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Sample records for active tremor compensation

  1. Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... interferes with your daily activities or causes embarrassment. Treatment depends on the cause. Tremor caused by a medical condition, such as hyperthyroidism, will likely get better when the condition is ...

  2. Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physical activity, travel, and social engagements to avoid embarrassment or other consequences. The symptoms of essential tremor ... on the treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician ...

  3. Effects of alprazolam on cortical activity and tremors in patients with essential tremor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Ibáñez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Essential tremor (ET is characterised by postural and action tremors with a frequency of 4-12 Hz. Previous studies suggest that the tremor activity originates in the cerebello-thalamocortical pathways. Alprazolam is a short-acting benzodiazepine that attenuates tremors in ET. The mechanisms that mediate the therapeutic action of alprazolam are unknown; however, in healthy subjects, benzodiazepines increase cortical beta activity. In this study, we investigated the effect of alprazolam both on beta and tremor-related cortical activity and on alterations in tremor presentation in ET patients. Therefore, we characterised the dynamics of tremor and cortical activity in ET patients after alprazolam intake. METHODS: We recorded hand tremors and contralateral cortical activity in four recordings before and after a single dose of alprazolam. We then computed the changes in tremors, cortico-muscular coherence, and cortical activity at the tremor frequency and in the beta band. RESULTS: Alprazolam significantly attenuated tremors (EMG: 76.2 ± 22.68%, decreased cortical activity in the tremor frequency range and increased cortical beta activity in all patients (P<0.05. At the same time, the cortico-muscular coherence at the tremor frequency became non-significant (P<0.05. We also found a significant correlation (r = 0.757, P<0.001 between the reduction in tremor severity and the increased ratio of cortical activity in the beta band to the activity observed in the tremor frequency range. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first quantitative analysis of tremor reduction following alprazolam intake. We observed that the tremor severity decreased in association with an increased ratio of beta to tremor-related cortical activity. We hypothesise that the increase in cortical beta activity may act as a blocking mechanism and may dampen the pathological oscillatory activity, which in turn attenuates the observed tremor.

  4. Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... beta blockers (such as nadolol) and primidone, an anticonvulsant drug. Dystonic tremor may respond to clonazepam, anticholinergic ... beta blockers (such as nadolol) and primidone, an anticonvulsant drug. Dystonic tremor may respond to clonazepam, anticholinergic ...

  5. Motor imagery evokes increased somatosensory activity in Parkinson's disease patients with tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is surprisingly heterogeneous: some patients have a prominent resting tremor, while others never develop this symptom. Here we investigate whether the functional organization of the voluntary motor system differs between PD patients with and without resting tremor, and whether these differences relate to the cerebral circuit producing tremor. We compared 18 PD patients with marked tremor, 20 PD patients without tremor, and 19 healthy controls. Subjects performed a controlled motor imagery task during fMRI scanning. We quantified imagery-related cerebral activity by contrasting imagery of biomechanically difficult and easy movements. Tremor-related activity was identified by relating cerebral activity to fluctuations in tremor amplitude, using electromyography during scanning. PD patients with tremor had better behavioral performance than PD patients without tremor. Furthermore, tremulous PD patients showed increased imagery-related activity in somatosensory area 3a, as compared with both healthy controls and to nontremor PD patients. This effect was independent from tremor-related activity, which was localized to the motor cortex, cerebellum, and thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM). The VIM, with known projections to area 3a, was unique in showing both tremor- and imagery-related responses. We conclude that parkinsonian tremor influences motor imagery by modulating central somatosensory processing through the VIM. This mechanism may explain clinical differences between PD patients with and without tremor.

  6. Cross-spectral analysis of physiological tremor and muscle activity; 2, Application to synchronized EMG

    CERN Document Server

    Timmer, J; Pfleger, W; Deuschl, G

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between synchronized muscle activity and tremor time series in (enhanced) physiological tremor by cross-spectral analysis. Special attention is directed to the phase spectrum and its possibilities to clarify the contribution of reflex mechanisms to physiological tremor. The phase spectra are investigated under the assumptions that the EMG synchronization was caused by a reflex, respectively a central oscillator. In comparison of these results to phase spectra of measured data we found a significant contribution of reflexes. But reflexes only modify existing peaks in the power spectrum. The main agents of physiological tremor are an efferent pace and the resonant behavior of the biomechanical system.

  7. Short-term spasmodic switching of volcanic tremor source activation in a conduit of the 2011 Kirishima eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, T.; Uehira, K.; Yamashita, Y.; Nakamoto, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Chikura, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic tremors are seismic indicators providing clues for magma behavior, which is related to volcanic eruptions and activity. Detection of spatial and temporal variations of volcanic tremors is important for understanding the mechanism of volcanic eruptions. However, temporal variations of tremor activity in short-term than a minute have not been previously detected by seismological observations around volcanoes. Here, we show that volcanic tremor sources were activated at the top of the conduit (i.e. the crater) and at its lower end by analyzing seismograms from a dense seismic array during the 2011 Kirishima eruption. We observed spasmodic switching in the seismic ray direction during a volcanic tremor sequence. Such fine volcanic tremor structure suggests an interaction between tremor sources located in both deep and shallow depths. Our result suggests that seismic array observations can monitor the magma behavior and contribute to the evaluation of the activity's transition.

  8. Activation and tremor of the shoulder muscles to the demands of an archery task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiu-Jenq; Hung, Cheng-Ju; Yang, Ching-Ching; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chou, Feng-Ching; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2010-02-01

    Physiological tremor and strength during the maintenance of shoulder position occur during a precision aiming task, such as archery. It is unclear how positions for precision demands affect physiological tremor and associated muscular activities. The purpose of this study was to assess the tremor amplitude and muscular activities of the shoulder between the various positions for precision demands. Ten males (age 21.9 +/- 2.0 years) participated in the study. Electromyography (EMG) was quantified on eight humeral/scapular muscles. The tremor was measured by the acceleration component of a motion tracking sensor in the 3-7 Hz and 8-12 Hz frequency bands. Participants simulated six preparatory archery shooting positions (3 arm angles x 2 arm draw positions) and performed isometric contractions. The relative root mean square (RMS) amplitudes of the shoulder muscles were significantly greater for the full drawing position compared with the partial position (humeral muscles: P = 0.011; scapular muscles: P = 0.026). In the full drawing position, increased humeral/scapular muscle EMG amplitude was moderately associated with an increased power spectrum of 8-12/3-7 Hz tremor in humerus/scapula motion (R = 0.43-0.57). To minimize fluctuations in high strength muscle performance, 90 degrees of elevation in the full drawing position may be a suitable position for demands in archery. In addition, scapular muscle amplitude is important for stability to reduce humerus tremor during archery performance.

  9. Differences in brain activation between tremor- and nontremor-dominant Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodoehl, Janey; Planetta, Peggy J; Kurani, Ajay S; Comella, Cynthia L; Corcos, Daniel M; Vaillancourt, David E

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare differences in functional brain activity between tremor- and nontremor-dominant subtypes of Parkinson disease (PD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. DESIGN In our study, patients with tremor-dominant PD and those with nontremor-dominant PD performed a grip task, and the results obtained were compared using voxelwise analysis. Areas of the brain that were significantly different were then examined using a region-of-interest analysis to compare these patients with healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry was used to determine macroscopic differences in gray and white matter volume between patient groups. SETTING University-affiliated research institution. PARTICIPANTS A total of 20 drug-naive patients with PD (10 with tremor-dominant PD and 10 with nontremor-dominant PD) and a total of 20 healthy controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Blood oxygenation level-dependent activation and percent signal change. RESULTS Robust findings across both voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses showed that, compared with patients with tremor-dominant PD, patients with nontremor-dominant PD had reduced activation in the ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the globus pallidus interna, and the globus pallidus externa. Region-of-interest analyses confirmed that patients with nontremor-dominant PD had reduced activity in the ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the globus pallidus interna, and the globus pallidus externa compared with patients with tremor-dominant PD and healthy controls. Patients with tremor-dominant PD had increased activity in the contralateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared with patients with nontremor-dominant PD and healthy controls. These results could not be explained by differences in gray or white matter volume. CONCLUSIONS Reduced brain activity occurs in the prefrontal cortex and globus pallidus of patients with nontremor-dominant PD compared with both patients with tremor-dominant PD and healthy controls

  10. Volcanic tremor associated with eruptive activity at Bromo volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gottschämmer

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Three broadband stations were deployed on Bromo volcano, Indonesia, from September to December 1995. The analysis of the seismograms shows that the signals produced by the volcanic sources cover the frequency range from at least 25 Hz down to periods of several minutes and underlines, therefore, the importance of broadband recordings. Frequency analysis reveals that the signal can be divided into four domains. In the traditional frequency range of volcanic tremor (1-10 Hz sharp transitions between two distinct values of the tremor amplitude can be observed. Additional tremor signal including frequencies from 10 to 20 Hz could be found during late November and early December. Throughout the whole experiment signals with periods of some hundred seconds were observed which are interpreted as ground tilts. For these long-period signals a particle motion analysis was performed in order to estimate the source location. Depth and radius can be estimated when the source is modeled as a sudden pressure change in a sphere. The fourth frequency range lies between 0.1 and 1 Hz and is dominated by two spectral peaks which are due to marine microseism. The phase velocity and the direction of wave propagation of these signals could be determined using the tripartite-method.

  11. Cross-spectral analysis of physiological tremor and muscle activity; 1, Theory and application to unsynchronized EMG

    CERN Document Server

    Timmer, J; Pfleger, W; Deuschl, G

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the extensor electromyogram (EMG) and tremor time series in physiological hand tremor by cross-spectral analysis. Special attention is directed to the phase spectrum and the effects of observational noise. We calculate the theoretical phase spectrum for a second order linear stochastic process and compare the results to measured tremor data recorded from subjects who did not show a synchronized EMG activity in the corresponding extensor muscle. The results show that physiological tremor is well described by the proposed model and that the measured EMG represents a Newtonian force by which the muscle acts on the hand.

  12. Effect of Crocus sativus extracts and its active constituent safranal on the harmaline-induced tremor in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Amin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Due to unsatisfactory response or intolerable side effects of current drugs, treatment of essential tremor remains inadequate. Thus, we aimed to investigate the protective and therapeutic effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Crocus sativus (saffron, and its active consistent, safranal, on the harmaline-induced tremor in mice. Materials and Methods: To induce tremor, harmaline (30 mg/kg was injected intraperitoneally. Test groups were also given the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of saffron (40, 80, and 160 mg/kg as well as safranal (0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 ml/kg, intraperitoneally, 10 min before harmaline administration (prophylactic study or 10 min after the onset of tremors (curative study. The latency of onset, duration, and intensity of tremor were recorded. Results: The extracts (80 and160 mg/kg dose dependently attenuated duration of harmaline-induced tremors as did reference drug, propranolol (2 and 5 mg/kg. Only the highest dose of extracts (160 mg/kg attenuated intensity of harmaline-induced tremors throughout the study. Safranal at the doses of (0.1 and 0.3 ml/kg but not 0.5 ml/kg attenuated duration and intensity of tremor. Onset of tremor increased with the extracts (80 and 160 mg/kg in prophylactic study, as the effect observed with propranolol at the dose of 5 mg/kg. Safranal did not affect the latency of tremor. Conclusion: Both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of saffron and with a less effect, low doses of safranal, have relatively protective and suppressive effects on the harmaline-induced tremor and different constituents of extracts seem to participate in the protective effects against harmaline induced tremor.

  13. Acute chlordecone toxicity in rats: a relationship between tremor and ATPase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J E; Grice, T; Mishra, S K; Desaiah, D

    1981-10-01

    Since we have demonstrated that ATPase system was sensitive to chlordecone, it was decided to examine the relationship between physiological and biochemical responses to this neurotoxin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with chlordecone by gastric intubation at 10, 25 and 50 mg/kg/day for three days. Control rats received 0.3 ml of corn oil. Complete body movements (including tremors) were monitored for a period of 12 hr at 24, 48 and 72 hr after treatment by a piezoelectric crystal attached to the bottom of a plastic rodent cage. The output of the crystal was recorded by a Grass model of EEG machine and magnetic tape. For biochemical study chlordecone treated rats were killed, the brain synaptosomes were prepared and Na+-K+ ATPase, oligomycin-sensitive and insensitive Mg2+ ATPases were determined. Rats receiving chlordecone showed an increased tremor activity which was significant and dose- dependent with a correlation coefficient of the regression line of 0.96. The onset of tremors was evident as early as 2 hr in 50 mg/kg dosed rats. Behavioral abnormalities include startling response to external stimuli like sound, etc. The brain synaptosomal Na+-K+ and oligomycin-sensitive Mg2+ ATPases were significantly decreased in chlordecone treated rats as compared to controls and the decrease was dose-dependent. A linear relationship was observed between the decreases in ATPase activities and physiological (tremor) activity with an r value of 0.96. These results suggest that the inhibition of ATPase system in brain may be related to the production of the neurotoxic symptoms.

  14. Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... propranolol or other beta blockers and primidone, an anticonvulsant drug. Eliminating tremor "triggers" such as caffeine and ... propranolol or other beta blockers and primidone, an anticonvulsant drug. Eliminating tremor "triggers" such as caffeine and ...

  15. Suppression of enhanced physiological tremor via stochastic noise: initial observations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Trenado

    Full Text Available Enhanced physiological tremor is a disabling condition that arises because of unstable interactions between central tremor generators and the biomechanics of the spinal stretch reflex. Previous work has shown that peripheral input may push the tremor-related spinal and cortical systems closer to anti-phase firing, potentially leading to a reduction in tremor through phase cancellation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether peripherally applied mechanical stochastic noise can attenuate enhanced physiological tremor and improve motor performance. Eight subjects with enhanced physiological tremor performed a visuomotor task requiring the right index finger to compensate a static force generated by a manipulandum to which Gaussian noise (3-35 Hz was applied. The finger position was displayed on-line on a monitor as a small white dot which the subjects had to maintain in the center of a larger green circle. Electromyogram (EMG from the active hand muscles and finger position were recorded. Performance was measured by the mean absolute deviation of the white dot from the zero position. Tremor was identified by the acceleration in the frequency range 7-12 Hz. Two different conditions were compared: with and without superimposed noise at optimal amplitude (determined at the beginning of the experiment. The application of optimum noise reduced tremor (accelerometric amplitude and EMG activity and improved the motor performance (reduced mean absolute deviation from zero. These data provide the first evidence of a significant reduction of enhanced physiological tremor in the human sensorimotor system due to application of external stochastic noise.

  16. Suppression of enhanced physiological tremor via stochastic noise: initial observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenado, Carlos; Amtage, Florian; Huethe, Frank; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Mendez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Baker, Stuart N; Baker, Mark; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Manjarrez, Elias; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced physiological tremor is a disabling condition that arises because of unstable interactions between central tremor generators and the biomechanics of the spinal stretch reflex. Previous work has shown that peripheral input may push the tremor-related spinal and cortical systems closer to anti-phase firing, potentially leading to a reduction in tremor through phase cancellation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether peripherally applied mechanical stochastic noise can attenuate enhanced physiological tremor and improve motor performance. Eight subjects with enhanced physiological tremor performed a visuomotor task requiring the right index finger to compensate a static force generated by a manipulandum to which Gaussian noise (3-35 Hz) was applied. The finger position was displayed on-line on a monitor as a small white dot which the subjects had to maintain in the center of a larger green circle. Electromyogram (EMG) from the active hand muscles and finger position were recorded. Performance was measured by the mean absolute deviation of the white dot from the zero position. Tremor was identified by the acceleration in the frequency range 7-12 Hz. Two different conditions were compared: with and without superimposed noise at optimal amplitude (determined at the beginning of the experiment). The application of optimum noise reduced tremor (accelerometric amplitude and EMG activity) and improved the motor performance (reduced mean absolute deviation from zero). These data provide the first evidence of a significant reduction of enhanced physiological tremor in the human sensorimotor system due to application of external stochastic noise.

  17. The pathophysiology of essential tremor and Parkinson's tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C; Toni, Ivan; Deuschl, Günther; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2013-09-01

    We review recent evidence about the pathophysiology of essential tremor and tremor in Parkinson's disease. We believe that a network perspective is necessary to understand this common neurological symptom, and that knowledge of cerebral network dysfunction in tremor disorders will help to develop new therapies. Both essential tremor and Parkinson's tremor are associated with increased activity in the cerebellothalamocortical circuit. However, different pathophysiological mechanisms lead to tremulous activity within this circuit. In Parkinson's disease, evidence suggests that dopaminergic dysfunction of the pallidum triggers increased activity in the cerebellothalamocortical circuit. In essential tremor, GABAergic dysfunction of the cerebellar dentate nucleus and brain stem, possibly caused by neurodegeneration in these regions, may lead to tremulous activity within the cerebellothalamocortical circuit. In both disorders, network parameters such as the strength and directionality of interregional coupling are crucially altered. Exciting new research uses these network parameters to develop network-based therapies, such as closed-loop deep brain stimulation and transcranial magnetic or direct current stimulation.

  18. Active Wireline Heave Compensation for Ocean Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D.; Liu, T.; Swain, K.; Furman, C.; Iturrino, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    The up-and-down heave motion of a ship causes a similar motion on any instruments tethered on wireline cable below it. If the amplitude of this motion is greater than a few tens of cm, significant discrepancy in the depth below the ship is introduced, causing uncertainty in the acquired data. Large and irregular cabled motions also increase the risk of damaging tethered instruments, particularly those with relatively delicate sensors. In 2005, Schlumberger and Deep Down, Inc built an active wireline heave compensator (AHC) system for use onboard the JOIDES Resolution to compensate for heave motion on wireline logging tools deployed in scientific drill holes. The goals for the new AHC system were to (1) design a reliable heave compensation system; and (2) devise a robust and quantitative methodology for routine assessment of compensation efficiency (CE) during wireline operations. Software programs were developed to monitor CE and the dynamics of logging tools in real-time, including system performance under variable parameters such as water depth, sea state, cable length, logging speed and direction. We present the CE results from the AHC system on the JOIDES Resolution during a 5-year period of recent IODP operations and compare the results to those from previous compensation systems deployed during ODP and IODP. Based on new data under heave conditions of ±0.2-2.0 m and water depths of 300-4,800 m in open holes, the system reduces 65-80% of downhole tool displacement under stationary conditions and 50-60% during normal logging operations. Moreover, down/up tool motion at low speeds (300-600 m/h) reduces the system's CE values by 15-20%, and logging down at higher speeds (1,000-1,200 m/h) reduces CE values by 55-65%. Furthermore, the system yields slightly lower CE values of 40-50% without tension feedback of the downhole cable while logging. These results indicate that the new system's compensation efficiency is comparable to or better than previous systems

  19. Motor imagery evokes increased somatosensory activity in parkinson's disease patients with tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is surprisingly heterogeneous: some patients have a prominent resting tremor, while others never develop this symptom. Here we investigate whether the functional organization of the voluntary motor system differs between PD patients with and without resting tremor, and wheth

  20. Motor imagery evokes increased somatosensory activity in parkinson's disease patients with tremor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is surprisingly heterogeneous: some patients have a prominent resting tremor, while others never develop this symptom. Here we investigate whether the functional organization of the voluntary motor system differs between PD patients with and without resting tremor, and wheth

  1. Episodic tremor triggers small earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    It has been suggested that episodic tremor and slip (ETS), the weak shaking not associated with measurable earthquakes, could trigger nearby earthquakes. However, this had not been confirmed until recently. Vidale et al. monitored seismicity in the 4-month period around a 16-day episode of episodic tremor and slip in March 2010 in the Cascadia region. They observed five small earthquakes within the subducting slab during the ETS episode. They found that the timing and locations of earthquakes near the tremor suggest that the tremor and earthquakes are related. Furthermore, they observed that the rate of earthquakes across the area was several times higher within 2 days of tremor activity than at other times, adding to evidence of a connection between tremor and earthquakes. (Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, doi:10.1029/2011GC003559, 2011)

  2. The Clinical Evaluation of Parkinson's Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Heidemarie; Dirkx, Michiel; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Helmich, Rick C

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease harbours many different tremors that differ in distribution, frequency, and context in which they occur. A good clinical tremor assessment is important for weighing up possible differential diagnoses of Parkinson's disease, but also to measure the severity of the tremor as a basis for further tailored treatment. This can be challenging, because Parkinson's tremor amplitude is typically very variable and context-dependent. Here, we outline how we investigate Parkinson's tremor in the clinic. We describe a simple set of clinical tasks that can be used to constrain tremor variability (cognitive and motor co-activation, several specific limb postures). This may help to adequately characterize the tremor(s) occurring in a patient with Parkinson's disease.

  3. Estimation of pathological tremor from recorded signals based on adaptive sliding fast Fourier transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological tremor is an approximately rhythmic movement and considerably affects patients’ daily living activities. Biomechanical loading and functional electrical stimulation are proposed as potential alternatives for canceling the pathological tremor. However, the performance of suppression methods is associated with the separation of tremor from the recorded signals. In this literature, an algorithm incorporating a fast Fourier transform augmented with a sliding convolution window, an interpolation procedure, and a damping module of the frequency is presented to isolate tremulous components from the measured signals and estimate the instantaneous tremor frequency. Meanwhile, a mechanism platform is designed to provide the simulation tremor signals with different degrees of voluntary movements. The performance of the proposed algorithm and existing procedures is compared with simulated signals and experimental signals collected from patients. The results demonstrate that the proposed solution could detect the unknown dominant frequency and distinguish the tremor components with higher accuracy. Therefore, this algorithm is useful for actively compensating tremor by functional electrical stimulation without affecting the voluntary movement.

  4. Support System to Improve Reading Activity in Parkinson’s Disease and Essential Tremor Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Parrales Bravo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs to improve the quality of life of people with chronic and degenerative diseases is a topic receiving much attention nowadays. We can observe that new technologies have driven numerous scientific projects in e-Health, encompassing Smart and Mobile Health, in order to address all the matters related to data processing and health. Our work focuses on helping to improve the quality of life of people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD and Essential Tremor (ET by means of a low-cost platform that enables them to read books in an easy manner. Our system is composed of two robotic arms and a graphical interface developed for Android platforms. After several tests, our proposal has achieved a 96.5% accuracy for A4 80 gr non-glossy paper. Moreover, our system has outperformed the state-of-the-art platforms considering different types of paper and inclined surfaces. The feedback from ET and PD patients was collected at “La Princesa” University Hospital in Madrid and was used to study the user experience. Several features such as ease of use, speed, correct behavior or confidence were measured via patient feedback, and a high level of satisfaction was awarded to most of them. According to the patients, our system is a promising tool for facilitating the activity of reading.

  5. Unusual Forehead Tremor in Four Patients with Essential Tremor

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    Jordi Gascón-Bayarri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Forehead tremor has only been reported in two patients with essential tremor, one with rhythmic tremor and the other with dystonic tremor. We report 4 new patients with essential tremor who present a 4–6 Hz frontal tremor registered by electromyography and unusual features like frontal tremor preceding limb tremor or unilateral involvement. Frontal tremor is present in some patients with essential tremor, sometimes preceding limb tremor. Treatment with botulinum toxin may be useful.

  6. The measurement of tremor using a velocity transducer: comparison to simultaneous recordings using transducers of displacement, acceleration and muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, K E; Edwards, R; Beuter, A

    1999-10-15

    Precise kinematic measurements of tremor have historically been obtained using accelerometers. However, current technology permits precise measurements in velocity and displacement. The primary advantage of velocity recording is that only one step of integration or differentiation is required for either displacement or acceleration. A method is presented of measuring finger tremor using a laser system that transduces velocity precisely. Measurements of postural finger tremor thus obtained were compared to those simultaneously obtained from a laser system that transduces displacement, from an accelerometer and from surface electromyography (EMG) of the extensor digitorum communis. A range of amplitude and frequency content was obtained by testing control subjects and subjects with Parkinson's disease. The velocity transducer showed excellent correspondence of amplitude and frequency measurement with the displacement transducer. Measures of absolute and relative amplitude correlated well (r > or = 0.96 in amplitude measures in displacement, velocity and acceleration), and high coherence was found throughout the frequency range of interest. Measurements by the accelerometer generally showed poorer correspondence with those of the other instruments. EMG measurements showed good correspondence in some trials but poorer correspondence in others, attributed to the low level of muscle activity required in the task. Precise kinematic measurements appear to be highly sensitive to neuromotor impairment.

  7. Essential Tremor Is More Than a Tremor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Home About the IETF Volunteer For Healthcare Providers Giving Options Donate Prev Next IETF > About Essential Tremor > ... Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor symptoms Raving Fan Home About the IETF Volunteer For Healthcare Providers Giving ...

  8. Essential Tremor Is More Than a Tremor

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    Full Text Available ... in new window) Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Click to print ( ... in new window) Essential Tremor is More Than a Tremor Providing a voice for people with essential ...

  9. Essential Tremor Is More Than a Tremor

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    Full Text Available ... in new window) Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Click to print ( ... in new window) Essential Tremor is More Than a Tremor Providing a voice for people with essential ...

  10. Experiences with active damping and impedance-matching compensators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betros, Robert S.; Alvarez, Oscar S.; Bronowicki, Allen J.

    1993-09-01

    TRW has been implementing active damping compensators on smart structures for the past five years. Since that time there have been numerous publications on the use of impedance matching techniques for structural damping augmentation. The idea of impedance matching compensators came about by considering the flow of power in a structure undergoing vibration. The goal of these compensators is to electronically dissipate as much of this flowing power as possible. This paper shows the performance of impedance matching compensators used in smart structures to be comparable to that of active damping compensators. Theoretical comparisons between active damping and impedance matching methods are made using PZT actuators and sensors. The effects of these collocated and non-collocated PZT sensors and actuators on the types of signals they sense and actuate are investigated. A method for automatically synthesizing impedance matching compensators is presented. Problems with implementing broad band active damping and impedance matching compensators on standard Digital Signal Processing (DSP) chips are discussed. Simulations and measurements that compare the performance of active damping and impedance matching techniques for a lightly damped cantilevered beam are shown.

  11. Imaging coherent sources of tremor related EEG activity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraman, M; Raethjen, J; Hellriegel, H; Deuschl, G; Heute, U

    2008-01-01

    The cortical sources of both the basic and first 'harmonic' frequency of Parkinsonian tremor are addressed in this paper. The power and coherence was estimated using the multitaper method for EEG and EMG data from 6 Parkinsonian patients with a classical rest tremor. The Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources (DICS) was used to find the coherent sources in the brain. Before hand this method was validated for the application to the EEG by showing in 3 normal subjects that rhythmic stimuli (1-5Hz) to the median nerve leads to almost identical coherent sources for the basic and first harmonic frequency in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex which is the biologically plausible result. In all the Parkinson patients the corticomuscular coherence was also present in the basic and the first harmonic frequency of the tremor. However, the source for the basic frequency was close to the frontal midline and the first harmonic frequency was in the region of premotor and sensory motor cortex on the contralateral side for all the patients. Thus the generation of these two oscillations involves different cortical areas and possibly follows different pathways to the periphery.

  12. Tidal modulation of nonvolcanic tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Justin L; La Rocca, Mario; Vidale, John E; Creager, Kenneth C; Wech, Aaron G

    2008-01-11

    Episodes of nonvolcanic tremor and accompanying slow slip recently have been observed in the subduction zones of Japan and Cascadia. In Cascadia, such episodes typically last a few weeks and differ from "normal" earthquakes in their source location and moment-duration scaling. The three most recent episodes in the Puget Sound/southern Vancouver Island portion of the Cascadia subduction zone were exceptionally well recorded. In each episode, we saw clear pulsing of tremor activity with periods of 12.4 and 24 to 25 hours, the same as the principal lunar and lunisolar tides. This indicates that the small stresses associated with the solid-earth and ocean tides influence the genesis of tremor much more effectively than they do the genesis of normal earthquakes. Because the lithostatic stresses are 10(5) times larger than those associated with the tides, we argue that tremor occurs on very weak faults.

  13. Multistation alarm system for eruptive activity based on the automatic classification of volcanic tremor: specifications and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Horst; Falsaperla, Susanna; Messina, Alfio; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    With over fifty eruptive episodes (Strombolian activity, lava fountains, and lava flows) between 2006 and 2013, Mt Etna, Italy, underscored its role as the most active volcano in Europe. Seven paroxysmal lava fountains at the South East Crater occurred in 2007-2008 and 46 at the New South East Crater between 2011 and 2013. Month-lasting lava emissions affected the upper eastern flank of the volcano in 2006 and 2008-2009. On this background, effective monitoring and forecast of volcanic phenomena are a first order issue for their potential socio-economic impact in a densely populated region like the town of Catania and its surroundings. For example, explosive activity has often formed thick ash clouds with widespread tephra fall able to disrupt the air traffic, as well as to cause severe problems at infrastructures, such as highways and roads. For timely information on changes in the state of the volcano and possible onset of dangerous eruptive phenomena, the analysis of the continuous background seismic signal, the so-called volcanic tremor, turned out of paramount importance. Changes in the state of the volcano as well as in its eruptive style are usually concurrent with variations of the spectral characteristics (amplitude and frequency content) of tremor. The huge amount of digital data continuously acquired by INGV's broadband seismic stations every day makes a manual analysis difficult, and techniques of automatic classification of the tremor signal are therefore applied. The application of unsupervised classification techniques to the tremor data revealed significant changes well before the onset of the eruptive episodes. This evidence led to the development of specific software packages related to real-time processing of the tremor data. The operational characteristics of these tools - fail-safe, robustness with respect to noise and data outages, as well as computational efficiency - allowed the identification of criteria for automatic alarm flagging. The

  14. The phenomenology of parkinsonian tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschl, Günther; Papengut, Frank; Hellriegel, Helge

    2012-01-01

    The definition of Parkinsonian tremor covers all different forms occurring in Parkinson's disease. The most common form is rest tremor, labelled as typical Parkinsonian tremor. Other variants cover also postural and action tremors. Data support the notion that suppression of rest tremor may be more specific for PD tremors. Several differential diagnoses like rest tremor in ET, dystonic tremor, psychogenic tremor and Holmes' tremor may be misinterpreted as PD-tremor. Tests and clinical clues to separate them are presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation.

  16. Active phase compensation of quantum key distribution system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; HAN ZhengFu; MO XiaoFan; XU FangXing; WEI Guo; GUO GuangCan

    2008-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) system must be robust enough in practical communication. Besides birefringence of fiber, system performance is notably affected by phase drift. The Faraday-Michelson QKD system can auto-compensate the birefringence of fiber, but phase shift is still a serious problem in its practical operation. In this paper, the major reason of phase drift and its effect on Faraday-Michel-son QKD system is analyzed and an effective active phase compensation scheme is proposed. By this means, we demonstrate a quantum key distribution system which can stably run over 37-km fiber in practical working condition with the long-time averaged quantum bit error rate of 1.59% and the stan-dard derivation of 0.46%. This result shows that the active phase compensation scheme is suitable to be used in practical QKD systems based on double asymmetric interferometers without additional de-vices and thermal controller.

  17. Dopamine controls Parkinson's tremor by inhibiting the cerebellar thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkx, Michiel F; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Aarts, Esther; Timmer, Monique H M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan; Helmich, Rick C

    2017-01-09

    Parkinson's resting tremor is related to altered cerebral activity in the basal ganglia and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit. Although Parkinson's disease is characterized by dopamine depletion in the basal ganglia, the dopaminergic basis of resting tremor remains unclear: dopaminergic medication reduces tremor in some patients, but many patients have a dopamine-resistant tremor. Using pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging, we test how a dopaminergic intervention influences the cerebral circuit involved in Parkinson's tremor. From a sample of 40 patients with Parkinson's disease, we selected 15 patients with a clearly tremor-dominant phenotype. We compared tremor-related activity and effective connectivity (using combined electromyography-functional magnetic resonance imaging) on two occasions: ON and OFF dopaminergic medication. Building on a recently developed cerebral model of Parkinson's tremor, we tested the effect of dopamine on cerebral activity associated with the onset of tremor episodes (in the basal ganglia) and with tremor amplitude (in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit). Dopaminergic medication reduced clinical resting tremor scores (mean 28%, range -12 to 68%). Furthermore, dopaminergic medication reduced tremor onset-related activity in the globus pallidus and tremor amplitude-related activity in the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus. Network analyses using dynamic causal modelling showed that dopamine directly increased self-inhibition of the ventral intermediate nucleus, rather than indirectly influencing the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit through the basal ganglia. Crucially, the magnitude of thalamic self-inhibition predicted the clinical dopamine response of tremor. Dopamine reduces resting tremor by potentiating inhibitory mechanisms in a cerebellar nucleus of the thalamus (ventral intermediate nucleus). This suggests that altered dopaminergic projections to the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit have a role

  18. Bilateral primary writing tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Jimenez; Cabrera-Valdivia; Orti-Pareja; Gasalla; Tallon-Barranco; Zurdo

    1998-11-01

    Primary writing tremor is a task-specific tremor that is considered to be unilateral. We report a 59-year-old man with a 5-year history of a typical primary writing tremor in the right hand who developed similar symptoms in the left hand. Copyright 1998 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  19. Adaptive Compensation of Reactive Power With Shunt Active Power Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Asiminoaei, Lucian; Hansen, Steffan;

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive method for compensating the reactive power with an active power filter (APF), which is initially rated for mitigation of only the harmonic currents given by a nonlinear industrial load. It is proven that, if the harmonic currents do not load the APF at the rated...

  20. Multistep prediction of physiological tremor for surgical robotics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluvolu, Kalyana C; Tatinati, Sivanagaraja; Hong, Sun-Mog; Ang, Wei Tech

    2013-11-01

    Accurate canceling of physiological tremor is extremely important in robotics-assisted surgical instruments/procedures. The performance of robotics-based hand-held surgical devices degrades in real time due to the presence of phase delay in sensors (hardware) and filtering (software) processes. Effective tremor compensation requires zero-phase lag in filtering process so that the filtered tremor signal can be used to regenerate an opposing motion in real time. Delay as small as 20 ms degrades the performance of human-machine interference. To overcome this phase delay, we employ multistep prediction in this paper. Combined with the existing tremor estimation methods, the procedure improves the overall accuracy by 60% for tremor estimation compared to single-step prediction methods in the presence of phase delay. Experimental results with developed methods for 1-DOF tremor estimation highlight the improvement.

  1. Kinetic tremor: differences between smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2007-05-01

    Tremor is among the acute effects of nicotine exposure. Published studies have focused on smoking-related postural (static) hand tremor rather than kinetic tremor (tremor during hand use), and gender differences in smoking-related tremor have not been examined. In a group of adults who were sampled from a population (mean+/-S.D.=65.7+/-11.5 years, range=18-92 years), the investigator assessed whether the severity of postural and kinetic tremors differed in smokers versus non-smokers, and whether this difference was influenced by gender. Twenty-seven (9.9%) of 273 subjects were current smokers. Greater tremor was observed in smokers than non-smokers during a variety of activities (drawing a spiral, using a spoon, finger-nose-finger maneuver, all phabits should be considered carefully in order to avoid over- or underestimating the effects of occupational and non-occupational exposures to other tremor-producing neurotoxins.

  2. The Clinical Evaluation of Parkinson’s Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Heidemarie; Dirkx, Michiel; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Helmich, Rick C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson’s disease harbours many different tremors that differ in distribution, frequency, and context in which they occur. A good clinical tremor assessment is important for weighing up possible differential diagnoses of Parkinson’s disease, but also to measure the severity of the tremor as a basis for further tailored treatment. This can be challenging, because Parkinson’s tremor amplitude is typically very variable and context-dependent. Here, we outline how we investigate Parkinson’s tremor in the clinic. We describe a simple set of clinical tasks that can be used to constrain tremor variability (cognitive and motor co-activation, several specific limb postures). This may help to adequately characterize the tremor(s) occurring in a patient with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26406126

  3. Ambient tremors in a collisional orogenic belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Lindsay Yuling; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Wech, Aaron G.; Byrne, Timothy; Peng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Deep-seated tectonic tremors have been regarded as an observation tied to interconnected fluids at depth, which have been well documented in worldwide subduction zones and transform faults but not in a collisional mountain belt. In this study we explore the general features of collisional tremors in Taiwan and discuss the possible generation mechanism. In the 4 year data, we find 231 ambient tremor episodes with durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. In addition to a coseismic slip-induced stress change from nearby major earthquake, increased tremor rate is also highly correlated with the active, normal faulting earthquake swarms at the shallower depth. Both the tremor and earthquake swarm activities are confined in a small, area where the high attenuation, high thermal anomaly, the boundary between high and low resistivity, and localized veins on the surfaces distributed, suggesting the involvement of fluids from metamorphic dehydration within the orogen.

  4. Tremor in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deuschl, Günther; Petersen, Inge; Lorenz, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Isolated tremor in the elderly is commonly diagnosed as essential tremor (ET). The prevalence of tremor increases steeply with increasing age, whereas hereditary tremor is becoming less common. Moreover, late-manifesting tremor seems to be associated with dementia and earlier mortality. We...... hypothesize that different entities underlie tremor in the elderly. Two thousand four hundred forty-eight subjects from the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins older than 70 y answered screening questions for ET in 2001. Two thousan fifty-six (84%) participants drew Archimedes spirals to measure...... patients did not show an increased but rather a lower mortality rate although it was not statistically significant. Consistent with a slower than normal aging, they were also physically and cognitively better functioning than controls. Because incident tremors beyond 70 y of age show worse aging parameters...

  5. Power System Harmonic Compensation Using Shunt Active Power Filter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiuly Mukherjee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the method of improving the power quality using shunt active power filter. The proposedtopic comprises of PI controller, filter hysteresis current control loop, dc link capacitor. The switching signal generation for filter is fromhysteresis current controller techniques. With the all these element shunt active power filter reduce the total harmonic distortion. Thispaper represents the simulation and analysis of the using three phase three wire system active filter to compensate harmonics .Theproposed shunt active filter model uses balanced non-linear load. This paper successfully lowers the THD within IEEE norms and satisfactorily works to compensatecurrent harmonics.

  6. Influence of gravity compensation on muscle activity during reach and retrieval in healthy elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prange, Grada Berendina; Kallenberg, L.A.C.; Jannink, M.J.A.; Stienen, Arno; van der Kooij, Herman; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Arm support like gravity compensation may improve arm movements during stroke rehabilitation. It is unknown how gravity compensation affects muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval movements. Since muscle activity during reach is represented by a component varying with

  7. Variations on tremor parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boose, A.; Jentgens, Ch.; Spieker, S.; Dichgans, J.

    1995-03-01

    This paper describes our analysis procedure for long-term tremor EMG recordings, as well as three examples of applications. The description of the method focuses on how characteristics of the tremor (e.g. frequency, intensity, agonist-antagonist interaction) can be defined and calculated based on surface EMG data. The resulting quantitative characteristics are called ``tremor parameters.'' We discuss sinusoidally modulated, band-limited white noise as a model for pathological tremor-EMG, and show how the basic parameters can be extracted from this class of signals. The method is then applied to (1) estimate tremor severity in clinical studies, (2) quantify agonist-antagonist interaction, and (3) investigate the variations of the tremor parameters using simple methods from time-series analysis.

  8. Widespread Triggered Tremor In Japan Following the 2012 Mw8.6 Sumatra Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, K.; Obara, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep "non-volcanic" tremor has been observed at many major plate-boundary faults around the Pacific Rim. Recent studies have shown that the tremor triggered by the surface waves of teleseismic earthquake occurs on the same fault patches as the ambient tremor (i.e., those occurring spontaneously). The observations suggest that the triggered tremor can be used as a proxy to estimate the background tremor activity. Triggered and ambient tremors have been well studied along the Nankai subduction zone in southwest Japan. Recently, new identified triggered tremor sources were found in Hokkaido in northernmost Japan (Obara, 2012, submitted manuscript), suggesting, contrary to previous beliefs, that tremor can be observed in various tectonic environments. Here, we systematically search for triggered tremor on the main islands of Japan (i.e., Kyushu, Shikoku, Honshu, and Hokkaido) following the 2012/04/11 Mw 8.6 Sumatra earthquake. We examined a total of about 1300 seismic stations from the Hi-net operated by NIED (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention) and other arrays operated by universities and other organizations. We first identified triggered tremor as a high-frequency, non-impulsive signal in phase with the large-amplitude teleseismic waves and then located the triggered tremor sources using a standard envelope cross-correlation technique. We also compared the tremor triggering potential with Love and Rayleigh waves by shifting the seismograms of tremor and surface waves back to the best tremor source. We observed clear triggered tremor following the 2012 Sumatra mainshock in Shikoku, Kii, and Tokai, where ambient tremors are very active and triggered tremors have been identified previously. Moreover, we successfully detected new triggered tremor sources in Hokkaido, Kyushu, and Kanto. In central Hokkaido, tremor triggered by the 2012 Sumatra earthquake was located at the same place where tremor was triggered by the 2004 Sumatra

  9. Task-related activity in sensorimotor cortex in Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor: changes in beta and gamma bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Rowland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson’s disease patients in the OFF medication state, basal ganglia local field potentials exhibit changes in beta and gamma oscillations that correlate with reduced voluntary movement, manifested as rigidity and akinesia. However, magnetoencephalography and low-resolution electrocorticography (ECoG studies in Parkinson’s patients suggest that changes in sensorimotor cortical oscillations differ from those of the basal ganglia. To more clearly define the role of sensorimotor cortex oscillatory activity in Parkinson’s, we performed intraoperative, high-resolution (4 mm spacing ECoG recordings in 10 Parkinson’s patients (2 females, ages 47-72 undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS lead placement in the awake, OFF medication state. We analyzed ECoG potentials during a computer-controlled reaching task designed to separate movement preparation from movement execution and compared findings to similar invasive recordings in eight patients with essential tremor (3 females, ages 59-78, a condition not associated with rigidity or akinesia. We show that 1 cortical beta spectral power at rest does not differ between Parkinson’s and essential tremor patients (p = 0.85, 2 early motor preparation in Parkinson’s patients in the OFF medication state is associated with a larger beta desynchronization compared to patients with essential tremor (p = 0.0061, and 3 cortical broadband gamma power is elevated in Parkinson’s patients compared to essential tremor patients during both rest and task recordings (p = 0.004. Our findings suggest an oscillatory profile in sensorimotor cortex of Parkinson’s patients that, in contrast to the basal ganglia, may act to promote movement to oppose the anti-kinetic bias of the dopamine-depleted state.

  10. 75 FR 15495 - Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP)) Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP)) Activities... (CPEP).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans...

  11. 78 FR 6848 - Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program) Activities Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Compensation and Pension Examination Program) Activities Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Compensation and Pension Examination Program (CPEP) Veterans Satisfaction...

  12. Northern Cascadia episodic tremor and slip: A decade of tremor observations from 1997 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Honn; Shan, Shao-Ju; Dragert, Herb; Rogers, Garry

    2009-11-01

    We analyze continuous seismic and GPS records collected in the last decade (1997-2007) to establish the most comprehensive observational basis for northern Cascadia episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events. A simple "ETS scale" system, using a combination of a letter and a digit, is proposed to quantitatively characterize the spatial and temporal dimensions of ETS events. Clear correlation between GPS and tremor signals is observed for all A/B class episodes, but the GPS signature is less obvious for minor ones. Regular ETS recurrence can be established only for A/B class episodes in southern Vancouver Island. Halting and jumping are very common in ETS migration patterns, and along-strike migration can happen in both directions. A prominent tremor gap is observed in midisland around 49.5°N. This gap coincides with the epicenters of the only two large earthquakes beneath Vancouver Island. ETS tremors also tend to occur in places where the local seismicity is relatively sparse. The tremor depth distribution shows a peak in the 25-35 km range where strong seismic reflectors (i.e., the E layer) are documented. Detailed waveform analysis confirms the existence of shallow tremors above the currently interpreted plate interface. Our results suggest that a significant portion of the tremor activity and perhaps associated shearing are taking place along well-developed structures such as the E layer, while fewer tremor bursts are generated elsewhere in response to the induced stress variation throughout the source volume.

  13. Approach to a tremor patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tremors are commonly encountered in clinical practice and are the most common movement disorders seen. It is defined as a rhythmic, involuntary oscillatory movement of a body part around one or more joints. In the majority of the population, tremor tends to be mild. They have varying etiology; hence, classifying them appropriately helps in identifying the underlying cause. Clinically, tremor is classified as occurring at rest or action. They can also be classified based on their frequency, amplitude, and body part involved. Parkinsonian tremor is the most common cause of rest tremor. Essential tremor (ET and enhanced physiological tremor are the most common causes of action tremor. Isolated head tremor is more likely to be dystonic rather than ET. Isolated voice tremor could be considered to be a spectrum of ET. Psychogenic tremor is not a diagnosis of exclusion; rather, demonstration of various clinical signs is needed to establish the diagnosis. Severity of tremor and response to treatment can be assessed using clinical rating scales as well as using electrophysiological measurements. The treatment of tremor is symptomatic. Medications are effective in half the cases of essential hand tremor and in refractory patients; deep brain stimulation is an alternative therapy. Midline tremors benefit from botulinum toxin injections. It is also the treatment of choice in dystonic tremor and primary writing tremor.

  14. Active Heave-Compensated Coring On The New Jersey Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, D. L.; Pardey, M.; Austin, J. A.; Goff, J. A.; Alexander, C.; Christensen, B. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Fulthorpe, C. S.; Nordfjord, S.; Sommerfield, C.; Venherm, C.

    2003-12-01

    The continental shelves are of obvious scientific and strategic importance. However, the ability to cost-effectively collect core samples of continental shelf sediments has been limited by technical difficulties. Many sites of scientific interest are too shallow to be drilled by large drill ships, and they are too deep to be drilled economically from jack-up platforms. DOSECC has developed an Active Heave Compensated (AHC800) drilling system under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research to overcome these obstacles by building a small active heave compensated drilling rig that can be used to collect high-quality core from selected vessels of opportunity. The AHC800 drilling rig is designed to collect continuous core to a total drill string length of 800 m. Water depths of 200 m and less are optimal; however, with some modification operation in deeper water is possible. The AHC800 senses vessel heave using a constantly tensioned low-stretch taut line attached to a seafloor weight. A linear position transducer is attached to this taut line and through the data acquisition system, the ship's distance from the bottom is communicated to the heave compensation computer running Labview RT operating system and object-based software language. This real-time control system is used to achieve a 10-ms control loop for both data gathering and output functions. The Labview RT system continuously controls two hydraulic cylinders that keep the heave carriage and the drill string at the same reference distance from the bottom. The AHC800 system was used on the R/V Knorr on the New Jersey continental shelf in water depths from 74 to 130 m from 25 Sep to 15 Oct 2002. The AHC800 system performed up to and beyond its design specifications. The rig was designed to compensate for 2.44 m of heave with an 8 s period. However, the Knorr's response was a 6 s period resulting in a significant increase in the required acceleration as well as a faster response time for the system as a whole

  15. Genetics Home Reference: essential tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tremor that results from other disorders or known causes, such as Parkinson disease or head trauma. Essential tremor usually occurs ... tremor occurs. Severe cases are often misdiagnosed as Parkinson disease . Related Information What information ... causes of essential tremor are unknown. Researchers are studying ...

  16. Essential Tremor Is More Than a Tremor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Essential Tremor > Video Video Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Click to print (Opens ...

  17. 77 FR 56710 - Proposed Information Collection (Veteran's Application for Compensation and/or Pension) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... Information Collection (Veteran's Application for Compensation and/or Pension) Activity: Comment Request... applicable, for compensation and/or pension benefit sought. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on... Compensation and/or Pension, VA Form 21-526. b. Veteran's Supplemental Claim Application, VA Form 21-526b. c...

  18. Best-basis analysis of broadband tremor signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Steffen

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Active volcanoes usually generate highly non-stationary broadband tremor signals. Short-time shock events with a frequency content of several decades are superimposed on a stationary narrow band continuous tremor. Tremor signals of this type can be observed in the near field of many active volcanoes. In this paper we will demonstrate the analysis of such signals using a specific tremor signal of Mt. Stromboli (Sicily. We used the Best-Basis Algorithm (BBA in order to compute a spectrogram which is adapted to signal properties on highly different scales. It turns out that the BBA can reveal better fitting properties of the tremor in the time-frequency plane compared to standard methods like Short-Time Fourier Transformation (STFT. Moreover, this very effective algorithm can be used for real time monitoring in the time-frequency plane, for data compression or for de-noising of the tremor signals.

  19. Simulation of Complex Tremor Migration Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The discovery of slow-slip events (SSE) and non-volcanic tremors has greatly enriched the spectrum of earthquake behavior and offers a unique window into the mechanics of the deeper portion of the seismogenic zone of active faults, an uncharted region of great importance in the nucleation of large earthquakes. In Northern Cascadia, tremors show an intriguing hierarchy of migration patterns: large-scale tremor migrating along-strike at about 10 km/day, sparsely distributed swarms that propagate 10 times faster in the opposite direction ('rapid tremor reversals' or RTRs) and even 10 times faster swarms that propagate along-dip. Moreover, during the initial phase of ETS (Episodic Tremor and Slip) the tremor source amplitude shows a linear growth and up-dip propagation. We have proposed a model to reproduce these observations based on interaction of brittle asperities (frictionally unstable, velocity-weakening patches) embedded in a relatively stable fault, mediated by creep transients. We continue quantitative studies of this model through numerical simulations of heterogeneous rate-and-state faults under the Quasi-DYNamic approximation (open-source software project QDYN, hosted online at http://code.google.com/p/qdyn/). We performed both 2D and 3D simulations and successfully reproduced all the major phenomena of complex tremor migration patterns (forward migration, RTRs and along-dip swarms). We will show a complete analysis of friction properties and geometrical settings (i.e. asperity size, distance, etc.) that affects spatial-temporal distribution and migration velocity of tremors. Our study shows that by decreasing the distance between asperities or by increasing the value of (a-b)*sigma inside them, both RTR migration velocity and distance increase positively correlated, and the proportion of moment released seismically during the ETS increases, while the ratio of RTR versus forward tremor migration speed remains mostly the same. While the density of these deep

  20. Mapping Yakutat Subduction with Tectonic Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wech, A.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction of the Yakutat microplate (YAK) in south-central Alaska may be responsible for regional high topography, large slip during the 1964 earthquake, and the anomalous gap in arc volcanism, but the exact geodynamics and its relationship with the underlying Pacific Plate (PP) are not fully understood. Refraction data support distinct subducting layers, and both GPS and body wave tomography suggest the YAK extends from the Cook Inlet volcanoes in the west to the Wrangell volcanic field in the east. Earthquakes, however, are limited to normal faulting within the PP with an abrupt eastern boundary 80 km west of the inferred YAK edge, and more recent active source seismic data suggest subduction of one homogenous thickened oceanic plateau. Here, I perform a search for tectonic tremor to investigate the role of tremor and slow slip in the system. I scan continuous waveforms from 2007-2015 using all available data from permanent and campaign seismic stations in south-central Alaska. Using envelope cross-correlation, I detect and locate ~9,000 tectonic tremor epicenters, providing a map of the transition zone downdip of the 1964 earthquake. Tremor epicenters occur downdip of discrete slow slip events, and tremor rates do not correlate temporally with slow slip behavior. Depth resolution is poor, but horizontal locations are well constrained and spatially correlate with the velocity images of the YAK. Likewise, tremor extends 80 km further east than intraslab seismicity. Tremor swarms occur intermittently and manifest as ambient tremor. I interpret tremor to mark slow, semi-continuous slip occurring at the boundary between the YAK and North American plates, whose interface continues beyond the eastern edge of the PP. In this model, the YAK is welded to the underlying PP in the west, but extends past the eastern terminus of the PP. This geometry explains the correlation between tremor and the YAK, the discrepancy between deep seismicity and tremor, and the paucity of

  1. Tremor - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your provider about how you can change your sleep habits if you have problems sleeping. Stress and anxiety can also make your tremor worse. These things may lower your stress level: Meditation, deep relaxation, or breathing exercises Reducing your caffeine ...

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Compensation during Gait using Hamstring Muscle Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalfamo, Paola Formento; Aguiar, Gerardo; Curi, Jorge; Braidot, Ariel

    2010-06-10

    Previous research has shown that an increase in hamstring activation may compensate for anterior tibial transalation (ATT) in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee (ACLd); however, the effects of this compensation still remain unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify the activation of the hamstring muscles needed to compensate the ATT in ACLd knee during the complete gait cycle and to evaluate the effect of this compensation on quadriceps activation and joint contact forces. A two dimensional model of the knee was used, which included the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints, knee ligaments, the medial capsule and two muscles units. Simulations were conducted to determine the ATT in healthy and ACLd knee and the hamstring activation needed to correct the abnormal ATT to normal levels (100% compensation) and to 50% compensation. Then, the quadriceps activation and the joint contact forces were calculated. Results showed that 100% compensation would require hamstring and quadriceps activations larger than their maximum isometric force, and would generate an increment in the peak contact force at the tibiofemoral (115%) and patellofemoral (48%) joint with respect to the healthy knee. On the other hand, 50% compensation would require less force generated by the muscles (less than 0.85 of maximum isometric force) and smaller contact forces (peak tibiofemoral contact force increased 23% and peak patellofemoral contact force decreased 7.5% with respect to the healthy knee). Total compensation of ATT by means of increased hamstring activity is possible; however, partial compensation represents a less deleterious strategy.

  3. Tremor as observed by the Array of Arrays in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Vidale, J. E.; Creager, K. C.

    2010-12-01

    We are capturing the intimate details of tremor activity in Cascadia with 8 small-aperture seismic arrays in northwestern Washington. The Array of Arrays (AoA) focuses on the tremor-active megathrust, including the area we previously imaged with a solo seismic array in 2008 [Ghosh et al., GRL, 2009, 2010]. Each array consists of 10 to 20 three-component sensors recording in continuous mode. Since it became operational in June 2009, the AoA has recorded several minor tremor episodes, and the recent episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event in August 2010. During the ETS event, each array was augmented by 10 additional single-channel, vertical-component sensors. We have already started to analyze seismic data for tremor episodes in July 2009, and March 2010. At each array, we apply a beamforming technique to stack the seismic energy at every 0.2 Hz from 2 to 15 Hz. During active tremor, the arrays show stable slowness, and azimuth over time, and up to 15 Hz energy on vertical channels, and 6 Hz on horizontals, with slowness consistent with the P and S waves respectively (Figure 1). Vidale et al. in this meeting provide a detailed description of a weeklong tremor episode in March 2010. The ETS started early second week of August about 60 km south of our arrays, and in a week or so, migrated along-strike to the north passing directly underneath the arrays. Strong tremor is still active about 50 km north of the arrays as we write this abstract. We will imminently analyze this data, and by the time of AGU, have preliminary results to present. Currently, we are developing an algorithm to focus as many arrays as possible to locate the tremor sources. With fine tremor detection capability and good azimuthal coverage, our AoA will better resolve the various confounding features of tremor spatiotemporal distribution (e.g., tremor patches, bands, streaks, rapid tremor reversals, low frequency earthquakes) that have been recently discovered in Cascadia. The AoA is poised to provide

  4. Cerebral causes and consequences of parkinsonian resting tremor: a tale of two circuits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C; Hallett, Mark; Deuschl, Günther; Toni, Ivan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2012-11-01

    Tremor in Parkinson's disease has several mysterious features. Clinically, tremor is seen in only three out of four patients with Parkinson's disease, and tremor-dominant patients generally follow a more benign disease course than non-tremor patients. Pathophysiologically, tremor is linked to altered activity in not one, but two distinct circuits: the basal ganglia, which are primarily affected by dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease, and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit, which is also involved in many other tremors. The purpose of this review is to integrate these clinical and pathophysiological features of tremor in Parkinson's disease. We first describe clinical and pathological differences between tremor-dominant and non-tremor Parkinson's disease subtypes, and then summarize recent studies on the pathophysiology of tremor. We also discuss a newly proposed 'dimmer-switch model' that explains tremor as resulting from the combined actions of two circuits: the basal ganglia that trigger tremor episodes and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit that produces the tremor. Finally, we address several important open questions: why resting tremor stops during voluntary movements, why it has a variable response to dopaminergic treatment, why it indicates a benign Parkinson's disease subtype and why its expression decreases with disease progression.

  5. Seismic moulin tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeoesli, Claudia; Walter, Fabian; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Kissling, Edi

    2016-08-01

    Through glacial moulins, meltwater is routed from the glacier surface to its base. Moulins are a main feature feeding subglacial drainage systems and thus influencing basal motion and ice dynamics, but their geometry remains poorly known. Here we show that analysis of the seismic wavefield generated by water falling into a moulin can help constrain its geometry. We present modeling results of hour-long seimic tremors emitted from a vertical moulin shaft, observed with a seismometer array installed at the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The tremor was triggered when the moulin water level exceeded a certain height, which we associate with the threshold for the waterfall to hit directly the surface of the moulin water column. The amplitude of the tremor signal changed over each tremor episode, in close relation to the amount of inflowing water. The tremor spectrum features multiple prominent peaks, whose characteristic frequencies are distributed like the resonant modes of a semiopen organ pipe and were found to depend on the moulin water level, consistent with a source composed of resonant tube waves (water pressure waves coupled to elastic deformation of the moulin walls) along the water-filled moulin pipe. Analysis of surface particle motions lends further support to this interpretation. The seismic wavefield was modeled as a superposition of sustained wave radiation by pressure sources on the side walls and at the bottom of the moulin. The former was found to dominate the wave field at close distance and the latter at large distance to the moulin.

  6. The pathophysiology of essential tremor and Parkinson's tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Toni, I.; Deuschl, G.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    We review recent evidence about the pathophysiology of essential tremor and tremor in Parkinson's disease. We believe that a network perspective is necessary to understand this common neurological symptom, and that knowledge of cerebral network dysfunction in tremor disorders will help to develop ne

  7. The Pathophysiology of Essential Tremor and Parkinson's Tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Toni, I.; Deuschl, G.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    We review recent evidence about the pathophysiology of essential tremor and tremor in Parkinson's disease. We believe that a network perspective is necessary to understand this common neurological symptom, and that knowledge of cerebral network dysfunction in tremor disorders will help to develop ne

  8. Task force report: Scales for screening and evaluating tremor: Critique and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elble, R.; Bain, P.; Forjaz, M. Joao; Haubenberger, D.; Testa, C.; Goetz, C.G.; Leentjens, A.F.; Martinez-Martin, P.; Traon, A. Pavy-Le; Post, B.; Sampaio, C.; Stebbins, G.T.; Weintraub, D.; Schrag, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Movement Disorder Society established a task force to review rating scales for the assessment of tremor. Screening instruments used in identifying patients with tremor were also reviewed. Seven tremor severity scales, six activities of daily living (ADL)/disability scales, four quality-of-life

  9. Task force report: Scales for screening and evaluating tremor: Critique and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elble, R.; Bain, P.; Forjaz, M. Joao; Haubenberger, D.; Testa, C.; Goetz, C.G.; Leentjens, A.F.; Martinez-Martin, P.; Traon, A. Pavy-Le; Post, B.; Sampaio, C.; Stebbins, G.T.; Weintraub, D.; Schrag, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Movement Disorder Society established a task force to review rating scales for the assessment of tremor. Screening instruments used in identifying patients with tremor were also reviewed. Seven tremor severity scales, six activities of daily living (ADL)/disability scales, four quality-of-life s

  10. Transducer-based evaluation of tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubenberger, Dietrich; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bain, Peter G; Bajaj, Nin; Benito-León, Julián; Bhatia, Kailash P; Deuschl, Günther; Forjaz, Maria João; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Lyons, Kelly E; Mestre, Tiago A; Raethjen, Jan; Stamelou, Maria; Tan, Eng-King; Testa, Claudia M; Elble, Rodger J

    2016-09-01

    The International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society established a task force on tremor that reviewed the use of transducer-based measures in the quantification and characterization of tremor. Studies of accelerometry, electromyography, activity monitoring, gyroscopy, digitizing tablet-based measures, vocal acoustic analysis, and several other transducer-based methods were identified by searching PubMed.gov. The availability, use, acceptability, reliability, validity, and responsiveness were reviewed for each measure using the following criteria: (1) used in the assessment of tremor; (2) used in published studies by people other than the developers; and (3) adequate clinimetric testing. Accelerometry, gyroscopy, electromyography, and digitizing tablet-based measures fulfilled all three criteria. Compared to rating scales, transducers are far more sensitive to changes in tremor amplitude and frequency, but they do not appear to be more capable of detecting a change that exceeds random variability in tremor amplitude (minimum detectable change). The use of transducer-based measures requires careful attention to their limitations and validity in a particular clinical or research setting. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. The central oscillatory network of orthostatic tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Hellriegel, Helge; Paschen, Steffen; Hofschulte, Frank; Reese, Rene; Volkmann, Jens; Witt, K; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Orthostatic tremor (OT) is a movement disorder of the legs and trunk that is present in the standing position but typically absent when sitting. The pathological central network involved in orthostatic tremor is still unknown. In this study we analyzed 15 patients with simultaneous high-resolution electroencephalography and electromyography recording to assess corticomuscular coherence. In 1 patient we were able to simultaneously record the local field potential in the ventrolateral thalamus and electroencephalography. Dynamic imaging of coherent source analysis was used to find the sources in the brain that are coherent with the peripheral tremor signal. When standing, the network for the tremor frequency consisted of unilateral activation in the primary motor leg area, supplementary motor area, primary sensory cortex, two prefrontal/premotor sources, thalamus, and cerebellum for the whole 30-second segment recorded. The source coherence dynamics for the primary leg area and the thalamic source signals with the tibialis anterior muscle showed that they were highly coherent for the whole 30 seconds for the contralateral side but markedly decreased after 15 seconds for the ipsilateral side. The source signal and the recorded thalamus signal followed the same time frequency dynamics of coherence in 1 patient. The corticomuscular interaction in OT follows a consistent pattern with an initially bilateral pattern and then a segregated unilateral pattern after 15 seconds. This may add to the feeling of unsteadiness. It also makes the thalamus unlikely as the main source of orthostatic tremor. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Characterizing the Relationship of Tremor and Slip during Recent ETS Events in Northern Cascadia using Strainmeters, GPS, and Tremor Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogstad, R. D.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between slip and tremor during multiple recent slow slip events in northern Cascadia. While the relationship of geodetically detectable slow slip and nonvolcanic tremor appears to be broadly coincident, the exact spatial and temporal characteristics remain unclear at a finer scale. Typical GPS derived slip distributions tend to be spatially and temporally smoothed and offset slightly updip of tremor distributions. These discrepancies may be real, or they may be a consequence of the resolution of GPS data or an artifact of the inversion methodology. Borehole strainmeters provide additional independent geodetic constraints for characterizing slip, provide greater temporal resolution, and greater precision than GPS. However, various non-tectonic artifacts and other sources of error have limited the number of usable stations and made deriving reliable information from strainmeters during slip events difficult. We utilize strainmeters with low levels of noise and minimal observable artifacts to constrain forward models and to provide additional independent observations in joint geodetic inversions with GPS data. A series of slip distributions are derived by inverting strainmeter and GPS data using the Kalman-filter-based Extended Network Inversion Filter. To compare the tremor distributions to the geodetically derived slip we also construct slip distributions using tremor occurrences as a proxy for localized slip on the plate interface. The magnitude of slip per tremor occurrence is then scaled to best match the observed surface displacements. Separate slip distributions informed by GPS and tremor are then used to predict strain time series. The comparisons between strain predictions and observations produce mixed results. This may indicate that that tremor and slip are not always coincident. This is particularly evident during the Aug. 2010 event, where the peak GPS-derived slip is located in a region with decreased tremor activity

  13. Tremor in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Mostert, Jop; Heersema, Dorothea; De Keyser, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Tremor is estimated to occur in about 25 to 60 percent of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This symptom, which can be severely disabling and embarrassing for patients, is difficult to manage. Isoniazid in high doses, carbamazepine, propranolol and gluthetimide have been reported to provide som

  14. Changes in Muscle Activation after Reach Training with Gravity Compensation in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Gerdienke B.; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Ijzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation…

  15. Changes in Muscle Activation after Reach Training with Gravity Compensation in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Gerdienke B.; Krabben, Thijs; Renzenbrink, Gerbert J.; Ijzerman, Maarten J.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of gravity compensation training on reaching and underlying changes in muscle activation. In this clinical trial, eight chronic stroke patients with limited arm function received 18 sessions (30 min) of gravity-compensated reach training (during 6 weeks) in combination with a rehabilitation…

  16. Frequency Response Analysis of Current Controllers for Selective Harmonic Compensation in Active Power Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, C.; Asiminoaei, L.; Boldea, I.;

    2009-01-01

    This paper compares four current control structures for selective harmonic compensation in active power filters. All controllers under scrutiny perform the harmonic compensation by using arrays of resonant controllers, one for the fundamental and one for each harmonic of interest, in order to ach...

  17. Compensating for Bias in the SDM Fast Activation Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Roland

    1996-01-01

    The Kanerva Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) is a mechanism for implementing a memory with a huge address space. The physical memory consists of substantially fewer locations than the virtual address space. The plain Kanerva SDM memory assumes address and data to be random bit vectors with equal probability for 0 and 1. To compensate for any bias in address or data, several more or ...

  18. How typical are 'typical' tremor characteristics? : Sensitivity and specificity of five tremor phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stouwe, A. M. M.; Elting, J. W.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; van Laar, T.; Leenders, K. L.; Maurits, N. M.; Tijssen, M. Aj.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Distinguishing between different tremor disorders can be challenging. Some tremor disorders are thought to have typical tremor characteristics: the current study aims to provide sensitivity and specificity for five 'typical' tremor phenomena. Methods: Retrospectively, we examined 210 t

  19. Voluntary driven elbow orthosis with speed controlled tremor suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil eHerrnstadt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Robotic technology is gradually becoming commonplace in the medical sector and in the service of patients. Medical conditions that have benefited from significant technological development include stroke, for which rehabilitation with robotic devices is administered, and surgery assisted by robots. Robotic devices have also been proposed for assistance of movement disorders. Pathological tremor, among the most common movement disorders, is such one example. In practice, the dissemination and availability of tremor suppression robotic systems has been limited. Devices in the marketplace tend to either be non-ambulatory or to target specific functions such as eating and drinking.We have developed a one degree-of-freedom (DOF elbow orthosis that could be worn by an individual with tremor. A speed controlled voluntary driven suppression approach is implemented with the orthosis. Typically tremor suppression methods estimate the tremor component of the signal and produce a canceling counterpart signal. The suggested approach, instead estimates the voluntary component of the motion. A controller then actuates the orthosis based on the voluntary signal while simultaneously rejecting the tremorous motion.In this work, we tested the suppressive orthosis using a 1 DOF robotic system that simulates the human arm. The suggested suppression approach does not require a model of the human arm. Moreover, the human input along with the orthosis forearm gravitational forces, of nonlinear nature, are considered as part of the disturbance to the suppression system. Therefore, the suppression system can be modeled linearly. Nevertheless, the orthosis forearm gravitational forces can be compensated by the suppression system.The electromechanical design of the orthosis is presented, and data from an Essential Tremor patient is used as the human input. Velocity tracking results demonstrate an RMS error of 0.31 rad/s, and a power spectral density shows a reduction of

  20. Hypothetical membrane mechanisms in essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramat Stefano

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Essential tremor (ET is the most common movement disorder and its pathophysiology is unknown. We hypothesize that increased membrane excitability in motor circuits has a key role in the pathogenesis of ET. Specifically, we propose that neural circuits controlling ballistic movements are inherently unstable due to their underlying reciprocal innervation. Such instability is enhanced by increased neural membrane excitability and the circuit begins to oscillate. These oscillations manifest as tremor. Methods Postural limb tremor was recorded in 22 ET patients and then the phenotype was simulated with a conductance-based neuromimetic model of ballistic movements. The model neuron was Hodgkin-Huxley type with added hyperpolarization activated cation current (Ih, low threshold calcium current (IT, and GABA and glycine mediated chloride currents. The neurons also featured the neurophysiological property of rebound excitation after release from sustained inhibition (post-inhibitory rebound. The model featured a reciprocally innervated circuit of neurons that project to agonist and antagonist muscle pairs. Results Neural excitability was modulated by changing Ih and/or IT. Increasing Ih and/or IT further depolarized the membrane and thus increased excitability. The characteristics of the tremor from all ET patients were simulated when Ih was increased to ~10× the range of physiological values. In contrast, increasing other membrane conductances, while keeping Ih at a physiological value, did not simulate the tremor. Increases in Ih and IT determined the frequency and amplitude of the simulated oscillations. Conclusion These simulations support the hypothesis that increased membrane excitability in potentially unstable, reciprocally innervated circuits can produce oscillations that resemble ET. Neural excitability could be increased in a number of ways. In this study membrane excitability was increased by up-regulating Ih and IT. This

  1. Automated detection and characterization of harmonic tremor in continuous seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Diana C.

    2017-06-01

    Harmonic tremor is a common feature of volcanic, hydrothermal, and ice sheet seismicity and is thus an important proxy for monitoring changes in these systems. However, no automated methods for detecting harmonic tremor currently exist. Because harmonic tremor shares characteristics with speech and music, digital signal processing techniques for analyzing these signals can be adapted. I develop a novel pitch-detection-based algorithm to automatically identify occurrences of harmonic tremor and characterize their frequency content. The algorithm is applied to seismic data from Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, and benchmarked against a monthlong manually detected catalog of harmonic tremor events. During a period of heightened eruptive activity from December 2014 to May 2015, the algorithm detects 1465 min of harmonic tremor, which generally precede periods of heightened explosive activity. These results demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately characterize harmonic tremor while highlighting the need for additional work to understand its causes and implications at restless volcanoes.

  2. Active temperature compensation design of sensor with fiber gratings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingfa Dong(董兴法); Yonglin Huang(黄勇林); Li Jiang(姜莉); Guiyun Kai(开桂云); Xiaoyi Dong(董孝义)

    2004-01-01

    A technique for compensation of temperature effects in fiber grating sensors is reported. For strain sensors and other sensors related to strain such as electromagnetic sensors, a novel structure is designed, which uses two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as strain differential sensor and has temperature effects cancelled. Using this technique, the stress sensitivity has been amplified and gets up to 0.226 nm/N, the total variation in wavelength difference within the range of 3-45 ℃ is 0.03 nm, 1/14 of the uncompensated FBG.The structure can be used in the temperature-insensitive static strain measurement and minor-vibration measurement.

  3. Tremor and its duration-amplitude distribution at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arámbula-Mendoza, R.; Valdés-González, C.; Varley, N.; Reyes-Pimentel, T. A.; Juárez-García, B.

    2016-09-01

    The duration-amplitude distribution was calculated for the tremor observed at Popocatépetl volcano during episodes of activity in 2000 and 2012-2014. An exponential function was used to obtain a good fit for the duration-amplitude distribution, and the source of volcanic tremor is probably generated by the transportation of magmatic fluids and its coupling with the host rock within the volcanic conduit. In particular, harmonic tremor has shown large amplitudes, durations, and mean values of amplitude, more than spasmodic or pulsating tremor. This is due to different generation mechanisms: in the case of harmonic tremor, it is produced during magma ascent and lava dome growth, while spasmodic and pulsating tremors are associated with fragmentation of the lava dome and gas emissions. This paper presents the duration-amplitude distribution as a method to estimate the intensity of the tremor at Popocatépetl, a volcano with the major risk in all Mexico.

  4. Task force report: scales for screening and evaluating tremor: critique and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elble, Rodger; Bain, Peter; Forjaz, Maria João; Haubenberger, Dietrich; Testa, Claudia; Goetz, Christopher G; Leentjens, Albert F G; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Post, Bart; Sampaio, Cristina; Stebbins, Glenn T; Weintraub, Daniel; Schrag, Anette

    2013-11-01

    The Movement Disorder Society established a task force to review rating scales for the assessment of tremor. Screening instruments used in identifying patients with tremor were also reviewed. Seven tremor severity scales, six activities of daily living (ADL)/disability scales, four quality-of-life scales, and five screening instruments were identified by searching PubMed.gov. The availability, use, acceptability, reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change were reviewed for each scale; and each scale was classified as recommended, suggested or listed based on whether 3, 2, or 1 of the following criteria were met: (1) used in the assessment of tremor (yes/no), (2) used in published studies by people other than the developers (yes/no), and (3) successful clinimetric testing (yes/no). Five tremor severity scales (the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale, the Bain and Findley Clinical Tremor Rating Scale, the Bain and Findley Spirography Scale, the Washington Heights-Inwood Genetic Study of Essential Tremor Rating Scale, and the Tremor Research Group Essential Tremor Rating Assessment Scale), one ADL/disability scale (the Bain and Findley Tremor ADL Scale), one quality-of-life scale (the Quality of Life in Essential Tremor Questionnaire), and one screening instrument (the Washington Heights-Inwood Genetic Study of Essential Tremor Rating Scale, version 1) are recommended using these criteria. However, all scales need a more comprehensive analysis of sensitivity to change in order to judge their utility in clinical trials and individual patient assessments. The task force recommends that further work with existing recommended scales be performed as opposed to the development of new tremor scales.

  5. Active compensation of wavefront aberrations by controllable heating of lens with electric film heater matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua; Hou, Lv; Zhou, Xinglin

    2016-08-20

    We present a new apparatus for active compensation of wavefront aberrations by controllable heating of a lens using a film heater matrix. The annular electric film heater matrix, comprising 24 individual heaters, is attached to the periphery of a lens. Utilizing the linear superposition, and wavefront change proportional to the heating energy properties induced by heating, a controllable wavefront can be defined by solving a linear function. The two properties of wavefront change of a lens have been confirmed through a specially designed experiment. The feasibility of the compensation method is validated by compensating the wavefront of a plate lens. The results show that the wavefront of the lens changes from 12.52 to 2.95 nm rms after compensation. With a more precise electric controlling board, better results could be achieved.

  6. Redundant unbalance compensation of an active magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Markus; Kalteis, Gerald; Schrödl, Manfred

    2017-09-01

    To achieve a good running behavior of a magnetic levitated rotor, a well-developed position controller and different compensation methods are required. Two very important structures in this context are the reduction of the gyroscopic effect and the unbalance vibration. Both structures have in common that they need the angular velocity information for calculation. For industrial applications this information is normally provided by an angle sensor which is fixed on the rotor. The angle information is also necessary for the field oriented control of the electrical drive. The main drawback of external position sensors are the case of a breakdown or an error of the motor controller. Therefore, the magnetic bearing can get unstable, because no angular velocity information is provided. To overcome this problem the presented paper describes the development of a selfsensing unbalance rejection in combination with a selfsensing speed control of the motor controller. Selfsensing means in this context that no angle sensor is required for the unbalance or torque control. With such structures two redundant speed and angle information sources are available and can be used for the magnetic bearing and the motor controller without the usage of an angle sensor.

  7. High order single step time delay compensation algorithm for structural active control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王焕定; 耿淑伟; 王伟

    2002-01-01

    The optimal instantaneous high order single step algorithm for active control is first discussed andthen, the n + 1 time step controlling force vector of the instantaneous optimal algorithm is derived from way of ntime state vector. An estimating algorithm, is developed from this to solve the problem of active control withtime delay compensation. The estimating algorithm based on this high order single step β method (HSM) foun-dation, is proven by simulation and experiment analysis, to be a valid solution to problem of active control withtime delay compensation.

  8. A NEW METHOD TO CALCULATE COMPENSATION CURRENT IN PARALLEL ACTIVE POWER FILTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet ALTINTAŞ

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, active power filter plays an important role in reducing harmonic current and reactive power in power lines. The reliability and effectiveness of an active power filter depends basically on three characteristics. These are the modulation method, the design characteristics of the PWM modulator and the method implemented to generate compensation current. For the last one, there are many proposed methods. Most of them complicated and hence difficult to implement and adjust. In this study, a new method to calculate compensation current is improved and tested in single-phase parallel active power filter controlled by microcontroller. Experimental and simulation results are presented in the paper.

  9. 21 CFR 882.1950 - Tremor transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tremor transducer. 882.1950 Section 882.1950 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1950 Tremor transducer. (a) Identification. A tremor transducer is a device used to measure the degree of tremor caused by certain diseases...

  10. Approach to unbalance power active compensation under linear load unbalances and fundamental voltage asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segui-Chilet, S.; Gimeno-Sales, F.J.; Orts, S.; Alcaniz, M.; Masot, R. [Instituto de Tecnologia Electrica - Grupo de Tecnologia Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Garcera, G.; Figueres, E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    This paper proposes a new definition of the unbalance power that allows the selective compensation of inefficiencies caused by linear loads by means of a three-phase shunt active power compensator (APC). Symmetrical components of current and voltage are used to evaluate the unbalance power in these systems and to define the compensating currents. The instantaneous power flows with unbalanced linear loads connected to a three-phase electrical system are analyzed following the normal procedure used for the quantification of the reactive power. Equations to calculate the unbalance power and the effective apparent power are obtained from the analysis of the instantaneous power flows. The output currents of the selective APC are defined using the instantaneous unbalance power approach. Power quantities and APC compensating current are defined for IEEE Std. 1459 and for the instantaneous unbalance power approach. Two examples are used to compare the power quantities and the APC operation. The main effects of unbalanced linear load and of fundamental voltage asymmetries are analyzed. Simulations of a shunt APC emphasize the advantages of the calculation of the compensating currents based on the proposed instantaneous unbalance power approach. A comparison with the results obtained by calculation of the compensating currents based on IEEE Std. 1459 is carried out. A new power factor is also defined and compared with other conventional definitions. (author)

  11. Ambient Tremor Triggered by Long-term Slow Slip Event in Bungo Channel, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, K.; Hirose, H.; Matsuzawa, T.; Tanaka, S.; Maeda, T.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a stick-slip in the transition zone between locked and stable sliding zones on the plate interface in Southwest Japan and Cascadia. ETS episode with duration of several days usually recurs at interval of several months at each segment. On the other hand, in the Bungo channel region where is the western edge of the ETS zone in SW Japan, tremor activity continued for several months during the long-term slow slip event (SSE) in 2003 and 2010. In this paper, the relationship between long-term SSE and surrounded triggered tremor is discussed. Tremor triggered by the long-term SSE is spatially localized in the narrow width of about 10 km at the shallowest part of the tremor zone, and at the neighboring area just downdip from the source fault of the SSE. The frequency distribution of tremor along the dip direction during the SSE period is consistent with the spatial distribution of total slip estimated for 2010 SSE. Therefore, the slip of the long-term SSE penetrated in the ETS zone may generate tremor. The daily number of the activated tremor is 12-14 during the SSE; however, it is 40-50 for regular ETS episode during the inter-SSE period. On the other hand, slip rates of the long-term SSE and ETS are typically 1 mm/d and 3 mm/d, respectively. Therefore, tremor rate may be controlled by slip rate. After SSEs in 2003 and 2010, tremor activity seems to slightly increase in the east region within 50 km from the triggered tremor area. Such 7-year period variation in tremor activity is observed in only the shallower side of the tremor zone. Moreover, pattern of the long-term variation seems to slightly migrate to east during a few years. We interpret that a tiny transient slip after the long-term SSE slowly propagates between transition and locked zones. Tremor activity at the shallowest part of the tremor zone in the Bungo channel continued longer than that of regular ETS in the late 2006 during the inter-SSE period. Associated tiny GPS

  12. Searching for Tectonic Tremor on the North Anatolian Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfohl, A.; Warren, L. M.; Sit, S. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Tectonic tremor, a relatively newly-discovered seismologic phenomenon, has been helpful in increasing our understanding of fault evolution and slip. Tectonic tremor was first identified in subduction zones, such as Cascadia and Japan. More recently, tremor was discovered on a transform boundary, the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in California. The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in Turkey is also a transform boundary and has a similar slip rate to the SAF but is younger. Because tremor has not previously been identified on the NAF, our search was designed to identify signals with characteristics similar to those of tremor found in previous studies. In our search for tremor, we analyzed data from the North Anatolian Fault Passive Seismic Experiment that was deployed along the NAF in central Turkey from 2005 to 2008. This experiment included 39 broadband stations, some of which were located within a few kilometers of the NAF or its major splays. In other regions, tremor has been triggered by the surface waves of large earthquakes so we first checked if this was also the case for the NAF. For the 22 earthquakes of M ≥ 5.5 in or around Turkey during the time period of the experiment, we filtered the seismograms between 2-8 Hz, the dominant tremor passband for other regions. We inspected the filtered records but did not see any tremor triggered by surface waves. We then focused on identifying ambient tremor along the NAF using a frequency ratio scanning method. Since different types of seismic signals have peak amplitudes in different frequency bands, time periods with increased tremor activity may be identified by an increase in amplitude in the appropriate frequency band. In this step of the analysis, data from all stations were filtered from 2-5 Hz, 10-15, and 0.02-0.1 Hz to differentiate tremor, local earthquakes, and surface waves, respectively, and the amplitude was computed for 5-minute-long windows for each passband. We more closely investigated time periods with

  13. Widespread triggering of nonvolcanic tremor in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Rubinstein, Justin L; Peng, Zhigang; Creager, Kenneth C; Vidale, John E; Bodin, Paul

    2008-01-11

    We identified seven locations on or near the transform plate boundary in California where nonvolcanic tremor was triggered by the 2002 Denali earthquake. This result implies that the conditions essential for nonvolcanic tremor exist in a range of tectonic environments. Models explaining tremor typically require conditions endemic to subduction zones, that is, high temperatures and fluid pressures, because previously tremor was nearly exclusively documented in subduction zones. The absence of tremor in geothermal areas is inconsistent with such models. Additionally, we found no correlation between creeping or locked faults and tremor, contrary to predictions of frictional models of tremor.

  14. Aberrant brain network efficiency in Parkinson’s disease patients with tremor: a multi-modality study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delong eZhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The coordination of spontaneous brain activity is widely enhanced relative to compensation activity in Parkinson’s disease (PD with tremor; however, the associated topological organization remains unclear. Here, we collected magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data from 16 patients and 20 matched normal controls (NCs and constructed wavelet-based functional and morphological brain networks for individual participants. Graph-based network analysis indicated that the information translation efficiency in the functional brain network was disrupted within the wavelet scale 2 (i.e., .063–.125 Hz in PD patients. Compared with the NCs, the network local efficiency was decreased and the network global efficiency was increased in PD patients. Network local efficiency could effectively discriminate PD patients from the NCs using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA, and could also describe the variability of tremor based on a multiple linear regression model (MLRM. However, these observations were not identified in the network global efficiency. Notably, the global and local efficiency were both significantly increased in the morphological brain network of PD patients. Further analysis showed that the global and local network efficiency both performed well in PD classifications (i.e., using MVPA and clinical performance descriptions (i.e., using MLRM. More importantly, functional and morphological brain networks were highly associated in terms of network local efficiency in PD patients. These findings provide a comprehensive view of network disorganization in PD with tremor and have important implications for understanding the neural substrates underlying this specific type of PD.

  15. Vertical Position Control for Top Tensioned Riser with Active Heave Compensator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leira, Bernt J.; Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    The top and bottom angles of a marine riser are of crucial importance during e.g. drilling and workover operations. A ver- tical position control with active heave compensator (AHC) is proposed to maintain the safety of the riser when subjected to environmental excitations. The possibility...... of reducing the maxi- mum angular response level by adjusting the vertical rod position by means of an active heave compensator is investigated with a positioning algorithm based on adaptive backstepping. Riser top and bottom angles are dealt with by the algorithm in order to minimize both angles....

  16. Design of active temperature compensated composite free-free beam MEMS resonators in a standard process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xereas, George; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2014-03-01

    Frequency references are used in almost every modern electronic device including mobile phones, personal computers, and scientific and medical instrumentation. With modern consumer mobile devices imposing stringent requirements of low cost, low complexity, compact system integration and low power consumption, there has been significant interest to develop batch-manufactured MEMS resonators. An important challenge for MEMS resonators is to match the frequency and temperature stability of quartz resonators. We present 1MHz and 20MHz temperature compensated Free-Free beam MEMS resonators developed using PolyMUMPS, which is a commercial multi-user process available from MEMSCAP. We introduce a novel temperature compensation technique that enables high frequency stability over a wide temperature range. We used three strategies: passive compensation by using a structural gold (Au) layer on the resonator, active compensation through using a heater element, and a Free-Free beam design that minimizes the effects of thermal mismatch between the vibrating structure and the substrate. Detailed electro-mechanical simulations were performed to evaluate the frequency response and Quality Factor (Q). Specifically, for the 20MHz device, a Q of 10,000 was obtained for the passive compensated design. Finite Element Modeling (FEM) simulations were used to evaluate the Temperature Coefficient of frequency (TCf) of the resonators between -50°C and 125°C which yielded +0.638 ppm/°C for the active compensated, compared to -1.66 ppm/°C for the passively compensated design and -8.48 ppm/°C for uncompensated design for the 20MHz device. Electro-thermo-mechanical simulations showed that the heater element was capable of increasing the temperature of the resonators by approximately 53°C with an applied voltage of 10V and power consumption of 8.42 mW.

  17. Hereditary chin tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, Sevda; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Hereditary chin tremor (HCT) is characterized by rhythmical, involuntary movements of the chin muscles usually inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. We describe a 74-year old man with familial, childhood-onset chin tremor, and a 3-year history of progressive hand tremor, gait difficulty, and other parkinsonian features. Since chin tremor often occurs in Parkinson's disease (PD), a coexistent HCT may not be recognized unless past and family history of tremor is carefully explored.

  18. Factors Influencing Compensation Demanded for Environmental Impacts Generated by Different Economic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virna Vaneza Gutiérrez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work advances the understanding of compensation demanded for environmental impacts on atmosphere, lakes and rivers, soil, and ocean generated by mining, urban, fishing and agriculture activities. Our aims are to determine whether compensation demanded depends on the standard variables used in the field of risk perception (as perceived risk, public acceptability and trust in regulating authorities, and to explore whether these relationships depend on the environment affected and on the economic activity generating the impacts. General Linear Models were used to analyze survey responses from 427 citizens of Santiago, Chile. Results showed that compensation demanded depends on perceived risk, acceptability, and on the economic activity, but not on the environment affected. Acceptability depends on trust in authorities, on perceived risk and on the economic activity. Perceived risk depends on trust, the economic activity and the environment affected. Overall, environmental impacts from the mining industry are perceived as riskier, less acceptable, and have a higher compensation demanded than those generated by the other sectors. These results suggest that to achieve sustainable development, regulations should consider not only environmental impacts but also the economic activity originating them.

  19. Nonvolcanic tremors in the Mexican subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payero, J. S.; Kostoglodov, V.; Mikumo, T.; Perez-Campos, X.; Iglesias, A.; Clayton, R.

    2007-05-01

    Nonvolcanic low frequency tremors (NVT) have been discovered and studied recently in Japan and Cascadia subduction zones and deep beneath the San Andreas Fault. The tremors activity is increasing during so-called silent earthquakes (SQ) in Japan and Cascadia. NVT clusters also migrate following the propagation of the SQ. The origin of the NVT is still unclear. The studies of NVT and SQ in different subduction zones are required to understand the cause for these phenomena. We discovered a number of NVT from daily spectrograms of continuous broad band records at seismic stations of Servicio Seismológico Nacional (SSN) an MASE project. The analyzed data cover a period of 2001-2004 (SSN) when in 2002 a large SQ has occurred in the Guerrero- Oaxaca region, and a steady-state interseismic epoch of 2005 and a new large SQ in 2006 (MASE). NVT occurred in the central part of the Mexican subduction zone (Guerrero) at approximately 200 km from the coast. We can not accurately localize the tremors because of sparse station coverage in 2001-2004. The MASE data of 2005-2006 show that NVT records in Mexico are very similar to those obtained in Cascadia subduction zone. The tremors duration is of 10-60 min, and they appear to travel at S-wave velocities. More than 100 strong NVT were recorded by most of the MASE stations with the epicenters clustered in the narrow band of ~40x150 km to the south of Iguala city and parallel to the coast line. NVT depths are poorly constrained but seem to be less than 40 km deep. We noticed a some increase of NVT activity during the 2001-2002 and 2006 SQs compared with an NVT activity for the "SQ quiet" period of 2003-2004 nevertheless. A lack of NVT for the period of 2-3 months after the SQ is apparent in 2002 and 2006.

  20. Decreased Cerebellar Fiber Density in Cortical Myoclonic Tremor but Not in Essential Tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, Arthur W. G.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Maurits, Natasha M.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    Pathophysiology of tremor generation remains uncertain in 'familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy' (FCMTE) and essential tremor (ET). In both disorders, imaging and pathological studies suggest involvement of the cerebellum and its projection areas. MR diffusion tensor imaging allows

  1. Decreased Cerebellar Fiber Density in Cortical Myoclonic Tremor but Not in Essential Tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, Arthur W. G.; Caan, Matthan W. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Maurits, Natasha M.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiology of tremor generation remains uncertain in 'familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy' (FCMTE) and essential tremor (ET). In both disorders, imaging and pathological studies suggest involvement of the cerebellum and its projection areas. MR diffusion tensor imaging allows estim

  2. Systematic Search of Remotely Triggered Tremor in Northern and Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, A.; Ojha, L.; Peng, Z.; Chao, K.

    2009-12-01

    Non-volcanic tremor is a seismic signal observed away from volcanoes, and is characterized with long durations and no clear body wave arrivals. Recent studies have found that non-volcanic tremor can be triggered instantaneously during the surface waves of large teleseismic events in Central California, Japan, Cascadia, and Taiwan. However, it is still not clear how widespread the triggering phenomenon is, and what are the necessary conditions for tremor to occur. Here we conduct a systematic search of remotely triggered tremor in Northern and Southern California, focusing on the following regions with dense instrumentations: the Central Calaveras fault, the Northern Hayward fault, the San Jacinto fault near Hemet and the Simi Valley, and the San Gabriel Mountains. Out of the 30 large teleseismic events with Mw ≥ 7.5 since 2001, our visual inspection shows that only the 2002 Mw7.8 Denali Fault earthquake has triggered tremor in these regions, including the San Gabriel Mountains where neither triggered nor ambient tremor has been observed before. The tremor observed near the Calaveras fault and San Jacinto fault appears to be initiated by Love waves, and becomes intensified during the large amplitude Rayleigh waves. The tremor triggered in Simi Valley and San Gabriel Mountains only shows weak correlations with the Rayleigh waves. Our results suggest a lack of widespread triggering in Northern and Southern California, which is in contrast with the finding of multiple events that triggered tremor in Central California, Japan, Cascadia, and Taiwan. However, such observation is consistent with a general lack of ambient tremor activities in these regions. Possible reasons for a lack of widespread triggering in Northern and Southern California include: elevated background noises for surface stations that may hide weak triggered tremor signals, different ambient tremor rate, or different tremor triggering threshold in different regions. Updated results will be presented

  3. Load compensation for single phase system using series active filter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    transmission system to low voltage distribution system, quite a good number of series ... Keywords: Active power filter (APF), current source type of harmonic load .... voltage source type harmonic loads are having diode rectifier with smoothing.

  4. Surface-wave potential for triggering tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Source processes commonly posed to explain instances of remote dynamic triggering of tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor by surface waves include frictional failure and various modes of fluid activation. The relative potential for Love- and Rayleigh-wave dynamic stresses to trigger tectonic tremor through failure on critically stressed thrust and vertical strike-slip faults under the Coulomb-Griffith failure criteria as a function of incidence angle is anticorrelated over the 15- to 30-km-depth range that hosts tectonic tremor. Love-wave potential is high for strike-parallel incidence on low-angle reverse faults and null for strike-normal incidence; the opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. Love-wave potential is high for both strike-parallel and strike-normal incidence on vertical, strike-slip faults and minimal for ~45?? incidence angles. The opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. This pattern is consistent with documented instances of tremor triggered by Love waves incident on the Cascadia mega-thrust and the San Andreas fault (SAF) in central California resulting from shear failure on weak faults (apparent friction, ????? 0.2). However, documented instances of tremor triggered by surface waves with strike-parallel incidence along the Nankai megathrust beneath Shikoku, Japan, is associated primarily with Rayleigh waves. This is consistent with the tremor bursts resulting from mixed-mode failure (crack opening and shear failure) facilitated by near-lithostatic ambient pore pressure, low differential stress, with a moderate friction coefficient (?? ~ 0.6) on the Nankai subduction interface. Rayleigh-wave dilatational stress is relatively weak at tectonic tremor source depths and seems unlikely to contribute significantly to the triggering process, except perhaps for an indirect role on the SAF in sustaining tremor into the Rayleigh-wave coda that was initially triggered by Love waves.

  5. Essential Tremor (ET): Surgical Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t respond to propranolol, primidone, or other common ET medications and whose tremor has become debilitating, there ... treatments were first introduced. Current surgical options for ET include Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) , Focused Ultrasound Thalamotomy , ...

  6. Essential tremor responsive to levetiracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Yılgör

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor is one of the most common movementdisorders with a prevalence of 0.4% to 3.9% in the generalpopulation and increases with age. The medical treatmentavailable for patients with essential tremor is ofteninadequate. Propranolol and primidone are the first-linetreatment options, improving in up to two thirds of cases.This article reports a satisfying response to levetiracetamwith disabling essential tremor in a 58-year-old man whompropranolol as well as primidone had to be discontinueddue to unresponsiveness and severe side effects. One ofthe antiepileptic drugs, levetiracetam, may be more usefulin the treatment of essential tremor. J Clin Exp Invest2012; 3(1: 108-110

  7. Performance evaluation of active wireline heave compensation systems in marine well logging environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tanzhuo; Iturrino, Gerardo; Goldberg, David; Meissner, Eric; Swain, Kerry; Furman, Clayton; Fitzgerald, Peter; Frisbee, Nathan; Chlimoun, Joe; Van Hyfte, John; Beyer, Ron

    2013-02-01

    The basic functionality and performance of a new Schlumberger active wireline heave compensation system on the JOIDES Resolution was evaluated during the sea trial and a 3-year period of the IODP Phase II operations. A suite of software programs was developed to enable real-time monitoring of the dynamics of logging tools, and assess the efficiency of wireline heave compensation during downhole operations. The evaluation of the system effectiveness was performed under normal logging conditions as well as during stationary tests. Logging data were analyzed for their overall quality and repeatability, and to assess the reliability of high-resolution data such as formation microscanner (FMS) electrical images. This revealed that the system reduces 65-80 % of displacement or 88-98 % variance of downhole tool motion in stationary mode under heave conditions of ±0.2-1.5 m and water depths of 300-4,500 m in open holes. Under similar water/heave conditions, the compensator system reduces tool displacement by 50-60 %, or 75-84 % variance in downhole tool motion during normal logging operations. Such compensation efficiency (CE) is comparable to previous compensation systems, but using advanced and upgradeable technologies, and provides 50-85 % heave motion and heave variance attenuation. Moreover, logging down/up at low speeds (300-600 m/h) reduces the system's CE values by 15-20 %, and logging down at higher speeds (1,000-1,200 m/h) eliminates CE values by 55-65 %. Considering the high quality of the logging data collected, it is concluded that the new system can provide an improved level of compensation over previous systems. Also, if practically feasible, future integration of downhole cable dynamics as an input feedback into the current system could further improve its compensation efficiency during logging operations.

  8. Compensation in resting metabolism for experimentally increased activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deerenberg, C; Overkamp, GJF; Visser, GH; Daan, S; Heldmaier, G.

    1998-01-01

    To study zebra finch allocation of energy to day and night at two different workloads, we assessed the daily energy turnover from: (1) metabolizable energy of the food, and (2) doubly-labeled water. In both experiments we imposed two levels of activity on captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata),

  9. Vertical Position Control for Top Tensioned Riser with Active Heave Compensator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leira, Bernt J.; Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    The top and bottom angles of a marine riser are of crucial importance during e.g. drilling and workover operations. A ver- tical position control with active heave compensator (AHC) is proposed to maintain the safety of the riser when subjected to environmental excitations. The possibility...

  10. Active and passive compensation of APPLE II-introduced multipole errors through beam-based measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Huang, Szu-Jung; Fu, Huang-Wen; Chang, Ho-Ping; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Ching-Shiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    The effect of an APPLE II-type elliptically polarized undulator (EPU) on the beam dynamics were investigated using active and passive methods. To reduce the tune shift and improve the injection efficiency, dynamic multipole errors were compensated using L-shaped iron shims, which resulted in stable top-up operation for a minimum gap. The skew quadrupole error was compensated using a multipole corrector, which was located downstream of the EPU for minimizing betatron coupling, and it ensured the enhancement of the synchrotron radiation brightness. The investigation methods, a numerical simulation algorithm, a multipole error correction method, and the beam-based measurement results are discussed.

  11. Observations of two special kinds of tremor at Galeras volcano, Colombia(1989-1991

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gil-Cruz

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the reactivation of Galeras volcano in 1988 its seismic activity has been dominated by a variety of LP waveforms and tremor events. Some of these signals occurred as a response to volcanic activity. Among them, two kinds of tremor deserve special attention, Flute tremor and Spasmodic tremor. Flute tremor has a spectrum of equally spaced peaks and is associated with a quasi-steady degassing process at the top of the lava dome. It is accompanied by a flute-like sound. Its spectral features and the correlation with field observations are consistent with a model generation indicating that a crack or set of cracks are excited to resonance by the release and flow of gas through the lava dome. Spasmodic tremor is composed of several distinct LP-like events joined together by a continuous signal with lower amplitudes. Two types of spasmodic tremor may be distinguished on the basis of their spectral characteristics and field observations. Spasmodic tremor type I is apparently dominated by a mix of P, SH and Rayleigh waves as determined from preliminary polarization analysis. The source appears to be located, in a region west of the active crater. As a first approximation, Spasmodic tremor type I could be associated with magmatic intrusion process occurred in 1989-1991.

  12. Morphometric and functional MRI changes in essential tremor with and without resting tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Valentina; Cecchi, Paolo; Frosini, Daniela; Pesaresi, Ilaria; Fabbri, Serena; Diciotti, Stefano; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Cosottini, Mirco; Ceravolo, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The etiopathogenesis of essential tremor (ET) is still debated, since the predominant role of circuit dysfunction or brain degenerative changes has not been clearly established. The relationship with Parkinson's Disease (PD) is also controversial and resting tremor occurs in up to 20 % of ET. We investigated the morphological and functional changes associated with ET and we assessed potential differences related to the presence (ET+R) or absence (ET-R) of resting tremor. 32 ET patients (18 ET+R; 14 ET-R) and 12 healthy controls (HC) underwent 3T-MRI protocol including Spoiled Gradient T1-weighted sequence for Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analysis and functional MRI during continuous writing of "8" with right dominant hand. VBM analysis revealed no gray and white matter atrophy comparing ET patients to HC and ET+R to ET-R patients. HC showed a higher BOLD response with respect to ET patients in cerebellum and other brain areas pertaining to cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit. Between-group activation maps showed higher activation in precentral gyrus bilaterally, right superior and inferior frontal gyri, left postcentral gyrus, superior and inferior parietal gyri, mid temporal and supramarginal gyri, cerebellum and internal globus pallidus in ET-R compared to ET+R patients. Our findings support that the dysfunction of cerebello-thalamo-cortical network is associated with ET in absence of any morphometric changes. The dysfunction of GPi in ET+R patients, consistently with data reported in PD resting tremor, might suggest a potential role of this structure in this type of tremor.

  13. Altered Activation in Cerebellum Contralateral to Unilateral Thalamotomy May Mediate Tremor Suppression in Parkinson’s Disease: A Short-Term Regional Homogeneity fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhi; Zhang, Jie; Li, Jielan; Dai, Jiankun; Lin, Fuchun; Wu, Guangyao

    2016-01-01

    Background Ventral intermediate nucleus thalamotomy is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease tremor. However, its mechanism is still unclear. Purpose We used resting-state fMRI to investigate short-term ReHo changes after unilateral thalamotomy in tremor-dominant PD, and to speculate about its possible mechanism on tremor suppression. Methods 26 patients and 31 healthy subjects (HS) were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups according to right- (rPD) and left-side (lPD) thalamotomy. Tremor was assessed using the 7-item scale from the Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale motor score (mUPDRS). Patients were scanned using resting state fMRI after 12h withdrawal of medication, both preoperatively (PDpre) and 7- day postoperatively (PDpost), whereas healthy subjects were scanned once. The regions associated with tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation were examined. Results The impact of unilateral VIM thalamotomy was characterized in the frontal, parietal, temporal regions, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Compared with PDpre, significantly reduced ReHo was found in the left cerebellum in patients with rPDpost, and slightly decreased ReHo in the cerebellum vermis in patients with lPDpost, which was significantly higher than HS. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the ReHo values in the cerebellum (in rPD, peak coordinate [-12, -54, -21], R = 0.64, P = 0.0025, and peak coordinate [-9, -54, -18], R = 0.71, P = 0.0025; in lPD, peak coordinate [3, -45, -15], R = 0.71, P = 0.004) in the pre-surgical condition, changes of ReHo induced by thalamotomy (in rPD, R = 0.63, P = 0.021, R = 0.6, P = 0.009; in lPD, R = 0.58, P = 0.028) and tremor scores contralateral to the surgical side, respectively. Conclusion The specific area that may be associated with PD tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation is the cerebellum. The neural basis underlying thalamotomy is complex; cerebellum involvement is far beyond cerebello

  14. Altered Activation in Cerebellum Contralateral to Unilateral Thalamotomy May Mediate Tremor Suppression in Parkinson's Disease: A Short-Term Regional Homogeneity fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Wen

    Full Text Available Ventral intermediate nucleus thalamotomy is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease tremor. However, its mechanism is still unclear.We used resting-state fMRI to investigate short-term ReHo changes after unilateral thalamotomy in tremor-dominant PD, and to speculate about its possible mechanism on tremor suppression.26 patients and 31 healthy subjects (HS were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups according to right- (rPD and left-side (lPD thalamotomy. Tremor was assessed using the 7-item scale from the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale motor score (mUPDRS. Patients were scanned using resting state fMRI after 12h withdrawal of medication, both preoperatively (PDpre and 7- day postoperatively (PDpost, whereas healthy subjects were scanned once. The regions associated with tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation were examined.The impact of unilateral VIM thalamotomy was characterized in the frontal, parietal, temporal regions, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Compared with PDpre, significantly reduced ReHo was found in the left cerebellum in patients with rPDpost, and slightly decreased ReHo in the cerebellum vermis in patients with lPDpost, which was significantly higher than HS. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the ReHo values in the cerebellum (in rPD, peak coordinate [-12, -54, -21], R = 0.64, P = 0.0025, and peak coordinate [-9, -54, -18], R = 0.71, P = 0.0025; in lPD, peak coordinate [3, -45, -15], R = 0.71, P = 0.004 in the pre-surgical condition, changes of ReHo induced by thalamotomy (in rPD, R = 0.63, P = 0.021, R = 0.6, P = 0.009; in lPD, R = 0.58, P = 0.028 and tremor scores contralateral to the surgical side, respectively.The specific area that may be associated with PD tremor and altered ReHo due to thalamic ablation is the cerebellum. The neural basis underlying thalamotomy is complex; cerebellum involvement is far beyond cerebello-thalamic tract breakage.

  15. Slip rate and tremor genesis in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wech, Aaron G.; Bartlow, Noel M.

    2014-01-01

    At many plate boundaries, conditions in the transition zone between seismogenic and stable slip produce slow earthquakes. In the Cascadia subduction zone, these events are consistently observed as slow, aseismic slip on the plate interface accompanied by persistent tectonic tremor. However, not all slow slip at other plate boundaries coincides spatially and temporally with tremor, leaving the physics of tremor genesis poorly understood. Here we analyze seismic, geodetic, and strainmeter data in Cascadia to observe for the first time a large, tremor-generating slow earthquake change from tremor-genic to silent and back again. The tremor falls silent at reduced slip speeds when the migrating slip front pauses as it loads the stronger adjacent fault segment to failure. The finding suggests that rheology and slip-speed-regulated stressing rate control tremor genesis, and the same section of fault can slip both with and without detectable tremor, limiting tremor's use as a proxy for slip.

  16. Postural and intention tremors: Detailed clinical study of essential tremor vs. Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer J Sternberg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: An estimated 30-50% of essential tremor diagnoses are incorrect, and the true diagnosis in those patients is often Parkinson’s disease or other tremor disorders. There are general statements about the tremor in these essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease, but published data on the more subtle characteristics of tremor are surprisingly limited. Postural tremor may occur in both disorders, adding to the difficulty. There are several anecdotal impressions regarding specific features of postural tremor in essential tremor vs. Parkinson’s disease, including joint distribution (e.g., phalanges, metacarpal-phalangeal joints, wrist, tremor directionality (e.g., flexion-extension vs. pronation-supination, and presence of intention tremor. However, there is little data to support these impressions.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 patients (essential tremor, 50 Parkinson’s disease underwent detailed videotaped neurological examinations. Arm tremor was rated by a movement disorder neurologist who assessed severity and directionality across multiple joints. Results: During sustained arm extension, essential tremor patients exhibited more wrist than metacarpal-phalangeal and phalangeal joint tremor than did Parkinson’s disease patients (p<0.001, and more wrist flexion-extension tremor than wrist pronation-supination tremor (p<0.001. During the finger-nose-finger maneuver, intention tremor was present in approximately one in four (28% essential tremor patients vs. virtually none (4% of the Parkinson’s patients (p<0.001.Conclusions: We evaluated the location, severity, and directionality of postural tremor in essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease, and the presence of intention tremor, observing several clinical differences. We hope that detailed phenomenological data on tremor in essential tremor and Parkinson’s disease will help practicing physicians delineate the two diseases.

  17. Accuracy of forecast of mine tremors location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan Drzewieck [Central Mining Institute, Katowice (Poland)

    2009-09-15

    The Upper Silesian Coal Basin is one of the most active mining areas in the world in respect of seismicity. Underground mining in this area takes place in a special environment with a high degree of risk of unpredictable event occurrence. Especially dangerous are phenomena that occur during the extraction of deposits at great depths in the environment of compact rocks. Deep underground mining violates the balance of these rocks and induces dynamic phenomena at the longwall life (in terms of distance) referred to as mine tremors. The sources of these tremors are located in layers characterised by high strength, especially in thick sandstone strata occurring in the roof of the mined seam. In the paper a discussion is presented about the influence of mining intensity (longwall face speed) on the location of mine tremor sources, both in the direction of longwall life (in terms of distance) and towards the surface. The presented material has been prepared based on the results of tests and measurements carried out at the Central Mining Institute. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Accuracy of forecast of mine tremors location

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DRZEWIECKI Jan

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Silesian Coal Basin is one of the most active mining areas in the world in respect of seismicity. Underground mining in this area takes place in a special environment with a high degree of risk of unpredictable event occurrence. Especially dangerous are phenomena that occur during the extraction of deposits at great depths in the environment of compact rocks. Deep underground mining violates the balance of these rocks and induces dynamic phenomena at the longwall life (in terms of distance) referred to as mine tremors. The sources of these tremors are located in layers characterised by high strength, especially in thick sandstone strata occurring in the roof of the mined seam. In the paper a discussion is presented about the influence of mining inten-sity (longwall face speed) on the location of mine tremor sources, both in the direction of longwall life (in terms of distance) and towards the surface. The presented material has been prepared basing on the results of tests and measurements carried out at the Central Mining Institute.

  19. An active thermal compensator for closed-cycle helium refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D. E.; Hillman, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A technique was developed for reducing the amplitude of the temperature oscillation in He closed-cyle refrigerators. The device uses a semiconductor diode as a heating element to actively supply a small oscillating input of heat at a point between the laser and the cold-tip to cancel the heat oscillations due to the refrigerator. It was found that the heater diode could drive the temperature of the heat sink more effectively, i.e., with lower current and therefore less heat, if the heat sink was insulated slightly from the rest of the mount. A sine-wave generator was used to drive the programmable supply which provided the offset current to the heater diode. By matching the frequency and phase of the oscillator to that of the refrigerator cycle, and by adjusting the amplitude of the oscillator signal, the temperature fluctuations at the laser could be minimized. Residual fluctuations were about 0.003K peak-to-peak, at an operating temperature of 9.5K.

  20. The Commercial TREMOR Strong-Motion Seismograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. R.; Hamstra, R. H.; Kuendig, C.; Camina, P.

    2001-12-01

    -connected cell-phone-based Internet technology (CDPD), but any RS-232 connected telemetry system is a viable candidate (spread spectrum, CDMA, GSM, POT). The instruments can be synchronized via CDPD to a few tenths of a second, or to full precision with an optional GPS receiver. Sensor RMS noise is 33 \\mathrm \\mu g over the band 0.1 to 35 Hz, 11 \\mathrm \\mu g$ over the band 0.1 to 1.0 Hz; the sensor is extremely linear (far better than 1% of full scale); temperature compensation is to better than 1% of full scale. TREMOR-class instruments are intended to fill the niche of high spatial resolution with an economical low-maintenance device, while conventional instruments continue to pursue maximum amplitude resolution. The TREMOR instrument also has applications in areas where budget or access limitations require lower purchase, installation, or maintenance cost (commercial ANSS partners, remote sites, on-call aftershock arrays, extremely dense arrays, and organizations with limited budgets). However, we primarily envision large, mixed arrays of conventional and TREMOR instruments in urban areas, the former providing better early information from small events and the TREMOR instruments guaranteeing better spatial resolution and more near-field recording of large events. Together, they would meet the ANSS goal of dense near-real-time urban monitoring and the collection of requisite data for risk mitigation.

  1. Tremor, the curious third wheel of fault motion (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The known universe of tectonic fault behavior has gained a new neighborhood in the last few years. Before, faults were considered to either conform to the reasonably well-understood earthquake cycle or else slide steadily. In the earthquake cycle, a fault stays locked for the years while stress is accumulating, then cracks and slides, releasing about 0.1-10 MPa of the stress on the fault. The crack spreads across the fault at roughly the shear wave velocity, kilometers per second. Sliding across the crack occurs at rates on the order of a meter per second. Deeper than the locked portion, faults were assumed to move stealthily and steadily. Disrupting this orderly bipartite universe has been tremor - a prolonged, noise-like, 1-10 Hz rumbling that has been spotted below the locked portion of a variety of faults. In subduction zones, often tremor is coincident with slow and low-stress-drop slip that takes many orders of magnitude longer to complete than garden-variety earthquakes, with the rupture progression estimated in km per day rather than per second. The so-called episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is seen to strike at much more regular intervals than old-fashioned quakes. Speculation and disjoint observations abound. Probably the observations represent just the most easily observed portions of a process that moves with power at all frequencies. The spectrum of tremor radiation is less “red” than that of earthquakes for periods shorter than their duration. Near-lithostatic pore pressure may play an important role in lubricating ETS activity. ETS activity appears generally restricted to only some major faults. Strong passing surface waves from distant great earthquakes trigger pulsations of tremor. Strong nearby earthquakes can cause weeks of stronger than normal tremor. The ebb and flow of diurnal tides cause a rise and fall in tremor amplitude. Tremor can contain earthquake-like short bursts of energy, even dozens of discrete pops, all with the less red spectra

  2. Active listening room compensation for massive multichannel sound reproduction systems using wave-domain adaptive filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spors, Sascha; Buchner, Herbert; Rabenstein, Rudolf; Herbordt, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    The acoustic theory for multichannel sound reproduction systems usually assumes free-field conditions for the listening environment. However, their performance in real-world listening environments may be impaired by reflections at the walls. This impairment can be reduced by suitable compensation measures. For systems with many channels, active compensation is an option, since the compensating waves can be created by the reproduction loudspeakers. Due to the time-varying nature of room acoustics, the compensation signals have to be determined by an adaptive system. The problems associated with the successful operation of multichannel adaptive systems are addressed in this contribution. First, a method for decoupling the adaptation problem is introduced. It is based on a generalized singular value decomposition and is called eigenspace adaptive filtering. Unfortunately, it cannot be implemented in its pure form, since the continuous adaptation of the generalized singular value decomposition matrices to the variable room acoustics is numerically very demanding. However, a combination of this mathematical technique with the physical description of wave propagation yields a realizable multichannel adaptation method with good decoupling properties. It is called wave domain adaptive filtering and is discussed here in the context of wave field synthesis.

  3. Motor network disruption in essential tremor : a functional and effective connectivity study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, Arthur W. G.; van der Stouwe, A. M. Madelein; Broersma, Marja; Sharifi, Sarvi; Groot, Paul F. C.; Speelman, Johannes D.; Maurits, Natasha M.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2015-01-01

    Although involvement of the cerebello-thalamo-cortical network has often been suggested in essential tremor, the source of oscillatory activity remains largely unknown. To elucidate mechanisms of tremor generation, it is of crucial importance to study the dynamics within the

  4. Holmes' tremor caused by midbrain cavernoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Jun; LI Shi-ting; XU Shun-qing; WAN Liang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Holmes' tremor has been postulated as a syndrome attributed to those lesions that interrupt the dentatethalamic and the nigrostriatal tracts thus causing both an action and a rest tremor.1 It may arise from various underlying structural disorders including multiple sclerosis, stroke, or tumors. So far, to our knowledge, few studies on Holmes' tremor secondary to cavernoma have been reported.2 Here we report a case of disabling tremor,who harbored a cavernoma in the midbrain.

  5. Tremor UPDRS estimation in home environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, George; Gatsios, Dimitris; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Chondrogiorgi, Maria; Tsironis, Christos; Konitsiotis, Spyridon; Gentile, Giovanni; Marcante, Andrea; Antonini, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a method for the assessment of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating scale (UPDRS) related to tremor is presented. The method described consists of hand resting and posture state detection, tremor detection and tremor quantification based on accelerometer and gyroscope readings from a wrist worn sensor. The initial results on PD patient recordings on home environment indicate the feasibility of the proposed method in monitoring UPDRS tremor in patient home environment.

  6. Significance of the compensation effect and the definition of active centres in metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    A linear correlation is often observed between the activation energy and the logarithm of the pre-exponential factor in catalysed reactions, although the root cause of this so-called compensation effect is still uncertain. Certain systems exhibit dual or multiple compensation lines, and it is argued that each line corresponds to a particular form of active centre; in monometallic systems each form is thought to have the same number of atoms in the same spatial arrangement. This concept is applied both to simple reactions yielding only one product (e.g. CO methanation, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/ hydrogenolysis) and to reactions forming a variety of products (e.g. cyclopropane hydrogenation), and also to sulphide catalysts for thiophene HDS.

  7. Modelling and Simulation of Single-Phase Series Active Compensator for Power Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Arun Kumar; Mathuria, Kirti; Singh, Bhim; Bhuvaneshwari, G.

    2016-10-01

    A single-phase active series compensator is proposed in this work to reduce harmonic currents at the ac mains and to regulate the dc link voltage of a diode bridge rectifier (DBR) that acts as the front end converter for a voltage source inverter feeding an ac motor. This ac motor drive is used in any of the domestic, commercial or industrial appliances. Under fluctuating ac mains voltages, the dc link voltage of the DBR depicts wide variations and hence the ac motor is used at reduced rating as compared to its name-plate rating. The active series compensator proposed here provides dual functions of improving the power quality at the ac mains and regulating the dc link voltage thus averting the need for derating of the ac motor.

  8. Dual objective active suspension system based on a novel nonlinear disturbance compensator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Vaijayanti S.; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes an active suspension system to fulfil the dual objective of improving ride comfort while trying to keep the suspension deflection within the limits of the rattle space. The scheme is based on a novel nonlinear disturbance compensator which employs a nonlinear function of the suspension deflection. The scheme is analysed and validated by simulation and experimentation on a laboratory setup. The performance is compared with a passive suspension system for a variety of road profiles.

  9. The Clinical Evaluation of Parkinson's Tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zach, H.; Dirkx, M.; Bloem, B.R.; Helmich, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease harbours many different tremors that differ in distribution, frequency, and context in which they occur. A good clinical tremor assessment is important for weighing up possible differential diagnoses of Parkinson's disease, but also to measure the severity of the tremor as a

  10. Assessing the Updip Spatial Offset of Tremor and Slip during ETS Events in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogstad, R. D.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the updip spatial overlap of tremor and slip during recent episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events in Cascadia using a combination of forward and inverse models constrained by GPS, strainmeter, and tremor observations. Results from major ETS events in northern Cascadia suggest that, although there is significant spatial overlap, slow slip tends to extend further updip than tremor. ETS activity is thought to be dependent on a range of parameters, such as variable fluid pressures, temperature dependent physical properties, and facies changes. A spatial offset would indicant that tremor and slip are reflective of different physical conditions. While a clear offset of tremor and slip has been observed in multiple other subduction zones, a similar offset in Cascadia has remained difficult to constrain. Here we seek to establish whether the updip spatial offset is real in Cascadia and to quantify its extent. To complement GPS observations in Cascadia, we incorporate high fidelity strainmeter observations into inversions and sensitivity tests of iterative forward models. Tremor distributions are used as a proxy for slip and incorporated into slip models where parameters affecting the distribution and magnitude of slip are allowed to vary. These slip models are used to forward predict surface displacements and strains, which are then compared to the geodetic observations and inferred slip based on geodetic inversions. Results indicate that, while the tremor-derived slip distributions do a good job predicting the broad-scale surface deformation, the best-fit models have slip updip of the peak tremor activity. The fine-scale relationship of tremor and slip appears to vary on an event-by-event basis, where areas of high tremor density do not always correlate with increased surface displacements and vice-versa.

  11. Modeling and Fuzzy Logic Control of an Active Reaction Compensating Platform System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.J. Lin

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the application of the fuzzy logic (FL concept to the active control of a multiple degree of freedom reaction compensating platform system that is designed and used for isolating vibratory disturbances of space-based devices. The physical model used is a scaled down two-plate platform system. In this work, simulation is performed and presented. According to the desired performance specifications, a full range of investigation regarding the development of an FL stabilization controller for the system is conducted. Specifically, the study includes four stages: comprehensive dynamic modeling of the reaction compensating system; analysis of the dynamic responses of the platform system when it is subjected to various disturbances; design of an FL controller capable of filtering the vibratory disturbances transmitted to the bottom plate of the platform system; performance evaluation of the developed FL controller through computer simulations. To simplify the simulation work, the system model is linearized and the system component parameter variations are not considered. The performance of the FL controller is tested by exciting the system with an impulsive force applied at an arbitrarily chosen point on the top plate. It is shown that the proposed FL controller is robust in that the resultant active system is well stabilized when subjected to a random external disturbance. The comparative study of the performances of the FL controlled active reaction and passive reaction compensating systems also reveals that the FL controlled system achieves significant improvements in reducing vibratory accelerations over passive systems.

  12. A High Power Density Integrated Charger for Electric Vehicles with Active Ripple Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a high power density on-board integrated charger with active ripple compensation circuit for electric vehicles. To obtain a high power density and high efficiency, silicon carbide devices are reported to meet the requirement of high-switching-frequency operation. An integrated bidirectional converter is proposed to function as AC/DC battery charger and to transfer energy between battery pack and motor drive of the traction system. In addition, the conventional H-bridge circuit suffers from ripple power pulsating at second-order line frequency, and a scheme of active ripple compensation circuit has been explored to solve this second-order ripple problem, in which a pair of power switches shared traction mode, a ripple energy storage capacitor, and an energy transfer inductor. Simulation results in MATLAB/Simulink validated the eligibility of the proposed topology. The integrated charger can work as a 70 kW motor drive circuit or a converter with an active ripple compensation circuit for 3 kW charging the battery. The impact of the proposed topology and control strategy on the integrated charger power losses, efficiency, power density, and thermal performance has also been analysed and simulated.

  13. Time-frequency scale decomposition of tectonic tremor signals for space-time reconstruction of tectonic tremor sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiata, N.; Satriano, C.; Vilotte, J. P.; Bernard, P.; Obara, K.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic radiation associated with transient deformations along the faults and subduction interfaces encompasses a variety of events, i.e., tectonic tremors, low-frequency earthquakes (LFE), very low-frequency earthquakes (VLFs), and slow-slip events (SSE), with a wide range of seismic moment and characteristic durations. Characterizing in space and time the complex sources of these slow earthquakes, and their relationship with background seismicity and large earthquakes generation, is of great importance for understanding the physics and mechanics of the processes of active deformations along the plate interfaces. We present here first developments towards a methodology for: (1) extracting the different frequency and scale components of observed tectonic tremor signal, using advanced time-frequency and time-scale signal representation such as Gabor transform scheme based on, e.g. Wilson bases or Modified Discrete Cosine Transform (MDCT) bases; (2) reconstructing their corresponding potential sources in space and time, using the array method of Poiata et al. (2015). The methodology is assessed using a dataset of tectonic tremor episodes from Shikoku, Japan, recorded by the Hi-net seismic network operated by NIED. We illustrate its performance and potential in providing activity maps - associated to different scale-components of tectonic tremors - that can be analyzed statistically to improve our understanding of tremor sources and scaling, as well as their relation with the background seismicity.

  14. Neural correlates of dystonic tremor: a multimodal study of voice tremor in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirke, Diana N; Battistella, Giovanni; Kumar, Veena; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Rumbach, Anna; Simonyan, Kristina

    2016-02-03

    Tremor, affecting a dystonic body part, is a frequent feature of adult-onset dystonia. However, our understanding of dystonic tremor pathophysiology remains ambiguous as its interplay with the main co-occurring disorder, dystonia, is largely unknown. We used a combination of functional MRI, voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-weighted imaging to investigate similar and distinct patterns of brain functional and structural alterations in patients with dystonic tremor of voice (DTv) and isolated spasmodic dysphonia (SD). We found that, compared to controls, SD patients with and without DTv showed similarly increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex, inferior frontal (IFG) and superior temporal gyri, putamen and ventral thalamus, as well as deficient activation in the inferior parietal cortex and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). Common structural alterations were observed in the IFG and putamen, which were further coupled with functional abnormalities in both patient groups. Abnormal activation in left putamen was correlated with SD onset; SD/DTv onset was associated with right putaminal volumetric changes. DTv severity established a significant relationship with abnormal volume of the left IFG. Direct patient group comparisons showed that SD/DTv patients had additional abnormalities in MFG and cerebellar function and white matter integrity in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Our findings suggest that dystonia and dystonic tremor, at least in the case of SD and SD/DTv, are heterogeneous disorders at different ends of the same pathophysiological spectrum, with each disorder carrying a characteristic neural signature, which may potentially help development of differential markers for these two conditions.

  15. Quantification of a secondary task-specific tremor in a violinist after a temporal lobectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, André; Tominaga, Kenta; Furuya, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Fumio; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific tremors (TSTs) occur mainly during certain tasks and may be highly disabling. In this case study, we report on a 66-year-old violinist who developed a TST of the right arm only while playing the violin 4 weeks after a temporal lobectomy, which had been performed as a result of his temporal lobe epilepsy. Since a similar case, to our knowledge, has not been reported so far, our aim was to quantitatively assess and describe the tremor by measuring (a) the electromyography (EMG) activity of the wrist flexor and extensor as well as (b) an accelerometer signal of the hand. We found a tremor-related frequency of about 7 Hz. Furthermore, at a similar frequency of about 7 Hz, there was coherence between the tremor acceleration and EMG-activity of the wrist flexor and extensor as well as between the tremor acceleration and coactivation. The tremorgenesis remains unclear, and possible explanations can only be speculative.

  16. Voltage Drop Compensation Method for Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang-moo; Ryu, Do-hyung; Kim, Keum-nam; Choi, Jae-beom; Kim, Byung-hee; Berkeley, Brian

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the conventional voltage drop compensation methods are reviewed and the novel design and driving scheme, the advanced power de-coupled (aPDC) driving method, is proposed to effectively compensate the voltage IR drop of active matrix light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays. The advanced PDC driving scheme can be applied to general AMOLED pixel circuits that have been developed with only minor modification or without requiring modification in pixel circuit. A 14-in. AMOLED panel with the aPDC driving scheme was fabricated. Long range uniformity (LRU) of the 14-in. AMOLED panel was improved from 43% without the aPDC driving scheme, to over 87% at the same brightness by using the scheme and the layout complexity of the panel with new design scheme is less than that of the panel with the conventional design scheme.

  17. Study on a Mechanical Semi-Active Heave Compensation System of Drill String for Use on Floating Drilling Platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyou Liu

    Full Text Available There are some disadvantages for existing heave compensation systems of drill string used for the Floating Drilling Platform (FDP, including high energy consumption, large and complex structure, and expensive manufacturing and maintenance costs. In view of the above, we present a streamlined mechanical semi-active heave compensation system (MSAHC in this study. This system consists of active compensation part with the pinion and rack and passive compensation part. In order to evaluate system performance of the MSAHC, we establish its simulation model with AMEsim software. In the process of simulation, displacement of rotary hook and energy consumption is regarded as performance parameters of the system. And the change rule of two performance parameters are analyzed by changing these design parameters including gear radius of the pinion and rack, scale coefficient of PID, rotary hook load, heave height and heave period of the FDP, and accumulator volume. Then, based on the simulation results of the MSAHC system performance, we have selected out a best set of design parameters from them. Moreover, the feasibility of the design scheme of the MSAHC is effectively verified by comparison with the existing three heave compensation system. The result shows that the energy consumption of the MSAHC is lower than the active heave compensation system (AHC and the semi-active heave compensation system (SAHC when achieving a same compensation effect as well as the accumulator volume of MSAHC is half of the passive heave compensation system (PHC. Therefore, the new designed MSAHC not only ensure compensation effect but also lower energy consumption, and its structure is simplified by adopting the simple mechanical structure to decrease manufacturing cost, maintenance cost and floor space.

  18. Study on a Mechanical Semi-Active Heave Compensation System of Drill String for Use on Floating Drilling Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyou; Tang, Yang; Huang, Chongjun; Xie, Chong

    2015-01-01

    There are some disadvantages for existing heave compensation systems of drill string used for the Floating Drilling Platform (FDP), including high energy consumption, large and complex structure, and expensive manufacturing and maintenance costs. In view of the above, we present a streamlined mechanical semi-active heave compensation system (MSAHC) in this study. This system consists of active compensation part with the pinion and rack and passive compensation part. In order to evaluate system performance of the MSAHC, we establish its simulation model with AMEsim software. In the process of simulation, displacement of rotary hook and energy consumption is regarded as performance parameters of the system. And the change rule of two performance parameters are analyzed by changing these design parameters including gear radius of the pinion and rack, scale coefficient of PID, rotary hook load, heave height and heave period of the FDP, and accumulator volume. Then, based on the simulation results of the MSAHC system performance, we have selected out a best set of design parameters from them. Moreover, the feasibility of the design scheme of the MSAHC is effectively verified by comparison with the existing three heave compensation system. The result shows that the energy consumption of the MSAHC is lower than the active heave compensation system (AHC) and the semi-active heave compensation system (SAHC) when achieving a same compensation effect as well as the accumulator volume of MSAHC is half of the passive heave compensation system (PHC). Therefore, the new designed MSAHC not only ensure compensation effect but also lower energy consumption, and its structure is simplified by adopting the simple mechanical structure to decrease manufacturing cost, maintenance cost and floor space. PMID:26186620

  19. Continental crust anisotropy measurements from tectonic tremor in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesca-Pérez, Eduardo; Ortega, Roberto; Valenzuela, Raúl W.

    2017-05-01

    We present new observations of crustal anisotropy in the southern Cascadia fore arc from tectonic tremor. The abundance of tremor activity in Oregon and northern California during slow-slip events offers an enormous amount of information with which to measure and analyze anisotropy in the upper brittle continental crust. To accomplish this, we performed analyses of wave polarization and shear wave splitting of tectonic tremor signals by using three component broadband seismic stations. The splitting times range between 0.11 and 0.32 s and are consistent with typical values observed in the continental crust. Fast polarization azimuths are, in general, margin parallel and trend N-S, which parallels the azimuths of the maximum compressive stresses observed in this region. This pattern is likely to be controlled by the stress field. Comparatively, the anisotropic structure of fast directions observed in the northern section of the Cascadia margin is oblique with respect to the southern section of Cascadia, which, in general, trends E-W and is mainly controlled by active faulting and geological structures. Source distribution analysis using a bivariate normal distribution that expresses the distribution of tremors in a preferred direction shows that in northern California and Oregon, the population of tremors tends to distribute parallel to fast polarization azimuths and maximum compressive stresses, suggesting that both tremor propagation and anisotropy are influenced by the stress field. Results show that the anisotropy reflects an active tectonic process that involves the northward movement of the Oregon Block, which is rotating as a rigid body. In northern Cascadia, previous results of anisotropy show that the crust is undergoing a shortening process due to velocity differences between the Oregon Block and the North America plate, which is moving more slowly with respect to the Oregon Block, making it clash against Vancouver Island.

  20. Treatment of patients with essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschl, Günther; Raethjen, Jan; Hellriegel, Helge; Elble, Rodger

    2011-02-01

    Essential tremor is a common movement disorder. Tremor severity and handicap vary widely, but most patients with essential tremor do not receive a diagnosis and hence are never treated. Furthermore, many patients abandon treatment because of side-effects or poor efficacy. A newly developed algorithm, based on the logarithmic relation between tremor amplitude and clinical tremor ratings, can be used to compare the magnitude of effect of available treatments. Drugs with established efficacy (propranolol and primidone) produce a mean tremor reduction of about 50%. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the thalamic nucleus ventrointermedius or neighbouring subthalamic structures reduces tremor by about 90%. However, no controlled trials of DBS have been done, and the best target is still uncertain. Better drugs are needed, and controlled trials are required to determine the safety and efficacy of DBS in the nucleus ventrointermedius and neighbouring subthalamic structures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Compensation for Adolescents’ School Mental Load by Physical Activity on Weekend Days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Kudláček

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Increasing mental load and inadequate stress management significantly affect the efficiency, success and safety of the educational/working process in adolescents. The objective of this study is to determine the extent that adolescents compensate for their school mental load by physical activity (PA on weekend days and, thus, to contribute to the objective measurement of mental load in natural working conditions. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2013 and April 2014. A set of different methods was employed—self-administered questionnaire (IPAQ-long questionnaire, objective measurements—pedometers, and accelerometers (ActiTrainers. They was distributed to 548 students from 17 high schools. Participants’ mental load was assessed based on the difference between PA intensity and/or physical inactivity and heart rate range. Results: The participants with the highest mental load during school lessons do not compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. Conclusions: Adolescents need to be encouraged to be aware of their subjective mental load and to intentionally compensate for this load by PA on weekend days. It is necessary to support the process of adopting habits by sufficient physical literacy of students, as well as teachers, and by changes in the school program.

  2. Characterization and modelling of the boron-oxygen defect activation in compensated n-type silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schön, J.; Niewelt, T.; Broisch, J.; Warta, W.; Schubert, M. C. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2015-12-28

    A study of the activation of the light-induced degradation in compensated n-type Czochralski grown silicon is presented. A kinetic model is established that verifies the existence of both the fast and the slow components known from p-type and proves the quadratic dependence of the defect generation rates of both defects on the hole concentration. The model allows for the description of lifetime degradation kinetics in compensated n-type silicon under various intensities and is in accordance with the findings for p-type silicon. We found that the final concentrations of the slow defect component in compensated n-type silicon only depend on the interstitial oxygen concentration and on neither the boron concentration nor the equilibrium electron concentration n{sub 0}. The final concentrations of the fast defect component slightly increase with increasing boron concentration. The results on n-type silicon give new insight to the origin of the BO defect and question the existing models for the defect composition.

  3. Disruption of nigrostriatal and cerebellothalamic pathways in dopamine responsive Holmes' tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, S; Kasprian, G; Leutmezer, F; Prayer, D; Auff, E

    2009-08-01

    Holmes' tremor is an unusual combination of rest, postural and kinetic tremor of the extremities. Medical treatment of this condition still remains unsatisfactory. The case of a 20-year-old female patient is reported who developed right-sided Holmes' tremor 9 months after a left-sided, cavernoma induced midbrain/pontine haemorrhage at the age of 16 years. Beta-CIT single photon emission computed tomography revealed abolished dopamine transporter activity in the left basal ganglia and striatum, in accordance with missing ipsilateral tegmento-frontal connectivity (medial forebrain bundle), demonstrated by diffusion tensor MRI. Tractography showed reduced fibre connectivity of the superior and middle cerebellar peduncles on the lesioned side. Administration of pramipexole and L-DOPA led to a clinically significant reduction in tremor severity. In conclusion, our results support the notion that Holmes' tremor was a result of diminished striatal dopaminergic input in our patient.

  4. Evolution of Tremor's Tidal Sensitivity Through the Slow Slip Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, H.

    2014-12-01

    Solid Earth and ocean loading tides generate stresses that modulate slow slip and tremor on deep plate boundaries. Analysis of the influence of tidal stress on 35000 tremors located in a northern Cascadia region that ruptures repeatedly in M6.5 to 6.8 slow earthquakes has yielded several new findings (Houston, 2014, subm.). Tremor sensitivity to tidal stress is low for the first day or so of activity at a spot, but increases progressively over a few days of slip at that spot, constraining the pace of weakening during ETS. After the first day or so, sensitivity varies exponentially with stress. Consideration of an isotropic pore pressure model allows an in-situ estimate of intrinsic friction on the deep subduction interface, yielding values far below lab values (i.e., mu et al, 2010). Inter-ETS tremor groups of several months duration show some sensitivity to tidal stress, although not as much as tremor during the late portions of ETS. Interestingly, I see an evolution during the 12-15 month interval between major ETSs. In particular, tidal sensitivity increases moderately toward the end of the interval as the fault is reloaded and the next large ETS is imminent. First-order features are consistent with extension of the above-mentioned model of threshold failure strength versus stress. The concept is that during the inter-ETS period, strength rebuilds as the logarithm of time (e.g., Vidale et al, 1994) since the last major ETS, while average shear or Coulomb stress on the plate interface rebuilds roughly linearly due to plate convergence. Tidal stresses become more effective in triggering tremor later in the cycle as the linearly-growing stress approaches the logarithmically-growing strength. This approach illuminates the competition between healing on the plate interface and reloading with tectonic stress, and can help constrain healing rate and conditions on the deep subduction interface.

  5. Reduced order generalized integrators with phase compensation for three-phase active power filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Chuan; Li, Kai; Zhao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Current regulation is a critical issue for the stable operation of three-phase active power filters (APF). The challenge of the current controller lies in how to track the high slew rate reference with zero steady-state error in a fast and accurate way. Conventionally, multiple paralleled second-order...... generalized integrators (SOGIs) are utilized to achieve those objectives. However, it will increase the computational burden due to calculation of the multiple paralleled SOGIs. To overcome this issue, phase compensated reduced order generalized integrator (ROGI) is proposed in this paper. Compared...

  6. The complete frequency spectrum of physiological tremor can be recreated by broadband mechanical or electrical drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernooij, Carlijn Andrea; Lakie, Martin; Reynolds, Raymond Francis

    2015-01-15

    Two frequency peaks of variable preponderance have been reported for human physiological finger tremor. The high-frequency peak (20-25 Hz, seen only in postural tremor) is generally attributed to mechanical resonance, whereas the lower frequency peak (8-12 Hz, seen in both postural and kinetic tremor) is usually attributed to synchronous central or reflexive neural drive. In this study, we determine whether mechanical resonance could generate both peaks. In relaxed subjects, an artificial finger tremor was evoked by random mechanical perturbations of the middle finger or random electrical muscular stimulation of the finger extensor muscle. The high and the low frequencies observed in physiological tremor could both be created by either type of artificial input at appropriate input intensity. Resonance, inferred from cross-spectral gain and phase, occurred at both frequencies. To determine any neural contribution, we compared truly passive subjects with those who exhibited some electromyographic (EMG) activity in the finger extensor; artificially created tremor spectra were almost identical between groups. We also applied electrical stimuli to two clinically deafferented subjects lacking stretch reflexes. They exhibited the same artificial tremor spectrum as control subjects. These results suggest that both typical physiological finger tremor frequencies can be reproduced by random artificial input; neither requires synchronized neural input. We therefore suggest that mechanical resonance could generate both dominant frequency peaks characteristic of physiological finger tremor. The inverse relationship between the input intensity and the resulting tremor frequency can be explained by a movement-dependent reduction in muscle stiffness, a conjecture we support using a simple computational model.

  7. EVALUATING DEGREE OF ACTIVE POWER LOSSES REDUCTION IN THE ELECTRIC POWER LINES WITH REACTIVE POWER COMPENSATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Radkevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers evaluation procedure for the degree of active power losses reduction in the power transmission lines under 1 kV and 6–10 kV of the systems of electric power supply of industrial enterprises with compensating installations mounted at the side of the customer. The capacitor installations conform to the applied voltage level and factor in dielectric losses in the capacitors. The voltage at the compensating device terminal changes from 0.95 to 1.05 of the capacitors nominal voltage. The study did not account for reactive power losses in the line, nor did it for its charge capacity, conditioned by relative shortness of the cable lines generally operating in the mains of industrial enterprises. For this reason, the quantities of reactive power being consumed and generated by the transmission line are negligible and do not significantly affect the reactive power flux. The researchers obtain functional relations that allow estimating the degree of power loss reduction in the transmission line factoring in its explicit initial data. They perform mathematical analysis of the obtained functional relations and study the function by means of derivatives. The function extremum points are found as well as the intervals of its increment and decrement. A graphical research of the obtained functional relation is performed. It is ascertained that reduction of the active power losses is contingent on the line and the capacitor-installation engineering factors, the electrical energy consumer reactive load value as well as the voltage applied to the capacitor installation. The functional relations presented in the article can be employed in scoping calculation necessary for decision making on the reactive power compensation in systems of the industrial facilities electric power supply. Their account will allow a more accurate estimate of technical and economic effect of the capacitor bank installation in the electrical mains under 1 kV and 6

  8. Changes in physiological tremor associated with an epileptic seizure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duval Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Epileptic seizures are associated with motor, sensory, somatosensory or autonomic symptoms that have all been described in varying detail over the years. Of interest in the present report is a case of normal physiological tremor, which to date has never been evaluated prior to and during an epileptic seizure. In fact, there is only anecdotal mention of pre-ictal and ictal changes in clinically noticeable tremor in the literature. Case presentation Our patient was a left-handed, 27-year-old Caucasian woman diagnosed seven years previously with partial epileptic seizures, secondarily generalized. Physiological tremor was measured simultaneously on the index finger of both hands of our patient. Electromyography as well as heart rate and respiration were also monitored. A previously performed electroencephalography examination revealed abnormal oscillations focalized to the left primary somatosensory cortex. She was also diagnosed with left frontal neuronal heterotopias. We detected subclinical changes in tremor characteristics, such as amplitude, median power frequency and power dispersion, contralateral to the localization of epileptic activity. Tremor characteristics remained relatively steady ipsilateral to the localization of the epileptic activity. Conclusions Changes in physiological tremor characteristics should be considered as another possible pre-ictal or ictal manifestation. We propose that the network associated with physiological tremor might be more sensitive to abnormal oscillations generated within the central nervous system by epileptic activity from certain structures.

  9. Some aspects of the design of the ITER NBI Active Correction and Compensation Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Javier, E-mail: javier.alonso@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barrera, Germán; Cabrera, Santiago; Rincón, Esther; Ríos, Luis; Soleto, Alfonso [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); El-Ouazzani, Anass; Graceffa, Joseph; Shah, Darshan; Urbani, Marc [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Agarici, Gilbert [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3 – 07/08, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Water cooled coil design. • Magnetic shielding of the plasma heating Neutral Beam Injection System. • Active coils for magnetic field compensation. - Abstract: The neutral beam system for ITER consists of two heating and current drive injectors plus a diagnostic neutral beam injector. The proposed physical plant layout allows for a possible third heating injector to be installed later. For correct operation of the beam source, and to avoid deflections of the charged fraction of the beam, the magnetic field along the beam path must be very low. To minimize the stray ITER field in critical areas (ion source, acceleration grids, neutralizer, residual ion dump), a Magnetic Field Reduction System will envelop the beam vessels and the high voltage transmission lines to ion source. This whole system comprises the Passive Magnetic Shield, a set of thick steel plates, and the Active Correction and Compensation Coils, a set of coils carrying currents which depend on the tokamak stray field. This paper describes the status of the coil design, terminals and support structures, as well as a description of the calculations carried out. Most coils are suitable for removal from their final position to be replaced in case of a fault. Conclusions of the chosen design highlight the strategy for the system feasibility.

  10. Repeating deep tremors on the plate interface beneath Kyushu, southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Suguru; Ide, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    In the subduction zone south of Kyushu Island, at the western extension of the Nankai subduction zone, southwest Japan, the age of the oceanic crust increases toward the south across the subducting Kyushu-Palau ridge. While tremor activity is very high in Nankai, tectonic tremors have only recently been discovered in Kyushu. In this study, we examined tremors beneath Kyushu using an improved version of the envelope correlation method. In doing so, we distinguished tremors from normal earthquakes and background noise using the criteria of source duration and the spectrum ratio between low and high frequencies. Accurate measurement of S- P times, using cross-correlation between vertical and horizontal seismograms, constrains the tremor depth precisely. Tremor activity is low and within a small region in southern Kyushu, where thick crust of the Kyushu-Palau ridge is being subducted, at depths between 35 and 45 km (i.e., shallower than intra-slab earthquakes by about 20 km), which is consistent with the location of the plate interface within uncertainties proposed in previous studies. Establishing precise depth estimates for tectonic tremors beneath Kyushu, which results from shear slip along the plate interface, is useful in defining the plate interface within the Nankai subduction zone.

  11. Non-Volcanic Tremor Observed in Guerrero, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payero, J.; Kostoglodov, V.; Shapiro, N.; Mikumo, T.; Iglesias, A.; Perez, X.; Clayton, R.

    2007-12-01

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) activity is clearly identified as episodes of higher spectral amplitude in the range of 1-8 Hz in daily spectrograms from the continuous records at broad band seismic stations in the Guerrero state, Mexico. The analyzed data cover a period of 2001-2007 when in 2001-2002 a large slow slip event (SSE) had occurred in the Guerrero-Oaxaca region, and then followed by a steady-state interseismic epoch of 2003-2005 and a new large SSE occurred in 2006. The tremor signals in Mexico are very similar to those obtained in Cascadia subduction zone. An average tremor burst remains for 10-60 min and is dominated by S-waves. More than 100 strong NVT bursts were recorded by the most of the Meso-American Subduction Experiment (MASE 2005-2007) seismic stations with the majority of epicenters clustered in the narrow band of ~40 x 150 km2 to the south of Iguala city and in parallel to the coastline. Depths of NVT hypocenters are poorly constrained but mostly scattered in the continental crust between 5 and 45 km depth. Tremor activity is significantly higher during the 2001-2002 and 2006 SSE compared with that for the "quiet" period of 2003-2005. Very low NVT occurrence for the period of about 2 months right after the SSE is apparent in 2002 and 2006. Similar to the Japan and Cascadia subduction zones, the main tremor activity in Mexico develops in the area close to the mantle wedge. In Mexico it is located at approximately 200 km inland from the trench. While conductivity pattern obtained from the magnetotelluric profile in Guerrero does not correlate directly with the NVT distribution, gravity and magnetic anomalies modeling favors a hypothesis that the NVT is apparently related to the dehydration and serpentinization processes.

  12. Fuzzy variable structure algorithms for active queue management with delay compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the linearized model of the TCP connections through the congested routers, this paper puts forward an active queue management algorithm (FVS-T). The algorithm utilizes the fuzzy variable structure control algorithm with delay factor to compensate time varying round-trip times (RTT) and uncertainties with respect to the number of active TCP sessions. By analyzing the robustness and performance of the control scheme for the nonlinear TCP/AQM model, we show that the proposed design has good performance and robustness, which are central to the notion of AQM. Implementation issues were discussed and ns simulations were provided to validate the design and compare its performance to other peer schemes in different scenarios. The results show that the proposed design significantly outperforms the other congestion schemes in terms of packet loss ratio, throughput and buffer fluctuation.

  13. Model of Deep Non-Volcanic Tremor in Episodic Tremor and Slip Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenzon, N. I.; Bambakidis, G.

    2014-12-01

    Bursts of tremor accompany a moving slip pulse in Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. The sources of this non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are largely unknown. We have developed a model describing the mechanism of NTV generation. According to this model, NTV is a reflection of resonant-type oscillations excited in a fault at certain depth ranges. From a mathematical viewpoint, tremor (phonons) and slip pulses (solitons) are two different solutions of the sine-Gordon equation describing frictional processes inside a fault. In an ETS event, a moving slip pulse generates tremor due to interaction with structural heterogeneities in a fault and to failures of small asperities (see Figure). Observed tremor parameters, such as central frequency and frequency attenuation curve, are associated with fault parameters and conditions, such as elastic modulus, effective normal stress, penetration hardness and friction. Model prediction of NTV frequency content is consistent with observations. In the framework of this model it is possible to explain the complicated pattern of tremor migration, including rapid tremor propagation and reverse tremor migration. Migration along the strike direction is associated with movement of the slip pulse. Rapid tremor propagation in the slip-parallel direction is associated with movement of kinks along a 2D slip pulse. A slip pulse, pinned in some places, can fragment into several pulses, causing tremor associated with some of these pulse fragments to move opposite to the main propagation direction. The model predicts that the frequency content of tremor during an ETS event is slightly different from the frequency content of ambient tremor and tremor triggered by earthquakes. Figure 1. The slip velocity w of a slip pulse in time-space (x-t) coordinates moving in (a) ideal substrate and (b) substrate with a structural heterogeneity. Pulse is driven by constant external shear stress. Figure 1(b) shows that the pulse oscillates about an obstacle

  14. Augmented visual feedback counteracts the effects of surface muscular functional electrical stimulation on physiological tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Fernandez, Alfredo; Manto, Mario

    2013-09-24

    Recent studies suggest that surface muscular functional electrical stimulation (FES) might suppress neurological upper limb tremor. We assessed its effects on upper limb physiological tremor, which is mainly driven by mechanical-reflex oscillations. We investigated the interaction between FES and augmented visual feedback, since (a) most daily activities are performed using visual cues, and (b) augmented visual feedback exacerbates upper limb tremor. 10 healthy subjects (23.4 ± 7.7 years) performed 2 postural tasks with combinations of FES (4 sites; frequency of stimulation: 30 Hz; pulse width: 300 microsec; range of current delivered 10-34 mAmp) and augmented visual feedback. Spectral analysis of tremor showed a decrease of power spectral density to 62.18% (p = 0.01), of the integral in the 8-12 Hz frequency band to 57.67% (p = 0.003), and of tremor root mean square (RMS) to 57.16% (p = 0.002) during FES, without any changes in tremor frequency. Augmented visual feedback blocked the beneficial effect of FES, as confirmed by power spectral analysis (p = 0.01). We found a statistically significant interaction between augmented visual feedback and electrical stimulation (p = 0.039). Augmented visual feedback antagonizes the effects of FES on physiological tremor. The absence of changes of peak frequency argues against an effect of FES on mechanical properties of the upper limb.

  15. Multichannel feedforward control schemes with coupling compensation for active sound profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera-Sánchez, Jaime A.; Desmet, Wim; de Oliveira, Leopoldo P. R.

    2017-05-01

    Active sound profiling includes a number of control techniques that enables the equalization, rather than the mere reduction, of acoustic noise. Challenges may rise when trying to achieve distinct targeted sound profiles simultaneously at multiple locations, e.g., within a vehicle cabin. This paper introduces distributed multichannel control schemes for independently tailoring structural borne sound reaching a number of locations within a cavity. The proposed techniques address the cross interactions amongst feedforward active sound profiling units, which compensate for interferences of the primary sound at each location of interest by exchanging run-time data amongst the control units, while attaining the desired control targets. Computational complexity, convergence, and stability of the proposed multichannel schemes are examined in light of the physical system at which they are implemented. The tuning performance of the proposed algorithms is benchmarked with the centralized and pure-decentralized control schemes through computer simulations on a simplified numerical model, which has also been subjected to plant magnitude variations. Provided that the representation of the plant is accurate enough, the proposed multichannel control schemes have been shown as the only ones that properly deliver targeted active sound profiling tasks at each error sensor location. Experimental results in a 1:3-scaled vehicle mock-up further demonstrate that the proposed schemes are able to attain reductions of more than 60 dB upon periodic disturbances at a number of positions, while resolving cross-channel interferences. Moreover, when the sensor/actuator placement is found as defective at a given frequency, the inclusion of a regularization parameter in the cost function is seen to not hinder the proper operation of the proposed compensation schemes, at the time that it assures their stability, at the expense of losing control performance.

  16. Dynamics of tremor-related oscillations in the human globus pallidus: A single case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, José M.; Gray, Charles M.; Tamas, Laszlo B.; Sigvardt, Karen A.

    1999-01-01

    Physiological evidence indicates that the resting tremor of Parkinson’s disease originates in oscillatory neural activity in the forebrain, but it is unknown whether that activity is globally synchronized or consists of parallel, independently oscillating circuits. In the present study, we used dual microelectrodes to record tremor-related neuronal activity from eight sites in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) from an awake Parkinson’s disease patient undergoing stereotaxic pallidotomy. We utilized spectral analysis to evaluate the temporal correlations between multiunit activity at spatially separated sites and between neural and limb electromyographic activity. We observed that some GPi neural pairs oscillated synchronously at the tremor frequency, whereas other neural pairs oscillated independently. Additionally, we found that GPi tremor-related activity at a given site could fluctuate between states of synchronization and independence with respect to upper limb tremor. Consistent with this finding, some paired recording sites within GPi showed periods of transient synchronization. These observations support the hypothesis of independent tremor-generating circuits whose coupling can fluctuate over time. PMID:9990083

  17. Thalamic deep brain stimulation for the treatment of tremor due to multiple sclerosis: a prospective study of tremor and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Caglar; Carr, Jason; Sinden, Marci; Martzke, Jeff; Honey, Christopher R

    2002-10-01

    In several studies a significant reduction in tremor after thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been reported among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It has not been determined if this results in an improved quality of life. In this study the authors prospectively evaluated the effects of thalamic DBS on tremor and quality of life. Videotapes of the patients' tremor were made preoperatively and 2 and 12 months postoperatively, and tremor was scored by a neurologist blinded to the treatment. Patients were tested pre- and postoperatively to measure any changes in their reported ability to perform selected activities of daily living and in their health-related quality of life. Patients were asked to complete a questionnaire about their satisfaction with the surgery. Postoperative changes were examined using paired t-tests. There were significant reductions in postural, action, and overall tremor at 2 and 12 months postoperatively. The patients' reported ability to feed themselves was significantly improved 2 months after surgery (p = 0.01). There were short-term trends toward improvement in reported dressing ability, personal hygiene, and writing. There were no significant changes in the SF-36 subscales or total score. In this cohort of patients with MS who suffered from tremor, thalamic DBS significantly improved their tremor and ability to feed themselves. Patient satisfaction with the procedure, however, was variable. Preoperative patient education about what functions might (and might not) be improved is crucial to avoid unrealistic expectations. Our results indicate that younger patients with MS tremor who had a shorter disease duration and no superimposed ataxia benefited most from this surgery.

  18. Pain syndromes in competitive elite level female artistic gymnasts. Role of specific preventive-compensative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Mirca; Mirca, Marini; Sgambati, Eleonora; Eleonora, Sgambati; Barni, Edy; Edy, Barni; Piazza, Marina; Marina, Piazza; Monaci, Marco; Marco, Monaci

    2008-01-01

    The pain is a serious problem in advanced level female artistic gymnasts because it decreases the performance. The pain is due to the high numbers of hours spent in training sessions and may be associated to injuries that have relatively high incidence and severity in these athletes. We investigated the role of a preventive-compensative physical activity program, implemented in the warm-up and the cool-down session of standard training, in the prevention and reduction of the pain syndromes, evaluated in elite level young female artistic gymnasts. Thirty elite level female athletes, 10-14 years old, participated in this study and were followed for 12 weeks during the competition preparation period. Fifteen athletes were trained with preventive-compensative motory program implemented in the ordinary training (intervention group) and fifteen (control group) followed the standard training. All athletes completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding the pain intensity on the basis of a Visual Analogue Scale pre- and post- intervention. The experimental protocol consisted of three steps: the treatment of the shortened muscle chains according to Active Posture Reeducation method, the propriocettive-coordinative training with wobble board and the mobilization and stretching of back using fitball. Before intervention, the pain in practicing this sport was reported by 83% of all the athletes. The most common primary pain sites were the ankle and low back; the pain anatomical location was correlated to the training. After intervention, low back pain assessment showed a decrease of pain identified as mild (from 56% to 44%) or moderate (from 33% to 22%) and a disappearance of severe pain (from 11% to 0%). Ankle pain decreased and/or disappeared: the mild pain from 33% to 27%, moderate from 27% to 13% and severe from 13% to 0%. The pain analysis did not show different results in the control group. Our results indicated that the performed preventive-compensative training

  19. Active Head Motion Compensation of TMS Robotic System Using Neuro-Fuzzy Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Zakaria W.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS allows neuroscientist to study human brain behaviour and also become an important technique for changing the activity of brain neurons and the functions they sub serve. However, conventional manual procedure and robotized TMS are currently unable to precisely position the TMS coil because of unconstrained subject’s head movement and excessive contact force between the coil and subject’s head. This paper addressed this challenge by proposing an adaptive neuro-fuzzy force control to enable low contact force with a moving target surface. A learning and adaption mechanism is included in the control scheme to improve position disturbance estimation. The results show the ability of the proposed force control scheme to compensate subject’s head motions while maintaining desired contact force, thus allowing for more accurate and repeatable TMS procedures.

  20. Thermal analysis of HTS air-core transformer used in voltage compensation type active SFCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, M.; Tang, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, L.; Ren, L.

    2010-11-01

    The three-phase voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is composed of three HTS air-core transformers and a three-phase four-wire Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) converter. The primary winding of the each phase HTS air-core transformer is in series with the main system, and the second winding is connected with the PWM converter. The single-phase conduction-cooled HTS air-core transformer is consisting of four double-pancakes wound by the Bi2223/Ag tape. In this paper, according to the electromagnetic analysis on the single-phase HTS air-core transformer, its AC loss corresponding to different operation modes is calculated. Furthermore, the thermal behaviors are studied by the time-stepping numerical simulations. On the basis of the simulation results, the related problems with the HTS air-core transformer's thermal stability are discussed.

  1. COMPENSATED INVERSE PID CONTROLLER FOR ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL WITH PIEZOELECTRIC PATCHES: MODELING, SIMULATION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asan Gani

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Active vibration control of the first three modes of a vibrating cantilever beam using collocated piezoelectric sensor and actuator is examined in this paper. To achieve this, a model based on Euler-Bernoulli beam equation is adopted and extended to the case of three bonded piezoelectric patches that act as sensor, actuator and exciter respectively. A compensated inverse PID controller has been designed and developed to damp first three modes of vibration. Controllers have been designed for each mode and these are later combined in parallel to damp any of the three modes. Individual controller gives better reduction in sensor output for the second and third modes while the combined controller performs better for the first mode. Simulation studies are carried out using MATLAB. These results are compared and verified experimentally and the real-time implementation is carried out with xPC-target toolbox in MATLAB

  2. Compensating active power imbalances in power system with large-scale wind power penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basit, Abdul; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Altin, Müfit

    2016-01-01

    penetration. This paper evaluates the impact oflarge-scale wind power integration on future power systems.An active power balance control methodology is usedfor compensating the power imbalances between thedemand and the generation in real time, caused by windpower forecast errors. The methodology......Large-scale wind power penetration can affectthe supply continuity in the power system. This is a matterof high priority to investigate, as more regulating reservesand specified control strategies for generation control arerequired in the future power system with even more highwind power...... for the balancepower control of future power systems with large-scalewind power integration is described and exemplified consideringthe generation and power exchange capacities in2020 for Danish power system....

  3. Manipulator Design and Operation for a Six-Degree-of-Freedom Handheld Tremor-Canceling Microsurgical Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungwook; MacLachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the design and actuation of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) manipulator for a handheld instrument, known as "Micron," which performs active tremor compensation during microsurgery. The design incorporates a Gough-Stewart platform based on piezoelectric linear motor, with a specified minimum workspace of a cylinder 4 mm long and 4 mm in diameter at the end-effector. Given the stall force of the motors and the loading typically encountered in vitreoretinal microsurgery, the dimensions of the manipulator are optimized to tolerate a transverse load of 0.2 N on a remote center of motion near the midpoint of the tool shaft. The optimization yields a base diameter of 23 mm and a height of 37 mm. The fully handheld instrument includes a custom-built optical tracking system for control feedback, and an ergonomic housing to serve as a handle. The manipulation performance was investigated in both clamped and handheld conditions. In positioning experiments with varying side loads, the manipulator tolerates side load up to 0.25 N while tracking a sinusoidal target trajectory with less than 20 μm error. Physiological hand tremor is reduced by about 90% in a pointing task, and error less than 25 μm is achieved in handheld circle-tracing.

  4. TYPES OF TREMOR IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES AND CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov Igor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tremor can occur as a part of the clinical feature of cerebrovascular diseases. Many patients with cerebral stroke have cardiovascular diseases as a comorbidity or complication of stroke; sometimes cardiovascular events can lead to embolic stroke. Aim: To present types of tremor in patients with cerebrovascular diseases and cardiovascular events and diabetes mellitus type 2, clinical characteristics of tremor and investigations used. Material and methods: In our study we included 36 patients, 24 men and 12 women, that were examined and followed for 3 years, from 2012-2015. All patients were subjected to the following investigations: neurological examination, laboratory analysis, computerized tomography of brain, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography. In cardiovascular patients we also performed Doppler sonography of carotid arteries, electrocardiography, cardiac ultrasound. The patients were examined and treated by cardiologists. Results: Of all patients 22% had cerebral infarction, 41% atherosclerosis, 36% multiple lacunar infarctions and 28% diabetes mellitus type 2. Three patients with cerebral infarction had chorea, hemiballismus, dystonia and dystonic tremor, three had postural tremor and two cerebellar intention tremor. Atherosclerotic patients had atherosclerotic action tremor, while diabetic patients predominantly presented with action-type tremor. Electroencephalography showed irritative basic brain activity with slow waves, while carotid arteries stenosis was diagnosed by Doppler sonography. Computerized tomography of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging revealed cerebrovascular diseases in certain areas. Patients with cardiomyopathy, rhythm disorders, high blood pressure, hyperlipidemia was investigated and medically treated by a cardiologist. Conclusion: In cerebrovascular diseases different types of tremor can occur as the result of the damage of the extrapyramidal system.

  5. EFFECTS OF WRIST WEIGHING IN REDUCING UPPER LIMB TREMORS IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBELLAR LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Priya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: An intentional tremor is one of the most untreated causes in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Upper limb tremors decreases the performance of many activities of daily life Thus treatment of patients with tremor probably implies better functional ability. It is one of the major areas of concern to improve functional independence hence, this study proposed to know the effects of wrist weighing in reducing upper limb tremors in cerebellar injury patients. Materials and Methods: A total number of 21 patients with various abnormalities of cerebellum were selected depending on selection criteria. These patients were randomly divided into two groups. One group was treated with wrist weighing by using Velcro weight cuffs for 15 minutes along with conventional physiotherapy for 5 days a week for 2 months & other group is treated with conventional physiotherapy for 5 days in a week for 2 months. The objectives were tested by using tremor rating scale and nine hole peg test. The values are collected before and after the treatment Results: In the group treated with wrist weighing the improvement in the tremor rating scale is very significant (p: 0.0001 and in nine hole peg test is extremely significant (p: 0.0001. In conventional therapy group the improvement in the tremor rating scale is not significant (p: 0.0051 and in nine hole peg test is very significant (p: 0.0002. Conclusion: Incorporation of wrist weighing along with conventional therapy reduced the intensity of upper limb tremors in patients with cerebellar injuries but both the treatments are effective in improving upper limb functions. KEY WORDS: Intentional tremor, Rehabilitation, Wrist weighing

  6. Beta-adrenergic modulation of tremor and corticomuscular coherence in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Baker

    Full Text Available Coherence between the bioelectric activity of sensorimotor cortex and contralateral muscles can be observed around 20 Hz. By contrast, physiological tremor has a dominant frequency around 10 Hz. Although tremor has multiple sources, it is partly central in origin, reflecting a component of motoneuron discharge at this frequency. The motoneuron response to ~20 Hz descending input could be altered by non-linear interactions with ~10 Hz motoneuron firing. We investigated this further in eight healthy human subjects by testing the effects of the beta-adrenergic agents propranolol (non-selective β-antagonist and salbutamol (β(2-agonist, which are known to alter the size of physiological tremor. Corticomuscular coherence was assessed during an auxotonic precision grip task; tremor was quantified using accelerometry during index finger extension. Experiments with propranolol used a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. A single oral dose of propranolol (40 mg significantly increased beta band (15.3-32.2 Hz corticomuscular coherence compared with placebo, but reduced tremor in the 6.2-11.9 Hz range. Salbutamol (2.5 mg was administered by inhalation. Whilst salbutamol significantly increased tremor amplitude as expected, it did not change corticomuscular coherence. The opposite direction of the effects of propranolol on corticomuscular coherence and tremor, and the fact that salbutamol enhances tremor but does not affect coherence, implies that the magnitude of corticomuscular coherence is little influenced by non-linear interactions with 10 Hz oscillations in motoneurons or the periphery. Instead, we suggest that propranolol and salbutamol may affect both tremor and corticomuscular coherence partly via a central site of action.

  7. Sweet Spot Tremor Triggered by Intraslab Earthquakes in the Nankai Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, C.; Obara, K.; Peng, Z.; Chao, K.; Maeda, T.

    2014-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor has been observed at several major plate-bounding faults around the Pacific Rim. Tremor­ in these regions can be triggered by small stresses arising from solid earth tides as well as passing seismic waves of large, distant earthquakes. While large, distant earthquakes are capable of repeatedly triggering tremor in the same region (i.e., a sweet spot), it is less understood how intraslab earthquakes interact with sweet spot tremor areas. We conduct a systematic survey of tremor triggered in the Nankai subduction zone by intraslab earthquakes to better understand what governs fault slip along the Eurasian-Philippine Sea Plate boundary. We examine 3 tremor sweet spots in the Nankai subduction zone: Shikoku West, Kii North, and Tokai. In each region, we select earthquakes from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) catalog that occur from mid-2009 to mid-2014 with magnitude (M) greater than 2, that occur within the down-going Philippine Sea Plate, and within a 300 km epicentral distance of the sweet spot region. Using these selection criteria, we obtain ~1,200 earthquakes in each region. We examine a tremor catalog immediately before and after these local events as well as visually inspect filtered waveforms from short-period Hi-net seismic stations surrounding the sweet spot areas to identify additional tremor signals. From our initial analysis, we have identified 18 clear cases of increased tremor activity immediately following intraslab earthquakes in Shikoku West, most of which occur down-dip of the Shikoku West sweet spot. In comparison, we have identified only 5 triggering earthquakes in Kii North, and our investigation at Tokai is still ongoing. Our results so far are in agreement with triggering susceptibility being dependent upon background activity rates, as has been suggested for remote triggering of microearthquakes in geothermal regions by large, distant earthquakes as well as for remotely triggered tremor in the Nankai subduction zone

  8. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  9. Feasibility study of spectral pattern recognition reveals distinct classes of volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unglert, K.; Jellinek, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    characteristics such as magma viscosity, storage depths, and the physical properties of volcanic edifices. Similarities among the spectral patterns detected at stations 4km and 8-10km distance from the centers of volcanic activity, respectively, indicate that path effects do not strongly influence spectral shapes at distances of a few kilometers from the inferred source of the signals. Our preliminary work shows that a global comparison of tremor is feasible. Our results suggest that further work on data from a larger sample and diverse range of volcano types will reveal additional classes of tremor signals and plausibly identify fingerprints of source processes that are specific to volcano type, but independent of volcano location.

  10. Complex behavior and source model of the tremor at Arenal volcano, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Philippe; Mora, Mauricio M.; Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Pacheco, Javier; Métaxian, Jean-Philippe

    2006-09-01

    related to variations of the pressure in the conduit, which modify the gas fraction, the wave velocity and, possibly, the length of the resonator. Moreover, several observations suggest that two seismic sources, associated with two magmatic conduits, are active in Arenal volcano. They could explain in particular the apparent independence of tremor and explosions and the episodes of tremor displaying two simultaneous systems of spectral peaks.

  11. Electrophysiologic characteristics of tremor in Parkinson?s disease and essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ederson Cichaczewski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tremor in essential tremor (ET and Parkinson’s disease (PD usually present specific electrophysiologic profiles, however amplitude and frequency may have wide variations. Objective: To present the electrophysiologic findings in PD and ET. Method: Patients were assessed at rest, with posture and action. Seventeen patients with ET and 62 with PD were included. PD cases were clustered into three groups: predominant rest tremor; tremor with similar intensity at rest, posture and during kinetic task; and predominant kinetic tremor. Results: Patients with PD presented tremors with average frequency of 5.29±1.18 Hz at rest, 5.79±1.39 Hz with posture and 6.48±1.34 Hz with the kinetic task. Tremor in ET presented with an average frequency of 5.97±1.1 Hz at rest, 6.18±1 Hz with posture and 6.53±1.2 Hz with kinetic task. Seven (41.2% also showed rest tremor. Conclusion: The tremor analysis alone using the methodology described here, is not sufficient to differentiate tremor in ET and PD.

  12. Active toroidal field ripple compensation and MHD feedback control coils in FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramogida, G., E-mail: giuseppe.ramogida@enea.it [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Calabrò, G.; Cocilovo, V.; Crescenzi, F.; Crisanti, F.; Cucchiaro, A. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Di Gironimo, G. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Fresa, R. [Università della Basilicata, Via Nazario Sauro 85, I-85100 Potenza (Italy); Fusco, V. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Martin, P. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Mastrostefano, S. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – DIEI Università di Cassino, Via Di Biasio 43, I-03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Mozzillo, R. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Nuzzolese, F. [Università della Basilicata, Via Nazario Sauro 85, I-85100 Potenza (Italy); Renno, F. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Rita, C. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Villone, F. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – DIEI Università di Cassino, Via Di Biasio 43, I-03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Vlad, G. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Active Ripple Compensating System (ARCS) consists of 18 off-centre poloidal coils between plasma and Toroidal Field Coils. ► The current in ARCS, adjustable and opposite to that in TFC, reduces the toroidal ripple below 0.2% at any toroidal fields. ► Feedback Active Control System (FACS) consists of two arrays of 9 in-vessel saddle coils fed by an MHD feedback controller. ► FACS allows robust feedback stabilization of low toroidal number MHD modes enabling plasma operations at low safety factor. ► ARCS and FACS are included in the whole FAST model and first engineering assessments show their feasibility and capability. -- Abstract: The Fusion Advanced Study Torus (FAST) has been proposed as a high magnetic field, compact size tokamak providing a flexible integrated environment to study physics and technology issues in ITER and DEMO relevant conditions. FAST has a quite large natural toroidal field ripple (around 1.5%) due to its compactness and to the number of access ports: this ripple must be lowered to an acceptable level to allow safe operations and a good confinement quality. An Active Ripple Compensating System (ARCS) has been designed, based on a set of poloidal coils placed between the plasma chamber and the Toroidal Field Coils (TFCs). These ARCS coils will be fed with adjustable currents, opposite in direction respect to the TFC currents, and will allow lowering the ripple up to zero and beyond. The CAD model of FAST including the ARCS coils has been completed and preliminary electromagnetic and thermal analyses have been carried out. Moreover, a Feedback Active Control System (FACS) composed of two arrays of in-vessel saddle coils has been designed to allow safe high plasma current, low safety factor operation and to mitigate possibly large ELMs effects in FAST. These FACS coils will be fed by a feedback system to control MHD modes: a first engineering assessment of the current requirements has been carried out.

  13. New hybrid active power filter for harmonic current suppression and reactive power compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biricik, Samet; Cemal Ozerdem, Ozgur; Redif, Soydan; Sezai Dincer, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In the case of undistorted and balanced grid voltages, low ratio shunt active power filters (APFs) can give unity power factors and achieve current harmonic cancellation. However, this is not possible when source voltages are distorted and unbalanced. In this study, the cost-effective hybrid active power filter (HAPF) topology for satisfying the requirements of harmonic current suppression and non-active power compensation for industry is presented. An effective strategy is developed to observe the effect of the placement of power capacitors and LC filters with the shunt APF. A new method for alleviating the negative effects of a nonideal grid voltage is proposed that uses a self-tuning filter algorithm with instantaneous reactive power theory. The real-time control of the studied system was achieved with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture, which was developed using the OPAL-RT system. The performance result of the proposed HAPF system is tested and presented under nonideal supply voltage conditions.

  14. Precise tremor source locations and amplitude variations along the lower-crustal central San Andreas Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2010-01-01

    We precisely locate 88 tremor families along the central San Andreas Fault using a 3D velocity model and numerous P and S wave arrival times estimated from seismogram stacks of up to 400 events per tremor family. Maximum tremor amplitudes vary along the fault by at least a factor of 7, with by far the strongest sources along a 25 km section of the fault southeast of Parkfield. We also identify many weaker tremor families, which have largely escaped prior detection. Together, these sources extend 150 km along the fault, beneath creeping, transitional, and locked sections of the upper crustal fault. Depths are mostly between 18 and 28 km, in the lower crust. Epicenters are concentrated within 3 km of the surface trace, implying a nearly vertical fault. A prominent gap in detectible activity is located directly beneath the region of maximum slip in the 2004 magnitude 6.0 Parkfield earthquake.

  15. Geophysics. Migrating tremor off southern Kyushu as evidence for slow slip of a shallow subduction interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Y; Yakiwara, H; Asano, Y; Shimizu, H; Uchida, K; Hirano, S; Umakoshi, K; Miyamachi, H; Nakamoto, M; Fukui, M; Kamizono, M; Kanehara, H; Yamada, T; Shinohara, M; Obara, K

    2015-05-08

    Detection of shallow slow earthquakes offers insight into the near-trench part of the subduction interface, an important region in the development of great earthquake ruptures and tsunami generation. Ocean-bottom monitoring of offshore seismicity off southern Kyushu, Japan, recorded a complete episode of low-frequency tremor, lasting for 1 month, that was associated with very-low-frequency earthquake (VLFE) activity in the shallow plate interface. The shallow tremor episode exhibited two migration modes reminiscent of deep tremor down-dip of the seismogenic zone in some other subduction zones: a large-scale slower propagation mode and a rapid reversal mode. These similarities in migration properties and the association with VLFEs strongly suggest that both the shallow and deep tremor and VLFE may be triggered by the migration of episodic slow slip events.

  16. Detailed Tremor Migration Styles in Guerrero, Mexico Imaged with Cross-station Cross-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y.; Rubin, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tremor occurred downdip of the area that slipped the most during the 2006 slow slip event (SSE) in Guerrero, Mexico, as opposed to Cascadia, where tremor locations and rupture zones of SSEs largely overlap. Here we obtain high resolution tremor locations by applying cross-station cross-correlations [Armbruster et al., 2014] to seismic data from the Meso-America Subduction Experiment deployment. A few 3-station detectors are adopted to capture detailed deformation styles in the tremor "transient zone" and the downdip "sweet spot" as defined in Frank et al., 2014. Similar to Cascadia, tremor activities in our study region were comprised mostly of short tremor bursts lasting minutes to hours. Many of these bursts show clear migration patterns with propagation velocities of hundreds of km/day, comparable to those in Cascadia. However, the propagation of the main tremor front was often not in a simple unilateral fashion. Before the 2006 SSE, we observe 4 large tremor episodes during which both the transient zone and the sweet spot participated, consistent with previous findings [Frank et al., 2014]. The transient zone usually became active a few days after the sweet spot. We find many along-dip migrations with recurrence intervals of about a half day within a region about 10 km along strike and 35 km along dip in the sweet spot, suggesting possible tidal modulation, after the main front moved beyond this region. These migrations appear not to originate at the main front, in contrast to tremor migrations from a few km to tens of km across observed in Cascadia [Rubin and Armbruster, 2013; Peng et al., 2015; Peng and Rubin, submitted], but possibly similar to Shikoku, Japan [Shelly et al., 2007]. We do not observe obvious half-day periodicity for the migrations farther downdip within the sweet spot. During the SSE, the recurrence interval of tremor episodes decreased significantly in both the transient zone and the sweet spot, with that of the former being much shorter

  17. Less wiring, more firing: Low-performing older adults compensate for impaired white matter with greater neural activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daselaar, S.M.; Iyengar, V.; Davis, S.W.; Eklund, K.; Hayes, S.M.; Cabeza, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reliable neuroimaging finding that older adults often show greater activity (over-recruitment) than younger adults is typically attributed to compensation. Yet, the neural mechanisms of over-recruitment in older adults (OAs) are largely unknown. Rodent electrophysiology studies have shown that

  18. Active Speed Compensation Method of Direct Torque Control System and Stability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing characteristics of the DTC (direct torque control system in electrical driving system, a shortcoming of the classical DTC method is to point out that it is unable to decouple the mutual interference between torque and speed, so that when a running asynchronous motor subjected to an instantaneous impact load, rotor speed and its deviation appears excessive fluctuations that can not be quickly restored to the initial set value. In this research, under conditions that without sensors for measuring load torque and rotor speed, to an electrical drive systems contains DTC devices, a novel ASCC (active speed compensation control method is proposed based on ADRC (active disturbance rejection control theory, on account of DTC model of asynchronous motor, a multiobjective observer is designed to regulate both the speed and the torque, and a proof of asymptotic stability that related this new control systems with the observer is made by theoretical deduction. Finally stimulating results show that this method can overcome the shortcomings of classical DTC system and greatly enhance the ability of the high-speed driving system to deal with unexpected impact loads.

  19. Model of deep non-volcanic tremor part II: episodic tremor and slip

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I

    2014-01-01

    Bursts of tremor accompany a moving slip pulse in Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events. The sources of this non-volcanic tremor (NVT) are largely unknown. We have developed a model describing the mechanism of NTV generation. According to this model, NTV is a reflection of resonant-type oscillations excited in a fault at certain depth ranges. From a mathematical viewpoint, tremor (phonons) and slip pulses (solitons) are two different solutions of the sine-Gordon equation describing frictional processes inside a fault. In an ETS event, a moving slip pulse generates tremor due to interaction with structural heterogeneities in a fault and to failures of small asperities. Observed tremor parameters, such as central frequency and frequency attenuation curve, are associated with fault parameters and conditions, such as elastic modulus, effective normal stress, penetration hardness and friction. Model prediction of NTV frequency content is consistent with observations. In the framework of this model it is possible t...

  20. Quantification of a Secondary Task-Specific Tremor in a Violinist after a Temporal Lobectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eLee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Task-specific tremors occur mainly during certain tasks and may be highly disabling. In this case study, we report on a 66-year-old violinist who developed a task-specific tremor of the right arm only while playing the violin four weeks after a temporal lobectomy, which had been performed as a result of his temporal lobe epilepsy. Since a similar case, to our knowledge, has not been reported so far, our aim was to quantitatively assess and describe the tremor by measuring (a the electromyography (EMG activity of the wrist flexor and extensor as well as (b an accelerometer signal of the hand. We found a tremor-related frequency of about 7 Hz. Furthermore, at a similar frequency of about 7 Hz, there was coherence between the tremor acceleration and EMG-activity of the wrist flexor and extensor as well as between the tremor acceleration and coactivation. The tremorgenesis remains unclear, and possible explanations can only be speculative.

  1. Subthalamic and Cortical Local Field Potentials Associated with Pilocarpine-Induced Oral Tremor in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lauren L; Podurgiel, Samantha J; Haque, Aileen F; Errante, Emily L; Chrobak, James J; Salamone, John D

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) are rapid vertical deflections of the lower jaw that resemble chewing but are not directed at any particular stimulus. In rodents, TJMs are induced by neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including neurotoxic or pharmacological depletion of striatal dopamine (DA), DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration. Moreover, TJMs in rodents can be attenuated by antiparkinsonian agents, including levodopa (L-DOPA), DA agonists, muscarinic antagonists, and adenosine A2A antagonists. In human Parkinsonian patients, exaggerated physiological synchrony is seen in the beta frequency band in various parts of the cortical/basal ganglia/thalamic circuitry, and activity in the tremor frequency range (3-7 Hz) also has been recorded. The present studies were undertaken to determine if tremor-related local field potential (LFP) activity could be recorded from motor cortex (M1) or subthalamic nucleus (STN) during the TJMs induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, which is a well-known tremorogenic agent. Pilocarpine induced a robust TJM response that was marked by rhythmic electromyographic (EMG) activity in the temporalis muscle. Compared to periods with no tremor activity, TJM epochs were characterized by increased LFP activity in the tremor frequency range in both neocortex and STN. Tremor activity was not associated with increased synchrony in the beta frequency band. These studies identified tremor-related LFP activity in parts of the cortical/basal ganglia circuitry that are involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinsonism. This research may ultimately lead to identification of the oscillatory neural mechanisms involved in the generation of tremulous activity, and promote development of novel treatments for tremor disorders.

  2. Volcanic tremors and magma wagging: gas flux interactions and forcing mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Jellinek, A. Mark; Michaut, Chloé; Roman, Diana C.; Morse, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Volcanic tremor is an important precursor to explosive eruptions and is ubiquitous across most silicic volcanic systems. Oscillations can persist for days and occur in a remarkably narrow frequency band (i.e. 0.5-7 Hz). The recently proposed magma-wagging model of Jellinek & Bercovici provides a basic explanation for the emergence and frequency evolution of tremor that is consistent with observations of many active silicic and andesitic volcanic systems. This model builds on work suggesting that the magma column rising in the volcanic conduit is surrounded by a permeable vesicular annulus of sheared bubbles. The magma-wagging model stipulates that the magma column rattles within the spring like foam of the annulus, and predicts oscillations at the range of observed tremor frequencies for a wide variety of volcanic environments. However, the viscous resistance of the magma column attenuates the oscillations and thus a forcing mechanism is required. Here we provide further development of the magma-wagging model and demonstrate that it implicitly has the requisite forcing to excite wagging behaviour. In particular, the extended model allows for gas flux through the annulus, which interacts with the wagging displacements and induces a Bernoulli effect that amplifies the oscillations. This effect leads to an instability involving growing oscillations at the lower end of the tremor frequency spectrum, and that drives the system against viscous damping of the wagging magma column. The fully non-linear model displays tremor oscillations associated with pulses in gas flux, analogous to observations of audible `chugging'. These oscillations also occur in clusters or envelopes that are consistent with observations of sporadic tremor envelopes. The wagging model further accurately predicts that seismic signals on opposite sides of a volcano are out of phase by approximately half a wagging or tremor period. Finally, peaks in gas flux occur at the end of the growing instability

  3. Beeinflussung des Essentiellen Tremors und des Tremors beim Morbus Parkinson durch transkranielle Gleichstromstimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hellriegel, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Ziel dieser Arbeit war es die Rolle des primärmotorischen Kortex bei der Entstehung und Weiterleitung des Essentiellen Tremors und des Tremors beim Morbus Parkinson zu untersuchen. Hierzu wurde eine transkranielle Gleichstromstimulation über dem primärmotorischen Kortex bei Patienten mit oben genannten Tremorsyndromen durchgeführt und die klinischen sowie elektrophysiologisch messbaren Änderungen des Tremors beurteilt.

  4. Voltage Unbalance and Harmonic Compensation in Microgrids by Cooperation of Distributed Generators and Active Power Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashempour, Mohammad M.; Savaghebi, Mehdi; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2016-01-01

    , selective virtual impedance and voltage/current regulators. Based on the secondary control, at first voltage harmonic compensation and voltage unbalance compensation of point of common coupling (PCC), that might includes sensitive loads, is carried out by DGs. Voltage compensation of PCC by DGs may cause...... severe voltage distortion at DGs terminals. Thus, the coordinated control is used to mitigate the voltage distortion to the defined maximum allowable value at DGs terminals. Evaluation of the proposed hierarchical control is carried out by a simulation study....

  5. Relationship between resting and action tremors in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the relationship between resting tremor (RT and action tremor (AT in Parkinson's disease (PD patients. Methods: A retrospective study of RT and AT severity was conducted in 100 PD patients. The severity rating for each type of tremor in the upper extremities was assessed. The disparity in tremor severity between extremities for each tremor type was compared to that of the other two to identify commonalities in the laterality of the tremor manifestation. Results: Overall, RT is predictive of AT on the same side, but not the opposing side of the body. Patients with less intense resting right upper limb (RRU tremor and moderately intense RRU tremor were significantly more likely to have an action right upper limb (ARU tremor (−1.53, P = 0.020; −1.88, P = 0.005, respectively. Similarly, patients with less intense resting left upper limb (RLU tremor and moderately intense RLU tremors were significantly more likely to have an action left upper limb (ALU tremor (−3.49, P = 0.000; −1.86, P = 0.017, respectively. In addition, RRU and ALU tremors were associated with an increase in RLU and ARU tremors, respectively. Conclusion: Tremors are common findings in PD patients, and often impair quality of life. By identifying and classifying the relationship between resting and ATs in PD patients, our study sheds light onto the importance of better understanding and future management of this debilitating symptomology.

  6. Neural networks and dynamical system techniques for volcanic tremor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Carniel

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A volcano can be seen as a dynamical system, the number of state variables being its dimension N. The state is usually confined on a manifold with a lower dimension f, manifold which is characteristic of a persistent «structural configuration». A change in this manifold may be a hint that something is happening to the dynamics of the volcano, possibly leading to a paroxysmal phase. In this work the original state space of the volcano dynamical system is substituted by a pseudo state space reconstructed by the method of time-delayed coordinates, with suitably chosen lag time and embedding dimension, from experimental time series of seismic activity, i.e. volcanic tremor recorded at Stromboli volcano. The monitoring is done by a neural network which first learns the dynamics of the persistent tremor and then tries to detect structural changes in its behaviour.

  7. Long-distance induced tremor observed off western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-05-01

    Using seismic observations made near the Queen Charlotte Margin (QCM), a seismically active region off the western coast of Canada, Aiken et al. add to the growing body of research on how large earthquakes can cause tectonic plates to slip half way around the world. Reaching north from the intersection of the Juan de Fuca ridge, the Cascadia subduction zone, and the Queen Charlotte Fault, QCM underlies the islands of Haida Gwaii and was the site of a magnitude 7.7 earthquake in October 2012. Drawing on seismic readings collected from 1990 to 2012 and using a database of major worldwide earthquakes, the authors identified three earthquakes that induced tremors in QCM: the 2002 magnitude 7.9 Denali earthquake, the 2004 magnitude 9.2 Sumatra quake, and the 2011 magnitude 9.1 Tohoku earthquake. The authors observed the induction not of conventional earthquakes but of deep tectonic tremors, slips of tectonic plates with epicenters located far beneath the surface.

  8. Tidal sensitivity of tectonic tremors in Nankai and Cascadia subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Suguru; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Houston, Heidi; Ide, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Tectonic tremors in subduction zones, which result from slip at the deep plate interface, are known to exhibit a 12.4 h periodicity in their activity, due to tidal influence. Because tidal stress can be calculated quantitatively, the response of the plate interface can yield quantitative information about its frictional property. The relation between tremor rate and tidal stress is investigated, and an exponential relation is widely confirmed, as observed by previous studies. This study particularly focuses on spatial variations of tidal sensitivity, which are compared with spatial variations of tremor duration and amplitude. The sensitivity is quantitatively defined by the exponent of the exponential relation, which can be related to the parameter aσ, or (a - b)σ in the rate-and-state friction law, where σ is effective normal stress. On the shallower tremor zone, short-duration and large-amplitude tremors occur followed by more sensitive tremors. Meanwhile, deeper tremors with longer duration and smaller amplitude show lower sensitivity, although along-strike variation also exists. Typical and maximum sensitivities estimated here imply values for aσ or (a - b)σ of about 3 and 1 kPa, respectively. These correlations are consistent with a model in which the plate interface consists of a velocity-strengthening background with embedded velocity-weakening regions. The frictional heterogeneity may be statistically characterized by cluster size and density of the velocity-weakening regions and controls the overall slip behavior. The observed depth dependency of tremor duration, amplitude, and sensitivity implies that frictional heterogeneity is controlled by physical quantities varying with depth, such as temperature or fluid amount.

  9. Balance in essential tremor during tandem gait: is the first mis-step an important finding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, N; Sahin, S; Okluoglu Onay, T; Karsidag, S

    2013-10-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is the most commonly diagnosed movement disorder. ET may cause substantial loss of motor skills and balance with advanced age. We compared abnormalities in tandem gait with daily activity and Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale (FTMTRS) scores in 90 ET patients. All patients performed a 15-step tandem three times. The mean of first mis-steps was accepted as the tandem index (TI). The mean age was 61.4 ± 17 years; the mean duration of tremor was 6.7 ± 4 years; and there were 36 men and 54 women. There was no significant difference for age or sex between patients and controls. Head (24.6%), jaw (5.5%), voice (11%), and tongue tremors (1.5%) were identified in ET patients. Rest (2.5%), postural (95%), and kinetic tremors (54%) were detected in the upper extremities. Postural tremor was found in the lower extremities of 5%. The mean TI was 8.3 ± 4 (median, 8) in ET patients, and 10.6 ± 3.9 (median, 10) in controls (p=0.04). Correlation analysis of TI and FTMTRS scores showed tandem gait was significantly correlated with age, total tremor score, postural and kinetic extremity tremor, writing, drawing, pouring, feeding, and working scores. Linear regression showed a significant effect of age and FTMTRS score on TI. The decrease in balance control is apparent with advancing age. Balance disorders were more pronounced in ET patients. Although first mis-step in tandem gait is not as detailed as dynamic balance tests, it can be a simple method for detecting balance disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Surface-wave potential for triggering tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor-corrected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Source processes commonly posed to explain instances of remote dynamic triggering of tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor by surface waves include frictional failure and various modes of fluid activation. The relative potential for Love- and Rayleigh-wave dynamic stresses to trigger tectonic tremor through failure on critically stressed thrust and vertical strike-slip faults under the Coulomb-Griffith failure criteria as a function of incidence angle are anticorrelated over the 15- to 30-km-depth range that hosts tectonic tremor. Love-wave potential is high for strike-parallel incidence on low-angle reverse faults and null for strike-normal incidence; the opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. Love-wave potential is high for both strike-parallel and strike-normal incidence on vertical, strike-slip faults and minimal for ~45° incidence angles. The opposite holds for Rayleigh waves. This pattern is consistent with documented instances of tremor triggered by Love waves incident on the Cascadia megathrust and the San Andreas fault (SAF) in central California resulting from shear failure on weak faults (apparent friction is μ* ≤ 0:2). Documented instances of tremor triggered by surface waves with strike-parallel incidence along the Nankai megathrust beneath Shikoku, Japan, however, are associated primarily with Rayleigh waves. This is consistent with the tremor bursts resulting from mixed-mode failure (crack opening and shear failure) facilitated by near-lithostatic ambient pore pressure, low differential stress, with a moderate friction coefficient (μ ~ 0:6) on the Nankai subduction interface. Rayleigh-wave dilatational stress is relatively weak at tectonic tremor source depths and seems unlikely to contribute significantly to the triggering process, except perhaps for an indirect role on the SAF in sustaining tremor into the Rayleigh-wave coda that was initially triggered by Love waves.

  11. Northern Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip: A Decade of Observations from 1997 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, H.; Shan, S.; Dragert, H.; Rogers, G.; Ito, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic and GPS records collected in the last decade (1997-2007) to establish the most comprehensive observational basis for northern Cascadia episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events. A simple ¡§ETS scale¡¨ system, using a combination of a letter and a digit, is proposed to quantitatively characterize the spatial and temporal dimensions of ETS events. Clear correlation between GPS and tremor signals is observed for all major episodes with lateral dimension >150 km (i.e., A- or B-class), but the GPS signature is less obvious for minor ones. Regular ETS recurrence can be established only for A-/B-class episodes in southern Vancouver Island. Halting and jumping are very common in ETS migration patterns, and along-strike migration can happen in both directions. A prominent tremor gap is observed in mid island around 49.5N. This gap coincides with the epicenters of the only two large documented crustal earthquakes in the region. ETS tremors also tend to occur in places where the local seismicity is relatively sparse. The tremor depth distribution shows a peak in the 25-35 km range where strong seismic reflectors (i.e., the E- layer) are documented. Existence of tremors in the vicinity of E-layer is also confirmed by an independent waveform analysis. More significantly, we have found a few very-low-frequency earthquakes (VLFE) at the depth of E-layer showing low-angle thrust faulting mechanisms. Our results suggest that a significant portion of the tremor activity and perhaps associated shearing are taking place along well-developed structures such as the E-layer, while a reduced number of tremor bursts are generated elsewhere in response to induced stress variation throughout the source volume.

  12. Thalamic DBS with a constant-current device in essential tremor: A controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharen, Robert E; Okun, Michael S; Guthrie, Barton L; Uitti, Ryan J; Larson, Paul; Foote, Kelly; Walker, Harrison; Marshall, Frederick J; Schwalb, Jason; Ford, Blair; Jankovic, Joseph; Simpson, Richard; Dashtipour, Khashayar; Phibbs, Fenna; Neimat, Joseph S; Stewart, R Malcolm; Peichel, DeLea; Pahwa, Rajesh; Ostrem, Jill L

    2017-07-01

    This study of thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) investigated whether a novel constant-current device improves tremor and activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with essential tremor (ET). A prospective, controlled, multicenter study was conducted at 12 academic centers. We investigated the safety and efficacy of unilateral and bilateral constant-current DBS of the ventralis intermedius (VIM) nucleus of the thalamus in patients with essential tremor whose tremor was inadequately controlled by medications. The primary outcome measure was a rater-blinded assessment of the change in the target limb tremor score in the stimulation-on versus stimulation-off state six months following surgery. Multiple secondary outcomes were assessed at one-year follow-up, including motor, mood, and quality-of-life measures. 127 patients were implanted with VIM DBS. The blinded, primary outcome variable (n = 76) revealed a mean improvement of 1.25 ± 1.26 points in the target limb tremor rating scale (TRS) score in the arm contralateral to DBS (p < 0.001). Secondary outcome variables at one year revealed significant improvements (p ≤ 0.001) in quality of life, depression symptoms, and ADL scores. Forty-seven patients had a second contralateral VIM-DBS, and this group demonstrated reduction in second-sided tremor at 180 days (p < 0.001). Serious adverse events related to the surgery included infection (n = 3), intracranial hemorrhage (n = 3), and device explantation (n = 3). Unilateral and bilateral constant-current VIM DBS significantly improves upper extremity tremor, ADL, quality of life, and depression in patients with severe ET. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sequence-specific targeting of dosage compensation in Drosophila favors an active chromatin context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom A Alekseyenko

    Full Text Available The Drosophila MSL complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcription of the single X chromosome in males approximately two-fold. This is accomplished through recognition of the X chromosome and subsequent acetylation of histone H4K16 on X-linked genes. Initial binding to the X is thought to occur at "entry sites" that contain a consensus sequence motif ("MSL recognition element" or MRE. However, this motif is only ∼2 fold enriched on X, and only a fraction of the motifs on X are initially targeted. Here we ask whether chromatin context could distinguish between utilized and non-utilized copies of the motif, by comparing their relative enrichment for histone modifications and chromosomal proteins mapped in the modENCODE project. Through a comparative analysis of the chromatin features in male S2 cells (which contain MSL complex and female Kc cells (which lack the complex, we find that the presence of active chromatin modifications, together with an elevated local GC content in the surrounding sequences, has strong predictive value for functional MSL entry sites, independent of MSL binding. We tested these sites for function in Kc cells by RNAi knockdown of Sxl, resulting in induction of MSL complex. We show that ectopic MSL expression in Kc cells leads to H4K16 acetylation around these sites and a relative increase in X chromosome transcription. Collectively, our results support a model in which a pre-existing active chromatin environment, coincident with H3K36me3, contributes to MSL entry site selection. The consequences of MSL targeting of the male X chromosome include increase in nucleosome lability, enrichment for H4K16 acetylation and JIL-1 kinase, and depletion of linker histone H1 on active X-linked genes. Our analysis can serve as a model for identifying chromatin and local sequence features that may contribute to selection of functional protein binding sites in the genome.

  14. Sequence-specific targeting of dosage compensation in Drosophila favors an active chromatin context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom A Alekseyenko

    Full Text Available The Drosophila MSL complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcription of the single X chromosome in males approximately two-fold. This is accomplished through recognition of the X chromosome and subsequent acetylation of histone H4K16 on X-linked genes. Initial binding to the X is thought to occur at "entry sites" that contain a consensus sequence motif ("MSL recognition element" or MRE. However, this motif is only ∼2 fold enriched on X, and only a fraction of the motifs on X are initially targeted. Here we ask whether chromatin context could distinguish between utilized and non-utilized copies of the motif, by comparing their relative enrichment for histone modifications and chromosomal proteins mapped in the modENCODE project. Through a comparative analysis of the chromatin features in male S2 cells (which contain MSL complex and female Kc cells (which lack the complex, we find that the presence of active chromatin modifications, together with an elevated local GC content in the surrounding sequences, has strong predictive value for functional MSL entry sites, independent of MSL binding. We tested these sites for function in Kc cells by RNAi knockdown of Sxl, resulting in induction of MSL complex. We show that ectopic MSL expression in Kc cells leads to H4K16 acetylation around these sites and a relative increase in X chromosome transcription. Collectively, our results support a model in which a pre-existing active chromatin environment, coincident with H3K36me3, contributes to MSL entry site selection. The consequences of MSL targeting of the male X chromosome include increase in nucleosome lability, enrichment for H4K16 acetylation and JIL-1 kinase, and depletion of linker histone H1 on active X-linked genes. Our analysis can serve as a model for identifying chromatin and local sequence features that may contribute to selection of functional protein binding sites in the genome.

  15. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living: Compensation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Parsey, Carolyn; Lamb, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The Instrumental Activities of Daily Living – Compensation (IADL-C) scale was developed to capture early functional difficulties and to quantify compensatory strategy use that may mitigate functional decline in the aging population. The IADL-C was validated in a sample of cognitively healthy older adults (N=184) and individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; N=92) and dementia (N=24). Factor analysis and Rasch item analysis led to the 27-item IADL-C informant questionnaire with four functional domain subscales (money and self-management, home daily living, travel and event memory, and social skills). The subscales demonstrated good internal consistency (Rasch reliability 0.80 to 0.93) and test-retest reliability (Spearman coefficients 0.70 to 0.91). The IADL-C total score and subscales showed convergent validity with other IADL measures, discriminant validity with psychosocial measures, and the ability to discriminate between diagnostic groups. The money and self management subscale showed notable difficulties for individuals with MCI, whereas difficulties with home daily living became more prominent for dementia participants. Compensatory strategy use increased in the MCI group and decreased in the dementia group. PMID:25344901

  16. Recent Findings on the Nature of Episodic Tremor and Slip Along the Northern Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragert, H.; Wang, K.; Kao, H.

    2008-12-01

    Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS), as observed along the northern Cascadia margin, has been defined empirically as repeated, transient ground motions at a plate margin, roughly opposite to longer-term interseismic deformation, occurring synchronously with low-frequency, emergent seismic signals. Although the exact causal processes are still a matter of debate, recent improvements in the monitoring of these transient events provide clearer constraints for the location and the migration of both tremor and slip. In areal distribution, the tremors continue to occur in a band overlying the 25 to 55 km depth contours of the nominal subducting plate interface. The previously reported extended depth distribution of tremor is also observed for the most recent tremor episodes, as is the coincidence of peak tremor activity with a band of seismic reflectors that is commonly interpreted to be positioned above the plate interface. In these episodes, tremors migrate along strike of the subduction zone from the southeast to the northwest at speeds ranging from 5 to 13 km/day. Tremor data also show changes in migration speed during the course of a single episode. No systematic migration in depth has yet been resolved. Denser GPS monitoring and the introduction of borehole strainmeters have also led to a better definition of the ETS surface deformations patterns, including those derived from the vertical GPS component. Inversion of the GPS data, constrained by limiting slip to the currently accepted plate interface, results in an area of slip that parallels the strike of the subduction zone, overlapping with but narrower than the band of tremor distribution and displaced slightly seaward. Inversion constrained by a shallower occurrence of slip, on or near the reflector band, results in a broader distribution of slip with reduced magnitudes. This would be more commensurate with the wider distribution of tremor. The current GPS deformation data are unable to tell whether the slip could

  17. Management of tremor in medieval Persia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargaran, Arman; Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Mehdizadeh, Alireza; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    Tremor has been described in traditional systems of medicine throughout history. Persian medicine was one of those systems in medieval times and in it neurology and neurosurgery were also widely practiced and accepted. Based on the main Persian medical manuscripts, the current study focuses on the medieval concept of tremor as an important neurological disorder in order to clarify the development of neurology. Accordingly, three main approaches to the control and treatment of tremor in traditional Persian medicine are considered. First is lifestyle modification. The administration of simple medicines is the second, and the last is the application of compound medicines. Our study shows how much was known about tremor in traditional Persian medicine.

  18. Effect of mental fatigue on induced tremor in human knee extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budini, Francesco; Lowery, Madeleine; Durbaba, Rade; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the effects of mental fatigue on mechanically induced tremor at both a low (3-6Hz) and high (8-12Hz) frequency were investigated. The two distinct tremor frequencies were evoked using two springs of different stiffness, during 20s sustained contractions of the knee extensor muscles at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) before and after 100min of a mental fatigue task, in 12 healthy (29±3.7years) participants. Mental fatigue resulted in a 6.9% decrease in MVC and in a 9.4% decrease in the amplitude of the agonist muscle EMG during sustained 30% MVC contractions in the induced high frequency only. Following the mental fatigue task, the coefficient of variation and standard deviation of the force signal decreased at 8-12Hz induced tremor by 31.7% and 35.2% respectively, but not at 3-6Hz induced tremor. Similarly, the maximum value and area underneath the peak in the power spectrum of the force signal decreased by 55.5% and 53.1% respectively in the 8-12Hz range only. In conclusion, mental fatigue decreased mechanically induced 8-12Hz tremor and had no effect on induced 3-6Hz tremor. We suggest that the reduction could be attributed to the decreased activation of the agonist muscles.

  19. Electrophysiologic Assessments of Involuntary Movements: Tremor and Myoclonus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Dong Park

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tremor is defined as a rhythmical, involuntary oscillatory movement of a body part. Although neurological examination reveals information regarding its frequency, regularity, amplitude, and activation conditions, the electrophysiological investigations help in confirming the tremor, in differentiating it from other hyperkinetic disorders like myoclonus, and may provide etiological clues. Accelerometer with surface electromyogram (EMG can be used to document the dominant frequency of a tremor, which may be useful as certain frequencies are more characteristic of specific etiologies than others hyperkinetic disorders. It may show rhythmic bursts, duration and activation pattern (alternating or synchronous. Myoclonus is a quick, involuntary movement. Electrophysiological studies may helpful in the evaluation of myoclonus, not only for confirming the clinical diagnosis but also for understanding the underlying physiological mechanisms. Electroencephalogram (EEG-EMG correlates can give us important information about myoclonus. Jerk-locked back-averaging and evoked potentials with recording of the long-latency, long-loop reflexes are currently available to study the pathophysiology of myoclonus.

  20. Nonvolcanic tremor observed in the Mexican subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payero, Juan S.; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Shapiro, Nikolai; Mikumo, Takeshi; Iglesias, Arturo; Pérez-Campos, Xyoli; Clayton, Robert W.

    2008-04-01

    Nonvolcanic tremor (NVT) activity is revealed as episodes of higher spectral amplitude at 1-8 Hz in daily spectrograms from the continuous seismological records in Guerrero, Mexico. The analyzed data cover a period of 2001-2007 when in 2001-2002 a large slow slip event (SSE) had occurred in the Guerrero-Oaxaca region, and then a new large SSE occurred in 2006. The tremor burst is dominated by S-waves. More than 100 strong NVT bursts were recorded in the narrow band of ~40 × 150 km2 to the south of Iguala City and parallel to the coastline. Depths of NVT hypocenters are mostly scattered in the continental crust between 5 and 40 km depth. Tremor activity is higher during the 2001-2002 and 2006 SSE compared with that for the ``quiet'' period of 2003-2005. While resistivity pattern in Guerrero does not correlate directly with the NVT distribution, gravity and magnetic anomaly modeling favors a hypothesis that the NVT is apparently related to the dehydration and serpentinization processes.

  1. Characteristics of Task-specific Tremor in String Instrument Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, André; Chadde, Mareike; Altenmüller, Eckart; Schoonderwaldt, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent studies primary bowing tremor has been described; however, tremor frequency has never been quantitatively assessed. In addition to describing phenomenological aspects of tremor we thus aimed at assessing tremor frequency. Our hypothesis was that primary bowing tremor is similar to the phenomenological aspects and frequency of primary writing tremor. Methods We quantified primary bowing tremor in four violinists under two conditions: open strings and a G major scale. Data were analyzed using empirical mode decomposition because it takes into account non-stationarity and non-linearity of signals. For each patient we further described tremor phenomenology and assessed symptom onset, risk factors, medication, and family history with a structured anamnesis. We compare the findings to previous findings for primary bowing tremor and primary writing tremor. Results We mainly found a flexion–extension tremor of the wrist with a frequency range of 4.7–6.7 Hz. There was no significant difference between the conditions. Mean onset age was 43±2.4 years. Medication included trihexyphenidyl, propranolol, primidone, and botulinum toxin. We found a positive family history in two patients and an injury prior to symptom onset in another two patients. Comparison of onset age, frequency range, family history, and injuries prior to onset revealed that our findings are very similar to previous findings on primary bowing tremor and primary writing tremor. Discussion Our findings confirmed our hypothesis that primary bowing tremor is similar to primary writing tremor, with regard to phenomenology and epidemiology as well as tremor frequency. There was no difference in tremor frequency between conditions, suggesting that tremor is not influenced by bimanual coordination or bowing speed. Our findings thus provide new phenomenological aspects and may contribute to a better understanding of primary bowing tremor. PMID:24932423

  2. Six years of tectonic tremor observations prior to the Mw 7.4 March 20, 2012 Ometepec Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, S. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Schlanser, K. M.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; DeMets, C.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) at several major tectonic boundaries have suggested a potential temporal relationship between the new seismic phenomena and megathrust earthquake events. The subduction zone in Oaxaca, Mexico provides an ideal locality to investigate this potential relationship, where we obtain a multi-year record of tectonic tremor detections and slow slip observations prior to the recent Mw 7.4 March 20, 2012 Ometepec earthquake. The preliminary epicenter, depth (20 km), and finite fault model all place the earthquake at the downdip edge of the band of background seismicity that is thought to outline the boundary between the seismogenic zone and transition zone of the plate interface. To detect tectonic tremor, we take advantage of its unique frequency content by scanning multiple frequency passbands where tremor (2-5 Hz), regional seismicity (10-15 Hz), and teleseismic surface waves (0.02-0.1 Hz) are present. We calculate a ratio of amplitudes favoring tremor behavior and downweighting activity from the other frequency passbands. Application of our technique allows us to quickly examine the prevalence of tremor beginning in mid-2006. Results from our frequency-based detection algorithm are in good agreement with previous tremor detections and locations in Oaxaca and additionally detects several previously unidentified low amplitude, short duration tremor episodes. Tremor occurs over a relatively short time period, 2-10 days, recurs as often as every 2-3 months, and does not regularly correlate with periods of large slow slip that tend to last several months and occur further updip. These observations are more consistent with those from Nankai than Cascadia. Preliminary analysis suggests that no obvious change in tremor prevalence occurred prior to the 2012 Ometepec earthquake; however, a variety of GPS inferred slow slip signals begin in the months leading up to the event. The puzzling relationship between tremor, slow slip, and

  3. Deep Tectonic Tremor in Haiti triggered by the 2010/02/27 Mw8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, C.; Peng, Z.; Douilly, R.; Calais, E.; Deschamps, A.; Haase, J. S.

    2013-05-01

    Tectonic tremors have been observed along major plate-boundary faults around the world. In most of these regions, tremors occur spontaneously (i.e. ambient) or as a result of small stress perturbations from passing surface waves (i.e. triggered). Because tremors are located below the seismogenic zone, a detailed study of their behavior could help to better understand how tectonic movement is accommodated in the deep root of major faults, and the relationship with large earthquakes. Here, we present evidence of triggered tremor in southern Haiti around the aftershock zone of the 2010/01/12 Mw7.0 Haiti earthquake. Following the January mainshock, several groups have installed land and ocean bottom seismometers to record aftershock activity (e.g., De Lepinay et al., 2011). In the following month, the 2010/02/27 Mw8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake occurred and was recorded in the southern Haiti region by these seismic stations. We apply a 5-15 Hz band-pass filter to all seismograms to identify local high-frequency signals during the Chile teleseismic waves. Tremor is identified as non-impulsive bursts with 10-20 s durations that is coherent among different stations and is modulated by surface waves. We also convert the seismic data into audible sounds and use them to distinguish between local aftershocks and deep tremor. We locate the source of the tremor bursts using an envelope cross-correlation method based on travel time differences. Because tremor depth is not well constrained with this method, we set it to 20 km, close to the recent estimate of Moho depth in this region (McNamara et al., 2012). Most tremors are located south of the surface expression of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF), a high-angle southward dipping left-lateral strike-slip fault that marks the boundary between the Gonave microplate and the Caribbean plate, although the location errors are large. Tremor peaks are mostly modulated by Love wave velocity, which is consistent with left

  4. A causal relationship between the slow slip event and deep low frequency tremor indicated by strain data recorded at Shingu borehole station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, M.; Sagiya, T.; Asai, Y.

    2008-12-01

    In the southwest Japan, synchronized deep low frequency tremors and short-term slow slip events occur repeatedly in several regions such as Tokai, northern Kii Peninsula and western Shikoku areas, and these activities are partitioned by 'gaps' of tremors. Although concurrent occurrences of slow slips and tremors have been detected at various subducting plate boundary, their physical mechanism is still not well understood. We are monitoring crustal deformation at Shingu city on the southeastern coast of Kii Peninsula, with an integrated multi-component borehole monitoring system developed by Ishii et al. [2002]. The borehole sensor unit consists of 6 strain sensors (4 in horizontal, 2 in vertical), 2 pendulum tilt sensors, magnetic direction finder and a quartz thermometer and installed at 510m depth. Fukuda et al. [2007] reported two types of strain changes, one associated with deep low frequency tremors and the other without tremors from November 2005 to March 2006. We extend the analysis period to 41 months, from January 2004 to September 2007. We identified 11 episodic strain changes. One of them was caused by heavy rainfall but the rest of the changes are considered to be slow slips. Among all the slow slips identified, five events occurred associated with reported tremor events, but the rest 5 changes were not accompanied by tremors. These slow slip events are characterized by N-S compression (0.017 - 0.063 ppm), and E-W extension (0.013 - 0.071 ppm), NW-SE extension (0.008 - 0.097 ppm), and last 4 - 9 days. We estimate a fault model for each event by forward modeling, and find that the all the strain changes can be attributed to reverse faulting on the plate boundary beneath the Kii Peninsula. An interesting strain change occurred from 26 Dec. 2004 to 2 Jan. 2005. In this period, a tremor activity propagated southwestward on central Kii Peninsula and the level of activity remarkably drops when the activity propagated into the tremor gap zone. After that, the

  5. Development of an essential tremor embarrassment assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, Rebecca E; Gerbin, Marina; Mullaney, Mary M; Louis, Elan D

    2010-12-01

    Embarrassment is commonly reported in essential tremor (ET) patients yet there is no formal tool to assess embarrassment in ET. Our aim was to develop such a tool and to assess its clinimetric properties. A quantitative measure of embarrassment could be used to assess response to treatment in clinical practice and clinical trials. Based on surveys of international tremor experts and ET patients, we constructed the Essential Tremor Embarrassment Assessment (ETEA), a brief, easily administered, 14-item self-assessment scale. The ETEA was assessed for validity, reliability and other clinimetric properties in 75 ET patients. Forty-seven tremor experts from eight countries were surveyed. On average, they estimated that 75% of their patients experienced embarrassment, yet there was very little agreement (range = 10-95%). Among ET patients, three-quarters (77.3%) reported at least occasional embarrassment due to their tremor and one-third (36.4%) reported daily embarrassment. ETEA scores correlated with a tremor disability questionnaire score (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores (pEmbarrassment is commonly experienced by ET patients. The ETEA is a reliable and valid tool to measure embarrassment in patients with this disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Migration Episode of Shallow Low-frequency Tremor at the Nankai Trough Subduction Zone: Seismological Evidence for Episodic Slow Slip Event Occurring at the Shallow Transition Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Y.; Yakiwara, H.; Shimizu, H.; Uchida, K.; Hirano, S.; Miyamachi, H.; Umakoshi, K.; Nakamoto, M.; Fukui, M.; Kamizono, M.; Kanehara, H.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.; Obara, K.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the shallow part of plate interface between megathrust seismogenic zone and trench axis is very important for development of huge earthquake rupture and generation of tsunami. Monitoring of offshore seismicity near the Nankai trough by temporal ocean bottom seismographic observation in 2013 revealed that low-frequency tremor occurred associated with shallow very-low-frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in the shallow part of plate interface. The shallow tremor episode lasted for approximately 1 month, which is almost consistent with the shallow VLFE activity observed from land broad-band seismic stations [Asano, 2014]. The horizontal location of shallow tremor estimate by envelope correlation method [Obara, 2002] shows a belt-like distribution along trench strike with narrow width than the deep tremor. The most remarkable feature of the shallow tremor activity is migration. There are two migration modes including diffusive slower migration and rapid tremor reversal (RTR), which are very similar to the deep tremor as a part of the ETS. This strongly indicates a possibility of the occurrence of episodic slow slip event in the shallow transition zone. That is to say, the migration of shallow tremor is supposed to be caused by migrating rupture front of SSE. In addition, the migration was detouring around the subducted Kyushu-Palau ridge. This suggests that the occurrence of tremor is sensitive to change in the shape of plate interface and seeks to propagate along almost the same depth range, in other word, a specified temperature and pressure condition. The narrow width distribution of shallow tremor also indicates that the shallow tremor is strongly related to dehydration process of a specified mineral under a narrow limited range of temperature and pressure condition compared to the deep tremor.

  7. Deserved Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ China's National People's Congress (NPC), the top legislature, recently adopted amendments to the Law on State Compensation, granting citizens greater power to obtain compensation when their rights are violated by the state.

  8. Model of deep non-volcanic tremor part I: ambient and triggered tremor

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence of triggering of tremor by seismic waves emanating from distant large earthquakes. The frequency contents of triggered and ambient tremor are largely identical, suggesting that tremor does not depend directly on the nature of the source. We show here that the model of plate dynamics developed earlier by us is an appropriate tool for describing the onset of tremor. In the framework of this model, tremor is an internal response of a fault to a failure triggered by external disturbances. The model predicts generation of radiation in a frequency range defined by the fault parameters. Other specific features predicted are: the upper limit of the size of the emitting area is a few dozen km; tremor accompanies earthquakes and aseismic slip; the frequency content of tremor depends on the type of failure. The model also explains why a tremor has no clear impulsive phase, in contrast to earthquakes. A comparatively small effective normal stress (hence a high fluid pressure) is required to make the mod...

  9. Tremor recording and analysis as a tool for target localisation in thalamotomy and DBS for tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Journee, HL; Hamoen, DJ; Staal, MJ; Sclabassi, R; Haaxma, R; Elands, A; Hummel, JJJ; Boom, H; Robinson, C; Rutten, W; Neuman, M; Wijkstra, H

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work was to design and use a tremor and analysis system for stereotactic thalamotomy and thalamus stimulation (DBS). A notebook PC based system was developed. The tremor was measured by accelero-transducers or EMG. The method was used to confirm the definitive localization of

  10. Tremor recording and analysis as a tool for target localisation in thalamotomy and DBS for tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Journee, HL; Hamoen, DJ; Staal, MJ; Sclabassi, R; Haaxma, R; Elands, A; Hummel, JJJ; Boom, H; Robinson, C; Rutten, W; Neuman, M; Wijkstra, H

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work was to design and use a tremor and analysis system for stereotactic thalamotomy and thalamus stimulation (DBS). A notebook PC based system was developed. The tremor was measured by accelero-transducers or EMG. The method was used to confirm the definitive localization of t

  11. Tectonic tremor and LFEs on a reverse fault in Taiwan: TREMOR AND LFES IN TAIWAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Ana C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California USA; Geophysics Department, Stanford University, Stanford California USA; Chao, Kevin [Center for Optimization and Statistical Learning, Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems, Northwestern University, Evanston Illinois USA; Beroza, Gregory C. [Geophysics Department, Stanford University, Stanford California USA

    2017-07-06

    We compare low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) from triggered and ambient tremor under the southern Central Range, Taiwan. We apply the PageRank algorithm used by Aguiar and Beroza (2014) that exploits the repetitive nature of the LFEs to find repeating LFEs in both ambient and triggered tremor. We use these repeaters to create LFE templates and find that the templates created from both tremor types are very similar. To test their similarity, we use both interchangeably and find that most of both the ambient and triggered tremor match the LFE templates created from either data set, suggesting that LFEs for both events have a common origin. We locate the LFEs by using local earthquake P wave and S wave information and find that LFEs from triggered and ambient tremor locate to between 20 and 35 km on what we interpret as the deep extension of the Chaochou-Lishan Fault.

  12. A Modular Cascaded Multilevel Inverter Based Shunt Hybrid Active Power Filter for Selective Harmonic and Reactive Power Compensation Under Distorted/Unbalanced Grid Voltage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Demirdelen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, shunt hybrid active power filters are being increasingly considered as a viable alternative to both passive filters and active power filters for compensating harmonics. In literature, their applications are restricted to balanced systems and low voltage applications and therefore not for industrial applications. This paper investigates the performance of a modular cascaded multilevel inverter based Shunt Hybrid Active Power Filter (SHAPF for reactive power compensation and selective harmonics elimination under distorted/unbalanced grid voltage conditions in medium voltage levels. In the proposed control method, reactive power compensation is achieved successfully with a perceptible amount and the performance results of harmonic compensation are satisfactory. Theoretical analysis and simulation results are obtained from an actual industrial network model in PSCAD. The simulation results are presented for a proposed system in order to demonstrate that the harmonic compensation performance meets the IEEE-519 standard.

  13. A review of primary writing tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Vaid, Haris M

    2012-03-01

    A task-specific tremor (TST) is a rare form of movement disorder that appears while performing or attempting to perform a particular task. Primary writing tremor (PWT) is the most common form of TST which only occurs during the act of writing and hinders it. (Bain PG, Findley LJ, Britton TC, Rothwell JC, Gresty MA, Thompson PD, Marsden CD. MRC Human Movement, and Balance Unit, Institute of Neurology, London, UK. Primary writing tremor. Brain. 1995;118(6):1461-72.) Primary writing tremor type B is present not only during the act of writing but also when the hand assumes a writing posture. (Bain PG, Findley LJ, Britton TC, Rothwell JC, Gresty MA, Thompson PD, Marsden CD. MRC Human Movement and Balance Unit, Institute of Neurology, London, UK. Primary writing tremor. Brain. 1995;118(6):1461-72.) We first of all describe a remarkable case study of a 50-year old, right-handed male who started experiencing a primary writing tremor in his right hand about a year ago. This case was found to be of particular interest because the patient had it relatively difficult when attempting to write numbers as opposed to writing letters. This review further discusses the clinical manifestations of PWT. In addition, three main hypotheses have been proposed for the causation of PWT, although the exact pathophysiology of PWT still remains unknown. It has been suggested that PWT is a separate entity, a variant of essential tremor and not a separate entity, or a type of dystonia. The various treatment options for PWT are discussed including botulinum toxin and oral pharmacotherapy.

  14. AHC (Active Heave Compensation) - 800 Drilling on the Atlantic (New Jersey) Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    The New Jersey continental shelf, an old, stable passive margin, has been a focus of latest Pleistocene-Holocene sea-level studies for decades, because eustasy is a major driving force in the production of the surficial stratigraphic record there. This margin is also geographically proximal to diverse oceanographic resources - laboratories, ports and ships - so hypothesis-testing using a "natural laboratory" approach has been suitable for data acquisition, analysis and interpretation. The Office of Naval Research has taken advantage of this shelf's characteristics to support collection and interpretation of a huge and diverse suite of geophysical data off New Jersey since the late 1980's - MCS profiles at multiple frequencies, deep-towed boomer and chirp profiles, multibeam bathymetry/ backscatter control, and most recently sediment samples using a lake-drilling system owned and operated by Drilling, Observation and Sampling of the Earth's Continental Crust (DOSECC), Inc., modified with active heave compensation for deployment off the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution research vessel Knorr. The goal is to understand how the diverse interaction of depositional and erosional processes culminates in the preserved stratigraphic record. A first test of the AHC-800 drilling system took place in November 2001 in Block Island Sound off southern New England, with the following results: 1) some success was achieved in sampling mud, 2) fall weather was a limiting factor (heave compensation limits of 2.44 m in 8 s were often exceeded), 3) the vessel's dynamic positioning (DP) system was not always capable of maintaining station in shifting winds; precise navigation (beyond differential GPS) was required, and 4) the need for automated drillpipe handling to increase efficiency was recognized. A second test took place on the New Jersey shelf in September-October 2002, using updated software, automated pipe handling, and differential GPS navigation supplemented by a POS/MV 320

  15. Migrating tremors illuminate complex deformation beneath the seismogenic San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    The San Andreas fault is one of the most extensively studied faults in the world, yet its physical character and deformation mode beneath the relatively shallow earthquake-generating portion remain largely unconstrained. Tectonic non-volcanic tremor, a recently discovered seismic signal probably generated by shear slip on the deep extension of some major faults, can provide new insight into the deep fate of such faults, including that of the San Andreas fault near Parkfield, California. Here I examine continuous seismic data from mid-2001 to 2008, identifying tremor and decomposing the signal into different families of activity based on the shape and timing of the waveforms at multiple stations. This approach allows differentiation between activities from nearby patches of the deep fault and begins to unveil rich and complex patterns of tremor occurrence. I find that tremor exhibits nearly continuous migration, with the most extensive episodes propagating more than 20 kilometres along fault strike at rates of 15-80 kilometres per hour. This suggests that the San Andreas fault remains a localized through-going structure, at least to the base of the crust, in this area. Tremor rates and recurrence behaviour changed markedly in the wake of the 2004 magnitude-6.0 Parkfield earthquake, but these changes were far from uniform within the tremor zone, probably reflecting heterogeneous fault properties and static and dynamic stresses decaying away from the rupture. The systematic recurrence of tremor demonstrated here suggests the potential to monitor detailed time-varying deformation on this portion of the deep San Andreas fault, deformation which unsteadily loads the shallower zone that last ruptured in the 1857 magnitude-7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  16. Movement-related dynamics of cortical oscillations in Parkinson's disease and essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondylis, Efstathios D; Randazzo, Michael J; Alhourani, Ahmad; Lipski, Witold J; Wozny, Thomas A; Pandya, Yash; Ghuman, Avniel S; Turner, Robert S; Crammond, Donald J; Richardson, R M

    2016-08-01

    Recent electrocorticography data have demonstrated excessive coupling of beta-phase to gamma-amplitude in primary motor cortex and that deep brain stimulation facilitates motor improvement by decreasing baseline phase-amplitude coupling. However, both the dynamic modulation of phase-amplitude coupling during movement and the general cortical neurophysiology of other movement disorders, such as essential tremor, are relatively unexplored. To clarify the relationship of these interactions in cortical oscillatory activity to movement and disease state, we recorded local field potentials from hand sensorimotor cortex using subdural electrocorticography during a visually cued, incentivized handgrip task in subjects with Parkinson's disease (n = 11), with essential tremor (n = 9) and without a movement disorder (n = 6). We demonstrate that abnormal coupling of the phase of low frequency oscillations to the amplitude of gamma oscillations is not specific to Parkinson's disease, but also occurs in essential tremor, most prominently for the coupling of alpha to gamma oscillations. Movement kinematics were not significantly different between these groups, allowing us to show for the first time that robust alpha and beta desynchronization is a shared feature of sensorimotor cortical activity in Parkinson's disease and essential tremor, with the greatest high-beta desynchronization occurring in Parkinson's disease and the greatest alpha desynchronization occurring in essential tremor. We also show that the spatial extent of cortical phase-amplitude decoupling during movement is much greater in subjects with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor than in subjects without a movement disorder. These findings suggest that subjects with Parkinson's disease and essential tremor can produce movements that are kinematically similar to those of subjects without a movement disorder by reducing excess sensorimotor cortical phase-amplitude coupling that is characteristic of these

  17. Context compensation in the vestibulo-ocular reflex during active head rotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medendorp, W.P.; Gisbergen, J.A.M. van; Pelt, S. van; Gielen, C.C.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) needs to modulate its gain depending on target distance to prevent retinal slip during head movements. We investigated gain modulation (context compensation) for binocular gaze stabilization in human subjects during voluntary yaw and pitch head rotations. Movements o

  18. The 2011 unrest at Katla volcano: characterization and interpretation of the tremor sources

    CERN Document Server

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Einarsson, Páll; Lucchi, Federico; Li, Ka Lok; Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Roberts, Roland; Tryggvason, Ari

    2016-01-01

    A 23 hour tremor burst was recorded on July 8-9th 2011 at the Katla subglacial volcano, one of the most active and hazardous volcanoes in Iceland. This was associated with deepening of cauldrons on the ice cap and a glacial flood that caused damage to infrastructure. Increased earthquake activity within the caldera started a few days before and lasted for months afterwards and new seismic activity started on the south flank. No visible eruption broke the ice and the question arose as to whether this episode relates to a minor subglacial eruption with the tremor being generated by volcanic processes, or by the flood. The tremor signal consisted of bursts with varying amplitude and duration. We have identified and described three different tremor phases, based on amplitude and frequency features. A tremor phase associated with the flood was recorded only at stations closest to the river that flooded, correlating in time with rising water level observed at gauging stations. Using back-projection of double cross-...

  19. Mitochondrial serine protease HTRA2 p.G399S in a kindred with essential tremor and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal Gulsuner, Hilal; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Mercan, Fatma Nazli; Onat, Onur Emre; Walsh, Tom; Shahin, Hashem; Lee, Ming K; Dogu, Okan; Kansu, Tulay; Topaloglu, Haluk; Elibol, Bulent; Akbostanci, Cenk; King, Mary-Claire; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2014-12-23

    Essential tremor is one of the most frequent movement disorders of humans and can be associated with substantial disability. Some but not all persons with essential tremor develop signs of Parkinson disease, and the relationship between the conditions has not been clear. In a six-generation consanguineous Turkish kindred with both essential tremor and Parkinson disease, we carried out whole exome sequencing and pedigree analysis, identifying HTRA2 p.G399S as the allele likely responsible for both conditions. Essential tremor was present in persons either heterozygous or homozygous for this allele. Homozygosity was associated with earlier age at onset of tremor (P Parkinson signs in the middle age. Among population controls from the same Anatolian region as the family, frequency of HTRA2 p.G399S was 0.0027, slightly lower than other populations. HTRA2 encodes a mitochondrial serine protease. Loss of function of HtrA2 was previously shown to lead to parkinsonian features in motor neuron degeneration (mnd2) mice. HTRA2 p.G399S was previously shown to lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, altered mitochondrial morphology, and decreased protease activity, but epidemiologic studies of an association between HTRA2 and Parkinson disease yielded conflicting results. Our results suggest that in some families, HTRA2 p.G399S is responsible for hereditary essential tremor and that homozygotes for this allele develop Parkinson disease. This hypothesis has implications for understanding the pathogenesis of essential tremor and its relationship to Parkinson disease.

  20. Tremor irregularity, torque steadiness and rate of force development in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Martin H; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Jensen, Bente R

    2013-04-01

    We investigated lower-extremity isometric tremor Approximate Entropy (irregularity), torque steadiness and rate of force development (RFD) and their associations to muscle activation strategy during isometric knee extensions in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirteen male patients with idiopathic PD and 15 neurologically healthy matched controls performed isometric maximal contractions (extension/flexion) as well as steady submaximal and powerful isometric knee extensions. The patients with PD showed decreased isometric tremor irregularity. Torque steadiness was reduced in PD and the patients had increased muscle coactivation. A markedly lower RFD was found in PD and the decreased RFD correlated with reduced agonist muscle activation. Furthermore, patient RFD correlated with the Movement-Disorder-Society-Unified-Parkinson's-Disease-Rating-Scale 3 (motor part) scores. We concluded that both knee isometric tremor Approximate Entropy and torque steadiness clearly differentiate between patients with PD and healthy controls. Furthermore, severely compromised RFD was found in patients with PD and was associated with decreased agonist muscle activation.

  1. Dynamic Harmonic and Reactive Power Compensation with an Adaptive Shunt Active Filter for Variable Speed Induction Motor Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu M R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Variable speed drives are mostly preferred in industries, while considering energy saving, smooth control, flexible operation and fast response. On the other hand, this equipment generates dynamic harmonic distortions in source currents and draws variable reactive power demand depending on variation in load condition. These distortions propagate throughout the system and affect all the loads connected to the point of common coupling. Hence a dynamic harmonic and reactive compensator is necessary to enhance power quality to meet current and voltage distortion limits at point of common coupling as per IEEE standard. The most common choice for adjustable speed drives in industries is three phase voltage source inverter based induction motor drives which uses PWM technique for voltage, frequency and current control. This paper presents harmonic analysis of an induction motor drive in an industrial plant and development of adaptive dynamic harmonic and reactive compensator to improve power quality. A digital controller which is programmed with adaptive Artificial Neural Network (ANN based control algorithm is used for controlling shunt active filter. The simulation and experimental results show that the adaptive shunt active filter provides effective harmonic and reactive compensation in the system under steady state and dynamic load conditions.

  2. Familial cortical tremor with epilepsy and cerebellar pathological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, AF; Aronica, E; Steur, ENHJ; Rozemuller-Kwakkel, JM; de Vos, RAI; Tijssen, MAJ

    The clinical and neuropathological findings in a patient with familial cortical tremor with epilepsy (FCTE) are described. Clinically, the patient showed cortical myoclonus, tremor, and generalized seizures. Pathological investigation showed cerebellar degeneration and somal sprouting and loss of

  3. Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources and Publications Fragile X-Associated Tremor and Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS): Overview Skip sharing on social media ... this: Page Content Fragile X-associated tremor and ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset condition (occurs ...

  4. Isolated tongue tremor after gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sun J; Im, Joo-Hyuk; Lee, Jae-Hong; Cho, A-Hyun; Kwon, Miseon; Lee, Myoung C

    2005-01-01

    We describe a patient who had an isolated tongue tremor with an audible click after gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic schwannoma. The nature of the tongue tremor was clearly demonstrated by videofluoroscopy. The possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Using Online Active-Learning Techniques to Convey Time Compensated Sun Compass Orientation in the Eastern North American Monarch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Hammond Green

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A common tool that animals use to navigate in a constant direction is known as “time compensated sun compass orientation.” This is a process by which animals use the position of the sun along with information from their internal circadian clocks to determine and maintain a directional heading. Many circadian scientists and educators use this process as an example of how the internal circadian clock can directly influence animal behavior. However, many students have difficulty grasping this biological process due to its multivariable nature. We have created an online module that uses the principles of active learning to facilitate student comprehension of this process. Our module contains instructional videos, practice problems and an interactive diagram. We implemented the module in an undergraduate biological clocks class at Vanderbilt University, where its use significantly improved students’ understanding of time compensated sun compass orientation as well as their ability to solve complex problems involving principles associated with this process.

  6. Comparative study of tectonic tremor locations: Characterization of slow earthquakes in Guerrero, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, J.; Ide, S.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Kostoglodov, V.; González-Molina, G.; Pérez-Campos, X.

    2016-07-01

    Deep tectonic tremor in Guerrero, Mexico, has been observed using dense temporal seismic networks (i.e., the Meso-American Subduction Experiment and Guerrero Gap Experiment (G-GAP) arrays) during two different time periods. We apply a set of seismic waveform analysis methods to these data sets to constrain the locations of tremors and determine the associated moment tensors. First we detect and locate the tremors. Next, very low frequency (VLF) signals are identified by stacking waveform data during tremor bursts, and their moment tensors are determined. Finally, to better investigate the link between tremors and VLF earthquakes, we detect VLF events using a matched filtering algorithm to search continuous seismic records. None of the 11 VLF events detected by this method occurred in the absence of tremor bursts suggesting they are indeed part of the same phenomena. Unlike previous investigations, our results for the G-GAP period reveal that downdip tremor activity (i.e., in the so-called "sweet spot") is segmented into two patches separated by 40 km in the along-trench direction, indicating possible variations in the geometry of the plate interface and/or slab effective pressure. Moment tensors of VLF signals are consistent with shear slip on the near-horizontal plate interface, but source depths are about 5 km deeper than the established plate interface. The slip directions of the VLF events are slightly ( 10°) counterclockwise of the plate convergence direction, indicating that strain energy promoting left-lateral strike-slip motion may accumulate in the continental crust during the interseismic period.

  7. Tremor da escrita: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hack Nicaretta

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available O tremor da escrita é distúrbio precipitado por atividade motora específica, geralmente a escrita. Analisamos este caso sob o ponto de vista clínico e terapêutico. O paciente apresentava tremor ao escrever tomando sua letra ilegível; sem qualquer outra alteração neurológica. Não havia antecedentes familiares, metabólicos, endócrinos, iatrogênicos, tóxicos ou traumáticos. No manuseio terapêutico não ocorreu resposta satisfatória ao propranolol, sendo discreta à primidona. A introdução de anticolinérgicos (tri-hexifenidil evidenciou certa melhora na sintomatologia, com redução do tremor no momento da escrita.

  8. Composition-tuning in a solid-state electrotransport furnace with active thermal expansion compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmehr, J L; Whitley, W; Huxley, A D

    2016-12-01

    A new solid-state electrotransport (SSE) apparatus for refining ultra-pure single crystals of metallic compounds under ultra-high vacuum is described. The setup employs a novel thermal expansion compensation mechanism to minimize mechanical stress on the sample during refinement with cold clamps for contamination-less purification at elevated temperatures. The apparatus is designed to tune the composition of initially slightly off-stoichiometric samples. The expansion compensation and stress-free operation were tested by recording the thermal expansion of elemental cerium in a treatment up to 655 °C. SSE refinement was then performed on a high-quality single crystal of U6Fe resulting in a 50% increase of its residual resistivity ratio to the highest value obtained for a single crystal to date.

  9. Composition-tuning in a solid-state electrotransport furnace with active thermal expansion compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmehr, J. L.; Whitley, W.; Huxley, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    A new solid-state electrotransport (SSE) apparatus for refining ultra-pure single crystals of metallic compounds under ultra-high vacuum is described. The setup employs a novel thermal expansion compensation mechanism to minimize mechanical stress on the sample during refinement with cold clamps for contamination-less purification at elevated temperatures. The apparatus is designed to tune the composition of initially slightly off-stoichiometric samples. The expansion compensation and stress-free operation were tested by recording the thermal expansion of elemental cerium in a treatment up to 655 °C. SSE refinement was then performed on a high-quality single crystal of U6Fe resulting in a 50% increase of its residual resistivity ratio to the highest value obtained for a single crystal to date.

  10. Loss compensation in metamaterials through embedding of active transistor based negative differential resistance circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wangren; Padilla, Willie J; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2012-09-24

    Dielectric and ohmic losses in metamaterials are known to limit their practical use. In this paper, an all-electronic approach for loss compensation in metamaterials is presented. Each unit cell of the meta-material is embedded with a cross-coupled transistor pair based negative differential resistance circuit to cancel these losses. Design, simulation and experimental results for Split Ring Resonator (SRR) metamaterials with and without loss compensation are presented. Results indicate that the quality factor (Q) of the SRR improves by over 400% at 1.6 GHz, showing the effectiveness of the approach. The proposed technique is scalable over a broad frequency range and is limited only by the maximum operating frequency of transistors, which is reaching terahertz in today's semiconductor technologies.

  11. Tectonic tremor on Vancouver Island, Cascadia, modulated by the body and surface waves of the Mw 8.6 and 8.2, 2012 East Indian Ocean earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Bhaskar; Ghosh, Abhijit; Mendoza, Manuel; Bürgmann, Roland; Gahalaut, V. K.; Saikia, Dipankar

    2016-09-01

    The 2012 East Indian Ocean earthquake (Mw 8.6), so far the largest intraoceanic plate strike-slip event ever recorded, modulated tectonic tremors in the Cascadia subduction zone. The rate of tremor activity near Vancouver Island increased by about 1.5 times from its background level during the passage of seismic waves of this earthquake. In most cases of dynamic modulation, large-amplitude and long-period surface waves stimulate tremors. However, in this case even the small stress change caused by body waves generated by the 2012 earthquake modulated tremor activity. The tremor modulation continued during the passage of the surface waves, subsequent to which the tremor activity returned to background rates. Similar tremor modulation is observed during the passage of the teleseismic waves from the Mw 8.2 event, which occurs about 2 h later near the Mw 8.6 event. We show that dynamic stresses from back-to-back large teleseismic events can strongly influence tremor sources.

  12. Performance of a 6-degree-of-freedom active microsurgical manipulator in handheld tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sungwook; Wells, Trent S; Maclachlan, Robert A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the first experimental results from human users of a new 6-degree-of-freedom handheld micromanipulator. This is the latest prototype of a fully-handheld system, known as "Micron," which performs active compensation of hand tremor for microsurgery. The manipulator is a miniature Gough-Stewart platform incorporating linear ultrasonic motors that provide a cylindrical workspace 4 mm long and 4 mm wide. In addition, the platform allows the possibility of imposing a remote center of motion for controlling motion not only at the tip but also at the entry point in the sclera of the eye. We demonstrate hand tremor reduction in both static and dynamic micromanipulation tasks on a rubber pad. The handheld performance is also evaluated in an artificial eye model while imposing a remote center of motion. In all cases, hand tremor is significantly reduced.

  13. Unilateral rubral tremors in Wilson′s disease treated with dimercaprol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul T Chakor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tremors are reported as the most frequent neurological manifestation of Wilson′s disease (WD in some series. Postural tremors, rest tremors, action tremors and wing-beating (rubral tremors are the different types of tremors seen in WD. We report a patient of WD with unilateral rubral tremors refractory to 1-year therapy with Penicillamine and anti-tremor medications. The tremors decreased considerably after adding chelation therapy with dimercaprol. Combination of Penicillamine and dimercaprol is an effective decoppering measure in rubral tremors of WD.

  14. The 2011 unrest at Katla volcano: Characterization and interpretation of the tremor sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgattoni, Giulia; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Einarsson, Páll; Lucchi, Federico; Li, Ka Lok; Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Roberts, Roland; Tryggvason, Ari

    2017-05-01

    A 23-hour tremor burst was recorded on July 8-9th 2011 at the Katla subglacial volcano, one of the most active and hazardous volcanoes in Iceland. This was associated with deepening of cauldrons on the ice cap and a glacial flood that caused damage to infrastructure. Increased earthquake activity within the caldera started a few days before and lasted for months afterwards and new seismic activity started on the southern flank. No visible eruption broke the ice and the question arose as to whether this episode relates to a minor subglacial eruption with the tremor being generated by volcanic processes, or by the flood. The tremor signal consisted of bursts with varying amplitude and duration. We have identified and described three different tremor phases, based on amplitude and frequency features. A tremor phase associated with the flood was recorded only at stations closest to the river that flooded, correlating in time with rising water level observed at gauging stations. Using back-projection of double cross-correlations, two other phases have been located near the active ice cauldrons and are interpreted to be caused by volcanic or hydrothermal processes. The greatly increased seismicity and evidence of rapid melting of the glacier may be explained by a minor sub-glacial eruption. A less plausible interpretation is that the tremor was generated by hydrothermal boiling and/or explosions with no magma involved. This may have been induced by pressure drop triggered by the release of water when the glacial flood started. All interpretations require an increase of heat released by the volcano.

  15. A Pilot Study of Botulinum Toxin for Jerky, Position-Specific, Upper Limb Action Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifee, Tabish A.; Teodoro, Tiago; Erro, Roberto; Edwards, Mark J.; Cordivari, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin (BT) injections for jerky action tremor of the upper limb. Methods We performed an uncontrolled, prospective study of electromyography (EMG)-guided BT injections for jerky, position-specific, upper limb action tremor. The primary outcome was clinical global impression at 3–6 weeks after baseline. Results Eight patients with jerky, position-specific action tremor involving the upper limb were consecutively recruited. After a median follow-up of 4.4 weeks (interquartile range [IQR] 3.6–6 weeks), four of them rated themselves as “improved” and two as “much improved.” Five of these six subjects reported improvements in specific activities of daily living (bringing liquids to mouth, feeding, shaving, and dressing). Upper limb subscore of the Fahn–Tolosa–Marin Tremor Rating Scale (FTM) significantly decreased from 4.5 (4–6) to 3 (2–5) (p = 0.01). Discussion This pilot, prospective cohort study suggests that EMG-guided BT injections may improve jerky, position-specific, upper limb action tremor. Placebo-controlled studies evaluating larger samples of patients are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:27818844

  16. Continuous theta-burst stimulation of the primary motor cortex in essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellriegel, Helge; Schulz, Eva M; Siebner, Hartwig R; Deuschl, Günther; Raethjen, Jan H

    2012-05-01

    We investigated whether essential tremor (ET) can be altered by suppressing the corticospinal excitability in the primary motor cortex (M1) with transcranial magnetic stimulation. 10 Patients with ET and 10 healthy controls underwent transcranial continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) of the left primary motor hand area at 80% (real cTBS) and 30% (control cTBS) of active motor threshold in two separate sessions at least one week apart. Postural tremor was rated clinically and measured accelerometrically before and after cTBS. Corticospinal excitability was assessed by recording the motor evoked potentials (MEP) from the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Real cTBS but not control cTBS reduced the tremor total power assessed with accelerometry. This beneficial effect was subclinical as there were no significant changes in clinical tremor rating after real cTBS. Relative to control cTBS, real cTBS reduced corticospinal excitability in the stimulated primary motor cortex only in healthy controls but not in ET patients. Real cTBS has a beneficial effect on ET. Since cTBS did not induce a parallel reduction in corticospinal excitability, this effect was not mediated by a suppression of the corticospinal motor output. "Inhibitory" cTBS of M1 leads to a consistent but subclinical reduction in tremor amplitude. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparing Moment Release and Tremor Amplitudes in Cascadia ETS Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, K.; Schmidt, D. A.; Houston, H.

    2016-12-01

    A proposed relationship between the moment release of ETS and tremor duration. [Aguiar et al., 2009] compared moment from static inversions of slip with the overall duration of the entire ETS, finding a linear relationship between moment release and tremor duration. There is a logical relationship between the processes that generate slip and those that generate tremor. Spatially, we have seen that slip may occur up-dip of tremor [Houston, 2012] and [Hall and Houston, 2014] in Northern Cascadia. On the other hand, Bartlow et al. [2011] did not resolve a spatio-temporal difference between tremor and slow slip for the 2009 ETS in mid-Cascadia. This raises the possibility that there could be an as-yet-unrecognized regional difference. In order to explore spatio-temporal relationships between tremor and slow slip, I used the Extended Network Inversion Filter (ENIF) [Segall and Matthews, 1997] together with PNSN tremor locations. Preliminary results for the 2010 ETS event yield a M6.8 event that begins near Seattle on August 8th and propagates mainly to the north with some smaller slip to the south, following the propagation of the tremor, a pattern consistent with our static inversion results. The slip-pulse nature of the ETS process is clearly imaged, with some fault patches continuing to slip for several days after tremor has passed through, but not for the entire duration of the event. I then looked at tremor amplitudes [Ulberg and Creager, AGU Abs, 2013], which represent the amount of energy released in a five-minute tremor window. Because the tremor catalog has much finer temporal resolution than the GPS data, I sum the daily tremor amplitudes and compare to daily moment-rates from the time-dependent inversion, obtaining a correlation between moment-rate and tremor amplitude rate. This suggests that the energy released by tremor may be a direct proxy for energy released by slip.

  18. Diagnóstico diferencial dos tremores Differential diagnosis of tremors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAMES PITÁGORAS DE MATTOS

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Baseado na revisão da literatura, o autor refere-se aos tremores normal (fisiológico e anormal (patológico. Analisa particularmente os patológicos, dividindo-os em de repouso e de ação. Com os elementos semiológicos estabelece o diagnóstico diferencial entre os tremores parkinsoniano, essencial severo, rubral, tardio, postural, cinético e os de posição e de ação específica, entre outros.After the review of the literature the author presents the semiologic basis for the differential diagnosis of rest and action tremors. The parkinsonian, severe essential, rubral, tardive, postural, kinetic and the task or position-specific tremors are mainly analysed.

  19. Control of transient vibrations due to stage movements in 6-dof active pneumatic table by inertial force compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jong-Oh; Kim, Kwang-joon

    2013-10-01

    Passive pneumatic tables are popularly used in precision measurements or processes for isolation of ground vibrations over frequency ranges higher than resonance frequencies of a few Hz typically. Recently, active pneumatic tables are also used often because the passive systems are liable to table excitations in the low resonance frequency ranges, causing long settling times. In studies on the active tables, disturbances onto the tables were often regarded to be unknown and, hence, feedback control algorithms were implemented. However, the disturbances are mostly due to inertial forces due to movement of equipment on the table, e.g., x-y stages. Such a movement is given relative to the table as command inputs. Since absolute motion of the table is normally measured in an active isolation table, absolute motion of the equipment can be easily estimated for calculation of the inertial force exerted onto the table by the moving equipment. Consequently, by compensating dynamic pressure inside the pneumatic chamber to counteract with the inertia force due to the equipment motion, resultant forces acting onto the table can be made zero. In this paper, how to apply the proposed feed-forward control algorithm to a 6-degree of freedom active pneumatic table with time-delay pneumatic control is presented. Performance of the inertial force compensation control evaluated through experiments is also discussed.

  20. Dramatic response to levetiracetam in post-ischaemic Holmes’ tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, P; Elefante, Andrea; Coppola, Antonietta; Tortora, Fabio; Zara, Federico; Minetti, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Holmes’ tremor refers to an unusual combination of rest, postural and kinetic tremor of extremities. Common causes of Holmes’ tremor include stroke, trauma, vascular malformations and multiple sclerosis, with lesions involving the thalamus, brain stem or cerebellum. Although some drugs (eg, levodopa and dopaminergic drugs, clonazepam and propranolol) have been occasionally reported to give some benefit, medical treatment of Holmes’ tremor is unsatisfactory, and many patients require thalamic surgery to achieve satisfactory control. We report a patient in whom post-ischaemic Holmes’ tremor dramatically responded to levetiracetam treatment. PMID:21686707

  1. Facial emotion recognition is inversely correlated with tremor severity in essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzou, Nicolas; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Dupouy, Sandrine; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2014-04-01

    We here assess limbic and orbitofrontal control in 20 patients with essential tremor (ET) and 18 age-matched healthy controls using the Ekman Facial Emotion Recognition Task and the IOWA Gambling Task. Our results show an inverse relation between facial emotion recognition and tremor severity. ET patients also showed worse performance in joy and fear recognition, as well as subtle abnormalities in risk detection, but these differences did not reach significance after correction for multiple testing.

  2. De fysiologische tremor van de hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerden, Tiemen Willem van

    1989-01-01

    Bij het innemen van een houding, zoals het willekeurig horizontaal gestrekt houden van de hand, vertoont het betrokken lichaamsdeel kleine fluctuaties in positie: de fysiologische tremor. Het doel van het proefschrift is, naast een beschrijving van het fenomeen, inzicht te geven in de oorzakelijke f

  3. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Physiological Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Pavel; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Manto, Mario-Ubaldo; Bareš, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET), clinically characterized by postural and kinetic tremors, predominantly in the upper extremities, originates from pathological activity in the dynamic oscillatory network comprising the majority of nodes in the central motor network. Evidence indicates dysfunction in the thalamus, the olivocerebellar loops, and intermittent cortical engagement. Pathology of the cerebellum, a structure with architecture intrinsically predisposed to oscillatory activity, has also been implicated in ET as shown by clinical, neuroimaging, and pathological studies. Despite electrophysiological studies assessing cerebellar impairment in ET being scarce, their impact is tangible, as summarized in this review. The electromyography-magnetoencephalography combination provided the first direct evidence of pathological alteration in cortico-subcortical communication, with a significant emphasis on the cerebellum. Furthermore, complex electromyography studies showed disruptions in the timing of agonist and antagonist muscle activation, a process generally attributed to the cerebellum. Evidence pointing to cerebellar engagement in ET has also been found in electrooculography measurements, cerebellar repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation studies, and, indirectly, in complex analyses of the activity of the ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (an area primarily receiving inputs from the cerebellum), which is also used in the advanced treatment of ET. In summary, further progress in therapy will require comprehensive electrophysiological and physiological analyses to elucidate the precise mechanisms leading to disease symptoms. The cerebellum, as a major node of this dynamic oscillatory network, requires further study to aid this endeavor.

  4. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Snoek, Govert J; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V; Jannink, Michiel J A

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation); however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional explorative study to study these effects. Nine subjects with a CSCI performed two goal-directed arm movements (maximal reach, reach and retrieval) with and without gravity compensation. Angles at elbow and shoulder joints and muscle activation were measured and compared. Seven subjects reduced elbow extension (range 1.8°-4.5°) during the maximal reaching task with gravity compensation. In the reach and retrieval task with gravity compensation, all subjects decreased elbow extension (range 0.1°-11.0°). Eight subjects executed movement closer to the body. Regarding muscle activation, gravity compensation did not influence timing; however, the amplitude of activation decreased, especially in antigravity muscles, namely mean change +/- standard deviation of descending part of trapezius (18.2% +/- 37.5%), anterior part of deltoid (37.7% +/- 16.7%), posterior part of deltoid (32.0% +/- 13.9%), and long head biceps (49.6% +/- 20.0%). Clinical implications for the use of gravity compensation in rehabilitation (during activities of daily living or exercise therapy) should be further investigated with a larger population.

  5. Radical advancement in multi-spectral imaging for autonomous vehicles (UAVs, UGVs, and UUVs) using active compensation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Brian F.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to demonstrate a compact, multi-spectral, refractive imaging systems using active optical compensation. Compared to a comparable, conventional lens system, our system has an increased operational bandwidth, provides for spectral selectivity and, non-mechanically corrects aberrations induced by the wavelength dependent properties of a passive refractive optical element (i.e. lens). The compact nature and low power requirements of the system lends itself to small platforms such as autonomous vehicles. In addition, the broad spectral bandwidth of our system would allow optimized performance for both day/night use, and the multi-spectral capability allows for spectral discrimination and signature identification.

  6. Differences in striatal dopamine transporter density between tremor dominant and non-tremor Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Kinos, Maija; Joutsa, Juho [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku (Finland); University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Seppaenen, Marko [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku (Finland); Noponen, Tommi [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can manifest with a tremor-dominant or a non-tremor (akinetic-rigid) phenotype. Although the tremor-dominant subtype may show a better prognosis, there is limited information on the phenotypic differences regarding the level of striatal dopamine transmission. The present study investigated striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding characteristics in a large sample of patients with and without tremor. [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT SPECT scans of 231 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PD and abnormal FP-CIT binding (157 with tremor, 74 without tremor) and 230 control patients with normal FP-CIT binding (148 with tremor, 82 without tremor) were analysed using an automated region-of-interest analysis of the scans (BRASS). Specific striatal binding ratios were compared between phenotypes and groups using age, sex, and symptom duration, predominant side of symptoms, dopaminergic medications and scanner as covariates. Patients with PD had 28.1 - 65.0 % lower binding in all striatal regions compared to controls (p < 0.001). The mean FP-CIT caudate nucleus uptake and the left caudate nucleus uptake were higher in PD patients with tremor than in PD patients without tremor (mean 9.0 % higher, left 10.5 % higher; p < 0.05), whereas there were no differences between tremor and non-tremor control patients. No significant effects of tremor on DAT binding were observed in the anterior or posterior putamen. The motor phenotype is associated with the extent of caudate dopamine terminal loss in PD, as dopamine function is relatively more preserved in tremor patients. Symptom type is related to caudate dopamine function only in association with Parkinsonian dopaminergic degeneration, not in intact dopamine systems in patients with non-PD tremor. (orig.)

  7. TremorScope: A Tool to Image the Deep Workings of the San Andreas Fault near Cholame, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, M.; Burgmann, R.; Taira, T.; Nadeau, R. M.; Dreger, D. S.; Allen, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, active fault zones were thought to deform via seismic slip during earthquakes in the upper, brittle portion of the crust, and by steady, aseismic shear below. However, since 2000, this view has been shaken by seismological observations of seismic tremor deep in the roots of active fault zones, including on the section of the San Andreas to the southeast of Parkfield, CA, deep (~20-30 km) beneath the nucleation zone of the great 1857 Fort Tejon earthquake. With funding from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, we have improved the seismic network in the area above the tremor source by installing four new broadband/strong motion surface stations and four borehole sites with uphole accelerometers and downhole geophones, broadband and strong motion sensors. Data from all stations are telemetered in real-time. They are analysed as part of normal earthquake monitoring, and archived and distributed through the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC). Data from the TremorScope project is improving earthquake monitoring in the region south of Parkfield, including allowing empirical Greens function finite fault analysis of moderate events in the area. Locations and characterization of tremor episodes are improved by the data recorded by TremorScope stations. For example, the rate of ambient tremor activity in the TremorScope area increased by a factor of ~8 within ~12 hours of the 2014 Napa M6.0 earthquake and remained elevated for ~ 100 days, exceeding the tremor rate increase following the 2004 Parkfield M6.0 quake despite the differences in epicentral distance (~300 km vs. ~15 km). No comparable increases in tremor rates have been observed between the Parkfield and Napa events. This suggests that the sensitivity to external stressing in the in the deep tremor zone of the TremorScope region may have increased since 2004. We also show how this network's strong motion instrumentation will provide unprecedented and exciting insights into the

  8. Tactile and proprioceptive temporal discrimination are impaired in functional tremor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tinazzi

    Full Text Available In order to obtain further information on the pathophysiology of functional tremor, we assessed tactile discrimination threshold and proprioceptive temporal discrimination motor threshold values in 11 patients with functional tremor, 11 age- and sex-matched patients with essential tremor and 13 healthy controls.Tactile discrimination threshold in both the right and left side was significantly higher in patients with functional tremor than in the other groups. Proprioceptive temporal discrimination threshold for both right and left side was significantly higher in patients with functional and essential tremor than in healthy controls. No significant correlation between discrimination thresholds and duration or severity of tremor was found.Temporal processing of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli is impaired in patients with functional tremor. The mechanisms underlying this impaired somatosensory processing and possible ways to apply these findings clinically merit further research.

  9. Model for triggering of non-volcanic tremor by earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence of tremor triggering by seismic waves emanating from distant large earthquakes. The frequency content of both triggered and ambient tremor are largely identical, suggesting that this property does not depend directly on the nature of the source. We show here that the model of plate dynamics developed earlier by us is an appropriate tool for describing tremor triggering. In the framework of this model, tremor is an internal response of a fault to a failure triggered by external disturbances. The model predicts generation of radiation in a frequency range defined by the fault parameters. Thus, although the amplitude and duration of a tremor burst may reflect the "personality" of the source, the frequency content does not. The model also explains why a tremor has no clear impulsive phase, in contrast to earthquakes. The relationship between tremor and low frequency earthquakes is discussed.

  10. Aberration influence and active compensation on laser mode properties for asymmetric folded resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Hu, Zhiqiu; Yang, Wentao; Su, Likun

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the influence on mode features with introducing typical intracavity perturbation and results of aberrated wavefront compensation in a folded-type unstable resonator used in high energy lasers. The mode properties and aberration coefficient with intracavity misalignment are achieved by iterative calculation and Zernike polynomial fitting. Experimental results for the relation of intracavity maladjustment and mode characteristics are further obtained in terms of S-H detection and model wavefront reconstruction. It indicates that intracavity phase perturbation has significant influence on out coupling beam properties, and the uniform and symmetry of the mode is rapidly disrupted even by a slight misalignment of the resonator mirrors. Meanwhile, the far-field beam patterns will obviously degrade with increasing the distance between the convex mirror and the phase perturbation position even if the equivalent disturbation is inputted into such the resonator. The closed-loop device for compensating intracavity low order aberration is successfully fabricated. Moreover, Zernike defocus aberration is also effectively controlled by precisely adjusting resonator length, and the beam quality is noticeably improved.

  11. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  12. The Dynamics of Voluntary Force Production in Afferented Muscle Influence Involuntary Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Laine

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary control of force is always marked by some degree of error and unsteadiness. Both neural and mechanical factors contribute to these fluctuations, but how they interact to produce them is poorly understood. In this study, we identify and characterize a previously undescribed neuromechanical interaction where the dynamics of voluntary force production suffice to generate involuntary tremor. Specifically, participants were asked to produce isometric force with the index finger and use visual feedback to track a sinusoidal target spanning 5 to 9 % of each individual’s maximal voluntary force level. Force fluctuations and EMG activity over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS muscle were recorded and their frequency content was analyzed as a function target phase. Force variability in either the 1 to 5 or 6 to 15 Hz frequency ranges tended to be largest at the peaks and valleys of the target sinusoid. In those same periods, FDS EMG activity was synchronized with force fluctuations. We then constructed a physiologically-realistic computer simulation in which a muscle-tendon complex was set inside of a feedback-driven control loop. Surprisingly, the model sufficed to produce phase-dependent modulation of tremor similar to that observed in humans. Further, the gain of afferent feedback from muscle spindles was critical for appropriately amplifying and shaping this tremor. We suggest that the experimentally-induced tremor may represent the response of a viscoelastic muscle-tendon system to dynamic drive, and therefore does not fall into known categories of tremor generation, such as tremorogenic descending drive, stretch-reflex loop oscillations, motor unit behavior, or mechanical resonance. Our findings motivate future efforts to understand tremor from a perspective that considers neuromechanical coupling within the context of closed-loop control. The strategy of combining experimental recordings with physiologically-sound simulations will

  13. Principle and Control Design of Active Ground-Fault Arc Suppression Device for Full Compensation of Ground Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wen; Zeng, Xiangjun; Yan, Lingjie;

    2017-01-01

    Traditional ground-fault arc suppression devices mainly deal with capacitive component of ground current and have weak effect on the active and harmonic ones, which limits the arc suppression performance. The capacitive current detection needed in them suffers from low accuracy and robustness....... The commonly-used large-capacity reactive component may bring about overvoltage because of possible resonance with the distributed phase-to-ground capacitance. To solve these problems, an active ground-fault arc suppression device is presented. It employs a topology based on single-phase inverter to inject...... current into the neutral without any large-capacity reactors, and thus avoids the aforementioned overvoltage. It compensates all the active, reactive and harmonic components of the ground current to reliably extinguish the ground-fault arcs. A dual-loop voltage control method is proposed to realize arc...

  14. Photovoltaic power converter system with a controller configured to actively compensate load harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Michael Andrew; Steigerwald, Robert Louis; Delgado, Eladio Clemente

    2008-12-16

    Photovoltaic power converter system including a controller configured to reduce load harmonics is provided. The system comprises a photovoltaic array and an inverter electrically coupled to the array to generate an output current for energizing a load connected to the inverter and to a mains grid supply voltage. The system further comprises a controller including a first circuit coupled to receive a load current to measure a harmonic current in the load current. The controller includes a second circuit to generate a fundamental reference drawn by the load. The controller further includes a third circuit for combining the measured harmonic current and the fundamental reference to generate a command output signal for generating the output current for energizing the load connected to the inverter. The photovoltaic system may be configured to compensate harmonic currents that may be drawn by the load.

  15. Tremor Hypocenters Form a Narrow Zone at the Plate Interface in Two Areas of SW Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    The tremor detectors developed for accurately locating tectonic tremor in Cascadia [Armbruster et al., JGR 2014] have been applied to data from the HINET seismic network in Japan. In the overview by Obara [Science 2002] there are three strong sources of tectonic tremor in southwest Japan: Shikoku, Kii Pen. and Tokai. The daily epicentral distributions of tremor on the HINET web site allow the identification of days when tremor in each source is active. The worst results were obtained in Shikoku, in spite of the high level of tremor activity observed there by others. This method requires a clear direct arrival of the S and P waves at the stations for coherence to be seen, so scattering and shear wave splitting are possible reasons for poor results there. Relatively wide station spacing, 19-30 km, is another possible reason. The best results were obtained in Tokai with stations STR, HRY and TYE spacing 18-19 km, and Kii Pen. with stations KRT, HYS and KAW spacing 15-22 km. In both of those areas the three station detectors see strong episodes of tremor. If detections with three stations are located by constraining them to the plate interface, a pattern of persistent sources is seen, with some intense sources. This is similar to what was seen in Cascadia. Detections with four stations give S and P arrival times of high accuracy. In Tokai the hypocenters form a narrow, 2-3 km thick, zone dipping to the north, consistent with the plate interface there. In Kii Pen. the hypocenters dip to the northwest in a thin, 2-3 km thick, zone but approximately 5 km shallower than a plate interface model for this area [Yoshioka and Murakami, GJI 2007]. The overlap of tremor sources in the 12 years analyzed here suggests relative hypocentral location errors as small as 2-3 km. We conclude that the methods developed in Cascadia will work in Japan but the typical spacing of HINET stations, ~20 km, is greater than the optimum distance found in analysis of data from Cascadia, 8 to 15 km.

  16. 半主动式钻柱升沉补偿系统补偿机理分析%Analysis of the Compensating Mechanism of Semi-active Drill String Heaving Compensation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萌; 胡小东; 李波

    2012-01-01

    Applying the d'Alembert principle and referring to the movement law of drill string, the parallel and serial dynamic models of semi-active drill string heaving compensation device were established. The compensating mechanism of the parallel and serial semi-active drill string heaving compensation systems were analyzed and com- pared. The findings show that the function of the passive compensation part in the system is to support most of the mass of drill string and that of the active compensation part is to compensate the variation of various forces. The hy- draulic system of the parallel structure is quite complex due to the fact that there are more executing components in parallel structure than in serial structure. However, when the generated displacement of the hull is remarkable and the compensation load required by subsea drilling is relatively large, parallel structure is better than serial struc- ture. The parallel drill string heaving compensation can only reach the control goal through the output force of the control compensation system when the control goal is to keep downhole drilling pressure unchanged in normal drill- ing conditions. But the serial structure can reach the control goal through controlling the output pressure or keeping constant output force of the compensation system.%运用达朗伯原理,结合钻柱的运动规律,分别建立了并联和串联2种形式的半主动式钻柱升沉补偿装置力学模型,分析比较这2种半主动式升沉补偿装置的补偿机理。结果表明,在半主动式升沉补偿系统中,被动补偿部分所起的作用是支撑钻柱的大部分质量,主动补偿部分只是用来补偿各种力的变化量;由于并联式结构比串联式结构的执行原件多,所以其液压系统相对复杂,但当船体升沉位移较大和深海钻进所需的补偿负载较大时,并联式结构又优于串联式结构;在正常钻进工况下,当控制目标为控制井底钻压不变时,并联式钻

  17. Creative compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coll, D

    1994-09-19

    A discussion is presented of executive compensation in Canada's petroleum industry. Mandatory disclosure of executive compensation and benefits is regulated by the Ontario Securities Commission. Examination of the compensation packages of 80 oilpatch CEOs shows a clear difference in philosophy between large and small companies. Larger companies pay larger salaries, offer pension plans, and reward long-term loyalty. Within smaller companies, compensation tends to be linked with stock performance. Trends in compensation are to lower base salaries with more variables such as bonuses, cash incentives and gain-sharing programs. Increasing shareholder scrutiny is prompting more stringent guidelines on stock option plans. Some companies place performance conditions on stock vesting. Another option is to grant premium priced options to executives, to increase the gains required for the executive to post a profit. Other comapanies are granting stock options to their field personnel, or are granting stock to all employees. Directors are playing an increasing role in executive compensation. 4 tabs.

  18. Cerebral causes and consequences of parkinsonian resting tremor: a tale of two circuits?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Hallett, M.; Deuschl, G.; Toni, I.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Tremor in Parkinson's disease has several mysterious features. Clinically, tremor is seen in only three out of four patients with Parkinson's disease, and tremor-dominant patients generally follow a more benign disease course than non-tremor patients. Pathophysiologically, tremor is linked to

  19. Observations of two special kinds of tremor at Galeras volcano, Colombia (1989-1991)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil Cruz, F. [Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico, Manizales (Colombia)

    1999-06-01

    The paper analyzes two kinds of tremor produced by Galeras volcano in 1988: flute tremor and spasmodic tremor. Spectrum and peak of flute tremor are described. The paper also distinguishes two types of spasmodic tremor on the basis of their spectral characteristics and field observations.

  20. Cerebral causes and consequences of parkinsonian resting tremor: a tale of two circuits?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Hallett, M.; Deuschl, G.; Toni, I.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Tremor in Parkinson's disease has several mysterious features. Clinically, tremor is seen in only three out of four patients with Parkinson's disease, and tremor-dominant patients generally follow a more benign disease course than non-tremor patients. Pathophysiologically, tremor is linked to altere

  1. A capacitor-free CMOS LDO regulator with AC-boosting and active-feedback frequency compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Qianneng; Wang Yongsheng; Lai Fengchang

    2009-01-01

    A capacitor-free CMOS low-dropout(LDO)regulator for system-on-chip(SoC)applications is presented.By adopting AC-boosting and active-feedback frequency compensation(ACB-AFFC),the proposed LDO enhancement circuit is adopted to increase the slew rate and decrease the output voltage dips when the load current is suddenly switched from low to high.The LDO regulator is designed and fabricated in a 0.6/am CMOS process.The active silicon area is only 770×472μm2.Experimental results show that the total error of the output voltage due to line variation is less than ±0.1 97%.The load regulation is only 0.35 mV/mA when the load current changes fromoto 100mA.

  2. Familial Essential Tremor Studied With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, A.; Salgado, P.; Gil, A.; Barrios, F. A.

    2003-09-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become an important analytical tool to study neurodegenerative diseases. We applied the EPI-BOLD functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging technique to acquire functional images of patients with familial essential tremor (FET) disorder and healthy control volunteers, during a motor task activity. Functional and anatomic images were used to produce the brain activation maps of the patients and volunteers. These functional maps of the primary somatosensorial and motor cortexes of patients and control subjects were compared for functional differences per subject. The averaged functional brain images of eight of each case were acquired were, it can be clearly observed the differences in active zones. The results presented in this work show that there are differences in the functional maps during motor task activation between control subjects and FET patients suggesting a cerebral functional reorganization that can be mapped with BOLD-fMRI.

  3. Quantifying tectonic tremor in southern Mexico and its curious relationship to slow slip and other tremor triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, S. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    The discoveries of tectonic tremor along with slow slip provide exciting new insights into fault deformation at major tectonic boundaries. Tremor and slip were first recorded in Cascadia, but have now been observed in a variety of other subduction zones. Recent studies in Oaxaca, Mexico reveal both slow slip and tectonic tremor, but analysis of the most prominent tremor finds it occurs over a short time period of 2-10 days and recurs as often as every 2-3 months, while slow slip occurs much less frequently on the order of 12-24 months. This result was surprising considering that tremor and slip are so well correlated in Cascadia that a linear relationship exists between the number of tremor hours recorded and the moment of concurrent slow slip. In contrast, the first study of tremor in Oaxaca found prominent tremor episodes were only slightly more common during the 2-month slow slip event than the 6 months before or after. However, tremor is more difficult to detect in Oaxaca than Cascadia considering the frequent regional seismicity, seasonal storms, and limited seismic network. Here, we use our detection algorithm to investigate the prevalence of short period tremor, which may have gone undetected by the original processing of scanning 4-day average absolute amplitudes in the tremor passband. As an alternative, we utilize a recently developed technique for detecting tremor that takes advantage of the narrow frequency content by calculating the ratio of amplitudes in the tremor passband relative to amplitudes in higher and lower frequency passbands where regional seismicity and surface waves are more common, respectively. Results from this frequency ratio method are in good agreement with the original tremor detections and locations in Oaxaca and additionally, detect several previously unidentified low amplitude, short duration inter-ETS tremor events. Moreover, this detection technique will provide a more thorough estimate of tremor prevalence over time to test

  4. Functional MRI for immediate monitoring stereotactic thalamotomy in a patient with essential tremor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Schaaf, Maike; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus [University of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Maarouf, Mohammed; Hunsche, Stefan; Sturm, Volker [University of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Lasek, Kathrin [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig Holstein, Klinik fuer Neurologie, Luebeck (Germany); Wedekind, Christoph [Akademisches Lehrkrankenhaus der Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Belegabteilung fuer Neurochirurgie, Klinikum Bamberg, Bamberg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    The effect of stereotactic thalamotomy was assessed with pre- and postoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) under motor stimulation. A patient with unilateral essential tremor (ET) of the left arm underwent stereotactically guided thalamotomy of the right ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM). FMRI was done directly before and after surgery on a 1.5-Tesla scanner. The stimulation paradigm was maintainance of the affected arm in an extended position and hand clenching being performed in a block design manner. Statistical analysis was done with Brain Voyager 2000. After thalamotomy the tremor diminished completely. As a difference between the pre- and postoperative fMRI, a significant activation was found in the VIM contralateral to the activation site, adjacent to the inferior olivary nucleus contralateral to the activation site and in the dorsal cingulum. In conclusion, fMRI can detect the functional effect of thalamotomy for tremor treatment. Direct postoperative fMRI provides a sufficient method for estimating the effect of thalamotomy immediately after intervention. The importance of the intermediate thalamic nucleus and the olivary nucleus in tremor generation is supported by our findings. (orig.)

  5. Seismic Tremor Generated by Multiple Processes, Vatnajökull Glacier, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, E. P. S.; Bean, C. J.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    Vatnajökull glacier in eastern Iceland covers five volcanic systems in which Bárdarbunga and Grimsvötn are the most active volcanoes. Whilst fluctuating ice cover mitigates against year-round near-field monitoring of the volcanoes, important information can be gleaned from stations deployed at the glacier's edge. Glacial cover significantly increases the complexity of and the solution space for observed seismic signals. For example tremor can be caused by magmatic activity, intra-glacier interactions, melt water flow or hydrothermal boiling. A better understanding of hazard requires a more indepth understanding of the signals generated by these processes at Vatnajökull. We augmented the sparse network in the region with two seven-element broad band seismometer arrays west of Vatnajökull, in Jökulheimar and near Laki respectively. Observed seismic tremor-like transients (< 2 Hz) originating from two cauldrons west of Grimsvötn are directly associated with small flooding events (jökulhaups), as subsequently confirmed by radar and hydrological observations. For larger longer duration floods dominant harmonic tremor frequencies of 2 to 4 Hz are observed, but they change in amplitude and frequency with time, likely reflecting variable feed and flow rates, associated with a moving source. Our aim is to 'fingerprint' these events such that they can be distinguished from seismic tremor signals associated with magmatic activity.

  6. Cosmic signatures in earth's seismic tremor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulargia, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Even in absence of earthquakes, each site on earth experiences continuous elastic vibrations which are mostly traced to the nonlinear interactions of ocean waves. However, the fine structure of the spectrum at mHz frequencies shows many persistent and highly significant narrow bandwidth peaks in surprising coincidence with solar acoustic eigenmodes. The feasibility of a common cosmic origin is evaluated through an estimate of the gravitational wave cross-section of the earth, combined with its elastic response and with the stochastic amplification produced by the interference of the cosmic signal with tremor of oceanic origin. The measured spectral peaks appear compatible with a gravitational monochromatic illumination at strains h ≳ 10-20, larger than those expected for any known gravitational stellar source. Hence, a gravitational source attribution to the tremor spectral peaks would call for a population of unknown non-luminous sources with well-defined mass-distance ratios.

  7. [Topiramate in the treatment of essential tremor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalialova, Z A; Latypova, G R

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic efficacy of topiramate in essential tremor (ET) was assessed in comparison with propranolol in two groups which included 24 and 20 patients, respectively, aged from 21 to 83 years (mean age 53 years). Along with clinical examination, a number of scales: Clinical rating scale for tremor, scale of functional disturbances and Visual-analogous scale have been administered. The efficacy of topiramate was comparable to that of propranolol in 83% and 75% cases, respectively. However topiramate has some therapeutic advantages compared to propranolol; it may be prescribed for all clinical forms regardless of sex (its efficacy is higher in women), age and illness duration, both in earlier and later onset, familial and sporadic variants of ET (propranolol is more effective in patients with family history of ET). Moreover, in contrast to propranolol, topiramate may be prescribed to patients with predisposition to arterial hypertension and bradicardia, bronchial spasms of diabetes mellitus and heart rhythm disturbances.

  8. 1979 national survey of compensation. Paid scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    This survey of compensation uses the maturity of age-wage approach, in which salary data are related to years since receipt of degree or chronological age. This report gives the results of the twelfth annual survey, conducted in 1979. Introductory material is given on the sampling plan (survey universe listing, sampling frame, sampling procedures, structure of sample), basic data for survey analysis (establishment data, employee data), entrance rates, trend analysis, geographic analysis, analysis of data (editing of raw data, use of varying axes, arithmetic formulas, median curves), important qualifications concerning survey results, and computation of approximate confidence limits. The bulk of the report contains salary tables of the following types: total survey tables; Bachelor's degree; Master's degree; Doctorate degree; professional degrees; median, curves-supervisory level by degree level, YSBD; nondegreed employees, age; working-as occupation, YSBD; sex, nonsupervisory employees, Bachelor's degree, working-as occupation; trend analysis-five-year identical-company comparisons, median curves; and standard metropolitan statistical area size by establishment size, median curves and census district curves. Employer questionnaire forms are appended. (RWR)

  9. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagerman, Paul J; Hagerman, Randi J

    2015-03-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that affects some but not all carriers of small, noncoding CGG-repeat expansions (55-200 repeats; premutation) within the fragile X gene (FMR1). Principal features of FXTAS include intention tremor, cerebellar ataxia, Parkinsonism, memory and executive function deficits, autonomic dysfunction, brain atrophy with white matter disease, and cognitive decline. Although FXTAS was originally considered to be confined to the premutation range, rare individuals with a gray zone (45-54 repeats) or an unmethylated full mutation (>200 repeats) allele have now been described, the constant feature of the disorder remaining the requirement for FMR1 expression, in contradistinction to the gene silencing mechanism of fragile X syndrome. Although transcriptional activity is required for FXTAS pathogenesis, the specific trigger(s) for FXTAS pathogenesis remains elusive, highlighting the need for more research in this area. This need is underscored by recent neuroimaging findings of changes in the central nervous system that consistently appear well before the onset of clinical symptoms, thus creating an opportunity to delay or prevent the appearance of FXTAS. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Neurological tremor: sensors, signal processing and emerging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Neurological tremor is the most common movement disorder, affecting more than 4% of elderly people. Tremor is a non linear and non stationary phenomenon, which is increasingly recognized. The issue of selection of sensors is central in the characterization of tremor. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art instrumentation and methods of signal processing for tremor occurring in humans. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of the most commonly used sensors, as well as the emerging wearable sensors being developed to assess tremor instantaneously. We discuss the current limitations and the future applications such as the integration of tremor sensors in BCIs (brain-computer interfaces) and the need for sensor fusion approaches for wearable solutions.

  12. Behavioral analyses of visually impaired Crx knockout mice revealed sensory compensation in exploratory activities on elevated platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iura, Yoichiro; Udo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Visual perception is important for acquiring spatial information in many animals, and loss of vision often causes devastating effects on their survival. However, it may be compensated to some extent by utilizing other intact sensory modalities. The cone-rod homeobox (Crx) gene plays a key role in development of photoreceptor cells, but behavioral consequences of the gene deletion have not been well characterized. In this study, we analyzed homozygous knockout (Crx(-/-)) mice by comparing with heterozygous knockout (Crx(+/-)) mice as controls. We first checked their vision with three different behavioral paradigms of the glass table visual recognition test, the light-dark transition test, and the Barnes maze test with a visual cue, all of which indicated that Crx(-/-) mice were blind while Crx(+/-) mice were sighted. In the fear conditioning test, Crx(-/-) mice were able to acquire both contextual and cued memory using non-visual information. Crx(-/-) mice showed normal thigmotaxis, but the exploratory activities were significantly increased. In the elevated plus maze test, it was unexpected that Crx(-/-) mice rarely fell down from the narrow platform. There was no reduction in their moving speeds and the moving distance was rather increased in Crx(-/-) mice. Such behaviors were not affected by trimming their whiskers. However, attachment of earplugs significantly reduced their exploratory activities. In summary, these data suggest that Crx(-/-) mice were behaviorally blind but were able to learn and recognize external environment utilizing non-visual information, as exemplified by sensory compensation in exploratory activities on elevated platforms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetics of Parkinson disease and essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wider, Christian; Ross, Owen A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2010-08-01

    Elucidating the genetic background of Parkinson disease and essential tremor is crucial to understand the pathogenesis and improve diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. A number of approaches have been applied including familial and association studies, and studies of gene expression profiles to identify genes involved in susceptibility to Parkinson disease. These studies have nominated a number of candidate Parkinson disease genes and novel loci including Omi/HtrA2, GIGYF2, FGF20, PDXK, EIF4G1 and PARK16. A recent notable finding has been the confirmation for the role of heterozygous mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) as risk factors for Parkinson disease. Finally, association studies have nominated genetic variation in the leucine-rich repeat and Ig containing 1 gene (LINGO1) as a risk for both Parkinson disease and essential tremor, providing the first genetic evidence of a link between the two conditions. Although undoubtedly genes remain to be identified, considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the genetic basis of Parkinson disease. This same effort is now required for essential tremor. The use of next-generation high-throughput sequencing and genotyping technologies will help pave the way for future insight leading to advances in diagnosis, prevention and cure.

  14. Discriminating Tectonic Tremor from Magmatic Processes in Observationally Challenging Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. R.; Beroza, G. C.

    2011-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor is a long-duration, low amplitude signal that has been shown to consist of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) on the plate interface in subduction zones. Detecting LFEs from tremor-like signals in subduction settings can be challenging due to the combination of volcanic seismicity and sparse station geometry. This is particularly true for island arcs such as the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone where the islands are small and noise levels are high. We have detected and located LFEs within tremor signals along the Alaska-Aleutian Arc in four locations: Kodiak Island, Alaska Peninsula, eastern Aleutians, and the Andreanof Islands. In all areas, the LFEs are located 10-40 km trenchward of the volcanic chain at depths ranging from 45-70 km. Location errors are significant (+/- 20 km in depth) due to sparse station geometry such that there is the possibility that the tremor could be associated with nearby volcanoes. Since most documented volcanic tremor is located in the shallow crust, it can often be discriminated from tectonic tremor simply based on location. However, deep volcanic tremor has been documented in Hawaii to depths of 40 km and could be more widespread. In the Aleutian arc, deep long period events (DLPs), which are thought to result from the movement of magma and volatiles, have been located as deep as 45 km and sometimes resemble tremor-like signals. The spectral character is another potential discriminant. We compare the cepstra (Fourier transform of the logarithmic power spectrum of a time series) of the tectonic tremor-like signals/LFEs and DLPs associated with volcanoes. Source characteristics of DLPs (non-shear slip) and tectonic tremor/LFEs (shear slip) are distinct and should be noticeable in the cepstral domain. This approach of using tremor locations and cepstral analysis could be useful for detecting and differentiating tectonic tremor from deep volcanic processes in other island arcs as well.

  15. Within-person associations of young adolescents’ physical activity across five primary locations: is there evidence of cross-location compensation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Jordan A.; Mitchell, Tarrah B.; Saelens, Brian E.

    2017-01-01

    Youth are active in multiple locations, but it is unknown whether more physical activity in one location is associated with less in other locations. This cross-sectional study examines whether on days with more physical activity in a given location, relative to their typical activity in that loca...... in that location, youth had less activity in other locations (i.e., within-person associations/compensation)....

  16. The timing of primary orthostatic tremor bursts has a task-specific plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, J H; Britton, T C; Rothwell, J C; Findley, L J; Marsden, C D

    2000-02-01

    Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by unsteadiness and shakiness of the legs while standing. It is due to a remarkably strong and regular EMG modulation at approximately 16 Hz that is thought to be of CNS origin. Previous studies have shown that the tremor frequency is the same in all involved muscles and that the time relation between bursts of activity in different muscles may be fixed (e.g. always co-contracting or always contracting in an alternating pattern). Here we have used frequency domain analysis of postural muscle EMG signals in five primary orthostatic tremor patients and in two normal controls to explore the nature of such fixed timing patterns. The timing is found not to relate simply to the relative conduction times for passage of rhythmic bursts from a central oscillation to different muscles. Indeed, although the timing pattern (expressed as phase) of the 16-Hz EMG bursts in different postural muscles remains constant while the subject adopts a certain steady posture, it is different for different subjects and also changes when the same subject adopts a different posture. It seems unlikely that such complex task-dependent timing relations of rhythmic postural muscle activity are due to the primary pathology of primary orthostatic tremor. Instead, we suggest that the abnormally strong peripheral manifestation of a 16-Hz CNS oscillation merely unmasks normal central processes so that the timing patterns may provide a clue to the nature of postural motor control.

  17. Volcanic tremor at Mt Vesuvius associated with low frequency shear failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rocca, Mario; Galluzzo, Danilo

    2016-05-01

    Mt Vesuvius has been dormant since the eruption occurred in 1944, after which the conduit closed and the volcano entered a quiescent state. Only a minor seismic activity, characterized by low magnitude volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, testifies that the magmatic system is still active. In this paper we report the fist quantitative analysis of volcanic tremor discovered at Vesuvius through the analysis of array data. A seismic array installed in 2012 improved the monitoring performance of the local network, permitting the identification of low amplitude coherent signals. Many of such coherent signals recorded during the last few years have been classified as volcanic tremor. We selected 22 tremor events based on their amplitude and on the number of available stations, and performed detailed analysis aimed at location and characterization of the source. They are characterized by low frequency, duration of a few minutes, and the strongest episodes are recorded at distance up to 90 km from the volcano. In many cases we could identify P-S wave pairs in the seismograms that allowed a precise location of the source depth, which is in the range between 5 km and 6.5 km below the crater. Waveform features, spectral analysis, and comparison with VT earthquakes located at the same depth indicate that the source mechanism of the Vesuvius non-eruptive tremor is a sequence of low frequency shear failures.

  18. Alumina Encapsulated Strain Gage Not Mechanically Attached To The Substrate, Used to Temperature Compensate an Active High Temperature Gage In A Half-Bridge Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Anthony (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A temperature compensation element for a high-temperature strain gage and the method of fabricating the same. Preferably, the element is a "dummy" strain gage not mechanically attached to the substrate. The element is encapsulated in an insulative material and used to compensate an active high-temperature strain gage and wired in a half-bridge configuration. The temperature compensation element and high-temperature strain gage are fabricated using the method of the present invention. This method includes temporarily adhering the element to a heat sink, encapsulated in an insulative material and then removed from the heat sink. Next, the element is either stacked or placed near the active gage. Ideally, the element and the active gage have substantially similar heat transfer and electrical properties.

  19. Research on the filtering characteristic of single phase series hybrid active power filter based on fundamental magnetic flux compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Chen, Qiaofu; Zhang, Yuqi

    2012-12-01

    In this article, the PWM inverter works as a controlled fundamental current source in the single phase series hybrid active power filter (APF) based on fundamental magnetic flux compensation (FMFC). The series transformer can exhibit the self-impedance of primary winding to harmonic current, which forces harmonic current to flow into passive power filter. With the influence of harmonic current, the voltage of primary winding of transformer is a harmonic voltage, which makes the inverter output currents have a certain harmonic component, and it degrades the filtering characteristics. On the basis of PWM inverter, the mathematical model of series hybrid APF is established, and the filtering characteristics of single phase APF are analysed in detail. Three methods are gained to improve filtering characteristics: reasonably designing the inverter output filter inductance, increasing series transformer ratio and adopting voltage feed-forward control. Experimental results show that the proposed APF has greater validity.

  20. Embarrassment in essential tremor: prevalence, clinical correlates and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D; Rios, Eileen

    2009-08-01

    Embarrassment is a commonly described feature of essential tremor (ET) but has not been the focus of clinical research. To estimate the prevalence, identify susceptible patient groups, and quantify the therapeutic correlates of reported embarrassment. A total of 106 ET cases from a population-based sample and 349 ET cases from a clinical sample were asked, "Does your tremor often embarrass you?" In the clinical sample, the prevalence of embarrassment was high (58.2%). Even in those ET cases with no head tremor and mild arm tremor, nearly one-half (29/61 [47.5%]) reported embarrassment. While the prevalence of embarrassment was lower in the population-based sample, it was not negligible (18.9%). Embarrassment was associated with younger age of onset (p=0.003) and women were nearly twice as likely as men to report embarrassment (OR=1.85, p=0.01). Independent of tremor severity, embarrassment nearly doubled the odds of using tremor medication (OR=1.86, p=0.01). Embarrassment may be a source of disability in ET. Even among clinic patients with mild tremor, nearly one-half reported embarrassment. We identified a number of patient characteristics linked to embarrassment. Embarrassment alone (i.e., independent of tremor severity) was responsible for a doubling of tremor medication usage. The majority of clinical trials do not assess the therapeutic effects of medication on embarrassment. These trials may benefit from scaled assessments of level of embarrassment.

  1. Towards closed-loop deep brain stimulation: decision tree-based essential tremor patient's state classifier and tremor reappearance predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pitamber; Basu, Ishita; Tuninetti, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a surgical procedure to treat some progressive neurological movement disorders, such as Essential Tremor (ET), in an advanced stage. Current FDA-approved DBS systems operate open-loop, i.e., their parameters are unchanged over time. This work develops a Decision Tree (DT) based algorithm that, by using non-invasively measured surface EMG and accelerometer signals as inputs during DBS-OFF periods, classifies the ET patient's state and then predicts when tremor is about to reappear, at which point DBS is turned ON again for a fixed amount of time. The proposed algorithm achieves an overall accuracy of 93.3% and sensitivity of 97.4%, along with 2.9% false alarm rate. Also, the ratio between predicted tremor delay and the actual detected tremor delay is about 0.93, indicating that tremor prediction is very close to the instant where tremor actually reappeared.

  2. Imaging Slow Slip Fronts in Cascadia With High-Precision Tremor Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, A. M.; Armbruster, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    We use the method of Armbruster and Kim [AGU 2010] to obtain tremor locations using 4-second windows, focusing on a few spots beneath southern Vancouver Island activated by slow slip events from 2003 to 2005. The method compares horizontal-component waveforms (not envelopes) at 3 stations separated by 10-20 km. From local earthquakes "caught" by the detector it appears that the coherent signal consists of the direct S arrival but not the S coda. Using 150-s windows, Armbruster and Kim found "wispy" sources of tremor that in some regions were reproducible between the 2003, 2004, and 2005 events to within 1 km. In time, their tremor locations trace out quasi-linear trajectories on the fault surface that migrate tens of times faster than the main front, as has been reported elsewhere [e.g., Ghosh et al., 2010; Vidale et al., AGU 2011]. By moving to 4-s windows, we find that these long-time-window locations very often represent the spatial "average" of secondary fronts behind the main front. These secondary fronts tend to (a) start within about 1 km of the main tremor front and propagate back along strike, akin to the "rapid tremor reversals" of Houston et al. [2011] but on a smaller scale (5 km rather than 50); (b) less commonly do the reverse, ending at the main front; or (c) propagate up- or down-dip at or within 1-2 kilometers of the main front. Rare events propagate in other directions. The fronts that move along strike can be as narrow as 1 km in the propagation direction but can exceed 5 km in the orthogonal direction. Those that propagate along dip are typically also narrow (~ 1 km) in the strike direction; if they are even narrower in the propagation direction this is below our resolution. Characteristic propagation speeds are 10 km/hr along strike and several times faster along dip. For those along-dip migrations that occur at the main front, the larger propagation speed is plausibly an "apparent" velocity as the main front intersects an along-dip alignment

  3. Shallow micro low-frequency tremor before the Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakami, Satoshi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ohta, Kazuaki; Hino, Ryota; Suzuki, Syuichi; Shinohara, Masanao

    2017-04-01

    Slow earthquake activity is one of the important phenomena to understand slip behavior in the shallower part of the subduction zone, especially to understand the generation of tsunami earthquakes. Recently, SSEs and low-frequency tremor have been observed near the trench by using ocean bottom observations, and these have been located in the updip portion of a coseismic slip area [Wallace et al., 2016; Yamashita et al., 2015]. In addition, Ito et al. [2015] observed tremor sequences from the excitation of ambient noise amplitude, accompanied with SSE in the source area of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake's mainshock. However, the signals observed within these sequences showed very weak amplitude and were observed at only one station, nearest to the Japan Trench. Here, we report on our detection of micro low-frequency tectonic tremor (mLFT) activity prior to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake near the Japan Trench by using modified frequency scanning method (mFSM) as applied to ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) . The original frequency scanning method [Sit et al., 2012] proposed a tremor detection method of calculating envelope waveform ratios through different bandpass filters of broadband data in the Cascadia margin. We modified this analysis for short period OBS seismic data recorded at 17 OBSs deployed in an area near the trench axis offshore Miyagi Prefecture, northeast Japan. Three bandpass filters of 2-4 Hz, 10-20 Hz, and 0.5-1.0 Hz, corresponding to the dominant frequency band of tremors, local earthquakes, and ocean noise, respectively, were applied to the OBS records for a period between November 19, 2010 and March 9, 2011. This duration is the same as the deployment period of TJT2 station which is located nearest to the Japan Trench, and is also before the largest foreshock of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The results of applying the mFSM show three major tremor sequences, suggesting tremor activity in the shallowest part of the subduction zone. The sequences agree with

  4. Observations of volcanic earthquakes and tremor at Deception Island - Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Morales

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Deception Island - South Shetlands, Antarctica is site of active volcanism. Since 1988 field surveys have been carried out with the aim of seismic monitoring, and in 1994 a seismic array was set up near the site of the Spanish summer base in order to better constrain the source location and spectral properties of the seismic events related to the volcanic activity. The array was maintained during the Antarctic summer of 1995 and the last field survey was carried out in 1996. Data show the existence of three different groups (or families of seismic events: 1 long period events, with a quasi-monochromatic spectral content (1-3 Hz peak frequency and a duration of more than 50 s, often occurring in small swarms lasting from several minutes to some day; 2 volcanic tremor, with a spectral shape similar to the long period events but with a duration of several minutes (2-10; 3 hybrid events, with a waveform characterised by the presence of a high frequency initial phase, followed by a low frequency phase with characteristics similar to those of the long period events. The high frequency phase of the hybrid events was analysed using polarisation techniques, showing the presence of P waves. This phase is presumably located at short epicentral distances and shallow source depth. All the analysed seismic events show back-azimuths between 120 and 330 degrees from north (corresponding to zones of volcanic activity showing no seismic activity in the middle of the caldera. Particle motion, Fourier spectral and spectrogram analysis show that the low frequency part of the three groups of the seismic signals have similar patterns. Moreover careful observations show that the high frequency phase which characterises the hybrid events is present in the long period and in the tremor events, even with lower signal to noise ratios. This evidence suggests that long period events are events in which the high frequency part is simply difficult to observe, due to a very

  5. Geodetic And Seismic Signatures of Episodic Tremor And Slip Beneath Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragert, H.; Rogers, G.; Wang, K.

    2004-05-01

    Slip events with an average duration of about 10 days and effective total slip displacements of several centimetres have been detected on the deeper (25 to 45 km) part of the northern Cascadia subduction zone plate interface by a network of continuously recording Global Positioning System (GPS) sites. The slip events occur down-dip from the currently locked, seismogenic portion of the plate interface, and, for the geographic region around Victoria, British Columbia, repeat at 13 to 16 month intervals. These episodes of slip are accompanied by distinct, low frequency, non-earthquake tremors, similar to those reported in the forearc region of southern Japan, prompting the naming of this phenomenon as Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS). The tremor-like seismic signals have now been identified beneath most of Vancouver Island. For northern Vancouver Island, where plate convergence is at a much slower rate, return periods of about 14 months were also observed for significant (duration exceeding 7 days) tremor sequences, but about 6 months out of phase with southern Vancouver Island. Slip associated with northern island tremors has not been resolved clearly enough to allow modeling because of sparse GPS coverage, but 3 to 4 mm surface displacements coincident with the most recent tremors were observed at two newer GPS stations located on the northwest coast of Vancouver Island. The total amount of tremor activity, and by inference slip activity, appears to be the same in northern and southern Vancouver Island and therefore independent of plate convergence rate. ETS activity is observed to migrate along the strike of the subduction zone at speeds of 5 to 15 km/day and this migration does not appear to be impeded by the Nootka Fault Zone that marks the change in subduction rates. It is strongly suspected that the youth of the subducting plate and the release of fluids from slab dehydration are key factors contributing to the episodic, semi-brittle behaviour of the ETS zone. It

  6. Spatial and temporal patterns of nonvolcanic tremor along the southern Cascadia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarko, Devin C.; Brudzinski, Michael R.

    2010-08-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS), the spatial and temporal correlation of slow slip events monitored via GPS surface displacements and nonvolcanic tremor (NVT) monitored via seismic signals, is a newly discovered mode of deformation thought to be occurring downdip from the seismogenic zone along several subduction zone megathrusts. To provide overall constraints on the distribution and migration behavior of NVT in southern Cascadia, we apply a semiautomated location algorithm to seismic data available during the EarthScope Transportable Array deployment to detect the most prominent pulses of NVT and invert analyst-refined relative arrival times for source locations. In the processing, we also detect distinct and isolated bursts of energy within the tremor similar to observations of low-frequency earthquakes in southwest Japan. We investigate in detail eight NVT episodes between November 2005 and August 2007 with source locations extending over a 650 km along-strike region from northern California to northern Oregon. We find complex tremor migration patterns with periods of steady migration (4-10 km/d), halting, and frequent along-strike jumps (30-400 km) in activity. The initiation and termination points of laterally continuous tremor activity appear to be repeatable features between NVT episodes which support the hypothesis of segmentation within the ETS zone. The overall distribution of NVT epicenters occur within a narrow band primarily confined by the surface projections of the 30 and 40 km contours of the subducting plate interface. We find as much as 50 km spatial offset from the updip edge of the tremor source zone to the downdip edge of the thermally and geodetically defined transition zone, which may inhibit ETS from triggering earthquakes further updip. Intriguingly, NVT activity is spatially anticorrelated with local seismicity, suggesting the two processes are mutually exclusive. We propose that the transition in frictional behavior coupled with high pore

  7. Questioning Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Transparent management and open information needed for the fund set up to compensate victims of the 2008 Sanlu milk scandal Almost three years after the Sanlu milk scandal that caused thousands of infants in China to develop urinary disease after drinking melamine

  8. Reduction of muscle activity during repeated reach and retrieval with gravity compensation in stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, M.J.A.; Prange, Grada Berendina; Stienen, Arno; van der Kooij, Herman; Kruitbosch, J.M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.; G.J. Gelderblom Bart Driessen, Just L. Herder

    2007-01-01

    Active movement of the affected arm is important in the training of arm function after stroke. By supporting the weight of the arm during movements, either in conventional treatment or in other approaches such as robot-aided therapy, active arm movements can be facilitated. Studies into the

  9. Tremor Reduction at the Palm of a Parkinson’s Patient Using Dynamic Vibration Absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gebai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s patients suffer from severe tremor due to an abnormality in their central oscillator. Medications used to decrease involuntary antagonistic muscles contraction can threaten their life. However, mechanical vibration absorbers can be used as an alternative treatment. The objective of this study is to provide a dynamic modeling of the human hand that describes the biodynamic response of Parkinson’s patients and to design an effective tuned vibration absorber able to suppress their pathological tremor. The hand is modeled as a three degrees-of-freedom (DOF system describing the flexion motion at the proximal joints on the horizontal plane. Resting tremor is modeled as dual harmonic excitation due to shoulder and elbow muscle activation operating at resonance frequencies. The performance of the single dynamic vibration absorber (DVA is studied when attached to the forearm and compared with the dual DVA tuned at both excitation frequencies. Equations of motion are derived and solved using the complex transfer function of the non-Lagrangian system. The absorber’s systems are designed as a stainless steel alloy cantilevered beam with an attached copper mass. The dual DVA was the most efficient absorber which reduces 98.3%–99.5%, 97.0%–97.3% and 97.4%–97.5% of the Parkinson’s tremor amplitude at the shoulder, elbow and wrist joint.

  10. Episodic Muscle Tremors in a Quarter Horse: Resemblance to Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiss, Janet E.; Naylor, Jonathan M.

    1986-01-01

    A three year old Quarter Horse stallion was presented with a one year history of episodes of generalized muscle tremors and stiffness, and spasm of the muscles of facial expression, lasting 10-15 minutes. Between attacks, the horse was either normal or had a localized muscle tremor in the flank region. Episodes appeared unrelated to exercise. The major abnormal findings included 1) a rise in plasma potassium from a resting level of 4.4 to 7.9 mmol/L during an attack and 2) electromyographic findings of generalized increased insertion activity and myotonic discharges. The horse was treated with hydrochlorothiazide tablets for nine months, during which time no further attacks were noted. However, four months after the drug was stopped, sporadic focal muscle tremors reappeared; two months later, generalized attacks were seen. Despite reinstitution of the diuretic, a focal flank tremor persisted. Two related horses in the same stable also were reported by the owner to exhibit sporadic generalized muscle twitching. The abnormal findings of the present case differ from clinical syndromes previously reported in horses. Some similarities to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in humans are noted. PMID:17422693

  11. A Postural Tremor Highly Responsive to Transcranial Cerebello-Cerebral DCS in ARCA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodranghien, Florian; Oulad Ben Taib, Nordeyn; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Manto, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are disabling disorders that impact the quality of life of patients. In many cases, an effective treatment is missing. Despite the increasing knowledge on the pathogenesis of cerebellar disorders including genetic aspects, there is currently a gap in the therapeutical management of cerebellar deficits. Cerebellar ataxia associated with ANO10 mutation (ARCA3) presents a disabling cerebellar syndrome. The aim of this study is to report a patient with a marked postural tremor responding to transcranial cerebello-cerebral direct current stimulation (tCCDCS). We applied tCCDCS using anodal stimulation over the cerebellum with a return electrode on the contralateral motor cortex. We performed a clinical rating, accelerometry studies, and recordings of voluntary movements at baseline, after sham, and after active tCCDCS. A dramatic response of postural tremor was observed after tCCDCS, with a major drop of the power spectral density to 26.12% of basal values. The postural tremor of cerebellar ataxia associated with ANO10 mutation was highly responsive to tCCDCS in our patient. This case illustrates that tCCDCS is a novel therapeutic option in the treatment of cerebellar deficits and might represent a promising tool to reduce tremor in ARCA3.

  12. Episodic tremor and slip in Northern Sumatra subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sianipar, Dimas; Subakti, Hendri

    2017-07-01

    The first reported observation of non-volcanic tremor in Sunda Arc in Sumbawa, Indonesia open a possibility of discovery of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) from out of Pacific Rim. Non-volcanic tremor gives some important information about dynamic of plate boundaries. The characteristics of these tremors are visually as non-impulsive, high frequency, long-duration and low-amplitude signals. Tectonic tremor occurred in a transition part of brittle-ductile of a fault and frequently associated with the shearing mechanism of slow slip. Tectonic tremor is a seismic case that also very interested, because it shows strong sensitivity to stress changes. Deep non-volcanic tremor is usually associated with episodic slow-slip events. Tectonic tremor is found in close association with geodetically observed slow-slip events (SSE) in subduction zones. One research found that there is possibility of SSE occurrence on Banyak Islands, North Sumatra revealed from coral observation. The SSE occurred on the Banyak Islands portion of the megathrust at 30-55 km depth, within the downdip transition zone. We do a systematic search of episodic tremor and its possible relationship with slow-slip phenomena in Northern Sumatra subduction zone. The spectrogram analysis is done to analyze the potential tremor signals. We use three component broadband seismic stations with 20, 25, and 50 sampling per second (BH* and SH* channels). We apply a butterworth 5 Hz highpass filter to separate the signal as local tremor and teleseismic/regional earthquakes. Before computing spectrogram to avoid high-frequency artifacts to remote triggering, we apply a 0.5 Hz filter. We also convert the binary seismic data into sound waves to make sure that these events meet the tectonic tremor criterion. We successfully examine 3 seismic stations with good recording i.e. GSI, SNSI and KCSI. We find there are many evidences of high frequency episodic tremor like signals. This include an analysis of potential triggered

  13. The Power Quality Compensation Strategy for Power Distribution System Based on Hybrid Parallel Active Power Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid DEHINI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the main aim is to confront the performance of shunt active power filter (SAPF and the shunt hybrid active power filter (SHAPF to achieve flexibility and reliability of the filter devices. Both of the two devices used the classical proportional-integral controller for pulse generation to trigger the inventers MOSFET’s. In the adopted hybrid active filter there is a passive power filter with high power rating to filter the low order harmonies and one active filter with low power rating to filter the other high order harmonies. In order to investigate the effectiveness of (SHAPF, the studies have been accomplished using simulation with the MATLAB-SIMULINK. The results show That (SHAPF is more effective than (SAPF, and has lower cost.

  14. Factors Influencing Compensation Demanded for Environmental Impacts Generated by Different Economic Activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutiérrez, Virna; Cifuentes, Luis; Bronfman, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    ... (as perceived risk, public acceptability and trust in regulating authorities), and to explore whether these relationships depend on the environment affected and on the economic activity generating the impacts...

  15. Control strategy for three-phase four-wire PWM converter of integrated voltage compensation type active SFCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Tang, Yuejin; Shi, Jing; Li, Zhi; Ren, Li; Cheng, Shijie

    2010-02-01

    The integrated voltage compensation type active superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) is composed of three air-core superconducting transformers and a three-phase four-wire PWM converter. In order to realize the current-limiting characteristics of the integrated active SFCL, it is needed to control the three-phase four-wire PWM converter flexibly and reasonably. Thereby, the control strategy for the converter is analyzed in this paper. In dq0 reference frame, the mathematical model of the converter is founded. The double-loop control strategy, consisting of voltage outer loop and current inner loop, is presented. Moreover, the voltage balance control for the split DC link capacitors is also considered. Using MATLAB, the simulation model of the integrated active SFCL is built. According to the simulation results, it is known that, the presented control strategy is feasible and valid, and the converter can work well under unsymmetrical and symmetrical fault conditions, and then the fault current can be limited quickly and effectively.

  16. Time variation in amplitude-frequency distribution of deep non-volcanic tremors in the Bungo Channel region, southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Y.; Suda, N.

    2009-12-01

    Magnitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes follows the Gutenberg-Richter law. The slope of this law, b value, represents the relative occurrence of large and small earthquakes. Since magnitude is defined as corrected logarithmic amplitude, amplitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes is linear on log-log graph. On the other hand, that of non-volcanic tremors is linear on semi-log graph, indicating that it follows the exponential distribution, not the power-law distribution [Hiramatsu et al., 2008]. Thus the slope of amplitude-frequency distribution for tremors is equivalent to b value for earthquakes. In this study, we investigated time variation in the slope of amplitude-frequency distribution from analyses of tremor activities in the Bungo Channel region, where long-term slow slip events occurred in 1997 and 2003. We analyzed vertical-component records from Hi-net and the seismic networks of Japan Meteorological Agency and universities for the five-year period between 2004 and 2008. We also used records from the temporal seismic station in Hiburi Island installed by us in the period after Sept. 2004. In the Bungo Channel region, tremor activity occurs with a recurrence interval of approximately two months. We observed a total of 35 activities including small ones in the analysis period. To detect tremors and determine their hypocenters, we used the same software as Automatic Tremor Monitoring System (ATMOS) [Suda et al., in press]. We obtained frequency distribution of reduced displacements (RDs) for each tremor activity. RD is RMS amplitude of ground displacement corrected with hypocentral distance [Aki and Koyanagi, 1981], and it is proportional to seismic moment rate. The observed slopes of RD-frequency distribution for active swarms were approximately constant in the period between 2004 and 2006, but they declined in 2007. At the end of 2008, the slopes decreased bellow half the values between 2004 and 2006. As well as b value, the slope represents

  17. Power factor compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barra R, Felipe [Schneider Electric Chile (Chile)

    2010-07-01

    Every company is looking for ways to increase productivity as a way to gain a competitive advantage. Energy is a significant element in making any product and so it is important to assess production processes from an energy perspective. This paper discusses the impact of power factor compensation on energy efficiency. The life cycle solution for energy efficiency involves optimization of active energy using automation and regulation. A brief explanation is given of how each component of a company plays a part in this cycle. Examples include simulations and analysis, modeling, performance monitoring facilities, and environmental sustainability. Reactive energy suppliers and the installation of capacitors are also explained. Types of compensation include fixed and automation compensations. Economic advantages include a reduction in the electricity bill and active energy consumption. Technical advantages include reduction in voltage drop and an increase in available power. The power correction factor also improves reliability and contributes to conservation of the environment.

  18. Minimising tremor in a joystick using fuzzy logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, B.J.; Corbett, Dan; Jain, Lakhmi; Kappen, H.J.; Duin, R.P.W.; Krose, B.J.A.; Segeth, W.

    We have designed and built a fuzzy logic controller which minimises the effect of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) hand tremors. The aim of our project has been to give people with Multiple Sclerosis better control of an electronic wheelchair by removing tremors from the joystick signal. The system

  19. Phenomenology of tremor-like signals observed over hydrocarbon reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dangel, S.; Schaepman, M.E.; Stoll, E.P.; Carniel, R.; Barzandji, O.; Rode, E.D.; Singer, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    We have observed narrow-band, low-frequency (1.5-4 Hz, amplitude 0.01-10 mum/s) tremor signals on the surface over hydrocarbon reservoirs (oil, gas and water multiphase fluid systems in porous media) at currently 15 sites worldwide. These 'hydrocarbon tremors' possess remarkably similar spectral and

  20. Capturing hand tremors with a fuzzy logic wheelchair joystick controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, B.J.; Corbett, Dan

    1999-01-01

    We have designed and built a fuzzy logic wheelchair controller which minimizes the effect of Multiple Sclerosis and tremors. The aim of our project has been to give people with Multiple Sclerosis better control of an electric wheelchair by removing tremors from the joystick signal. The system interc

  1. Capturing hand tremors with a fuzzy logic wheelchair joystick controller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaag, van der Berend-Jan; Corbett, Dan

    1999-01-01

    We have designed and built a fuzzy logic wheelchair controller which minimizes the effect of Multiple Sclerosis and tremors. The aim of our project has been to give people with Multiple Sclerosis better control of an electric wheelchair by removing tremors from the joystick signal. The system interc

  2. Minimising tremor in a joystick using fuzzy logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaag, van der Berend-Jan; Corbett, Dan; Jain, Lakhmi

    1999-01-01

    We have designed and built a fuzzy logic controller which minimises the effect of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) hand tremors. The aim of our project has been to give people with Multiple Sclerosis better control of an electronic wheelchair by removing tremors from the joystick signal. The system intercept

  3. Phenomenology of tremor-like signals observed over hydrocarbon reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dangel, S.; Schaepman, M.E.; Stoll, E.P.; Carniel, R.; Barzandji, O.; Rode, E.D.; Singer, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    We have observed narrow-band, low-frequency (1.5-4 Hz, amplitude 0.01-10 mum/s) tremor signals on the surface over hydrocarbon reservoirs (oil, gas and water multiphase fluid systems in porous media) at currently 15 sites worldwide. These 'hydrocarbon tremors' possess remarkably similar spectral and

  4. Sensory electrical stimulation for suppression of postural tremor in patients with essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Won; Kwon, Yuri; Lee, Sang-Ki; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Kwon, Do-Young; Lee, Chan-Nyeong; Park, Kun-Woo; Manto, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Essential tremor is an involuntary trembling of body limbs in people without tremor-related disease. In previous study, suppression of tremor by sensory electrical stimulation was confirmed on the index finger. This study investigates the effect of sensory stimulation on multiple segments and joints of the upper limb. It denotes the observation regarding the effect's continuity after halting the stimulation. 18 patients with essential tremor (8 men and 10 women) participated in this study. The task, "arms stretched forward", was performed and sensory electrical stimulation was applied on four muscles of the upper limb (Flexor Carpi Radialis, Extensor Carpi Radialis, Biceps Brachii, and Triceps Brachii) for 15 seconds. Three 3-D gyro sensors were used to measure the angular velocities of segments (finger, hand, and forearm) and joints (metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints) for three phases of pre-stimulation (Pre), during-stimulation (On), and 5 minute post-stimulation (P5). Three characteristic variables of root-mean-squared angular velocity, peak power, and peak power frequency were derived from the vector sum of the sensor signals. At On phase, RMS velocity was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints while peak power was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints except for forearm segment. Sensory stimulation showed no effect on peak power frequency. All variables at P5 were similar to those at On at all segments and joints. The decrease of peak power of the index finger was noted by 90% during stimulation from that of On phase, which was maintained even after 5 min. The results indicate that sensory stimulation may be an effective clinical method to treat the essential tremor.

  5. Deterministic properties of mine tremor aftershocks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgarume, TE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available on Deep and High Stress Mining, 6-8 October 2010, Santiago CHILE Deterministic properties of mine tremor aftershocks T.E. Kgarume CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation and University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa S.M. Spottiswoode Consultant, South... : Dyke 7 7 : Span Figure 1 Simplified mine plan showing the main elements of stopes in South African gold mines 5th International Seminar on Deep and High Stress Mining, 6-8 October 2010, Santiago CHILE Table 1 Datasets used in the analysis...

  6. Modeling noisy time series Physiological tremor

    CERN Document Server

    Timmer, J

    1998-01-01

    Empirical time series often contain observational noise. We investigate the effect of this noise on the estimated parameters of models fitted to the data. For data of physiological tremor, i.e. a small amplitude oscillation of the outstretched hand of healthy subjects, we compare the results for a linear model that explicitly includes additional observational noise to one that ignores this noise. We discuss problems and possible solutions for nonlinear deterministic as well as nonlinear stochastic processes. Especially we discuss the state space model applicable for modeling noisy stochastic systems and Bock's algorithm capable for modeling noisy deterministic systems.

  7. Influence of gravity compensation on kinematics and muscle activation patterns during reach and retrieval in subjects with cervical spinal cord injury An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Marieke G. M.; Snoek, Govert J.; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Nene, Anand V.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many interventions in upper-limb rehabilitation after cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) use arm support (gravity compensation), however, its specific effects on kinematics and muscle activation characteristics in subjects with a CSCI are largely unknown We conducted a cross-sectional explorative

  8. Threshold-Voltage-Shift Compensation and Suppression Method Using Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Transistors for Large Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kyonghwan; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2012-03-01

    A threshold-voltage-shift compensation and suppression method for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays fabricated using a hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane is proposed. The proposed method compensates for the threshold voltage variation of TFTs due to different threshold voltage shifts during emission time and extends the lifetime of the AMOLED panel. Measurement results show that the error range of emission current is from -1.1 to +1.7% when the threshold voltage of TFTs varies from 1.2 to 3.0 V.

  9. Characteristics of hand tremor and postural sway in patients with fetal-type Minamata disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Toyoto; Takaoka, Shigeru; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Maeda, Eri; Nakamura, Masaaki; Liu, Xiao-Jie; Murata, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    About forty certified patients aged around 50 years old existed as living witnesses to fetal-type Minamata disease (methylmercury poisoning due to in utero exposure) in Minamata, Japan in 2006. Computerized hand tremor and postural sway tests with spectral analysis were conducted for 24 of them and in matched control subjects to examine the pathophysiological feature of neuromotor function. The tremor intensities of the patients with fetal-type Minamata disease were significantly larger than those of the 67 controls at every frequency band for both hands. In the patients, proportions for intensity at 1-6 Hz of both hands were larger, but those of the intensity at 6-10 Hz were smaller compared with the controls. The center frequency of a tremor was significantly lower in the patients than in the controls. Only eight males of the 24 patients were examined to evaluate postural sway because of extremely low scores in activities of daily living in the remaining. Most of the postural sway parameters obtained with eyes open and closed were significantly larger in the patients than in the male controls. Likewise, Romberg quotients of postural sway in anterior-posterior direction were significantly higher in the patients. In conclusion, the patients with fetal-type Minamata disease of our study showed a larger tremor of low frequency at less than 6 Hz and postural instability. Spectral analyses of computerized hand tremor and postural sway are suggested to be useful for assessing the pathophysiological change, related to a lesion of the cerebellum, resulting from prenatal methylmercury exposure.

  10. Vocal Tremor: Novel Therapeutic Target for Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K. Ravikumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tremulous voice is characteristically associated with essential tremor, and is referred to as essential vocal tremor (EVT. Current estimates suggest that up to 40% of individuals diagnosed with essential tremor also present with EVT, which is associated with an impaired quality of life. Traditional EVT treatments have demonstrated limited success in long-term management of symptoms. However, voice tremor has been noted to decrease in patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS with the targeting of thalamic nuclei. In this study, we describe our multidisciplinary procedure for awake, frameless DBS with optimal stimulation targets as well as acoustic analysis and laryngoscopic assessment to quantify tremor reduction. Finally, we investigate the most recent clinical evidence regarding the procedure.

  11. Tectonic tremor and LFEs on a reverse fault in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Ana C.; Chao, Kevin; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2017-07-01

    We compare low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) from triggered and ambient tremor under the southern Central Range, Taiwan. We apply the PageRank algorithm used by Aguiar and Beroza (2014) that exploits the repetitive nature of the LFEs to find repeating LFEs in both ambient and triggered tremor. We use these repeaters to create LFE templates and find that the templates created from both tremor types are very similar. To test their similarity, we use both interchangeably and find that most of both the ambient and triggered tremor match the LFE templates created from either data set, suggesting that LFEs for both events have a common origin. We locate the LFEs by using local earthquake P wave and S wave information and find that LFEs from triggered and ambient tremor locate to between 20 and 35 km on what we interpret as the deep extension of the Chaochou-Lishan Fault.

  12. Exploring dielectric elastomers as actuators for hand tremor suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Christopher R.; Kauffman, Jeffrey L.

    2017-04-01

    Pathological tremor results in undesired motion of body parts, with the greatest effect typically occurring in the hands. Since common treatment methods are ineffective in some patients or have risks associated with surgery or side effects, researchers are investigating mechanical means of tremor suppression. This work explores the viability of dielectric elastomers as the actuators in a tremor suppression control system. Dielectric elastomers have many properties similar to human muscle, making them a natural fit for integration into the human biomechanical system. This investigation develops a model of the integrated wrist-actuator system to determine actuator parameters that produce the necessary control authority without significantly affecting voluntary motion. Furthermore, this paper develops a control law for the actuator voltage to increase the effective viscous damping of the system. Simulations show excellent theoretical tremor suppression, demonstrating the potential for dielectric elastomers to suppress tremor while maximizing compatibility between the actuator and the human body.

  13. High prevalence of reported tremor in Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Tanya L; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro

    2009-06-01

    Several uncontrolled reports in the literature dating from decades ago suggest a link between Klinefelter syndrome (KS) and essential tremor (ET). Aiming to determine whether this association truly exists, we designed a controlled survey to ascertain the prevalence of reported tremor in KS. We identified subjects with KS through our hospital database and recruited controls among men who were accompanying patients to our Neurology Clinic. The presence of tremor and other variables were recorded employing a previously validated questionnaire. Whereas our control population was slightly older and more frequently reported a family history of tremor, the frequency of reported tremor was significantly higher in subjects with KS than controls with onset at a younger age. In addition, a high proportion of subjects with KS indicated gait imbalance. In summary, our study supports the previously reported association of an ET-like syndrome and KS.

  14. Contribution à la compensation active des vibrations des machines électriques

    OpenAIRE

    Granjon, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    This work is devoted to elaborate an active control system of rotating machine vibrations. It is based on additional currents supplying the stator coils of the machine. They generate radial forces on the stator frame,and finally create additional vibrations which interact with the machine ones. Therefore, the aim of this system is to process the optimal value of the input currents, in order to minimize the vibration signals power measured on the stator frame by several accelerometers.First, t...

  15. Driving Method for Compensating Reliability Problem of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors and Image Sticking Phenomenon in Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Seok; Jo, Yun-Rae; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a driving method for compensating the electrical instability of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors (TFTs) and the luminance degradation of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices for large active matrix OLED (AMOLED) displays. The proposed driving method senses the electrical characteristics of a-Si:H TFTs and OLEDs using current integrators and compensates them by an external compensation method. Threshold voltage shift is controlled a using negative bias voltage. After applying the proposed driving method, the measured error of the maximum emission current ranges from -1.23 to +1.59 least significant bit (LSB) of a 10-bit gray scale under the threshold voltage shift ranging from -0.16 to 0.17 V.

  16. Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Justin L; Vidale, John E; Gomberg, Joan; Bodin, Paul; Creager, Kenneth C; Malone, Stephen D

    2007-08-01

    Non-impulsive seismic radiation or 'tremor' has long been observed at volcanoes and more recently around subduction zones. Although the number of observations of non-volcanic tremor is steadily increasing, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Some have attributed non-volcanic tremor to the movement of fluids, while its coincidence with geodetically observed slow-slip events at regular intervals has led others to consider slip on the plate interface as its cause. Low-frequency earthquakes in Japan, which are believed to make up at least part of non-volcanic tremor, have focal mechanisms and locations that are consistent with tremor being generated by shear slip on the subduction interface. In Cascadia, however, tremor locations appear to be more distributed in depth than in Japan, making them harder to reconcile with a plate interface shear-slip model. Here we identify bursts of tremor that radiated from the Cascadia subduction zone near Vancouver Island, Canada, during the strongest shaking from the moment magnitude M(w) = 7.8, 2002 Denali, Alaska, earthquake. Tremor occurs when the Love wave displacements are to the southwest (the direction of plate convergence of the overriding plate), implying that the Love waves trigger the tremor. We show that these displacements correspond to shear stresses of approximately 40 kPa on the plate interface, which suggests that the effective stress on the plate interface is very low. These observations indicate that tremor and possibly slow slip can be instantaneously induced by shear stress increases on the subduction interface-effectively a frictional failure response to the driving stress.

  17. Neuroimaging essentials in essential tremor: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Sarvi; Nederveen, Aart J; Booij, Jan; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Essential tremor is regarded to be a disease of the central nervous system. Neuroimaging is a rapidly growing field with potential benefits to both diagnostics and research. The exact role of imaging techniques with respect to essential tremor in research and clinical practice is not clear. A systematic review of the different imaging techniques in essential tremor is lacking in the literature. We performed a systematic literature search combining the terms essential tremor and familial tremor with the following keywords: imaging, mri, vbm, dwi, fmri, pet and spect, both in abbreviated form as well as in full form. We summarize and discuss the quality and the external validity of each study and place the results in the context of existing knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of essential tremor. A total of 48 neuroimaging studies met our search criteria, roughly divided into 19 structural and 29 functional and metabolic studies. The quality of the studies varied, especially concerning inclusion criteria. Functional imaging studies indicated cerebellar hyperactivity during rest and during tremor. The studies also pointed to the involvement of the thalamus, the inferior olive and the red nucleus. Structural studies showed less consistent results. Neuroimaging techniques in essential tremor give insight into the pathophysiology of essential tremor indicating the involvement of the cerebellum as the most consistent finding. GABAergic dysfunction might be a major premise in the pathophysiological hypotheses. Inconsistencies between studies can be partly explained by the inclusion of heterogeneous patient groups. Improvement of scientific research requires more stringent inclusion criteria and application of advanced analysis techniques. Also, the use of multimodal neuroimaging techniques is a promising development in movement disorders research. Currently, the role of imaging techniques in essential tremor in daily clinical practice is limited.

  18. Active power filter for harmonic compensation using a digital dual-mode-structure repetitive control approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Zhixiang; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Ming;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an digital dual-mode-structure repetitive control approach for the single-phase shunt active power filter (APF), which aims to enhance the tracking ability and eliminate arbitrary order harmonic. The proposed repetitive control scheme blends the characteristics of both odd......-harmonic repetitive control and even-harmonic repetitive control. Moreover, the convergence rate is faster than conventional repetitive controller. Additionally, the parameters have been designed and optimized for the dual-mode structure repetitive control to improve the performance of APF system. Experimental...... results on a laboratory setup are given to verify the proposed control scheme....

  19. Gradient Descent Learning for Utility Current Compensation using Active Regenerative PWM Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Balamurugan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Harmonic analysis is a primary matter of power quality assessment. Its main intention is to check the utility whether it is delivering the loads without any deviations in voltages and currents. The problem is due to proliferation of Electronic converters and power electronics which gave birth to numerous new applications, offering unmatched comfort to the customers. Approach: Harmonics should be maintained within the limits said in standards like IEEE 519 and others such as IEEE 1159 for safeguarding the utility. This was provided by many mitigation technologies like passive, shunt and series filtering, active conditioners, but they were lack of some demerits like huge cost, many controllers and circuit components. So for controlling the harmonic loads the converter with four quadrant characteristics was implemented and this converter act as shunt active filter as well as rectifier simultaneously without any additional circuitry. For having better harmonic reduction in addition, many controllers like p-q Theorem based controller, Fuzzy and gradient descent based neural network is also used. Results: The simulation results gives the compared source current wave forms for various controllers with individual harmonic mitigations. Conclusion: The pure utility current is obtained by using this intelligent neural filter without any additional components and without any extra controllers than the conventional methods.

  20. Physical Activity and Compensation of Body Posture Disorders in Children Aged Seven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hricková Katarína

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Physical activity is an indelible part of human life, but the impact of industrial changes on society has led to a hypokinetic lifestyle not only in adults but also in children and youth. This paper aims to present the results of a study of the body posture of 7-year-olds, which is an essential part of their physical development evaluation. The aim of our study was to expand our knowledge of the occurrence of body posture disorders in 7-year-olds, as well as to develop an appropriate movement programme which would help improve the current situation. Material and methods. The research sample consisted of 393 first-graders from 4 grammar schools in Kosice. We used muscle testing according to Janda and Tichy to obtain data on individual muscle weaknesses and postural deviations. Results. Our research confirmed the findings of several other researchers who had pointed out that muscle weaknesses and postural deviations can be observed already in preschoolers. Due to a lack of physical activity and movement, muscle weakness in preschool children results in more serious health issues at school age and later in adulthood. Conclusions. We managed to stabilise and even to correct the weaknesses we observed by implementing a movement programme focusing on the diagnosed muscle weakness.

  1. Strength stimuli on the quadriceps femoris influences the physiological tremor of the index finger

    CERN Document Server

    Lainez, Miguel J A; Gallach, Jose E; Moras, Gerard; Ranz, Daniel; Toca-Herrera, Jose L

    2008-01-01

    The influence of fatiguing stimuli applied to the quadriceps femoris on the tremor of the index finger on sixteen healthy subjects has been investigated, by measuring the acceleration and the electromyography activity of the extensor digitorum at two different speeds. No significant changes in the basal condition could be measured at 0.52 rad/s. However, at 1.05 rad/s the tremor amplitude (12.23%, p<0.05) and the electromyography activity (20.19%, p<0.05) increased in the time domain. In the frequential domain, the peak associated to the acceleration increased in 26.30% (p<0.05), while the electromiography activity experienced an increase of 81.34% (p<0.05). The largest change in frequency took place in the range 7-17 Hz. The discussion of the results leads to the conclusion that the supraespinal mechanism is responsible for the measured effect.

  2. Cosmic signatures in earth's seismic tremor?

    CERN Document Server

    Mulargia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Even in absence of earthquakes, each site on earth experiences continuous elastic vibrations which are mostly traced to the non-linear interactions of sea waves. However, the fine structure of the spectrum at mHz frequencies shows hundreds of highly significant narrow bandwidth peaks, with a persistence and a coincidence with solar acoustic eigenmodes which are incompatible with any geophysical origin. The feasibility of a common cosmic origin is evaluated through an estimate of the gravitational wave cross-section of the earth, combined with its elastic response and with the stochastic amplification produced by the interference of the cosmic signal with tremor of oceanic origin. The measured spectral peaks appear compatible with a gravitational monochromatic illumination at strains $h \\gtrsim 10^{-20} $. We analize in detail the band around 2.614 mHz, where the binary white dwarf J0651+2844 - which is the second strongest known gravitational stellar source - is expected to emit. Compatible spectral tremor pe...

  3. Report on the Aseismic Slip, Tremor, and Earthquakes Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan; Roeloffs, Evelyn; Trehu, Anne; Dragert, Herb; Meertens, Charles

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussions and information presented during the workshop on Aseismic Slip, Tremor, and Earthquakes. Workshop goals included improving coordination among those involved in conducting research related to these phenomena, assessing the implications for earthquake hazard assessment, and identifying ways to capitalize on the education and outreach opportunities presented by these phenomena. Research activities of focus included making, disseminating, and analyzing relevant measurements; the relationships among tremor, aseismic or 'slow-slip', and earthquakes; and discovering the underlying causative physical processes. More than 52 participants contributed to the workshop, held February 25-28, 2008 in Sidney, British Columbia. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Science Foundation?s Earthscope Program and UNAVCO Consortium, and the Geological Survey of Canada. This report has five parts. In the first part, we integrate the information exchanged at the workshop as it relates to advancing our understanding of earthquake generation and hazard. In the second part, we summarize the ideas and concerns discussed in workshop working groups on Opportunities for Education and Outreach, Data and Instrumentation, User and Public Needs, and Research Coordination. The third part presents summaries of the oral presentations. The oral presentations are grouped as they were at the workshop in the categories of phenomenology, underlying physical processes, and implications for earthquake hazards. The fourth part contains the meeting program and the fifth part lists the workshop participants. References noted in parentheses refer to the authors of presentations made at the workshop, and published references are noted in square brackets and listed in the Reference section. Appendix A contains abstracts of all participant presentations and posters, which also have been posted online, along with presentations and author contact

  4. Low-Power Three-Stage Amplifier Using Active-Feedback Miller Capacitor and Serial RC Frequency Compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庚宇; 肖夏; 聂凯明; 徐江涛

    2015-01-01

    A low-power three-stage amplifier for driving large capacitive load is proposed. The feedback path formed by the active-feedback Miller capacitor leads to a high frequency complex-pole but a highQ-value, which significantly deteriorates the stability of the amplifier. The serial RC stage introduced as the second stage output load can optimize the resistorRz and the capacitorCz under fixed power and small compensation capacitorCa, which brings about a suitableQ-value of the complex-pole and the gain-bandwidth product extension of the ampli-fier. The amplifiers were designed and implemented in a standard 65 nm CMOS process with capacitive loads of 500 pF and 2 nF, respectively. The post-layout simulation results show that the amplifier driving the 500 pF capaci-tive load can achieve a gain of 113 dB, a phase margin of 50.6° and a gain-bandwidth product of 5.22 MHz while consuming 24 µW from a 1.2 V supply. For the 2 nF capacitive load, the amplifier has a gain of 102 dB, a phase margin of 52.8°, a gain-bandwidth product of 4.41 MHz and a power of 43 µW. The total compensation capacitors are equal to 1.13 pF and 1.03 pF. The better figures-of-merits are 108 750 and 205 113(MHz×pF/mW). The lay-out areas are 0.064 mm×0.026 mm and 0.063 mm×0.027 mm. Compared with the CFCC scheme, the gain-bandwidth product is extended by 1.6 times atCL=500 pF andCa=1.1 pF.

  5. Rest and action tremor in Parkinson's disease: effects of Deep Brain Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Wentink, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson’s disease is rest tremor. While rest tremor generally disappears during sleep and voluntary movement, action tremor may be triggered by voluntary movement, and may even be more disabling than rest tremor. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic

  6. Rest and action tremor in Parkinson's disease: effects of Deep Brain Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, T.; Wentink, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson’s disease is rest tremor. While rest tremor generally disappears during sleep and voluntary movement, action tremor may be triggered by voluntary movement, and may even be more disabling than rest tremor. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucle

  7. The distributed somatotopy of tremor: a window into the motor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.

    2013-01-01

    The posterior ventrolateral thalamus (VLp) plays a crucial role in Parkinson's tremor and in essential tremor: deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the VLp effectively diminishes both tremor types. Previous research has shown tremor oscillations in the VLp, but the spatial extent and somatotopy of these

  8. Polarization of Tremor Wave-field Before and During The July-august 2001 Mt. Etna Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, F.; Patanè, D.; del Pezzo, E.; Gresta, S.; Ibanez, J.; Saccarotti, G.; Scarfi, L.

    One of the most important lateral eruptive events in the last 30 years started in July 2001, which has been characterized by an unusual eruptive style, with lava flow emis- sions at different quotes along a complex fracture system, frequent and power strom- bolian explosions sometimes culminating in lava fountains and abundant gas emis- sions. Apart from tectonic seismicity, volcanic tremor had a key role in monitoring the evolution of the eruption. Paroxysmal phases such as lava fountains and power- ful strombolian activity were associated with remarkable increments in the amplitude of tremor. Although with some fluctuation, high amplitude values maintained after the opening of the eruptive fractures, reaching a maximum on July 25. An inversion of this trend started in the late morning on July 31, when a sudden decrease in the amplitude of tremor occurred. In this work, polarization of the tremor wave-field, recorded simultaneously at 12 three-component digital stations, equipped with short period (1s) or broad-band (20s) sensors, is analyzed by use of a polarization filter. Spectrograms show predominant energy into 1-6ÿ7 Hz frequency band. Before and during the July-August 2001 Mt. Etna eruption, significant variations with time of direction of polarization, incidence angle and linear content of the tremor wave-field are found mainly on the broad-band recordings at frequencies lower than ca. 1.5 Hz. This is in agreement with temporal modifications of the activity observed during the pre- and the eruptive period. Moreover, we observe that the tremor shows steady hor- izontal, near-linear, ca. west-east pattern, at several stations (TDF, MNT, ESP, ERS, EC11). Such a behaviour excludes confinement of the source to the only active vents and suggests the possibility that a vertical extended source with overall north-south alignment might radiate SH waves, in the direction normal to the source.

  9. Observations of rapid-fire event tremor at Lascar volcano, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rademacher

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Proyecto de Investigaciòn Sismològica de la Cordillera Occidental (PISCO '94 in the Atacama desert of Northern Chile, a continuously recording broadband seismic station was installed to the NW of the currently active volcano, Lascar. For the month of April, 1994, an additional network of three, short period, three-component stations was deployed around the volcano to help discriminate its seismic signals from other local seismicity. During the deployment, the volcanic activity at Lascar appeared to be limited mainly to the emission of steam and SO2. Tremor from Lascar is a random, «rapid-fire» series of events with a wide range of amplitudes and a quasi-fractal structure. The tremor is generated by an ensemble of independent elementary sources clustered in the volcanic edifice. In the short-term, the excitation of the sources fluctuates strongly, while the long-term power spectrum is very stationary.

  10. Observations of rapid-fire event tremor at Lascar volcano, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Guenter; Wylegalla, K.; Hellweg, M.; Seidl, D.; Rademacher, H.

    1996-01-01

    During the Proyecto de Investigacio??n Sismolo??gica de la Cordillera Occidental (PISCO '94) in the Atacama desert of Northern Chile, a continuously recording broadband seismic station was installed to the NW of the currently active volcano, Lascar. For the month of April, 1994, an additional network of three, short period, three-component stations was deployed around the volcano to help discriminate its seismic signals from other local seismicity. During the deployment, the volcanic activity at Lascar appeared to be limited mainly to the emission of steam and SO2. Tremor from Lascar is a random, ??rapid-fire?? series of events with a wide range of amplitudes and a quasi-fractal structure. The tremor is generated by an ensemble of independent elementary sources clustered in the volcanic edifice. In the short-term, the excitation of the sources fluctuates strongly, while the long-term power spectrum is very stationary.

  11. Research Development and Perspective on Slow Slip, Tremors, and Slow Earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yanzhao; Shen Zhengkang

    2007-01-01

    Seismological and geodetic observations indicate that slow slip sometimes occurs in active fault zones beneath the seismogenic depth, and large slow slip can result in transient ground motion.Slow earthquakes, on the other hand, emit tremor-like signals within a narrow frequency band, and usually produce no catastrophic consequences. In general, slow slip and slow earthquakes probably correspond to deformation processes associated with releasing elastic energy in fault zones, and understanding their mechanisms may help improve our understanding of fault zone dynamic processes. This article reviews the research progress on slow slip and slow earthquakes over the last decade. Crustal motion and tremor activities associated with slow slip and slow earthquakes have been investigated extensively, mainly involving locating sources of slow slip and slow earthquakes and numerical modeling of their processes. In the meantime, debates have continued about slow slip and slow earthquakes,such as their origins, relationship, and mechanisms.

  12. Real-Time Estimation of Pathological Tremor Parameters from Gyroscope Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Pons

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two stage algorithm for real-time estimation of instantaneous tremor parameters from gyroscope recordings. Gyroscopes possess the advantage of providing directly joint rotational speed, overcoming the limitations of traditional tremor recording based on accelerometers. The proposed algorithm first extracts tremor patterns from raw angular data, and afterwards estimates its instantaneous amplitude and frequency. Real-time separation of voluntary and tremorous motion relies on their different frequency contents, whereas tremor modelling is based on an adaptive LMS algorithm and a Kalman filter. Tremor parameters will be employed to drive a neuroprosthesis for tremor suppression based on biomechanical loading.

  13. Wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to monitor adenosine in patients with essential tremor during deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su-Youne; Kim, Inyong; Marsh, Michael P; Jang, Dong Pyo; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Goerss, Stephan J; Kimble, Christopher J; Bennet, Kevin E; Garris, Paul A; Blaha, Charles D; Lee, Kendall H

    2012-08-01

    Essential tremor is often markedly reduced during deep brain stimulation simply by implanting the stimulating electrode before activating neurostimulation. Referred to as the microthalamotomy effect, the mechanisms of this unexpected consequence are thought to be related to microlesioning targeted brain tissue, that is, a microscopic version of tissue ablation in thalamotomy. An alternate possibility is that implanting the electrode induces immediate neurochemical release. Herein, we report the experiment performing with real-time fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to quantify neurotransmitter concentrations in human subjects with essential tremor during deep brain stimulation. The results show that the microthalamotomy effect is accompanied by local neurochemical changes, including adenosine release.

  14. 14 CFR 1253.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1253.515 Compensation. A...

  15. Familial orthostatic tremor and essential tremor in two young brothers: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyan B Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthostatic tremor (OT, is usually a disease of old age and is characterized by quivering movements of the legs during quiet standing or in the state of isometric contraction in the lower limbs. This is relieved on walking or on lying down. It is diagnosed by surface electromyography, particularly over the quadriceps femoris muscles which shows a distinctive frequency of 13 to 18 Hz on standing. Some investigators consider it as a variant of essential tremor (ET and the two conditions often co-exist. The disease is usually non-familial. Two brothers presented with tremor in the lower limbs on standing and on the outstretched hands without any family history. Subsequently, they were proved to be suffering from OT and ET by clinical examination and surface EMG. Simultaneous occurrence of OT and ET in two young brothers without any family history in the previous generation has not been described before and they also appeared at a much earlier age than what is described in the literature.

  16. Deep Brain Stimulation for Essential Vocal Tremor: A Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Allen L; Choudhri, Omar; Sung, C Kwang; DiRenzo, Elizabeth E; Halpern, Casey H

    2015-03-01

    Essential vocal tremor (EVT) is the presence of a tremulous voice that is commonly associated with essential tremor. Patients with EVT often report a necessary increase in vocal effort that significantly worsens with stress and anxiety and can significantly impact quality of life despite optimal medical and behavioral treatment options. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as an effective therapy for vocal tremor, but very few studies exist in the literature that comprehensively evaluate the efficacy of DBS for specifically addressing EVT. We present a technical report on our multidisciplinary, comprehensive operative methodology for treatment of EVT with frameless, awake deep brain stimulation (DBS).

  17. Prominent Bilateral Hand Tremor in Hashimoto's Encephalopathy: A Video Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramcharan, Kanterpersad; Hosein, Nadeem; Teelucksingh, Joel David; Rampersad, Fidel; Teelucksingh, Surujpal

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy often presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations including seizures and movement disorders. We describe a patient who presented with bilateral hand tremor and mild cognitive defects that fulfilled the criteria for a diagnosis of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. There was a rapid response to glucocorticoid therapy with relapse following treatment withdrawal. Recently published clinical criteria for the diagnosis of Hashimoto's encephalopathy include seizures, myoclonus, hallucinations, or stroke-like episodes but do not include tremor. Our case had mild cognitive dysfunction and a coarse tremor as the predominant clinical features, which probably represent mild disease.

  18. Evaluation of a screening instrument for essential tremor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Delia; Papengut, Frank; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a screening instrument for essential tremor (ET) consisting of a seven-item questionnaire and a spiral drawing. A total of 2,448 Danish twins aged 70 years or more and a second sample aged 60 years or more (n = 1,684) from a population-based northern German cross-sectional study (Pop....... Definite or probable ET was diagnosed in 104 patients, possible in 86 and other tremors in 98 patients. The sensitivity of the screening instrument was 70.5%, the positive predictive value was 64.9%, the specificity was 68.2%, and the negative predictive value was 73.5%. Tremor severity correlated...

  19. Tectonic tremor and slow slip along the northwestern section of the Mexico subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzinski, Michael R.; Schlanser, Kristen M.; Kelly, Nicholas J.; DeMets, Charles; Grand, Stephen P.; Márquez-Azúa, Bertha; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    The southwestern coast of Mexico is marked by active subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates, producing megathrust earthquakes that tend to recur every 50-100 yr. Herein, we use seismic and GPS data from this region to investigate the potential relationship between earthquakes, tectonic (non-volcanic) tremor, and transient slip along the westernmost 200 km of the Mexico subduction zone. Visual examination of seismograms and spectrograms throughout the 18-month-long MARS seismic experiment reveals clear evidence for frequent small episodes of tremor along the Rivera and Cocos subduction zones beneath the states of Jalisco, Colima, and Michoacán. Using a semi-automated process that identifies prominent energy bursts in envelope waveforms of this new data, analyst-refined relative arrival times are inverted for source locations using a 1-D velocity model. The resulting northwest-southeast trending linear band of tremor is located downdip from the rupture zones of the 1995 Mw 8.0 Colima-Jalisco and 2003 Mw 7.2 Tecoman subduction-thrust earthquakes and just below the regions of afterslip triggered by these earthquakes. Despite the close proximity between tremor and megathrust events, there is no evidence that the time since the last great earthquake influences the spatial or temporal pattern of tremor. A well-defined gap in the tremor beneath the western Colima Graben appears to mark a separation along the subducted Rivera-Cocos plate boundary. From the position time series of 19 continuous GPS sites in western Mexico, we present the first evidence that slow slip events occur on the Rivera plate subduction interface. Unlike the widely-recorded, large-amplitude, slow slip events on the nearly horizontal Cocos plate subduction interface below southern Mexico, slow slip events below western Mexico have small amplitudes and are recorded at relatively few, mostly coastal stations. The smaller slow slip beneath western Mexico may be due to the steeper dip, causing a

  20. 6 CFR 17.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 17.515 Section 17.515 Domestic... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.515 Compensation. A recipient shall... of pay or other compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a...

  1. 22 CFR 146.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation. 146.515 Section 146.515 Foreign... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.515 Compensation. A recipient shall not make or enforce... compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a rate less than that paid...

  2. 41 CFR 101-4.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compensation. 101-4.515... Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 101-4.515 Compensation. A recipient shall not... pay or other compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a rate...

  3. 10 CFR 5.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 5.515 Section 5.515 Energy NUCLEAR... Activities Prohibited § 5.515 Compensation. A recipient shall not make or enforce any policy or practice that, on the basis of sex: (a) Makes distinctions in rates of pay or other compensation; (b) Results in...

  4. 45 CFR 86.54 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compensation. 86.54 Section 86.54 Public Welfare... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.54 Compensation. A recipient shall... of pay or other compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a...

  5. 7 CFR 15a.54 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 15a.54 Section 15a.54 Agriculture Office... Activities Prohibited § 15a.54 Compensation. A recipient shall not make or enforce any policy or practice which, on the basis of sex: (a) Makes distinctions in rates of pay or other compensation; (b) Results...

  6. 22 CFR 229.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensation. 229.515 Section 229.515 Foreign... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.515 Compensation. A recipient shall not make or... compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a rate less than that paid...

  7. 43 CFR 41.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compensation. 41.515 Section 41.515 Public... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 41.515 Compensation. A recipient shall... of pay or other compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a...

  8. 49 CFR 25.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compensation. 25.515 Section 25.515 Transportation... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.515 Compensation. A recipient shall not make or enforce any... compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a rate less than that paid...

  9. 29 CFR 36.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compensation. 36.515 Section 36.515 Labor Office of the... Activities Prohibited § 36.515 Compensation. A recipient shall not make or enforce any policy or practice that, on the basis of sex: (a) Makes distinctions in rates of pay or other compensation; (b) Results...

  10. 15 CFR 8a.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 8a.515 Section 8a.515... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 8a.515 Compensation. A recipient shall... of pay or other compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a...

  11. 10 CFR 1042.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 1042.515 Section 1042.515 Energy DEPARTMENT... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.515 Compensation. A recipient shall not make or enforce... compensation; (b) Results in the payment of wages to employees of one sex at a rate less than that paid...

  12. The Role of β-Carboline Alkaloids in the Pathogenesis of Essential Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviță, Svetlana Iuliana; Aro, Rania; Kiss, Béla; Manto, Mario; Duez, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most prevalent neurological disorders in the world. Environmental factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ET. In particular, epidemiological studies have suggested that neurotoxic agents, especially β-carboline alkaloids (βCAs), might be generated through Maillard-type reaction. βCAs are molecules which are members of a large group of heterocyclic amines (HCAs, the so-called products of cooking meat). βCAs are highly tremorogenic in animals, producing a marked generalized action tremor soon after systemic administration in a wide range of laboratory animals such as mice, rats and monkeys. Administration of βCAs remains currently the main experimental model of ET. We review the pathogenesis of ET, with a focus on the biochemistry of βCAs, their occurrence and biological activity, their endogenous biosynthesis, their formation in food, their toxicokinetics and their neurotoxicity. We highlight open questions regarding the effects of βCAs in humans.

  13. Characteristics and interactions between non-volcanic tremor and related slow earthquakes in the Nankai subduction zone, southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige

    2011-10-01

    Non-volcanic tremor and related slow earthquakes in subduction zones are one of the most significant and exciting geophysical discoveries of the 21st century. In Japan, some types of slow earthquakes associated with subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate have been detected by dense seismic and geodetic observation networks equipped with continuous data-recording systems. At the deepest part of the transition between the Nankai megathrust seismogenic zone and the deep stable sliding zone, short-term slow slip events (SSE) occur on the plate interface with durations of days, accompanied by tremor and deep very-low-frequency (VLF) earthquakes resulting from interplate shear stick-slip motions. Along-strike source regions of tremor are divided into segments where these three coupling phenomena (tremor, short-term SSEs, and deep VLF earthquakes) occur at regular recurrence intervals, with durations of 2-6 months. On the updip side of the tremor zone, long-term SSEs with durations of years occur at intervals of 5-10 yrs and trigger tremor at the downdip part of the source region of long-term slip. Near the Nankai trough, shallow VLF earthquakes occur in the accretionary prism. At the eastern edge of the subducting Philippine Sea Plate, short-term SSEs recur every 6 yrs, associated with active earthquake swarms. Some of these slow earthquakes have been detected in other subduction zones; however, the properties of each constituent member of slow earthquakes are different in each subduction zone. Slow earthquakes represent transient shear slip around the seismogenic portion of major interplate megathrust faults; therefore, monitoring the relationship between slow earthquakes and interplate megathrust earthquakes is important for intermediate- and long-term predictions of the next major earthquake.

  14. Significance of peripheral afferent input to the alpha-motoneurone pool for enhancement of tremor during an isometric fatiguing contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, A G; Löscher, W N

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of peripheral afferent input to the enhancement of isometric tremor during a sustained submaximal isometric contraction. It was hypothesised that during muscle fatigue, when excitatory drive is high, peripheral afferent input may augment oscillations in the stretch reflex arc and result in bursting motor-unit activity and increased tremor. Nine healthy subjects maintained isometric plantar flexions at 30% of their maximum voluntary contraction until the limit of endurance, under three test conditions. Two paradigms were used to reduce afferent input to the triceps surae alpha-motoneurone pool: (1) continued vibration of the Achilles tendon, and (2) ischaemic partial block of the tibial nerve. These were compared to a control experiment, in which there was no intervention. By recording H-reflexes from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, it was possible to assess the effectiveness of reducing the afferent input. When H-reflex suppression had stabilised, the fatiguing contraction was commenced and tremor was computed from the continuously recorded torque signal. Superimposed maximum twitches were elicited as indirect measures of excitatory drive. The increase in tremor root mean square throughout the fatiguing contraction was significantly less for both the vibration and ischaemic conditions. Furthermore, tremor mean power frequency decreased significantly with endurance time in the control experiment, while no significant change was seen in the other two experimental conditions. It is concluded that the enhancement of isometric tremor seen during a fatiguing submaximal isometric contraction is facilitated by peripheral afferent input to the alpha-motoneurone pool.

  15. Surgeon compensation and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, K K; Walker, P M

    2000-06-01

    Financial incentives are the only form of compensation that will motivate surgeons at an academic health sciences center to perform the tasks outlined in the hospital's mission statement. A questionnaire divided into 5 sections: demographics, compensation, time allocation, benefits and incentives, and motivational factors. The Department of Surgery, The Toronto Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. All academic surgeons (N=64) practicing at The Toronto Hospital in July 1997. Of the 64 eligible mailed surveys, there were responses for 59. Of these 59 surgeons, 48 (81%) receive compensation through a fee-for-service method. However, only 32 (54%) of the surgeons prefer the fee-for-service method, while 18 (31%) prefer salary and 9 (15%) prefer an alternative system. On average, these academic surgeons spend 44% of their time teaching or performing research, for which they receive 14% of their total income. Of the motivational factors assessed, financial bonuses are a positive motivational factor for all "surgeon tasks." In addition, task-specific motivational factors were established for research, teaching, and operating, including research facilities, mentorship and prestige, and interesting case types, respectively. Surgeons are not appropriately renumerated for time spent on academic activities, and many would prefer an alternative form of compensation to the fee-for-service method. Knowledge that surgeons are receptive to tasks supporting the hospital's mission statement leads us to conclude that appropriate motivation can shape the activity of academic surgeons. Financial rewards ranked the highest as a motivational factor for all surgeon tasks; however, task-specific motivational factors were identified. Overall, multiple factors, specifically targeted to the individual, will serve to motivate. Thus, compensation packages based on individual preferences and personal motivational factors will be the most successful.

  16. Essential Tremor (ET): Coping Tips for Everyday Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several marathons each year, raising funds and awareness. ET is a life-altering condition that makes everyday ... tremor. In order to assist people who have ET in continuing to live full, meaningful lives, the ...

  17. Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a patient may be under the care of multiple or varying specialists. These include but are not limited to: Neurologists (for tremor, ataxia, memory loss) Psychiatrists (for personality change, depression, mood disorders) Psychologists (for cognitive impairment) Movement disorders specialists (for ...

  18. Tremor in workers with low exposure to metallic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verberk, M.M.; Salle, H.J.A.; Kemper, C.H.

    1986-09-01

    In a fluorescent lamp production factory, a newly developed lightweight balance-tremormeter was used to measure postural tremor of the finger in 21 workers (ages 28 to 61) exposed for 0.5-19 yr to metallic mercury. In addition, tremor was measured in an indirect way by means of a hole-tremormeter. The excretion of mercury in urine was 9-53 (average 20) ..mu..mol/mol creatinine. With increasing mercury excretion, the following parameters increased: the acceleration of the tremor, the contribution of the neuromuscular component (8-12 Hz) to the power spectrum of the acceleration, the width of the power-spectrum and the score on the hole-tremormeter. The study indicates that exposure to metallic mercury below the current TLV (50 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/) may increase the tremor of the finger.

  19. Palatal tremor after lithium and carbamazepine use: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuruvilla Anju

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Palatal tremor, characterized by rhythmic contractions of the soft palate, can occur secondary to pathology in the dentato-rubro-olivary pathway, or in the absence of such structural lesions. Its pathogenesis is only partially understood. We describe a case of probable drug-induced palatal tremor. Case presentation A 27-year-old Indian man had taken carbamazepine and lithium for 7 years for the treatment of a manic episode. He presented with a one-year history of bilateral rhythmic oscillations of his soft palate and tremors of his tongue. There were no other abnormalities detected from his examination or after detailed investigation. Conclusion Palatal tremors may result from medication used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  20. Chin tremor in full-term neonate after hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Ayres de Araújo Scattolin

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Newborns may present a range of motor phenomena that are not epileptic in nature. Chin tremor is an unusual movement disorder that typically starts in early childhood and may be precipitated by stress and emotion. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated. CASE REPORT: We describe a full-term newborn that, immediately after neonatal anoxia, presented body and chin tremors that were unresponsive to anti-epileptic drugs. Subsequent neurological evaluation revealed signs of pyramidal tract damage and chin tremor triggered by percussion and crying. We discuss the hypothesis that the anatomopathological abnormality may lie at the level of the higher cortical centers or midbrain. CONCLUSIONS: Further studies are needed in order to gain greater comprehension of neonatal tremors. Recognition of the various etiological possibilities and consequent management of treatable causes is essential for care optimization.

  1. Seismic Tremors and Magma Wagging During Explosive Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, M.; Bercovici, D.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic tremor is a ubiquitous feature of explosive eruptions. This ground oscillation persists for minutes to weeks and is characterized by a remarkably narrow band of frequencies (i.e., ~0.5 - 7 Hz). Prior to major eruptions, tremor can occur in concert with ground deformation probably related to a buildup of magmatic gas. Volcanic tremor is, thus, of particular value for eruption forecasting. Most models for volcanic tremor rely on specific properties of the geometry, structure and constitution of volcanic conduits as well as the gas content of the erupting magma. Because neither the initial structure nor the evolution of the magma-conduit system will be the same from one volcano to the next, it is surprising that tremor characteristics are so consistent among different volcanoes. Indeed, this universality of tremor properties remains a major enigma. Here we employ the contemporary view that silicic magma rises in the conduit as a columnar plug surrounded by a highly vesicular annulus of sheared bubbles. We demonstrate that, for most geologically relevant conditions, the magma column will oscillate or "wag" against the restoring "gas-spring" force of the annulus at observed tremor frequencies. In contrast to previous models, the magma wagging oscillation is relatively insensitive to the conduit structure and geometry, thereby predicting the narrow band of tremor frequencies observed around the world. Moreover, the model predicts that as an eruption proceeds there will be an upward drift in both the maximum frequency and the total signal frequency bandwidth, the nature of which depends on the explosivity of the eruption, as observed.

  2. Effects of image noise, respiratory motion, and motion compensation on 3D activity quantification in count-limited PET images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siman, W.; Mawlawi, O. R.; Mikell, J. K.; Mourtada, F.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of noise, motion blur, and motion compensation using quiescent-period gating (QPG) on the activity concentration (AC) distribution—quantified using the cumulative AC volume histogram (ACVH)—in count-limited studies such as 90Y-PET/CT. An International Electrotechnical Commission phantom filled with low 18F activity was used to simulate clinical 90Y-PET images. PET data were acquired using a GE-D690 when the phantom was static and subject to 1-4 cm periodic 1D motion. The static data were down-sampled into shorter durations to determine the effect of noise on ACVH. Motion-degraded PET data were sorted into multiple gates to assess the effect of motion and QPG on ACVH. Errors in ACVH at AC90 (minimum AC that covers 90% of the volume of interest (VOI)), AC80, and ACmean (average AC in the VOI) were characterized as a function of noise and amplitude before and after QPG. Scan-time reduction increased the apparent non-uniformity of sphere doses and the dispersion of ACVH. These effects were more pronounced in smaller spheres. Noise-related errors in ACVH at AC20 to AC70 were smaller (15%). The accuracy of ACmean was largely independent of the total count. Motion decreased the observed AC and skewed the ACVH toward lower values; the severity of this effect depended on motion amplitude and tumor diameter. The errors in AC20 to AC80 for the 17 mm sphere were  -25% and  -55% for motion amplitudes of 2 cm and 4 cm, respectively. With QPG, the errors in AC20 to AC80 of the 17 mm sphere were reduced to  -15% for motion amplitudes  0.5, QPG was effective at reducing errors in ACVH despite increases in image non-uniformity due to increased noise. ACVH is believed to be more relevant than mean or maximum AC to calculate tumor control and normal tissue complication probability. However, caution needs to be exercised when using ACVH in post-therapy 90Y imaging because of its susceptibility to image

  3. Maximal force and tremor changes across the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenan, Matthew S; Hackney, Anthony C; Griffin, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones have profound effects on the nervous system in vitro and in vivo. The present study examines the effect of the menstrual cycle on maximal isometric force (MVC) and tremor during an endurance task. Nine eumenorrheic females participated in five study visits across their menstrual cycle. In each menstrual phase, an MVC and an endurance task to failure were performed. Tremor across the endurance task was quantified as the coefficient of variation in force and was assessed in absolute time and relative percent time to task failure. MVC decreases 23% from ovulation to the mid luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. In absolute time, the mid luteal phase has the highest initial tremor, though the early follicular phase has substantially higher tremor than other phases after 150 s of task performance. In relative time, the mid luteal phase has the highest level of tremor throughout the endurance task. Both MVC and tremor during an endurance task are modified by the menstrual cycle. Performance of tasks and sports which require high force and steadiness to exhaustion may be decreased in the mid luteal phase compared to other menstrual phases.

  4. A repetitive control scheme aiming to compensate the 6k+1 harmonics for three-phase hybrid active filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Zhaoxu; Su, Mei; Yang, Jian;

    2016-01-01

    in stationary reference frame, which only compensates the 6k+1 harmonics (e.g. -5, +7, -11, +13) in three-phase systems and reduces the time delay to T0/6 . So compared with the earlier reduced delay time repetitive controllers, the robustness and transient performance is further improved, the waste of control...

  5. Lu AF21934, a positive allosteric modulator of mGlu4 receptors, reduces the harmaline-induced hyperactivity but not tremor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossowska, Krystyna; Wardas, Jadwiga; Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Pilc, Andrzej; Zorn, Stevin H; Doller, Dario

    2014-08-01

    Harmaline induces tremor in animals resembling essential tremor which has been suggested to result from activation of the glutamatergic olivo-cerebellar projection. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of systemic administration of Lu AF21934, a brain-penetrating positive allosteric modulator of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4), on the harmaline-induced tremor and other forms of motor activity in rats using fully automated Force Plate Actimeters. The influence of harmaline on the mGlu4 mRNA expression in the cerebellum and inferior olive was analysed by in situ hybridization. Harmaline at a dose of 15 mg/kg (ip) triggered tremor which was manifested by an increase in the power within 9-15 Hz band and in the tremor index (a difference in power between bands 9-15 Hz and 0-8 Hz). Harmaline induced a biphasic effect on mobility, initially inhibiting the exploratory locomotor activity of rats (0-30 min after administration), followed by an increase in their basic activity. Lu AF21934 (0.5-5 mg/kg sc) did not influence tremor but at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg reversed harmaline-induced hyperactivity. MGlu4 mRNA expression was high in the cerebellar cortex and low in the inferior olive. Repeated harmaline (15 mg/kg ip once a day for 5 days] decreased mGlu4 mRNA in the cerebellum and inferior olive. The present study indicates that the mGlu4 stimulation counteracts hyperactivity induced by harmaline which suggests the involvement of cerebellar glutamatergic transmission in this process. In contrast, neuronal mechanisms involved in tremor seem to be insensitive to the stimulation of mGlu4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Avaliação vestibular no tremor essencial Vestibular evaluation in the essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: o tremor essencial é familial em cerca de 50% dos casos, com uma herança autossômica, possui início insidioso e é lentamente progressivo. PROCEDIMENTOS: avaliou-se no Setor de Otoneurologia de um Hospital Particular em fevereiro de 2007, uma paciente do sexo feminino, branca, 59 anos, casada, artista plástica, com história de tremor na cabeça desde os dois anos de idade (sic. A paciente relata queixa de tontura há vários meses de origem súbita sem acompanhamento de náusea e/ou queda. Nega perda de força muscular e formigamento em membros superiores e inferiores, rebaixamento da acuidade auditiva e zumbido. A paciente relata que um de seus filhos possuiu tremor nas mãos há dois anos e avós maternos e paternos com Parkinson. Realizaram-se os seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica e avaliação vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia. RESULTADOS: observaram-se os seguintes achados ao exame vestibular: nistagmo de posicionamento com características centrais, nistagmo espontâneo presente com os olhos abertos, nistagmo semi-espontâneo do tipo múltiplo e hiper-reflexia em valor absoluto à prova calórica 20ºC (OD e OE. CONCLUSÃO: o exame vestibular mostrou-se sensível e importante para captar alterações em provas que sugerissem envolvimento do sistema nervoso central.BACKGROUND: essential tremors are family-related in about 50% of the cases with an autosomal inheritance and they register an insidious beginning with a slow progression. PROCEDURE: a 59 year old, white female patient, married and whose occupation is a plastic artist with a history of head tremors since she was two years (sic old was evaluated in the Otoneurology sector of a private hospital, during the period from February 2007. The patient had been complaining of dizziness from unknown origin for several months without accompanying nausea and/or falls. She denied any loss of muscular strength or tingling in her upper and lower

  7. Alpha band cortico-muscular coherence occurs in healthy individuals during mechanically-induced tremor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Budini

    Full Text Available The present work aimed at investigating the effects of mechanically amplified tremor on cortico-muscular coherence (CMC in the alpha band. The study of CMC in this specific band is of particular interest because this coherence is usually absent in healthy individuals and it is an aberrant feature in patients affected by pathological tremors; understanding its mechanisms is therefore important. Thirteen healthy volunteers (23±4 years performed elbow flexor sustained contractions both against a spring load and in isometric conditions at 20% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC. Spring stiffness was selected to induce instability in the stretch reflex servo loop. 64 EEG channels, surface EMG from the biceps brachii muscle and force were simultaneously recorded. Contractions against the spring resulted in greater fluctuations of the force signal and EMG amplitude compared to isometric conditions (p<.05. During isometric contractions CMC was systematically found in the beta band and sporadically observed in the alpha band. However, during the contractions against the spring load, CMC in the alpha band was observed in 12 out of 13 volunteers. Partial directed coherence (PDC revealed an increased information flow in the EMG to EEG direction in the alpha band (p<.05. Therefore, coherence in the alpha band between the sensory-motor cortex and the biceps brachii muscle can be systematically induced in healthy individuals by mechanically amplifying tremor. The increased information flow in the EMG to EEG direction may reflect enhanced afferent activity from the muscle spindles. These results may contribute to the understanding of the presence of alpha band CMC in tremor related pathologies by suggesting that the origin of this phenomenon may not only be at cortical level but may also be affected by spinal circuit loops.

  8. Predictive value of the smell identification test for nigrostriatal dopaminergic depletion in Korean tremor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin Yong; Chung, Seok Jong; Lee, Ji E; Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Lee, Phil Hyu; Sohn, Young H

    2013-11-01

    The predictive value of Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test for nigrostriatal dopaminergic depletion in Korean tremor patients has yet to be assessed. Three hundred nineteen drug-naive patients who visited our clinic for the diagnosis of their tremor, and took both Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test and dopamine transporter PET were included in the data analysis. Visual grading of each PET image was performed by two independent neurologists. Smell test scores were significantly correlated to the striatal dopaminergic activity (Kendall's τb = -0.291, p smell test score alone appeared to have relatively weak power for predicting dopaminergic depletion (area under the curve = 0.693). Multivariate logistic regression model with inclusion of the patient's age and symptom duration as independent variables enhanced predictive power for dopaminergic depletion (area under the curve = 0.812). These results demonstrated that Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test measurements alone may be insufficient to predict striatal dopaminergic depletion in Korean tremor patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic Assessing of Tremor Severity Using Nonlinear Dynamics, Artificial Neural Networks and Neuro-Fuzzy Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEMAN, O.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases like Alzheimer, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and other dementias influence the lives of patients, their families and society. Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disease that occurs due to loss of dopamine, a neurotransmitter and slow destruction of neurons. Brain area affected by progressive destruction of neurons is responsible for controlling movements, and patients with PD reveal rigid and uncontrollable gestures, postural instability, small handwriting and tremor. Commercial activity-promoting gaming systems such as the Nintendo Wii and Xbox Kinect can be used as tools for tremor, gait or other biomedical signals acquisitions. They also can aid for rehabilitation in clinical settings. This paper emphasizes the use of intelligent optical sensors or accelerometers in biomedical signal acquisition, and of the specific nonlinear dynamics parameters or fuzzy logic in Parkinson's disease tremor analysis. Nowadays, there is no screening test for early detection of PD. So, we investigated a method to predict PD, based on the image processing of the handwriting belonging to a candidate of PD. For classification and discrimination between healthy people and PD people we used Artificial Neural Networks (Radial Basis Function - RBF and Multilayer Perceptron - MLP and an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Classifier (ANFC. In general, the results may be expressed as a prognostic (risk degree to contact PD.

  10. Transparent Pixel Circuit with Threshold Voltage Compensation Using ZnO Thin-Film Transistors for Active-Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ik-Seok; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2009-03-01

    A transparent pixel circuit with a threshold voltage compensating scheme using ZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) for active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is proposed. This circuit consists of five n-type ZnO TFTs and two capacitors and can compensate for the threshold voltage variation of ZnO TFTs in real time. From simulation results, the maximum deviation of the emission current of the pixel circuit with a threshold voltage variation of ±1 V is determined to be less than 10 nA. From measurement results, it is verified that the maximum deviation of measured emission currents with measurement position in a glass substrate is less than 15 nA in a higher current range, and the deviation of emission current with time is less than 3%.

  11. Seed reserves partition and light compensation point of mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King seedlings growth under low photosynthetic active radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pires de Lemos Filho

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the dry mass partition of the seed reserves during the initial growth of Swietenia macrophylla seedlings, in the dark, and at low levels of photosynthetically active radiation: 0.125; 3.12 and 52 µ mol.m-2.s-1. After 50 days, the dry mass of the seed reserves did not differ with treatments, but the total dry mass and leaf area were higher in the seedlings under higher light treatment. No difference in root/shoot ratio was observed between treatments, but the leaf area ratio was lower at higher light. Only the seedlings grown at 52 µ mol.m-2.s-1 showed a positive dry mass increase in relation to the mobilized seed reserves. With the values of the net increase of the seedling mass, a linear equation was adjusted in relation to the light levels, permitting to determine 3.76 µ mol.m-2.s-1 as the seedling light compensation point. These results explain the shade tolerance of the S. macrophylla seedlings.O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a partição da massa seca das reservas das sementes durante o crescimento de plântulas de Sietenia macrophylla , no escuro e sob baixos níveis de radiação fotossintéticamente ativa: 0,125; 3,12 e 52µ mol.m-2.s-1. Após 50 dias a massa seca das reservas das sementes não diferiram com os diferentes tratamentos de luz. Não foi observado diferenças na razão raíz/parte aérea, mas a razão área foliar foi menor no maior nível de luz. Somente as plântulas crescidas a 52 µ mol.m-2.s-1 mostraram um incremento positivo na massa seca em relação às reservas mobilizadas da semente. Uma equação linear foi ajustada entre o incremento líquido de massa seca das plântulas e níveis de luz, permitindo determinar 3,76 µ mol.m-2.s-1 como ponto de compensação de luz das plântulas. Esses resultados explicam a tolerância à sombra das plântulas de S. macrophylla

  12. Is localised dehydration and vein generation the tremor-generating mechanism in subduction zones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagereng, Ake; Meneghini, Francesca; Diener, Johann; Harris, Chris

    2017-04-01

    geochemical characteristics of the fluid source potentially required to produce tremor. In the Chrystalls Beach Complex, quartz δ18O values range from 14.1 ‰ to 17.0 ‰ (n = 18), whereas in the Kuiseb schist, values range from 9.4 ‰ to 17.9 ‰ (n = 30). In the latter, values less than 14.0‰ are associated with long-lived shear zones. Excluding the lower values in the Kuiseb schist, the δ18O values are consistent with metamorphic fluids in near equilibrium with the host rocks. We thus infer that the veins that developed on the prograde path formed at a small range of temperatures from a local fluid source. This interpretation is consistent with the veins forming in response to a spatially localised metamorphic fluid release. If vein swarms are formed by the mechanism geophysically recorded as tremor, this implies that tremor is, at least in some locations, triggered by metamorphic fluid release and associated hydrofracture and low effective stress shear activation of low permeability shear zone rocks. If this is correct, then a corollary may be that the near-periodic nature of tremor events is related to a regular nature in the build-up and release of fluid pressure.

  13. Aborted eruptions at Mt. Etna (Italy) in spring 2007 unveiled by an integrated study of gas emission and volcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsaperla, S.; Behncke, B.; Giammanco, S.; Neri, M.; Langer, H.; Pecora, E.; Salerno, G.

    2012-04-01

    In spring 2007, a sequence of paroxysmal episodes took place at the Southeast Crater of Mt. Etna, Italy. Eruptive activity, characterised by Strombolian explosions, lava fountains, emission of lava flows and tephra, were all associated with an outstanding increase in the amplitude of volcanic tremor. In periods of quiescence between the eruptive episodes, recurring phases of seismic unrest were observed in forms of small temporary enhancements of the volcanic tremor amplitude, even though none of them culminated in eruptive activity. Here, we present the results of an integrated geophysical and geochemical data analysis encompassing records of volcanic tremor, thermal data, plume SO2 flux and radon over two months. We conclude that between February and April 2007, magma triggered repeated episodes of gas pulses and rock fracturing, but failed to reach the surface. Our multidisciplinary study allowed us to unveil these 'aborted' eruptions by investigating the long-temporal evolution of gas measurements along with seismic radiation. Short-term changes were additionally highlighted using a method of pattern classification based on Kohonen Maps and Fuzzy Clustering applied to volcanic tremor and radon data.

  14. Non-volcanic tremor in Cascadia: Segmented along strike, anti-correlated with earthquakes, and offset from the locked zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarko, D. C.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Allen, R. M.; Porritt, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS), the spatial and temporal correlation of slow slip events monitored by GPS observations and non-volcanic tremor (NVT) monitored by seismic signals, is a recently discovered type of deformation thought to occur immediately down-dip from the seismogenic zone along several subduction margins. Owing to the wealth of geodetic and seismic observatories in Washington and Vancouver Island, ETS in northern Cascadia has been the subject of numerous studies over the last half-decade, while the rest of the margin has received considerably less attention. We will present a comprehensive review of tremor activity along the southern Cascadia margin between 2005 and 2007 using both semi-automated and fully-automated source location routines. We will also utilize the fully-automated routine to expand the scope to include the entire Cascadia margin and episodes after 2007, including the great 2008 ETS episode which spans nearly the entire length of the margin. The along-strike length of activity of an individual episode varies between 30 to 900 km, evolving in a very complex manner with periods of steady and halting migration and frequent along-strike jumps (30-600 km). The initiation and termination points of laterally-continuous tremor activity appear to be repeatable features between NVT episodes which support the hypothesis of segmentation within the ETS zone. The distribution of tremor epicenters occur within a narrow band confined by the surface projections of the 30 and 40 km contours of the subducting plate interface. We find the tremor zone is spatially offset by as much as 50 km down-dip from the thermally- and geodetically-defined transition zone, which may decrease the efficiency of stress transmission and slip propagation during either transient or seismogenic deformation episodes. Intriguingly, NVT activity is spatially anti-correlated with local seismicity, suggesting the two processes occur mutually exclusive of one another. We propose

  15. LINGO-1 and Neurodegeneration: Pathophysiologic Clues for Essential Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Dong; Sathiyamoorthy, Sushmitha; Tan, Eng-King

    2012-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET), one of the most common adult-onset movement disorders, has been associated with cerebellar Purkinje cell degeneration and formation of brainstem Lewy bodies. Recent findings suggest that genetic variants of the leucine-rich repeat and Ig domain containing 1 (LINGO-1) gene could be risk factors for ET. The LINGO-1 protein contains both leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in its extracellular region, as well as a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic tail. LINGO-1 can form a ternary complex with Nogo-66 receptor (NgR1) and p75. Binding of LINGO-1 with NgR1 can activate the NgR1 signaling pathway, leading to inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has also been found to bind with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and induce downregulation of the activity of EGFR-PI3K-Akt signaling, which might decrease Purkinje cell survival. Therefore, it is possible that genetic variants of LINGO-1, either alone or in combination with other genetic or environmental factors, act to increase LINGO-1 expression levels in Purkinje cells and confer a risk to Purkinje cell survival in the cerebellum.Here, we provide a concise summary of the link between LINGO-1 and neurodegeneration and discuss various hypotheses as to how this could be potentially relevant to ET pathogenesis.

  16. Spasmodic tremor and possible magma injection in Long Valley caldera, eastern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryall, A.; Ryall, F.

    1983-03-25

    Intensive microearthquake swarms with the appearance of volcanic tremor have been observed in the southwest part of Long Valley caldera, southeastern California. This activity, possibly associated with magma injection, began 6 weeks after several strong (magnitude 6+) earthquakes in an area south of the caldera and has continued sporadically to the present time. The earthquake sequence and magmatic activity are part of a broad increase in tectonic activity in a 15,000-square-kilometer region surrounding the White Mountains seismic gap, an area with high potential for the next earthquake in the western Great Basin.

  17. Tremor irregularity, torque steadiness and rate of force development in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Martin Høyer; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2013-01-01

    We investigated lower-extremity isometric tremor Approximate Entropy (irregularity), torque steadiness and rate of force development (RFD) and their associations to muscle activation strategy during isometric knee extensions in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirteen male patients...... and the patients had increased muscle co-activation. A markedly lower RFD was found in PD and the decreased RFD correlated with reduced agonist muscle activation. Furthermore, patient RFD correlated with the Movement-Disorder-Society-Unified-Parkinson's-Disease-Rating-Scale 3 (motor part) scores. We concluded...

  18. Evaluation of Non-Volcanic Tremor Detection Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, S. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Kao, H.

    2009-12-01

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) is a subduction zone process often associated with the transition from stick-slip to stable sliding on the plate interface. In Northern Cascadia, NVT episodes lasting multiple weeks have been correlated spatially and temporally with slow slip episodes at a regular recurrence interval of 15±2 months. However, NVT across the entire Cascadia margin varies widely in recurrence and duration, while still other subduction zones (Japan, Mexico) observe separate cases of tremor and GPS-detected slip. Multiple identification and location techniques exist, but we will focus on techniques that can identify NVT at single stations to accommodate searching outside a dense network of instruments. This study evaluates these techniques in several regions along the entire Cascadia margin and in the Oaxaca segment of the Middle America Subduction Zone. Tremor signals are collected from a mixture of seismometers including those of temporary deployments targeting NVT, the EarthScope Transportable Array, the Canadian National Seismograph Network, and a few other regional networks that span the subduction zones. We compare existing techniques that scan moving averages, scintillation index, and hourly mean amplitudes with a new tremor frequency scanning technique that bandpass filters seismic data into three categories, 10-15 Hz, 2-5 Hz, and 0.2-0.5 Hz, where we expect prominent signals from microseismicity, NVT, and surface waves, respectively. Applying these techniques to episodes over the last few years finds that each technique can identify large, multi-week tremor events associated with GPS recorded slow slip. However, different techniques result in different totals of tremor hours detected per episode, as well as variable numbers of additional smaller episodes identified. Based on previous research that finds the amount of tremor correlated to the amount of slip from geodetic inversions, we are working towards a consensus single station approach that is

  19. Depressive symptoms can amplify embarrassment in essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D; Cosentino, Stephanie; Huey, Edward D

    2016-01-01

    Embarrassment can be a considerable problem for patients with essential tremor (ET) and is a major motivator for treatment. Depression is also a common feature of ET; as many as 35 % of patients report moderate to severe depressive symptoms. Our goal was to assess the associations between these motor and psychosocial factors (tremor, depression, embarrassment) in ET, with a particular interest in more fully assessing the possible association between depression and embarrassment. Ninety one ET cases (age 70.4 ± 12.8 years) enrolled in a prospective, clinical-epidemiological study. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD-10, 0-30 [maximum]), embarrassment, with the Essential Tremor Embarrassment Assessment (ETEA, 0-70 [maximum]), and action tremor, with a detailed in-person neurological examination. Higher CESD-10 score was significantly associated with higher ETEA score (p = 0.005), but not with increasing tremor severity (p = 0.94). In stratified analyses, cases with no or minimal depressive symptoms had the lowest ETEA scores, cases with moderate depressive symptoms had intermediate ETEA scores, and cases with severe depressive symptoms had the highest ETEA scores (p = 0.01). Furthermore, at each level of tremor severity, cases with more depressive symptoms had more embarrassment. Depressive symptoms seem to be more than a secondary response to the tremor in ET; they seem to amplify the level of embarrassment and, in addition to their own importance, seem to be a driver of other important clinical outcomes. Earlier treatment of depressive symptoms in ET patients could lessen the burden of secondary embarrassment.

  20. Dynamic Harmonic and Reactive Power Compensation with an Adaptive Shunt Active Filter for Variable Speed Induction Motor Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhu M R; Aneesh P; Manjula G Nair; T N P Nambiar

    2014-01-01

    Variable speed drives are mostly preferred in industries, while considering energy saving, smooth control, flexible operation and fast response. On the other hand, this equipment generates dynamic harmonic distortions in source currents and draws variable reactive power demand depending on variation in load condition. These distortions propagate throughout the system and affect all the loads connected to the point of common coupling. Hence a dynamic harmonic and reactive compensator is necess...

  1. Dispersion compensation based on prism compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongying; Lan, Tian; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2017-04-01

    A prism compressor can compensate dispersion of femtosecond light pulses travelling in air for laser ranging. An accurate expression of the group delay dispersion (GDD) of a prism compressor at arbitrary incident angle and at arbitrary incident point is obtained, which is of benefit to finely compensating dispersion of femtosecond pulses. Influences of several parameters on group delay dispersion are analyzed for the active compensation of dispersion of femtosecond pulses. These expressions are convenient to applications of intra- and extra-cavity dispersion compensation of ultra-short laser pulses, as well as fine compensation of satellite laser ranging and laser altimetry.

  2. Tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease under resting-state and stress-state conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Ji; Lee, Woong Woo; Kim, Sang Kyong; Park, Hyeyoung; Jeon, Hyo Seon; Kim, Han Byul; Jeon, Beom S; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-03-15

    Tremor characteristics-amplitude and frequency components-are primary quantitative clinical factors for diagnosis and monitoring of tremors. Few studies have investigated how different patient's conditions affect tremor frequency characteristics in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we analyzed tremor characteristics under resting-state and stress-state conditions. Tremor was recorded using an accelerometer on the finger, under resting-state and stress-state (calculation task) conditions, during rest tremor and postural tremor. The changes of peak power, peak frequency, mean frequency, and distribution of power spectral density (PSD) of tremor were evaluated across conditions. Patients whose tremors were considered more than "mild" were selected, for both rest (n=67) and postural (n=25) tremor. Stress resulted in both greater peak powers and higher peak frequencies for rest tremor (pcharacteristics, namely a lower frequency as amplitude increases, are different in stressful condition. Patient's conditions directly affect neural oscillations related to tremor frequencies. Therefore, tremor characteristics in PD should be systematically standardized across patient's conditions such as attention and stress levels.

  3. The distributed somatotopy of tremor: a window into the motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C

    2013-03-01

    The posterior ventrolateral thalamus (VLp) plays a crucial role in Parkinson's tremor and in essential tremor: deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the VLp effectively diminishes both tremor types. Previous research has shown tremor oscillations in the VLp, but the spatial extent and somatotopy of these oscillations remained unclear. In this issue of Experimental Neurology, Pedrosa and colleagues measured neuro-muscular coherence at multiple sites in the VLp of patients with essential tremor and Parkinson's disease using implanted DBS electrodes (Pedrosa et al., 2012). They found multiple tremor clusters within the VLp, with spatially distinct tremor clusters for antagonistic muscles, and in many patients also multiple distinct tremor clusters for a single muscle. Interestingly, this group previously showed similar effects for the STN in tremulous Parkinson's disease (Reck et al., 2009, 2010). Together, these studies suggest that the distribution of tremor clusters is a general organizational principle of tremor, being present in two different tremor pathologies, and in two different nodes of the motor system. The presence of multiple tremor clusters also fits with the distributed somatotopy of the healthy motor system. Therefore, a further conclusion of this study could be that tremor is caused by aberrant synchronization within an otherwise healthy network, brought about by different pathophysiological neural triggers.

  4. Compensation effects and relation between the activation energy of spin transition and the hysteresis loop width for an iron(ii) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushuev, Mark B; Pishchur, Denis P; Nikolaenkova, Elena B; Krivopalov, Viktor P

    2016-06-22

    The enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for the cooperative → spin transition (the phase is a mononuclear complex [FeL2](BF4)2, L is 4-(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-2-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-methylpyrimidine). The physical origin of this effect is the fact that the → spin transition is the first order phase transition accompanied by noticeable variations in the Tonset↑, ΔH and ΔS values. Higher ΔH and ΔS values are correlated with higher Tonset↑ values. The higher the enthalpy and entropy of the spin transition, the wider the hysteresis loop. The kinetic compensation effect, i.e. a linear relationship between ln A and Ea, was observed for the → spin transition. Moreover, an isokinetic relationship was detected in this system: the Arrhenius lines (ln k vs. 1/T) obtained from magnetochemical data for different samples of the phase undergoing the → transition show a common point of intersection (Tiso = 490 ± 2 K, ln kiso = -6.0 ± 0.2). The validity of this conclusion was confirmed by the Exner-Linert statistical method. This means that the isokinetic relationship and the kinetic compensation effect (ln A vs. Ea) in this system are true ones. The existence of a true kinetic compensation effect is supported independently by the fact that the hysteresis loop width for the cooperative spin transition ↔ increases with increasing activation barrier height. Estimating the energy of excitations for the phase with Tiso ∼ 490 K yields wavenumbers of ca. 340 cm(-1) corresponding to the frequencies of the stretching vibrations of the Fe(LS)-N bonds, i.e. the bonds directly involved in the mechanism of the spin transition. This is the first observation of the kinetic compensation effect (ln A vs. Ea) and the isokinetic relationship for a cooperative spin crossover system showing thermal hysteresis. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that the higher the activation barrier for the spin transition, the wider the hysteresis loop for a

  5. Faculty Compensation Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silander, Fred

    1983-01-01

    Faculty compensation policy is seen as one means by which an institution influences the faculty to work toward institutional goals. Among the broad criteria for compensation are worth, equity, need, and market measures. Benefits and issues in compensation including differentials in compensation, merit, part-time instruction, etc. are discussed.…

  6. Extending Alaska's plate boundary: tectonic tremor generated by Yakutat subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wech, Aaron G.

    2016-01-01

    The tectonics of the eastern end of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone are complicated by the inclusion of the Yakutat microplate, which is colliding into and subducting beneath continental North America at near-Pacific-plate rates. The interaction among these plates at depth is not well understood, and further east, even less is known about the plate boundary or the source of Wrangell volcanism. The drop-off in Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) seismicity could signal the end of the plate boundary, the start of aseismic subduction, or a tear in the downgoing plate. Further compounding the issue is the possible presence of the Wrangell slab, which is faintly outlined by an anemic, eastward-dipping WBZ beneath the Wrangell volcanoes. In this study, I performed a search for tectonic tremor to map slow, plate-boundary slip in south-central Alaska. I identified ∼11,000 tremor epicenters, which continue 85 km east of the inferred Pacific plate edge marked by WBZ seismicity. The tremor zone coincides with the edges of the downgoing Yakutat terrane, and tremors transition from periodic to continuous behavior as they near the aseismic Wrangell slab. I interpret tremor to mark slow, semicontinuous slip occurring at the interface between the Yakutat and North America plates. The slow slip region lengthens the megathrust interface beyond the WBZ and may provide evidence for a connection between the Yakutat slab and the aseismic Wrangell slab.

  7. Blinded placebo crossover study of gabapentin in primary orthostatic tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Julian P; Edwards, Dylan J; Walters, Susan E; Byrnes, Michelle L; Thickbroom, Gary W; Stell, Rick; Mastaglia, Frank L

    2006-07-01

    Primary orthostatic tremor (OT) is a rare but disabling condition characterized by leg tremor and feelings of instability during stance. Previous studies have reported a reduction in OT symptoms with gabapentin treatment. In this study, we report on the benefits of gabapentin treatment in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 6 OT patients. First, the maximally effective gabapentin dosage (600-2,700 mg/day) for each patient was determined during an initial dose-titration phase. Patients were then studied 7 days after drug withdrawal and again after two 2-week periods of treatment with either gabapentin or placebo, using force platform posturography to quantify postural sway and tremor. Other medications for OT were continued unchanged. Symptomatic response was assessed by a patient-rated severity scale and quality of life (QOL) questionnaire. All patients reported an increase in symptoms during the washout phase and symptom reduction (50%-75%) during gabapentin treatment. Tremor amplitude was reduced to 79% +/- 11% and sway area to 71% +/- 11% of the placebo state. QOL improved in all patients, no adverse drug effects were noted, and symptomatic benefit was maintained at follow-up (mean = 19 months). The findings confirm that gabapentin is an effective treatment for OT, reducing both tremor and postural instability and improving quality of life, and support its use as add-on or first-line therapy for OT.

  8. Global survey of earthquakes and non-volcanic tremor triggered by the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, T.; Peng, Z.; Wang, W.; Chen, Q.

    2008-12-01

    We perform a global survey of triggered earthquakes and non-volcanic tremor by the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. The analyzed data is obtained from the Global Seismic Network and various local and regional seismic networks around the world. We identify triggered earthquakes as impulsive seismic energies with clear P and S arrivals on 5 Hz high-pass-filtered three-component velocity seismograms, and triggered tremor as bursts of high-frequency, non-impulsive seismic energies that are coherent among many stations and during the passage of teleseismic body and surface waves. We find wide-spread triggering of regular earthquakes within mainland China and elsewhere in the world. The triggered earthquakes mostly occur in tectonically active regions in northwest and northeast China. However, we also find clear evidence of triggered earthquakes in southeast China that is not tectonically active. Our observations are consistent with previous studies of earthquake triggering (e.g., Gomberg et al., 2004; Velasco et al., 2008), indicating that dynamic triggering of earthquakes is ubiquitous and independent of the tectonic environments. In comparison, clear triggered tremor associated with the Wenchuan earthquake is found in the Taiwan Island (Chao and Peng, 2008), southwest Japan, Cascadia (Vidale et al., 2008), and around the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault (Peng et al., 2008), where regular and/or triggered tremor has been found before. So far we have not found clear evidence of triggered tremor within mainland China. At least part of the reason could be due to severe clippings of the broadband waveforms during large-amplitude surface waves for many stations within 2000 km of the epicenter. Updated results will be presented at the meeting.

  9. Altered Functional Connectivity in Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D.; Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Manzanedo, Eva; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix; Posada, Ignacio; Rocon, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Essential tremor (ET) has been associated with a spectrum of clinical features, with both motor and nonmotor elements, including cognitive deficits. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether brain networks that might be involved in the pathogenesis of nonmotor manifestations associated with ET are altered, and the relationship between abnormal connectivity and ET severity and neuropsychological function. Resting-state fMRI data in 23 ET patients (12 women and 11 men) and 22 healthy controls (HC) (12 women and 10 men) were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a “dual-regression” technique, to identify the group differences of resting-state networks (RSNs) (default mode network [DMN] and executive, frontoparietal, sensorimotor, cerebellar, auditory/language, and visual networks). All participants underwent a neuropsychological and neuroimaging session, where resting-state data were collected. Relative to HC, ET patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (DMN and frontoparietal networks) and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and visual networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with ET severity (DMN) and ET duration (DMN and left frontoparietal network), but also with cognitive ability. Moreover, in at least 3 networks (DMN and frontoparietal networks), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, verbal memory, visual memory, and language) and depressive symptoms. Further, in the visual network, decreased connectivity was associated with worse performance on visuospatial ability. ET was associated with abnormal brain connectivity in major RSNs that might be involved in both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Our findings underscore the importance of examining RSNs in this population as a biomarker of disease. PMID:26656325

  10. Boosting of Nonvolcanic Tremor by Regional Earthquakes 2011-2012 in Guerrero, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, J. A.; Kostoglodov, V.; Husker, A. L.; Payero, J. S.; G-GAP Research Team

    2013-05-01

    Sistematic observation of nonvolcanic tremor (NVT) in Guerrero, Mexico started in 2005 after the installation of MASE broadband seismic network. Since 2008 the new "G-GAP" network of 10 seismic mini-arrays provides the data for the NVT detailed studies together with the broadband stations of the Servicio Seimologogico Nacional (SSN). Most of the NVT recorded in the central Guerrero area are of so called ambient type, which in most cases are related with the occurrence of aseismic slow slip events (SSE). While the locations of NVT are estimated relatively well, their depths are not reliable but distributed close to the subduction plate interface. The ambient NVT activity increases periodically every 3-4 months and is strongly modulated by large SSE. Another type of tremor has been observed in Guerrero during and after several large teleseismic events, such as Mw=8.8, 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake. This NVT was triggered by the surface waves when they traveled across the tremor-generating area. Large teleseismic events may also activate a noticeable post-seismic NVT activity. In subduction zones, triggering of the NVT and its post-seismic activation by the regional and local earthquakes have not yet been observed. We tried to detect the NVT triggered or boosting of post-seismic tremor activity by two recent large earthquakes that occurred in Guerrero: December 11, 2011, Mw=6.5 Zumpango, and March 20, 2012, Mw=7.4 Ometepec. The first earthquake was of the intraplate type, with normal focal mechanism, at the depth of 58 km, and the second was the shallow interplate event of the thrust type, at the depth of ~15 km. It is technically difficult to separate the NVT signal in its characteristic 1-10 Hz frequency range from the high frequency input from the regional earthquake. The Zumpango event, which is located closer to the NVT area, produced a noticeable boosting of post-seismic NVT activity to the North of its epicenter. Meanwhile the larger magnitude Ometepec

  11. Quality parameters for a multimodal EEG/EMG/kinematic brain-computer interface (BCI) aiming to suppress neurological tremor in upper limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Giuliana; Manto, Mario; Jdaoudi, Yassin

    2014-01-01

    Tremor is the most common movement disorder encountered during daily neurological practice. Tremor in the upper limbs causes functional disability and social inconvenience, impairing daily life activities. The response of tremor to pharmacotherapy is variable. Therefore, a combination of drugs is often required. Surgery is considered when the response to medications is not sufficient. However, about one third of patients are refractory to current treatments. New bioengineering therapies are emerging as possible alternatives. Our study was carried out in the framework of the European project “Tremor” (ICT-2007-224051). The main purpose of this challenging project was to develop and validate a new treatment for upper limb tremor based on the combination of functional electrical stimulation (FES; which has been shown to reduce upper limb tremor) with a brain-computer interface (BCI). A BCI-driven detection of voluntary movement is used to trigger FES in a closed-loop approach. Neurological tremor is detected using a matrix of EMG electrodes and inertial sensors embedded in a wearable textile. The identification of the intentionality of movement is a critical aspect to optimize this complex system. We propose a multimodal detection of the intentionality of movement by fusing signals from EEG, EMG and kinematic sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometry). Parameters of prediction of movement are extracted in order to provide global prediction plots and trigger FES properly. In particular, quality parameters (QPs) for the EEG signals, corticomuscular coherence and event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) parameters are combined in an original algorithm which takes into account the refractoriness/responsiveness of tremor. A simulation study of the relationship between the threshold of ERD/ERS of artificial EEG traces and the QPs is also provided. Very interestingly, values of QPs were much greater than those obtained for the corticomuscular module alone

  12. A new familial disease of saccadic oscillations and limb tremor provides clues to mechanisms of common tremor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Miura, Kenichiro; Optican, Lance M; Ramat, Stefano; Leigh, R John; Zee, David S

    2007-11-01

    Tremor disorders pose fundamental questions about disease mechanisms, and challenges to successful neurotherapeutics: What causes motor circuits to oscillate in disorders in which the central nervous system otherwise seems normal? How does inheritance 'determine' the clinical phenotype in familial tremor disorders? Here, we address these questions. Analogies between the neural circuits controlling rapid eye movements (saccades) and those controlling limb movements allow us to translate the interpretations from the saccadic systems to the limb movement system. Moreover, the relatively well understood neurophysiology of the ocular motor system offers a unique opportunity to test specific hypotheses about normal and abnormal motor control of both eye and limb movements. We describe a new familial disorder--'micro-saccadic oscillations and limb tremor (microSOLT)'--in a mother and daughter who had tiny saccadic oscillations of the eyes and tremor of the hands. This unique oscillatory movement disorder resembles other common tremor disorders (such as essential tremor) that occur in patients who have an otherwise normally functioning central nervous system. We hypothesize that microSOLT is caused by an inherited abnormality that results in abnormal membrane properties causing reduced external inhibition in the premotor neurons that generate the high-frequency discharge (burst) for saccades and for ballistic limb movements. To test this hypothesis, we recorded hand tremor and eye movements in two patients with microSOLT and particularly during natural circumstances when inhibition of the premotor saccadic burst neurons is removed (e.g. eye closure). We then simulated a conductance-based model for the premotor commands which included excitatory and reciprocally inhibitory burst neurons. The structure of this physiologically realistic model was based upon known cell types and anatomical connections in the brainstem (for saccades) and the thalamus (for limb movements). The

  13. On a chaotic potential at the surface of a compensated semiconductor under conditions of the self-assembly of electrically active defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarenko, V. B., E-mail: enter@spbstu.ru; Filimonov, A. V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Natural irregularities of the electric potential on the surface of a semiconductor under conditions of the partial self-assembly of electrically active defects, i.e., on the formation of donor–acceptor pairs in depletion layers, are studied. The amplitude and character of the spatial distribution of the chaotic potential on the surface of a semiconductor in the cases of localized and delocalized states are determined. The dependence of the amplitude of the chaotic potential on the degree of compensation of the semiconductor is obtained.

  14. The approximate entropy of the electromyographic signals of tremor correlates with the osmotic fragility of human erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penha-Silva Nilson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main problem of tremor is the damage caused to the quality of the life of patients, especially those at more advanced ages. There is not a consensus yet about the origins of this disorder, but it can be examined in the correlations between the biological signs of aging and the tremor characteristics. Methods This work sought correlations between the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes and features extracted from electromyographic (EMG activity resulting from physiological tremor in healthy patients (N = 44 at different ages (24-87 years. The osmotic fragility was spectrophotometrically evaluated by the dependence of hemolysis, provided by the absorbance in 540 nm (A54o, on the concentration of NaCl. The data were adjusted to curves of sigmoidal regression and characterized by the half transition point (H50, amplitude of lysis transition (dx and values of A540 in the curve regions that characterize the presence of lysed (A1 and preserved erythrocytes (A2. The approximate entropy was estimated from EMG signals detected from the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle during the movement of the hand of subjects holding up a laser pen towards an Archimedes spiral, fixed in a whiteboard. The evaluations were carried out with the laser pen at rest, at the center of the spiral, and in movement from the center to the outside and from outside to the center. The correlations among the parameters of osmotic fragility, tremor and age were tested. Results Negative correlations with age were found for A1 and dx. With the hand at rest, a positive correlation with H50 was found for the approximate entropy. Negative correlations with H50 were found for the entropy with the hand in movement, as from the center to the outside or from the outside to the center of the spiral. Conclusion In healthy individuals, the increase in the erythrocyte osmotic fragility was associated with a decrease in the approximate entropy for rest tremor and with an increase

  15. Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, David; Haney, Matthew M; Matoza, Robin S; Eaton, Alexa R; Cervelli, Peter; Schneider, David J; Iezzi, Alexandra M

    2017-01-06

    The March 2016 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, produced an ash plume that caused the cancellation of more than 100 flights in North America. The eruption generated strong tremor that was recorded by seismic and remote low-frequency acoustic (infrasound) stations, including the EarthScope Transportable Array. The relationship between the tremor amplitudes and plume height changes considerably between the waxing and waning portions of the eruption. Similar hysteresis has been observed between seismic river noise and discharge during storms, suggesting that flow and erosional processes in both rivers and volcanoes can produce irreversible structural changes that are detectable in geophysical data. We propose that the time-varying relationship at Pavlof arose from changes in the tremor source related to volcanic vent erosion. This relationship may improve estimates of volcanic emissions and characterization of eruption size and intensity.

  16. Dynamic Variability of Isometric Action Tremor in Precision Pinching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Eakin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary development of isometric force impulse frequencies, power, and the directional concordance of changes in oscillatory tremor during performance of a two-digit force regulation task was examined. Analyses compared a patient group having tremor confounding volitional force regulation with a control group having no neuropathological diagnosis. Dependent variables for tremor varied temporally and spatially, both within individual trials and across trials, across individuals, across groups, and between digits. Particularly striking findings were magnitude increases during approaches to cue markers and shifts in the concordance phase from pinching toward rigid sway patterns as the magnitude increased. Magnitudes were significantly different among trace line segments of the task and were characterized by differences in relative force required and by the task progress with respect to cue markers for beginning, reversing force change direction, or task termination. The main systematic differences occurred during cue marker approach and were independent of trial sequence order.

  17. A 13.56 MHz CMOS Active Rectifier With Switched-Offset and Compensated Biasing for Biomedical Wireless Power Transfer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan Lu; Wing-Hung Ki

    2014-06-01

    A full-wave active rectifier switching at 13.56 MHz with compensated bias current for a wide input range for wirelessly powered high-current biomedical implants is presented. The four diodes of a conventional passive rectifier are replaced by two cross-coupled PMOS transistors and two comparator- controlled NMOS switches to eliminate diode voltage drops such that high voltage conversion ratio and power conversion efficiency could be achieved even at low AC input amplitude |VAC|. The comparators are implemented with switched-offset biasing to compensate for the delays of active diodes and to eliminate multiple pulsing and reverse current. The proposed rectifier uses a modified CMOS peaking current source with bias current that is quasi-inversely proportional to the supply voltage to better control the reverse current over a wide AC input range (1.5 to 4 V). The rectifier was fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS N-well process with active area of 0.0651 mm(2). For the proposed rectifier measured at |VAC| = 3.0 V, the voltage conversion ratios are 0.89 and 0.93 for RL=500 Ω and 5 kΩ, respectively, and the measured power conversion efficiencies are 82.2% to 90.1% with |VAC| ranges from 1.5 to 4 V for RL=500 Ω.

  18. The functional interplay between protein kinase CK2 and CCA1 transcriptional activity is essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Portolés

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are daily biological oscillations driven by an endogenous mechanism known as circadian clock. The protein kinase CK2 is one of the few clock components that is evolutionary conserved among different taxonomic groups. CK2 regulates the stability and nuclear localization of essential clock proteins in mammals, fungi, and insects. Two CK2 regulatory subunits, CKB3 and CKB4, have been also linked with the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian system. However, the biological relevance and the precise mechanisms of CK2 function within the plant clockwork are not known. By using ChIP and Double-ChIP experiments together with in vivo luminescence assays at different temperatures, we were able to identify a temperature-dependent function for CK2 modulating circadian period length. Our study uncovers a previously unpredicted mechanism for CK2 antagonizing the key clock regulator CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1. CK2 activity does not alter protein accumulation or subcellular localization but interferes with CCA1 binding affinity to the promoters of the oscillator genes. High temperatures enhance the CCA1 binding activity, which is precisely counterbalanced by the CK2 opposing function. Altering this balance by over-expression, mutation, or pharmacological inhibition affects the temperature compensation profile, providing a mechanism by which plants regulate circadian period at changing temperatures. Therefore, our study establishes a new model demonstrating that two opposing and temperature-dependent activities (CCA1-CK2 are essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

  19. The functional interplay between protein kinase CK2 and CCA1 transcriptional activity is essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Sergi; Más, Paloma

    2010-11-04

    Circadian rhythms are daily biological oscillations driven by an endogenous mechanism known as circadian clock. The protein kinase CK2 is one of the few clock components that is evolutionary conserved among different taxonomic groups. CK2 regulates the stability and nuclear localization of essential clock proteins in mammals, fungi, and insects. Two CK2 regulatory subunits, CKB3 and CKB4, have been also linked with the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian system. However, the biological relevance and the precise mechanisms of CK2 function within the plant clockwork are not known. By using ChIP and Double-ChIP experiments together with in vivo luminescence assays at different temperatures, we were able to identify a temperature-dependent function for CK2 modulating circadian period length. Our study uncovers a previously unpredicted mechanism for CK2 antagonizing the key clock regulator CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). CK2 activity does not alter protein accumulation or subcellular localization but interferes with CCA1 binding affinity to the promoters of the oscillator genes. High temperatures enhance the CCA1 binding activity, which is precisely counterbalanced by the CK2 opposing function. Altering this balance by over-expression, mutation, or pharmacological inhibition affects the temperature compensation profile, providing a mechanism by which plants regulate circadian period at changing temperatures. Therefore, our study establishes a new model demonstrating that two opposing and temperature-dependent activities (CCA1-CK2) are essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

  20. The functional interplay between protein kinase CK2 and CCA1 transcriptional activity is essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Portolés

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are daily biological oscillations driven by an endogenous mechanism known as circadian clock. The protein kinase CK2 is one of the few clock components that is evolutionary conserved among different taxonomic groups. CK2 regulates the stability and nuclear localization of essential clock proteins in mammals, fungi, and insects. Two CK2 regulatory subunits, CKB3 and CKB4, have been also linked with the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian system. However, the biological relevance and the precise mechanisms of CK2 function within the plant clockwork are not known. By using ChIP and Double-ChIP experiments together with in vivo luminescence assays at different temperatures, we were able to identify a temperature-dependent function for CK2 modulating circadian period length. Our study uncovers a previously unpredicted mechanism for CK2 antagonizing the key clock regulator CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1. CK2 activity does not alter protein accumulation or subcellular localization but interferes with CCA1 binding affinity to the promoters of the oscillator genes. High temperatures enhance the CCA1 binding activity, which is precisely counterbalanced by the CK2 opposing function. Altering this balance by over-expression, mutation, or pharmacological inhibition affects the temperature compensation profile, providing a mechanism by which plants regulate circadian period at changing temperatures. Therefore, our study establishes a new model demonstrating that two opposing and temperature-dependent activities (CCA1-CK2 are essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

  1. Limited correlations between clinician-based and patient-based measures of essential tremor severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stouwe, A. M. M.; Broersma, M.; Buijink, A. W. G.; van Rootselaar, A. F.; Maurits, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated the relation between changes in clinician-based and patient-based measures of tremor severity, within the Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale (IRS) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) in essential tremor patients. Methods: Thirty-seven patients were assessed twice: on- an

  2. Tremor Detection Using Parametric and Non-Parametric Spectral Estimation Methods : A Comparison with Clinical Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez Manzanera, Octavio; Elting, Jan Willem; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Maurits, Natasha M

    2016-01-01

    In the clinic, tremor is diagnosed during a time-limited process in which patients are observed and the characteristics of tremor are visually assessed. For some tremor disorders, a more detailed analysis of these characteristics is needed. Accelerometry and electromyography can be used to obtain a

  3. Seismic tremor and gravity measurements at Inferno Crater Lake, Waimangu Geothermal Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J. F.; Jolly, A. D.; Fournier, N.; Cole-Baker, J.; Hurst, T.; Roman, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic crater lakes are often associated with active hydrothermal systems that induce cyclic behavior in the lake's level, temperature, and chemistry. Inferno Crater Lake, located in the Waimangu geothermal field within the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) on the North Island of New Zealand exhibits lake level fluctuations of >7m, and temperature fluctuations >40°C with a highly variable periodicity. Seismic and gravity monitoring of Inferno Lake was carried out from December, 2009 - March, 2010 and captured a full cycle of lake fluctuation. Results indicate that this cycle consisted of ~5 smaller fluctuations of ~3m in lake level followed by a larger fluctuation of ~7m. A broadband seismometer recorded strong seismic tremor in the hours leading up to each of the minor and major high stands in lake level. Spectral analysis of the tremor shows dominant frequencies in the range of ~10Hz and a fundamental harmonic frequency located in the 1Hz range. The 1Hz frequency band exhibits gliding spectral lines which increase in frequency at the end of each tremor period. Particle motion analysis of harmonic tremor waveforms indicate a ~100m upward migration of the source location from the onset of tremor until it ceases at the peak of each lake level high stand. Particle motions also indicate an azimuthal migration of the source by ~30° from the overflow outlet region of the lake toward the central vent location during the course of the tremor and lake level increase. Lake water temperature has a direct relationship with lake level and ranges between ~40°C - ~80°C. Gravity fluctuations were also continuously monitored using a Micro-g-LaCoste gPhone relative gravity meter with a 1Hz sampling rate and precision of 1 microgal. These data indicate a direct relationship between lake level and gravity showing a net increase of ~100 microgals between lake level low and high stands. A piezometer located beside the lake indicates an inflow of ground water into the subsoil during

  4. Methodological issues in clinical drug development for essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Michael A; Snyder, Madeline R; Elble, Rodger J; Boutzoukas, Angelique E; Zesiewicz, Theresa A

    2012-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common tremor disorders in the world. Despite this, only two medications have received Level A recommendations from the American Academy of Neurology to treat it (primidone and propranolol). Even though these medications provide relief to a large group of ET patients, up to 50% of patients are non-responders. Additional medications to treat ET are needed. This review discusses some of the methodological issues that should be addressed for quality clinical drug development in ET.

  5. Relative Motion Compensation for Cargo Handling Operations -- Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    4-6 Active Heave Compensation Systems on Board of Vessels and Offshore Rigs ............................................... 4...Herwig, "Active Heave Compensation Systems on Board of Vessels and Offshore Rigs," Marine Technology, pp. 59-61 (May 1986). Active heave compensation systems

  6. Knowledge gaps and research recommendations for essential tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopfner, F.; Haubenberger, D.; Galpern, W.R.; Gwinn, K.; Veer, A. van der; White, S.; Bhatia, K.; Adler, C.H.; Eidelberg, D.; Ondo, W.; Stebbins, G.T.; Tanner, C.M.; Helmich, R.C.G.; Lenz, F.A.; Sillitoe, R.V.; Vaillancourt, D.; Vitek, J.L.; Louis, E.D.; Shill, H.A.; Frosch, M.P.; Foroud, T.; Kuhlenbaumer, G.; Singleton, A.; Testa, C.M.; Hallett, M.; Elble, R.; Deuschl, G.

    2016-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is a common cause of significant disability, but its etiologies and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Research has been hampered by the variable definition of ET and by non-standardized research approaches. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (USA)

  7. Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but almost always with less severity. Most affected women have some degree of tremor and/or ataxia. While the psychiatric and mood disorders are also less frequent in females, they are at higher risk for anxiety and depression in general. Additional symptoms affecting some ...

  8. Rhythmic finger tapping reveals cerebellar dysfunction in essential tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijink, A. W. G.; Broersma, M.; van der Stouwe, A. M. M.; van Wingen, G. A.; Groot, P. F. C.; Speelman, J. D.; Maurits, N. M.; van Rootselaar, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebellar circuits are hypothesized to play a central role in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. Rhythmic finger tapping is known to strongly engage the cerebellar motor circuitry. We characterize cerebellar and, more specifically, dentate nucleus function, and neural correlates of

  9. Semidominant heridity of absence-like seizures in tremor rat.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaiJi-qun; KumatoshiIshihara; RyosukeHanaya; YoshihiroKiura; KaoruKurisu; TadaoSerikawa; MasashiSasa

    2004-01-01

    The tremor rat (tm/tm) exhibits absence-like seizures characterized by 5 -7 Hz spike-wave complexes in cortical and hippocampal EEG. Recently, the TM rat has been found to be devoid of the asp) artoacylase (asp gene responsible for metabolizing N-acetyl aspartate. Electrophysiological studies were performed to determine whether the tm gene was

  10. Dementia in Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Nitrini

    Full Text Available Abstract Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a cause of movement disorders and cognitive decline which has probably been underdiagnosed, especially if its prevalence proves similar to those of progressive supranuclear palsy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented with action tremor, gait ataxia and forgetfulness. There was a family history of tremor and dementia, and one of the patient's grandsons was mentally deficient. Neuropsychological evaluation disclosed a frontal network syndrome. MRI showed hyperintensity of both middle cerebellar peduncles, a major diagnostic hallmark of FXTAS. Genetic testing revealed premutation of the FMR1 gene with an expanded (CGG90 repeat. The diagnosis of FXTAS is important for genetic counseling because the daughters of the affected individuals are at high risk of having offspring with fragile X syndrome. Tremors and cognitive decline should raise the diagnostic hypothesis of FXTAS, which MRI may subsequently reinforce, while the detection of the FMR1 premutation can confirm the condition.

  11. Online tremor suppression using electromyography and low-level electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosen, Strahinja; Muceli, Silvia; Dideriksen, Jakob Lund; Romero, Juan Pablo; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, Jose; Farina, Dario

    2015-05-01

    Tremor is one of the most prevalent movement disorders. There is a large proportion of patients (around 25%) in whom current treatments do not attain a significant tremor reduction. This paper proposes a tremor suppression strategy that detects tremor from the electromyographic signals of the muscles from which tremor originates and counteracts it by delivering electrical stimulation to the antagonist muscles in an out of phase manner. The detection was based on the iterative Hilbert transform and stimulation was delivered above the motor threshold (motor stimulation) and below the motor threshold (sensory stimulation). The system was tested on six patients with predominant wrist flexion/extension tremor (four with Parkinson disease and two with Essential tremor) and led to an average tremor reduction in the range of 46%-81% and 35%-48% across five patients when using the motor and sensory stimulation, respectively. In one patient, the system did not attenuate tremor. These results demonstrate that tremor attenuation might be achieved by delivering electrical stimulation below the motor threshold, preventing muscle fatigue and discomfort for the patients, which sets the basis for the development of an alternative treatment for tremor.

  12. Evaluating machine learning algorithms estimating tremor severity ratings on the Bain-Findley scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohanandan, Shivanthan A. C.; Jones, Mary; Peppard, Richard; Tan, Joy L.; McDermott, Hugh J.; Perera, Thushara

    2016-12-01

    Tremor is a debilitating symptom of some movement disorders. Effective treatment, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is contingent upon frequent clinical assessments using instruments such as the Bain-Findley tremor rating scale (BTRS). Many patients, however, do not have access to frequent clinical assessments. Wearable devices have been developed to provide patients with access to frequent objective assessments outside the clinic via telemedicine. Nevertheless, the information they report is not in the form of BTRS ratings. One way to transform this information into BTRS ratings is through linear regression models (LRMs). Another, potentially more accurate method is through machine learning classifiers (MLCs). This study aims to compare MLCs and LRMs, and identify the most accurate model that can transform objective tremor information into tremor severity ratings on the BTRS. Nine participants with upper limb tremor had their DBS stimulation amplitude varied while they performed clinical upper-extremity exercises. Tremor features were acquired using the tremor biomechanics analysis laboratory (TREMBAL). Movement disorder specialists rated tremor severity on the BTRS from video recordings. Seven MLCs and 6 LRMs transformed TREMBAL features into tremor severity ratings on the BTRS using the specialists’ ratings as training data. The weighted Cohen’s kappa ({κ\\text{w}} ) defined the models’ rating accuracy. This study shows that the Random Forest MLC was the most accurate model ({κ\\text{w}}   =  0.81) at transforming tremor information into BTRS ratings, thereby improving the clinical interpretation of tremor information obtained from wearable devices.

  13. Using a smart phone as a standalone platform for detection and monitoring of pathological tremors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneault, Jean-François; Carignan, Benoit; Codère, Carl Éric; Sadikot, Abbas F; Duval, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Smart phones are becoming ubiquitous and their computing capabilities are ever increasing. Consequently, more attention is geared toward their potential use in research and medical settings. For instance, their built-in hardware can provide quantitative data for different movements. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to evaluate the capabilities of a standalone smart phone platform to characterize tremor. Algorithms for tremor recording and online analysis can be implemented within a smart phone. The smart phone provides reliable time- and frequency-domain tremor characteristics. The smart phone can also provide medically relevant tremor assessments. Smart phones have the potential to provide researchers and clinicians with quantitative short- and long-term tremor assessments that are currently not easily available. A smart phone application for tremor quantification and online analysis was developed. Then, smart phone results were compared to those obtained simultaneously with a laboratory accelerometer. Finally, results from the smart phone were compared to clinical tremor assessments.

  14. Tremor in X-linked recessive spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. Dias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study tremor in patients with X-linked recessive spinobulbar muscular atrophy or Kennedy's disease. METHODS: Ten patients (from 7 families with a genetic diagnosis of Kennedy's disease were screened for the presence of tremor using a standardized clinical protocol and followed up at a neurology outpatient clinic. All index patients were genotyped and showed an expanded allele in the androgen receptor gene. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 37.6 years and mean number of CAG repeats 47 (44-53. Tremor was present in 8 (80% patients and was predominantly postural hand tremor. Alcohol responsiveness was detected in 7 (88% patients with tremor, who all responded well to treatment with a β-blocker (propranolol. CONCLUSION: Tremor is a common feature in patients with Kennedy's disease and has characteristics similar to those of essential tremor.

  15. Essays in Executive Compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Zhang (Dan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis dissertation focuses on how executive compensation is designed and its implications for corporate finance and government regulations. Chapter 2 analyzes several proposals to restrict CEO compensation and calibrates two models of executive compensation that describe how firms would r

  16. Essays in Executive Compensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Zhang (Dan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis dissertation focuses on how executive compensation is designed and its implications for corporate finance and government regulations. Chapter 2 analyzes several proposals to restrict CEO compensation and calibrates two models of executive compensation that describe how firms would

  17. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation for Essential Tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ludy C.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the use of non-invasive brain stimulation to characterize and potentially treat essential tremor (ET). Studies have used a variety of stimulation coils, paradigms, and target locations to make these observations. We reviewed the literature to compare prior studies and to evaluate the rationale and the methods used in these studies. Methods We performed a systematic literature search of the PubMed database using the terms “transcranial,” “noninvasive,” “brain stimulation,” “transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS),” “transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS),” “transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS),” and “essential tremor.” Results Single pulses of TMS to the primary motor cortex have long been known to reset tremor. Although there are relatively few studies showing alterations in motor cortical physiology, such as motor threshold, short and long intracortical inhibition, and cortical silent period, there may be some evidence of altered intracortical facilitation and cerebello-brain inhibition in ET. Repetitive TMS, theta burst stimulation, tDCS, and tACS have been applied to human subjects with tremor with some preliminary signs of tremor reduction, particularly in those studies that employed consecutive daily sessions. Discussion A variety of stimulation paradigms and targets have been explored, with the increasing rationale an interest in targeting the cerebellum. Rigorous assessment of coil geometry, stimulation paradigm, rationale for selection of the specific anatomic target, and careful phenotypic and physiologic characterization of the subjects with ET undergoing these interventions may be critical in extending these preliminary findings into effective stimulation therapies. PMID:28373927

  18. Permanent tremor of Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua: Wave field analysis and source location

    Science.gov (United States)

    MéTaxian, Jean-Philippe; Lesage, Philippe; Dorel, Jacques

    1997-10-01

    The Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua, is a basaltic caldera in a subduction zone. The permanent source of the volcanic tremor was located inside Santiago crater, at the lava lake's position and 400 m below the NE rim, and therefore corresponds to superficial magma activity. We used two tripartite arrays (90 m side), one semicircular array (r=120 m) in 1992, and two semicircular arrays (r=60 m) and a 2500 m long linear array radiating out from the source and on the flank of the crater in 1993. We used both a cross-spectrum method and a correlation method to determine the wave delay time between the reference station and the other stations of an array and to quantify the wave field. Using the delays therefore by intersecting the back azimuth wave directions from the arrays, we could pinpoint the source. Additionally, the correlation coefficients obtained as functions of frequency for the three components of motion confirm the inferred position of the source of tremor. The tremor's wave field is composed of comparable quantities of dispersed Rayleigh and Love surface waves, whose phase velocities lie in the ranges 730-1240 m/s at 2 Hz and 330-550 m/s at 6 Hz. The dispersive phase velocities were inverted to obtain crustal structures with a minimal number of layers. The resulting velocity models are similar for the northern and southern parts of the volcano. After geometrical spreading corrections, Q2Hz=14 and Q3Hz=31 were determined along the northern linear array. The typical low velocities and low Q corresponding to the cone structure and are similar to those of other basaltic volcanoes like Puu Oo, Hawaii, and Klyuchevskoy, Kamchatka.

  19. Source and path effects in the wave fields of tremor and explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B.; Saccorotti, G.; Martini, M.; Dawson, P.; De Luca, G.; Milana, G.; Scarpa, R.

    1997-01-01

    The wave fields generated by Strombolian activity are investigated using data from small-aperture seismic arrays deployed on the north flank of Stromboli and data from seismic and pressure transducers set up near the summit crater. Measurements of slowness and azimuth as a function of time clearly indicate that the sources of tremor and explosions are located beneath the summit crater at depths shallower than 200 m with occasional bursts of energy originating from sources extending to a depth of 3 km. Slowness, azimuth, and particle motion measurements reveal a complex composition of body and surface waves associated with topography, structure, and source properties. Body waves originating at depths shallower than 200 m dominate the wave field at frequencies of 0.5-2.5 Hz, and surface waves generated by the surficial part of the source and by scattering sources distributed around the island dominate at frequencies above 2.5 Hz. The records of tremor and explosions are both dominated by SH motion. Far-field records from explosions start with radial motion, and near-field records from those events show dominantly horizontal motion and often start with a low-frequency (1-2 Hz) precursor characterized by elliptical particle motion, followed within a few seconds by a high-frequency radial phase (1-10 Hz) accompanying the eruption of pyroclastics. The dominant component of the near- and far-field particle motions from explosions, and the timing of air and body wave phases observed in the near field, are consistent with a gaspiston mechanism operating on a shallow (<200 m deep), vertical crack-like conduit. Models of a degassing fluid column suggest that noise emissions originating in the collective oscillations of bubbles ascending in the magma conduit may provide an adequate self-excitation mechanism for sustained tremor generation at Stromboli. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. 40 CFR 5.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.515 Compensation. A recipient...

  1. 28 CFR 54.515 - Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 54.515 Compensation. A recipient...

  2. Reduced Activity of Mutant Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Is Compensated in Plasmodium falciparum through the Action of Protein Kinase G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisheka Bansal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We used a sensitization approach that involves replacement of the gatekeeper residue in a protein kinase with one with a different side chain. The activity of the enzyme with a bulky gatekeeper residue, such as methionine, cannot be inhibited using bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs. Here, we have used this approach to study Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1. The methionine gatekeeper substitution, T145M, although it led to a 47% reduction in transphosphorylation, was successfully introduced into the CDPK1 locus using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9. As methionine is a bulky residue, BKI 1294 had a 10-fold-greater effect in vitro on the wild-type enzyme than on the methionine mutant. However, in contrast to in vitro data with recombinant enzymes, BKI 1294 had a slightly greater inhibition of the growth of CDPK1 T145M parasites than the wild type. Moreover, the CDPK1 T145M parasites were more sensitive to the action of compound 2 (C2, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG. These results suggest that a reduction in the activity of CDPK1 due to methionine substitution at the gatekeeper position is compensated through the direct action of PKG or of another kinase under the regulation of PKG. The transcript levels of CDPK5 and CDPK6 were significantly upregulated in the CDPK1 T145M parasites. The increase in CDPK6 or some other kinase may compensate for decrease in CDPK1 activity during invasion. This study suggests that targeting two kinases may be more effective in chemotherapy to treat malaria so as not to select for mutations in one of the enzymes.

  3. Research on the tremor suppression test system for the tremor suppression robot%抑制震颤机器人抑震试验系统研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军强; 王娟; 高永生

    2012-01-01

    By applying the magnetorheological damper developed,a tremor suppression robot with 2 degree of freedom was designed,which tremor occurred in the process of elbow flexion or extension and forearm revolving can be suppressed.Then a tremor suppression controller was developed, which can execute (he tremor suppression control algorithm,convert and process the tremor information as well as output the control current and communical.e with the PC and so on.Finally the tremor system for simulating arm was designed,which can output tremor information for the tremor suppression tesuBased on above results, the motion control test for the tremor suppression test system was done., which result shows that the tremor suppression test system can simulate the tremor effectually.%应用所研制的磁流变阻尼器,设计了两个自由度的抑震机器人结构,可对人体上肢肘部屈/伸、前臂旋转运动过程中产生的震颤进行抑制.研制了抑震控制器,能够完成抑震控制算法的运行、震颤信息的转换与处理、控制量的输出以及与上位机通信等工作.设计了模拟人体上肢震颤系统,为抑震试验提供震颤信息.在此基础上进行了抑震试验系统运动控制试验,试验结果显示,所研制的抑震试验系统能够较好的模拟人体的震颤过程.

  4. Fault Slip Embedded in Creep: Insight into Tectonic Tremors and Slow Slip Events from Acoustic and Optical Monitoring of Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Lengline, O.; Ampuero, J. P.; Schmittbuhl, J.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of temporal and spatial correlations between slow slip earthquakes and tectonic tremor activity suggest a physical relation between them. Early descriptions of mechanisms relating these phenomena simply attributed the relation between seismic and aseismic events to fluid mediated processes. More recent hypotheses suggest that tectonic tremors are bursts of seismic energy due to the rupturing of small asperities within slow slipping regions. Here we present laboratory results of a unique experimental setting aimed at understanding the response to transient loads of a system of small asperities embedded in creep as a model of tectonic tremor activity triggered by slow slip and modulated by tides. We performed mode I crack propagation experiments on glass bead blasted and annealed 2D interfaces of transparent material (Polymethylmethacrylate) where fracture fronts were confined to the 2D weakness plane of the heterogeneous interface. We monitored acoustic emissions (AE) with piezo-electric sensors surrounding the crack front line. We also optically monitored the rupture front line with up to 1000 frames per second. The experimental loading conditions produce quasi-static front propagation at slow average speeds. Image processing reveals de-pinning along the front that we characterize as intermittent opening during slow front propagation. AE locations strongly correlate to the spatiotemporal clustering of the de-penning events along the front. Moreover, this correlation is preserved at the time of imposed transient fluctuations in loading during front propagation. Using the analogy between mode I and modes II and III fractures, our results translate into intermittent slip on faults linked to clustering of seismic activity produced by the breakage of asperities embedded in creeping regions with no need of invoking fluid mediated processes. Thus our experiments help reveal the interplay between aseismic and seismic slip on faults. We also observe qualitative

  5. Dosage compensation on the active X chromosome minimizes transcriptional noise of X-linked genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shanye; Wang, Ping; Deng, Wenjun; Zheng, Hancheng; Hu, Landian; Hurst, Laurence D; Kong, Xiangyin

    2009-01-01

    Theory predicts that haploid-expressed genes should have noisier expression than comparable diploid-expressed ones with the same expression level. However, in mammals there are several classes of gene that are monoallelically expressed, including X-linked genes, imprinted genes and some other autosomal genes. Does it follow that the evolution of X chromosomes in eukaryotes comes at the cost of increased transcriptional noise in the heterogametic sex? Moreover, is escaping X-inactivation in mammalian females associated with an increase in transcriptional variation? To address these questions, we analyze gene expression variation between replicate samples of diverse mammalian cell lines in steady-state using microarray data. We observe that transcriptional variation of X-linked genes is no different to that of autosomal genes both before and after control for transcript abundance. By contrast, autosomal genes subject to allelic exclusion do have unusually high noise levels even allowing for their low transcript abundance. The prior theory we suggest was insufficient, at least as regards X-chromosomes, as it failed to appreciate the regulatory complexity of gene expression, not least the effects of genomic neighborhood. These results suggest that high noise is not a necessary consequence of haploid expression and emphasize the primacy of expression level as a determinant of noise. The latter has consequences for understanding the etiology of haplo-insufficiency and the evolution of gene expression levels. Given the coupling between expression level and noise on the X-chromosome, we suggest that part of the selective advantage of dosage compensation is noise abatement of X-linked genes.

  6. Systematic search of triggered and ambient tectonic tremor in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Peng, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Tectonic tremor has been extensively observed along the Parkfield-Cholame section of the San Andreas Fault in central California. In contrast, observations of either triggered or ambient tremor in southern California are quite sparse to date. In this study we conduct a systematic search of tectonic tremor around the Simi Valley (SV), the San Gabriel Mountain (SGM), and the San Jacinto Fault (SJF). We focus on these regions, mainly because of previous observations of triggered tremor at the SV and SJF, and evidence of near-lithostatic fluid under the SGM and deep creep along the SJF. We first search for tremor triggered by distant large earthquakes around the SV and the SGM in southern California. Out of 59 large earthquakes between 2000 and 2013, only the 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake triggered clear tremor in the region. The observed travel times of the triggered tremors are consistent with theoretical predictions from tremor sources that are spatially clustered in the SV, close to the rupture zone of the 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake. We also estimate the triggering stress threshold as ˜12 KPa from measuring the peak ground velocities near the tremor source. The lack of clear tremor beneath the SGM provides a 'negative' example for a region where tremor is expected to occur because of clear evidence of fluid-rich zones at the middle crust. The results imply that the necessary conditions for tremor to occur are more than fluid-induced low effective normal stress. In addition to tremor in the SV, we also investigate tremor along the SJF, where tremor was triggered by the 2002 Mw7.9 Denali Fault and the 2011 Mw9.1 Tohoku-Oki earthquakes. These triggered tremors provide natural templates of the low frequency earthquakes that can be used to perform matched-filter detection to search for additional tremors along the SJF. In addition, there are strain transients following the March 11, 2013, Mw 4.7 earthquake that are captured by PBO strainmeters near the SJF

  7. Contribution of inter-muscular synchronization in the modulation of tremor intensity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Hao, Man-Zhao; Wei, Ming; Xiao, Qin; Lan, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Involuntary central oscillations at single and double tremor frequencies drive the peripheral neuromechanical system of muscles and joints to cause tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD). The central signal of double tremor frequency was found to correlate more directly to individual muscle EMGs (Timmermann et al. 2003). This study is aimed at investigating what central components of oscillation contribute to inter-muscular synchronization in a group of upper extremity muscles during tremor in PD patients. 11 idiopathic, tremor dominant PD subjects participated in this study. Joint kinematics during tremor in the upper extremity was recorded along with EMGs of six upper arm muscles using a novel experimental apparatus. The apparatus provided support for the upper extremity on a horizontal surface with reduced friction, so that resting tremor in the arm can be recorded with a MotionMonitor II system. In each subject, the frequencies of rhythmic firings in upper arm muscles were determined using spectral analysis. Paired and pool-averaged coherence analyses of EMGs for the group of muscles were performed to correlate the level of inter-muscular synchronization to tremor amplitudes at shoulder and elbow. The phase shift between synchronized antagonistic muscle pairs was calculated to aid coherence analysis in the muscle pool. Recorded EMG revealed that rhythmic firings were present in most recorded muscles, which were either synchronized to form phase-locked bursting cycles at a subject specific frequency, or unsynchronized with a random phase distribution. Paired coherence showed a stronger synchronization among a subset of recorded arm muscles at tremor frequency than that at double tremor frequency. Furthermore, the number of synchronized muscles in the arm was positively correlated to tremor amplitudes at elbow and shoulder. Pool-averaged coherence at tremor frequency also showed a better correlation with the amplitude of resting tremor than that of double tremor

  8. Characteristics of volcanic tremor accompanying the September 24th, 1986 explosive eruption of Mt. Etna (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cristofolini

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Features of the volcanic tremor recorded before, during and after the eruptive event which occurred at Mt. Etna on September 24th 1986, are described. The whole eruption was particularly short in time (about eight hours and characterized by an extremely violent explosive activity with lava fountains a few hundred meters high. As the complete record of the seismic signals generated during the whole eruptive episode was available, a detailed spectral analysis of the volcanic tremor recorded at four stations, located at increasing distance from the summit of the volcano, was carried out. Fourier analysis, that was performed using temporal windows of about 11 min in duration, pointed to some large fluctuations of the overall spectral amplitude, as well as some frequency variations of the dominant spectral peaks. The ratio of the overall spectral amplitude recorded at the highest station and at the peripheral ones, was calculated in the two spectral bands 1.0-2.5 and 2.6-6.0 Hz, respectively. The significant contribution of energy at low frequency values supports the hypothesis of a subvertical planar source, which was active during the paroxysmal stage of the eruption. Such results are also supported by the analysis of the attenuation function of the spectral amplitude.

  9. 77 FR 326 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Dependency and Indemnity Compensation By Parent(s...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ...), (Including Accrued Benefits and Death Compensation)): Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... Dependency and Indemnity Compensation by Parent(s), (Including Accrued Benefits and Death Compensation), VA...-535 to apply for dependency and indemnity compensation, death compensation, and/or accrued benefits...

  10. Slip Updip of Tremor during the 2012 Cascadia ETS Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, K.; Houston, H.

    2014-12-01

    The interplay between tremor and slow slip during ETS has implications for the slip budget of the Cascadia subduction zone. In particular, it can constrain the downdip edge of the locked zone, which informs the hazard assessments for major cities including Seattle, Tacoma, and Vancouver. As shown by Houston (AGU abstract, 2012), slip inferred from GPS extended updip of the seismically-detected tremor in the 2010 M6.8 ETS event. Following the methods used on the 2010 ETS event, we used the PANGA GPS to measure the displacement vectors for 71 stations to analyze a large ETS event in 2012 that extended from Vancouver Island to Southern Washington. We implemented Principal Component Analysis to automatically select the direction and magnitude of the maximum displacement vector. We then inverted these GPS displacements for slip, using the Okada formulation of buried rectangular faults in a halfspace with a grid of 8 by 8 km subfaults based on the McCrory slab model. We performed inversions with either 0th or 2nd order Tikhonov regularization and found that over the 6 weeks of propagation, the 2012 ETS event released moment corresponding to M6.7, in three high-slip regions. We compared two different inversions, one where slip was allowed on a broad regional grid and a tremor-restricted inversion (TRI) where slip was restricted to grid locations where tremor had been detected in the 2012 ETS. We found that the TRI forced the slip to the updip edge of the grid where it reached above 10 cm, which is physically implausible given that this exceeds the slip that can accumulate in an inter-ETS time period. Additionally, the regional grid inversion indicates that 1 to 2 cm of slip occurred 10's of km updip of the western edge of tremor. This further supports the inference from the 2010 event that in northern Washington, the slow slip during an ETS event extends many kilometers updip of the western edge of tremor.

  11. Modulation of voice related to tremor and vibrato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Rosemary Anne

    Modulation of voice is a result of physiologic oscillation within one or more components of the vocal system including the breathing apparatus (i.e., pressure supply), the larynx (i.e. sound source), and the vocal tract (i.e., sound filter). These oscillations may be caused by pathological tremor associated with neurological disorders like essential tremor or by volitional production of vibrato in singers. Because the acoustical characteristics of voice modulation specific to each component of the vocal system and the effect of these characteristics on perception are not well-understood, it is difficult to assess individuals with vocal tremor and to determine the most effective interventions for reducing the perceptual severity of the disorder. The purpose of the present studies was to determine how the acoustical characteristics associated with laryngeal-based vocal tremor affect the perception of the magnitude of voice modulation, and to determine if adjustments could be made to the voice source and vocal tract filter to alter the acoustic output and reduce the perception of modulation. This research was carried out using both a computational model of speech production and trained singers producing vibrato to simulate laryngeal-based vocal tremor with different voice source characteristics (i.e., vocal fold length and degree of vocal fold adduction) and different vocal tract filter characteristics (i.e., vowel shapes). It was expected that, by making adjustments to the voice source and vocal tract filter that reduce the amplitude of the higher harmonics, the perception of magnitude of voice modulation would be reduced. The results of this study revealed that listeners' perception of the magnitude of modulation of voice was affected by the degree of vocal fold adduction and the vocal tract shape with the computational model, but only by the vocal quality (corresponding to the degree of vocal fold adduction) with the female singer. Based on regression analyses

  12. 19th-century American contributions to the recording of tremors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, D J

    2000-07-01

    Studies of tremor in the 19th century were based initially on simple observation and later on the use of crude graphic recording devices that had been modified from instruments developed for other purposes. Like several European contemporaries, American investigators studying tremor used and adapted various existing instruments, including tambours and sphygmographs. A tambour used a drum-shaped pneumatic mechanism to transmit movements to a recording instrument, whereas the sphygmograph was a nonpneumatic mechanical device initially used to record the pulse. 19th-century American neurologists who used such devices included Frederick Peterson, Hobart Amory Hare, Charles Loomis Dana, and Augustus A. Eshner. Their measurements of tremor frequency were generally consistent with modern estimates for various types of tremor. Eshner, in particular, was frustrated by the overlap of frequency domains for tremors in different diseases, because this precluded use of tremor frequency alone as a differentiating feature for diagnosis. Peterson and Dana recognized the variation in tremor frequency in different body parts resulting from different natural resonance frequencies of these parts as a function of weight and elastic properties. Peterson, Dana, and Eshner also recognized that tremor amplitude and frequency are inversely related. Finally, these 19th-century investigators recognized that the tremor of Parkinson's disease is a relatively low-frequency rest tremor, suppressed by action, and generally synchronous in symmetric body parts, but varying in amplitude and frequency in different body parts or over time.

  13. Cohort study of prevalence and phenomenology of tremor in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrj, Marco; Varanese, Sara; Bonanni, Laura; Taylor, John-Paul; Antonini, Angelo; Valente, Enza Maria; Petrucci, Simona; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Thomas, Astrid; Perfetti, Bernardo

    2013-07-01

    To study prevalence, specific patterns and response to treatment of tremor in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), in comparison with other tremulous disorders prevalence, qualitative and quantitative features of tremor were studied in an incident cohort of 67 dopaminergic treatment naive DLB, 111 Parkinson's Disease (PD) and 34 Essential Tremor (ET) patients. Tremulous DLB patients (tDLB) were compared with tremulous PD (tPD) and ET patients and followed for 2 years. Double blind placebo-controlled acute drug challenge with L-Dopa and alcohol was performed in all ET, 24 tDLB and 27 tPD. Effects of dopaminergic chronic treatment in all tDLB and tPD patients and primidone in 8 tDLB were also assessed. Tremor occurred in 44.76 % of DLB patients. The tDLB patients presented a complex pattern of mixed tremors, characterized by rest and postural/action tremor, including walking tremor and standing overflow in 50 % tDLB. Standing tremor with overflow was characteristic of tDLB (p < 0.001). Head tremor was more frequent in tDLB than tPD and ET (p = 0.001). The tDLB tremors were reduced by acute and chronic dopaminergic treatments (p < 0.01) but not by alcohol or primidone. Tremor occurs commonly in DLB patients with a complex mixed tremor pattern which shows a significant response to acute and chronic dopaminergic treatments. Recognizing that there is a clinical category of tremulous DLB may help the differential diagnosis of tremors.

  14. One central oscillatory drive is compatible with experimental motor unit behaviour in essential and Parkinsonian tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Gallego, Juan A.; Holobar, Ales; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Pathological tremors are symptomatic to several neurological disorders that are difficult to differentiate and the way by which central oscillatory networks entrain tremorogenic contractions is unknown. We considered the alternative hypotheses that tremor arises from one oscillator (at the tremor frequency) or, as suggested by recent findings from the superimposition of two separate inputs (at the tremor frequency and twice that frequency). Approach. Assuming one central oscillatory network we estimated analytically the relative amplitude of the harmonics of the tremor frequency in the motor neuron output for different temporal behaviors of the oscillator. Next, we analyzed the bias in the relative harmonics amplitude introduced by superimposing oscillations at twice the tremor frequency. These findings were validated using experimental measurements of wrist angular velocity and surface electromyography (EMG) from 22 patients (11 essential tremor, 11 Parkinson’s disease). The ensemble motor unit action potential trains identified from the EMG represented the neural drive to the muscles. Main results. The analytical results showed that the relative power of the tremor harmonics in the analytical models of the neural drive was determined by the variability and duration of the tremor bursts and the presence of the second oscillator biased this power towards higher values. The experimental findings accurately matched the analytical model assuming one oscillator, indicating a negligible functional role of secondary oscillatory inputs. Furthermore, a significant difference in the relative power of harmonics in the neural drive was found across the patient groups, suggesting a diagnostic value of this measure (classification accuracy: 86%). This diagnostic power decreased substantially when estimated from limb acceleration or the EMG. Signficance. The results indicate that the neural drive in pathological tremor is compatible with one central network

  15. Tremor and hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) in road maintenance workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast-Pettersen, Rita; Ulvestad, Bente; Færden, Karl; Clemm, Thomas Aleksander C; Olsen, Raymond; Ellingsen, Dag Gunnar; Nordby, Karl-Christian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate postural and rest tremor among workers using vibrating hand tools, taking into account the possible effects of toxicants such as alcohol and tobacco. A further aim was to study workers diagnosed with hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) at the time of examination. This study comprises 103 road maintenance workers, 55 exposed to vibrating hand tools (age 41.0 years; range 21-62) and 48 referents (age 38.5 years; range 19-64). They were examined with the CATSYS Tremor Pen(®). Exposure to vibrating tools and serum biomarkers of alcohol and tobacco consumption were measured. Cumulative exposure to vibrating tools was associated with increased postural (p < 0.01) and rest tremor (p < 0.05) and with a higher Center Frequency of postural tremor (p < 0.01) among smokers and users of smokeless tobacco. Rest tremor Center Frequency was higher than postural tremor frequency (p < 0.001). The main findings indicate an association between cumulative exposure to hand-held vibrating tools, tremor parameters and consumption of tobacco products. The hand position is important when testing for tremor. Rest tremor had a higher Center Frequency. Postural tremor was more strongly associated with exposure than rest tremor. The finding of increased tremor among the HAVS subjects indicated that tremor might be a part of the clinical picture of a HAVS diagnosis. As with all cross-sectional studies, inferences should be made with caution when drawing conclusions about associations between exposure and possible effects. Future research using longitudinal design is required to validate the findings of the present study.

  16. Microcystin-LR (MCLR Induces a Compensation of PP2A Activity Mediated by α4 Protein in HEK293 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Li, Pu Huang, Jing Liang, Wenyu Fu, Zonglou Guo, Lihong Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a major protein phosphatase with important cell functions. Known and utilized as a potent inhibitor of PP2A, microcystin-LR (MCLR targets PP2A as a core element that affects numerous cellular mechanisms. But apart from direct inhibition, the exact effect of MCLR on PP2A in cell is largely unknown, specifically with regard to cellular response and autoregulation. Here, we show that a low concentration of MCLR stimulates, rather than inhibits, PP2A activity in HEK293 cells. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays reveal that the catalytic subunit and a regulatory subunit of PP2A, termed α4, dissociate from inactive complex upon MCLR exposure, suggesting that the released catalytic subunit regains activity and thereby compensates the activity loss. At high concentrations of MCLR, PP2A activity decreases along with dissociation of the core enzyme and altered post-translational modification of its catalytic subunit. In addition, the dissociation of α4 and PP2A may contribute to destabilization of HEK293 cells cytoskeleton architecture, detachment to extracellular matrix and further anoikis. Our data provide a novel PP2A upregulation mechanism and challenge the recognition of MCLR only as a PP2A inhibitor in cells.

  17. S-wave triggering of tremor beneath the Parkfield, California, section of the San Andreas fault by the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake: observations and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Peng, Zhigang; Shelly, David R.; Aiken, Chastity

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic stresses that are associated with the energetic seismic waves generated by the Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake off the northeast coast of Japan triggered bursts of tectonic tremor beneath the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault (SAF) at an epicentral distance of ∼8200  km. The onset of tremor begins midway through the ∼100‐s‐period S‐wave arrival, with a minor burst coinciding with the SHSH arrival, as recorded on the nearby broadband seismic station PKD. A more pronounced burst coincides with the Love arrival, followed by a series of impulsive tremor bursts apparently modulated by the 20‐ to 30‐s‐period Rayleigh wave. The triggered tremor was located at depths between 20 and 30 km beneath the surface trace of the fault, with the burst coincident with the S wave centered beneath the fault 30 km northwest of Parkfield. Most of the subsequent activity, including the tremor coincident with the SHSH arrival, was concentrated beneath a stretch of the fault extending from 10 to 40 km southeast of Parkfield. The seismic waves from the Tohoku epicenter form a horizontal incidence angle of ∼14°, with respect to the local strike of the SAF. Computed peak dynamic Coulomb stresses on the fault at tremor depths are in the 0.7–10 kPa range. The apparent modulation of tremor bursts by the small, strike‐parallel Rayleigh‐wave stresses (∼0.7  kPa) is likely enabled by pore pressure variations driven by the Rayleigh‐wave dilatational stress. These results are consistent with the strike‐parallel dynamic stresses (δτs) associated with the S, SHSH, and surface‐wave phases triggering small increments of dextral slip on the fault with a low friction (μ∼0.2). The vertical dynamic stresses δτd do not trigger tremor with vertical or oblique slip under this simple Coulomb failure model.

  18. Increased range of motion and decreased muscle activity during maximal reach with gravity compensation in stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prange, Grada Berendina; Stienen, Arno; Jannink, M.J.A.; van der Kooij, Herman; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.; G.J. Gelderblom Bart Driessen, Just L. Herder

    2007-01-01

    To stimulate restoration of arm function after stroke, active movement is important, which can be facilitated by supporting the weight of the hemiparetic arm, either in conventional treatment or in other approaches such as robot-aided therapy. During arm support, the active range of motion during

  19. A double-correlation tremor-location method

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ka Lok; Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Roberts, Roland; Gudmundsson, Ólafur

    2016-01-01

    A double-correlation method is introduced to locate tremor sources based on stacks of complex, doubly-correlated tremor records of multiple triplets of seismographs back projected to hypothetical source locations in a geographic grid. Peaks in the resulting stack of moduli are inferred source locations. The stack of the moduli is a robust measure of energy radiated from a point source or point sources even when the velocity information is imprecise. Application to real data shows how double correlation focuses the source mapping compared to the common single correlation approach. Synthetic tests demonstrate the robustness of the method and its resolution limitations which are controlled by the station geometry, the finite frequency of the signal, the quality of the used velocity information and noise level. Both random noise and signal or noise correlated at time shifts that are inconsistent with the assumed velocity structure can be effectively suppressed. Assuming a surface-wave velocity, we can constrain t...

  20. Regular and stochastic behavior of Parkinsonian pathological tremor signals

    CERN Document Server

    Yulmetyev, R M; Panischev, O Y; Hänggi, P; Timashev, S F; Vstovsky, G V; Yulmetyev, Renat M.; Demin, Sergey A.; Panischev, Oleg Yu.; H\\"anggi, Peter; Timashev, Serge F.; Vstovsky, Grigoriy V.

    2006-01-01

    Regular and stochastic behavior in the time series of Parkinsonian pathological tremor velocity is studied on the basis of the statistical theory of discrete non-Markov stochastic processes and flicker-noise spectroscopy. We have developed a new method of analyzing and diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD) by taking into consideration discreteness, fluctuations, long- and short-range correlations, regular and stochastic behavior, Markov and non-Markov effects and dynamic alternation of relaxation modes in the initial time signals. The spectrum of the statistical non-Markovity parameter reflects Markovity and non-Markovity in the initial time series of tremor. The relaxation and kinetic parameters used in the method allow us to estimate the relaxation scales of diverse scenarios of the time signals produced by the patient in various dynamic states. The local time behavior of the initial time correlation function and the first point of the non-Markovity parameter give detailed information about the variation of p...

  1. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Tremor and Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotia, Mitesh; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The therapeutic applications of botulinum toxin (BoNT) have grown manifold since its initial approval in 1989 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of strabismus, blepharospasm, and other facial spasms. Although it is the most potent biologic toxin known to man, long-term studies have established its safety in the treatment of a variety of neurologic and nonneurologic disorders. Despite a paucity of randomized controlled trials, BoNT has been found to be beneficial in treating a variety of tremors and tics when used by clinicians skilled in the administration of the drug for these hyperkinetic movement disorders. Botulinum toxin injections can provide meaningful improvement in patients with localized tremors and tics; in some cases, they may be an alternative to other treatments with more undesirable adverse effects.

  2. Slow slip, tremor, and local earthquakes prior to the Mw 7.4 megathrust event in Oaxaca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, S. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Graham, S. E.; Colella, H. V.; Holtkamp, S. G.; Ghouse, N.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; DeMets, C.

    2013-05-01

    The search for observations to demonstrate slow slip phenomena can trigger large and damaging earthquakes is fueled by theoretical predictions that slip in the deeper transitional zone can promote failure in the shallow seismogenic zone. If such a link is verified, then operational earthquake forecasting could be improved by incorporating more slow slip behaviors. The subduction zone in Oaxaca, Mexico provides an ideal locality to investigate this potential relationship, where a joint seismic-geodetic network provides a multi-year record of traditional earthquakes, tectonic tremor, and slow slip events (SSE) prior to the recent March 12, 2012 Mw 7.4 megathrust Ometepec earthquake. Geodetically detected SSEs are observed for 2-3 months every 1-2 years, where stronger signals originate in the updip portion of the transition zone. In the months preceding the Ometepec mainshock, visual inspection of GPS time series for the 2011-2012 SSE suggests a migration of slip from east to west, along strike toward the source region of the earthquake. Preliminary models of the time series confirm slip ends just downdip of the epicenter in the weeks prior to the earthquake. While slow slip activity is prominent in the months leading up to the mainshock, tremor activity remains near background levels for much of that time, particularly in the days leading up to the earthquake. Observations from single station frequency scanning, beginning in mid-2006 show tremor activity is located further down-dip than SSE and occur over relatively short time periods, 2-10 days and recurs as often as every 2-3 months. Curiously, if we look at the preceding year, more tremor activity is detected during the nearly 6-month 2011 slow slip event. To further investigate the relationship between SSEs, tremor, and megathrust earthquakes, we use a multi-station template waveform matching technique to detect and locate events several of orders of magnitude smaller than would be possible using traditional

  3. A new compensation current real-time computing method for power active filter based on double linear construction algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zicheng; SUN; Yukun

    2006-01-01

    Considering the detection principle that "when load current is periodic current, the integral in a cycle for absolute value of load current subtracting fundamental active current is the least", harmonic current real-time detection methods for power active filter are proposed based on direct computation, simple iterative algorithm and optimal iterative algorithm. According to the direct computation method, the amplitude of the fundamental active current can be accurately calculated when load current is placed in stable state. The simple iterative algorithm and the optimal iterative algorithm provide an idea about judging the state of load current. On the basis of the direct computation method, the simple iterative algorithm, the optimal iterative algorithm and precise definition of the basic concepts such as the true amplitude of the fundamental active current when load current is placed in varying state, etc., the double linear construction idea is proposed in which the amplitude of the fundamental active current at the moment of the sample is accurately calculated by using the first linear construction and the condition which disposes the next sample is created by using the second linear construction. On the basis of the double linear construction idea, a harmonic current real-time detection method for power active filter is proposed based on the double linear construction algorithm. This method has the characteristics of small computing quantity, fine real-time performance, being capable of accurately calculating the amplitude of the fundamental active current and so on.

  4. 复合液压缸式半主动升沉补偿系统建模及仿真%Modeling and Simulation for Semi-active Heave Compensation System of Composite-cylinder Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    全伟才; 张艾群; 张竺英

    2013-01-01

    A semi-active heave compensation system of composite-cylinder type was presented according to the requirement of improving the safety of handling of deep-sea remotely operated vehicle ( ROV) in harsh sea state. Hie semi-active heave compensation principles were introduced, and the simulation models of the system under passive heave compensation mode and semi-active heave compensation mode were set np respectively via the AMESim. The performance of heave compensation system under different heave frequencies and the change laws of piston displacement of composite-type cylinder and accumulator pressure were analyzed through cont-rastive analysis. The results demonstrate that the semi-active heave compensation system can be used to reduce the strong influence of periodic ship heave motion on umbilical tension and tether-management-system displacement effectively.%为提高深海有缆水下机器人吊放作业的安全性,提出一种复合液压缸式半主动升沉补偿系统,介绍系统的工作原理,并利用AMESim分别建立了系统在被动升沉补偿模式与半主动升沉补偿模式下的仿真模型.对比分析了不同升沉频率下系统的补偿性能和补偿过程中复合液压缸活塞位移与蓄能器压力的变化规律.分析结果表明,所提出的半主动升沉补偿系统能有效降低周期性母船升沉运动对铠缆张力和中继器位移的影响.

  5. Joint observation of long period tremor signals with broadband seismometer, tiltmeter and gravimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-bin; JIANG Jun; LIAO Ying-chun; LI Sheng-le; ZHONG Tie-tao

    2008-01-01

    We report here the observation result of joint observation of long period tremor signals with broadband seismometer, tiltmeter and gravimeter at the HUST (Huazhong University of Science and Technology) station. The observed data were compared and analyzed. Since 2005, the several tens of abnormal tremor signals which are weak, complex and duration of 2 to 3 days have been synchronously recorded by the different instruments. The tremor signals have the periodic domain in the range of 3 to 5 minutes, 20 to 30 minutes and even more than 1 hour. The observation shows such tremors are a physical existence. The analysis indicates that a part of the tremors caused by the typhoon from the western Pacific Ocean. These tremors have a close relationship with wind velocity of typhoon and distance between the typhoon center and the station. Except these, the cause of others is still unclear.

  6. Prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos and childhood tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Virginia A.; Garcia, Wanda E.; Whyatt, Robin M.; Horton, Megan K.; Barr, Dana B.; Louis, Elan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF), widely used for agricultural purposes, has been linked to neurodevelopmental deficits. Possible motor effects at low to moderate levels of exposure have not been evaluated. Methods Prenatal exposure to CPF was measured in umbilical cord blood in a sample of 263 inner-city minority children, who were followed prospectively. At approximately 11 years of age (mean age 10.9 ± 0.85 years, range = 9.0–13.9), during a neuropsychological assessment, children were asked to draw Archimedes spirals. These were rated by a senior neurologist specializing in movement disorders who was blind to CPF exposure level. Results Compared to all other children, those with prenatal CPF exposure in the upper quartile range (n = 43) were more likely to exhibit mild or mild to moderate tremor (≥1) in either arm (p = 0.03), both arms (p = 0.02), the dominant arm (p = 0.01), and the non-dominant arm (p = 0.055). Logistic regression analyses showed significant CPF effects on tremor in both arms, either arm, the dominant arm (p-values < 0.05), and the non-dominant arm (p = 0.06), after adjustment for sex, age at testing, ethnicity, and medication. Conclusion Prenatal CPF exposure is associated with tremor in middle childhood, which may be a sign of the insecticide's effects on nervous system function. PMID:26385760

  7. Rationalizing vaccine injury compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Michelle M

    2008-01-01

    Legislation recently adopted by the United States Congress provides producers of pandemic vaccines with near-total immunity from civil lawsuits without making individuals injured by those vaccines eligible for compensation through the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. The unusual decision not to provide an alternative mechanism for compensation is indicative of a broader problem of inconsistency in the American approach to vaccine-injury compensation policy. Compensation policies have tended to reflect political pressures and economic considerations more than any cognizable set of principles. This article identifies a set of ethical principles bearing on the circumstances in which vaccine injuries should be compensated, both inside and outside public health emergencies. A series of possible bases for compensation rules, some grounded in utilitarianism and some nonconsequentialist, are discussed and evaluated. Principles of fairness and reasonableness are found to constitute the strongest bases. An ethically defensible compensation policy grounded in these principles would make a compensation fund available to all individuals with severe injuries and to individuals with less-severe injuries whenever the vaccination was required by law or professional duty.

  8. Compensation of Cross-Coupling Stiffness and Increase of Direct Damping in Multirecess Journal Bearings using Active Hybrid Lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Ilmar; Watanabe, F.Y.

    2004-01-01

    journal bearings (HJB). When part of hydrostatic pressure is also dynamically modified by means of hydraulic control systems, one refers to the active lubrication. The main contribution of the present theoretical work is to show that it is possible to reduce cross-coupling stiffness and increase...... the direct damping coefficients by means of the active lubrication, what leads to rotor-bearing systems with larger threshold of stability....

  9. Introduction to special section on phenomenology, underlying processes, and hazard implications of aseismic slip and nonvolcanic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the special section on the "phenomenology, underlying processes, and hazard implications of aseismic slip and nonvolcanic tremor" by highlighting key results of the studies published in it. Many of the results indicate that seismic and aseismic manifestations of slow slip reflect transient shear displacements on the plate interface, with the outstanding exception of northern Cascadia where tremor sources have been located on and above the plate interface (differing models of the plate interface there also need to be reconciled). Slow slip phenomena appear to result from propagating deformation that may develop with persistent gaps and segment boundaries. Results add to evidence that when tectonic deformation is relaxed via slow slip, most relaxation occurs aseismically but with seismic signals providing higher-resolution proxies for the aseismic slip. Instead of two distinct slip modes as suggested previously, lines between "fast" and "slow" slip more appropriately may be described as blurry zones. Results reported also show that slow slip sources do not coincide with a specific temperature or metamorphic reaction. Their associations with zones of high conductivity and low shear to compressional wave velocity ratios corroborate source models involving pore fluid pressure buildup and release. These models and spatial anticorrelations between earthquake and tremor activity also corroborate a linkage between slow slip and frictional properties transitional between steady state and stick-slip. Finally, this special section highlights the benefits of global and multidisciplinary studies, which demonstrate that slow phenomena are not confined to beneath the locked zone but exist in many settings.

  10. Tremores intra e pós-operatório: prevenção e tratamento farmacológico Temblores intra y postoperatorio: prevención y tratamiento farmacológico Intra - and postoperative tremors: prevention and pharmacological treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Ferreira Albergaria

    2007-08-01

    ón de calor. E temblor postoperatorio es una desagradable complicación que está relacionada con el aumento de la morbidez. El temblor aumenta el metabolismo resultando en un aumento de 200% a 500% en el consumo de oxígeno. CONTENIDO: Discute las causas, prevención y tratamiento de los temblores intra y postoperatorio en pacientes adultos y pediátricos sometidos a la intervención quirúrgica bajo anestesia general o del neuroeje. CONCLUSIONES: Los temblores son, juntamente con náuseas y vómitos, causas de intensa incomodidad en la sala de recuperación pos anestésica, además de potencialmente perjudiciales por generar un aumento de la demanda metabólica. Aunque la presencia de temblores no haya sido directamente relacionada a la morbidez cardiaca, la prevención se ha hecho tema de debate y de varios artículos científicos. La prevención y el tratamiento de temblores deben ser implementados. Pacientes con reserva cardio pulmorar limitada pueden sufrir con la acidosis láctica, falta de saturación venosa mixta e hipoxemia.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tremors can be an adverse effect of the surgical intervention and anesthesia. The incidence of postoperative tremors varies from 6.3% to 66%. Young age, male gender, the use of halogenated anesthetics, and prolonged anesthesia or surgical procedure are related with tremors. Tremors are involuntary and present as oscillating muscular activity aiming at increasing heat production. Postoperative tremors are a disagreeable complication related with increased morbidity. Tremors increase the metabolism, resulting in a 200% to 500% increase in oxygen consumption. CONTENTS: The objective of this paper was to discuss the causes, prevention, and treatment of intra- and postoperative tremors in adults and children undergoing general anesthesia or neuroaxis anesthesia for surgical interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Tremors, along with nausea and vomiting, cause severe discomfort in the recovery room, besides being highly prejudicial

  11. Orthostatic tremor: Report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya K

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthostatic tremor is a rare movement disorder characterized by tremulousness of the lower limbs on standing that disappears on walking, sitting or on lying down and a distinctive electromyographic burst of 14 to 16 Hz. On inspection, fine ripples can sometimes be seen over the quadriceps on standing. The tremor has a tendency to reappear even in the supine posture if the lower limb muscles are put to an isometric contraction state, indicating thereby that in spite of the fact that the tremor occurs on standing, it is essentially 'orthostasis independent' and the central factor is the contraction of the muscles. As a matter of fact, the tremor is abolished if the subject is suspended by harness, thus relieving him of muscle contraction. Doubts are being cast whether it is a variant of essential tremor since a number of families are being reported to be suffering from this disease as well. Positron emission tomography reveals hyperactivity of cerebellum in orthostatic tremor as it shows in essential tremor, therefore lending credence to such a hypothesis. However, lack of response to alcohol, propranolol and primidone in orthostatic tremor stands out as a serious challenge to such a view. Lack of positive family history, synchrony of contracting group of muscles and negative `reseting' of the tremor by increasing peripheral load-phenomena consistently observed in orthostatic tremor and not in essential tremor, are other features that often help to distinguish between the two conditions. We report a case of orthostatic tremor that presented with the classical clinical and eletromyographic features. Relevant literature in this regard is also being reviewed.

  12. Light-activation through indirect ceramic restorations: does the overexposure compensate for the attenuation in light intensity during resin cement polymerization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Luis Novaes Bueno

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effects of light exposure through simulated indirect ceramic restorations (SICR on hardness (KHN of dual-cured resin cements (RCs, immediately after light-activation and 24 h later. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three dual-cured RCs were evaluated: Eco-Link (Ivoclar Vivadent, Rely X ARC (3M ESPE, and Panavia F (Kuraray Medical Inc.. The RCs were manipulated in accordance to the manufacturers' instructions and were placed into cylindrical acrylic matrixes (1-mm-thick and 4-mm diameter. The RC light-activation (Optilux 501; Demetron Kerr was performed through a glass slide for 120 s (control group, or through 2-mm or 4-mm thick SICRs (IPS Empress II; Ivoclar Vivadent. The specimens were submitted to KHN analysis immediately and 24 h after light-activation. The data obtained at the 2 evaluation intervals were submitted to 2-way ANOVA repeated measures and post-hoc Tukey's test (pre-set alpha of 5%. RESULTS: Lower KHN was observed when light-activation was performed through SICRs for Eco-Link at all evaluation intervals and for Rely X ARC 24 h later. For Panavia F, no significant difference in KHN was observed between control and experimental groups, regardless of evaluation interval. Most groups exhibited higher KHN after 24 h than immediately after light-activation, with the exception of Rely X ARC light-activated through SICR, as no significant difference in KHN was found between evaluation intervals. CONCLUSIONS: Light overexposure did not compensate for light intensity attenuation due to the presence of SICR when Rely X and Eco-Link were used. Although hardness of such RCs increased over a 24-h interval, the RCs subjected to light overexposure did not reach the hardness values exhibited after direct light exposure.

  13. Seismic Tremors and Three-Dimensional Magma Wagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Y.; Bercovici, D.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic tremor is a feature shared by many silicic volcanoes and is a precursor of volcanic eruption. Many of the characteristics of tremors, including their frequency band from 0.5 Hz to 7 Hz, are common for volcanoes with very different geophysical and geochemical properties. The ubiquitous characteristics of tremor imply that it results from some generation mechanism that is common to all volcanoes, instead of being unique to each volcano. Here we present new analysis on the magma-wagging mechanism that has been proposed to generate tremor. The model is based on the suggestion given by previous work (Jellinek & Bercovici 2011; Bercovici et.al. 2013) that the magma column is surrounded by a compressible, bubble-rich foam annulus while rising inside the volcanic conduit, and that the lateral oscillation of the magma inside the annulus causes observable tremor. Unlike the previous two-dimensional wagging model where the displacement of the magma column is restricted to one vertical plane, the three-dimensional model we employ allows the magma column to bend in different directions and has angular motion as well. Our preliminary results show that, without damping from viscous deformation of the magma column, the system retains angular momentum and develops elliptical motion (i.e., the horizontal displacement traces an ellipse). In this ''inviscid'' limit, the magma column can also develop instabilities with higher frequencies than what is found in the original two-dimensional model. Lateral motion can also be out of phase for various depths in the magma column leading to a coiled wagging motion. For the viscous-magma model, we predict a similar damping rate for the uncoiled magma column as in the two-dimensional model, and faster damping for the coiled magma column. The higher damping thus requires the existence of a forcing mechanism to sustain the oscillation, for example the gas-driven Bernoulli effect proposed by Bercovici et al (2013). Finally, using our new 3

  14. Primary task-specific bowing tremor: an entity of its own?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2012-12-01

    A professional violinist in his early 60s, playing in a prestigious German orchestra for more than 20 years, presented to our institute because of a task-induced tremor in his right arm when playing the violin. We describe the phenomenology of this tremor and its treatment options and compare it to findings in primary writing tremor (PWT). We then discuss whether primary bowing tremor is an entity of its own (similar to PWT) and propose hypotheses that would derive from such a definition.

  15. Compensation of Cross-Coupling Stiffness and Increase of Direct Damping in Multirecess Journal Bearings using Active Hybrid Lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Ilmar; Watanabe, F.Y.

    2004-01-01

    journal bearings (HJB). When part of hydrostatic pressure is also dynamically modified by means of hydraulic control systems, one refers to the active lubrication. The main contribution of the present theoretical work is to show that it is possible to reduce cross-coupling stiffness and increase...

  16. Essential tremor then and now: How views of the most common tremor diathesis have changed over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2017-07-13

    Essential tremor (ET) is the most prevalent tremor diathesis. In this "then" and "now" piece, I detail how views of this disorder have changed over time. A PubMed search was conducted on June 15, 2017. The term "essential tremor" was crossed in sequential order with 14 s search terms (e.g., genetics, clinical). The traditional view of ET was that it was monosymptomatic. An emerging view of ET is as a more clinically-complex entity with a range of possible motor and non-motor features. Traditionally, ET was viewed as autosomal dominant with complete penetrance by age 65. Current thinking is that, in addition to monogenic forms of ET, the disease is likely to be complex, with incomplete penetrance into advanced age. While non-genetic factors were traditionally presumed to exist, epidemiological studies have explored several potential environmental toxicants. The traditional olivary model of ET posited the existence of a central oscillator; an alternative is the cerebellar degenerative model, which is now under consideration. For ET, there is clearly a "then" and "now" when one assesses changes in our understanding of the disease with time. Indeed, concepts relating to the clinical features, disease etiology and pathogenesis have all changed substantially. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome: An under-recognised cause of tremor and ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalus, Sarah; King, John; Lui, Elaine; Gaillard, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a progressive degenerative movement disorder resulting from a fragile X "premutation", defined as 55-200 CGG repeats in the 5'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The FMR1 premutation occurs in 1/800 males and 1/250 females, with FXTAS affecting 40-45% of male and 8-16% of female premutation carriers over the age of 50. FXTAS typically presents with kinetic tremor and cerebellar ataxia. FXTAS has a classical imaging profile which, in concert with clinical manifestations and genetic testing, participates vitally in its diagnosis. The revised FXTAS diagnostic criteria include two major radiological features. The "MCP sign", referring to T2 hyperintensity in the middle cerebellar peduncle, has long been considered the radiological hallmark of FXTAS. Recently included as a major radiological criterion in the diagnosis of FXTAS is T2 hyperintensity in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Other imaging features of FXTAS include T2 hyperintensities in the pons, insula and periventricular white matter as well as generalised brain and cerebellar atrophy. FXTAS is an under-recognised and misdiagnosed entity. In patients with unexplained tremor, ataxia and cognitive decline, the presence of middle cerebellar peduncle and/or corpus callosum splenium hyperintensity should raise suspicion of FXTAS. Diagnosis of FXTAS has important implications not only for the patient but also, through genetic counselling and testing, for future generations.

  18. Simulation Research on Semi-active Heave Compensation System Based on AMESim Software%基于AMESim的半主动式升沉补偿系统仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘茹; 徐涛

    2016-01-01

    为进一步研究半主动式升沉补偿的补偿工作机制,在对半主动式升沉补偿装置补偿原理分析的基础上,对装置中的气液储能器和主动补偿缸进行了力学分析和流量连续性分析,并基于AMESim软件对补偿系统进行建模和仿真分析.结果表明:补偿过程中大钩位移随时间变化范围较小,处于小幅值正弦波动范围内,系统能耗曲线近似呈线性上升趋势以及气液储能器压力曲线变化整体趋于平稳.该系统仿真结果能为半主动式升沉补偿装置的设计改进和技术发展提供参考,进一步提高系统的补偿效率和降低能耗.%Abatract: In order to further study the compensation mechanism of semi-active heave compensation, based on the analysis of the compensation principle of semi-active heave compensation device, the analyses of mechanics and flow continuity of gas-liquid storage devices and active compensation cylinder was carried out. The AMESim software was accepted for the modeling and simulation analysis. The result shows that the variation range of compensation process of large hook displacement is in a small amplitude of sine wave when the time changes. The system energy consumption curve is approximate to linear upward trend and the pressure curve of gas liquid accu-mulator overall tends to leveled off. The system simulation results of semi-active heave compensation device can be used as the reference for improving the design and developing technology of the system of compensation efficiency and reducing energy consumption.

  19. Comprehensive Monitor-Oriented Compensation Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Colombo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Compensation programming is typically used in the programming of web service compositions whose correct implementation is crucial due to their handling of security-critical activities such as financial transactions. While traditional exception handling depends on the state of the system at the moment of failure, compensation programming is significantly more challenging and dynamic because it is dependent on the runtime execution flow — with the history of behaviour of the system at the moment of failure affecting how to apply compensation. To address this dynamic element, we propose the use of runtime monitors to facilitate compensation programming, with monitors enabling the modeller to be able to implicitly reason in terms of the runtime control flow, thus separating the concerns of system building and compensation modelling. Our approach is instantiated into an architecture and shown to be applicable to a case study.

  20. Compensation of Disadvantages in University Examination Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Quapp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Active social participation of disabled people is one of the major tasks of modern society. That also includes access to the academic community by higher education. Universities all over the world work hard to give handicapped students a chance to graduate. In this context, compensation of disadvantages in examination procedures is an important matter. But, also chronic illness may impair the student's examination performance. To ensure equal examination opportunities for all students, responsible university officials must be creative to find individual compensation solutions. The paper analyzes examination regulations at universities in different countries and offers solutions to compensate disabled and chronic ill students' disadvantages. It discusses the necessity of compensation for different types of disability and chronic illness. Finally, an overview of current German case law and solutions for compensation problems are provided.

  1. Options in Compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flor, Christian Riis; Frimor, Hans; Munk, Claus

    2014-01-01

    We derive the optimal compensation contract in a principal–agent setting in which outcome is used to provide incentives for both effort and risky investments. To motivate investment, optimal compensation entails rewards for high as well as low outcomes, and it is increasing at the mean outcome to...

  2. Cooperation, compensation and transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ju, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Cooperation and compensation are two important and well-linked issues in economics. The central question in cooperation is how to share the joint gains among participating players. Compensation is a specific aspect of surplus sharing problems providing incentives for agents to sacrifice their own di

  3. Indexing Executive Compensation Contracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Dittmann (Ingolf); E.G. Maug (Ernst); O.G. Spalt (Oliver)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe analyze the efficiency of indexing executive pay by calibrating the standard model of executive compensation to a large sample of US CEOs. The benefits from linking the strike price of stock options to an index are small and fully indexing all options would increase compensation costs

  4. Magnetic force driven six degree-of-freedom active vibration isolation system using a phase compensated velocity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongdae; Kim, Sangyoo; Park, Kyihwan

    2009-04-01

    A six-axis active vibration isolation system (AVIS) is developed using voice coil actuators. Point contact configuration is employed to have an easy assembly of eight voice coil actuators to an upper and a base plates. The velocity sensor, using an electromagnetic principle that is commonly used in the vibration control, is investigated since its phase lead characteristic causes an instability problem for a low frequency vibration. The performances of the AVIS are investigated in the frequency domain and finally validated by comparing with the passive isolation system using the atomic force microscope images.

  5. An Enhanced Intelligent Handheld Instrument with Visual Servo Control for 2-DOF Hand Motion Error Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Naing Aye

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The intelligent handheld instrument, ITrem2, enhances manual positioning accuracy by cancelling erroneous hand movements and, at the same time, provides automatic micromanipulation functions. Visual data is acquired from a high speed monovision camera attached to the optical surgical microscope and acceleration measurements are acquired from the inertial measurement unit (IMU on board ITrem2. Tremor estimation and canceling is implemented via Band-limited Multiple Fourier Linear Combiner (BMFLC filter. The piezoelectric actuated micromanipulator in ITrem2 generates the 3D motion to compensate erroneous hand motion. Preliminary bench-top 2-DOF experiments have been conducted. The error motions simulated by a motion stage is reduced by 67% for multiple frequency oscillatory motions and 56.16% for pre-conditioned recorded physiological tremor.

  6. Detecting tectonic tremor through frequency scanning at a single station: Application to the Cascadia margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Stefany; Brudzinski, Michael; Kao, Honn

    2012-11-01

    The discovery of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) spurred increased instrumentation and investigation of the Cascadia margin, which is now typified by the seismic phenomena. We utilize established detection and location techniques already present in the region to guide the development of a new single station detection method. While detailed network-wide investigations have led to exciting discoveries on the source location and migration patterns of tectonic tremor, single station detection has the ability to expand our search for tremor to more subduction zones and tectonic settings where instrumentation is not widely available. Our frequency scanning technique bandpass filters seismic data into three categories, 2-5 Hz, 10-15 Hz, and 0.02-0.1 Hz, where we expect prominent signals produced by tectonic tremor, local earthquakes, and surface waves, respectively. We combine amplitudes in each category into a ratio to determine tremor detection for a given hour. Results from our technique are evaluated in two ways: 1) combined in a network setting to compare with prominent location and detection methods and 2) assessed at an individual station and compared with other techniques that are capable of single station tremor detection. Network-wide processing over a two-year time period in both northern and southern Cascadia reveals common identification of larger ETS episodes when comparing our technique to both envelope waveform and combined single station detection methods. We find slight variations in the total duration of tremor and the onset timing between the different techniques, which may be due to the varying stations included in each technique. Frequency scanning identifies more inter-ETS episodes than envelope waveform and single station methods, particularly in the more sparsely instrumented region of southern Oregon. Our method also reduces erroneous signals more commonly found in other single station methods, discerned through comparison of nearby seismograms

  7. On the compensation effect in heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Bligaard; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2003-01-01

    For a class of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions, we explain the compensation effect in terms of a switching of kinetic regimes leading to a concomitant change in the apparent activation energy and in the prefactor for the overall rate of the reaction. We first use the ammonia synthesis...... to illustrate the effect. Both experiments and a detailed kinetic model show a compensation effect. Second, we use density functional theory calculations to show that the compensation effect is not only due to changes in the activation barrier and prefactor of the rate-determining step, N-2 dissociation. We...... why this should be a general effect for a broad class of reactions. We will show that the compensation effect in the rate is intimately linked to the underlying linear relationships between activation energy and stability of intermediates, which have been found to hold for a number of surface...

  8. Method for Analysis of an Offshore Heave Compensator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwi-Nam Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A heave compensation system consists of a drill string compensator (DSC and an active heave compensator (AHC cylinder, which together produce control force over an oil pressure system suitable for transmission of considerable power and compensating for heaving motion of the hull during drilling work. In this study, a heave compensator of an oil pressure system was simulated to draw a conclusion, which was verified by comparison with the result of a test conducted using an actual miniature model. The compensation rate was 95%, based on which the dynamic behaviors of an actual-size heave compensator were presumed. Furthermore, the speed of each cylinder and the acceleration of heave can be determined and used to fabricate an actual-size heave compensator.

  9. A Novel LTPS-TFT Pixel Circuit to Compensate the Electronic Degradation for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Fan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel pixel driving circuit for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED displays with low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs is studied. The proposed compensation pixel circuit is driven by voltage programming scheme, which is composed of five TFTs and one capacitor, and has been certified to provide uniform output current by the Automatic Integrated Circuit Modeling Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (AIM-SPICE simulator. The results of simulation show excellent performance, such as the low average error rate of OLED current variation (<0.5% and the low average nonuniformity of OLED current variation (<0.8% while the shift of threshold voltage of the driving poly-Si TFT and the OLED are both in the worst case ( V for TFT and  V for OLED. The proposed pixel circuit shows high immunity to the threshold voltage deviation of both the driving poly-Si TFT and the OLED.

  10. Quality parameters for a multimodal EEG/EMG/kinematic brain-computer interface (BCI aiming to suppress neurological tremor in upper limbs [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3aq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Grimaldi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tremor is the most common movement disorder encountered during daily neurological practice. Tremor in the upper limbs causes functional disability and social inconvenience, impairing daily life activities. The response of tremor to pharmacotherapy is variable. Therefore, a combination of drugs is often required. Surgery is considered when the response to medications is not sufficient. However, about one third of patients are refractory to current treatments. New bioengineering therapies are emerging as possible alternatives. Our study was carried out in the framework of the European project “Tremor” (ICT-2007-224051. The main purpose of this challenging project was to develop and validate a new treatment for upper limb tremor based on the combination of functional electrical stimulation (FES; which has been shown to reduce upper limb tremor with a brain-computer interface (BCI. A BCI-driven detection of voluntary movement is used to trigger FES in a closed-loop approach. Neurological tremor is detected using a matrix of EMG electrodes and inertial sensors embedded in a wearable textile. The identification of the intentionality of movement is a critical aspect to optimize this complex system. We propose a multimodal detection of the intentionality of movement by fusing signals from EEG, EMG and kinematic sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometry. Parameters of prediction of movement are extracted in order to provide global prediction plots and trigger FES properly. In particular, quality parameters (QPs for the EEG signals, corticomuscular coherence and event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS parameters are combined in an original algorithm which takes into account the refractoriness/responsiveness of tremor. A simulation study of the relationship between the threshold of ERD/ERS of artificial EEG traces and the QPs is also provided. Very interestingly, values of QPs were much greater than those obtained for the corticomuscular

  11. Aseismic moment release associated with rapid tremor reversals in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, J. C.; Bostock, M. G.; Royer, A. A.; Thomas, A.; Savard, G.

    2015-12-01

    We identify variations in slow slip moment rate associated with rapid tremor reversals (RTRs) beneath Vancouver Island, in Cascadia. The RTRs were identified by Royer et. al., 2015 with their high-quality tremor catalog based on low frequency earthquakes. In most of them, tremor propagates a few tens of kilometers over a few hours. We use PBO borehole strain data to search for aseismic moment rate variations associated with the reversals. We isolate components of strain that have high signal to noise ratios by avoiding components that have a strong response to atmospheric pressure. In the corrected strain data, the strain rate is systematically higher during the RTRs than during the 4 days surrounding them. On average, the strain rate increases by a factor of 2 during the reversals.This factor of 2 increase in strain rate can be roughly interpreted as a factor of 2 increase in moment rate. The location of slip moves by just a few tens of kilometers during the 4-day periods of interest, so the Green's functions do not change dramatically. If we scale this moment rate by the moment rate of the slow slip event, and account for the RTR durations, we estimate that each reversal releases a moment similar to that in a M 5 earthquake. If the along-dip width of the reversals is comparable to the width of the whole slow slip event, the estimated moment implies a stress drop of order 1 kPa. This is comparable to the tidal stresses and less than 10% of the slow slip stress drop. If the along-dip width of the RTRs is smaller---say 20 km---the aseismic moment implies a stress drop of order 5 kPa, only a factor of a few smaller than the slow slip stress drop.

  12. Quality of life and personality in essential tremor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Delia; Schwieger, Daniel; Moises, Hans; Deuschl, Günther

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of essential tremor (ET) on quality of life and its relation with tremor severity and the personality profile of ET patients. One hundred and five patients with definite or probable ET from an outpatient population were tested with the Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF36) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R). Compared to controls, the ET patients scored worse in all eight domains of the SF36. The physical component score (PCS) did not differ significantly from the normal population, whereas ET patients older than 40 years were significantly more affected with regard to the mental domains measured by the mental component score (MCS) with their median below the 20th percentile of the German controls. Tremor severity correlated with some of the physical domains and the PCS as well as with social function of the mental domains. ET patients showed significantly lower scores in the psychoticism (P) scale of the EPQ-R, with a median value on the 11th percentile of normal German population, indicating a more tender-minded personality type. The MCS correlated highly significant with the neuroticism (N) scale and extraversion (E) scale of EPQ-R. Multiple regression analysis identified age as the only predictive factor for the PCS and the N-scale as the only predictive factor for the MCS. Although ET is considered a pure movement disorder, the mental components of quality of life are more affected than the physical dimensions. A more controlled personality type may in part contribute to this.

  13. Mutation Analysis of HTRA2 Gene in Chinese Familial Essential Tremor and Familial Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ya-Chao; Huang, Pei; Li, Qiong-Qiong; Sun, Qian; Li, Dun-Hui; Wang, Tian; Shen, Jun-Yi; Du, Juan-Juan; Cui, Shi-Shuang; Gao, Chao; Fu, Rao; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-01-01

    Background. HTRA2 has already been nominated as PARK13 which may cause Parkinson's disease, though there are still discrepancies among these results. Recently, Gulsuner et al.'s study found that HTRA2 p.G399S is responsible for hereditary essential tremor and homozygotes of this allele develop Parkinson's disease by examining a six-generation family segregating essential tremor and essential tremor coexisting with Parkinson's disease. We performed this study to validate the condition of HTRA2 gene in Chinese familial essential tremor and familial Parkinson's disease patients, especially essential tremor. Methods. We directly sequenced all eight exons, exon-intron boundaries, and part of the introns in 101 familial essential tremor patients, 105 familial Parkinson's disease patients, and 100 healthy controls. Results. No exonic variant was identified, while one exon-intron boundary variant (rs2241028) and one intron variant (rs2241027) were detected, both with no clinical significance and uncertain function. There was no difference in allele, genotype, and haplotype between groups. Conclusions. HTRA2 exonic variant might be rare among Chinese Parkinson's disease and essential tremor patients with family history, and HTRA2 may not be the cause of familial Parkinson's disease and essential tremor in China.

  14. Continuous theta-burst stimulation of the primary motor cortex in essential tremor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellriegel, Helge; Schulz, Eva M; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether essential tremor (ET) can be altered by suppressing the corticospinal excitability in the primary motor cortex (M1) with transcranial magnetic stimulation.......We investigated whether essential tremor (ET) can be altered by suppressing the corticospinal excitability in the primary motor cortex (M1) with transcranial magnetic stimulation....

  15. Design and validation of a rehabilitation robotic exoskeleton for tremor assessment and suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocon, E; Belda-Lois, J M; Ruiz, A F; Manto, M; Moreno, J C; Pons, J L

    2007-09-01

    Exoskeletons are mechatronic systems worn by a person in such a way that the physical interface permits a direct transfer of mechanical power and exchange of information. Upper limb robotic exoskeletons may be helpful for people with disabilities and/or limb weakness or injury. Tremor is the most common movement disorder in neurological practice. In addition to medication, rehabilitation programs, and deep brain stimulation, biomechanical loading has appeared as a potential tremor suppression alternative. This paper introduces the robotic exoskeleton called WOTAS (wearable orthosis for tremor assessment and suppression) that provides a means of testing and validating nongrounded control strategies for orthotic tremor suppression. This paper describes in detail the general concept for WOTAS, outlining the special features of the design and selection of system components. Two control strategies developed for tremor suppression with exoskeletons are described. These two strategies are based on biomechanical loading and notch filtering the tremor through the application of internal forces. Results from experiments using these two strategies on patients with tremor are summarized. Finally, results from clinical trials are presented, which indicate the feasibility of ambulatory mechanical suppression of tremor.

  16. Hypertrophic Olivary Degeneration and Palatal or Oculopalatal Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Tilikete

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic degeneration of the inferior olive is mainly observed in patients developing palatal tremor (PT or oculopalatal tremor (OPT. This syndrome manifests as a synchronous tremor of the palate (PT and/or eyes (OPT that may also involve other muscles from the branchial arches. It is associated with hypertrophic inferior olivary degeneration that is characterized by enlarged and vacuolated neurons, increased number and size of astrocytes, severe fibrillary gliosis, and demyelination. It appears on MRI as an increased T2/FLAIR signal intensity and enlargement of the inferior olive. There are two main conditions in which hypertrophic degeneration of the inferior olive occurs. The most frequent, studied, and reported condition is the development of PT/OPT and hypertrophic degeneration of the inferior olive in the weeks or months following a structural brainstem or cerebellar lesion. This “symptomatic” condition requires a destructive lesion in the Guillain–Mollaret pathway, which spans from the contralateral dentate nucleus via the brachium conjunctivum and the ipsilateral central tegmental tract innervating the inferior olive. The most frequent etiologies of destructive lesion are stroke (hemorrhagic more often than ischemic, brain trauma, brainstem tumors, and surgical or gamma knife treatment of brainstem cavernoma. The most accepted explanation for this symptomatic PT/OPT is that denervated olivary neurons released from inhibitory inputs enlarge and develop sustained synchronized oscillations. The cerebellum then modulates/accentuates this signal resulting in abnormal motor output in the branchial arches. In a second condition, PT/OPT and progressive cerebellar ataxia occurs in patients without structural brainstem or cerebellar lesion, other than cerebellar atrophy. This syndrome of progressive ataxia and palatal tremor may be sporadic or familial. In the familial form, where hypertrophic degeneration of the inferior olive may not

  17. Bilateral cerebellar activation in unilaterally challenged essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Broersma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results expand on previous findings of bilateral cerebellar involvement in ET. We have identified specific areas in the bilateral somatomotor regions of the cerebellum: lobules V, VI and VIII.

  18. Tectonic Tremor Triggered along Major Strike-Slip Faults around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, C.; Peng, Z.; Shelly, D. R.; Hill, D. P.; Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Chao, K.; Zimmerman, J. P.; Douilly, R.; Deschamps, A.; Haase, J. S.; Calais, E.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, deep tectonic tremor has been observed at several major plate-bounding faults around the Pacific Rim. Observations in these regions show that ambient tremor occurs spontaneously in association with geodetically detectable slow-slip events and that triggered tremor occurs in response to small stress perturbations arising from solid earth tides as well as passing seismic waves of a distant earthquake. Tremor generally occurs in the lower crust, beneath the seismogenic zone where earthquakes occur. In order to investigate the potential link between tremor and earthquake nucleation, further study of when, where, and how tremor occurs is needed. Here, we present a review of remotely triggered tectonic tremor in four strike-slip regions: (1) the Queen Charlotte Fault near Haida Gwaii, Canada, (2) the Eastern Denali Fault in Yukon, Canada, (3) the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault in the southern Haiti peninsula, and (4) the Parkfield-Cholame segment of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California. In Haida Gwaii, Yukon and Parkfield, we first compute the estimated dynamic stress for all magnitude ≥ 5.5 earthquakes based on the magnitude listed in the Advanced National Seismograph System (ANSS) earthquake catalog and epicentral distance to the region where tremor is observed. We then retrieve seismic data from local networks for earthquakes that are estimated to generate ≥ 1 kPa dynamic stress, without regard to epicentral distance. We characterize tremor triggered by these distant earthquakes as broadband signals with long duration that are coincident with surface waves from a distant event or occur in a large cluster immediately following the teleseismic wavetrain. In Haiti, a temporary seismic network was deployed shortly after the 2010/01/12 Mw7.0 Haiti earthquake. Thus, we are only able to report on triggering by the 2010/02/27 Mw8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake that occurred shortly thereafter. In Parkfield, we use a low-frequency earthquake

  19. Climate change and compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint; Flanagan, Tine Bech

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a case for compensation of actual harm from climate change in the poorest countries. First, it is shown that climate change threatens to reverse the fight to eradicate poverty. Secondly, it is shown how the problems raised in the literature for compensation to some extent...... are based on misconceptions and do not apply to compensation of present actual harm. Finally, two arguments are presented to the effect that, in so far as developed countries accept a major commitment to mitigate climate change, they should also accept a commitment to address or compensate actual harm from...... climate change. The first argument appeals to the principle that if it is an injustice to cause risk of incurring harm in the future, then it is also an injustice to cause a similar harm now. The second argument appeals to the principle that if there is moral reason to reduce the risk of specific harms...

  20. Workers Compensation Claim Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains DOT employee workers compensation claim data for current and past DOT employees. Types of data include claim data consisting of PII data (SSN,...

  1. Tremor-genic slow slip regions may be deeper and warmer and may slip slower than non-tremor-genic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Syracuse, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) are observed worldwide and often coincide with tectonic tremor. Notable examples of SSEs lacking observed tectonic tremor, however, occur beneath Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, the Boso Peninsula, Japan, near San Juan Bautista on the San Andreas Fault, California, and recently in Central Ecuador. These SSEs are similar to other worldwide SSEs in many ways (e.g., size or duration), but lack the concurrent tectonic tremor observed elsewhere; instead, they trigger swarms of regular earthquakes. We investigate the physical conditions that may distinguish these non-tremor-genic SSEs from those associated with tectonic tremor, including slip velocity, pressure, temperature, fluids, and fault asperities, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that tectonic tremor may be obscured in highly attenuating regions. Slip velocities of SSEs at Kīlauea Volcano (∼10−6 m/s) and Boso Peninsula (∼10−7 m/s) are among the fastest SSEs worldwide. Kīlauea Volcano, the Boso Peninsula, and Central Ecuador are also among the shallowest SSEs worldwide, and thus have lower confining pressures and cooler temperatures in their respective slow slip zones. Fluids also likely contribute to tremor generation, and no corresponding zone of high vp/vs has been noted at Kīlauea or Boso. We suggest that the relatively faster slip velocities at Kīlauea Volcano and the Boso Peninsula result from specific physical conditions that may also be responsible for triggering swarms of regular earthquakes adjacent to the slow slip, while different conditions produce slower SSE velocities elsewhere and trigger tectonic tremor.

  2. Integration of Osteopathic Manual Treatments in Management of Cervical Dystonia with Tremor: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Miriam; Leder, Adena; Mancini, Jayme D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical dystonia, also known as spasmodic torticollis, is a chronic disorder in which patients exhibit involuntary repetitive contractions of neck muscles resulting in abnormal postures or movements. Occasionally, there is also a dystonic head tremor. The underlying mechanisms for cervical dystonia and dystonic tremor are not clear, and treatments are limited. Case Report In the present cases, two females with head tremor starting in adolescence developed worsening symptoms of cervical dystonia with dystonic tremor in their 60s. On osteopathic physical examination, both had a vertical type strain to the sphenobasilar synchondrosis. Discussion Vertical strains are more frequently found in patients after head trauma, congenital or later in life, than in healthy patients, and head trauma may have been a precipitating factor in these patients. There were improvements in cervical dystonia symptoms, including tremor, in both patients after osteopathic manual treatment. PMID:28119789

  3. 浮式钻井平台主动式钻柱升沉补偿装置设计%Design for an active drill-string heave compensation system of the floating drilling platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜浩; 刘衍聪; 张彦廷; 刘振东; 白鹿

    2012-01-01

    To solve problems of the heave movement of a float drilling platform caused by ocean waves, which make a drill string reciprocate with vibration and cause a shock against the drill bit, a new type of active drill-string heave compensation system was designed. This system can achieve a real-time domination over the piston movement of a hydraulic cylinder by controlling the electro-hydraulic proportional direction valve and variable pump, which can compensate the drill string movement caused by heaving of ocean waves. Meanwhile, a system mathematical model was built, and then an experimental table for heave compensation was designed and constructed to carry out simulation, with which the heave movement and dynamic load were simulated. Active heave compensation experiments with the valve control or pump-valve control were carried out under the circumstance of heave motion and dynamic load simulation. The results indicate that the active valve control can get a better compensation effect but be accompanied with larger power consumption, while the pump-valve control consumes smaller power but has a high compensation request in operation and a little worse compensation effect.%针对海浪升沉运动对钻柱和钻压的影响,设计了一种海洋浮式钻井平台主动式钻柱升沉补偿装置,其以电液比例方向阀和变量泵为控制对象,实现了对液压缸活塞运动的实时控制,进而对海浪升沉造成的钻柱运动进行补偿.建立了主动式钻柱升沉补偿装置系统的数学模型,设计、搭建升沉补偿实验台实现了升沉运动和动态负载的实验模拟,并进行了阀控和泵控加周控的主动升沉补偿实验.结果表明:主动阀控方案具有较好的补偿效果,但消耗能量较大;泵控加阀控方案能耗较低,但控制策略要求较高,补偿效果稍差.

  4. ACTS Rain Fade Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coney, Thom A.

    1996-01-01

    Performance status of the Adaptive Rain Fade Compensation includes: (1) The rain fade protocol is functional detecting fades, providing an additional 10 dB of margin and seamless transitions to and from coded operation; (2) The stabilization of the link margins and the optimization of rain fade decision thresholds has resulted in improved BER performance; (3) Characterization of the fade compensation algorithm is ongoing.

  5. Dosage compensation in birds

    OpenAIRE

    McQueen, H A; McBride, D; Miele, G; Bird, A.P.; Clinton, M

    2001-01-01

    The Z and W sex chromosomes of birds have evolved independently from the mammalian X and Y chromosomes [1]. Unlike mammals, female birds are heterogametic (ZW), while males are homogametic (ZZ). Therefore male birds, like female mammals, carry a double dose of sex-linked genes relative to the other sex. Other animals with nonhomologous sex chromosomes possess "dosage compensation" systems to equalize the expression of sex-linked genes. Dosage compensation occurs in animals as diverse as mamma...

  6. A Global Review of Slow Slip Events and Seismic Tremor at Circum-Pacific Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, S. Y.; Rokosky, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    It has been known for a long time that slip accompanying earthquakes accounts for only a fraction of plate tectonic displacements. However, only recently has a fuller spectrum of strain release processes, including normal, slow and silent earthquakes (or slow slip events), and continuous and episodic creep, been observed and generated by numerical simulations of the earthquake cycle. Despite a profusion of observations and modeling studies, the physical mechanism of slow slip events (SSEs) remains elusive. The concurrence of seismic tremor, similar to signals observed at volcanoes, with slow slip episodes in Cascadia and southwestern Japan suggests that SSEs may be related to fluid migration on or near the plate interface. We compare the location, spatial extent, magnitude, duration, slip rate, recurrence behavior and associated tremor and seismicity of aseismic slip transients worldwide to better understand their generation and earthquake hazard implications. We find that slow slip events occur at either the down-dip edge of the seismogenic zone, or at complementary locations to strongly locked patches or co-seismic asperities within the seismogenic zone. Nucleation of SSEs at frictional transitions is supported by rate- and state-dependent frictional modeling. We find a global scaling relationship between SSE duration and equivalent moment magnitude that implies a constant rate of slow slip propagation, consistent with the small range in observed SSE migration rates. Afterslip following moderate to large earthquakes suggests a relationship between slow slip and higher velocity rupture (earthquakes). We assess if such a cause-and-effect relationship exists between interseismic SSEs and earthquake activity. We find that although isolated episodes of interseismic slow slip can be related to nearby earthquake activity, a consistent triggering pattern has yet to emerge and further study is clearly warranted.

  7. Shallow Low-frequency Tremor in the Hyuga-nada region, western Nankai Trough subduction zone, observed by ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Y.; Yakiwara, H.; Shimizu, H.; Uchida, K.; Kamizono, M.; Nakamoto, M.; Fukui, M.; Fujita, S.; Aizawa, K.; Miyamachi, H.; Hirano, S.; Umakoshi, K.; Yamada, T.; Kanehara, H.; Aoshima, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Hyuga-nada region, locating western Nankai trough, is one of the most seismically active areas in Japan. Here, the Philippine Sea Plate subducts northwestward beneath the Eurasian Plate at an approximate rate of 5-7 cm/yr [e.g., Seno et al., 1993; Miyazaki and Heki, 2001]. Interplate earthquakes with magnitudes in the range of 6.5 to 7.5 repeatedly occur at intervals of decades. In the shallower part of the plate boundary in this region, the shallow very-low frequency earthquakes (dominant frequency 10~20 s) occur [Obara and Ito, 2005; Asano et al., 2008]. The shallow part of the plate boundary zone is very important for the generation of large interplate earthquakes and following tsunami. In order to reveal the detail of microseismicity from the shallower part of the plate boundary to seismogenic zone in the Hyuga-nada region, we have conducted Ocean Bottom Seismographic experiment from May 19 until July 6, 2013. We used 12 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) with a three-component short-period (10 OBSs: 4.5Hz, 2 OBSs: 1Hz) seismometer. All OBSs were recovered but one OBS was no data because of the technical problem of the recorder. During this experiment, many earthquakes recorded by OBSs. In addition, many low-frequency signals were also recorded. From the characteristic of the waveform and estimated source location, these are the shallow low-frequency tremor which is recorded for the first time by close-in observation the Hyuga-nada region. Here, we report the result of preliminary analysis of these shallow low-frequency tremors. The tremor activity mainly occurred from end of May to end of July 2013. Dominant frequency range of these tremors are 1-8 Hz and long duration range (10 seconds ~ a few minutes), which is same character of low-frequency tremor observed in Kii-Peninsula, Nankai trough using short-period OBSs [Obana and Kodaira, 2009]. We estimated tremor source location using envelop correlation method [Obara, 2002]. Although we estimated only a few

  8. Parkinsonian Rest Tremor Is Associated With Modulations of Subthalamic High-Frequency Oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Jan; Butz, Markus; Hartmann, Christian J; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Özkurt, Tolga E; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-10-01

    High frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) have been observed in the basal ganglia of PD patients and were shown to be modulated by the administration of levodopa and voluntary movement. The objective of this study was to test whether the power of high-frequency oscillations in the STN is associated with spontaneous manifestation of parkinsonian rest tremor. The electromyogram of both forearms and local field potentials from the STN were recorded in 11 PD patients (10 men, age 58 [9.4] years, disease duration 9.2 [6.3] years). Patients were recorded at rest and while performing repetitive hand movements before and after levodopa intake. High-frequency oscillation power was compared across epochs containing rest tremor, tremor-free rest, or voluntary movement and related to the tremor cycle. We observed prominent slow (200-300 Hz) and fast (300-400 Hz) high-frequency oscillations. The ratio between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power increased when tremor became manifest. This increase was consistent across nuclei (94%) and occurred in medication ON and OFF. The ratio outperformed other potential markers of tremor, such as power at individual tremor frequency, beta power, or low gamma power. For voluntary movement, we did not observe a significant difference when compared with rest or rest tremor. Finally, rhythmic modulations of high-frequency oscillation power occurred within the tremor cycle. Subthalamic high-frequency oscillation power is closely linked to the occurrence of parkinsonian rest tremor. The balance between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power combines information on motor and medication state. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Quantification of high pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS) tremor in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenau, S P; Ackermann, M J

    1978-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated two tremorgenic systems that involve separate brain mechanisms and exhibit different peak frequencies. One system (the thalamo-cortical) generates low frequency (4--8 Hz) tremor; the other (the olivo-cerebellar) produces high frequency (10--18 Hz) tremor. Based on this evidence, the present study focused on determining whether one or both of these tremor systems is involved in the high pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS). Specifically, the concern was to identify and to quantify amplitude and frequency characteristics of HPNS tremor in 8 guinea pigs breathing helium-oxygen during compression (40 ft/min) in a chamber dive to 61.6 ATA (2000 fsw) with a bottom time of 1 h. Rectal temperature was recorded and maintained at 39 degrees C +/- 1 degree. Leg tremor was recorded by magnetic inductance and stored on magnetic tape for power spectral analysis. Frequency histograms of the tremor data revealed development of a biphasic response. From surface to about 31.3 ATA (1000 fsw), a low-power, single, 4- to 6-Hz component was evident, which resembled fine or moderate tremor. Between 34.3 ATA (1100 fsw) and 61.6 ATA, a 12- to 18-Hz component emerged abruptly with a dramatic increase in power, which reflected coarse, uncontrollable tremors. In the first 5 to 10 min after the animals arrived at maximum pressure, relative power of the high frequency component dropped to and remained near base-line levels. These results support the hypothesis that HPNS tremor consists of two components and possibly two separate tremor systems.

  10. Using Seismic Arrays to Detect Triggered and Ambient Tremor in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Peng, Z.; Lin, C.; Chao, K.

    2013-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor triggered by teleseismic surface waves have been recently observed in the southern Central Range in Taiwan, an arc-continental type collision environment. Aiming to capture more tremor events, we installed two dense 36-element, small-aperture seismic arrays in 2011 around the Liouguei and Lidao areas, which are located about 20 km in southwest and northeast to the tremor sources. In each array, short-period, vertical-channel GS-11D sensors with 4.5Hz natural frequency seismometers were laid out on the relatively flat parts of the mountain areas with a spacing of approximately 100 by 80 meters. We had successfully recorded continuously for a total of 4,034 hours in 2011. As expected, the two arrays recorded tremor bursts triggered by the great Tohoku earthquake (Mw=9.0) on March 11, 2011. We apply the broadband frequency wavenumber (BBFK) beamforming method to measure the back-azimuth and incident angles for each tremor burst and through the whole data set. Our initial results show that obtained array parameters closely match those predicted from locations using tremor envelope cross-correlations (WECC) and we detect more tremor duration by BBFK than WECC. We further use a moving-window grid-search (MWGS) method to detect regular earthquakes. Our result indicates the southwestern array provides more stable results than the northeastern array. Our next step is to apply the same MWGS procedure to detect ambient tremor recorded by the southwestern array. Our systematic analysis of deep tremor in Taiwan could help to better understand critical conditions related to tremor occurrence and fault mechanics at the bottom of the seismogenic layer.

  11. 'Failed' eruptions revealed by integrated analysis of gas emission and volcanic tremor data at Mt. Etna, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, G. G.; Falsaperla, S. M.; Behncke, B.; Langer, H. K.; Neri, M.; Giammanco, S.; Pecora, E.; Biale, E.

    2013-12-01

    Mt Etna in Sicily is among the most intensely monitored and studied volcanoes on Earth due to its very frequent activity, and its location in a densely populated area. Through a sophisticated monitoring system run by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV-OE), scientists are gaining every day and in real time a picture of the state of volcanic activity of Etna. During the spring of 2007, various episodes of paroxysmal activity occurred at the South-East Crater, one of the four summit craters of Mt Etna. These episodes were always associated with a sharp increase in the amplitude of the volcanic tremor as well as changes in the spectral characteristics of this signal. Eruptive activity ranged from strong Strombolian explosions to lava fountains coupled with copious emission of lava flows and tephra. During inter-eruptive periods, recurrent seismic unrest episodes were observed in form of both temporary enhancements of the volcanic tremor amplitude as well as changes of spectral characteristics. These changes often triggered the automatic alert systems in the operation room of the INGV-OE, even though not being followed by manifest eruptive activity at the surface. The influence of man-made or meteorologically induced noise could be ruled out as a cause for the alarms. We therefore performed a multi-parametric analysis of these inter-eruptive periods by integrating seismic volcanic tremor, in-soil radon, plume SO2 flux and thermal data, discussing the potential volcano-dependent source of these episodes. Short-term changes were investigated applying pattern classification, in particular Kohonen Maps and fuzzy clustering, simultaneously on volcanic tremor, radon and ambient parameters (pressure and temperature). The well established SO2 flux and thermal radiation data were used as the 'smoking gun', for certifying that the observed changes in seismic and in radon data can be considered as volcanogenic. Our results unveil ';failed

  12. Different phase delays of peripheral input to primate motor cortex and spinal cord promote cancellation at physiological tremor frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koželj, Saša; Baker, Stuart N

    2014-05-01

    Neurons in the spinal cord and motor cortex (M1) are partially phase-locked to cycles of physiological tremor, but with opposite phases. Convergence of spinal and cortical activity onto motoneurons may thus produce phase cancellation and a reduction in tremor amplitude. The mechanisms underlying this phase difference are unknown. We investigated coherence between spinal and M1 activity with sensory input. In two anesthetized monkeys, we electrically stimulated the medial, ulnar, deep radial, and superficial radial nerves; stimuli were timed as independent Poisson processes (rate 10 Hz). Single units were recorded from M1 (147 cells) or cervical spinal cord (61 cells). Ninety M1 cells were antidromically identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs); M1 neurons were additionally classified according to M1 subdivision (rostral/caudal, M1r/c). Spike-stimulus coherence analysis revealed significant coupling over a broad range of frequencies, with the strongest coherence at <50 Hz. Delays implied by the slope of the coherence phase-frequency relationship were greater than the response onset latency, reflecting the importance of late response components for the transmission of oscillatory inputs. The spike-stimulus coherence phase over the 6-13 Hz physiological tremor band differed significantly between M1 and spinal cells (phase differences relative to the cord of 2.72 ± 0.29 and 1.72 ± 0.37 radians for PTNs from M1c and M1r, respectively). We conclude that different phases of the response to peripheral input could partially underlie antiphase M1 and spinal cord activity during motor behavior. The coordinated action of spinal and cortical feedback will act to reduce tremulous oscillations, possibly improving the overall stability and precision of motor control.

  13. Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) as a chaotic multiphysics spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veveakis, E.; Alevizos, S.; Poulet, T.

    2017-03-01

    Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events display a rich behaviour of slow and accelerated slip with simple oscillatory to complicated chaotic time series. It is commonly believed that the fast events appearing as non volcanic tremors are signatures of deep fluid injection. The fluid source is suggested to be related to the breakdown of hydrous phyllosilicates, mainly the serpentinite group minerals such as antigorite or lizardite that are widespread in the top of the slab in subduction environments. Similar ETS sequences are recorded in different lithologies in exhumed crustal carbonate-rich thrusts where the fluid source is suggested to be the more vigorous carbonate decomposition reaction. If indeed both types of events can be understood and modelled by the same generic fluid release reaction AB(solid) ⇌A(solid) +B(fluid) , the data from ETS sequences in subduction zones reveal a geophysically tractable temporal evolution with no access to the fault zone. This work reviews recent advances in modelling ETS events considering the multiphysics instabilities triggered by the fluid release reaction and develops a thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical oscillator (THMC spring) model for such mineral reactions (like dehydration and decomposition) in Megathrusts. We describe advanced computational methods for THMC instabilities and discuss spectral element and finite element solutions. We apply the presented numerical methods to field examples of this important mechanism and reproduce the temporal signature of the Cascadia and Hikurangi trench with a serpentinite oscillator.

  14. A double-correlation tremor-location method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ka Lok; Sgattoni, Giulia; Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Roberts, Roland; Gudmundsson, Olafur

    2017-02-01

    A double-correlation method is introduced to locate tremor sources based on stacks of complex, doubly-correlated tremor records of multiple triplets of seismographs back projected to hypothetical source locations in a geographic grid. Peaks in the resulting stack of moduli are inferred source locations. The stack of the moduli is a robust measure of energy radiated from a point source or point sources even when the velocity information is imprecise. Application to real data shows how double correlation focuses the source mapping compared to the common single correlation approach. Synthetic tests demonstrate the robustness of the method and its resolution limitations which are controlled by the station geometry, the finite frequency of the signal, the quality of the used velocity information and noise level. Both random noise and signal or noise correlated at time shifts that are inconsistent with the assumed velocity structure can be effectively suppressed. Assuming a surface wave velocity, we can constrain the source location even if the surface wave component does not dominate. The method can also in principle be used with body waves in 3-D, although this requires more data and seismographs placed near the source for depth resolution.

  15. Knowledge gaps and research recommendations for essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfner, Franziska; Haubenberger, Dietrich; Galpern, Wendy R; Gwinn, Katrina; Van't Veer, Ashlee; White, Samantha; Bhatia, Kailash; Adler, Charles H; Eidelberg, David; Ondo, William; Stebbins, Glenn T; Tanner, Caroline M; Helmich, Rick C; Lenz, Fred A; Sillitoe, Roy V; Vaillancourt, David; Vitek, Jerrold L; Louis, Elan D; Shill, Holly A; Frosch, Matthew P; Foroud, Tatiana; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Singleton, Andrew; Testa, Claudia M; Hallett, Mark; Elble, Rodger; Deuschl, Günther

    2016-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is a common cause of significant disability, but its etiologies and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Research has been hampered by the variable definition of ET and by non-standardized research approaches. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (USA) invited experts in ET and related fields to discuss current knowledge, controversies, and gaps in our understanding of ET and to develop recommendations for future research. Discussion focused on phenomenology and phenotypes, therapies and clinical trials, pathophysiology, pathology, and genetics. Across all areas, the need for collaborative and coordinated research on a multinational level was expressed. Standardized data collection using common data elements for genetic, clinical, neurophysiological, and pathological studies was recommended. Large cohorts of patients should be studied prospectively to collect bio-samples, characterize the natural history of the clinical syndrome including patient-oriented outcomes, investigate potential etiologies of various phenotypes, and identify pathophysiological mechanisms. In particular, cellular and system-level mechanisms of tremor oscillations should be elucidated because they may yield effective therapeutic targets and biomarkers. A neuropathology consortium was recommended to standardize postmortem analysis and further characterize neuropathological observations in the cerebellum and elsewhere. Furthermore, genome-wide association studies on large patient cohorts (>10,000 patients) may allow the identification of common genes contributing to risk, and whole exome or genome sequencing may enable the identification of genetic risk and causal mutations in cohorts and well-characterized families.

  16. The physics of non-volcanic tremor: insights from laboratory-scale earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Toro, G.; Meredith, P.

    2012-04-01

    -pressure/high-temperature, internally-heated gas apparatus. Acoustic emission (AE) output was recorded via two piezoelectric transducers embedded within the sample end caps and a third remote transducer located outside the pressure vessel. Drained and undrained experimental conditions were achieved by placing either permeable or impermeable ceramic discs at the samples ends. At 200 MPa, serpentinite dehydrates to talc + olivine + water around 5000C. Associated microseismicity, in the form of high-energy AE events, was confined to a narrow temperature interval just above the equilibrium dehydration temperature. This temperature overstep is expected, and is due to the heating rate in our experiments being much higher than for equilibrium studies. The high-energy AE events were characterised by very long durations, which is typical of a cascade of multiple, overlapping, shorter events that cannot be individually discriminated. Under drained conditions, the serpentinite samples showed a clear volume reduction following dehydration and subsequent compaction. By contrast, under undrained conditions, the samples maintained the same dimensions, but lost weight, implying that no compaction occurred during dehydration. Our results therefore demonstrate conclusively that seismicity can be generated by dehydration reactions even in the absence of a deviatoric stress. This observation is consistent with recent finding that tremor activity in nature has a strong tidal periodicity, indicating that tidal forces modulate slip velocity and suggesting near lithostatic fluid pressures at hypocentral depths. Furthermore, we suggest that the cascades of events that follow the onset of dehydration may well be related to the low-amplitude long-duration seismic events (seismic tremor) that characterize the seismic activity in subduction zones and that has been tentatively interpreted as being caused by dehydration of the subducting slab. Our laboratory observations support this hypothesis, since our low-amplitude, long

  17. Spatial and Temporal Comparisons of Tremor and Slow Slip in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, K.; Houston, H.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tremor is often thought to be a proxy for slip during ETS events and has been shown to have a relatively abrupt updip boundary, implying an abrupt updip limit of slip. However, as shown by Houston (AGU abstract, 2012) and Hall and Houston (AGU abstract, 2014), slip inferred from GPS extended updip of the seismically-detected tremor in the 2010 M6.8 and 2012 M6.7 ETS events. If slip extending updip of tremor is a persistent phenomena, tremor cannot be directly used as a proxy for slip. Following the methods used on the 2010 and 2012 ETS event, we found that the August 2009 ETS around Portland, OR also showed slip updip of tremor. Principal Component Analysis was implemented to automatically select the direction and magnitude of the maximum displacement vector. Our Green's functions use the Okada formulation of buried rectangular faults in a halfspace for a grid of 8x8 km subfaults based on the McCrory slab model. We then performed static inversions with 2nd order Tikhonov regularization to find slip on the fault surface. We also compared two different inversions for 2009, one where slip was allowed on a broad regional grid and a tremor-restricted inversion (TRI) where slip was restricted to subfaults in which tremor occurred. We found the 2009 ETS event released the equivalent of a M6.8 in slip. We also found that, as in the previous ETSs, the TRI forced up to 10 cm of slip to the updip edge of the grid, which is exceeds the amount of plate convergence expected in the inter-ETS periods and is therefore physically unsustainable over several ETS events. The excess slip along the updip edge in the TRI models also suggests that the geodetic data prefer slip with a larger footprint than the spatial pattern of tremor, and supports our conclusion that tremor does not represent all of the slip during an ETS event. We see consistent and clear spatial relationship between tremor and slip with some slip occurring updip of tremor. Our static inversions show where slip is

  18. 76 FR 60132 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Dependency and Indemnity Compensation by Parent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ...), (Including Accrued Benefits and Death Compensation)) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... compensation, and/or accrued benefits. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the proposed collection... Compensation by Parent(s), (Including Accrued Benefits and Death Compensation), VA Form 21-535. OMB Control...

  19. 基于级联有源滤波器与静止无功补偿器的综合补偿控制方案%A Universal Compensation Control Scheme Based on Cascade Active Power Filter and Static Var Compensator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高聪哲; 姜新建; 李永东

    2012-01-01

    How to keep system stability and optimize var compensation capability is the key issue in the combined system based on cascade multilevel active power filter(CS-APF) and static var compensator(SVC).A universal control strategy is proposed for the combined system.For the SVC,a feed forward control for the compensation of positive sequence reactive component and negative sequence component of the load is adopted.The network susceptance(with no components of CS-APF) feedback control is applied to decrease the compensation error.For the CS-APF control,a feed forward control of harmonic compensation for thyristor control reactor(TCR) and the load is applied.The network harmonic current feedback control is applied to decrease the compensation error.The fixed capacitor(in SVC) current component is removed from the network current feedback control loop of CS-APF to improve the stability of the combined system.The var compensation capability of CS-APF is enabled to optimize the performance of SVC.Moreover,a novel pre-calculation method for the TCR harmonic current detection is proposed.According to the triggering angle of the thyristor in TCR and the network voltage phase,the harmonic current is constructed with no time delay.Finally,the simulation and experimental results show that: 1)the system stability is high without closed loop between the control of CS-APF and SVC;2)the real-time harmonic compensation of TCR is realized;3)the system responsibility is quick;and 4)the capability of var compensation of SVC is improved.%级联多电平有源滤波器(CS-APF)与静止无功补偿器(SVC)同时运行存在稳定性及无功补偿控制优化等问题。文中提出一种统一控制策略,结合SVC和CS-APF的功能特点,使SVC对负载正序无功分量及负序分量的补偿进行前馈控制和电网电纳(不包含CS-APF分量)反馈控制;CS-APF对晶闸管相控电抗器(TCR)与电网负载谐波的补偿进行前馈

  20. Executive Compensation: A Brief Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bognanno, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Chief executive officer (CEO) compensation is defined as the sum of base pay, bonuses, stock grants, stock options, other forms of compensation and benefits. Inflation?adjusted, median total CEO compensation in the United States almost tripled between 1992 and 2000, with grants of stock options evolving to be the largest component of compensation. This article presents the arguments for and against this level and composition of CEO compensation.