2012-01-01

    Alkali-activated fly ash (AAF) is a promising material that exhibits comparable material properties as cement-based materials but with much less CO2 emission. In the present work, the effect of activating solution (SiO2 and Na2O content) on the performance of AAF was studied by means of isothermal calorimetry and X-ray diffraction analysis. Meanwhile, the pore structure of AAF was examined by mercury intrusion porosimetry combined with environmental scanning electron microscope. The results i...

  5. Activation-energy for the reaction h+oh--]eaq- - kinetic determination of the enthalpy and entropy of solvation of the hydrated electron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickle, B.; Sehested, Knud

    1985-01-01

    The reaction between atomic hydrogen and hydroxide ion in aqueous solutions H + OH- - eaq- + H20 has been studied by pulse radiolysis. The rate constant was measured at pH 11.7 and 12 by following the growth of the hydrated electron absorption at 600 nm. The activation energy of the reaction has...

  6. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-08-27

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media.

  7. Bifunctional enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Ag catalysts due to water activation on LaMnO3 supports in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Ae; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Song, Hannah; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2015-08-01

    Ag is considered to be one of the best candidates for oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts in alkaline media for application in various electrochemical energy devices. In this study, we demonstrate that water activation is a key factor in enhancing the ORR activity in alkaline media, unlike in acid environments. Ag supported on LaMnO3 having a high oxophilicity showed a markedly higher ORR activity than that on carbon with inert surfaces. Through various electrochemical tests, it was revealed that the origin of the enhanced ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3 is the bifunctional effect mainly due to the water activation at the interface between Ag and LaMnO3. Furthermore, the ligand effect due to the charge transfer from Mn to Ag leads to the enhancement of both oxygen activation on Ag and water activation on Mn sites, and hence, an improvement in the ORR activity of Ag/LaMnO3. On the other hand, the strain effect based on the fine structure variation in the lattice was negligible. We therefore suggest that the employment of a co-catalyst or support with highly oxophilic nature and the maximization of the interface between catalyst and support should be considered in the design of electrocatalysts for the ORR in alkaline media.

  8. The size of active bubbles for the production of hydrogen in sonochemical reaction field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2016-09-01

    The sonication of aqueous solution generates microscopic cavitation bubbles that may growth and violently collapse to produce highly reactive species (i.e. OH, HO2 and H2O2), hydrogen and emit light, sonoluminescence. The bubble size is a key parameter that influences the chemical activity of the system. This wok aims to study theoretically the size of active bubbles for the production of hydrogen in ultrasonic cavitation field in water using a single bubble sonochemistry model. The effect of several parameters such as frequency of ultrasound, acoustic intensity and liquid temperature on the range of sonochemically active bubbles for the production of hydrogen was clarified. The numerical simulation results showed that the size of active bubbles is an interval which includes an optimum value at which the production rate of H2 is maximal. It was shown that the range of ambient radius for an active bubble as well as the optimum bubble radius for the production of hydrogen increased with increasing acoustic intensity and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency and bulk liquid temperature. It was found that the range of ambient bubble radius dependence of the operational conditions followed the same trend as those reported experimentally for sonoluminescing bubbles. Comparison with literature data showed a good agreement between the theoretical determined optimum bubble sizes for the production of hydrogen and the experimental reported sizes for sonoluminescing bubbles. PMID:27150777

  9. Activity and Stability of RuOx Based Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoli, Elisa Antares

    delocalized hydrogen refueling stations. The sluggish kinetics of OER and the high costs of the materials represent some of the biggest technological challenges for PEM electrolysers. The current technology relies on Pt group based materials and in particular ruthenium and iridium are the most active...... and stable OER catalysts. To contain costs and precious metals supply, the mass activity should be maximized. However, in order to define the properties of a catalyst, knowing the distinction between geometric and electronic effects is fundamental. It is not trivial to determine the intrinsic catalytic...... activity on oxides and studies on well-defined surfaces are required. Notably, industrial applications demand maximized surface-to-bulk ratio, hence fabrication of catalysts in nanoparticulate form. In this perspective, this project aimed at investigating well-defined mass-selected ruthenium and ruthenium...

  10. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on α-Amylase Activity and Enzymatic Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Shaoyi; LIU Yong; WU Songhai; WANG Zhibin

    2009-01-01

    The effect of magnetic field on α-amylase was studied. Under the experimental conditions, α-amylase solution was treated by 0.15 T, 0.30 T and 0.45 T static magnetic fields for a known period of time, then the activ-ity, kinetic parameters, and the secondary conformation were investigated. The results showed that there was a con-siderable effect of the magnetic exposure on the α-amylase. The activity was increased by 27%, 34.1%, 37.8% compared with the control. It was also found that both kinetic parameters Km and Vm could be decreased due to the increasing magnetic field, Km decreased from 2.20×102 to 0.87×102, whereas Vm decreased from 2.0×103 g/min to 1.1×103g/min. At the same time, there were some irregular changes in α-amylase secondary conformation.

  11. Interleukin-13 Activates Distinct Cellular Pathways Leading to Ductular Reaction, Steatosis, and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseck, Richard L; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; Vannella, Kevin M; Cantu, David A; Lu, Wei-Yu; Ferreira-González, Sofía; Forbes, Stuart J; Vallier, Ludovic; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-07-19

    Fibroproliferative diseases are driven by dysregulated tissue repair responses and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality because they affect nearly every organ system. Type 2 cytokine responses are critically involved in tissue repair; however, the mechanisms that regulate beneficial regeneration versus pathological fibrosis are not well understood. Here, we have shown that the type 2 effector cytokine interleukin-13 simultaneously, yet independently, directed hepatic fibrosis and the compensatory proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary cells in progressive models of liver disease induced by interleukin-13 overexpression or after infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Using transgenic mice with interleukin-13 signaling genetically disrupted in hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, or resident tissue fibroblasts, we have revealed direct and distinct roles for interleukin-13 in fibrosis, steatosis, cholestasis, and ductular reaction. Together, these studies show that these mechanisms are simultaneously controlled but distinctly regulated by interleukin-13 signaling. Thus, it may be possible to promote interleukin-13-dependent hepatobiliary expansion without generating pathological fibrosis. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27421703

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanostructure fabricated by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of gold nanoparticles in an electroplating solution containing gold (I) trisodium disulphite under synchrotron X-ray radiation was investigated. The nanoparticles grew and aggregated into clusters with increasing radiation time. This behavior is explained by evaluating the effect of Derjaguin-Landau-Verweyand-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions combining repulsive electrostatic and attractive van der Waals forces on the particle deposition process. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4,4′ -bipyridine (4bpy) in aqueous solution was measured using gold nanoparticles immobilized on silicon substrates under systematically-varied X-ray exposure. The substrates provided an in situ SERS spectrum for 1 nM 4bpy. This demonstration creates new opportunities for chemical and environmental analyses through simple SERS measurements. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were produced by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation. • The gold nanoparticles grew and aggregated into the higher-order nanostructure. • The behavior is qualitatively explained by analytical estimation. • The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of 4,4′-bipyridine (4bpy) was demonstrated. • The substrate fabricated in a suitable condition provides in situ SERS for 1 nM 4bpy

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering active gold nanostructure fabricated by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu, E-mail: yamaguti@lasti.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Matsumoto, Takeshi [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan); Okada, Ikuo; Sakurai, Ikuya [Synchrotoron Radiation Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Utsumi, Yuichi [Laboratory of Advance Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Koto, Kamigori, Ako, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The deposition of gold nanoparticles in an electroplating solution containing gold (I) trisodium disulphite under synchrotron X-ray radiation was investigated. The nanoparticles grew and aggregated into clusters with increasing radiation time. This behavior is explained by evaluating the effect of Derjaguin-Landau-Verweyand-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions combining repulsive electrostatic and attractive van der Waals forces on the particle deposition process. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4,4′ -bipyridine (4bpy) in aqueous solution was measured using gold nanoparticles immobilized on silicon substrates under systematically-varied X-ray exposure. The substrates provided an in situ SERS spectrum for 1 nM 4bpy. This demonstration creates new opportunities for chemical and environmental analyses through simple SERS measurements. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles were produced by photochemical reaction of synchrotron radiation. • The gold nanoparticles grew and aggregated into the higher-order nanostructure. • The behavior is qualitatively explained by analytical estimation. • The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of 4,4′-bipyridine (4bpy) was demonstrated. • The substrate fabricated in a suitable condition provides in situ SERS for 1 nM 4bpy.

  14. Interesterification reaction activity, fatty acid composition and selectivity ratio of soybean oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Shattory, Y.

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The interesterification reaction was carried out by adding oleic acid to soybean oil by ratio 1:2 w/w under different conditions of temperature, stirring and catalyst percentages. Assessment of the interesterification of oils was reported by determination of saponification value, iodine value and fatty acids composition. This study showed that linolenic acid which is responsible for flavour instability of soybean oil and consider as primary factor contributing to deterioration of this oil could be reduced to less than or equals 3%.

    Se han llevado a cabo reacciones de interesterificación mediante la adición de ácido oleico a aceite de soja en la relación 1:2 w/w bajo diferentes condiciones de temperatura, agitación y porcentaje de catalizador. La evaluación de la interesterificación de los aceites se realizó por determinación del índice de saponificación, el índice de iodo y la composición en ácidos grasos. Este estudio mostró que el ácido linolénico, que es responsable de la inestabilidad del flavor del aceite de soja y considerado como factor primario que contribuye a la deterioración de este aceite, podría ser reducido a cantidades menores o iguales al 3%.

  15. Surface spectators and their role in relationships between activity and selectivity of the oxygen reduction reaction in acid environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciapina, Eduardo G.; Lopes, Pietro P.; Subbaraman, Ram; Ticianelli, Edson A.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Strmcnik, Dusan; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2015-11-01

    We use the rotating ring disk (RRDE) method to study activity-selectivity relationships for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt(111) modified by various surface coverages of adsorbed CNad (ΘCNad). The results demonstrate that small variations in ΘCNad have dramatic effect on the ORR activity and peroxide production, resulting in “volcano-like” dependence with an optimal surface coverage of ΘCNad = 0.3 ML. These relationships can be simply explained by balancing electronic and ensemble effects of co-adsorbed CNad and adsorbed spectator species from the supporting electrolytes, without the need for intermediate adsorption energy arguments. Although this study has focused on the Pt(111)-CNad/H2SO4 interface, the results and insight gained here are invaluable for controlling another dimension in the properties of electrochemical interfaces.

  16. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of $^{51,48}$Cr, $^{48}$V, $^{48,47,46,44m,44g,43}$Sc and $^{43,42}$K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  17. A Catalytically Active Membrane Reactor for Fast, Highly Exothermic, Heterogeneous Gas Reactions. A Pilot Plant Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, Jan W.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Swaaij, Wim P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    Membrane reactors have been frequently studied because of their ability to combine chemical activity and separation properties into one device. Due to their thermal stability and mechanical strength, ceramic membranes are preferred over polymeric ones, but small transmembrane fluxes obstruct a wides

  18. [Photodynamic reaction and oxidative stress - influence of the photodynamic effect on the activity antioxidant enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiszewska, Anna; Nowak-Stępniowska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of light with a photosensitizer, accumulated in a tissue in the presence of oxygen, leads to formation of reactive oxygen species, mainly of singlet oxygen and free radicals. These factors react with biomolecules producing their oxidized states. Reactive oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen and free radicals are able to damage membranes, DNA, enzymes, structural peptides and other cellular structures leading to cell death. An antioxidant protection of cell is formed by enzymes belonging to the family of oxidoreductases: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR). Photodynamic therapy leads to the increased production of oxidizing toxic forms. It is important to analyze impact of PDT on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, CAT, GPx. The activity of antioxidant enzymes during the photodynamic effect is influenced by both the light energy dose and the concentration of photosensitizer. The presence only of the photosensitizer or only the light energy may also result in changes in the activity of these enzymes. The differences in changes in the activity of these enzymes depend on the type of used photosensitizer. A phenomenon of selective accumulation of photosensitizer in tumor tissues is used in the photodynamic method of tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Reactions to Humorous Sexual Stimuli as a Function of Sexual Activeness and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prerost, Frank J.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed male (N=60) and female (N=60) responses to pictorial humorous sexual material in relationship to degree of sexual expression and personal satisfaction with sexual behavior. Results showed persons with active and satisfying sexual expression enjoyed sexually explicit cartoons and showed less preference for aggressive themes. (LLL)

  20. AB INITIO STUDY OF CHEMICAL ACTIVATION AND HYDROGENATION OF WHITE PHOSPHORUS IN REACTION WITH RHODIUM TRIHYDRIDE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanta I. Balan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The four-stage mechanism of reaction of the rhodium trihydride complex [(triphosRhH3] (triphos=1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphanylmethylethane with the white phosphorus molecule resulting in the phosphane and the cyclo-P3 complex [(triphosM(η3-P3] is analyzed on the basis of ab initio calculations of reactants, products, and intermediate complexes of reaction. It is shown that generation of the transient complex [(triphosRhH(η1:η1-P4] followed by intramolecular hydrogen atom migration from the metal to one of the phosphorus atoms is the energetically favourable process. Calculations also show that P4 molecule is activated by coordination to the above complex: the metal-bonded P-P edge is broken, and the tetrahedron P4 is opened to form the butterfly geometry. This activation is realized mainly due to the one-orbital back donation of 4d-electron density from the atom of Rh to the unoccupied antibonding triple degenerate t1*-MO of P4.

  1. Effects of some inhibitors of protein synthesis on the chloroplast fine structure, CO2 fixation and the Hill reaction activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Więckowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study concerning the effects of chloramphenicol (100 μg ml-1, actidione (10 μg ml-1, 5-bromouracil (190 μg ml-1, actinomycin D (30 μg ml-1 and DL-ethionine (800 μg ml-1 on the chloroplast fine structure, 14CO2 incorporation and the Hill reaction activity was the subject of the experiments presented in this paper. The experiments were conducted on bean seedlings under the conditions when chlorophyll accumulation was inhibited only partially. The results obtained indicate that chloromphenicol is responsible for the reduction of the number of grana per section of plastid and for the formation of numerous vesicles in the stroma. In the presence of actidione, actinomycin D or DL-ethionine the lamellae are poorly differentiated into .stroma and granum regions and there occur disturbances in the typical orientation of lamellae within chloroplasts. Only in the presence of 5-bromouracil the development of chloroplast structure resemble that in control plants. A comparison of the results obtained with those published earlier (Więckowski et al., 1974; Ficek and Więckowski, 1974 shows that such processes as assimilatory pigment accumulation, the rate of CO2 fixation, the Hill reaction activity, and the development of lamellar system are suppressed in a different extent by the inhibitors used.

  2. Measurement method of activation cross-sections of reactions producing short-lived nuclei with 14 MeV neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kawade, K; Kasugai, Y; Shibata, M; Iida, T; Takahashi, A; Fukahori, T

    2003-01-01

    We describe a method for obtaining reliable activation cross-sections in the neutron energy range between 13.4 and 14.9 MeV for the reactions producing short-lived nuclei with half-lives between 0.5 and 30 min. We noted neutron irradiation fields and measured induced activities, including (1) the contribution of scattered low-energy neutrons, (2) the fluctuation of the neutron fluence rate during the irradiation, (3) the true coincidence sum effect, (4) the random coincidence sum effect, (5) the deviation in the measuring position due to finite sample thickness, (6) the self-absorption of the gamma-ray in the sample material and (7) the interference reactions producing the same radionuclides or the ones emitting the gamma-ray with the same energy of interest. The cross-sections can be obtained within a total error of 3.6%, when good counting statistics are achieved, including an error of 3.0% for the standard cross-section of sup 2 sup 7 Al (n, alpha) sup 2 sup 4 Na. We propose here simple methods for measuri...

  3. Highly Durable and Active PtFe Nanocatalyst for Electrochemical Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong Young; Jun, Samuel Woojoo; Yoon, Gabin; Kwon, Soon Gu; Shin, Dong Yun; Seo, Pilseon; Yoo, Ji Mun; Shin, Heejong; Chung, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyunjoong; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Lee, Kug-Seung; Lee, Nam-Suk; Yoo, Sung Jong; Lim, Dong-Hee; Kang, Kisuk; Sung, Yung-Eun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-12-16

    Demand on the practical synthetic approach to the high performance electrocatalyst is rapidly increasing for fuel cell commercialization. Here we present a synthesis of highly durable and active intermetallic ordered face-centered tetragonal (fct)-PtFe nanoparticles (NPs) coated with a "dual purpose" N-doped carbon shell. Ordered fct-PtFe NPs with the size of only a few nanometers are obtained by thermal annealing of polydopamine-coated PtFe NPs, and the N-doped carbon shell that is in situ formed from dopamine coating could effectively prevent the coalescence of NPs. This carbon shell also protects the NPs from detachment and agglomeration as well as dissolution throughout the harsh fuel cell operating conditions. By controlling the thickness of the shell below 1 nm, we achieved excellent protection of the NPs as well as high catalytic activity, as the thin carbon shell is highly permeable for the reactant molecules. Our ordered fct-PtFe/C nanocatalyst coated with an N-doped carbon shell shows 11.4 times-higher mass activity and 10.5 times-higher specific activity than commercial Pt/C catalyst. Moreover, we accomplished the long-term stability in membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for 100 h without significant activity loss. From in situ XANES, EDS, and first-principles calculations, we confirmed that an ordered fct-PtFe structure is critical for the long-term stability of our nanocatalyst. This strategy utilizing an N-doped carbon shell for obtaining a small ordered-fct PtFe nanocatalyst as well as protecting the catalyst during fuel cell cycling is expected to open a new simple and effective route for the commercialization of fuel cells. PMID:26670103

  4. Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide on Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids as Highly Active Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kien-Cuong; Chang, Yung-Huang; McPhail, David S; Mattevi, Cecilia; Wee, Andrew T S; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report on the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulfide (MoSx, with x ≈ 3) on a high specific surface area conductive support of Graphene-Carbon Nanotube hybrids (GCNT) as the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) catalysts. We found that the high surface area GCNT electrode could support the deposition of MoSx at much higher loadings compared with simple porous carbon paper or flat graphite paper. The morphological study showed that MoSx was successfully deposited on and was in good contact with the GCNT support. Other physical characterization techniques suggested the amorphous nature of the deposited MoSx. With a typical catalyst loading of 3 mg cm(-2), an overpotential of 141 mV was required to obtain a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). A Tafel slope of 41 mV decade(-1) was demonstrated. Both measures placed the MoSx-deposited GCNT electrode among the best performing molybdenum sulfide-based HER catalysts reported to date. The electrode showed a good stability with only a 25 mV increase in overpotential required for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), after undergoing 500 potential sweeps with vigorous bubbling present. The current density obtained at -0.5 V vs SHE (Standard Hydrogen Electrode potential) decreased less than 10% after the stability test. The deposition of MoSx on high specific surface area conductive electrodes demonstrated to be an efficient method to maximize the catalytic performance toward HER. PMID:26864503

  5. Chemical and Free Radical-scavenging Activity Changes of Ginsenoside Re by Maillard Reaction and Its Possible Use as a Renoprotective Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Yamabe, Noriko; Song, Kyung Il; Lee, Woojung; Han, Im-Ho; Lee, Ji Hwan; Ham, Jungyeob; Kim, Su-Nam; Park, Jeong Hill; Kang, Ki Sung

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play critical role in kidney damage. Free radical-scavenging activities of Panax ginseng are known to be increased by heat-processing. The structural change of ginsenoside and the generation of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) are closely related to the increased free radical-scavenging activities. In the present study, we have demonstrated the Maillard reaction model experiment using ginsenoside Re and glycine mixture to identify the renoprotective effect of MRPs fro...

  6. Electrochemical activity and durability of platinum nanoparticles supported on ordered mesoporous carbons for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shou-Heng [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-166, Taipei 10617 (China); Chiang, Chien-Chang; Wu, Min-Tsung; Liu, Shang-Bin [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-166, Taipei 10617 (China); Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677 (China)

    2010-08-15

    A facile procedure for synthesizing platinum nanoparticles (NPs) studded in ordered mesoporous carbons (Pt-OMCs) based on the organic-organic self-assembly (one-pot) approach is reported. These Pt-OMCs, which can be easily fabricated with controllable Pt loading, were found to possess high surface areas, highly accessible and stable active sites and superior electrocatalytic properties pertinent as cathode catalysts for hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. The enhanced catalytic activity and durability observed for the Pt-OMC electrocatalysts are attributed to the strengthened interactions between the Pt catalyst and the mesoporous carbon that effectively precludes migration and/or agglomeration of Pt NPs on the carbon support. (author)

  7. Highly Active Iridium/Iridium Tin/Tin Oxide Heterogeneous Nanoparticles as Alternative Electrocatalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du W.; Su D.; Wang Q.; Saxner D.; Deskins N.A.; Krzanowski J.E.; Frenkel A.I.; Teng X.

    2011-08-03

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29} catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 {+-} 0.6 nm through a 'surfactant-free' wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the 'real' heterogeneous structure of Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO{sub 2}, which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO{sub 2} present on the surface. The Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO{sub 2} on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel 'surfactant-free' synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of 'real' heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative

  8. The role of reaction pathways and support interactions in the development of high activity hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Henrik; Hinnemann, Berit; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet;

    2005-01-01

    exhibiting a metallic character are observed to be involved in adsorption, hydrogenation and C-S bond cleavage. The insight is seen to provide a new framework for understanding the DDS and HYD pathways and the role of steric hindrance and poisons. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have illustrated...... structures may be present as single sulfide sheets. Thus, stacking is not an essential feature of Type II catalysts. The article illustrates how the new scientific insight has aided the introduction of the new high activity BRIM (TM) type catalysts for FCC pre-treatment and production of ultra low sulfur...

  9. Active and Durable Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalyst Derived from Pd-Doped Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jitang; Xia, Guoliang; Jiang, Peng; Yang, Yang; Li, Ren; Shi, Ruohong; Su, Jianwei; Chen, Qianwang

    2016-06-01

    The water electrolysis is of critical importance for sustainable hydrogen production. In this work, a highly efficient and stable PdCo alloy catalyst (PdCo@CN) was synthesized by direct annealing of Pd-doped metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) under N2 atmosphere. In 0.5 M H2SO4 solution, PdCo@CN displays remarkable electrocatalytic performance with overpotential of 80 mV, a Tafel slope of 31 mV dec(-1), and excellent stability of 10 000 cycles. Our studies reveal that noble metal doped MOFs are ideal precursors for preparing highly active alloy electrocatalysts with low content of noble metal.

  10. Activation cross sections of $\\alpha$-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of $^{178}$W/$^{178m}$Ta generator

    CERN Document Server

    Tárk'anyi, F; Ditrói, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178}$W-$^{178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

  11. Activation of Aryl Halides by Nickel(I) Pincer Complexes: Reaction Pathways of Stoichiometric and Catalytic Dehalogenations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettenmeier, Christoph A; Wenz, Jan; Wadepohl, Hubert; Gade, Lutz H

    2016-08-15

    Homolytic C-X bond cleavage of organohalides by the T-shaped nickel(I) complexes [LigNi(I)] 1 bearing the iso-PyrrMeBox ligand had been found previously to be the crucial activation step in the asymmetric hydrodehalogenation of geminal dihalides. Here, this mechanistic investigation is extended to aryl halides, which allowed a systematic study of the activation process by a combination of experimental data and density functional theory modeling. While the activation of both aryl chlorides and geminal dichlorides appears to proceed via an analogous transition state, the generation of a highly stabile nickel(II)aryl species in the reaction of the aryl chlorides for the former represents a major difference in the reactive behavior. This difference was found to have a crucial impact on the activity of these nickel pincer systems as catalysts in the dehalogenation of aryl chlorides compared to geminal dichlorides and highlights the importance of the regulatory pathways controlling the nickel(I) concentration throughout the catalysis. These results along with the identification and characterization of novel nickel(II)aryl species are presented. PMID:27483018

  12. Electrocatalytic activity of LaNiO3 toward H2O2 reduction reaction: Minimization of oxygen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirfakhri, Seyed Javad; Meunier, Jean-Luc; Berk, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    The catalytic activity of LaNiO3 toward H2O2 reduction reaction (HPRR), with a potential application in the cathode side of fuel cells, is studied in alkaline, neutral and acidic solutions by rotating disk electrode. The LaNiO3 particles synthesised by citrate-based sol-gel method have sizes between 30 and 70 nm with an active specific surface area of 1.26 ± 0.05 m2 g-1. LaNiO3 shows high catalytic activity toward HPRR in 0.1 M KOH solution with an exchange current density based on the active surface area (j0A) of (7.4 ± 1) × 10-6 A cm-2 which is noticeably higher than the j0A of N-doped graphene. The analysis of kinetic parameters suggests that the direct reduction of H2O2, H2O2 decomposition, O2 reduction and O2 desorption occur through HPRR on this catalyst. In order to control and minimize oxygen evolution from the electrode surface, the effects of catalyst loading, bulk concentration of H2O2, and using a mixture of LaNiO3 and N-doped graphene are studied. Although the mechanism of HPRR is independent of the aforementioned operating conditions, gas evolution decreases by increasing the catalyst loading, decreasing the bulk concentration of H2O2, and addition of N-doped graphene to LaNiO3.

  13. A multi-scale model of the oxygen reduction reaction on highly active graphene nanosheets in alkaline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Ramos-Sanchez, Guadalupe; Franco, Alejandro A.

    2016-10-01

    A multi-scale model based on a mean field approach, is proposed to describe the ORR mechanism on N-GN catalysts in alkaline media. The model implements activation energies calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT) at the atomistic level, and scales up them into a continuum framework describing the cathode/electrolyte interface at the mesoscale level. The model also considers mass and momentum transports arising in the region next to the rotating electrode for all ionic species and O2; correction of potential drop and electrochemical double-layer capacitance. Most fitted parameters describing the kinetics of ORR elementary reactions are sensitive in the multi-scale model, which results from the incorporation of activation energies using the mean field method, unlike single-scale modelling Errors in the deviations from activation energies are found to be moderate, except for the elementary step (2) related to the formation of O2ads, which can be assigned to the inherent DFT limitations. The consumption of O2ads to form OOHads is determined as the rate-determining step as a result of its highest energy barrier (163.10 kJ mol-1) in the system, the largest error obtained for the deviation from activation energy (28.15%), and high sensitivity. This finding is confirmed with the calculated surface concentration and coverage of electroactive species.

  14. The role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in eosinophil activation during inflammatory allergic reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are important chemotactic cytokines that play a fundamental role in the trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. They are also potent cell-activating factors, inducing cytokine and histamine release and free radical production, a fact that makes them particularly important in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. The action of chemokines is regulated at the level of agonist production and processing as well as at the level of receptor expression and coupling. Therefore, an analysis of the ligands must necessarily consider receptors. Eosinophils are target cells involved in the allergic inflammatory response since they are able to release a wide variety of mediators including CC and CXC chemokines and express their receptors. These mediators could damage the airway epithelial cells and might be important to stimulate other cells inducing an amplification of the allergic response. This review focuses on recently emerging data pertaining to the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in promoting eosinophil activation and migration during the allergic inflammatory process. The analysis of the function of eosinophils and their chemokine receptors during allergic inflammation might be a good approach to understanding the determinants of asthma severity and to developing novel therapies.

  15. An Upstream By-product from Ester Activation via NHC-Catalysis Catalyzes Downstream Sulfonyl Migration Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Runfeng; He, Liwenze; Liu, Lin; Xie, Xingang; She, Xuegong

    2016-01-01

    A sequential reaction combining N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI) catalysis allowed for the upstream by-product NHPI, which was generated in the NHC-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction, to act as the catalyst for a downstream nitrogen-to-carbon sulfonyl migration reaction. Enantiomeric excess of the major product in the cycloaddition reaction remained intact in the follow-up sulfonyl migration reaction. PMID:26522328

  16. Synthesis of dual-doped non-precious metal electrocatalysts and their electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xu; Guoshun Pan; Xiaolu Liang; Guihai Luo; Chunli Zou; Gaopan Chen

    2014-01-01

    The pyrolyzed carbon supported ferrum polypyrrole (Fe-N/C) catalysts are synthesized with or without selected dopants, p-toluenesulfonic acid (TsOH), by a facile thermal annealing approach at desired temperature for optimizing their activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in O2-saturated 0.1 mol/L KOH solution. The electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) are employed with the Koutecky-Levich theory to quantitatively obtain the ORR kinetic constants and the reaction mechanisms. It is found that catalysts doped with TsOH show significantly improved ORR activity relative to the TsOH-free one. The average electron transfer numbers for the catalyzed ORR are determined to be 3.899 and 3.098, respectively, for the catalysts with and without TsOH-doping. The heat-treatment is found to be a necessary step for catalyst activity improvement, and the catalyst pyrolyzed at 600◦C gives the best ORR activity. An onset potential and the potential at the current density of -1.5 mA/cm2 for TsOH-doped catalyst after pyrolysis are 30 mV and 170 mV, which are more positive than those without pyrolized. Furthermore, the catalyst doped with TsOH shows higher tolerance to methanol compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst in 0.1 mol/L KOH. To understand this TsOH doping and pyrolyzed effect, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used to characterize these catalysts in terms of their structure and composition. XPS results indicate that the pyrrolic-N groups are the most active sites, a finding that is supported by the correspondence between changes in pyridinic-N content and ORR activity that occur with changing temperature. Sulfur species are also structurally bound to carbon in the forms of C-Sn-C, an additional beneficial factor for the ORR.

  17. Effect of reaction environments on the reactivity of PCB (2-chlorobiphenyl) over activated carbon impregnated with palladized iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeok [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at Arlington, 416 Yates Drive, Arlington, TX 76019-0308 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R., E-mail: al-abed.souhail@epa.gov [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles has been developed to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we evaluated the effects of various reaction environments on the adsorption-mediated dechlorination of 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-ClBP) in the RAC system. The results were discussed in close connection to the implementation issue of the RAC system for the remediation of contaminated sites with PCBs. Adsorption event of 2-ClBP onto RAC limited the overall performance under condition with a 2-ClBP/RAC mass ratio of less than 1.0 x 10{sup -4} above which dechlorination of 2-ClBP adsorbed to RAC was the reaction rate-determining step. Acidic and basic conditions were harmful to 2-ClBP adsorption and iron stability while neutral pH showed the highest adsorption-promoted dechlorination of 2-ClBP and negligible metal leaching. Coexisting natural organic matter (NOM) slightly inhibited 2-ClBP adsorption onto RAC due to the partial partitioning of 2-ClBP into NOM in the liquid phase while the 2-ClBP absorbed into NOM, which also tended to adsorb onto RAC, was less available for the dechlorination reaction. Common anions slowed down 2-ClBP adsorption but adsorbed 2-ClBP was almost simultaneously dechlorinated. Some exceptions included strong inhibitory effect of carbonate species on 2-ClBP adsorption and severe detrimental effect of sulfite on 2-ClBP dechlorination. Results on treatment of 2-ClBP spiked to actual sediment supernatants implied site-specific reactivity of RAC.

  18. Antioxidant activity of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) in a lipid-rich model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vhangani, Lusani Norah; Van Wyk, Jessy

    2016-10-01

    Ribose-lysine (RL), ribose-glycine (RG), fructose-lysine (FL) and fructose-glycine (FG) Maillard models (whole mixture (WM) pH 4 and 9) were heated at 60, 80, 121°C for 30, 60, 120min, and dialysed into low (LMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) fractions. Reducing power (RP), DPPH and peroxyl radical scavenging (PRS) evaluated indirect antioxidant activity (AA). Direct AA in a water-in-oil emulsion was evaluated through peroxide value (PV), p-anisidine, TBARs inhibition and oxidative stability (OS). PRS and RP increased significantly with temperature and time from FLWM>HMW. With DPPH, only MRPs at 121°C exhibited higher AA than BHA. MRPs exhibited low PV, p-anisidine and inhibited the formation of TBARs. BHA showed the highest OS, with p-anisidine, PV and inhibition of TBARS similar to that of MRPs. PMID:27132854

  19. Reaction of physiological factors on the solar-geomagnetic activity (the physical mechanisms)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avakyan, Sergey; Voronin, Nikolai; Dubarenko, Konstantin

    This presentation proposes and provides substantiation for a hypothesis concerning the mechanism by which solar and geomagnetic activity (mainly of solar flares and magnetic storms) affects the biosphere, including man. The hypothesis, including a physical mechanism introduced by the authors, is that high-lying (Rydberg) states of all gases of the earth’s upper atmosphere are excited by ionospheric energetic electrons. Rydberg atoms, molecules and ions of all atmospheric gases emit characteristic radio emission in the spectral range from decimeters to millimeters. This radiation can easily penetrate to low atmosphere and biosphere carrying complete information about power and duration of solar flare and geomagnetic storms to biosphere. The microwave radioemission have the resonances at the spectral range 109 ÷ 1012 Hz at the cells and membranes, DNA and RNA, molecules of haemoglobin, erythrocytes, and this fact can explain the extremely small threshold for influence of ionospheric radioemission at the monochromatic (characteristic) transitions on biological objects, including the viscosity of blood. The energy estimates of the flux intensity of microwave radiation of the ionosphere from Rydberg states are used to prove for the first time that the values of this flux agree with the experimental data. A method is proposed for distinguishing the contributions of microwave radiation and magnetic perturbation in the geo-biocorrelations, taking into account the effect that the magnetic-field variations are not in phase with the flux of corpuscles from the radiation belts in the ionosphere during the period of a geomagnetic storm. Quanta of microwave radiation are emitted from the heights of 90 - 360 km, i.e. in the basic ionosphere regions. Their energy by almost 10 orders of magnitude exceeds that of the quanta of low-frequency electromagnetic background of the ionosphere (with the frequencies lower than 100 Hz, which coincide with those of biorhythms). Thereby

  20. Neural activity patterns evoked by a spouse's incongruent emotional reactions when recalling marriage-relevant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrican, Raluca; Rosenbaum, Rachel Shayna; Grady, Cheryl

    2015-10-01

    Resonance with the inner states of another social actor is regarded as a hallmark of emotional closeness. Nevertheless, sensitivity to potential incongruities between one's own and an intimate partner's subjective experience is reportedly also important for close relationship quality. Here, we tested whether perceivers show greater neurobehavioral responsiveness to a spouse's positive (rather than negative) context-incongruent emotions, and whether this effect is influenced by the perceiver's satisfaction with the relationship. Thus, we used fMRI to scan older long-term married female perceivers while they judged either their spouse's or a stranger's affect, based on incongruent nonverbal and verbal cues. The verbal cues were selected to evoke strongly polarized affective responses. Higher perceiver marital satisfaction predicted greater neural processing of the spouse's (rather than the strangers) nonverbal cues. Nevertheless, across all perceivers, greater neural processing of a spouse's (rather than a stranger's) nonverbal behavior was reliably observed only when the behavior was positive and the context was negative. The spouse's positive (rather than negative) nonverbal behavior evoked greater activity in putative mirror neuron areas, such as the bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL). This effect was related to a stronger inhibitory influence of cognitive control areas on mirror system activity in response to a spouse's negative nonverbal cues, an effect that strengthened with increasing perceiver marital satisfaction. Our valence-asymmetric findings imply that neurobehavioral responsiveness to a close other's emotions may depend, at least partly, on cognitive control resources, which are used to support the perceiver's interpersonal goals (here, goals that are relevant to relationship stability). PMID:26219536

  1. Acid-base behavior of cryptand 1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 21, 24-octaaza-bicycio[8, 8, 8] hexacosan-3, 8, 12, 17, 20, 25-hexone and complex formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The bicyclic cryptand 1,4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 21, 24-octaaza-bigcyclo [8, 8, 8] hexacosan-3, 8, 12, 17, 20, 25-hexone (COBH) bearing diaminoethane groups along the eight-atom bridges was synthesized. The structure consists of discrete neutral macrobicyclic units; the two cycles share the two tertiary amine nitrogen atoms, which exhibit an endo-endo conformation. Three identical branches formed by 1, 2-diaminoethane link the two tertiary amine groups. The protonation reactions ofcryptand (COBH) and its complex formation with copper (Ⅱ) were investigated by potentiometry in water and in a DMSO/water (80: 20 in mass ratio) mixture as solvents. The cryptand acts as a bis-base through its two Nbridgehead and exhibits a strong cooperativity that favors the first protonation and makes the second one difficult (pK 5.0 ). An inward rotation of the amide groups to form hydrogen bonds accounts for this cooperativity. The interaction of COBH with copper (Ⅱ) leads to several binuclear complex proton contents.

  2. Application of soft- and hard-modelling approaches to resolution of kinetics of electron donor-acceptor complex formation of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone with imipramine in different solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex formation of imipramine and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) was investigated spectrophotometrically in acetonitrile, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chloroform solutions using soft- and hard-modelling approaches. From the results of exploratory analysis of kinetic data and the spectral changes by soft-modelling approaches, evolving factor analysis (EFA) and orthogonal projection approach (OPA), a consecutive two-steps reaction with two intermediates was proposed for the process in acetonitrile and 1,2-dichloroethane media and one with a single intermediate in chloroform solution. Secondly, by applying, multivariate nonlinear least squares hard-modelling approach on the collected experimental kinetic data matrix, the nonlinear parameters (rate constants) as well as the linear parameters (spectral profiles) were obtained by fitting the collected experimental kinetic data matrix to the proposed model. Small values of standard deviation in the resulting parameters and sum of squares of the residuals (ssq) obtained showed the proper selection of the model. Furthermore, the values of lack of fit and percent of explained variance confirmed the correct identified models. Identification of the model with the aid of soft-modelling approaches followed by application of the hard-modelling approaches decreases significantly the rotational ambiguity associated with the obtained concentration and spectral profiles. Variations in the kinetic constants were in complete agreement with the model proposed and the solvent polarities

  3. Copper(I) complexes with trispyrazolylmethane ligands: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in cross-coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldón, Estela; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2012-08-01

    Three novel Cu(I) complexes bearing tris(pyrazolyl)methane ligands, Tpm(x), have been prepared from reactions of equimolar amounts of CuI and the ligands Tpm, (HC(pz)(3)), Tpm*, (HC(3,5-Me(2)-pz)(3)), and Tpm(Ms), (HC(3-Ms-pz)(3)). X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the Tpm and Tpm(Ms) derivatives exhibit a 2:1 Cu:ligand ratio, whereas the Tpm* complex is a mononuclear species in nature. The latter has been employed as a precatalyst in the arylation of amides and aromatic thiols with good activity. The synthesis of a Tpm*Cu(I)-phthalimidate, a feasible intermediate in this catalytic process, has also been performed. Low temperature (1)H NMR studies in CDCl(3) have indicated that this complex exists in solution as a mixture of two, neutral and ionic forms. Conductivity measurements have reinforced this proposal, the ionic form predominating in a very polar solvent such as DMSO. The reaction of Tpm*Cu(I)-phthalimidate with iodobenzene afforded the expected C-N coupling product in 76% yield accounting for its role as an intermediate in this transformation.

  4. Establishment of activity indicator of TiO{sub 2} photocatalytic reaction-Hydroxyl radical trapping method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chen-Yu, E-mail: cychang@mdu.edu.tw [Department of Life Science, Ming-Dao University, 369 Wen-Hua Road, Peetow, Chang-Hua County 52345, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Yung-Hsu [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung-Hsing University, 250 Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Ling-Ling [Department of Radiological Technology, Central Taiwan University of Sciences and Technology, 11 Pu-Tze Lane, Pei-Tun District, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Yao, Kuo-Shan; Cheng, Ta-Chih [Department of Life Science, Ming-Dao University, 369 Wen-Hua Road, Peetow, Chang-Hua County 52345, Taiwan (China)

    2009-07-30

    In this study, a new, low cost and easy method, hydroxyl radical trapping method, was employed to investigate the photo-activity of UV/TiO{sub 2} photocatalytic reaction. The Taguchi method was utilized to optimize the preparation of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin-film reactor through the modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The optimal yield of hydroxyl radicals was then evaluated by calculating the conversion ratio of salicylic acid under the optimal conditions. In the experiments, salicylic acid was used as the free-radical scavenger and the formation of three different intermediates were examined to shed light on the trend and kinetics of reaction of hydroxyl radical with organic substance under different operation conditions. The results indicated that the yield of hydroxyl radicals increased with increasing irradiation intensity and dissolved oxygen level. The optimal experimental conditions obtained in this study were irradiation with intensity of 2.9 mW cm{sup -2} on salicylic acid at concentration of 250 mg L{sup -1} by both agitation and aeration processes (dissolved oxygen level = 8.2 mg O{sub 2} L{sup -1}) at pH 5. Such conditions could achieve the optimal hydroxyl radical yield of 5.1 x 10{sup -17} M.

  5. Multi-Day Activity Scheduling Reactions to Planned Activities and Future Events in a Dynamic Model of Activity-Travel Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, L.; Arentze, T.; Timmermans, H.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling multi-day planning has received scarce attention in activity-based transport demand modeling so far. However, new dynamic activity-based approaches are being developed at the current moment. The frequency and inflexibility of planned activities and events in activity schedules of individual

  6. [Postsynaptic reactions of cerebral cortex neurons, activated by nociceptive afferents during stimulation of the Raphe nuclei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labakhua, T Sh; Dzhanashiia, T K; Gedevanishvili, G I; Dzhokhadze, L D; Tkemaladze, T T; Abzianidze, I V

    2012-01-01

    On cats, we studied the influence of stimulation of the Raphe nuclei (RN) on postsynaptic processes evoked in neurons of the somatosensory cortex by stimulation of nociceptive (intensive stimulation of the tooth pulp) and non-nociceptive (moderate stimulation of the ventroposteromedial--VPN--nucleus of the thalamus) afferent inputs. 6 cells, selectively excited by stimulation of nocciceptors and 9 cells, activated by both the above nociceptive and non-nociceptive influences (nociceptive and convergent neurons, respectively) were recorded intracellular. In neurons of both groups, responses to nociceptive stimulation (of sufficient intensity) looked like an EPSP-spike-IPSP (the letter of significant duration, up to 200-300 ms) compleх. Conditioning stimulation of the RN which preceded test stimulus applied to the tooth pulp or VPM nucleus by 100 to 800 ms, induced 40-60 % decrease of the IPSP amplitude only, while maхimal effect of influence, in both cases, was noted within intervals of 300-800 ms between conditioning and test stimulus. During stimulation of the RN, serotonin released via receptor and second messengers, provides postsynaptic modulation of GABAergic system, decreasing the IPSP amplitude which occurs after stimulation of both the tooth pulp and VPM thalamic nucleus. This process may be realized trough either pre- or postsynaptic mechanisms.

  7. Oxygen plasma etching of graphene: A first-principles dynamical inspection of the reaction mechanisms and related activation barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Boero, Mauro; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Oshiyama, Atsushi; Dept. of Applied Physics Team; Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Strasbourg (IPCMS) Collaboration; Department Of Materials Engineering Science Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen plasma etching is a crucial step in the fabrication of electronic circuits and has recently received a renovated interest in view of the realization of carbon-based nanodevices. In an attempt at unraveling the atomic-scale details and to provide guidelines for the control of the etching processes mechanisms, we inspected the possible reaction pathways via reactive first principles simulations. These processes involve breaking and formation of several chemical bonds and are characterized by different free-energy barriers. Free-energy sampling techniques (metadynamics and blue moon), used to enhance the standard Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, provide us a detailed microscopic picture of the etching of graphene surfaces and a comprehensive scenario of the activation barriers involved in the various steps. MEXT, Japan - contract N. 22104005

  8. In situ generated highly active copper oxide catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction at low overpotential in alkaline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Cui, Shengsheng; Qian, Manman; Sun, Zijun; Du, Pingwu

    2016-04-25

    Developing efficient water oxidation catalysts made up of earth-abundant elements has attracted much attention as a step toward for future clean energy production. Herein we report a simple one-step method to generate a low cost copper oxide catalyst film in situ from a copper(ii) ethylenediamine complex. The resulting catalyst has excellent activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solutions. A catalytic current density of 1.0 mA cm(-2) and 10 mA cm(-2) for the catalyst film requires the overpotentials of only ∼370 mV and ∼475 mV in 1.0 M KOH, respectively. This catalytic performance shows that the new catalyst is one of the best Cu-based heterogeneous OER catalysts to date. PMID:27020763

  9. Investigation of catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction of Pt dispersed on boron doped graphene in acid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullamsetty, Ashok; Sundara, Ramaprabhu

    2016-10-01

    Boron doped graphene was prepared by a facile method and platinum (Pt) decoration over boron doped graphene was done in various chemical reduction methods such as sodium borohydride (NaBH4), polyol and modified polyol. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the synthesized catalyst particles are present in a nanocrystalline structure and transmission and scanning electron microscopy were employed to investigate the morphology and particle distribution. The electrochemical properties were investigated with the help of the rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) takes place by a four-electron process. The kinetics of the ORR was evaluated using K-L and Tafel plots. The electrocatalyst obtained in modified polyol reduction method has shown the better catalytic activity compared to other two electrocatalysts. PMID:27393888

  10. Oxygen reduction reaction activity and structural stability of Pt-Au nanoparticles prepared by arc-plasma deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shuntaro; Chiba, Hiroshi; Kato, Takashi; Endo, Shota; Hayashi, Takehiro; Todoroki, Naoto; Wadayama, Toshimasa

    2015-07-28

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability of various Au(x)/Pt100 nanoparticles (where x is the atomic ratio of Au against Pt) are evaluated herein. The samples were fabricated on a highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate at 773 K through sequential arc-plasma depositions of Pt and Au. The electrochemical hydrogen adsorption charges (electrochemical surface area), particularly the characteristic currents caused by the corner and edge sites of the Pt nanoparticles, decrease with increasing Au atomic ratio (x). In contrast, the specific ORR activities of the Au(x)/Pt100 samples were dependent on the atomic ratios of Pt and Au: the Au28/Pt100 sample showed the highest specific activity among all the investigated samples (x = 0-42). As for ORR durability evaluated by applying potential cycles between 0.6 and 1.0 V in oxygen-saturated 0.1 M HClO4, Au28/Pt100 was the most durable sample against the electrochemical potential cycles. The results clearly showed that the Au atoms located at coordinatively-unsaturated sites, e.g. at the corners or edges of the Pt nanoparticles, can improve the ORR durability by suppressing unsaturated-site-induced degradation of the Pt nanoparticles. PMID:26118789

  11. Metallic Co4N Porous Nanowire Arrays Activated by Surface Oxidation as Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengzuo; Xu, Kun; Fang, Zhiwei; Tong, Yun; Wu, Junchi; Lu, Xiuli; Peng, Xu; Ding, Hui; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Designing highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) plays a key role in the development of various renewable energy storage and conversion devices. In this work, we developed metallic Co4N porous nanowire arrays directly grown on flexible substrates as highly active OER electrocatalysts for the first time. Benefiting from the collaborative advantages of metallic character, 1D porous nanowire arrays, and unique 3D electrode configuration, surface oxidation activated Co4N porous nanowire arrays/carbon cloth achieved an extremely small overpotential of 257 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), and a low Tafel slope of 44 mV dec(-1) in an alkaline medium, which is the best OER performance among reported Co-based electrocatalysts to date. Moreover, in-depth mechanistic investigations demonstrate the active phases are the metallic Co4N core inside with a thin cobalt oxides/hydroxides shell during the OER process. Our finding introduces a new concept to explore the design of high-efficiency OER electrocatalysts. PMID:26437900

  12. A multiple reaction monitoring (MRM method to detect Bcr-Abl kinase activity in CML using a peptide biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yi Yang

    Full Text Available The protein kinase Bcr-Abl plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, and is the target of the breakthrough drug imatinib (Gleevec™. While most patients respond well to imatinib, approximately 30% never achieve remission or develop resistance within 1-5 years of starting imatinib treatment. Evidence from clinical studies suggests that achieving at least 50% inhibition of a patient's Bcr-Abl kinase activity (relative to their level at diagnosis is associated with improved patient outcomes, including reduced occurrence of resistance and longer maintenance of remission. Accordingly, sensitive assays for detecting Bcr-Abl kinase activity compatible with small amounts of patient material are desirable as potential companion diagnostics for imatinib. Here we report the detection of Bcr-Abl activity and inhibition by imatinib in the human CML cell line K562 using a cell-penetrating peptide biosensor and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. MRM enabled reproducible, selective detection of the peptide biosensor at fmol levels from aliquots of cell lysate equivalent to ~15,000 cells. This degree of sensitivity will facilitate the miniaturization of the entire assay procedure down to cell numbers approaching 15,000, making it practical for translational applications in patient cells in which the limited amount of available patient material often presents a major challenge.

  13. Relation between phase composition and photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} in a sulfoxide deoxygenation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.molinari@unife.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università di Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Bonino, Francesca; Magnacca, Giuliana [Dipartimento di Chimica, NIS and INSTM Reference Centre, Università di Torino, Via G. Quarello 15, I-10135 and Via P. Giuria 7, I-10125, Turin (Italy); Demaria, Francesca; Maldotti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università di Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2015-05-05

    In the present study we synthesize three TiO{sub 2} samples, TiO{sub 2}-500, TiO{sub 2}-750 and TiO{sub 2}-850, by a sol–gel procedure varying the rutile and anatase content by calcination at different temperatures. Characterization by XRD, NIR-Raman, UV-Raman, BET, DR-UV-Vis spectroscopy and SEM points out that TiO{sub 2}-500 consists mainly of anatase and TiO{sub 2}-850 of rutile. TiO{sub 2}-700 presents both phases on the surface that is the part of the photocatalyst interested by UV illumination. The photocatalysts are tested in the deoxygenation reaction of methyl p-tolyl sulfoxide to the corresponding sulfide using 2-propanol as hole scavenger. It is demonstrated that the presence of both anatase and rutile on the surface of TiO{sub 2}-700 is responsible of the increase of the photocatalytic activity. This is likely due to a more efficient charge separation process that increases lifetime of the charges giving availability of electrons and holes for the photocatalytic reaction. Methyl p-tolyl sulfide is formed with a selectivity of 100%. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} samples are synthesized via sol–gel varying the rutile and anatase composition. • TiO{sub 2}-700 (calcined at 700 °C) presents both anatase and rutile on the surface. • Efficient charges separation is allowed by the presence of anatase and rutile. • Spatial separation of charges renders TiO{sub 2}-700 the most active photocatalyst. • Methyl p-tolyl sulfoxide is transformed in sulfide with 100% selectivity.

  14. Differential cell reaction upon Toll-like receptor 4 and 9 activation in human alveolar and lung interstitial macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerhans Andreas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations on pulmonary macrophages (MΦ mostly focus on alveolar MΦ (AM as a well-defined cell population. Characteristics of MΦ in the interstitium, referred to as lung interstitial MΦ (IM, are rather ill-defined. In this study we therefore aimed to elucidate differences between AM and IM obtained from human lung tissue. Methods Human AM and IM were isolated from human non-tumor lung tissue from patients undergoing lung resection. Cell morphology was visualized using either light, electron or confocal microscopy. Phagocytic activity was analyzed by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopy. Surface marker expression was measured by flow cytometry. Toll-like receptor (TLR expression patterns as well as cytokine expression upon TLR4 or TLR9 stimulation were assessed by real time RT-PCR and cytokine protein production was measured using a fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Results IM were found to be smaller and morphologically more heterogeneous than AM, whereas phagocytic activity was similar in both cell types. HLA-DR expression was markedly higher in IM compared to AM. Although analysis of TLR expression profiles revealed no differences between the two cell populations, AM and IM clearly varied in cell reaction upon activation. Both MΦ populations were markedly activated by LPS as well as DNA isolated from attenuated mycobacterial strains (M. bovis H37Ra and BCG. Whereas AM expressed higher amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon activation, IM were more efficient in producing immunoregulatory cytokines, such as IL10, IL1ra, and IL6. Conclusion AM appear to be more effective as a non-specific first line of defence against inhaled pathogens, whereas IM show a more pronounced regulatory function. These dissimilarities should be taken into consideration in future studies on the role of human lung MΦ in the inflammatory response.

  15. Increased platelet count and leucocyte-platelet complex formation in acute symptomatic compared with asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCabe, D J H

    2005-09-01

    The risk of stroke in patients with recently symptomatic carotid stenosis is considerably higher than in patients with asymptomatic stenosis. In the present study it was hypothesised that excessive platelet activation might partly contribute to this difference.

  16. Diazomethyl ketone substrate derivatives as active-site-directed inhibitors of thiol proteases. Papain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, R.; Larsen, D.; Watanabe, H.; Shaw, E.

    1977-12-27

    The diazomethyl ketones of z-Phe and z-Phe-Phe inactivate papain by a stoichiometric reaction at the active-center thiol. Since the reagents are stable in mercaptoethanol, their reaction with papain is judged to be the result of complex formation characteristic of affinity-labeling reagents. The diazomethyl ketones react by a mechanism different from that of chloromethyl ketones, since the pH dependence of their inactivation of papain is different, the rate increasing with decreasing pH. This relationship has been observed in other cases, such as the reaction of azaserine with glutamine amidotransferases (Buchanan, J. M. (1973), Adv. Enzmol. Relat. Areas Mol. Biol. 39, 91), and is interpreted as an indication of reaction with a thiol group in its protonated form.

  17. Antidrug antibodies against TNF-blocking agents: correlations between disease activity, hypersensitivity reactions, and different classes of immunoglobulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benucci M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Benucci,1 Francesca Li Gobbi,1 Francesca Meacci,2 Mariangela Manfredi,2 Maria Infantino,2 Maurizio Severino,3 Sergio Testi,3 Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini,4 Cristian Ricci,5 Fabiola Atzeni4 1Rheumatology Unit, 2Immunology and Allergology Laboratory Unit, 3Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, Nuovo Ospedale S Giovanni di Dio, Florence, Italy; 4Rheumatology Unit, L Sacco University Hospital, Milan, Italy; 5Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany Abstract: Although anti-TNF drugs have changed the clinical course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, survival rates and resistance-to-therapy data confirm that about 30% of RA patients fail to respond. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between the development of antidrug antibodies, specific IgG4 antibodies against TNF inhibitors, and resistance to therapy in RA patients. This retrospective study involved 129 patients with established RA naïve to biological agents (98 females and 32 males, mean age 56.7±12.3 years, disease duration 6.3±1.2 years, baseline Disease Activity Score [DAS]-28 3.2–5.6 who received treatment with anti-TNF agents after the failure of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (32 received infliximab [IFX], 58 etanercept [ETN], and 39 adalimumab [ADA]. After 6 months of treatment, the patients were classified as being in remission (DAS28 <2.6, having low disease activity (LDA; DAS28 2.6–3.2, or not responding (NR: DAS28 >3.2. The patients were also tested for serum antidrug antibodies and IgG4 antibodies against TNF inhibitors. After 24 weeks of treatment, 38% of the ETN-treated patients and 28% of those treated with ADA had injection-site reactions; the rate of systemic reactions in the IFX group was 25%. The differences among the three groups were not statistically significant (P=0.382; ETN versus ADA P=0.319. The percentages of patients with adverse events stratified by drug response were

  18. Crosstalk between Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF Receptor and Integrin through Direct Integrin Binding to FGF and Resulting Integrin-FGF-FGFR Ternary Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Mori

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs play a critical role in diverse physiological processes and the pathogenesis of diseases. Integrins are involved in FGF signaling, since integrin antagonists suppress FGF signaling. This is called integrin-FGF crosstalk, while the specifics of the crosstalk are unclear. This review highlights recent findings that FGF1 directly interacts with integrin αvβ3, and the resulting integrin-FGF-fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR ternary complex formation is essential for FGF1-induced cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. An integrin-binding defective FGF1 mutant (Arg-50 to Glu, R50E is defective in ternary complex formation and in inducing cell proliferation, migration and angiogenesis, while R50E still binds to the FGF receptor and heparin. In addition, R50E suppressed tumorigenesis in vivo, while wild-type (WT FGF1 enhanced it. Thus, the direct interaction between FGF1 and integrin αvβ3 is a potential therapeutic target, and R50E is a potential therapeutic agent.

  19. Fac-mer equilibria of coordinated iminodiacetate (ida2-) in ternary CuII(ida)(H-1B)- complex formation (B = imidazole, benzimidazole) in aqueous solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susmita Bandyopadhyay; G N Mukherjee

    2003-08-01

    pH potentiometric and spectrophotometric investigations on the complex formation equilibria of CuII with iminodiacetate (ida2-) and heterocyclic N-bases, viz. imidazole and benzimidazole (B), in aqueous solution in binary and ternary systems using different molar ratios of the reactants indicated the formation of complexes of the types, Cu(ida), Cu(ida)(OH)-, (ida)Cu(OH)Cu(ida)-, Cu(B)2+, Cu(H-1B)+, Cu(ida)(H-1B)-, (ida)Cu(B)Cu(ida) and (ida)Cu(H-1B)Cu(ida)-. Formation constants of the complexes at 25 ± 1° at a fixed ionic strength, = 0.1 mol dm-3 (NaNO3) in aqueous solution were evaluated and the complex formation equilibria were elucidated with the aid of speciation curves. Departure of the experimental values of the reproportionation constants (log Cu) of ternary Cu(ida)(H-1B)- complexes from the statistically expected values, despite their formation in appreciable amounts at equilibrium, were assigned to fac(f)-mer(m) equilibria of the ida2- ligand coordinated to CuII, as the N-heterocyclic donors, (H-1B)-, coordinate trans- to the N-(ida2-) atom in the binary Cu(ida) complex to form the ternary Cu(ida) (H-1B)- complexes.

  20. EF-Tu dynamics during pre-translocation complex formation: EF-Tu·GDP exits the ribosome via two different pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Chunlai; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Knudsen, Charlotte R; Goldman, Yale E; Cooperman, Barry S

    2015-10-30

    The G-protein EF-Tu, which undergoes a major conformational change when EF-Tu·GTP is converted to EF-Tu·GDP, forms part of an aminoacyl(aa)-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex (TC) that accelerates the binding of aa-tRNA to the ribosome during peptide elongation. Such binding, placing a portion of EF-Tu in contact with the GTPase Associated Center (GAC), is followed by GTP hydrolysis and Pi release, and results in formation of a pretranslocation (PRE) complex. Although tRNA movement through the ribosome during PRE complex formation has been extensively studied, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of EF-Tu interaction with either the ribosome or aa-tRNA. Here we examine these dynamics, utilizing ensemble and single molecule assays employing fluorescent labeled derivatives of EF-Tu, tRNA, and the ribosome to measure changes in either FRET efficiency or fluorescence intensity during PRE complex formation. Our results indicate that ribosome-bound EF-Tu separates from the GAC prior to its full separation from aa-tRNA, and suggest that EF-Tu·GDP dissociates from the ribosome by two different pathways. These pathways correspond to either reversible EF-Tu·GDP dissociation from the ribosome prior to the major conformational change in EF-Tu that follows GTP hydrolysis, or irreversible dissociation after or concomitant with this conformational change.

  1. Platinum-monolayer Electrocatalysts: Palladium Interlayer on IrCo Alloy Core Improves Activity in Oxygen-reduction Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, K.; Chen, W.-F.; Sasaki, K.; Su, D.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhou, W.; Izzo, E.L.; Perez-Acosta, C.; Hirunsit, P.; Balbuena, P.B.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and electrocatalytic properties of a new low-Pt electrocatalyst consisting of an IrCo core, a Pd interlayer, and a surface Pt monolayer, emphasizing the interlayer's role in improving electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt in HClO{sub 4} solution. We prepared the IrCo alloys by decomposing, at 800 C, hexacyanometalate, KCoIr(CN){sub 6}, adsorbed on the carbon surfaces. The synthesis of Ir{sub 3}Co/C involved heating a mix of metal salts and carbon in hydrogen at 500 C. Thereafter, we placed a palladium and/or platinum monolayer on them via the galvanic displacement of an underpotentially deposited copper monolayer. The electrocatalysts were characterized using structural- and electrochemical-techniques. For PtML/PdML/IrCo/C, we observed a Pt mass activity of 1.18 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and the platinum-group-metals mass of 0.16 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)}. In comparison, without a Pd interlayer, i.e., Pt{sub ML}/IrCo/C, the activities of 0.15 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and 0.036 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)} were considerably lower. We consider that the palladium interlayer plays an essential role in achieving high catalytic activity by adjusting the electronic interaction of the platinum monolayer with the IrCo core, so that it accelerates the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the intermediates of oxygen reduction. A similar trend was observed for Pt{sub ML}/Pd{sub ML} and Pt{sub ML} deposited on Ir{sub 3}Co/C alloy core. We used density functional theory to interpret the observed phenomena.

  2. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics using ammonium reineckate ion-pair complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Gamal H.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2004-03-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric, conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of norfloxacin (NRF), ciprofloxacin (CIP), ofloxacin (OFL) and enrofloxacin (ENF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone in the range 5.0-65, 4.0-48, 5.0-56 and 6.0-72 μg ml -1 of NRF, CPF, OFL and ENF, respectively. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. The results obtained showed good recoveries of 99.15±1.15, 99.30±1.40, 99.60±1.50, and 99.00±1.25% with relative standard deviations of 0.81, 1.06, 0.97, and 0.69% for NRF, CPF, OFL, and ENF, respectively. Applications of the proposed methods to representative pharmaceutical formulations are successfully presented.

  3. Polyethylene glycol(PEG-400): An efficient and recyclable reaction medium for the synthesis of novel 1,5-benzodiazepines and their antimicrobial activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shankaraiah G. Konda; Baseer M. Shaikh; Sanjay A. Chavan; Bhaskar S. Dawane

    2011-01-01

    A new series of imidazole-containing 1,5-benzodiazepines have been synthesized by the condensation of chalcones with ophenylenediamine using piperidine in polyethylene glycol(PEG-400)as an efficient and green reaction solvent.The advantages of this protocol are environmental friendliness,easy work-up,high yields,mild reaction condition and avoidance of expensive catalyst.Furthermore,newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity.

  4. Effective production of S-allyl-L-cysteine through a homogeneous reaction with activated endogenous γ-glutamyltranspeptidase in garlic (Allium Sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobian; Miao, Yelian; Chen, Jie Yu; Zhang, Qimei; Wang, Jining

    2015-03-01

    S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) is a bioactive compound in garlic (Allium sativum). A novel process including soaking and homogeneous reaction was applied for the effective production of SAC with endogenous γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP, EC 2.3.2.2) in garlic. The effects of temperature and CaCl2 concentration on γ-GTP activity in soaking, and the relationship of SAC production with γ-GTP activity in homogeneous reaction were investigated, using fresh garlic as raw material. The experimental results showed that the γ-GTP in fresh garlic was activated by soaking. The yield rate and the final content of SAC increased linearly with increasing initial γ-GTP activity in the homogeneous reaction at 37 °C. The final SAC content reached 606.3 μg/g (i.e. 32 times higher than that in fresh garlic) after soaking for 72 h in a 10-mM CaCl2 solution at 10 °C, and the homogeneous reaction for 8 h at 37 °C. SAC was produced effectively through the homogeneous reaction with activated endogenous γ-GTP in garlic. PMID:25745247

  5. Robust non-carbon titanium nitride nanotubes supported Pt catalyst with enhanced catalytic activity and durability for methanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the combination of solvothermal alcoholysis and post-nitriding method, titanium nitride nanotubes (TiN NTs), with high surface area, hollow and interior porous structure are prepared successfully and used at a support for Pt nanoparticles. The TiN NTs supported Pt (Pt/TiN NTs) catalyst displays enhanced activity and durability towards methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) compared with the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK) catalyst. X ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are performed to investigate the physicochemical properties of the synthesized catalyst. SEM and TEM images reveal that the wall of the TiN NTs is porous and Pt nanoparticles supported on the dendritic TiN nanocrystals exhibit small size and good dispersion. Effects of inherent corrosion-resistant, tubular and porous nanostructures and electron transfer due to the strong metal–support interactions of TiN NTs contribute to the enhanced catalytic activity and stability of Pt/TiN NTs towards the MOR

  6. Steam reforming of methane over Ni catalysts prepared from hydrotalcite-type precursors:Catalytic activity and reaction kinetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qi; Zhenmin Cheng; Zhiming Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Ni/Mg–Al catalysts derived from hydrotalcite-type precursors were prepared by a co-precipitation technique and applied to steam reforming of methane. By comparison with Ni/γ-Al2O3 and Ni/α-Al2O3 catalysts prepared by in-cipient wetness impregnation, the Ni/Mg–Al catalyst presented much higher activity as a result of higher specific surface area and better Ni dispersion. The Ni/Mg–Al catalyst with a Ni/Mg/Al molar ratio of 0.5:2.5:1 exhibited the highest activity for steam methane reforming and was selected for kinetic investigation. With external and inter-nal diffusion limitations eliminated, kinetic experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure and over a temperature range of 823–973 K. The results demonstrated that the overal conversion of CH4 and the conversion of CH4 to CO2 were strongly influenced by reaction temperature, residence time of reactants as wel as molar ratio of steam to methane. A classical Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model proposed by Xu and Froment (1989) fitted the experimental data with excellent agreement. The estimated adsorption parameters were consistent thermodynamical y.

  7. Activation cross-sections of deuteron-induced nuclear reactions on natural iron up to 24 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu_khandaker@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Haba, Hiromitsu; Kanaya, Jumpei [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Otuka, Naohiko [Nuclear Data Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-12-01

    Activation cross-sections of the {sup nat}Fe(d,x){sup 55,56,57,58g+m}Co, {sup 52g,54,56}Mn, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 59}Fe reactions were measured from their respective thresholds to 24 MeV via a stacked foil activation technique combined with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. An overall good agreement is found with some of the earlier measurements, whereas partial agreements are obtained with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2011 library. The present measurement reports four cross-sections of {sup 58g+m}Co, {sup 56}Mn and {sup 59}Fe radionuclides in the energy range of 20–24 MeV for the first time. Physical thick target yields deduced from the measured cross-sections are compared with the directly measured yields available in the literature. The measured {sup 58}Fe(d,p){sup 59}Fe cross section is underestimated by the original TENDL-2011 library while overestimated by the TENDL-2011 library renormalized by Ignatyuk for the FENDL-3 library.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of charge transfer complex formation between Silver Nitrate and Benzylcyanide in Solvent Ethylene Glycol

    CERN Document Server

    Modarress, H

    2003-01-01

    The formation constant for charge transfer complexes between electron acceptor (AgNo sub 3) and electron donor benzylcyanide (C sub 6 H sub 5 -CH sub 2 -C ident to N) in solvent ethyleneglycol [(CH sub 2 OH) sub 2] has been evaluated by using the nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of aromatic group of benzylcyanide measured against external references, tetramethylsilane, hexamethyldisilane and cyclohexane at 20 sup d ig sup C. The external referencing procedure eliminated the interference of internal reference in the course of complexation. The necessary bulk magnetic susceptibility corrections on the measured chemical shifts have been made. The solution nationalised and their effects on the formation constant have been considered and a new equation has been suggested to obtain the main ionic activity coefficient of AgNO sub 3 from nuclear magnetic resonance results. The mean ionic activity coefficient has been taken into account in the formation constant calculations. The results indicated that the a...

  9. Multi-day activity scheduling reactions to planned activities and future events in a dynamic model of activity-travel behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Linda; Arentze, Theo; Timmermans, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Modeling multi-day planning has received scarce attention in activity-based transport demand modeling so far. However, new dynamic activity-based approaches are being developed at the current moment. The frequency and inflexibility of planned activities and events in activity schedules of individuals indicate the importance of incorporating those pre-planned activities in the new generation of dynamic travel demand models. Elaborating and combining previous work on event-driven activity generation, the aim of this paper is to develop and illustrate an extension of a need-based model of activity generation that takes into account possible influences of pre-planned activities and events. This paper describes the theory and shows the results of simulations of the extension. The simulation was conducted for six different activities, and the parameter values used were consistent with an earlier estimation study. The results show that the model works well and that the influences of the parameters are consistent, logical, and have clear interpretations. These findings offer further evidence of face and construct validity to the suggested modeling approach.

  10. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Akshaya Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%. The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52% was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm 3 with comorbid conditions.

  11. Incidence of adverse drug reactions in human immune deficiency virus-positive patients using highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, B Akshaya; Babu, S Chandra; Yadav, Harlokesh Narayan; Jain, Sunil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in Human immune deficiency virus (HIV) patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To identify the risk factors associated with ADRs in HIV patients. To analyze reported ADRs based on various parameters like causality, severity, predictability, and preventability. Retrospective case-control study. An 18-month retrospective case-control study of 208 patients newly registered in ART center, RIMS hospital, Kadapa, were intensively monitored for ADRs to HAART. Predictability was calculated based on the history of previous exposure to drug. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify the risk factors for ADRs. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for estimating the correlation between ADRs and different variables. All statistical calculations were performed using EpiInfo version 3.5.3. Monitoring of 208 retrospective patients by active Pharmacovigilance identified 105 ADRs that were identified in 71 patients. Skin rash and anemia were the most commonly observed ADRs. The organ system commonly affected by ADR was skin and appendages (31.57%). The ADRs that were moderate were 90.14% of cases. The incidence of ADRs (53.52%) was higher with Zidovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine combination. CD4 cell count less than <250 cells/μl were 80.28%, male gender were observed to be the risk factors for ADRs. Our study finding showed that there is a need of active pharmaceutical care with intensive monitoring for ADRs in Indian HIV-positive patients who are illiterate, of male and female gender, with CD4 count ≤250 cells/mm(3) with comorbid conditions. PMID:22470896

  12. Methandiide as a non-innocent ligand in carbene complexes: from the electronic structure to bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Julia; Modl, Tanja; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of a ruthenium carbene complex based on a sulfonyl-substituted methandiide and its application in bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis is reported. In the complex, the metal-carbon interaction can be tuned between a Ru-C single bond with additional electrostatic interactions and a Ru=C double bond, thus allowing the control of the stability and reactivity of the complex. Hence, activation of polar and non-polar bonds (O-H, H-H) as well as dehydrogenation reactions become possible. In these reactions the carbene acts as a non-innocent ligand supporting the bond activation as nucleophilic center in the 1,2-addition across the metal-carbon double bond. This metal-ligand cooperativity can be applied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation for the reduction of ketones. This concept opens new ways for the application of carbene complexes in catalysis.

  13. Continental rifting and metamorphic core complex formation ahead of the Woodlark spreading ridge, D'Entrecasteaux Islands, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Timothy A.; Baldwin, S. L.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Monteleone, B.

    2007-02-01

    We evaluate the role of a metamorphic core complex (MCC) on Normanby Island in the Woodlark rift. Located 1 km thickness of blueschist-derived mylonites formed in a midcrustal shear zone during the Pliocene at ˜400-500°C. This top-to-the-north zone appears to have reactivated the gently dipping base of the Papuan ophiolite (Papuan Ultramafic Body, PUB), and its continued activity appears to control the north dipping asymmetry of active half grabens to the north of the MCC and rapid subsidence of the Woodlark Rise. Mylonites in the MCC's lower plate have been exhumed along a detachment as a result of >50 km of slip at rates of >12 mm/yr. The inactive, back-tilted detachment preserves fault surface megamullions and mylonitic lineations parallel to the Plio-Pleistocene plate motion. A second SE vergent detachment has been established on the opposite flank of this rolling-hinge style MCC, probably since 0.8) at depth, and provide a sufficient mechanism for activating low-angle normal faults in the rift. MCC inception was not localized to the tip of the Woodlark MOR. Instead, extreme crustal thinning near the MCC preconditioned later continental breakup. The lower crust appears to be weak, thickening beneath unloaded footwalls to uplift MCCs above sea level, and flowing laterally to even out regional crustal thickness contrasts on a 1-6 m.y. timescale. Deep-seated transforms separate rheologically distinct domains in which extension has been localized along the weak PUB to cause MCC formation, vs. those in which slip is distributed across an imbricate zone of more uniform strength normal faults. The Trobriand fault connects in the eastern Woodlark rift to the Owen Stanley fault in the Papuan Ranges, which is probably moving at nearly the full plate velocity.

  14. Study of Kinetics of Complexation Reaction of Co2+ with 2-benzoylpyridine-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and Kinetic spectrophotometric Determination of Cobalt%Co2+与BPPT络合反应动力学及动力学光谱法测定钴

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BINGOL,Haluk; ATALAY,Tevfik

    2006-01-01

    Kinetics of complexation reaction of Co2+ with 2-benzoylpyridine-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (BPPT)was spectrophotometrically examined at 421 nm. The ligand that is developed for a simple kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of Co2+ is based on 1:2 complex formation between Co2+ and BPPT. The complexation reaction was carried out in ethanol-water medium at 25 ℃. Kinetic and activation parameters of the complexation reaction were calculated, and the rate equation and the reaction mechanism were proposed. The calibration graph is linear in the concentration range of 0.10~2.91 mg·L-1 for the tangent method. The species that caused interference were investigated.

  15. Selective and non-extractive spectrophotometric determination of cefdinir in formulations based on donor-acceptor complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita K. Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cefdinir has broad spectrum of activity and high prescription rates, hence its counterfeiting seems imminent. We have proposed a simple, fast, selective and non-extractive spectrophotometric method for the content assay of cefdinir in formulations. The method is based on complexation of cefdinir and Fe under reducing condition in a buffered medium (pH 11 to form a magenta colored donor-acceptor complex (λ max = 550 nm; apparent molar absorptivity = 3720 L mol-1 cm-1. No other cephalosporins, penicillins and common excipients interfere under the test conditions. The Beer's law is followed in the concentration range 8-160 µg mL-1.

  16. Mechanisms of Host-Pathogen Protein Complex Formation and Bacterial Immune Evasion of Streptococcus suis Protein Fhb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueqin; Liu, Peng; Gan, Shuzhen; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-08-12

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2)-induced sepsis and meningitis are often accompanied by bacteremia. The evasion of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-mediated phagocytic clearance is central to the establishment of bacteremia caused by S. suis 2 and is facilitated by the ability of factor H (FH)-binding protein (Fhb) to bind FH on the bacterial surface, thereby impeding alternative pathway complement activation and phagocytic clearance. Here, C3b/C3d was found to bind to Fhb, along with FH, forming a large immune complex. The formation of this immune complex was mediated by domain II of Fhb via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which, to our knowledge, is a new type of interaction. Interestingly, Fhb was found to be associated with the cell envelope and also present in the culture supernatant, where secreted Fhb inhibited complement activation via interactions with domain II, thereby enhancing antiphagocytic clearance by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thus, Fhb is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement component C3 as well as FH and interferes with innate immune recognition in a secret protein manner. S. suis 2 therefore appears to have developed a new strategy to combat host innate immunity and enhance survival in host blood. PMID:27342778

  17. Inducer effect on the complex formation between rat liver nuclear proteins and cytochrome P450 2B gene regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzhak, T G; Schwartz, E I; Gulyaeva, L F; Lyakhovich, V V

    2002-09-01

    DNA gel retardation assay has been applied to the investigation of complexes between rat liver nuclear proteins and Barbie box positive regulatory element of cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) genes. The intensities of B1 and B2 bands detected in the absence of an inducer increased after 30 min protein incubation with phenobarbital (PB) or triphenyldioxane (TPD), but not with 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOPOB). In addition, a new complex (B3 band) was for the first time detected under induction by PB, TPD, and TCPOPOB. Increase in the incubation time up to 2 h facilitated the formation of other new complexes (B4 and B5 bands), which were detected only in the presence of TPD. The use of [3H]TPD in hybridization experiments revealed that this inducer, capable of binding to Barbie box DNA, is also present in B4 and B5 complexes. It is probable that the investigated compounds activate the same proteins at the initial induction steps, which correlates with the formation of B1, B2, and B3 complexes. The further induction step might be inducer-specific, as indicated by the formation of B4 and B5 complexes in the presence of TPD only. Thus, the present data suggest the possibility of specific gene activation signaling pathways that are dependent on a particular inducer. PMID:12387719

  18. Structural and functional characterization of complex formation between two Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors from Russell's Viper venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ashis K; Dutta, Sumita; Kalita, Bhargab; Jha, Deepak K; Deb, Pritam; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors (KSPIs) exhibit various biological functions including anticoagulant activity. This study elucidates the occurrence and subunit stoichiometry of a putative complex formed between two KSPIs (Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II) purified from the native Rusvikunin complex of Pakistan Russell's Viper (Daboia russelii russelii) venom (RVV). The protein components of the Rusvikunin complex were identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. The non-covalent interaction between two major components of the complex (Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II) at 1:2 stoichiometric ratio to form a stable complex was demonstrated by biophysical techniques such as spectrofluorometric, classical gel-filtration, equilibrium gel-filtration, circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE analyses. CD measurement showed that interaction between Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II did not change their overall secondary structure; however, the protein complex exhibited enhanced hydrodynamic diameter and anticoagulant activity as compared to the individual components of the complex. This study may lay the foundation for understanding the basis of protein complexes in snake venoms and their role in pathophysiology of snakebite.

  19. Effective production of S-allyl-L-cysteine through a homogeneous reaction with activated endogenous γ-glutamyltranspeptidase in garlic (Allium Sativum)

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiaobian; Miao, Yelian; Chen, Jie Yu; Zhang, Qimei; Wang, Jining

    2013-01-01

    S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) is a bioactive compound in garlic (Allium sativum). A novel process including soaking and homogeneous reaction was applied for the effective production of SAC with endogenous γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP, EC 2.3.2.2) in garlic. The effects of temperature and CaCl2 concentration on γ-GTP activity in soaking, and the relationship of SAC production with γ-GTP activity in homogeneous reaction were investigated, using fresh garlic as raw material. The experimental resul...

  20. Platelet-activating factor in Iberian pig spermatozoa: receptor expression and role as enhancer of the calcium-induced acrosome reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragado, M J; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2011-12-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid involved in reproductive physiology. PAF receptor is expressed in some mammalian spermatozoa species where it plays a role in these germ-cell-specific processes. The aim of this study is to identify PAF receptor in Iberian pig spermatozoa and to evaluate PAF's effects on motility, viability and acrosome reaction. Semen samples from Iberian boars were used. PAF receptor identification was performed by Western blotting. Spermatozoa motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis system, whereas spermatozoa viability and acrosome reaction were evaluated by flow cytometry. Different PAF concentrations added to non-capacitating medium during 60 min have no effect on any spermatozoa motility parameter measured. Acrosome reaction was rapid and potently induced by 1 μm calcium ionophore A23187 showing an effect at 60 min and maximum at 240 min. PAF added to a capacitating medium is not able to induce spermatozoa acrosome reaction at any time studied. However, PAF, in the presence of A23187, significantly accelerates and enhances the calcium-induced acrosome reaction in a concentration-dependent manner in Iberian boar spermatozoa. Exogenous PAF does not affect at all spermatozoa viability, whereas slightly exacerbated the A23187-induced loss in viability. This work demonstrates that PAF receptor is expressed in Iberian pig spermatozoa and that its stimulation by PAF regulates the calcium-induced acrosome reaction. This work contributes to further elucidate the physiological regulation of the most relevant spermatozoa functions for successful fertilization: acrosome reaction. PMID:22023717

  1. Thermodynamics of complexes formation by ITC in methanol/water = 9/1 (v/v) solution: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisicaro, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.fisicaro@unipr.it [University of Parma, Department of Pharmacy, Parco Area delle Scienze, 27/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Compari, Carlotta; Bacciottini, Franco; Contardi, Laura [University of Parma, Department of Pharmacy, Parco Area delle Scienze, 27/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Carcelli, Mauro; Rispoli, Gabriele; Rogolino, Dominga [University of Parma, Department of Chemistry, Parco Area delle Scienze, 17/A, 43124 Parma (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Integrase strand transfert inhibitors chelate the metal ions in the active site of HIV integrase. - Highlights: • Development of inhibitors acting against those viral enzymes operating via a cooperative two-metal ion mechanism, such as HIV integrase (IN), requires optimizing the binding affinity to the target. • We have defined an experimental procedure for obtaining reliable thermodynamic data by ITC in methanol/water = 9/1 (v/v) as solvent. • Formation heats in mixed solvent of the complexes formed by a ligand, model of Raltegravir, with Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) are here reported. - Abstract: Most enzymes that participate in the biochemistry of nucleic acids require divalent metal ion cofactors to promote activity. Development of potent inhibitors, acting against those viral enzymes operating via a cooperative two-metal ion mechanism, such as HIV integrase (IN) and RNase H, hepatitis C virus polymerase and influenza endonuclease, requires optimizing the binding affinity to the target, which is dictated by the binding free energy composed of both enthalpic and entropic contributions. They can be obtained by using isothermal titration microcalorimetry. We have defined an experimental procedure for obtaining reliable thermodynamic data in methanol/water = 9/1 0.1 M KCl as solvent, used to overcome solubility problems. In this way we have measured the heats of formation of the complexes formed by N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-5-hydroxy-2-isopropyl-1-methyl-6-oxo-1, 6-dihydroxypyrimidine-4-carboxylate (HL, a model of Raltegravir, the antiretroviral drug produced by Merck and Co.), and a series of divalent metal ions of biological interest (Mg(II), Mn(II), Co(II) and Zn(II)), whose speciation was previously determined by potentiometry.

  2. Density Functional Studies of the Reaction of Ytterbium Monocation with Fluoromethane: C-F Bond Activation and Electron-Transfer Reactivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The potential energy surface and reaction mechanism corresponding to the reaction of ytterbium monocation with fluoromethane,which represents a prototype of the activation of C-F bond in fluorohydrocarbons by bare lanthanide cations,have been investigated for the first time by using density functional theory.A direct fluorine abstraction mechanism was revealed,and the related thermochemistry data were determined.The electron-transfer reactivity of the reaction was analyzed using the two-state model,and a strongly avoided crossing behavior on the transition state region was shown.The present results support the reaction mechanism inferred from early experimental data and the related thermochemistry data can provide a guide for further experimental researches.

  3. Subnanometer Molybdenum Sulfide on Carbon Nanotubes as a Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Yang, Zhi; Shen, Juanxia; Nie, Huagui; Cai, Qiran; Li, Luhua; Ge, Mengzhan; Gu, Cancan; Chen, Xi'an; Yang, Keqin; Zhang, Lijie; Chen, Ying; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-02-10

    Electrochemically splitting water for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has been viewed as a promising approach to produce renewable and clean hydrogen energy. However, searching for cheap and efficient HER electrocatalysts to replace the currently used Pt-based catalysts remains an urgent task. Herein, we develop a one-step carbon nanotube (CNT) assisted synthesis strategy with CNTs' strong adsorbability to mediate the growth of subnanometer-sized MoS(x) on CNTs. The subnanometer MoS(x)-CNT hybrids achieve a low overpotential of 106 mV at 10 mA cm(-2), a small Tafel slope of 37 mV per decade, and an unprecedentedly high turnover frequency value of 18.84 s(-1) at η = 200 mV among all reported non-Pt catalysts in acidic conditions. The superior performance of the hybrid catalysts benefits from the presence of a higher number of active sites and the abundant exposure of unsaturated S atoms rooted in the subnanometer structure, demonstrating a new class of subnanometer-scale catalysts. PMID:26765150

  4. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure determination and catalytic activity in epoxidation reaction of two new oxidovanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Vida; Grivani, Gholamhossein; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    The five coordinated vanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes of VOL1 (1) and VOL2 (2), HL1 = 2-{(E)-[2-bromoethyl)imino]methyl}-2- naphthol, HL2 = 2-{(E)-[2-chloroethyl)imino]methyl}-2- naphthol, have been synthesized and they were characterized by using single-crystal X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis (CHN) and FT-IR spectroscopy. Crystal structure determination of these complexes shows that the Schiff base ligands (L1 and L2) act as bidentate ligands with two phenolato oxygen atoms and two imine nitrogen atoms in the trans geometry. The coordination geometry around the vanadium(IV) is distorted square pyramidal in which vanadium(IV) is coordinated by two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms of two independent ligands in the basal plane and by one oxygen atom in the apical position. The catalytic activity of the Schiff base complexes of 1 and 2 in the epoxidation of alkenes were investigated using different reaction parameters such as solvent effect, oxidant, alkene/oxidant ratio and the catalyst amount. The results showed that in the presence of TBHP as oxidant in 1: 4 and 1:3 ratio of the cyclooctene/oxidant ratio, high epoxide yield was obtained for 1 (76%) and 2 (80%) with TON(= mole of substrate/mole of catalyst) of 27 and 28.5, respectively, in epoxidation of cyclooctene.

  5. Study of non-1/ ν reaction nuclides using k0 - Neutron Activation Analysis at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modified spectral index r(α); the Westcott gLu(Tn) factor and absolute neutron temperature Tn were determined for the handling of non-1/ ν (n, γ) reaction based on the Westcott formalism using k0-neutron activation analysis (k0-NAA) method at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA) research reactor. The r(α) was determined by the bare bi-isotopic monitor method using measurement of radionuclides of 97Zr and 95Zr. The 176Lu as non-1/ ν and 197Au as 1/ ν monitors were utilized for determination of gLu(Tn). The r(α) and gLu(Tn) values ranged from 0.0715 to 0.1417 with a RSD of 15.24 % and from 1.7832 to 2.0149 with a RSD of 3.58 %, respectively. The accuracy of the method was evaluated based on the calculated absolute neutron temperature (Tn) value. The calculated average value of Tn was 40.56 ± 9.32 degree Celsius while the value reported by MNA was 40 degree Celsius, which represents an acceptable level of consistency. (author)

  6. Modelling active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in boron-containing zeolites and their interaction with probe molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezcano-González, Inés; Vidal-Moya, Alejandro; Boronat, Mercedes; Blasco, Teresa; Corma, Avelino

    2010-06-28

    Theoretical calculations and in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy have been combined to get insight on the nature of the active sites for the Beckmann rearrangement reaction in borosilicate zeolites. The interaction of a B site in zeolite Beta with a series of probe molecules (ammonia, pyridine, acetone and water) has been modelled and the (15)N and (11)B NMR isotropic chemical shift of the resulting complexes calculated and compared with experimental in situ NMR results. This approach has allowed validation of the methodology to model the adsorption on a zeolite boron site of molecules of varying basicity which are either protonated or non-protonated. The limitation is that theoretical calculations overestimate the effect of molecular adsorption through hydrogen bonds on the calculated isotropic (11)B NMR chemical shift.Theoretical and experimental results on the adsorption of acetophenone and cyclohexanone oximes on zeolite B-Beta indicate that Brønsted acid sites protonate the oximes, changing the boron coordination from trigonal to tetrahedral. Comparison of theoretical and experimental (15)N NMR chemical shifts of the adsorbed amides (acetanilide and epsilon-caprolactam) indicates that they are non-protonated, and the (11)B NMR spectra show that, as expected, boron remains in trigonal coordination with an isotropic delta(11)B(exp) which differs from the calculated value delta(11)B(calc).

  7. Contact and Support Considerations in the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Activity of Petaled MoS2 Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Shane T; Macdonald, Janet E

    2016-09-28

    Petaled MoS2 electrodes grown hydrothermally from Mo foils are found to have an 800 nm, intermediate, MoSxOy layer. Similar petaled MoS2 films without this intermediate layer are grown on Au. X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies and transmission electron microscopy indicate the resulting petaled multilayer MoS2 films are frayed and exhibit single-layer, 1T-MoS2 behavior at the edges. We compare the electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction activity via linear sweep voltammetry with Tafel analysis as well as the impedance properties of the electrodes. We find that petaled MoS2/Au and petaled MoS2/Mo exhibit comparable overpotential to 10 mA cm(-2) at -279 vs -242 mV, respectively, and similar Tafel slopes of ∼68 mV/decade indicating a similar rate-determining step. The exchange current normalized to the geometric area of petaled MoS2/Au (0.000921 mA cm(-2)) is 3 times smaller than that of petaled MoS2/Mo (0.00290 mA cm(-2)), and is attributed to the lower petal density on the Au support. However, Au supports increase the turnover frequency per active site of petaled MoS2 to 0.48 H2 Mo(-1) s(-1) from 0.25 H2 Mo(-1) s(-1) on Mo supports. Both petaled MoS2 films have nearly ohmic contacts to their supports with uncompensated resistivity Ru of <2.5 Ω·cm(2).

  8. Nucleoprotein of influenza B virus binds to its type A counterpart and disrupts influenza A viral polymerase complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaru-ampornpan, Peera, E-mail: peera.jar@biotec.or.th; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan, E-mail: anan.jon@biotec.or.th

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FluB nucleoprotein (BNP) can bind to FluA nucleoprotein (ANP). •BNP–ANP interaction inhibits FluA polymerase activity. •BNP binding prevents ANP from forming a functional FluA polymerase complex. •Nuclear localization of BNP is necessary for FluA polymerase inhibition. •Viral RNA is not required for the BNP–ANP interaction. -- Abstract: Upon co-infection with influenza B virus (FluB), influenza A virus (FluA) replication is substantially impaired. Previously, we have shown that the nucleoprotein of FluB (BNP) can inhibit FluA polymerase machinery, retarding the growth of FluA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this inhibitory action awaited further investigation. Here, we provide evidence that BNP hinders the proper formation of FluA polymerase complex by competitively binding to the nucleoprotein of FluA. To exert this inhibitory effect, BNP must be localized in the nucleus. The interaction does not require the presence of the viral RNA but needs an intact BNP RNA-binding motif. The results highlight the novel role of BNP as an anti-influenza A viral agent and provide insights into the mechanism of intertypic interference.

  9. Nucleoprotein of influenza B virus binds to its type A counterpart and disrupts influenza A viral polymerase complex formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •FluB nucleoprotein (BNP) can bind to FluA nucleoprotein (ANP). •BNP–ANP interaction inhibits FluA polymerase activity. •BNP binding prevents ANP from forming a functional FluA polymerase complex. •Nuclear localization of BNP is necessary for FluA polymerase inhibition. •Viral RNA is not required for the BNP–ANP interaction. -- Abstract: Upon co-infection with influenza B virus (FluB), influenza A virus (FluA) replication is substantially impaired. Previously, we have shown that the nucleoprotein of FluB (BNP) can inhibit FluA polymerase machinery, retarding the growth of FluA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this inhibitory action awaited further investigation. Here, we provide evidence that BNP hinders the proper formation of FluA polymerase complex by competitively binding to the nucleoprotein of FluA. To exert this inhibitory effect, BNP must be localized in the nucleus. The interaction does not require the presence of the viral RNA but needs an intact BNP RNA-binding motif. The results highlight the novel role of BNP as an anti-influenza A viral agent and provide insights into the mechanism of intertypic interference

  10. Ubiquitination of HTLV-I Tax in response to DNA damage regulates nuclear complex formation and nuclear export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HTLV-I oncoprotein, Tax, is a pleiotropic protein whose activity is partially regulated by its ability to interact with, and perturb the functions of, numerous cellular proteins. Tax is predominantly a nuclear protein that localizes to nuclear foci known as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS. We recently reported that the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins are altered in response to various forms of genotoxic and cellular stress. The level of cytoplasmic Tax increases in response to stress and this relocalization depends upon the interaction of Tax with CRM1. Cellular pathways and signals that regulate the subcellular localization of Tax remain to be determined. However, post-translational modifications including sumoylation and ubiquitination are known to influence the subcellular localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. The sumoylated form of Tax exists predominantly in the nucleus while ubiquitinated Tax exists predominantly in the cytoplasm. Therefore, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Tax that occur in response to DNA damage regulate the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. Results We found a significant increase in mono-ubiquitination of Tax in response to UV irradiation. Mutation of specific lysine residues (K280 and K284 within Tax inhibited DNA damage-induced ubiquitination. In contrast to wild-type Tax, which undergoes transient nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to DNA damage, the K280 and K284 mutants were retained in nuclear foci following UV irradiation and remained co-localized with the cellular TSS protein, sc35. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the localization of Tax, and its interactions with cellular proteins, are dynamic following DNA damage and depend on the post-translational modification status of Tax. Specifically, DNA damage induces the ubiquitination of Tax at K280 and K284

  11. Preparation and electrocatalytic activity of 3D hierarchical porous spinel CoFe2O4 hollow nanospheres as efficient catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction and Oxygen Evolution Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium-air battery has attracted extensively attention and now developing catalysts with high electrocatalytic activity is one of the challenges for lithium-air battery. In this paper, 3D hierarchical porous spinel CoFe2O4 hollow nanospheres were first prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The hollow CoFe2O4 nanospheres have unique bimodal porous structure which consists of micropores and mesopores. The catalytic activity of the CoFe2O4 hollow nanospheres for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has been studied and compared with the acetylene black, the solid CoFe2O4 nanospheres and the commercial Pt/C by using rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) technique. The spinel CoFe2O4 hollow nanospheres exhibit superior catalytic activity for the ORR compared to the acetylene black and the solid CoFe2O4 nanospheres. Besides, the spinel CoFe2O4 hollow nanospheres also afford high catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Furthermore, the hollow CoFe2O4 nanospheres show the smallest overpotential between ORR and OER. The chronoamperometric studies show that the CoFe2O4 hollow nanospheres exhibit excellent stability for both the ORR and OER. The high ORR and OER activities and stabilities of CoFe2O4 hollow nanospheres could be attributed to their special 3D hierarchical porous structure. This material shows a significant potential application on lithium-air battery

  12. Trends in activity for the water electrolyser reactions on 3d M(Ni,Co,Fe,Mn) hydr(oxy)oxide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Tripkovic, Dusan; Chang, Kee-Chul; Strmcnik, Dusan; Paulikas, Arvydas P.; Hirunsit, Pussana; Chan, Maria; Greeley, Jeff; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2012-06-01

    Design and synthesis of materials for efficient electrochemical transformation of water to molecular hydrogen and of hydroxyl ions to oxygen in alkaline environments is of paramount importance in reducing energy losses in water-alkali electrolysers. Here, using 3d-M hydr(oxy)oxides, with distinct stoichiometries and morphologies in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) regions, we establish the overall catalytic activities for these reaction as a function of a more fundamental property, a descriptor, OH-M2+δ bond strength (0 ≤ δ ≤ 1.5). This relationship exhibits trends in reactivity (Mn OER) or the water dissociation product (for the HER). The successful identification of these electrocatalytic trends provides the foundation for rational design of ‘active sites’ for practical alkaline HER and OER electrocatalysts.

  13. Asymmetric Baylis-Hillman Reaction between Chiral Activated Alkenes and Aromatic Aldehydes in Me3N/H2O/Solvent Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke HE; Zheng Hong ZHOU; Hong Ying TANG; Guo Feng ZHAO; Chu Chi TANG

    2005-01-01

    Chiral activated alkene, L-menthyl acrylate and (+)-N-α-phenylethyl acrylamide,induced asymmetric Baylis-Hillman reaction of aromatic aldehydes was realized at 25℃ for 7 days in Me3N/H2O/solvent homogeneous medium. The corresponding Baylis-Hillman adducts were obtained in good chemical yield with moderate to excellent diastereoselectivity (up to 99% de).

  14. Neutron-activated determination of chlorine, using the 35Cl(n,p)35S reaction as the basis, in thin coatings of silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron-activation determination of chlorine in thin coatings of silicon dioxide on silicon has been shown to be possible through the use of the 55Cl(n, P)35S reaction. The detection limit of chlorine is 3 x 10-9 g (5 x 1013 atoms)

  15. Cinchona alkaloid squaramide catalyzed enantioselective hydrazination/cyclization cascade reaction of α-isocyanoacetates and azodicarboxylates: synthesis of optically active 1,2,4-triazolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Xin; Bi, Hong-Lei; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Hui; Shi, Min

    2013-09-20

    An efficient enantioselective hydrazination/cyclization cascade reaction of α-substituted isocyanoacetates to azodicarboxylates catalyzed by Cinchona alkaloid derived squaramide catalysts has been investigated, affording the optically active 1,2,4-triazolines in excellent yields (up to 99%) and good to excellent enantioselectivities (up to 97% ee) under mild conditions. PMID:23984761

  16. The Influence of Particle Shape and Size on the Activity of Platinum Nanoparticles for Oxygen Reduction Reaction: A Density Functional Theory Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Bligaard, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    We present first principle investigation of the influence of platinum nanoparticle shape and size on the oxygen reduction reaction activity. We compare the activities of nanoparticles with specific shapes (tetrahedron, octahedron, cube and truncated octahedron) with that of equilibrium particle...... by explicitly taking the coverage of oxygenated species into account. A kinetic model derived from counting the number of sites shows that the theoretical activity obtained for equilibrium particle fits well with experimental data. Particles with similar to 3 nm diameter are found to possess the highest...... activity....

  17. Correlation between Cu ion migration behaviour and deNO x activity in Cu-SSZ-13 for the standard NH 3 -SCR reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Beale, A.M.; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Slawinksi, W. A.; Wragg, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the results of a synchrotron-based in situ, time-resolved PXRD study during activation of two Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts under O2/He and one during standard NH3-SCR reaction conditions to obtain insight into the behaviour of Cu ions. The results obtained indicate that deNOx activity is inexorably linked with occupancy of the zeolite 6r.

  18. Correlation between Cu ion migration behaviour and deNOx activity in Cu-SSZ-13 for the standard NH3-SCR reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, A M; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I; Slawinksi, W A; Wragg, D S

    2016-05-01

    Here we present the results of a synchrotron-based in situ, time-resolved PXRD study during activation of two Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts under O2/He and one during standard NH3-SCR reaction conditions to obtain insight into the behaviour of Cu ions. The results obtained indicate that deNOx activity is inexorably linked with occupancy of the zeolite 6r. PMID:27075517

  19. Correlation between Cu ion migration behaviour and deNOx activity in Cu-SSZ-13 for the standard NH3-SCR reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, A M; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I; Slawinksi, W A; Wragg, D S

    2016-05-01

    Here we present the results of a synchrotron-based in situ, time-resolved PXRD study during activation of two Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts under O2/He and one during standard NH3-SCR reaction conditions to obtain insight into the behaviour of Cu ions. The results obtained indicate that deNOx activity is inexorably linked with occupancy of the zeolite 6r.

  20. Production of $^3$He in Rocks by Reactions Induced by Particles of the Nuclear-Active and Muon Components of Cosmic Rays: Geological and Petrological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenok, A V

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents data on the production of the $^3$He nuclide in rocks under the effect of cosmic-ray particles. The origin of the nuclide in the ground in neutron- and proton-induced spallation reactions, reactions induced by high-energy muons, and negative muon capture reactions is analyzed. The cross sections of reactions producing $^3$He and $^3$H are calculated by means of numerical simulations with the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. The production rate of the $^3$He nuclide in the ground is evaluated for the average level of solar activity at high geomagnetic latitudes and at sea level. It is proved that the production of $^3$He in near-surface ground layers by spallation reactions induced by cosmic-ray protons may be approximately 10% of the total production rate of cosmogenic $^3$He. At depths of 10-50 m.w.e., the accumulation of $^3$He is significantly contributed by reactions induced by cosmic-ray muons. Data presented in the paper make it possible to calculate the accumulation rate of $^3$He in a roc...

  1. Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by Reaction Kinetics and EPR Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Karp, Eric M.; Luo, Jin-Yong; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-04-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with various Cu loadings were prepared via solution ion exchange. The hydrated samples were studied with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). Cu2+ ion coordination numbers were obtained by analyzing the hyperfine structures while Cu-Cu distances were estimated from line broadening of the EPR features. By coupling EPR and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) results, two Cu2+ ion locations were suggested. Standard and fast NH3-SCR, as well as non-selective NH3 oxidation reactions were carried out over these catalysts at high space velocities. For the SCR reaction, intra-particle diffusion limitation was found throughout the reaction temperatures investigated. Although clear structure-activity relationships cannot be derived, the reaction results allow for reactant diffusivities and Cu2+ ion locations to be estimated. The slower NH3 oxidation reaction, on the other hand, is kinetically limited at low temperatures, and, therefore, allows for a correlation between Cu2+ ion location and reaction kinetics to be made. Furthermore, the dynamic Cu2+ ion motion as a function of temperature could also be derived from the NH3 oxidation kinetics.

  2. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin α (Pheo α) within the D1 protein (PheoD1), while PheoD2 (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Qy-states of PheoD1 and PheoD2 bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling (Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374) of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of PheoD1 is near 672 nm, whereas PheoD2 (∼677.5 nm) and ChlD1 (∼680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the PheoD2-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Qy absorption maxima at 676-680 nm (Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672). To provide more insight into the site energies of both PheoD1 and PheoD2 (including the corresponding Qx transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch PheoD1 is genetically replaced with chlorophyll α (Chl α). We show that the Qx-/Qy-region site energies of PheoD1 and PheoD2 are ∼545/680 nm and ∼541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment (Jankowiak et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2002, 106, 8803?8814). The latter values should be used to model excitonic structure and excitation energy

  3. Inflammatory reaction versus endogenous peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors expression,re-exploring secondary organ complications of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li; KE Yan; ZHU Chun-yun; TANG Ning; TIAN Deng-ke; GAO Yue-hong; ZHENG Jian-pu; BIAN Ka

    2008-01-01

    Background The chronic pathological changes in vascular walls of hypertension may exert destructive effects on multiple organ systems.Accumulating evidence indicates that inflammatory reactions are involved in the pathological changes of hypertension.Three peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been identified:PPARα,PPARβ/δ,and PPARγ,all of which have multiple biological effects,especially the inhibition of inflammation.The aim of this study was to evaluate PPAR isoforms expression profile in important organs of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and to understand the modulation of endogenous PPAR isoforms under inflammatory condition.Methods Tissues (kidney,liver,heart,and brain) were dissected from SHR and age-matched control Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) to investigate the abundance of PPAR isoforms and PPAR-responsive genes (acyl-CoA oxidase and CD36).The expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ),which can trans-activate PPARγ expression,was also observed.The inflammatory response was analyzed by the expression of inflammatory mediators inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS),intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1),vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1),E-selectin,interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β),and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα),and formation of carbonyl and nitrated proteins.Results The expressions of 3 PPAR isoforms and PPAR-responsive genes were markedly upregulated in SHR compared with those of WKY.Specifically,the expression of PPARa protein in the kidney,liver,heart and brain increased by 130.76 %,91.48%,306.24%,and 90.70%;PPARβ/δ upregulated by 109.34%,161.98%,137.04%,and 131.66%;PPARγ increased by 393.76%,193.17%,559.29%,and 591.18%.In consistent with the changes in PPARγ,the expression of C/EBPδ was also dramatically elevated in SHR.Inflammatory mediators expressions were significantly increased in the most organs of SHR than WKY.As a consequence,increased formation of carbonyl and nitrated proteins were

  4. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  5. Nickel and cobalt as active phase on supported zirconia catalysts for bio-ethanol reforming: Influence of the reaction mechanism on catalysts performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, R.; Rodriguez, L.; Serrano, A.; Munoz, G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/ Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Benito, M.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/ Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Steam reforming of ethanol for hydrogen production was investigated on Co/ZrO{sub 2} and Ni/ZrO{sub 2} catalysts promoted with lanthana. Catalysts were prepared by impregnation method and characterized by XRD and TPR. TPD-R experiments were also carried out to determine the role of active phase on reaction mechanism. The results suggest that adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Then, the adsorbed acetaldehyde may evolve by different mechanisms, depending on the nature of active phase. On one hand, in cobalt-based catalyst, acetaldehyde could be reformed directly. By acetaldehyde thermal decomposition, methyl and formaldehyde groups are obtained. By coupling of methyl groups, ethane can be obtained. At medium temperature range, WGS reaction contribution is noteworthy. On the other hand, in nickel-based catalyst, acetone was detected in a higher temperature range as the main intermediate reaction product, which indicates that acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone by decarbonylation of acetaldehyde leading to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} formation. In addition, acetone can also be reformed to give both H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Contrary to cobalt-based catalyst, ethylene was detected at intermediate range temperature which suggests that it was formed by ethanol dehydration reaction. Ethylene polymerization could easily explain coke formation, which must be avoided. Steam reforming reaction was studied at S/C ratio of 4.84 and 700 C, to verify the activity, selectivity and stability of the catalysts. Ethanol conversion reached 100% and catalysts were very stable for almost 50 h on stream. No significant differences were detected in both catalysts. Nevertheless, TPO experiments performed on used samples demonstrate a higher carbon production on nickel based catalyst that can be correlated to ethanol dehydration contribution on it reaction pathway. (author)

  6. Highly Sensitive Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Riboflavin Based on the Generation of Active Oxygen Coupled with Enzymatic Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method for the determining riboflavin (VB2) based on its enhancement on the fluorescence of hemoglobin-catalyzed enzymatic reaction was proposed. The proposed method consisted of two reactions. One was the photochemical reaction of VB2, the other was a hemoglobin-catalyzed enzymatic reaction. The optimal experimental conditions for the determinations were established. The linear range of the method was 5.0×10-9-1.0×10-7mol/L of VB2. The detection limit was calculated to be 3.65×10-9 mol/L. The relative standard deviation of this method was 2.3 % at 7.0×10-8 mol/L for 11 determinations.

  7. Activation of C-H Bonds in Pt(+) + x CH4 Reactions, where x = 1-4: Identification of the Platinum Dimethyl Cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Oscar W; Salem, Michelle; Gao, Amanda; Bakker, Joost M; Armentrout, P B

    2016-08-11

    Activation of C-H bonds in the sequential reactions of Pt(+) + x(CH4/CD4), where x = 1-4, have been investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. Pt(+) cations are formed by laser ablation and exposed to controlled amounts of CH4/CD4 leading to [Pt,xC,(4x-2)H/D](+) dehydrogenation products. Irradiation of these products in the 400-2100 cm(-1) range leads to CH4/CD4 loss from the x = 3 and 4 products, whereas PtCH2(+)/PtCD2(+) products do not decompose at all, and x = 2 products dissociate only when formed from a higher order product. The structures of these complexes were explored theoretically at several levels of theory with three different basis sets. Comparison of the experimental and theoretical results indicate that the species formed have a Pt(CH3)2(+)(CH4)x-2/Pt(CD3)2(+)(CD4)x-2 binding motif for x = 2-4. Thus, reaction of Pt(+) with methane occurs by C-H bond activation to form PtCH2(+), which reacts with an additional methane molecule by C-H bond activation to form the platinum dimethyl cation. This proposed reaction mechanism is consistent with theoretical explorations of the potential energy surface for reactions of Pt(+) with one and two methane molecules.

  8. Effect of pH and temperature on comparative antioxidant activity of nonenzymatically browned proteins produced by reaction with oxidized lipids and carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaiz, M; Hidalgo, F J; Zamora, R

    1999-02-01

    The antioxidative activity of nonenzymatically browned bovine serum albumin (BSA) produced by reaction with ribose (RI), hydroperoxides of methyl linoleate oxidation (HP), and secondary products of methyl linoleate oxidation (SP), at different pHs (4, 7, and 10) and temperatures (25, 37, 50, 80, and 120 degrees C), was studied to compare the antioxidative effects of carbohydrate- and oxidized lipids-modified proteins. The modified proteins (RIBSA, HPBSA, and SPBSA) were tested for antioxidative activity (at 100 ppm) in soybean oil using the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) assay. All of them decreased significantly (p complimentary contribution of both Maillard and oxidized lipid/protein reactions to the antioxidative activity produced in foods during processing and storage. PMID:10563964

  9. High Surface Area Tungsten Carbides: Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Activity towards the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Phosphoric Acid at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf;

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten carbide powders were synthesized as a potential electrocatalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction in phosphoric acid at elevated temperatures. With ammonium metatungstate as the precursor, two synthetic routes with and without carbon templates were investigated. Through the intermediate...... nitride route and with carbon black as template, the obtained tungsten carbide samples had higher BET area. In 100% H3PO4 at temperatures up to 185°C, the carbide powders showed superior activity towards the hydrogen evolution reaction. A deviation was found in the correlation between the BET area...... and catalytic activity; this was attributed to the presence of excess amorphous carbon in the carbide powder. TEM imaging and TGA-DTA results revealed a better correlation of the activity with the carbide particle size....

  10. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015.

  11. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of (161)Er and (160)Er medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of (161)Er, (160)Er and (1)(59,157)Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related (161)Er and (160)Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the (162)Er(p,x)(161,160)Er and (162)Er(d,x)(161,160)Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015. PMID:27451109

  12. Activation cross sections of proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions on holmium and erbium, related to the production of $^{161}$Er and $^{160}$Er medical isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Baba, M

    2016-01-01

    Experimental excitation functions for long-lived products in proton induced reactions were measured with the activation method in the 37-65 MeV energy range on natural holmium. Stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution gamma spectrometry were used in order to measure cross-section data for the production of $^{161}$Er, $^{160}$Er and $^{159,157}$Dy. For comparison of the production routes of medically related $^{161}$Er and $^{160}$Er radioisotopes new experimental cross section data were deduced for the $^{162}$Er(p,x)$^{161,160}$Er and $^{162}$Er(d,x)$^{161,160}$Er reactions by re-evaluating gamma-ray spectra from earlier measurements. No earlier data were found in the literature for these reactions. The experimental data are compared with results of TALYS theoretical code reported in TENDL-2015.

  13. Monitoring and Control of a Continuous Grignard Reaction for the Synthesis of an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Intermediate Using Inline NIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera Padrell, Albert Emili; Nielsen, Jesper; Jønch Pedersen, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Inline near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been used to monitor a continuous synthesis of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) intermediate by a Grignard alkylation reaction. The reaction between a ketone substrate and allylmagnesium chloride may form significant impurities with excess...... to the stoichiometric ratio, leading the path to full process automation. The feedback control loop relies on NIR transmission measurements performed in a flow cell where, in contrast to labor-intensive offline HPLC analytical methods, the whole reaction product can be scanned in real time without sample dilution...... information about its dynamic behavior. This information is very useful for process control design, assessment of analytical tools and definition of sampling times. In this work, a systematic procedure for chemometric model building is followed, after which a discussion is made on some of the potential...

  14. Consequences of metal-oxide interconversion for C-H bond activation during CH4 reactions on Pd catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Ya-Huei Cathy; Buda, Corneliu; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2013-10-16

    Mechanistic assessments based on kinetic and isotopic methods combined with density functional theory are used to probe the diverse pathways by which C-H bonds in CH4 react on bare Pd clusters, Pd cluster surfaces saturated with chemisorbed oxygen (O*), and PdO clusters. C-H activation routes change from oxidative addition to H-abstraction and then to σ-bond metathesis with increasing O-content, as active sites evolve from metal atom pairs (*-*) to oxygen atom (O*-O*) pairs and ultimately to Pd cation-lattice oxygen pairs (Pd(2+)-O(2-)) in PdO. The charges in the CH3 and H moieties along the reaction coordinate depend on the accessibility and chemical state of the Pd and O centers involved. Homolytic C-H dissociation prevails on bare (*-*) and O*-covered surfaces (O*-O*), while C-H bonds cleave heterolytically on Pd(2+)-O(2-) pairs at PdO surfaces. On bare surfaces, C-H bonds cleave via oxidative addition, involving Pd atom insertion into the C-H bond with electron backdonation from Pd to C-H antibonding states and the formation of tight three-center (H3C···Pd···H)(‡) transition states. On O*-saturated Pd surfaces, C-H bonds cleave homolytically on O*-O* pairs to form radical-like CH3 species and nearly formed O-H bonds at a transition state (O*···CH3(•)···*OH)(‡) that is looser and higher in enthalpy than on bare Pd surfaces. On PdO surfaces, site pairs consisting of exposed Pd(2+) and vicinal O(2-), Pd(ox)-O(ox), cleave C-H bonds heterolytically via σ-bond metathesis, with Pd(2+) adding to the C-H bond, while O(2-) abstracts the H-atom to form a four-center (H3C(δ-)···Pd(ox)···H(δ+)···O(ox))(‡) transition state without detectable Pd(ox) reduction. The latter is much more stable than transition states on *-* and O*-O* pairs and give rise to a large increase in CH4 oxidation turnover rates at oxygen chemical potentials leading to Pd to PdO transitions. These distinct mechanistic pathways for C-H bond activation, inferred from theory

  15. Consequences of Metal–Oxide Interconversion for C–H Bond Activation during CH₄ Reactions on Pd Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Ya-Huei; Buda, Corneliu; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    Mechanistic assessments based on kinetic and isotopic methods combined with density functional theory are used to probe the diverse pathways by which C-H bonds in CH₄ react on bare Pd clusters, Pd cluster surfaces saturated with chemisorbed oxygen (O*), and PdO clusters. C-H activation routes change from oxidative addition to Habstraction and then to σ-bond metathesis with increasing O-content, as active sites evolve from metal atom pairs (*-*) to oxygen atom (O*-O*) pairs and ultimately to Pd cationlattice oxygen pairs (Pd2+-O2-) in PdO. The charges in the CH₃ and H moieties along the reaction coordinate depend on the accessibility and chemical state of the Pd and O centers involved. Homolytic C-H dissociation prevails on bare (*-*) and O*- covered surfaces (O*-O*), while C-H bonds cleave heterolytically on Pd2+-O2- pairs at PdO surfaces. On bare surfaces, C-H bonds cleave via oxidative addition, involving Pd atom insertion into the C-H bond with electron backdonation from Pd to C-H antibonding states and the formation of tight three-center (H₃C···Pd···H)‡ transition states. On O*-saturated Pd surfaces, C-H bonds cleave homolytically on O*-O* pairs to form radical-like CH3 species and nearly formed O-H bonds at a transition state (O*···CH3 •···*OH)‡ that is looser and higher in enthalpy than on bare Pd surfaces. On PdO surfaces, site pairs consisting of exposed Pd2+ and vicinal O2-, Pdox-Oox, cleave C-H bonds heterolytically via σ-bond metathesis, with Pd2+ adding to the C-H bond, while O2- abstracts the H-atom to form a four-center (H3Cδ-···Pdox···Hδ+···Oox) transition state without detectable Pdox reduction. The latter is much more stable than transition states on *-* and O*-O* pairs and give rise to a large increase in CH₄ oxidation turnover rates at oxygen chemical

  16. In vitro complex formation and inhibition of hepatic cytochrome P450 activity by different macrolides and tiamulin in goats and cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers-Zeilmaker, W.M.; Miert, A.S.J.P.A.M. van; Horbach, G.J.; Witkamp, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    In humans, clinically relevant drug–drug interactions occur with some macrolide antibiotics via the formation of stable metabolic intermediate (MI) complexes with enzymes of the cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A) subfamily. The formation of such complexes can result in a decreased biotransformation rate of s

  17. Kinetic analysis of γ-glutamyltransferase reaction process for measuring activity via an integration strategy at low concentrations of γ-glutamyl p-nitroaniline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-rong LI; Yin LIU; Xiao-lan YANG; Jun PU; Bei-zhong LIU; Yong-hua YUAN; Yan-ling XIE; Fei LIAO

    2011-01-01

    At 0.12 mmol/L γ-glutamyl p-nitroaniline (GGPNA), an improved integrated method was developed for kinetic analysis of γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) reaction process and the integration with the classical initial rate method to measure serum GGT. For the improved integrated method, an integrated rate equation, which used the predictor variable of reaction time and considered inhibitions by both GGPNA and products, was nonlinearly fit to GGT reaction processes. For the integration strategy, classical initial rates were estimated when GGPNA consumption percentages were below 50%; otherwise, maximal reaction rates of GGT were estimated by the improved integrated method and converted into initial rates according to the differential rate equation at 0.11 mmol/L GGPNA. The integration strategy was validated using optimized GGT kinetic parameters and 10-s intervals to record reaction curves within 8.0 min. By the integration strategy, there was a linear response from 0.9 to 32.0 U/L GGT, coefficients of variation were below 3.5% for GGT from 8.0 to 32.0 U/L (n=5), and GGT activities in clinical sera responded linearly to their classical initial rates at 2.00 mmol/L GGPNA with an expected slope. Therefore, the integration strategy was successful in measuring GGT at 0.12 mmol/L GGPNA.

  18. Dynamic studies of H-Ras•GTPγS interactions with nucleotide exchange factor Sos reveal a transient ternary complex formation in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-01

    The cycling between GDP- and GTP- bound forms of the Ras protein is partly regulated by the binding of Sos. The structural/dynamic behavior of the complex formed between activated Sos and Ras at the point of the functional cycle where the nucleotide exchange is completed has not been described to date. Here we show that solution NMR spectra of H-Ras∙GTPγS mixed with a functional fragment of Sos (Sos(Cat)) at a 2:1 ratio are consistent with the formation of a rather dynamic assembly. H-Ras∙GTPγS binding was in fast exchange on the NMR timescale and retained a significant degree of molecular tumbling independent of Sos(Cat), while Sos(Cat) also tumbled largely independently of H-Ras. Estimates of apparent molecular weight from both NMR data and SEC-MALS revealed that, at most, only one H-Ras∙GTPγS molecule appears stably bound to Sos. The weak transient interaction between Sos and the second H-Ras∙GTPγS may provide a necessary mechanism for complex dissociation upon the completion of the native GDP → GTP exchange reaction, but also explains measurable GTP → GTP exchange activity of Sos routinely observed in in vitro assays that use fluorescently-labelled analogs of GTP. Overall, the data presents the first dynamic snapshot of Ras functional cycle as controlled by Sos. PMID:27412770

  19. Dynamic studies of H-Ras•GTPγS interactions with nucleotide exchange factor Sos reveal a transient ternary complex formation in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-07-14

    The cycling between GDP- and GTP- bound forms of the Ras protein is partly regulated by the binding of Sos. The structural/dynamic behavior of the complex formed between activated Sos and Ras at the point of the functional cycle where the nucleotide exchange is completed has not been described to date. Here we show that solution NMR spectra of H-Ras∙GTPγS mixed with a functional fragment of Sos (Sos(Cat)) at a 2:1 ratio are consistent with the formation of a rather dynamic assembly. H-Ras∙GTPγS binding was in fast exchange on the NMR timescale and retained a significant degree of molecular tumbling independent of Sos(Cat), while Sos(Cat) also tumbled largely independently of H-Ras. Estimates of apparent molecular weight from both NMR data and SEC-MALS revealed that, at most, only one H-Ras∙GTPγS molecule appears stably bound to Sos. The weak transient interaction between Sos and the second H-Ras∙GTPγS may provide a necessary mechanism for complex dissociation upon the completion of the native GDP → GTP exchange reaction, but also explains measurable GTP → GTP exchange activity of Sos routinely observed in in vitro assays that use fluorescently-labelled analogs of GTP. Overall, the data presents the first dynamic snapshot of Ras functional cycle as controlled by Sos.

  20. Stereodynamical Origin of Anti-Arrhenius Kinetics: Negative Activation Energy and Roaming for a Four-Atom Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Silva, Valter H C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    The OH + HBr → H2O + Br reaction, prototypical of halogen-atom liberating processes relevant to mechanisms for atmospheric ozone destruction, attracted frequent attention of experimental chemical kinetics: the nature of the unusual reactivity drop from low to high temperatures eluded a variety of theoretical efforts, ranking this one among the most studied four-atom reactions. Here, inspired by oriented molecular-beams experiments, we develop a first-principles stereodynamical approach. Thermalized sets of trajectories, evolving on a multidimensional potential energy surface quantum mechanically generated on-the-fly, provide a map of most visited regions at each temperature. Visualizations of rearrangements of bonds along trajectories and of the role of specific angles of reactants' mutual approach elucidate the mechanistic change from the low kinetic energy regime (where incident reactants reorient to find the propitious alignment leading to reaction) to high temperature (where speed hinders adjustment of directionality and roaming delays reactivity). PMID:26263312

  1. [Use of reactions with Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) to determine biological activity of lipopolysaccharides from reference and clinical strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosz, Alicja; Fiejka, Maria; Górska, Paulina; Aleksandrowicz, Janina; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, Felicja; Łuczak, MirosŁaw

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare a biological activity of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from reference and clinical strains of strictly anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG) by means of quantitative, photometric BET (LAL) method with Limulus polyphemus amoebocyte lysate and chromogenic substrate S-2423. Lipopolysaccharides of five BFG species were extracted by Westphal and Jann method (1965) from eight reference and two clinical strains of B. fragilis group. Crude LPS preparations were purified according to the procedure described by Gmeiner (1975) with ultracentrifugation and nuclease treatment. Biological activities of bacterial endotoxins were determined by quantitative BET method with chromogenic substrate S-2423 (ENDOCHROME kit, Charles River Endosafe Ltd., USA). Tests were performed according to the producer's recommendations. E. coli O55:B5 LPS was applied to compare its activity in reaction with LAL reagent with activities of LPS preparations from rods of the Bacteroides genus. Among examined bacterial compounds the most active in BET method was E. coli O55:B5 LPS. Activities of lipopolysaccharides from five species of BFG rods in reaction with Limulus amoebocyte lysate were differentiated. Greater ability to activate LAL proenzyme revealed lipopolysaccharides of these species of the Bacteroides genus, which are important from the clinical point of view--B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron.

  2. Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

    2007-12-01

    Reaction pathways are presented for hydrogen-mediated isomerization of a five and six member carbon ring complex on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. A new reaction sequence that reverses orientation of the ring complex, or 'flips' it, was identified. Competition between the flip reaction and 'ring separation' was examined. Ring separation is the reverse of the five and six member ring complex formation reaction, previously reported as 'ring collision'. The elementary steps of the pathways were analyzed using density-functional theory (DFT). Rate coefficients were obtained by solution of the energy master equation and classical transition state theory utilizing the DFT energies, frequencies, and geometries. The results indicate that the flip reaction pathway dominates the separation reaction and should be competitive with other pathways important to the graphene zigzag edge growth in high temperature environments.

  3. Benzene activation and H/D isotope effects in reactions of size selected iron, cobalt and nickel cluster ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkert, Christine; Mohrbach, Jennifer; Tombers, Matthias; Barzen, Lars; Gaffga, Maximilian; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon [Fachbereich Chemie and Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A Penning ion trap served to investigate the reaction of size selected transition metal cluster ions in the size range 3reaction rates are inverse, Dehydrogenation Isotope Effects DIE(n) are predominantly normal. A multistep model of adsorption and stepwise dehydrogenation from the precursor adsorbate proves suitable to rationalize the found KIEs and DIEs in principle.

  4. AB INITIO STUDY OF CHEMICAL ACTIVATION AND HYDROGENATION OF WHITE PHOSPHORUS IN REACTION WITH RHODIUM TRIHYDRIDE COMPLEX

    OpenAIRE

    Iolanta I. Balan; Natalia N. Gorinchoy

    2011-01-01

    The four-stage mechanism of reaction of the rhodium trihydride complex [(triphos)RhH3] (triphos=1,1,1-tris(diphenylphosphanylmethyl)ethane) with the white phosphorus molecule resulting in the phosphane and the cyclo-P3 complex [(triphos)M(η3-P3] is analyzed on the basis of ab initio calculations of reactants, products, and intermediate complexes of reaction. It is shown that generation of the transient complex [(triphos)RhH(η1:η1-P4)] followed by intramolecular hydrogen atom migration from t...

  5. 试从家庭环境分析自卑感形成的影响因素%Inferiority Complex Formation Factors from the Family Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于见伟

    2012-01-01

    自从阿德勒建立个体心理学以来,其自卑理论流传全球,并对后世心理学理论产生了深远影响。关于自卑形成的内在机制及其影响因素众说纷纭,本文试从家庭微环境来探讨影响自卑形成的内在机制,主要从家庭的经济因素、家庭教育方式、孩子的出生顺序、家庭的和谐程度以及父母子三者的互动关系来探索自卑形成的影响因素。%Since Adler established individual psychology, the self-esteem theory spread to the world, and had a profound im- pact on future generations psychological theory. Divergent views on the inferiority complex formation of the internal mecha- nisms and their influencing factors, this article tries to explore the impact of low self-esteem inherent mechanism from the family microenvironment mainly from the economic factors of the family, family education, the child's birth order, the harmony of the family, and parental sub-interactions among these three relations to explore the impact factor of the inferiority.

  6. Cl-doping of Te-rich CdTe: Complex formation, self-compensation and self-purification from first principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lindström

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The coexistence in Te-rich CdTe of substitutional Cl-dopants, ClTe, which act as donors, and Cd vacancies, V C d − 1 , which act as electron traps, was studied from first principles utilising the HSE06 hybrid functional. We find ClTe to preferably bind to V C d − 1 and to form an acceptor complex, (ClTe–VCd−1. The complex has a (0,-1 charge transfer level close to the valence band and shows no trap state (deep level in the band gap. During the complex formation, the defect state of VCd−1 is annihilated and leaves the Cl-doped CdTe bandgap without any trap states (self-purification. We calculate Cl-doped CdTe to be semi-insulating with a Fermi energy close to midgap. We calculate the formation energy of the complex to be sufficiently low to allow for spontanous defect formation upon Cl-doping (self-compensation. In addition, we quantitatively analyse the geometries, DOS, binding energies and formation energies of the (ClTe–VCd complexes.

  7. Studies on reactions of cerium(4) reduction with alcohols. Part 3. Reactions of cerium(4) reduction with butane-2,3-diol, butane-1,3-diol and cis-butene-2-diol-1,4 in aqueous solutions of perchloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic study of the red-ox reaction kinetics of cerium ions -diols-water systems in presence of the perchloric acid is given. Dependence of the various agents and its concentrations on equilibrium constants the complex formation reactions and complex stability are discussed and compared. (B.Cz.)

  8. New activation cross section data on longer lived radio-nuclei produced in proton induced nuclear reaction on zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Al-Abyad, M; Yamazaki, H; Baba, M; Mohammadi, M A

    2016-01-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178-178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

  9. Amplification of Chloroplast DNA Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): A Practical Activity for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kenny; Barfoot, Jan; Crawford, Kathleen E.; Simpson, Craig G.; Beaumont, Paul C.; Bownes, Mary

    2006-01-01

    We describe a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol suitable for use in secondary schools and colleges. This PCR protocol can be used to investigate genetic variation between plants. The protocol makes use of primers which are complementary to sequences of nucleotides that are highly conserved across different plant genera. The regions of…

  10. Activation analysis of thallium in urine using the 203Tl(n,2n) 202Tl reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method developed by the authors of thallium determination in human urine, based on the 203Tl(n,2n)202Tl reaction followed by chemical separation and measurement of the produced 202Tl by gamma spectrometry, is described. Its application in some cases of intoxication by thallium is reported. The advantages and limitations of the described technique are discussed. (author)

  11. Evidence for the presence of an unknown factor, active in the light reaction, in preparations of Photobacterium phosphoreum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, Willemke

    1962-01-01

    An enzyme-free fraction, obtained from Photobacterium phosphorem, increases the light reaction caused by addition of FMNH to diluted enzyme lysates containing palmital. Evidence was obtained that this fraction contains a factor which dissociates from a complex with luciferase. Apart from its activat

  12. Role of complement activation in hypersensitivity reactions to doxil and hynic PEG liposomes: experimental and clinical studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szebeni, J.; Baranyi, L.; Savay, S.; Milosevits, J.; Bunger, R.; Laverman, P.; Metselaar, J.M.; Storm, G.; Chanan-Khan, A.; Liebes, L.; Muggia, F.M.; Cohen, R.; Barenholz, Y.; Alving, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) and 99mTc-HYNIC PEG liposomes (HPL) were reported earlier to cause hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) in a substantial percentage of patients treated i.v. with these formulations. Here we report that (1) Doxil, HPL, pegylated phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE)-c

  13. Concerted action of two avirulent spore effectors activates Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1)-mediated cereal stem rust resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    The barley stem rust resistance gene Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1), encoding a receptor-like kinase, confers durable resistance to the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. The fungal urediniospores form adhesion structures with the leaf epidermal cells within 1 h of inocula...

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of cubic α-Fe2O3 microparticles using glycine: Surface characterization, reaction mechanism and electrochemical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → We synthesize cubic α-Fe2O3 (hematite) microparticles. → Their morphological, mineralogical and surface properties are determined. → Reaction mechanism based on thermodynamics and ionic equilibrium concepts are described. → Microparticles have charge capacity of 160 mAh/g and good columbic efficiency of 94%. - Abstract: Cubic α-Fe2O3 (hematite) microparticles (side lengths = 0.3-1.3 μm) have been synthesized using glycine and ferric chloride via a simple one-step hydrothermal reaction. Their morphological, mineralogical and surface properties have been determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD analysis indicated that the synthesized α-Fe2O3 microparticles were minerallogically pure. An increase in hydrothermal reaction duration from 10 to 24 h increased the atomic percentages of α-Fe2O3 on the surface of the microparticles by almost 8%. The mechanism concerning reactions of species to produce this microparticles precipitate was elucidated based on thermodynamics and ionic equilibrium aspects. In the electrochemical analysis, the synthesized α-Fe2O3 microparticles (as cathode material) exhibit an approximate charge capacity of 160 mAh/g and excellent coulombic efficiency of 94%.

  15. Effects of baria on propane oxidation activity of Pd/Al2O3 catalyst:Pd-BaO interaction and reaction routes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Li; Xiaodong Wu; Shuang Liu; Jie Wan; Rui Ran; Duan Wengn

    2014-01-01

    The BaO-modified Pd/Al2O3 exhibits much better catalytic activity than Pd/Al2O3 for C3H8 oxidation both before and after the hydrothermal aging treatment. Further studies ascribe its good activity to the influence of BaO species on the physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst and the reaction routes. Firstly, the BaO species inhibits the phase transformation of alumina, resulting in higher surface area of the catalysts and hereby a better dispersion of Pd. Secondly, the basic nature and electron-withdrawing effect of barium oxide maintain palladium at high oxidation state, which leads to a higher PdO content on surface of the BaO-modified catalyst. Finally, the formation/decomposition of carbonate/bicarbonate species can be promoted by the addition of BaO, which provide extra reaction routes and are important for the deep oxidation of C3H8.

  16. Effects of activation and blockade of dopamine receptors on the extinction of a passive avoidance reaction in mice with a depressive-like state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, N I; Zinov'eva, D V

    2010-01-01

    Learning and extinction of a conditioned passive avoidance reaction resulting from neuropharmacological actions on dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors were demonstrated to be specific in intact mice and in mice with a depressive-like state. Learning was degraded only after administration of the D(2) receptor antagonist sulpiride and was independent of the initial functional state of the mice. In intact mice, activation of D(2) receptors with quinpirole led to a deficit of extinction, consisting of a reduction in the ability to acquire new inhibitory learning in conditions associated with the disappearance of the expected punishment. In mice with the "behavioral despair" reaction, characterized by delayed extinction, activation of D(1) receptors with SKF38393 normalized this process, while the D(2) agonist was ineffective. A positive effect consisting of accelerated extinction of the memory of fear of the dark ("dangerous") sector of the experimental chamber was also seen on blockade of both types of dopamine receptor.

  17. Effects of activation and blockade of dopamine receptors on the extinction of a passive avoidance reaction in mice with a depressive-like state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, N I; Zinov'eva, D V

    2010-01-01

    Learning and extinction of a conditioned passive avoidance reaction resulting from neuropharmacological actions on dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors were demonstrated to be specific in intact mice and in mice with a depressive-like state. Learning was degraded only after administration of the D(2) receptor antagonist sulpiride and was independent of the initial functional state of the mice. In intact mice, activation of D(2) receptors with quinpirole led to a deficit of extinction, consisting of a reduction in the ability to acquire new inhibitory learning in conditions associated with the disappearance of the expected punishment. In mice with the "behavioral despair" reaction, characterized by delayed extinction, activation of D(1) receptors with SKF38393 normalized this process, while the D(2) agonist was ineffective. A positive effect consisting of accelerated extinction of the memory of fear of the dark ("dangerous") sector of the experimental chamber was also seen on blockade of both types of dopamine receptor. PMID:20012492

  18. Interpretation of current-voltage relationships for "active" ion transport systems: I. Steady-state reaction-kinetic analysis of class-I mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, U P; Gradmann, D; Sanders, D; Slayman, C L

    1981-01-01

    This paper develops a simple reaction-kinetic model to describe electrogenic pumping and co- (or counter-) transport of ions. It uses the standard steady-state approach for cyclic enzyme- or carrier-mediated transport, but does not assume rate-limitation by any particular reaction step. Voltage-dependence is introduced, after the suggestion of Läuger and Stark (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 211:458-466, 1970), via a symmetric Eyring barrier, in which the charge-transit reaction constants are written as k12 = ko12 exp(zF delta psi/2RT) and k21 = ko21 exp(-zF delta psi/2RT). For interpretation of current-voltage relationships, all voltage-independent reaction steps are lumped together, so the model in its simplest form can be described as a pseudo-2-state model. It is characterized by the two voltage-dependent reaction constants, two lumped voltage-independent reaction constants (k12, k21), and two reserve factors (ri, ro) which formally take account of carrier states that are indistinguishable in the current-voltage (I-V) analysis. The model generates a wide range of I-V relationships, depending on the relative magnitudes of the four reaction constants, sufficient to describe essentially all I-V datas now available on "active" ion-transport systems. Algebraic and numerical analysis of the reserve factors, by means of expanded pseudo-3-, 4-, and 5-state models, shows them to be bounded and not large for most combinations of reaction constants in the lumped pathway. The most important exception to this rule occurs when carrier decharging immediately follows charge transit of the membrane and is very fast relative to other constituent voltage-independent reactions. Such a circumstance generates kinetic equivalence of chemical and electrical gradients, thus providing a consistent definition of ion-motive forces (e.g., proton-motive force, PMF). With appropriate restrictions, it also yields both linear and log-linear relationships between net transport velocity and either

  19. Intermolecular C-H activation with an Ir-METAMORPhos piano-stool complex--multiple reaction steps at a reactive ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenhof, S; Lutz, M; van der Vlugt, J I; Reek, J N H

    2015-10-21

    Substrate activation by means of a reactive ligand is a topic of much interest. Herein we describe a stoichiometric anti-Markovnikov C-N bond formation involving ligand reactivity in multiple steps along the reaction coordinate, including ligand assisted substrate (de)protonation and C-N bond formation, as illustrated by a combined experimental, spectroscopic and computational study. This affords a highly unusual four-membered iridacycle bearing an exo-cyclic C=C double bond. PMID:26329519

  20. An Event-Study Analysis of Equity Market Reaction to the Major Sport Events and Economic Activity Implications on Host Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Maigozhina, Gulmira

    2015-01-01

    Present study objective is twofold: to examine financial impact of international sport events on daily stock market performance and to conduct an assessment of the induced economic activity and industrial productivity quantified by the average quarterly performance of macroeconomic indices. An event study methodology is applied to examine the main and sector stock markets reaction to the host selection announcement and event beginning dates hypothesized to be positive, as well as the event en...

  1. Intermolecular C-H activation with an Ir-METAMORPhos piano-stool complex--multiple reaction steps at a reactive ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenhof, S; Lutz, M; van der Vlugt, J I; Reek, J N H

    2015-10-21

    Substrate activation by means of a reactive ligand is a topic of much interest. Herein we describe a stoichiometric anti-Markovnikov C-N bond formation involving ligand reactivity in multiple steps along the reaction coordinate, including ligand assisted substrate (de)protonation and C-N bond formation, as illustrated by a combined experimental, spectroscopic and computational study. This affords a highly unusual four-membered iridacycle bearing an exo-cyclic C=C double bond.

  2. Computational modeling of the enzymatic activities of biomolecules at different scales: from quantum mechanical reaction studies to systemic understanding of cell behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Barbieri,, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is the development of computational models of the enzymatic activity of biomolecules at different scales. Parallel investigations have been carried out at a quantum level to study the reactivity of an enzyme from an electronic point of view, and at a systemic level using simulation techniques to determine the role of enzymes in the network of cellular reactions. Starting from the lowest complexity level, the thesis begins with two computational studies with the aims ...

  3. TiO{sub 2}/Bi{sub 2}(BDC){sub 3}/BiOCl nanoparticles decorated ultrathin nanosheets with excellent photocatalytic reaction activity and selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shu-Mei; Ma, De-Kun, E-mail: dkma@wzu.edu.cn; Cai, Ping; Chen, Wei; Huang, Shao-Ming, E-mail: smhuang@wzu.edu.cn

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: TiO{sub 2}/Bi{sub 2}(BDC){sub 3}/BiOCl nanoparticles decorated ultrathin nanosheets showed excellent photocatalytic reaction activity and selectivity. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}/Bi{sub 2}(BDC){sub 3}/BiOCl nanoparticles decorated ultrathin nanosheets were synthesized through a facile hydrothermal process. • The products showed excellent photocatalytic activities for the degradation of various dyes. • The photocatalytic activities of the composite materials could be easily adjusted through tuning the content of TiO{sub 2}. • TiO{sub 2}/Bi{sub 2}(BDC){sub 3}/BiOCl displayed obvious photocatalytic selectivity in mixed dyes systems of rhodamine B and eosin Y. - Abstract: Photocatalysts with excellent photocatalytic reaction activity and ideal selectivity are highly desirable for pollutants clearance and purification of targeted organics from a mixture. Continued efforts toward the goal, we here present a facile hydrothermal route to synthesize TiO{sub 2}/Bi-benzenedicarboxylate/BiOCl nanoparticles decorated ultrathin nanosheets with a thickness less than 5 nm on a large scale. The as-synthesized products showed excellent photocatalytic activities for the degradation of various dyes such as rhodamine B, eosin Y and methylene blue in aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic activities of TiO{sub 2}/Bi-benzenedicarboxylate/BiOCl nanocomposites for the degradation of rhodamine B and eosin Y could be adjusted through tuning the content of TiO{sub 2}. With increasing the amount of TiO{sub 2}, the composites showed declining photocatalytic activities in decomposing of rhodamine B while on the contrary they displayed enhanced photocatalytic activities in decomposing of eosin Y. Interestingly, TiO{sub 2}/Bi-benzenedicarboxylate/BiOCl composite nanosheets showed obvious photocatalytic selectivity in a mixed dyes system. The photocatalytic reaction and selectivity mechanisms of the nanocomposites for the degradation of the

  4. A computational method for the systematic screening of reaction barriers in enzymes: Searching for Bacillus circulans xylanase mutants with greater activity towards a synthetic substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Hediger, Martin R; De Vico, Luca; Jensen, Jan H

    2013-01-01

    We present a semi-empirical (PM6-based) computational method for systematically estimating the effect of all possible single mutants, within a certain radius of the active site, on the barrier height of an enzymatic reaction. The intent of this method is not a quantitative prediction of the barrier heights, but rather to identify promising mutants for further computational or experimental study. The method is applied to identify promising single and double mutants of Bacillus circulans xylanase (BCX) with increased hydrolytic activity for the artificial substrate ortho-nitrophenyl \\beta-xylobioside (ONPX$_2$). The estimated reaction barrier for wild-type (WT) BCX is 18.5 kcal/mol, which is in good agreement with the experimental activation free energy value of 17.0 kcal/mol extracted from the observed k$_\\text{cat}$ using transition state theory (Joshi et al., Biochemistry 2001, 40, 10115). The PM6 reaction profiles for eight single point mutations are recomputed using FMO-MP2/PCM/6-31G(d) single points. PM6 ...

  5. An efficient route for catalytic activity promotion via hybrid electro-depositional modification on commercial nickel foam for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Guanshui; He, Yongwei; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Fuchun; Tang, Bin [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yingze West Road 79, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Xiaoguang, E-mail: wangxiaog1982@163.com [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yingze West Road 79, Taiyuan 030024 (China); International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Mono-Cu surface modification depress the HER activity of Ni-foam. • Hybrid Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05 exhibits superior HER performance. • Layer-by-layer structure may contribute to a synergistic promoting effect. - Abstract: In this paper, the single- and hybrid-layered Cu, Ni and Co thin films were electrochemically deposited onto the three-dimensional nickel foam as composite cathode catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline water electrolysis. The morphology, structure and chemical composition of the electrodeposited composite catalysts were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Electrochemical measurement depicted that, for the case of the monometallic layered samples, the general activity for hydrogen evolution reaction followed the sequence: Ni-foam/Ni > Ni-foam/Co > bare Ni-foam > Ni-foam/Cu. It is noteworthy that, the hybrid-layered Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05 exhibited the highest catalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction with the current density as high as 2.82 times that of the bare Ni-foam. Moreover, both excellent electrochemical and physical stabilities can also be acquired on the Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05, making this hybrid-layered composite structure as a promising HER electro-catalyst.

  6. Diagnosis and prognosis of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation in a general hospital -- meaning of the ISTH score system, fibrin monomers, and lipoprotein-C-reactive protein complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchie, Ph; Cauchie, Ch; Boudjeltia, K Zouaoui; Carlier, E; Deschepper, N; Govaerts, D; Migaud-Fressart, M; Woodhams, B; Brohée, D

    2006-06-01

    The meaning, the utility, and the prognostic significance of the International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) score and other parameters of coagulation activation including soluble fibrin monomer complexes (SFMC), antithrombin and protein C consumption, and formation of lipoprotein-C-reactive protein (LP-CRP) complexes (MDA slope 1 and flag A2) were evaluated in 165 inpatients from a general hospital for whom DIC testing was required by the attending physicians. Of these 165 patients, 148 had an underlying disease that clearly justified the laboratory request from our systematic post hoc review of the clinical charts. Of these 148 patients, 28 had a positive overt DIC score, 19 had an A2 flag, and 4 had both. The DIC score was strongly related to several major markers of coagulation activation such as D-dimers, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and soluble fibrin and was inversely related to antithrombin and protein C levels, which began to fall from DIC score 4 or higher. The formation of LP-CRP complexes was only related to Gram-negative sepsis and these patients had a strong inflammatory reaction. Independent risk factors for death were high creatininemia, positive overt DIC score, and/or presence of SFMC. In patients with positive DIC score, SFMC positivity and low levels of antithrombin and/or protein C were additional risk factors. The ISTH overt DIC score proves useful and adequate as a marker for clinically significant DIC. Illness severity is further defined by SFMC, antithrombin, and protein C levels. LP-CRP complexes are related to sepsis but not to actual overt DIC and lethal prognosis.

  7. Diagnosis and prognosis of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation in a general hospital -- meaning of the ISTH score system, fibrin monomers, and lipoprotein-C-reactive protein complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchie, Ph; Cauchie, Ch; Boudjeltia, K Zouaoui; Carlier, E; Deschepper, N; Govaerts, D; Migaud-Fressart, M; Woodhams, B; Brohée, D

    2006-06-01

    The meaning, the utility, and the prognostic significance of the International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) score and other parameters of coagulation activation including soluble fibrin monomer complexes (SFMC), antithrombin and protein C consumption, and formation of lipoprotein-C-reactive protein (LP-CRP) complexes (MDA slope 1 and flag A2) were evaluated in 165 inpatients from a general hospital for whom DIC testing was required by the attending physicians. Of these 165 patients, 148 had an underlying disease that clearly justified the laboratory request from our systematic post hoc review of the clinical charts. Of these 148 patients, 28 had a positive overt DIC score, 19 had an A2 flag, and 4 had both. The DIC score was strongly related to several major markers of coagulation activation such as D-dimers, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, and soluble fibrin and was inversely related to antithrombin and protein C levels, which began to fall from DIC score 4 or higher. The formation of LP-CRP complexes was only related to Gram-negative sepsis and these patients had a strong inflammatory reaction. Independent risk factors for death were high creatininemia, positive overt DIC score, and/or presence of SFMC. In patients with positive DIC score, SFMC positivity and low levels of antithrombin and/or protein C were additional risk factors. The ISTH overt DIC score proves useful and adequate as a marker for clinically significant DIC. Illness severity is further defined by SFMC, antithrombin, and protein C levels. LP-CRP complexes are related to sepsis but not to actual overt DIC and lethal prognosis. PMID:16680742

  8. Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of a Two-core Ruthenium Carbene Complex: a Unique Catalyst for Ring Closing Metathesis Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Ming-bo; WANG Jian-hui

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of a ruthenium carbide complex RuCl2(C:)(PCy3)2 with [H(Et2O)x]+[BF4]- at a molar ratio of 1:2 produced a two-core ruthenium carbene complex,{[RuCl(=HPCy3)(PCy3)]2(μ-Cl)3}+[BF4]-,in the form of a yellow-green crystalline solid in a yield of 94%.This two-core ruthenium complex is a selective catalyst for ring closing metathesis of unsubstituted terminal dienes.More importantly,no isomerized byproduct was observed for N-substrates when the two-core ruthenium complex was used as the catalyst at an elevated temperature(137 ℃),indicating that the complex is a chemo-selective catalyst for ring closing metathesis reactions.

  9. Concerted action of two avirulent spore effectors activates Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1)-mediated cereal stem rust resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmala, Jayaveeramuthu; Drader, Tom; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Yin, Chuntao; Hulbert, Scot; Steber, Camille M; Steffenson, Brian J.; Les J Szabo; von Wettstein, Diter; Kleinhofs, Andris

    2011-01-01

    The barley stem rust resistance gene Reaction to Puccinia graminis 1 (Rpg1), encoding a receptor-like kinase, confers durable resistance to the stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici. The fungal urediniospores form adhesion structures with the leaf epidermal cells within 1 h of inoculation, followed by hyphae and haustorium formation. The RPG1 protein is constitutively expressed and not phosphorylated. On inoculation with avirulent urediniospores, it is phosphorylated in vivo wit...

  10. Experimental verification of proton beam monitoring in a human body by use of activity image of positron-emitting nuclei generated by nuclear fragmentation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Inoue, Kazumasa; Gomi-Miyagishi, Tomoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kameoka, Satoru; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy is a form of radiotherapy that enables concentration of dose on a tumor by use of a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair-annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting nuclei generated by the nuclear fragmentation reaction of the incident protons on target nuclei using a PET apparatus. The activity of the positron-emitting nuclei generated in a patient was measured with a PET-CT apparatus after proton beam irradiation of the patient. Activity measurement was performed in patients with tumors of the brain, head and neck, liver, lungs, and sacrum. The 3-D PET image obtained on the CT image showed the visual correspondence with the irradiation area of the proton beam. Moreover, it was confirmed that there were differences in the strength of activity from the PET-CT images obtained at each irradiation site. The values of activity obtained from both measurement and calculation based on the reaction cross section were compared, and it was confirmed that the intensity and the distribution of the activity changed with the start time of the PET imaging after proton beam irradiation. The clinical use of this information about the positron-emitting nuclei will be important for promoting proton treatment with higher accuracy in the future.

  11. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: A Review of Its Antioxidant Activity, Protective Effects against Ischemia-reperfusion Injury and Drug Adverse Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Mai F; Omar, Hany A; Azab, Samar S; Khalifa, Amani E; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2016-10-01

    Propolis, a honey bee product, has been used in folk medicine for centuries for the treatment of abscesses, canker sores and for wound healing. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is one of the most extensively investigated active components of propolis which possess many biological activities, including antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects. CAPE is a polyphenolic compound characterized by potent antioxidant and cytoprotective activities and protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury in multiple tissues such as brain, retina, heart, skeletal muscles, testis, ovaries, intestine, colon, and liver. Furthermore, several studies indicated the protective effects of CAPE against chemotherapy-induced adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including several antibiotics (streptomycin, vancomycin, isoniazid, ethambutol) and chemotherapeutic agents (mitomycin, doxorubicin, cisplatin, methotrexate). Due to the broad spectrum of pharmacological activities of CAPE, this review makes a special focus on the recently published data about CAPE antioxidant activity as well as its protective effects against I/R-induced injury and many adverse drug reactions. PMID:25365228

  12. Influence of catalytic activity and reaction conditions on the product distribution in coal liquefaction; Sekitan ekikayu no seiseibutsu bunpu ni taisuru shokubai kassei oyobi hanno joken no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasuo, H.; Sakanishi, K.; Mochida, I. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Institute of Advanced Material Study

    1996-10-28

    The NiMo sulfide supported on Ketjen Black (KB) was more effective and yielded lighter oil products containing light fractions with their boiling point below 300{degree}C during the two stage liquefaction combining low temperature and high temperature hydrogenation the conventional NiMo/alumina catalyst and FeS2 catalyst. Although the NiMo/alumina yielded increased oil products during the two stage liquefaction, the lighter oil fractions did not increase and the heavier fractions increased mainly. This suggests that the hydrogenation of aromatic rings and successive cleavage of the rings are necessary for producing the light oil, which is derived from the sufficient hydrogenation of aromatic rings using catalysts. For the two stage reaction with NiMo/KB catalyst, it was considered that sufficient hydrogen was directly transferred to coal molecules at the first stage of the low temperature reaction, which promoted the solubilization of coal and the successive hydrogenation at the high temperature reaction. Thus, high activity of the catalyst must be obtained. It is expected that further high quality distillates can be produced through the optimization of catalysts and solvents at the two stage reaction. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Porous Mn2 O3 : A Low-Cost Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Media with Comparable Activity to Pt/C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhai; Geng, Jing; Kuai, Long; Li, Min; Geng, Baoyou

    2016-07-11

    Preparing nonprecious metal catalysts with high activity in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) can promote the development of energy conversion devices. Support-free porous Mn2 O3 was synthesized by a facile aerosol-spray-assisted approach (ASAA) and subsequent thermal treatment, and exhibited ORR activity that is comparable to commercial Pt/C The catalyst also exhibits notably higher activity than other Mn-based oxides, such as Mn3 O4 and MnO2 . The rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) study indicates a typical 4-electron ORR pathway on Mn2 O3 . Furthermore, the porous Mn2 O3 demonstrates considerable stability and a good methanol tolerance in alkaline media. In light of the low cost and high earth abundance of Mn, the highly active Mn2 O3 is a promising candidate to be used as a cathode material in metal-air batteries and alkaline fuel cells. PMID:27258474

  14. Momentum balance equation for nonelectrolytes in models of coupling between chemical reaction and diffusion in membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałdzicki, Z; Miekisz, S

    1984-04-01

    The role of viscosity in coupling between chemical reaction (complex formation) and diffusion in membranes has been investigated. The Fick law was replaced by the momentum balance equation with the viscous term. The irreversible thermodynamics admits coupling of the chemical reaction rate with the gradient of velocity. The proposed model has shown the contrary effect of viscosity and confirmed the experimental results. The chemical reaction rate increases only above the limit value of viscosity. The parameter Q (degree of complex formation) was introduced to investigate coupling. Q equals to the ratio of the chemical contribution into the flux of the complex to the total flux of the substance transported. For different values of the parameters of the model the dependence of Q upon position inside the membrane has been numerically calculated. The assumptions of the model limit it to a specific case and they only roughly model the biological situation. PMID:6537360

  15. Activation cross-sections of longer lived products of deuteron induced nuclear reactions on ytterbium up to 40 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tárkányi, F. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Ditrói, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Takács, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ignatyuk, A.V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: •Experimental excitation function of deuteron induced reactions on natural ytterbium up to 40 MeV. •Model code calculations with EMPIRE-D, ALICE-D and TALYS (TENDL-2011 and 2012). •Physical yield calculation. •Tabulated experimental results. •Discussion of medical and industrial applications. -- Abstract: In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of the deuteron induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the {sup nat}Yb(d,xn){sup 177,173,172mg,171mg,170,169}Lu, {sup nat}Yb(d,x){sup 175,169}Yb and {sup nat}Yb(d,x){sup 173,172,168,167,165}Tm reactions are studied up to 40 MeV, a few of them for the first time. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental data are analyzed and compared to the results of the theoretical model codes ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated. Applications of the new cross-sections are discussed.

  16. Trends in activity for the water electrolyzer reactions on 3d-M(Ni,Co,Fe,Mn)-hydr(oxy)oxide catalysts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbaraman, R.; Tripkovic, D.; Chang, K-C.; Strmcnik, D.; Paulikas, A. P.; Hirunsit, P.; Chan, M.; Greeley, J.; Stamenkovic, V.; Markovic, N. M. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); ( NE)

    2012-01-01

    Design and synthesis of materials for efficient electrochemical transformation of water to molecular hydrogen and of hydroxyl ions to oxygen in alkaline environments is of paramount importance in reducing energy losses in water-alkali electrolysers. Here, using 3d-M hydr(oxy)oxides, with distinct stoichiometries and morphologies in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) regions, we establish the overall catalytic activities for these reaction as a function of a more fundamental property, a descriptor, OH-M{sup 2+{delta}} bond strength (0 {le} {delta} {le} 1.5). This relationship exhibits trends in reactivity (Mn < Fe < Co < Ni), which is governed by the strength of the OH-M{sup 2+{delta}} energetic (Ni < Co < Fe < Mn). These trends are found to be independent of the source of the OH, either the supporting electrolyte (for the OER) or the water dissociation product (for the HER). The successful identification of these electrocatalytic trends provides the foundation for rational design of 'active sites' for practical alkaline HER and OER electrocatalysts.

  17. The size effect of titania-supported Pt nanoparticles on the electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation reaction primarily via the bifunctional mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Chao-Cheng; Liu, Chung-Hsuan; Tai, Chun-Yen; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Chao, Chih-Shuan; Pan, Fu-Ming

    2015-04-01

    We prepared Pt nanoparticles of different particle sizes by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) on the native oxide surface layer of Ti thin films, and investigated the Pt particle size effect on the electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in acidic media. The average Pt nanoparticles size ranges from 3 nm to 7 nm depending on the number of the PEALD reaction cycles. The electronic interaction between Pt nanoparticles and the TiO2 support is insignificant according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses, suggesting that the influence of the Pt particle size on the electrocatalytic activity can be mainly described by the bifunctional mechanism. From cyclic voltammetry measurements, Pt particles of smaller size have a better CO tolerance in MOR. We proposed the reaction steps for the electrooxidation of CO adspecies on Pt nanoparticles on the basis of the bifunctional mechanism. The electrode with Pt nanoparticles of ∼5 nm in size shows the best electrocatalytic performance in terms of CO tolerance and electrochemical stability.

  18. Bacterial lipoprotein-induced self-tolerance and cross-tolerance to LPS are associated with reduced IRAK-1 expression and MyD88-IRAK complex formation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Chong Hui

    2012-02-03

    Tolerance to bacterial cell-wall components may represent an essential regulatory mechanism during bacterial infection. We have demonstrated previously that the inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was present in bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) self-tolerance and its cross-tolerance to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study, the effect of BLP-induced tolerance on the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent upstream signaling pathway for NF-kappaB activation in vitro was examined further. When compared with nontolerant human monocytic THP-1 cells, BLP-tolerant cells had a significant reduction in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in response to a high-dose BLP (86+\\/-12 vs. 6042+\\/-245 ng\\/ml, P < 0.01) or LPS (341+\\/-36 vs. 7882+\\/-318 ng\\/ml, P < 0.01) stimulation. The expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) protein was down-regulated in BLP-tolerant cells, whereas no significant differences in TLR4, MyD88, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4), and TNF receptor-associated factor 6 expression were observed between nontolerant and BLP-tolerant cells, as confirmed by Western blot analysis. The IRAK-1 protein was reduced markedly in BLP-tolerant cells, although IRAK-1 mRNA expression remained unchanged as revealed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Furthermore, decreased MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex formation, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, was observed in BLP-tolerant cells following a second BLP or LPS stimulation. BLP pretreatment also resulted in a marked inhibition in total and phosphorylated inhibitor of kappaB-alpha (IkappaB-alpha) expression, which was not up-regulated by subsequent BLP or LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that in addition to the down-regulation of TLR2 expression, BLP tolerance is associated with a reduction in IRAK-1 expression, MyD88-IRAK association, and IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation. These

  19. Activation cross-sections of longer lived products of proton induced nuclear reactions on manganese up to 70 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditrói, F., E-mail: ditroi@atomki.hu [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Hermanne, A. [Cyclotron Laboratory, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels (Belgium); Yamazaki, H.; Baba, M.; Mohammadi, A. [Cyclotron Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Highlights: •Experimental excitation function of proton induced reactions on manganese up to 70 MeV. •Model code calculations with EMPIRE-3 and TALYS (TENDL-2012). •Integral production yield calculation. •Thin Layer Activation (TLA) curves for {sup 54}Mn and {sup 51}Cr. •Tabulated experimental results. -- Abstract: In the frame of a systematic study of the activation cross-sections of the proton induced nuclear reactions, excitation functions of the {sup 55}Mn(p,x){sup 54,52g}Mn, {sup 51}Cr and {sup 48}V were measured up to 70 MeV. Cross-sections were measured with the activation method using the stacked foil irradiation technique and high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. The experimental data are analyzed and compared to the earlier results and to the prediction of the EMPIRE-3 as well as the TALYS theoretical model code in the TENDL-2012 library. From the measured cross-section data integral production yields were calculated. Practical applications of the cross-sections e.g. for thin layer activation are discussed.

  20. Interaction Induced High Catalytic Activities of CoO Nanoparticles Grown on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Microspheres for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Jiang, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen doped graphene hollow microspheres (NGHSs) have been used as the supports for the growth of the CoO nanoparticles. The nitrogen doped structure favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles and the CoO nanoparticles are mostly anchored on the quaternary nitrogen doped sites of the NGHSs with good monodispersity since the higher electron density of the quaternary nitrogen favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles through its coordination and electrostatic interactions with the Co2+ ions. The resulting NGHSs supported CoO nanoparticles (CoO/NGHSs) are highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with activity and stability higher than the Pt/C and for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with activity and stability comparable to the most efficient catalysts reported to date. This indicates that the CoO/NGHSs could be used as efficient bi-functional catalysts for ORR and OER. Systematic analysis shows that the superior catalytic activities of the CoO/NGHSs for ORR and OER mainly originate from the nitrogen doped structure of the NGHSs, the small size of the CoO nanoparticles, the higher specific and electroactive surface area of the CoO/NGHSs, the good electric conductivity of the CoO/NGHSs, the strong interaction between the CoO nanoparticles and the NGHSs, etc.