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Sample records for active trail protein

  1. TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein shows in vitro antibacterial activity and a stronger antitumor activity than solo TRAIL protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ming; Zhang, Jiaxin; Li, Bin; Chen, Yuqing

    2016-06-01

    A TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein in soluble form with tumor selective apoptosis and antibacterial functions was expressed in the Escherichia coli expression system and isolated through dialysis refolding and histidine-tag Nickel-affinity purification. Fresh Jurkat cells were treated with the TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein. Trypan blue staining and MTT analyses showed that, similar to a TRAIL positive control, Jurkat cell proliferation was significantly inhibited. Flow cytometry analyses using Annexin V-fluorescein revealed that Jurkat cells treated with the TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein exhibited increased apoptosis. Laser confocal microscopy showed that APB-CM4 and the fusion protein TRAIL-CM4 can bind to Jurkat cell membranes and initiate their destruction. ABP-CM4 enhances the antitumor activity of TRAIL by targeting and damaging the tumor cell membrane. In antibacterial experiments, agar well diffusion and bacterial growth inhibition curve assays revealed concentration-dependent TRAIL-CM4 antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli K12D31. The expressed TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein exhibited enhanced antitumor and antibacterial activities. Fusion protein expression allowed the two different proteins to function in combination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exceptionally Potent Anti-Tumor Bystander Activity of an scFv:sTRAIL Fusion Protein with Specificity for EGP2 Toward Target Antigen-Negative Tumor Cells

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    Edwin Bremer

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported on the target cell-restricted fratricide apoptotic activity of scFvC54:sTRAIL, a fusion protein comprising human-soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL genetically linked to the antibody fragment scFvC54 specific for the cell surface target antigen EGP2. In the present study, we report that the selective binding of scFvC54:sTRAIL to EGP2-positive target cells conveys an exceptionally potent pro-apoptotic effect toward neighboring tumor cells that are devoid of EGP2 expression (bystander cells. The anti-tumor bystander activity of scFvC54:sTRAIL was detectable at target-tobystander cell ratios as low as 1:100. Treatment in the presence of EGP2-blocking or TRAIL-neutralizing antibody strongly inhibited apoptosis in both target and bystander tumor cells. In the absence of target cells, bystander cell apoptosis induction was abrogated. The bystander apoptosis activity of scFvC54:sTRAIL did not require internalization, enzymatic conversion, diffusion, or communication (gap junctional intracellular communication between target and bystander cells. Furthermore, scFvC54:sTRAIL showed no detectable signs of innocent bystander activity toward freshly isolated blood cells. Further development of this new principle is warranted for approaches where cancer cells can escape from antibody-based therapy due to partial loss of target antigen expression.

  3. Exceptionally potent anti-tumor bystander activity of an scFv : sTRAIL fusion protein with specificity for EGP2 toward target antigen-negative tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, E; Samplonius, D; Kroesen, BJ; van Genne, L; de Leij, L; Helfrich, W

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we reported on the target cell-restricted fratricide apoptotic activity of scFvC54:sTRAIL, a fusion protein comprising human-soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) genetically linked to the antibody fragment scFvC54 specific for the cell surface target

  4. Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand (TRAIL)-Troglitazone-induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells Involve AMP-activated Protein Kinase*

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    Santha, Sreevidya; Viswakarma, Navin; Das, Subhasis; Rana, Ajay; Rana, Basabi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men with limited treatment options for the hormone-resistant forms. Development of novel therapeutic options is critically needed to target advanced forms. Here we demonstrate that combinatorial treatment with the thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TZD) and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can induce significant apoptosis in various PCa cells independent of androgen receptor status. Because TZD is known to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we determined whether AMPK is a molecular target mediating this apoptotic cascade by utilizing PCa cell lines stably overexpressing AMPKα1 dominant negative (C4-2-DN) or empty vector (C4-2-EV). Our results indicated a significantly higher degree of apoptosis with TRAIL-TZD combination in C4-2-EV cells compared with C4-2-DN cells. Similarly, results from a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed a larger reduction of viability of C4-2-EV cells compared with C4-2-DN cells when treated with TRAIL-TZD, thus suggesting that C4-2-DN cells were more apoptosis-resistant. Additionally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous AMPKα1 expression showed a reduction of TRAIL-TZD-induced apoptosis, further confirming the participation of AMPK in mediating this apoptosis. Apoptosis induction by this combinatorial treatment was also associated with a cleavage of β-catenin that was inhibited in both C4-2-DN cells and those cells in which AMPKα1 was knocked down. In addition, time course studies showed an increase in pACCS79 (AMPK target) levels coinciding with the time of apoptosis. These studies indicate the involvement of AMPK in TRAIL-TZD-mediated apoptosis and β-catenin cleavage and suggest the possibility of utilizing AMPK as a therapeutic target in apoptosis-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26198640

  5. Use and Nonuse of a Rail Trail Conversion for Physical Activity: Implications for Promoting Trail Use

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    Price, Anna E.; Reed, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is limited research examining both use and nonuse of trails for physical activity. Purpose: Such research might enable health educators to better promote physical activity on trails.Methods:We used random digit dialing methods to survey 726 respondents in 2012. Results: The majority (75.1%) of respondents reported not using the…

  6. Bid is cleaved upstream of caspase-8 activation during TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells.

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    Garnett, Theodore O; Filippova, Maria; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope Jayne

    2007-07-01

    TRAIL induces apoptosis in many malignant cell types. In this study, we used the human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 E6 protein as a molecular tool to probe the TRAIL pathway in HCT116 colon carcinoma cells and U2OS osteosarcoma cells. Intriguingly, we found that while E6 protected HCT116 cells from TRAIL, U2OS cells expressing E6 remained sensitive to TRAIL. Furthermore, silencing FADD and procaspase-8 expression with siRNA did not prevent TRAIL-induced apoptosis in U2OS cells. However, siBid provided significant protection from TRAIL, and the cleavage kinetics of Bid and caspase-8 revealed that Bid was cleaved prior to the activation of caspase-8. Cathepsin B activity in U2OS cells was significantly activated shortly after exposure to TRAIL, and the cathepsin B inhibitor, CA074Me, inhibited both TRAIL- and anti-DR5-mediated apoptosis and delayed the cleavage of Bid. These findings suggest that TRAIL activates a pathway dependent on Bid, but largely independent of FADD and caspase-8, in U2OS cells.

  7. TRAIL deficiency and PP2A activation with salmeterol ameliorates egg allergen-driven eosinophilic esophagitis.

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    Sokulsky, Leon A; Collison, Adam M; Nightingale, Scott; Fevre, Anna Le; Percival, Elizabeth; Starkey, Malcolm R; Hansbro, Philip M; Foster, Paul S; Mattes, Joerg

    2016-12-01

    Food antigens are common inflammatory triggers in pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) promotes eosinophilic inflammation through the upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Midline (MID)-1 and subsequent downregulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), but the role of this pathway in EoE that is experimentally induced by repeated food antigen challenges has not been investigated. Esophageal mucosal biopsies were collected from children with EoE and controls and assessed for TRAIL and MID-1 protein and mRNA transcript levels. Wild-type and TRAIL-deficient (Tnfsf10(-/-)) mice were administered subcutaneous ovalbumin (OVA) followed by oral OVA challenges. In separate experiments, OVA-challenged mice were intraperitoneally administered salmeterol or dexamethasone. Esophageal biopsies from children with EoE revealed increased levels of TRAIL and MID-1 and reduced PP2A activation compared with controls. Tnfsf10(-/-) mice were largely protected from esophageal fibrosis, eosinophilic inflammation, and the upregulation of TSLP, IL-5, IL-13, and CCL11 when compared with wild-type mice. Salmeterol administration to wild-type mice with experimental EoE restored PP2A activity and also prevented esophageal eosinophilia, inflammatory cytokine expression, and remodeling, which was comparable to the treatment effect of dexamethasone. TRAIL and PP2A regulate inflammation and fibrosis in experimental EoE, which can be therapeutically modulated by salmeterol. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. RGD-avidin-biotin pretargeting to alpha v beta 3 integrin enhances the proapoptotic activity of TNF alpha related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL).

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    Tarrus, Marc; van der Sloot, Almer M; Temming, Kai; Lacombe, Marie; Opdam, Frank; Quax, Wim J; Molema, Grietje; Poelstra, Klaas; Kok, Robbert J

    2008-02-01

    Recombinant TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered a powerful and selective inducer of tumor cell death. We hypothesize that TRAIL's potential as anticancer agent can be enhanced further by promoting its accumulation in tumor tissue. For this purpose, we developed TRAIL complexes that bind to angiogenic endothelial cells. We employed an avidin-biotin pretargeting approach, in which biotinylated TRAIL interacted with RGD-equipped avidin. The assembled complexes killed tumor cells (Jurkat T cells) via apoptosis induction. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the association of the RGD-avidin-TRAIL complex onto endothelial cells enhanced the tumor cell killing activity. Endothelial cells were not killed by TRAIL nor its derived complexes. Our approach can facilitate the enrichment of TRAIL onto angiogenic blood vessels, which may enhance intratumoral accumulation. Furthermore, it offers a versatile technology for the complexation of targeting ligands with therapeutic recombinant proteins and by this a novel way to enhance their specificity and activity.

  9. PEGylated TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-loaded sustained release PLGA microspheres for enhanced stability and antitumor activity.

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    Kim, Tae Hyung; Jiang, Hai Hua; Park, Chan Woong; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Lee, Kang Choon

    2011-02-28

    The purpose of this work was to develop an effective PEGylated TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (PEG-TRAIL) delivery system for antitumor therapy based on local injection to tumor sites that has a sustained effect without protein aggregation or an initial release burst. The authors designed poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) microspheres that deliver PEG-TRAIL locally and continuously at tumor sites with sustained biological activity and compared its performance with that of TRAIL microspheres. TRAIL or PEG-TRAIL was microencapsulated into PLGA microspheres using a double-emulsion solvent extraction method. Prepared TRAIL and PEG-TRAIL microspheres showed entirely spherical, smooth surfaces. However, PEG-TRAIL microspheres exhibited a 2.07-fold higher encapsulation efficiency than TRAIL microspheres, and exhibited a tri-phasic in vitro release profile with a lower initial burst (15.8%) than TRAIL microspheres (42.7%). Furthermore, released PEG-TRAIL showed a continued ability to induce apoptosis over 14 days. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies also demonstrated that PEG-TRAIL microspheres had a sustained release profile (18 days), and that the steady-state concentration of PEG-TRAIL in rat plasma was reached at day 3 and maintained until day 15; its steady-state concentration in rat plasma changed from 1444.3 ± 338.4 to 2697.7 ± 419.7 pg/ml. However, TRAIL microspheres were released out within 2 days after administration. Finally, in vivo antitumor tests revealed that tumor growths were significantly more inhibited by a single dose of PEG-TRAIL microspheres than TRAIL microspheres when delivered at 300 μg of TRAIL/mouse. Tumors taken from mouse treated with PEG-TRAIL microspheres showed 78.3% tumor suppression at 24 days, and this was 3.02-fold higher than that observed for TRAIL microspheres (25.9% tumor inhibition). Furthermore, these improved pharmaceutical characteristics of PEG-TRAIL microspheres resulted in superior therapeutic effects without

  10. Resveratrol enhances antitumor activity of TRAIL in prostate cancer xenografts through activation of FOXO transcription factor.

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    Suthakar Ganapathy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resveratrol (3, 4', 5 tri-hydroxystilbene, a naturally occurring polyphenol, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, cardioprotective and antitumor activities. We have recently shown that resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL in prostate cancer cells through multiple mechanisms in vitro. Therefore, the present study was designed to validate whether resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL in a xenograft model of prostate cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Resveratrol and TRAIL alone inhibited growth of PC-3 xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation (PCNA and Ki67 staining and inducing apoptosis (TUNEL staining. The combination of resveratrol and TRAIL was more effective in inhibiting tumor growth than single agent alone. In xenografted tumors, resveratrol upregulated the expressions of TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5, Bax and p27(/KIP1, and inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1. Treatment of mice with resveratrol and TRAIL alone inhibited angiogenesis (as demonstrated by reduced number of blood vessels, and VEGF and VEGFR2 positive cells and markers of metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9. The combination of resveratrol with TRAIL further inhibited number of blood vessels in tumors, and circulating endothelial growth factor receptor 2-positive endothelial cells than single agent alone. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the cytoplasmic phosphorylation of FKHRL1 resulting in its enhanced activation as demonstrated by increased DNA binding activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that resveratrol can enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of TRAIL by activating FKHRL1 and its target genes. The ability of resveratrol to inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis, and enhance the therapeutic potential of TRAIL suggests that resveratrol alone or in combination with TRAIL can be used for the management of prostate cancer.

  11. Survivin S81A Enhanced TRAIL's Activity in Inducing Apoptosis

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    Ferry Sandra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivin is rarely expressed in normal healthy adult tissues, however, it is upregulated in the majority of cancers. Survivin, which belongs to IAPs family, has been widely reported to protect cells from apoptosis by inhibiting caspases pathway. Survivin’s mitotic activity is modulated by many kinases, and its phosphor status can also influence its ability to inhibit apoptosis. There are several important survivin’s phosphorylation sites, such as S20 and T34. We have continued our investigation on other potential survivin’s phosphorylation sites that could be important site for regulating survivin’s cyto-protection. METHODS: By assuming that S81 could be a potential target to modify activity of survivin, wild-type survivin (Survivin, antisense survivin (Survivin-AS, mutated-survivin Thr34Ala (Survivin-T34A and mutated-survivin Ser81Ala (Survivin-S81A were constructed and inserted into pMSCV-IRES-GFP vector with cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. Each retroviral product was produced in BOSC23 cells. LY294002 pretreatment and TRAIL treatment along with infection of retroviral products were performed in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells. For analysis, flow cytometric apoptosis assay and western blot were performed. RESULTS: In our present study, survivin for providing cytoprotection was regulated by PI3K. The results showed that LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K, effectively suppressed survivin-modulated cytoprotection in a TRAIL-induced apoptotic model. In addition, mutated survivin S81A showed marked suppression on survivin’s cytoprotection. Along with that, TRAIL’s apoptotic activity was enhanced for inducing apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: We suggested that survivin could inhibit apoptosis through PI3K and S81A could be another potential target in order to inhibit Survivin-modulated cytoprotection as well as to sensitize efficacy of TRAIL or other related apoptotic inducers. KEYWORDS: apoptosis, survivin, TRAIL, S81A, L929, LY294002.

  12. NFATc1 regulation of TRAIL expression in human intestinal cells.

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    Qingding Wang

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; Apo2 has been shown to promote intestinal cell differentiation. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT participates in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes, including differentiation. Here, we examined the role of NFAT in the regulation of TRAIL in human intestinal cells. Treatment with a combination of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA plus the calcium ionophore A23187 (Io increased NFAT activation and TRAIL expression; pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, an antagonist of NFAT signaling, diminished NFAT activation and TRAIL induction. In addition, knockdown of NFATc1, NFATc2, NFATc3, and NFATc4 blocked PMA/Io increased TRAIL protein expression. Expression of NFATc1 activated TRAIL promoter activity and increased TRAIL mRNA and protein expression. Deletion of NFAT binding sites from the TRAIL promoter did not significantly abrogate NFATc1-increased TRAIL promoter activity, suggesting an indirect regulation of TRAIL expression by NFAT activation. Knockdown of NFATc1 increased Sp1 transcription factor binding to the TRAIL promoter and, importantly, inhibition of Sp1, by chemical inhibition or RNA interference, increased TRAIL expression. These studies identify a novel mechanism for TRAIL regulation by which activation of NFATc1 increases TRAIL expression through negative regulation of Sp1 binding to the TRAIL promoter.

  13. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Compounds from Datura stramonium with TRAIL-Resistance Overcoming Activity.

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    Karmakar, Utpal K; Toume, Kazufumi; Ishikawa, Naoki; Arai, Midori A; Sadhu, Samir K; Ahmed, Firoj; Ishibashi, Masami

    2016-02-01

    TRAIL is a potent inducer of apoptosis in most cancer cells, but not in normal cells, and therefore has deserved intense interest as a promising agent for cancer therapy. In the search for bioactive natural products for overcoming TRAIL-resistance, we previously reported a number of active compounds. In our screening program on natural resources targeting overcoming TRAIL-resistance, activity-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract of Datura stramonium leaves led to the isolation of three alkaloids--scopolamine (1), trigonelline (2), and tyramine (3). Compounds 1, 2, and 3 exhibited TRAIL-resistance overcoming activity at 50, 150, and 100 µM, respectively in TRAIL-resistant AGS cells.

  14. STI571 reduces TRAIL-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells: c-Abl activation by the death receptor leads to stress kinase-dependent cell death

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    Huang Duen-Yi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to achieve better cancer therapies, we elucidated the combination cancer therapy of STI571 (an inhibitor of Bcr-Abl and clinically used for chronic myelogenous leukemia and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, a developing antitumor agent in leukemia, colon, and prostate cancer cells. Methods Colon cancer (HCT116, SW480, prostate cancer (PC3, LNCaP and leukemia (K562 cells were treated with STI571 and TRAIL. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay and sub-G1 appearance. Protein expression and kinase phosphorylation were determined by Western blotting. c-Abl and p73 activities were inhibited by target-specific small interfering (siRNA. In vitro kinase assay of c-Abl was conducted using CRK as a substrate. Results We found that STI571 exerts opposite effects on the antitumor activity of TRAIL. It enhanced cytotoxicity in TRAIL-treated K562 leukemia cells and reduced TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCT116 and SW480 colon cancer cells, while having no effect on PC3 and LNCaP cells. In colon and prostate cancer cells, TRAIL caused c-Abl cleavage to the active form via a caspase pathway. Interestingly, JNK and p38 MAPK inhibitors effectively blocked TRAIL-induced toxicity in the colon, but not in prostate cancer cells. Next, we found that STI571 could attenuate TRAIL-induced c-Abl, JNK and p38 activation in HCT116 cells. In addition, siRNA targeting knockdown of c-Abl and p73 also reduced TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity, rendering HCT116 cells less responsive to stress kinase activation, and masking the cytoprotective effect of STI571. Conclusions All together we demonstrate a novel mediator role of p73 in activating the stress kinases p38 and JNK in the classical apoptotic pathway of TRAIL. TRAIL via caspase-dependent action can sequentially activate c-Abl, p73, and stress kinases, which contribute to apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Through the inhibition of c-Abl-mediated apoptotic p73 signaling, STI571 reduces

  15. Flavopiridol induces cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein degradation by the proteasome and promotes TRAIL-induced early signaling and apoptosis in breast tumor cells.

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    Palacios, Carmen; Yerbes, Rosario; López-Rivas, Abelardo

    2006-09-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol is undergoing clinical trials as an antitumor drug. We show here that pretreatment of different human breast cancer cell lines with flavopiridol facilitates tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. In breast tumor cells, apoptosis induction by TRAIL is blocked at the level of apical caspase-8 activation. Flavopiridol treatment enhances TRAIL-induced formation of death-inducing signaling complex and early processing of procaspase-8. Subsequently, a TRAIL-induced, mitochondria-operated pathway of apoptosis is activated in cells treated with flavopiridol. Down-regulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory proteins (c-FLIP; c-FLIP(L) and c-FLIP(S)) is observed on flavopiridol treatment. c-FLIP loss and apoptosis sensitization by flavopiridol are both prevented in cells treated with an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, targeting c-FLIP directly with small interfering RNA oligonucleotides also sensitizes various human breast tumor cell lines to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our results indicate that flavopiridol sensitizes breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by facilitating early events in the apoptotic pathway, and this combination treatment could be regarded as a potential therapeutic tool against breast tumors.

  16. Trails, Other - Trails

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    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This trails map layer represents off-road recreational trail features and important road connections that augment Utah’s recreational trail network. This map layer...

  17. Aerodynamic Characteristic of the Active Compliant Trailing Edge Concept

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    Nie, Rui; Qiu, Jinhao; Ji, Hongli; Li, Dawei

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel Morphing Wing structure known as the Active Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE). ACTE structures are designed using the concept of “distributed compliance” and wing skins of ACTE are fabricated from high-strength fiberglass composites laminates. Through the relative sliding between upper and lower wing skins which are connected by a linear guide pairs, the wing is able to achieve a large continuous deformation. In order to present an investigation about aerodynamics and noise characteristics of ACTE, a series of 2D airfoil analyses are established. The aerodynamic characteristics between ACTE and conventional deflection airfoil are analyzed and compared, and the impacts of different ACTE structure design parameters on aerodynamic characteristics are discussed. The airfoils mentioned above include two types (NACA0012 and NACA64A005.92). The computing results demonstrate that: compared with the conventional plane flap airfoil, the morphing wing using ACTE structures has the capability to improve aerodynamic characteristic and flow separation characteristic. In order to study the noise level of ACTE, flow field analysis using LES model is done to provide noise source data, and then the FW-H method is used to get the far field noise levels. The simulation results show that: compared with the conventional flap/aileron airfoil, the ACTE configuration is better to suppress the flow separation and lower the overall sound pressure level.

  18. Antitumor activities and on-target toxicities mediated by a TRAIL receptor agonist following cotreatment with panobinostat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Ben P.; Frew, Ailsa J.; Bots, Michael; Fox, Stephen; Long, Fenella; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Yagita, Hideo; Atadja, Peter; Smyth, Mark J.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2011-01-01

    The recent development of novel targeted anticancer therapeutics such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and activators of the TRAIL pathway provide opportunities for the introduction of new treatment regimens in oncology. HDACi and recombinant TRAIL or agonistic anti-TRAIL receptor

  19. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation.

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    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M D; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-26

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL.

  20. [Newcastle disease virus enhances tumoricidal activity of mouse NK cells against mouse Novikoff hepatoma cells via up-regulating expression of TRAIL on the NK cells].

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    Song, Dezhi; Liang, Ying; Fan, Xiaohui; Yin, Jun; Gong, Jinling; Lai, Zhenping; Gao, Lingxi

    2015-05-01

    To observe the effect of intraperitoneal injection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression in mouse spleen NK cells and NK cells-mediated tumoricidal activity against mouse Novikoff hepatoma cell line, and explore the role of interferon (IFN)-γ in NDV-induced TRAIL expression and tumoricidal activity. NDV was injected intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice and IFN-γ receptor-deficient (IFN-γR-/-) B6.129S7 mice. Twelve hours after injection, the concentration of IFN-γ in peripheral blood from BALB/c mice was determined by ELISA. Mouse spleen NK cells were separated. The mRNA and protein expression of TRAIL in NK cells were detected through reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay was used to determine the cytotoxic activity of NK cells against mouse hepatoma cells. NDV injection increased the IFN-γ concentration in peripheral blood of BALB/c mice, induced up-regulation of TRAIL at the mRNA and protein levels in mouse spleen NK cells, and enhanced the killing ability of mouse spleen NK cells towards Novikoff hepatoma cells. Blocking TRAIL by neutralizing antibody suppressed the cytotoxic activity of NK cells against Novikoff hepatoma cells. Furthermore, NDV injection in IFN-γR-/- B6.129S7 mice did not make significant difference from control group in TRAIL expression in spleen NK cells, and the tumoricidal activity of IFN-γR-/- B6.129S7 mouse spleen NK cells against Novikoff hepatoma cells was significantly lower than that of BALB/c mouse NK cells. Intraperitoneal injection with NDV could enhance tumoricidal activity of mouse spleen NK cells in vitro, and one of the mechanisms might be that NDV injection up-regulates TRAIL expression in NK cells through the IFN-γ receptor pathway.

  1. RGD-avidin–biotin pretargeting to αvβ3 integrin enhances the proapoptotic activity of TNFα related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)

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    Tarrus, Marc; van der Sloot, Almer M.; Temming, Kai; Lacombe, Marie; Opdam, Frank; Quax, Wim J.; Molema, Grietje; Poelstra, Klaas

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered a powerful and selective inducer of tumor cell death. We hypothesize that TRAIL’s potential as anticancer agent can be enhanced further by promoting its accumulation in tumor tissue. For this purpose, we developed TRAIL complexes that bind to angiogenic endothelial cells. We employed an avidin–biotin pretargeting approach, in which biotinylated TRAIL interacted with RGD-equipped avidin. The assembled complexes killed tumor cells (Jurkat T cells) via apoptosis induction. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the association of the RGD-avidin-TRAIL complex onto endothelial cells enhanced the tumor cell killing activity. Endothelial cells were not killed by TRAIL nor its derived complexes. Our approach can facilitate the enrichment of TRAIL onto angiogenic blood vessels, which may enhance intratumoral accumulation. Furthermore, it offers a versatile technology for the complexation of targeting ligands with therapeutic recombinant proteins and by this a novel way to enhance their specificity and activity. PMID:18071905

  2. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

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    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes J M; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes.

  3. Dengue Virus Induces NK Cell Activation through TRAIL Expression during Infection.

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    Gandini, Mariana; Petitinga-Paiva, Fabienne; Marinho, Cíntia Ferreira; Correa, Gladys; De Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; de Souza, Luiz José; Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness with a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms ranging from mild to severe forms characterized by plasma leakage that can be fatal. NK cells are one of the main effectors in early infection and may play an important role in dengue pathogenesis. We investigated NK cell involvement during dengue infection. A higher frequency of NK cell subsets and TRAIL+NK cells was found in mild DF cases when compared to that in severe cases or healthy donors. NK activation markers such as CD107a and TLR3 were upregulated in patients' cells compared to those in healthy donors. In addition, IL12 related to NK cell activation were upregulated in mild DF cases. In vitro PBMC culture models show that DENV-stimulated and IFNα-stimulated NK cells were able to express TRAIL, suggesting an indirect activation of cells, regarding TRAIL expression. Type I IFN receptor blockage on DENV-stimulated PBMCs showed TRAIL expression on NK cells is partially IFNα dependent. In addition, during PBMC stimulation, TRAIL expression on NK cells was inversely correlated with DENV-positive monocytes. Therefore, we observed DENV-induced activation of NK cell populations. A higher activation of NK cells would promote limited viral spread, resulting in decreased inflammatory response, contributing to protection against dengue severity.

  4. Application of a FRET probe for Caspase-3 activation in living HeLa cells by sequentially treated cisplatin and TRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juqiang; Zhang, Zhihong; Yi, Qiushi; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2006-02-01

    Caspase-3 is a kind of cysteine proteases that plays an important role in cell apoptosis. We have constructed a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) probe fused with ECFP (enhanced cyan fluorescence protein) and DsRed (Discosoma red fluorescent protein) with a linker containing a caspase-3 cleavage sequence (CCS, DEVD).It could be observed much change in fluorescence emission ratio when the probe was cleaved by caspase-3. Therefore, application of this probe we can real-time detected the activation of caspase-3. It was already confirmed that caspase-3 was activated in HeLa cells treated by cisplatin or TRAIL (Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand). In the present study, we detected the activation of caspase-3 during cisplatin or TRAIL induced apoptosis in living HeLa cells, and also observed the activation of caspase-3 caused by both cisplatin and TRAIL combined treatment. Our results demonstrated a synergistic effect between cisplatin and TRAIL. Cisplatin is one of the most broadly used drugs in the Clinical applications of cancer chemotherapy, and TRAIL, which belongs to the TNF family proteins, can selectively induce apoptosis in many transformed cells but not in normal cells. Therefore, TRAIL is a very valuably prospective utility as its potential tumor-specific cancer therapeutic. Most of anticancer drugs can induce apoptosis which mediated by the activation of caspase pathway. We can select the best synergistic effect group by our FRET probe. This finding would be useful in the design of treatment modalities for patients.

  5. Identification of Flap Motion Parameters for Vibration Reduction in Helicopter Rotors with Multiple Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğbreve;ur Dalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An active control method utilizing the multiple trailing edge flap configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control is presented. A comprehensive model for rotor blade with active trailing edge flaps is used to calculate the vibration characteristics, natural frequencies and mode shapes of any complex composite helicopter rotor blade. A computer program is developed to calculate the system response, rotor blade root forces and moments under aerodynamic forcing conditions. Rotor blade system response is calculated using the proposed solution method and the developed program depending on any structural and aerodynamic properties of rotor blades, structural properties of trailing edge flaps and properties of trailing edge flap actuator inputs. Rotor blade loads are determined first on a nominal rotor blade without multiple active trailing edge flaps and then the effects of the active flap motions on the existing rotor blade loads are investigated. Multiple active trailing edge flaps are controlled by using open loop controllers to identify the effects of the actuator signal output properties such as frequency, amplitude and phase on the system response. Effects of using multiple trailing edge flaps on controlling rotor blade vibrations are investigated and some design criteria are determined for the design of trailing edge flap controller that will provide actuator signal outputs to minimize the rotor blade root loads. It is calculated that using the developed active trailing edge rotor blade model, helicopter rotor blade vibrations can be reduced up to 36% of the nominal rotor blade vibrations.

  6. Associations between sociodemographic characteristics and perceptions of the built environment with the frequency, type, and duration of physical activity among trail users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andréa L; Reed, Julian A; Price, Anna E; Hooker, Steven P

    2012-01-01

    Rail trails are elements of the built environment that support the Task Force on Community Preventive Services' recommendation to create, or enhance access to, places for physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between sociodemographic characteristics and perceptions of the built environment with the frequency, type, and duration of PA among users of an urban, paved rail trail segment. Interviewers conducted intercept surveys with 431 rail trail users and analyzed data by using logistic regression to estimate odds ratios between sociodemographic characteristics and perceptions of the built environment on the frequency, type, and duration of PA performed on the trail. Adults who used the trail in the cool months, traveled to the trail by a motorized vehicle, used the trail with others, and had some graduate school education visited the trail less often. Younger adults, men, whites, and those with some graduate school education were more likely to engage in vigorous activities on the trail. Adults who traveled to the trail by a motorized vehicle spent more time engaged in PA on the trail. Our results suggest that the most frequent users of a rail trail for PA are those who use the trail alone and travel to the trail by bicycle or on foot. Trails are an aspect of the built environment that supports active lifestyles, and future studies should evaluate different types of trails among more diverse populations and locations.

  7. Aeroelastic Optimization of a 10 MW Wind Turbine Blade with Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Athanasios; Tibaldi, Carlo; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the aeroelastic optimization of a 10MW wind turbine ‘smart blade’ equipped with active trailing edge flaps. The multi-disciplinary wind turbine analysis and optimization tool HawtOpt2 is utilized, which is based on the open-source framework Open-MDAO. The tool interfaces to ...

  8. Cell Surface Delivery of TRAIL Strongly Augments the Tumoricidal Activity of T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyn, Marco; Wei, Yunwei; Wiersma, Valerie R.; Samplonius, Douwe F.; Klip, Harry G.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Yang, Baofeng; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adoptive T-cell therapy generally fails to induce meaningful anticancer responses in patients with solid tumors. Here, we present a novel strategy designed to selectively enhance the tumoricidal activity of T cells by targeted delivery of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to the

  9. Receptor-specific TRAIL as a means to achieve targeted elimination of activated hepatic stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arabpour, Mohammad; Cool, Robbert; Faber, Klaas Nico; Quax, Wim J; Haisma, Hidde J

    2017-01-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are known to play a central role in liver fibrosis and their elimination is a crucial step toward the resolution and reversion of liver fibrosis. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a molecule that may contribute to the apoptotic

  10. Hepatitis B virus X protein and proinflammatory cytokines synergize to enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis of renal tubular cells by upregulation of DR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yitong; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Yueyue; Yuan, Weijie

    2018-02-09

    Persistent infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) may lead to HBV-associated glomerulonephritis (HBV-GN). Presence of HBV-DNA and -RNA in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) suggests direct virus-induced injury. Increase in proinflammatory cytokines is also observed under these conditions. Apoptosis by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of HBV-infections. However, the effects of HBV X protein (HBx) on TRAIL-induced apoptosis of RTECs especially under certain inflammatory conditions remain obscure. Here, we show that HBx synergizes with proinflammatory cytokines to significantly increase TRAIL-induced apoptosis of RTECs. HBx markedly up-regulates death receptor-4 (DR4) expression by enhancing the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines. Dramatic increase in DR4 expression leads to the sensitization of RTECs to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, in patients with HBV-GN, DR4 expression in the kidneys is significantly elevated and is positively correlated with the HBx and proinflammatory cytokines expression. These findings provide a novel insight into the underlying mechanisms of renal tubule lesions induced by HBx in HBV-GN. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Detecting short-term responses to weekend recreation activity: desert bighorn sheep avoidance of hiking trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longshore, Kathleen M.; Lowrey, Chris; Thompson, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    To study potential effects of recreation activity on habitat use of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni), we placed Global Positioning System collars on 10 female bighorn sheep within the Wonderland of Rocks–Queen Mountain region of Joshua Tree National Park (JOTR), California, USA, from 2002 to 2004. Recreation use was highest from March to April and during weekends throughout the year. Daily use of recreation trails was highest during midday. By comparing habitat use (slope, ruggedness, distance to water, and distance to recreation trails) of female bighorn sheep on weekdays versus weekends, we were able to detect short-term shifts in behavior in response to recreation. In a logistic regression of bighorn sheep locations versus random locations for March and April, female locations at midday (1200 hours) were significantly more distant from recreation trails on weekends compared with weekdays. Our results indicate that within this region of JOTR, moderate to high levels of human recreation activity may temporarily exclude bighorn females from their preferred habitat. However, the relative proximity of females to recreation trails during the weekdays before and after such habitat shifts indicates that these anthropogenic impacts were short-lived. Our results have implications for management of wildlife on public lands where the co-existence of wildlife and recreational use is a major goal.

  12. The enhanced expression of death receptor 5 (DR5) mediated by HBV X protein through NF-kappaB pathway is associated with cell apoptosis induced by (TNF-α related apoptosis inducing ligand) TRAIL in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanyun; You, Hongjuan; Zhao, Jinjin; Liu, Wen; Hu, Lei; Luo, Wenya; Hu, Wei; Tang, Renxian; Zheng, Kuiyang

    2015-11-17

    HBV X protein (HBX) is associated with cell apoptosis mediated by TNF-α related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), while the role of HBX on the expressions of TRAIL receptors death receptor 4 (DR4) and DR5 are unclear. In this study, we detected the cell apoptosis induced by TRAIL as well as gene and protein expressions of DR4 and DR5 in Huh-7 cells steadily transfected with HBX (Huh-7-HBX cells). In addition, we investigated the activation of different pathways associated with the expressions of TRAIL receptors in Huh-7-HBX cells. The apoptosis of Huh-7-HBX cells induced by TRAIL was evaluated by flow cytometry analysis. The levels of DR4 and DR5 expression in cells were determined by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. The activities of JNK pathway and NF-kappaB (NF-κB) pathway were demonstrated by western blotting assay. Compared to control cells, the percentage of cell apoptosis was increased in Huh-7-HBX cells. The increased expressions of DR4 and DR5 on gene and protein levels were observed in Huh-7-HBX cells. Further researches suggested that activation of JNK pathway was increased but not involved in the expression of TRAIL receptors in HBX positive cells. The activation of NF-κB pathway increased and was responsible for DR5 expression and cell apoptosis in HBX positive cells. These results demonstrate that increased apoptosis induced by TRAIL is associated with increased expression of DR5 that mediated by HBX through NF-κB pathway. This finding provides a critical insight into the mechanism of hepatocyte apoptosis mediated by HBX in HBV infection.

  13. Multivalent DR5 peptides activate the TRAIL death pathway and exert tumoricidal activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavet, V.; Beyrath, J.D.; Pardin, C.; Morizot, A.; Lechner, M.C.; Briand, J.P.; Wendland, M.; Maison, W.; Fournel, S.; Micheau, O.; Guichard, G.; Gronemeyer, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are exploring anticancer approaches based on signaling by TRAIL, a ligand for the cell death receptors DR4 and DR5. In this study, we report on the selective apoptotic effects of multivalent DR5 binding peptides (TRAIL(mim/DR5)) on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Surface

  14. Effects of Trail Information on Physical Activity Enjoyment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erik Rosegard

    2004-01-01

    Moderate physical activity (PA) improves physical fitness measures (i.e., aerobic capacity, agility, flexibility, body composition, and muscular endurance and strength). In addition to numerous physiological benefits, PA has been shown to increase cognitive and emotional functioning. These benefits lead to improved immune response and have been associated with...

  15. Activation of KIT modulates the function of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAIL-R) in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, A; Grotha, S P; Seeger, J M; Rabenhorst, A; Gehring, M; Raap, U; Létard, S; Dubreuil, P; Kashkar, H; Walczak, H; Roers, A; Hartmann, K

    2015-07-01

    Mastocytosis is characterized by the accumulation of mast cells (MCs) associated with activating mutations of KIT. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptors (TRAIL-Rs) are preferentially expressed on neoplastic cells and induce the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Recent studies reported on the expression of TRAIL-Rs and TRAIL-induced apoptosis in cultured human MCs, which depend on stem cell factor (SCF)-induced or constitutive KIT activation. We sought to further define the impact of TRAIL-Rs on MCs in vivo and in vitro. Using Cre/loxP recombination, we generated mice with MC-specific and ubiquitous knockout of TRAIL-R. In these mice, anaphylaxis and numbers of MCs were investigated. We also explored the expression and function of TRAIL-Rs in cultured murine and human MCs upon activation of KIT. By conducting immunofluorescence staining, we analyzed the expression of TRAIL-Rs in MCs infiltrating the bone marrow of patients with mastocytosis. MC-specific deletion of TRAIL-R was associated with a slight, but significant increase in anaphylaxis. Numbers of MCs in MC-specific knockouts of TRAIL-R were comparable to controls. Whereas cultured IL-3-dependent murine MCs from wild-type mice were resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, SCF-stimulated MCs underwent apoptosis in response to TRAIL. Interestingly, activating KIT mutations also promoted sensitivity to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human MCs. In line with these findings, MCs infiltrating the bone marrow of patients with mastocytosis expressed TRAIL-R1. Activation of KIT regulates the function of TRAIL-Rs in MCs. TRAIL-R1 may represent an attractive diagnostic and therapeutic target in diseases associated with KIT mutations, such as mastocytosis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Multivalent DR5 peptides activate the TRAIL death pathway and exert tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavet, Valeria; Beyrath, Julien; Pardin, Christophe; Morizot, Alexandre; Lechner, Marie-Charlotte; Briand, Jean-Paul; Wendland, Miriam; Maison, Wolfgang; Fournel, Sylvie; Micheau, Olivier; Guichard, Gilles; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2010-02-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are exploring anticancer approaches based on signaling by TRAIL, a ligand for the cell death receptors DR4 and DR5. In this study, we report on the selective apoptotic effects of multivalent DR5 binding peptides (TRAIL(mim/DR5)) on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Surface plasmon resonance revealed up to several thousand-fold increased affinities of TRAIL(mim/DR5)-receptor complexes on generation of divalent and trivalent molecules, the latter of which was achieved with a conformationally restricted adamantane core. Notably, only multivalent molecules triggered a substantial DR5-dependent apoptotic response in vitro. In tumor models derived from human embryonic kidney cells or primary foreskin fibroblasts, TRAIL(mim/DR5) peptides exerted a cancer cell-selective action that could synergize with resveratrol in a manner independent of p53. In a xenograft model of human colon cancer, a divalent TRAIL(mim/DR5) peptide inhibited tumor growth. Our results offer a proof-of-principle for the development of synthetic small molecules to trigger the TRAIL apoptosis pathway for cancer therapy.

  17. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in rheumatoid arthritis: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Anna; Corrado, Addolorata; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2014-05-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a type II transmembrane protein of the TNF superfamily that serves as an extracellular signal that triggers programmed cell death in tumor cells, without affecting normal cells. Recently, scientists have turned their attention to the emerging role of TRAIL in immune and autoimmune responses. TRAIL has been shown to down-regulate the self-antigens in autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by exerting its apoptotic effect on activated T cells and synoviocytes and by its local anti-inflammatory effect. The impact of TRAIL molecular variants and agonistic monoclonal antibodies in the regulation of TRAIL activity in arthritis animal models strongly supports the idea of testing the role of TRAIL in humans, with the aim of developing new effective therapies that promote apoptosis of synoviocytes and/or infiltrating lymphocytes, by targeting TRAIL. The aim of this review is to summarize recent progress and current knowledge of TRAIL functions in RA.

  18. Target cell-restricted and -enhanced apoptosis induction by a scFv:sTRAIL fusion protein with specificity for the pancarcinoma-associated antigen EGP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, Edwin; Kuijlen, Jos; Samplonius, Douwe; Walczak, H; de Leij, Lou; Helfrich, Wijnand

    2004-01-01

    The apparent tumor selective apoptosis-inducing activity of recombinant soluble TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has aroused much interest for use in clinical application. However, to exploit fully its therapeutic potential, the characteristics of both the TRAIL receptor system and

  19. Carnitine sensitizes TRAIL-resistant cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death through the up-regulation of Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Jung; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Joo-Oh; Kim, Jung Ho; Park, So Jung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Lee, Seung Jin; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Inki; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-11-09

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family with apoptosis-inducing activity. Given that TRAIL selectively induces cell death in various tumors but has little or no toxicity to normal cells, TRAIL agonists have been considered as promising anti-cancer therapeutic agents. However, the resistance of many primary tumors and cancer cells to TRAIL poses a challenge. In our present study, we found that carnitine, a metabolite that transfers long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria for beta-oxidation and modulates protein kinase C activity, sensitizes TRAIL-resistant cancer cells to TRAIL. Combination of carnitine and TRAIL was found to synergistically induce apoptotic cell death through caspase activation, which was blocked by a pan caspase inhibitor, but not by an inhibitor of autophagy or an inhibitor of necrosis. The combination of carnitine and TRAIL reversed the resistance to TRAIL in lung cancer cells, colon carcinoma cells, and breast carcinoma cells. We further demonstrate that carnitine, either alone or in combination with TRAIL, enhances the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein, Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax). The down-regulation of Bax expression by small interfering RNA reduced caspase activation when cells were treated with TRAIL, and experiments with cells from Bax knockout mice confirmed this result. Taken together, our current results suggest that carnitine can reverse the resistance of cancer cells to TRAIL by up-regulating Bax expression. Thus, a combined delivery of carnitine and TRAIL may represent a new therapeutic strategy to treat TRAIL-resistant cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dengue Virus Induces NK Cell Activation through TRAIL Expression during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Gandini; Fabienne Petitinga-Paiva; Cíntia Ferreira Marinho; Gladys Correa; Luzia Maria De Oliveira-Pinto; Luiz José de Souza; Rivaldo Venâncio Cunha; Claire Fernandes Kubelka; Elzinandes Leal de Azeredo

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness with a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms ranging from mild to severe forms characterized by plasma leakage that can be fatal. NK cells are one of the main effectors in early infection and may play an important role in dengue pathogenesis. We investigated NK cell involvement during dengue infection. A higher frequency of NK cell subsets and TRAIL+NK cells was found in mild DF cases when compared to that in severe cases or healthy donors. NK activation marke...

  1. Effects of the foot strike pattern on muscle activity and neuromuscular fatigue in downhill trail running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giandolini, M; Horvais, N; Rossi, J; Millet, G Y; Morin, J-B; Samozino, P

    2017-08-01

    Minimizing musculo-skeletal damage and fatigue is considered paramount for performance in trail running. Our purposes were to investigate the effects of the foot strike pattern and its variability on (a) muscle activity during a downhill trail run and (b) immediate and delayed neuromuscular fatigue. Twenty-three runners performed a 6.5-km run (1264 m of negative elevation change). Electromyographic activity of lower-limb muscles was recorded continuously. Heel and metatarsal accelerations were recorded to identify the running technique. Peripheral and central fatigue was assessed in knee extensors (KE) and plantar flexors (PF) at Pre-, Post-, and 2 days post downhill run (Post2d). Anterior patterns were associated with (a) higher gastrocnemius lateralis activity and lower tibialis anterior and vastus lateralis activity during the run and (b) larger decreases in KE high-frequency stimulus-evoked torque Post and larger decrements in KE MVC Post2d. High patterns variability during the run was associated with (a) smaller decreases in KE Db100 Post and MVC Post2d and (b) smaller decreases in PF MVC Post and Post2d. Anterior patterns increase the severity of KE peripheral fatigue. However, high foot strike pattern variability during the run reduced acute and delayed neuromuscular fatigue in KE and PF. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. TAK1 inhibition subverts the osteoclastogenic action of TRAIL while potentiating its antimyeloma effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenshin, Hirofumi; Teramachi, Jumpei; Oda, Asuka; Amachi, Ryota; Hiasa, Masahiro; Bat-Erdene, Ariunzaya; Watanabe, Keiichiro; Iwasa, Masami; Harada, Takeshi; Fujii, Shiro; Kagawa, Kumiko; Sogabe, Kimiko; Nakamura, Shingen; Miki, Hirokazu; Kurahashi, Kiyoe; Yoshida, Sumiko; Aihara, Kenichi; Endo, Itsuro; Tanaka, Eiji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2017-11-14

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) agonists induce tumor-specific apoptosis indicating that they may be an attractive therapeutic strategy against cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Osteoclastogenesis is highly induced in MM, which in turn enhances MM growth, thereby forming a vicious cycle between MM tumor expansion and bone destruction. However, the effects of TRAIL on MM-enhanced osteoclastogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that TRAIL induced apoptosis in MM cells, but not in osteoclasts (OCs), and that it rather facilitated receptor activator of NF-κB ligand-induced osteoclastogenesis along with upregulation of cellular FLICE inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). TRAIL did not induce death-inducing signaling complex formation in OCs, but formed secondary complex (complex II) with the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and thus activated NF-κB signaling. c-FLIP knockdown abolished complex II formation, thus permitting TRAIL induction of OC cell death. The TAK1 inhibitor LLZ1640-2 abrogated the TRAIL-induced c-FLIP upregulation and NF-κB activation, and triggered TRAIL-induced caspase-8 activation and cell death in OCs. Interestingly, the TRAIL-induced caspase-8 activation caused enzymatic degradation of the transcription factor Sp1 to noticeably reduce c-FLIP expression, which further sensitized OCs to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the TAK1 inhibition induced antiosteoclastogenic activity by TRAIL even in cocultures with MM cells while potentiating TRAIL's anti-MM effects. These results demonstrated that osteoclastic lineage cells use TRAIL for their differentiation and activation through tilting caspase-8-dependent apoptosis toward NF-κB activation, and that TAK1 inhibition subverts TRAIL-mediated NF-κB activation to resume TRAIL-induced apoptosis in OCs while further enhancing MM cell death in combination with TRAIL.

  3. Trailing TRAIL Resistance: Novel Targets for TRAIL sensitization in Cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RACHANA eTRIVEDI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is the major hindrance in the successful cancer therapy. The tumor necrosis factor- related apoptosis- inducing ligand (TRAIL is a member of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF family of ligands which initiates apoptosis in cancer cells through interaction with the death receptors DR4 and DR5. TRAIL is perceived as an attractive chemotherapeutic agent as it specifically targets cancer cells while sparing the normal cells. However TRAIL therapy has a major limitation as a large number of the cancer develop resistance towards TRAIL and escape from the destruction by the immune system. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular targets and signaling pathways responsible for TRAIL resistance is imperative for devising effective therapeutic strategies for TRAIL resistant cancers. Although, various molecular targets leading to TRAIL resistance are well studied, recent studies have implicated that the contribution of some key cellular processes towards TRAIL resistance need to be fully elucidated. These processes primarily include aberrant protein synthesis, protein misfolding, ubiquitin regulated death receptor expression, metabolic pathways, epigenetic deregulation and metastasis. Novel synthetic/natural compounds that could inhibit these defective cellular processes may restore the TRAIL sensitivity and combination therapies with such compounds may resensitize TRAIL resistant cancer cells towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In this review, we have summarized the key cellular processes associated with TRAIL resistance and their status as therapeutic targets for novel TRAIL-sensitizing agents.

  4. Antitumor Activity and Prolonged Expression from a TRAIL-Expressing Adenoviral Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwu Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induces apoptosis in a variety of transformed cell lines, but generally spares most normal cells. Transduction by an adenoviral vector expressing human TRAIL cDNA (Ad.TRAIL-GFP resulted in both direct tumor cell killing as well as a potent bystander effect through presentation of TRAIL by transduced normal cells. Administration of Ad.TRAIL-GFP significantly prolonged survival of mice harboring either intracerebral glioblastomas or breast carcinoma-induced peritoneal carcinomatosis. Additionally, TRAIL induced prolonged transgene expression in normal tissue, presumably as a result of diminished immunemediated destruction of vector-transduced cells. Taken together, these data suggest that vector-mediated transduction of TRAIL may represent an effective strategy for cancer gene therapy.

  5. Short-hairpin RNA-induced suppression of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 in breast cancer cells restores their susceptibility to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by activating JNK and modulating TRAIL receptor expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chul-Woo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL; apo2 ligand induces apoptosis in cancer cells but has little effect on normal cells. However, many cancer cell types are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, limiting the clinical utility of TRAIL as an anti-cancer agent. We previously reported that the suppression of adenine nucleotide translocase-2 (ANT2 by short-hairpin RNA (shRNA induces apoptosis of breast cancer cells, which frequently express high levels of ANT2. In the present study, we examined the effect of RNA shRNA-induced suppression of ANT2 on the resistance of breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Results ANT2 shRNA treatment sensitized MCF7, T47 D, and BT474 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of TRAIL death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5 and down-regulating the TRAIL decoy receptor 2 (DcR2. In MCF7 cells, ANT2 knockdown activated the stress kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, subsequently stabilizing and increasing the transcriptional activity of p53 by phosphorylating it at Thr81; it also enhanced the expression and activity of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1. ANT2 shRNA-induced overexpression of DR4/DR5 and TRAIL sensitization were blocked by a p53 inhibitor, suggesting that p53 activation plays an important role in the transcriptional up-regulation of DR4/DR5. However, ANT2 knockdown also up-regulated DR4/DR5 in the p53-mutant cell lines BT474 and T47 D. In MCF7 cells, ANT2 shRNA treatment led to DcR2 promoter methylation and concomitant down-regulation of DcR2 expression, consistent with the observed activation of DNMT1. Treatment of the cells with a demethylating agent or JNK inhibitor prevented the ANT2 shRNA-induced down-regulation of DcR2 and activation of both p53 and DNMT1. In in vivo experiments using nude mice, ANT2 shRNA caused TRAIL-resistant MCF7 xenografts to undergo TRAIL-induced cell death, up-regulated DR4/DR5

  6. An anthraquinone derivative, emodin sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL induced apoptosis through the induction of death receptors and downregulation of cell survival proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Aruljothi; Loo, Ser Yue; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Manu, Kanjoormana A; Perumal, Ekambaram; Li, Feng; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Park, Joo-In; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Hui, Kam M; Kumar, Alan P; Sethi, Gautam

    2013-10-01

    Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is currently under clinical trials for cancer, however many tumor cells, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develop resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Hence, novel agents that can alleviate TRAIL-induced resistance are urgently needed. In the present report, we investigated the potential of emodin to enhance apoptosis induced by TRAIL in HCC cells. As observed by MTT cytotoxicity assay and the externalization of the membrane phospholipid phosphatidylserine, we found that emodin can significantly potentiate TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. When investigated for the mechanism(s), we observed that emodin can downregulate the expression of various cell survival proteins, and induce the cell surface expression of both TRAIL receptors, death receptors (DR) 4 as well as 5. In addition, emodin increased the expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in a time-dependent manner. Knockdown of CHOP by siRNA decreased the induction of emodin-induced DR5 expression and apoptosis. Emodin-induced induction of DR5 was mediated through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as N-acetylcysteine blocked the induction of DR5 and the induction of apoptosis. Also, the knockdown of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein by siRNA significantly reduced the sensitization effect of emodin on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Overall, our experimental results clearly indicate that emodin can indeed potentiate TRAIL-induced apoptosis through the downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins, increased expression of apoptotic proteins, and ROS mediated upregulation of DR in HCC cells.

  7. Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis and Low Disease Activity because of Anti-TNF-Alpha Therapy Have Higher TRAIL Levels Than Controls: A Potential Compensatory Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Genre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. TRAIL is a potential biomarker of cardiovascular (CV disease. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with metabolic syndrome (MeS and accelerated atherosclerosis. We assessed whether disease activity, systemic inflammation, and MeS features were associated with circulating TRAIL levels in AS patients undergoing TNF-α antagonist infliximab therapy and if infliximab infusion modified TRAIL levels. Methods. We measured TRAIL serum levels in 30 nondiabetic AS patients without CV disease undergoing anti-TNF-α therapy, immediately before and after an infliximab infusion, and in 48 matched controls. Correlations of TRAIL levels with disease activity, systemic inflammation and MeS features, adipokines, and biomarkers of endothelial activation were evaluated. Changes in TRAIL levels following anti-TNF-α infusion were analyzed. Results. TRAIL levels were higher in AS patients than controls. TRAIL levels displayed an inverse correlation with total and LDL cholesterol. We observed an inverse correlation with QUICKI and a marginal association with HOMA-IR. We also found an inverse correlation with resistin and a marginal association with apelin and OPN. Anti-TNF-α infusion did not change TRAIL levels after 120′. Conclusion. Elevated TRAIL levels in AS patients may be the result of a compensatory mechanism to reduce CV risk in these patients.

  8. A placental protective role for trophoblast-derived TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, X; Williams, J L R; Greenwood, S L; Baker, P N; Aplin, J D; Crocker, I P

    2009-10-01

    Recent studies show that apoptosis, programmed cell death, plays an important role in the normal development of the human placenta and that an altered balance between proliferation and apoptosis of villous trophoblasts is associated with abnormal pregnancies. The TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a molecule belonging to TNF superfamily. The role of TRAIL and its Death Receptor 5 (DR5) in regulating villous trophoblast cell turnover in normal and pathologic pregnancies remains to be explored. In order to elucidate the role of TRAIL in the regulation of placental growth, primary cytotrophoblast cells were isolated from normal term placentas (n=13) and cultured for 18 and 66h to generate mononucleate and multinucleate trophoblasts, respectively. The protein expression and localisation of TRAIL and DR5 were determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Secreted sTRAIL was also measured by ELISA. Trophoblast apoptosis was measured by TUNEL in the presence of recombinant TRAIL (rTRAIL), and DR5 relocalisation was assessed by immunostaining after 18h exposure to TNFalpha. We demonstrated that TRAIL protein expression and the secretion of soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL) were down-regulated in syncytialised villous trophoblasts and that sTRAIL was independent of biochemical differentiation, as TRAIL-neutralizing antibody (2E5) failed to influence hCG production. TRAIL immunoreactivity was detected in mono- and multinucleated trophoblast cells and localised to the cytoplasm and cellular membranes -- more intense staining was associated with apoptotic nuclei. rTRAIL failed to induce apoptosis in trophoblasts cells owing to the nuclear localisation of DR5. However, TNFalpha treatment caused the redistribution of intracellular DR5 to the cell surface, potentiating apoptotic susceptibly to exogenously administered rTRAIL. These findings highlight a mechanism by which TRAIL and DR5 serve to protective trophoblasts in normal development, but may be activated in

  9. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and...

  10. Involvement of FOXO transcription factors, TRAIL-FasL/Fas, and sirtuin proteins family in canine coronavirus type II-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Marfè

    Full Text Available n our previous study, we have shown that canine coronavirus type II (CCoV-II activates both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathway in a canine fibrosarcoma cell line (A-72 cells. Herein we investigated the role of Sirtuin and Forkhead box O (FOXO families in this experimental model using Nortern Blot and Western Blot analysis. Our results demonstrated that mitochondrial SIRT3 and SIRT4 protein expression increased from 12 and 24 h post infection (p.i. onwards, respectively, whereas the nuclear SIRT1 expression increased during the first 12 h p.i. followed by a decrease after 36 h p.i., reaching the same level of control at 48 h p.i. Sirtuins interact with/and regulate the activity of FOXO family proteins, and we herein observed that FOXO3A and FOXO1 expression increased significantly and stably from 12 h p.i. onwards. In addition, CCoV-II induces a remarkable increase in the expression of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, while we observed a slight up-regulation of FasL/Fas at 36 p.i. with a decrease of both proteins at the end of infection. Furthermore, we found that virus infection increased both bax translocation into mitochondria and decreased bcl-2 expression in cytosol in a time-dependent manner.These data suggest that FOXO transcription factors mediate pro-apoptotic effects of CCoV-II, in part due to activation of extrinsic apoptosis pathway, while some Sirtuin family members (such as SIRT3 and SIRT4 may be involved in intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Moreover, these results propose that TRAIL is an important mediator of cell death induced by CCoV-II during in vitro infection.

  11. Apo2L/TRAIL and the death receptor 5 agonist antibody AMG 655 cooperate to promote receptor clustering and antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Jonathan D; Kordich, Jennifer J; Huang, Tzu-Hsuan; Piasecki, Julia; Bush, Tammy L; Sullivan, Timothy; Foltz, Ian N; Chang, Wesley; Douangpanya, Heather; Dang, Thu; O'Neill, Jason W; Mallari, Rommel; Zhao, Xiaoning; Branstetter, Daniel G; Rossi, John M; Long, Alexander M; Huang, Xin; Holland, Pamela M

    2014-08-11

    Death receptor agonist therapies have exhibited limited clinical benefit to date. Investigations into why Apo2L/TRAIL and AMG 655 preclinical data were not predictive of clinical response revealed that coadministration of Apo2L/TRAIL with AMG 655 leads to increased antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. The combination of Apo2L/TRAIL and AMG 655 results in enhanced signaling and can sensitize Apo2L/TRAIL-resistant cells. Structure determination of the Apo2L/TRAIL-DR5-AMG 655 ternary complex illustrates how higher order clustering of DR5 is achieved when both agents are combined. Enhanced agonism generated by combining Apo2L/TRAIL and AMG 655 provides insight into the limited efficacy observed in previous clinical trials and suggests testable hypotheses to reconsider death receptor agonism as a therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Skills in Motion: Boys' Trail Motorbiking Activities as Transitions into Working-Class Masculinity in a Post-Industrial Locale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivinson, Gabrielle Mary

    2014-01-01

    During an ethnographic research project exploring young people's perceptions of living in a post-industrial semi-rural place, boys aged 13/14 years revealed their semi-clandestine motorbiking activities across mountains trails. It was found that riding motorbikes and fixing engines were potential resources for young boys' transitions into adult…

  13. Aplysin Sensitizes Cancer Cells to TRAIL by Suppressing P38 MAPK/Survivin Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a tumor-selective apoptosis inducer and has been shown to be promising for treating various types of cancers. However, the application of TRAIL is greatly impeded by the resistance of cancer cells to its action. Studies show that overexpression of some critical pro-survival proteins, such as survivin, is responsible for TRAIL resistance. In this study, we found that Aplysin, a brominated compound from marine organisms, was able to restore the sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL both in vitro and in vivo. Aplysin was found to enhance the tumor-suppressing capacity of TRAIL on several TRAIL-resistant cancer cell lines. TRAIL-induced apoptosis was also potentiated in A549 and MCF7 cells treated with Aplysin. Survivin downregulation was identified as a mechanism by which Aplysin-mediated TRAIL sensitization of cancer cells. Furthermore, the activation of p38 MAPK was revealed in Aplysin-treated cancer cells, and its inhibitor SB203580 was able to abrogate the promoting effect of Aplysin on the response of cancer cells to TRAIL action, as evidenced by restored survivin expression, elevated cell survival and reduced apoptotic rates. In conclusion, we provided evidence that Aplysin acts as a sensitizer for TRAIL and its effect on p38 MAPK/survivin pathway may partially account for this activity. Considering its low cytotoxicity to normal cells, Aplysin may be a promising agent for cancer treatment in combination with TRAIL.

  14. Targeting TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor by natural products as a potential therapeutic approach for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jingwen; Arfuso, Frank; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Kumar, Alan Prem; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been shown to selectively induce apoptotic cell death in various tumor cells by engaging its death-inducing receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). This property has led to the development of a number of TRAIL-receptor agonists such as the soluble recombinant TRAIL and agonistic antibodies, which have shown promising anticancer activity in preclinical studies. However, besides activating caspase-dependent apoptosis in several cancer cells, TRAIL may also activate nonapoptotic signal transduction pathways such as nuclear factor-kappa B, mitogen-activated protein kinases, AKT, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3, which may contribute to TRAIL resistance that is being now frequently encountered in various cancers. TRAIL resistance can be overcome by the application of efficient TRAIL-sensitizing pharmacological agents. Natural compounds have shown a great potential in sensitizing cells to TRAIL treatment through suppression of distinct survival pathways. In this review, we have summarized both apoptotic and nonapoptotic pathways activated by TRAIL, as well as recent advances in developing TRAIL-receptor agonists for cancer therapy. We also briefly discuss combination therapies that have shown great potential in overcoming TRAIL resistance in various tumors. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  15. Chromomycins A2 and A3 from marine actinomycetes with TRAIL resistance-overcoming and Wnt signal inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toume, Kazufumi; Tsukahara, Kentaro; Ito, Hanako; Arai, Midori A; Ishibashi, Masami

    2014-06-05

    A biological screening study of an actinomycetes strain assembly was conducted using a cell-based cytotoxicity assay. The CKK1019 strain was isolated from a sea sand sample. Cytotoxicity-guided fractionation of the CKK1019 strain culture broth, which exhibited cytotoxicity, led to the isolation of chromomycins A2 (1) and A3 (2). 1 and 2 showed potent cytotoxicity against the human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line (IC50 1; 1.7 and 2; 22.1 nM), as well as strong inhibitory effects against TCF/β-catenin transcription (IC50 1; 1.8 and 2; 15.9 nM). 2 showed the ability to overcome tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) resistance. To the best of our knowledge, the effects of chromomycins A2 (1) and A3 (2) on TRAIL resistance-overcoming activity, and on the Wnt signaling pathway, have not been reported previously. Thus, 1 and 2 warrant potential drug lead studies in relation to TRAIL-resistant and Wnt signal-related diseases and offer potentially useful chemical probes for investigating TRAIL resistance and the Wnt signaling pathway.

  16. Chromomycins A2 and A3 from Marine Actinomycetes with TRAIL Resistance-Overcoming and Wnt Signal Inhibitory Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Toume

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A biological screening study of an actinomycetes strain assembly was conducted using a cell-based cytotoxicity assay. The CKK1019 strain was isolated from a sea sand sample. Cytotoxicity-guided fractionation of the CKK1019 strain culture broth, which exhibited cytotoxicity, led to the isolation of chromomycins A2 (1 and A3 (2. 1 and 2 showed potent cytotoxicity against the human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS cell line (IC50 1; 1.7 and 2; 22.1 nM, as well as strong inhibitory effects against TCF/β-catenin transcription (IC50 1; 1.8 and 2; 15.9 nM. 2 showed the ability to overcome tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL resistance. To the best of our knowledge, the effects of chromomycins A2 (1 and A3 (2 on TRAIL resistance-overcoming activity, and on the Wnt signaling pathway, have not been reported previously. Thus, 1 and 2 warrant potential drug lead studies in relation to TRAIL-resistant and Wnt signal-related diseases and offer potentially useful chemical probes for investigating TRAIL resistance and the Wnt signaling pathway.

  17. Inhibition of TACE activity enhances the susceptibility of myeloma cells to TRAIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Kagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand/Apo2 ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L selectively induces apoptosis in various cancer cells including myeloma (MM cells. However, the susceptibility of MM cells to TRAIL is largely low in most of MM cells by yet largely unknown mechanisms. Because TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE can cleave some TNF receptor family members, in the present study we explored the roles of proteolytic modulation by TACE in TRAIL receptor expression and TRAIL-mediated cytotoxicity in MM cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MM cells preferentially expressed death receptor 4 (DR4 but not DR5 on their surface along with TACE. Conditioned media from RPMI8226 and U266 cells contained a soluble form of DR4. The DR4 levels in these conditioned media were reduced by TACE inhibition by the TACE inhibitor TAPI-0 as well as TACE siRNA. Conversely, the TACE inhibition restored surface levels of DR4 but not DR5 in these cells without affecting DR4 mRNA levels. The TACE inhibition was able to restore cell surface DR4 expression in MM cells even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells or osteoclasts, and enhanced the cytotoxic effects of recombinant TRAIL and an agonistic antibody against DR4 on MM cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that MM cells post-translationally down-modulate the cell surface expression of DR4 through ectodomain shedding by endogenous TACE, and that TACE inhibition is able to restore cell surface DR4 levels and the susceptibility of MM cells to TRAIL or an agonistic antibody against DR4. Thus, TACE may protect MM cells from TRAIL-mediated death through down-modulation of cell-surface DR4. It can be envisaged that TACE inhibition augments clinical efficacy of TRAIL-based immunotherapy against MM, which eventually becomes resistant to the present therapeutic modalities.

  18. The TRAIL to Viral Pathogenesis: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Nathan; Badley, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) in 1995, much has been learned about the protein, its receptors and signaling cascade to induce apoptosis and the regulation of its expression. However, the physiologic role or roles that TRAIL may play in vivo are still being explored. The expression of TRAIL on effector T cells and the ability of TRAIL to induce apoptosis in virally infected cells provided early clues that TRAIL may play an active role in the immune defense against viral infections. However, increasing evidence is emerging that TRAIL may have a dual function in the immune system, both as a means to kill virally infected cells and in the regulation of cytokine production. TRAIL has been implicated in the immune response to viral infections (good), and in the pathogenesis of multiple viral infections (bad). Furthermore, several viruses have evolved mechanisms to manipulate TRAIL signaling to increase viral replication (ugly). It is likely that whether TRAIL ultimately has a proviral or antiviral effect will be dependent on the specific virus and the overall cytokine milieu of the host. Knowledge of the factors that determine whether TRAIL is proviral or antiviral is important because the TRAIL system may become a target for development of novel antiviral therapies. PMID:19519406

  19. TRAIL-functionalized gold nanoparticles selectively trigger apoptosis in polarized macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen-Jang; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have the same immunosuppressive effects as M2 macrophages in tumor progression and are correlated with poor-patient prognosis and survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, TAMs are the potential targets for cancer therapy. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of tumor necrosis factor superfamily and selectively induces cancer cell apoptosis, but not in most normal cells. Nanoparticles coated with multiple ligands can act as multivalent ligands that may actively crosslink cell surface receptors to affect downstream signals. Here, we explored nanogolds coated with TRAIL protein (nanogold-TRAIL complexes) as a potential anti-M2 macrophage drug. The structure of nanogold-TRAIL complexes comprised nanogold (3, 13, or 30 nm) as the core to crosslink multiple TRAIL for exhibition of multivalent property. Nanogold-TRAIL complexes selectively increased the cytotoxicity of TRAIL (30-fold increase in IC50) via changing O-glycosylation levels in M2-polarized macrophages. By testing the TRAIL complex efficacy on nanogold with different sizes and origins as well as on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, we further demonstrated that the enhanced cytotoxicity by nanoparticles was dependent on size and surface properties of the nanoparticles. Meanwhile, the nanogold-TRAIL complexes remained nontoxic to M1 macrophages or normal cells. Nanogold-TRAIL complexes thus provide a novel and promising strategy for the improvement of TRAIL-based therapy.

  20. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL): a new path to anti-cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoch, Peter A; Griffith, Thomas S

    2009-12-25

    Since its discovery in 1995, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the tumor necrosis factor super family, has been under intense focus because of its remarkable ability to induce apoptosis in malignant human cells while leaving normal cells unscathed. Consequently, activation of the apoptotic signaling pathway from the death-inducing TRAIL receptors provides an attractive, biologically-targeted approach to cancer therapy. A great deal of research has focused on deciphering the TRAIL receptor signaling cascade and intracellular regulation of this pathway, as many human tumor cells possess mechanisms of resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge regarding TRAIL signaling and resistance, the preclinical development of therapies targeted at TRAIL receptors and modulators of the pathway, and the results of clinical trials for cancer treatment that have emerged from this base of knowledge. TRAIL-based approaches to cancer therapy vary from systemic administration of recombinant, soluble TRAIL protein with or without the combination of traditional chemotherapy, radiation or novel anti-cancer agents to agonistic monoclonal antibodies directed against functional TRAIL receptors to TRAIL gene transfer therapy. A better understanding of TRAIL resistance mechanisms may allow for the development of more effective therapies that exploit this cell-mediated pathway to apoptosis.

  1. Affected pathways and transcriptional regulators in gene expression response to an ultra-marathon trail: Global and independent activity approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Maqueda

    Full Text Available Gene expression (GE analyses on blood samples from marathon and half-marathon runners have reported significant impacts on the immune and inflammatory systems. An ultra-marathon trail (UMT represents a greater effort due to its more testing conditions. For the first time, we report the genome-wide GE profiling in a group of 16 runners participating in an 82 km UMT competition. We quantified their differential GE profile before and after the race using HuGene2.0st microarrays (Affymetrix Inc., California, US. The results obtained were decomposed by means of an independent component analysis (ICA targeting independent expression modes. We observed significant differences in the expression levels of 5,084 protein coding genes resulting in an overrepresentation of 14% of the human biological pathways from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. These were mainly clustered on terms related with protein synthesis repression, altered immune system and infectious diseases related mechanisms. In a second analysis, 27 out of the 196 transcriptional regulators (TRs included in the Open Regulatory Annotation database were overrepresented. Among these TRs, we identified transcription factors from the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF family EPAS1 (p< 0.01 and HIF1A (p<0.001, and others jointly described in the gluconeogenesis program such as HNF4 (p< 0.001, EGR1 (p<0.001, CEBPA (p< 0.001 and a highly specific TR, YY1 (p<0.01. The five independent components, obtained from ICA, further revealed a down-regulation of 10 genes distributed in the complex I, III and V from the electron transport chain. This mitochondrial activity reduction is compatible with HIF-1 system activation. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway, known to be regulated by HIF, also emerged (p<0.05. Additionally, and related to the brain rewarding circuit, the endocannabinoid signalling pathway was overrepresented (p<0.05.

  2. Full-scale test of trailing edge flaps on a Vestas V27 wind turbine: active load reduction and system identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castaignet, Damien; Barlas, Thanasis K.; Buhl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    model, from trailing edge flap angle to flapwise blade root moment, was derived and compared with the linear analytical model used in the model predictive control design model. Flex5 simulations run with the same model predictive control showed a good correlation between the simulations......A full-scale test was performed on a Vestas V27 wind turbine equipped with one active 70 cm long trailing edge flap on one of its 13 m long blades. Active load reduction could be observed in spite of the limited spanwise coverage of the single active trailing edge flap. A frequency-weighted model...

  3. Compartmentalization of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor functions: emerging role of nuclear TRAIL-R2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, U; Röder, C; Kalthoff, H; Trauzold, A

    2014-08-28

    Localized in the plasma membrane, death domain-containing TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, induce apoptosis and non-apoptotic signaling when crosslinked by the ligand TRAIL or by agonistic receptor-specific antibodies. Recently, an increasing body of evidence has accumulated that TRAIL receptors are additionally found in noncanonical intracellular locations in a wide range of cell types, preferentially cancer cells. Thus, besides their canonical locations in the plasma membrane and in intracellular membranes of the secretory pathway as well as endosomes and lysosomes, TRAIL receptors may also exist in autophagosomes, in nonmembraneous cytosolic compartment as well as in the nucleus. Such intracellular locations have been mainly regarded as hide-outs for these receptors representing a strategy for cancer cells to resist TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Recently, a novel function of intracellular TRAIL-R2 has been revealed. When present in the nuclei of tumor cells, TRAIL-R2 inhibits the processing of the primary let-7 miRNA (pri-let-7) via interaction with accessory proteins of the Microprocessor complex. The nuclear TRAIL-R2-driven decrease in mature let-7 enhances the malignancy of cancer cells. This finding represents a new example of nuclear activity of typically plasma membrane-located cytokine and growth factor receptors. Furthermore, this extends the list of nucleic acid targets of the cell surface receptors by pri-miRNA in addition to DNA and mRNA. Here we review the diverse functions of TRAIL-R2 depending on its intracellular localization and we particularly discuss the nuclear TRAIL-R2 (nTRAIL-R2) function in the context of known nuclear activities of other normally plasma membrane-localized receptors.

  4. 2D CFD Analysis of an Airfoil with Active Continuous Trailing Edge Flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaksich, Dylan; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and quieter helicopter rotors can be achieved through on-blade control devices, such as active Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps driven by embedded piezoelectric material. This project aims to develop a CFD simulation tool to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with CTEF using open source code: OpenFOAM. Airfoil meshes used by OpenFOAM are obtained with MATLAB scripts. Once created it is possible to rotate the airfoil to various angles of attack. When the airfoil is properly set up various OpenFOAM properties, such as kinematic viscosity and flow velocity, are altered to achieve the desired testing conditions. Upon completion of a simulation, the program gives the lift, drag, and moment coefficients as well as the pressure and velocity around the airfoil. The simulation is then repeated across multiple angles of attack to give full lift and drag curves. The results are then compared to previous test data and other CFD predictions. This research will lead to further work involving quasi-steady 2D simulations incorporating NASTRAN to model aeroelastic deformation and eventually to 3D aeroelastic simulations. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  5. Greenway Trails

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — View the Town’s current and proposed greenway system, including connectors and street side trails.A greenway is a linear parcel of land set aside to preserve open...

  6. Airbag Trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This segment of the first color image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rover's airbag trails. These depressions in the soil were made when the airbags were deflated and retracted after landing.

  7. miR-133a Promotes TRAIL Resistance in Glioblastoma via Suppressing Death Receptor 5 and Activating NF-κB Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-shan Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, as a novel cancer therapeutic, is being tested in phase II and III clinical trials; however, TRAIL resistance remains a big obstacle preventing its clinical application. Considering that TRAIL-induced apoptosis through death receptors DR4 and DR5, their activation may be an alternative pathway to suppress TRAIL resistance. In this study, a negative correlation between DR5 expression and TRAIL resistance was observed, and miR-133a was predicted to be the most promising candidate to suppress DR5 expression. Further investigation demonstrated that miR-133a knockdown dramatically suppressed TRAIL resistance in glioblastoma in vitro and in vivo. An NF-κB family member, phosphorylated IκBα (P-IκBα, was shown to be stimulated by miR-133a, leading to the activation of this signaling. Finally, miR-133a was found to be inversely correlated with DR5 expression in human clinical specimens. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that miR-133a promotes TRAIL resistance in glioblastoma by suppressing DR5 expression and activating NF-κB signaling.

  8. Dexamethasone counteracts the anti-osteoclastic, but not the anti-leukemic, activity of TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauli, Giorgio; Rimondi, Erika; Celeghini, Claudio; Milani, Daniela; Secchiero, Paola

    2010-02-01

    We have analyzed the effect of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, used alone or in combination with recombinant TRAIL, on in vitro osteoclastic differentiation of peripheral blood-derived macrophages cultured in the presence of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) + RANKL for 12-14 days. Dexamethasone exhibited different effects based on the concentration used. Indeed, while at 10(-7) M dexamethasone reduced the number of mature osteoclasts, at 10(-8) M showed no significant effects and at 10(-9) M significantly increased the number of mature osteoclasts, with respect to cells cultured with only M-CSF + RANKL. On the other hand, the addition in culture of recombinant TRAIL inhibited the output of mature osteoclasts induced by M-CSF + RANKL. However, the presence of dexamethasone (10(-8) or 10(-9) M) into the culture medium significantly counteracted the anti-osteoclastic activity of TRAIL. In order to ascertain whether dexamethasone, might also interfere with the anti-leukemic activity of TRAIL, the degree of apoptosis induced by TRAIL was evaluated in several myeloid (OCI, MOLM, HL-60) and lymphoid (SKW6.4, MAVER, BJAB) leukemic cell lines. The levels of TRAIL-triggered apoptosis were not significantly different between leukemic cells cultured in the absence or presence of dexamethasone. Concerning the molecular mechanism mediating the dexamethasone-suppression of the TRAIL activity in pre-osteoclasts, but not in leukemic cells, we found that dexamethasone induced a significant down-regulation of the surface levels of TRAIL-R2 in cells of the osteoclastic lineage but not in leukemic cells. The ability of dexamethasone to counteract the TRAIL pathway envisions a novel mechanism mediating the pro-osteoclastic activity of dexamethasone in vivo. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. TRAIL Modulates the Immune System and Protects against the Development of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur Bossi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available TRAIL or tumor necrosis factor (TNF related apoptosis-inducing ligand is a member of the TNF superfamily of proteins, whose best characterized function is the induction of apoptosis in tumor, infected, or transformed cells through activation of specific receptors. In nontransformed cells, however, the actions of TRAIL are less well characterized. Recent studies suggest that TRAIL may be implicated in the development and progression of diabetes. Here we review TRAIL biological actions, its effects on the immune system, and how and to what extent it has been shown to protect against diabetes.

  10. Chemotherapy overcomes TRAIL-R4-mediated TRAIL resistance at the DISC level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizot, A; Mérino, D; Lalaoui, N; Jacquemin, G; Granci, V; Iessi, E; Lanneau, D; Bouyer, F; Solary, E; Chauffert, B; Saas, P; Garrido, C; Micheau, O

    2011-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand or Apo2L (Apo2L/TRAIL) is a promising anti-cancer drug owing to its ability to trigger apoptosis by binding to TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2, two membrane-bound receptors that are often expressed by tumor cells. TRAIL can also bind non-functional receptors such as TRAIL-R4, but controversies still exist regarding their potential to inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We show here that TRAIL-R4, expressed either endogenously or ectopically, inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with TRAIL restores tumor cell sensitivity to apoptosis in TRAIL-R4-expressing cells. This sensitization, which mainly occurs at the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) level, through enhanced caspase-8 recruitment and activation, is compromised by c-FLIP expression and is independent of the mitochondria. Importantly, TRAIL-R4 expression prevents TRAIL-induced tumor regression in nude mice, but tumor regression induced by TRAIL can be restored with chemotherapy. Our results clearly support a negative regulatory function for TRAIL-R4 in controlling TRAIL signaling, and unveil the ability of TRAIL-R4 to cooperate with c-FLIP to inhibit TRAIL-induced cell death. PMID:21072058

  11. Active load reduction by means of trailing edge flaps on a wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, Ian; Castaignet, Damien; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the blade fatigue load reduction achieved with a trailing edge flap during a full scale test on a Vestas V27 wind turbine. A frequency-weighted linear model predictive control (MPC) is tuned to decrease flapwise blade root fatigue loads at the frequencies where most of the blade...... damage occurs, i.e. the 1P and 2P frequencies (respectively 1 and 2 events per revolution). Frequency-weighted MPC is chosen for its ability to handle constraints on the trailing edge flap deflection and to optimise its actuation in order to decrease wear and tear of the actuator. The controller...

  12. Inhibition of the autophagy flux by gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazim, Uddin Md; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a primary anticancer agent and a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that selectively induces apoptosis in various tumor cells, but not in normal cells. Gingerol is a major ginger component with anti-inflammatory and anti‑tumorigenic activities. Autophagy flux is the complete process of autophagy, in which the autophagosomes are lysed by lysosomes. The role of autophagy in cell death or cell survival is controversial. A549 adenocarcinoma cells are TRAIL-resistant. In the present study, we showed that treatment with TRAIL slightly induced cell death, but gingerol treatment enhanced the TRAIL-induced cell death in human lung cancer cells. The combination of gingerol and TRAIL increased accumulation of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II and p62, confirming the inhibited autophagy flux. Collectively, our results suggest that gingerol sensitizes human lung cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the autophagy flux.

  13. Stabilization of TRAIL, an all-{beta}-sheet multimeric protein, using computational redesign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sloot, Almer Martinus; Mullally, Margaret; Fernandez-Ballester, G.; Serrano, L.; Quax, Wim

    2004-01-01

    Protein thermal stability is important for therapeutic proteins, both influencing the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and for stability during production and shelf-life of the final product. In this paper we show the redesign of a therapeutically interesting trimeric all-beta-sheet

  14. Stabilization of TRAIL, an all-beta-sheet multimeric protein, using computational redesign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sloot, AM; Mullally, MM; Fernandez-Ballester, G; Serrano, L; Quax, WJ

    Protein thermal stability is important for therapeutic proteins, both influencing the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and for stability during production and shelf-life of the final product. In this paper we show the redesign of a therapeutically interesting trimeric all-beta-sheet

  15. A smart rotor configuration with linear quadratic control of adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a smart rotor configuration where adaptive trailing edge flaps (ATEFs) are employed for active alleviation of the aerodynamic loads on the blades of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine. The flaps extend for 20% of the blade length and are controlled by a linear quadratic (LQ....... The effects of active flap control are assessed with aeroelastic simulations of the turbine in normal operation conditions, as prescribed by the International Electrotechnical Commission standard. The turbine lifetime fatigue damage equivalent loads provide a convenient summary of the results achieved...

  16. Designing Fitness Trails for Seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kenneth B.

    1991-01-01

    Fitness trails for senior adults are being developed in retirement communities and community parks nationwide to enhance total fitness through activities that build cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, strength, and balance. Recreation planners must create fitness trails that are interesting, enjoyable, safe, and appropriate for the senior…

  17. Adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation in a smart rotor configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, L.

    2013-08-15

    The work investigates the development of an active smart rotor concept from an aero-servo-elastic perspective. An active smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators, is able to alleviate the fluctuating part of the aerodynamic loads it has to withstand. The investigation focuses on a specific actuator type: the Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), which introduces a continuous deformation of the aft part of the airfoil camber-line. An aerodynamic model that accounts for the steady and unsteady effects of the flap deflection on a 2D airfoil section is developed, and, considering both attached and separated flow conditions, is validated by comparison against Computational Fluid Dynamic solutions and a panel code method. The aerodynamic model is integrated in the BEM-based aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2, thus providing a tool able to simulate the response of a wind turbine equipped with ATEF. A load analysis of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine in its baseline configuration reveals that the highest contribution to the blade flapwise fatigue damage originates from normal operation above rated wind speed, and from loads characterized by frequencies below 1 Hz. The analysis also reports that periodic load variations on the turbine blade account for nearly 11 % of the blade flapwise lifetime fatigue damage, while the rest is ascribed to load variations from disturbances of stochastic nature. The study proposes a smart rotor configuration with flaps laid out on the outer 20 % of the blade span, from 77 % to 97% of the blade length. The configuration is first tested with a simplified cyclic control approach, which gives a preliminary indication of the load alleviation potential, and also reveals the possibility to enhance the rotor energy capture below rated conditions by using the flaps. Two model based control algorithms are developed to actively alleviate the fatigue loads on the smart rotor with ATEF. The first

  18. The beneficial pleiotropic effects of tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) within the vasculature: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Hannah; Harper, Emma; Davenport, Colin; Rochfort, Keith D; Wallace, Robert; Murphy, Ronan P; Smith, Diarmuid; Cummins, Philip M

    2016-04-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a type II transmembrane protein that belongs to the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) cytokine superfamily. TRAIL is expressed by numerous cell types including vascular cells, immune cells and adipocytes. Although originally thought to induce apoptosis in malignant or transformed cells only, it is now known that TRAIL can bind up to 5 distinct receptors to activate complex signalling pathways, and is capable of exerting pleiotropic effects in non-transformed cells. In this respect, a number of clinical and animal studies point to the potential vasoprotective influence of TRAIL, with TRAIL deficiency being linked to accelerated atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. Moreover, exogenous TRAIL administration has been shown to exhibit anti-atherosclerotic activity in-vivo. In-vitro studies on TRAIL in this context have yielded conflicting results however, with evidence of both pro-atherogenic and vasoprotective effects ascribed to TRAIL. Notwithstanding these various studies, mechanistic information on the precise nature of TRAIL-mediated injury/protection within the vasculature, as well as the identity of the downstream molecular/cellular targets of TRAIL, is still quite limited. In this review, we will summarize our current knowledge of TRAIL regulation, signalling mechanisms, and its apparent involvement in CVD pathogenesis as a prelude to examining the existing evidence for TRAIL-mediated vasoprotection. To this end, extensive in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies will be reviewed and critical findings highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos López-Gómez

    Full Text Available The TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system participates in crucial steps in immune cell activation or differentiation. It is able to inhibit proliferation and activation of T cells and to induce apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes, and seems to be implicated in autoimmune diseases. Thus, TRAIL and TRAIL receptor genes are potential candidates for involvement in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS. To test whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the human genes encoding TRAIL, TRAILR-1, TRAILR-2, TRAILR-3 and TRAILR-4 are associated with MS susceptibility, we performed a candidate gene case-control study in the Spanish population. 59 SNPs in the TRAIL and TRAIL receptor genes were analysed in 628 MS patients and 660 controls, and validated in an additional cohort of 295 MS patients and 233 controls. Despite none of the SNPs withstood the highly conservative Bonferroni correction, three SNPs showing uncorrected p values<0.05 were successfully replicated: rs4894559 in TRAIL gene, p = 9.8×10(-4, OR = 1.34; rs4872077, in TRAILR-1 gene, p = 0.005, OR = 1.72; and rs1001793 in TRAILR-2 gene, p = 0.012, OR = 0.84. The combination of the alleles G/T/A in these SNPs appears to be associated with a reduced risk of developing MS (p = 2.12×10(-5, OR = 0.59. These results suggest that genes of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system exerts a genetic influence on MS.

  20. The plant alkaloid and anti-leukemia drug homoharringtonine sensitizes resistant human colorectal carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranova, Lenka; Pombinho, Antonio R; Spegarova, Jarmila; Koc, Michal; Klanova, Magdalena; Molinsky, Jan; Klener, Pavel; Bartunek, Petr; Andera, Ladislav

    2013-06-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a pro-apoptotic ligand from the TNF-alpha family that is under consideration, along with agonistic anti-TRAIL receptor antibodies, as a potential anti-tumor agent. However, most primary human tumors are resistant to monotherapy with TRAIL apoptogens, and thus the potential applicability of TRAIL in anti-tumor therapy ultimately depends on its rational combination with drugs targeting these resistances. In our high-throughput screening for novel agents/drugs that could sensitize TRAIL-resistant colorectal cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, we found homoharringtonine (HHT), a cephalotaxus alkaloid and tested anti-leukemia drug, to be a very effective, low nanomolar enhancer of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis/growth suppression of these resistant cells. Co-treatment of TRAIL-resistant RKO or HT-29 cells with HHT and TRAIL led to the effective induction of apoptosis and the complete elimination of the treated cells. HHT suppressed the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and cFLIP and enhanced the TRAIL-triggered activation of JNK and p38 kinases. The shRNA-mediated down-regulation of cFLIP or Mcl-1 in HT-29 or RKO cells variably enhanced their TRAIL-induced apoptosis but it did not markedly sensitize them to TRAIL-mediated growth suppression. However, with the notable exception of RKO/sh cFLIP cells, the downregulation of cFLIP or Mcl-1 significantly lowered the effective concentration of HHT in HHT + TRAIL co-treatment. Combined HHT + TRAIL therapy also led to the strong suppression of HT-29 tumors implanted into immunodeficient mice. Thus, HHT represents a very efficient enhancer of TRAIL-induced apoptosis with potential application in TRAIL-based, anti-cancer combination therapy.

  1. Anti-tumor activity of stability-engineered IgG-like bispecific antibodies targeting TRAIL-R2 and LTbetaR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelson, Jennifer S; Demarest, Stephen J; Miller, Brian; Amatucci, Aldo; Snyder, William B; Wu, Xiufeng; Huang, Flora; Phan, Samantha; Gao, Sharon; Doern, Adam; Farrington, Graham K; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Joseph, Ingrid; Bailly, Veronique; Wang, Xin; Garber, Ellen; Browning, Jeff; Glaser, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) represent an emerging class of biologics that achieve dual targeting with a single agent. Recombinant DNA technologies have facilitated a variety of creative bispecific designs with many promising therapeutic applications; however, practical methods for producing high quality BsAbs that have good product stability, long serum half-life, straightforward purification, and scalable production have largely been limiting. Here we describe a protein-engineering approach for producing stable, scalable tetravalent IgG-like BsAbs. The stability-engineered IgG-like BsAb was envisioned to target and crosslink two TNF family member receptors, TRAIL-R2 (TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand Receptor-2) and LTbetaR (Lymphotoxin-beta Receptor), expressed on the surface of epithelial tumor cells with the goal of triggering an enhanced anti-tumor effect. Our IgG-like BsAbs consists of a stability-engineered anti-LTbetaR single chain Fv (scFv) genetically fused to either the N- or C-terminus of the heavy chain of a fulllength anti-TRAIL-R2 IgG1 monoclonal antibody. Both N- or C-terminal BsAbs were active in inhibiting tumor cell growth in vitro, and with some cell lines demonstrated enhanced activity relative to the combination of parental Abs. Pharmacokinetic studies in mice revealed long serum half-lives for the BsAbs. In murine tumor xenograft models, therapeutic treatment with the BsAbs resulted in reduction in tumor volume either comparable to or greater than the combination of parental antibodies, indicating that simultaneously targeting and cross-linking receptor pairs is an effective strategy for treating tumor cells. These studies support that stability-engineering is an enabling step for producing scalable IgG-like BsAbs with properties desirable for biopharmaceutical development.

  2. A STRUCTURED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND HEALTH CARE EDUCATION BEATS POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION FOR PRIMIPARA MOTHERS: A PILOT RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Thiruppathi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: First time mothers in particular may feel anxious about how they are going to cope with looking after themselves and their newborn. Most Indian women believe that they have little or no control over their pregnancies or outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a Structured Physical Activity and Health Care Education program on the psychological well-being for Primipara mothers in postpartum period. Methods: This study was a Randomized Controlled Trail. Primipara mothers who were ready for discharge from The Narayana Medical College & General Hospital in postnatal ward were eligible for this study. Forty one (41 Primipara mothers randomized onto the trail. The experimental group(n=20 received an 4 week “Structured Physical Activity” (SPA program, including Structured Physical Activity provided by a team of health care professionals combined with parenting education & counseling. The other group (n=21 Health Care Education Only (HCEO received only the same educational material as the experimental group. In pre and post schedule outcome measures of both SPA&HCEO groups were assessed with Psychological well-being (Positive Affect Balance Scale, Depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale, and Physical activity were assessed at baseline, 4th week and then 8th week later. Results: The improvement was significantly high in well-being scores, depressive symptoms and physical activity of the (SPA group compared with the (HCEO group over the study period and this effect was maintained 8 weeks after completion of the program. Conclusion: A Structured Physical Activity and Health Care Education program is effective in improving the well-being for Primipara mothers in postpartum period. Continuous use of this program may reduce long-term problems such as postpartum depression and it will change the women’s Physical, emotional and social health.

  3. Superior Hiking Trail

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Superior Hiking Trail main trail, spurs, and camp spurs for completed trail throughout Cook, Lake, St. Louis and Carlton counties. These data were collected with...

  4. Superior Hiking Trail Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Superior Hiking Trail main trail, spurs, and camp spurs for completed trail throughout Cook, Lake, St. Louis and Carlton counties. These data were collected with...

  5. Role of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced sensitization of p53-deficient human colon cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis through up-regulation of death receptor 5 (DR5) by zerumbone and celecoxib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edagawa, Makoto; Kawauchi, Junya; Hirata, Manabu; Goshima, Hiroto; Inoue, Makoto; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Murakami, Akira; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Kitajima, Shigetaka

    2014-08-01

    Death receptor 5 (DR5) is a death domain-containing transmembrane receptor that triggers cell death upon binding to its ligand, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), and a combination of TRAIL and agents that increase the expression of DR5 is expected to be a novel anticancer therapy. In this report, we demonstrate that the stress response gene ATF3 is required for endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated DR5 induction upon zerumbone (ZER) and celecoxib (CCB) in human p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells. Both agents activated PERK-eIF2α kinases and induced the expression of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)-CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein, which were remarkably suppressed by reactive oxygen species scavengers. In the absence of ATF3, the induction of DR5 mRNA and protein was abrogated significantly, and this was associated with reduced cell death by cotreatment of TRAIL with ZER or CCB. By contrast, exogenous expression of ATF3 caused a more rapid and elevated expression of DR5, resulting in enhanced sensitivity to apoptotic cell death by TRAIL/ZER or TRAIL/CCB. A reporter assay demonstrated that at least two ATF/cAMP response element motifs as well as C/EBP homologous protein motif at the proximal region of the human DR5 gene promoter were required for ZER-induced DR5 gene transcription. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the role of ATF3 as an essential transcription factor for p53-independent DR5 induction upon both ZER and CCB treatment, and this may be a useful biomarker for TRAIL-based anticancer therapy. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. TRAIL-mediated signaling in prostate, bladder and renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2011-06-14

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a death receptor ligand that has the ability to preferentially initiate apoptosis in malignant cells with minimal toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL-based therapeutics, including recombinant TRAIL, TRAIL-receptor agonistic antibodies and TRAIL gene therapy, have now entered clinical trials. Although these therapeutics are promising, concerns regarding TRAIL resistance are causing research efforts to shift towards the identification of effective combination therapies. Small-molecule inhibitors, natural compounds, and drugs approved for treatment of diseases other than cancer have been shown to affect TRAIL receptors, antiapoptotic proteins and survival pathways in prostate, bladder and renal cell lines and in preclinical models. Changes in endogenous TRAIL and TRAIL receptor expression during the development of genitourinary malignancies and the way in which the expression pattern is affected by treatment are of great interest, and understanding the biological consequences of such changes will be important to maximize the potential of TRAIL-based therapeutics.

  7. Choline kinase inhibitors synergize with TRAIL in the treatment of colorectal tumors and overcomes TRAIL resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Lacal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: MN58b, which alone exhibits anticancer activities against a wide variety of tumor-derived cell lines, synergizes with TRAIL through a mechanism that involves DR5 upregulation. This study supports the use of MN58b in combination with TRAIL on colorectal tumors, including those that develop TRAIL resistance.

  8. Antitumor Activity of a Mesenchymal Stem Cell Line Stably Secreting a Tumor-Targeted TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Irene; Siegemund, Martin; Hutt, Meike; Kontermann, Roland E; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently exploited as gene delivery systems for transient in situ expression of cancer therapeutics. As an alternative to the prevailing viral expression, we here describe a murine MSC line stably expressing a therapeutic protein for up to 42 passages, yet fully maintaining MSC features. Because of superior antitumoral activity of hexavalent TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) formats and the advantage of a tumor-targeted action, we choose expression of a dimeric EGFR-specific diabody single-chain TRAIL (Db-scTRAIL) as a model. The bioactivity of Db-scTRAIL produced from an isolated clone (MSC.TRAIL) was revealed from cell death induction in Colo205 cells treated with either culture supernatants from or cocultured with MSC.TRAIL. In vivo, therapeutic activity of MSC.TRAIL was shown upon peritumoral injection in a Colo205 xenograft tumor model. Best antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo was observed upon combined treatment of MSC.TRAIL with bortezomib. Importantly, in vivo combination treatment did not cause apparent hepatotoxicity, weight loss, or behavioral changes. The development of well characterized stocks of stable drug-producing human MSC lines has the potential to establish standardized protocols of cell-based therapy broadly applicable in cancer treatment.

  9. MicroRNA-138 enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through interferon-stimulated gene 15 downregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chaohui; Sheng, Xinyi; Liu, Zhuo; Ma, Min; Xiong, Shuhan; Deng, Hongyu; Li, Sha; Yang, Darong; Wang, Xiaohong; Xiao, Hua; Quan, Hu; Xia, Man

    2017-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) is a potential target for cancer therapy. However, many cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and its mechanism is not well understood. In this study, to identify potential therapeutic targets for TRAIL-resistant cancer cells, we compared the expression levels of interferon-stimulated gene 15 in TRAIL-sensitive and TRAIL-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Western blot analysis showed that interferon-stimulated gene 15 expression levels were significantly higher in resistant HLCZ01and Huh7 cells than in sensitive LH86 and SMMC-7721 cells. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 knockdown in resistance cells led to TRAIL sensitivity. Conversely, interferon-stimulated gene 15 overexpression in sensitive cells resulted in TRAIL resistance. Our bioinformatics search detected a putative target sequence for microRNA miR-138 in the 3' untranslated region of the interferon-stimulated gene 15. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that miR-138 was significantly downregulated in TRAIL-resistant cells compared to TRAIL-sensitive cells. Forced expression of miR-138 in resistant cells decreased both messenger RNA and protein levels of interferon-stimulated gene 15, and when exposed to TRAIL, activated poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, indicating sensitization to TRAIL. The results suggested that miR-138 regulates the interferon-stimulated gene 15 expression by directly targeting the 3' untranslated region of interferon-stimulated gene 15 and modulates the sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. MiR-138 may be a target for therapeutic intervention in TRAIL-based drug treatments of resistant hepatocellular carcinoma or could be a biomarker to select patients who may benefit from the treatment.

  10. MAPK p38 and JNK have opposing activities on TRAIL-induced apoptosis activation in NSCLC H460 cells that involves RIP1 and caspase-8 and is mediated by Mcl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azijli, Kaamar; Yuvaraj, Saravanan; van Roosmalen, Ingrid; Flach, Koen; Giovannetti, Elisa; Peters, Godefridus J; de Jong, Steven; Kruyt, Frank A E

    2013-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can induce both caspase-dependent apoptosis and kinase activation in tumor cells. Here, we examined the consequences and mechanisms of TRAIL-induced MAPKs p38 and JNK in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. In apoptosis sensitive H460 cells, these kinases were phosphorylated, but not in resistant A549 cells. Time course experiments in H460 cells showed that induction of p38 phosphorylation preceded that of JNK. To explore the function of these kinases in apoptosis activation by TRAIL, chemical inhibitors or siRNAs were employed to impair JNK or p38 functioning. JNK activation counteracted TRAIL-induced apoptosis whereas activation of p38 stimulated apoptosis. Notably, the serine/threonine kinase RIP1 was cleaved following TRAIL treatment, concomitant with detectable JNK phosphorylation. Further examination of the role of RIP1 by short hairpin (sh)RNA-dependent knockdown or inhibition by necrostatin-1 showed that p38 can be phosphorylated in both RIP1-dependent and -independent manner, whereas JNK phosphorylation occurred independent of RIP1. On the other hand JNK appeared to suppress RIP1 cleavage via an unknown mechanism. In addition, only the activation of JNK by TRAIL was caspase-8-dependent. Finally, we identified Mcl-1, a known substrate for p38 and JNK, as a downstream modulator of JNK or p38 activity. Collectively, our data suggest in a subset of NSCLC cells a model in which TRAIL-induced activation of p38 and JNK have counteracting effects on Mcl-1 expression leading to pro- or anti-apoptotic effects, respectively. Strategies aiming to stimulate p38 and inhibit JNK may have benefit for TRAIL-based therapies in NSCLC.

  11. Multi-level disruption of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway mediates resistance of leukemia cells to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahomschi, S; Molinsky, J; Klanova, M; Andera, L; Peterka, M; Gasova, Z; Klener, P; Trneny, M; Necas, E; Simonova, T; Zivny, J; Klener, P

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of apoptotic pathways belongs to commonly reported molecular mechanisms that underlie cancer drug resistance. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, Apo2L) is a cytokine of the TNF family with selective anti-tumor activity and minimal toxicity toward healthy tissues. Primary leukemia cells are, however, largely intrinsically resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In this study we analyzed molecular differences between TRAIL-resistant K562 cell line and TRAIL-sensitive K562 clones. We demonstrate that TRAIL-sensitive K562 cells differ from the TRAIL-resistant cell line by cell surface downregulation of TRAIL decoy receptor 1, upregulation of both TRAIL death receptors, enhanced assembly and improved functioning of the death-inducing signaling complex, and increased cytoplasmic protein expression of CASP8 and key proapoptotic BCL2 members BID, BIM, BAD and BAK. The molecular basis of the intrinsic leukemia cell TRAIL resistance thus appears a consequence of the multi-level disruption of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The results of this study also suggest that the leukemia TRAIL-resistance is functional, leaving a possibility of overcoming the resistance by preexposure of the leukemia cells to potent TRAIL sensitizers, e.g. BH3-mimetics.

  12. Awareness and use of community walking trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Julian A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Wilson, Dawn K; Mixon, Gary; Cook, Annette

    2004-11-01

    Community trail development is an emerging strategy to increase physical activity (PA) among community residents. The purpose of this study was to assess awareness and use of trails and compare perceptions to objective data. A telephone survey was administered to a stratified sample of adults (N = 1,112) in a southeastern county in the United States. Respondents' home addresses and the locations of trails were entered into a GIS database. A kappa statistic was used to measure agreement between awareness and presence of trails. Differences in reported trail use patterns by sex, race, education, and PA levels were evaluated. There was no agreement between the awareness and presence of trails (kappa = 0.07). Fifty-six percent of the respondents reported having trails; however, only 33% reported using the trails. Of the trail users, 42% reported being regularly active in moderate-to-vigorous PA (30+ min/day for 5+ days/week), and 51% reported being less active (P or =30 min/day for > or =5 days/week), 49% of regular walkers and 35% of irregular walkers (Marketing programs should promote awareness and use of trails among older adults and irregularly active adults.

  13. Dyslipidemia and Diabetes Increase the OPG/TRAIL Ratio in the Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Toffoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dyslipidemia and diabetes are two of the most well established risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Both of them usually activate a complex range of pathogenic pathways leading to organ damage. Here we hypothesized that dyslipidemia and diabetes could affect osteoprotegerin (OPG and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL expression in the vessels and the heart. Materials and Methods. Gene and protein expression of OPG, TRAIL, and OPG/TRAIL ratio were quantified in the aorta and the hearts of control mice, dyslipidemic mice, and diabetic mice. Results. Diabetes significantly increased OPG and the OPG/TRAIL ratio expression in the aorta, while dyslipidemia was the major determinant of the changes observed in the heart, where it significantly increased OPG and reduced TRAIL expression, thus increasing cardiac OPG/TRAIL ratio. Conclusions. This work shows that both dyslipidemia and diabetes affect OPG/TRAIL ratio in the cardiovascular system. This could contribute to the changes in circulating OPG/TRAIL which are observed in patients with diabetes and CVD. Most importantly, these changes could mediate/contribute to atherosclerosis development and cardiac remodeling.

  14. Journey of TRAIL from bench to bedside and its potential role in immuno-oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Naoum

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells has increasingly been the focus of many therapeutic approaches in oncology field. Since its identification as a TNF family member, TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand paved a new path in apoptosis inducing cancer therapies. Its selective ability to activate extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways in cancer cells only, independently from p53 mutations responsible for conventional therapeutics resistance, spotted TRAIL as a potent cancer apoptotic agent. Many recombinant preparations of TRAIL and death receptor targeting monoclonal antibodies have been developed and being tested pre-clinically and clinically both as a single agent and in combinations. Of note, the monoclonal antibodies were not the only type of antibodies developed to target TRAIL receptors. Recent technology has brought forth several single chain variable domains (scFv designs fused recombinantly to TRAIL as well. Also, it is becoming progressively more understandable that field of nanotechnology has revolutionized cancer diagnosis and therapy. The recent breakthroughs in materials science and protein engineering have helped considerably in strategically loading drugs into nanoparticles or conjugating drugs to their surface. In this review we aim to comprehensively highlight the molecular knowledge of TRAIL in the context of its pathway, receptors and resistance factors. We also aim to review the clinical trials that have been done using TRAIL based therapies and to review various scFv designs, the arsenal of nano-carriers and molecules available to selectively target tumor cells with TRAIL.

  15. Genistein sensitizes human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by enhancing Bid cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cheng-Yun; Park, Cheol; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Gi-Young; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Lee, Su Jae; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2009-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, and it has been shown that many human cancer cell lines are refractory to TRAIL-induced cell death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance are unclear. In this study, we show that TRAIL resistance is reversed in human hepatoma cells by genistein, an isoflavone found in soy products. Synergistic induction of apoptosis in cells treated with genistein plus TRAIL was associated with cleavage of Bid, a proapoptotic BH3-only protein. Silencing of Bid expression reduced decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced apoptosis in cells treated with genistein and TRAIL, confirming that Bid cleavage is required for the response. Pretreatment with caspase-3 and caspase-8 inhibitors reduced cotreatment-induced apoptosis. However, treatment with TRAIL alone induced caspase-8 activity that was not different than TRAIL plus genistein; both effectively induced Bid cleavage. These data suggest that genistein abolishes resistance to the Bid cleavage of TRAIL, and that genistein does not interfere with signals upstream of Bid in hepatoma cells.

  16. Smac mimetic SM-164 potentiates APO2L/TRAIL- and doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuijun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The members of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs family are key negative regulators of apoptosis. Overexpression of IAPs are found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and can contribute to chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of HCC. Small-molecule Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac mimetics have recently emerged as novel anticancer drugs through targeting IAPs. The specific aims of this study were to 1 examine the anticancer activity of Smac mimetics as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy in HCC cells, and 2 investigate the mechanism of anticancer action of Smac mimetics. METHODS: Four HCC cell lines, including SMMC-7721, BEL-7402, HepG2 and Hep3B, and 12 primary HCC cells were used in this study. Smac mimetic SM-164 was used to treat HCC cells. Cell viability, cell death induction and clonal formation assays were used to evaluate the anticancer activity. Western blotting analysis and a pancaspase inhibitor were used to investigate the mechanisms. RESULTS: Although SM-164 induced complete cIAP-1 degradation, it displayed weak inhibitory effects on the viability of HCC cells. Nevertheless, SM-164 considerably potentiated Apo2 ligand or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (APO2L/TRAIL- and Doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in HCC cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that SM-164 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents resulted in enhanced activation of caspases-9, -3 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, and also led to decreased AKT activation. CONCLUSIONS: Smac mimetics can enhance chemotherapeutic-mediated anticancer activity by enhancing apoptosis signaling and suppressing survival signaling in HCC cells. This study suggests Smac mimetics are potential therapeutic agents for HCC.

  17. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  18. Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells express TRAIL receptors and can be sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarsky, Vladimir; Krivanek, Jan; Rankel, Liina; Nahacka, Zuzana; Barta, Tomas; Jaros, Josef; Andera, Ladislav; Hampl, Ales

    2013-11-15

    Death ligands and their tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family receptors are the best-characterized and most efficient inducers of apoptotic signaling in somatic cells. In this study, we analyzed whether these prototypic activators of apoptosis are also expressed and able to be activated in human pluripotent stem cells. We examined human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) and found that both cell types express primarily TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors and TNFR1, but very low levels of Fas/CD95. We also found that although hESC and hiPSC contain all the proteins required for efficient induction and progression of extrinsic apoptotic signaling, they are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. However, both hESC and hiPSC can be sensitized to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by co-treatment with protein synthesis inhibitors such as the anti-leukemia drug homoharringtonine (HHT). HHT treatment led to suppression of cellular FLICE inhibitory protein (cFLIP) and Mcl-1 expression and, in combination with TRAIL, enhanced processing of caspase-8 and full activation of caspase-3. cFLIP likely represents an important regulatory node, as its shRNA-mediated down-regulation significantly sensitized hESC to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Thus, we provide the first evidence that, irrespective of their origin, human pluripotent stem cells express canonical components of the extrinsic apoptotic system and on stress can activate death receptor-mediated apoptosis.

  19. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) regulates midline-1, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, inflammation, and remodeling in experimental eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Adam M; Sokulsky, Leon A; Sherrill, Joseph D; Nightingale, Scott; Hatchwell, Luke; Talley, Nicholas J; Walker, Marjorie M; Rothenberg, Marc E; Mattes, Joerg

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder of the esophagus defined by eosinophil infiltration and tissue remodeling with resulting symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) promotes inflammation through upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin-ligase midline-1 (MID1), which binds to and deactivates the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2Ac, resulting in increased nuclear factor κB activation. We sought to elucidate the role of TRAIL in EoE. We used Aspergillus fumigatus to induce EoE in TRAIL-sufficient (wild-type) and TRAIL-deficient (TRAIL(-/-)) mice and targeted MID1 in the esophagus with small interfering RNA. We also treated mice with recombinant thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and TRAIL. TRAIL deficiency and MID1 silencing with small interfering RNA reduced esophageal eosinophil and mast cell numbers and protected against esophageal circumference enlargement, muscularis externa thickening, and collagen deposition. MID1 expression and nuclear factor κB activation were reduced in TRAIL(-/-) mice, whereas protein phosphatase 2Ac levels were increased compared with those seen in wild-type control mice. This was associated with reduced expression of CCL24, CCL11, CCL20, IL-5, IL-13, IL-25, TGFB, and TSLP. Treatment with TSLP reconstituted hallmark features of EoE in TRAIL(-/-) mice and recombinant TRAIL induced esophageal TSLP expression in vivo in the absence of allergen. Post hoc analysis of gene array data demonstrated significant upregulation of TRAIL and MID1 in a cohort of children with EoE compared with that seen in controls. TRAIL regulates MID1 and TSLP, inflammation, fibrosis, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and expression of inflammatory effector chemokines and cytokines in experimental EoE. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The promise of cancer therapeutics targeting the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and TRAIL receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S

    2008-10-20

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF superfamily and has been shown to induce apoptosis in cancer cells but not normal cells. TRAIL triggers apoptosis through binding to its receptors DR4 and KILLER/DR5. Chemo or radiotherapy induces apoptosis through activation of p53 in response to cellular damage, whereas TRAIL induces apoptosis independent of p53. Mutations or deletions of p53 occurred in more than half of human tumors confer resistance to chemo-radiotherapy. Treatment of TRAIL-resistant tumors with agents targeting death receptors, intrinsic Bcl-2 family members, inhibitor of apoptosis proteins or PI3K/Akt pathway restores the sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Combination of rhTRAIL or the agonist antibody for TRAIL receptor with conventional chemotherapeutic agents results in enhanced efficacy in preventing tumor progression and metastasis. Therefore, the rational design of TRAIL-based therapy combining with other modality that either synergizes to apoptosis induction or overcomes the resistance represents a challenging strategy to achieve the systemic tumor targeting and augment the antitumor activity of cancer therapeutics.

  1. Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps for Active Load Alleviation in a Smart Rotor Configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo

    capture below rated conditions by using the flaps. Two model based control algorithms are developed to actively alleviate the fatigue loads on the smart rotor with ATEF. The first algorithm features a linear quadratic regulator with periodic disturbance rejection, and controls the deflection of the flap......The work investigates the development of an active smart rotor concept from an aero-servo-elastic perspective. An active smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators, is able to alleviate the fluctuating part of the aerodynamic loads it has...... the available actuators: ATEF, individual blade pitch, and generator. Both algorithms include frequency-dependent weighting of the control actions in order to limit high frequency control activity, and thus effectively reduce actuators use and wear. The smart rotor performances are evaluated from HAWC2...

  2. Combining trail with PI3 kinase or HSP90 inhibitors enhances apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells via suppression of survival signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Grazia; Valenti, Melanie; De Haven Brandon, Alexis; Thomas, George V; Eccles, Suzanne; Clarke, Paul A; Workman, Paul

    2013-08-01

    TRAIL has been shown to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, but in some cases they fail to respond to this ligand. We explored the ability of representative phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 Kinase)/mTOR and HSP90 inhibitors to overcome TRAIL resistance by increasing apoptosis in colorectal cancer models. We determined the sensitivity of 27 human colorectal cancer and 2 non-transformed colon epithelial cell lines to TRAIL treatment. A subset of the cancer cell lines with a range of responses to TRAIL was selected from the panel for treatment with TRAIL combined with the PI3 Kinase/mTOR inhibitor PI-103 or the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG (tanespimycin). Two TRAIL-resistant cell lines were selected for in vivo combination studies with TRAIL and 17-AAG. We found that 13 colorectal cancer cell lines and the 2 non-transformed colon epithelial cell lines were resistant to TRAIL. We demonstrated that co-treatment of TRAIL and PI-103 or 17-AAG was synergistic or additive and significantly enhanced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. This was associated with decreased expression or activity of survival protein biomarkers such as ERBB2, AKT, IKKα and XIAP. In contrast, the effect of the combination treatments in non-transformed colon cells was minimal. We show here for the first time that co-treatment in vivo with TRAIL and 17-AAG in two TRAIL-resistant human colorectal cancer xenograft models resulted in significantly greater tumor growth inhibition compared to single treatments. We propose that combining TRAIL with PI3 Kinase/mTOR or HSP90 inhibitors has therapeutic potential in the treatment of TRAIL-resistant colorectal cancers.

  3. Combinatorial treatment with anacardic acid followed by TRAIL augments induction of apoptosis in TRAIL resistant cancer cells by the regulation of p53, MAPK and NFκβ pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsha Raj, M; Yashaswini, B; Rössler, Jochen; Salimath, Bharathi P

    2016-05-01

    TRAIL, an apoptosis inducing cytokine currently in phase II clinical trial, was investigated for its capability to induce apoptosis in six different human tumor cell lines out of which three cell lines showed resistance to TRAIL induced apoptosis. To investigate whether Anacardic acid (A1) an active component of Anacardium occidentale can sensitize the resistant cell lines to TRAIL induced apoptosis, we treated the resistant cells with suboptimal concentration of A1 and showed that it is a potent enhancer of TRAIL induced apoptosis which up-regulates the expression of both DR4 and DR5 receptors, which has been observed in the cellular, protein and mRNA levels. The death receptors upregulation consequent to A1 treatment was corroborated by the activation of p53 as well as phosphorylation of p38 and JNK MAP kinases and concomitant inactivation of NFκβ and ERK signaling cascades. Also, A1 modulated the expression of key apoptotic players like Bax, Bcl-2 and CAD along with the abatement of tumor angiogenesis in vivo in EAT mouse model. Thus, post A1 treatment the TRAIL resistant cells turned into TRAIL sensitive cells. Hence our results demonstrate that A1 can synergize TRAIL induced apoptosis through the upregulation of death receptors and downregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins in cancer context.

  4. TAK1 is required for survival of mouse fibroblasts treated with TRAIL, and does so by NF-kappaB dependent induction of cFLIPL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Maria Lluis

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is known as a "death ligand"-a member of the TNF superfamily that binds to receptors bearing death domains. As well as causing apoptosis of certain types of tumor cells, TRAIL can activate both NF-kappaB and JNK signalling pathways. To determine the role of TGF-beta-Activated Kinase-1 (TAK1 in TRAIL signalling, we analyzed the effects of adding TRAIL to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs derived from TAK1 conditional knockout mice. TAK1-/- MEFs were significantly more sensitive to killing by TRAIL than wild-type MEFs, and failed to activate NF-kappaB or JNK. Overexpression of IKK2-EE, a constitutive activator of NF-kappaB, protected TAK1-/- MEFs against TRAIL killing, suggesting that TAK1 activation of NF-kappaB is critical for the viability of cells treated with TRAIL. Consistent with this model, TRAIL failed to induce the survival genes cIAP2 and cFlipL in the absence of TAK1, whereas activation of NF-kappaB by IKK2-EE restored the levels of both proteins. Moreover, ectopic expression of cFlipL, but not cIAP2, in TAK1-/- MEFs strongly inhibited TRAIL-induced cell death. These results indicate that cells that survive TRAIL treatment may do so by activation of a TAK1-NF-kappaB pathway that drives expression of cFlipL, and suggest that TAK1 may be a good target for overcoming TRAIL resistance.

  5. Temperamental activation and inhibition associated with autonomic function in preadolescents. The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Riese, Harriette; van Roon, Arie M.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Neeleman, Jan; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    We investigated the temperamental traits high-intensity pleasure (temperamental activation) and shyness (temperamental inhibition) in relation to autonomic function as measured by heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in 938 10-13-year-old

  6. Bidirectional Prospective Associations Between Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms. The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavrakakis, Nikolaos; de Jonge, Peter; Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    Purpose: Low levels of physical activity (PA) have been shown to be associated with depression in adults. The few studies that focused on adolescents yielded mixed and inconsistent results. Efforts to examine the direction of this relationship have been inconclusive up to now. The aims of this study

  7. FAST ROTATION AND TRAILING FRAGMENTS OF THE ACTIVE ASTEROID P/2012 F5 (GIBBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drahus, Michał; Waniak, Wacław [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, Kraków (Poland); Tendulkar, Shriharsh [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Agarwal, Jessica [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Jewitt, David [Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sheppard, Scott S., E-mail: drahus@oa.uj.edu.pl [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-20

    While having a comet-like appearance, P/2012 F5 (Gibbs) has an orbit native to the Main Asteroid Belt, and physically is a km-sized asteroid which recently (mid 2011) experienced an impulsive mass ejection event. Here we report new observations of this object obtained with the Keck II telescope on UT 2014 August 26. The data show previously undetected 200 m scale fragments of the main nucleus, and reveal a rapid nucleus spin with a rotation period of 3.24 ± 0.01 hr. The existence of large fragments and the fast nucleus spin are both consistent with rotational instability and partial disruption of the object. To date, many fast rotators have been identified among the minor bodies, which, however, do not eject detectable fragments at the present-day epoch, and also fragmentation events have been observed, but with no rotation period measured. P/2012 F5 is unique in that for the first time we detected fragments and quantified the rotation rate of one and the same object. The rapid spin rate of P/2012 F5 is very close to the spin rates of two other active asteroids in the Main Belt, 133P/Elst-Pizarro and (62412), confirming the existence of a population of fast rotators among these objects. But while P/2012 F5 shows impulsive ejection of dust and fragments, the mass loss from 133P is prolonged and recurrent. We believe that these two types of activity observed in the rapidly rotating active asteroids have a common origin in the rotational instability of the nucleus.

  8. RIP-1/c-FLIPL Induce Hepatic Cancer Cell Apoptosis Through Regulating Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jichun; Yu, Xiao; Wang, Changfa; Yu, Can; Li, Zhiqiang; Nie, Wanpin; Xu, Xundi; Miao, Xiongying; Jin, Xiaoxin

    2017-03-08

    BACKGROUND Almost all hepatic cancer cells have resistance to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. c-FLIPL and RIP-1 are apoptotic negative regulatory factors. This study investigated the role of c-FLIPL and RIP-1 in hepatic cancer cell resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS HepG2 cells were treated by TRAIL, RIP-1 siRNA, and/or BY11-7082. Cell viability was detected by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was tested by flow cytometry. DISC component proteins, RIP-1, and p-p65 were measured by Western blot. Caspase-8 and caspase-3 were determined by spectrophotometry. RESULTS Single TRAIL treatment showed no significant impact on cell proliferation and apoptosis. HepG2 cells expressed high levels of RIP1 and c-FLIPL, while a high concentration of TRAIL upregulated RIP-1 and c-FLIPL expression but not DR4 and DR5. Single TRAIL treatment did not obviously activate caspase-8 and caspase-3. RIP-1 or c-FLIPL siRNA markedly induced cell apoptosis and enhanced caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities. Combined transfection obviously increased apoptotic cells. TRAIL markedly upregulated RIP-1 expression and enhanced p-p65 protein. Downregulating RIP-1 and/or BAY11-7082 significantly reduced NF-kB transcriptional activity, blocked cells in G0/G1 phase, weakened proliferation, elevated caspase-8 and caspase-3 activities, and promoted cell apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS TRAIL can enhance RIP1 and c-FLIPL expression in HepG2 cells. High expression of RIP1 and c-FLIPL is an important reason for TRAIL resistance. Downregulation of RIP1 and c-FLIPL can relieve caspase-8 suppression, activate caspase-3, and promote cell apoptosis. TRAIL mediates apoptosis resistance through upregulating RIP-1 expression, enhancing NF-kB transcriptional activity, and weakening caspase activity.

  9. Novel HTS strategy identifies TRAIL-sensitizing compounds acting specifically through the caspase-8 apoptotic axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Finlay

    Full Text Available Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL is potentially a very important therapeutic as it shows selectivity for inducing apoptosis in cancer cells whilst normal cells are refractory. TRAIL binding to its cognate receptors, Death Receptors-4 and -5, leads to recruitment of caspase-8 and classical activation of downstream effector caspases, leading to apoptosis. As with many drugs however, TRAIL's usefulness is limited by resistance, either innate or acquired. We describe here the development of a novel 384-well high-throughput screening (HTS strategy for identifying potential TRAIL-sensitizing agents that act solely in a caspase-8 dependent manner. By utilizing a TRAIL resistant cell line lacking caspase-8 (NB7 compared to the same cells reconstituted with the wild-type protein, or with a catalytically inactive point mutant of caspase-8, we are able to identify compounds that act specifically through the caspase-8 axis, rather than through general toxicity. In addition, false positive hits can easily be "weeded out" in this assay due to their activity in cells lacking caspase-8-inducible activity. Screening of the library of pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC was performed as both proof-of-concept and to discover potential unknown TRAIL sensitizers whose mechanism is caspase-8 mediated. We identified known TRAIL sensitizers from the library and identified new compounds that appear to sensitize specifically through caspase-8. In sum, we demonstrate proof-of-concept and discovery of novel compounds with a screening strategy optimized for the detection of caspase-8 pathway-specific TRAIL sensitizers. This screen was performed in the 384-well format, but could easily be further miniaturized, allows easy identification of artifactual false positives, and is highly scalable to accommodate diverse libraries.

  10. Structural and mechanism design of an active trailing-edge flap blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Natarajan, Balakumaran; Eun, Won Jong

    2013-01-01

    , as the blade is able to withstand increased centrifugal force. The cross-section of the active blade is designed first. A stress/strain recovery analysis is then conducted to verify its structural integrity. A one-dimensional beam analysis is also carried out to assist with the construction of the fan diagram....... To select the actuator and design the flap actuation region, the flap hinge moment is estimated via a CFD analysis. To obtain the desired flap deflection of ±4°, three actuators are required. The design of the flap actuation region is validated using a test bed with a skin hinge. However, because the skin...... hinge induces additional flap hinge moment, it does not provide sufficient deflection angle. Therefore, the flap hinge is replaced by a pin-type hinge, and the results are evaluated....

  11. Bidirectional prospective associations between physical activity and depressive symptoms. The TRAILS Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakakis, Nikolaos; de Jonge, Peter; Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J

    2012-05-01

    Low levels of physical activity (PA) have been shown to be associated with depression in adults. The few studies that focused on adolescents yielded mixed and inconsistent results. Efforts to examine the direction of this relationship have been inconclusive up to now. The aims of this study were therefore to investigate (1) the direction of the inverse association between PA and depressive symptoms over time, and (2) whether these associations are specific to particular clusters of depressive symptoms in adolescents. Depressive symptoms and PA were assessed in a population sample of adolescents (N = 2,230) who were measured at three waves between age 10 and age 17. Depressive symptoms were measured by the Affective Problems scale of the Youth Self-Report and Child Behavior Checklist, whereas PA was operationalized as the amount of time spent on physical exercise. Structural equation modeling was used to examine bidirectional effects of PA and depressive symptoms over time. We found significant cross-lagged paths from prior PA to later depression as well as from prior depression to later PA (beta values = -.039 to -.047). After subdividing depression into affective and somatic symptoms, the affective symptoms were reciprocally related to PA, whereas the paths between somatic symptoms and PA did not reach statistical significance. An inverse bidirectional association between PA and general depressive symptoms was observed. This association was restricted to affective symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Melanoma-associated Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan (MCSP-targeted delivery of soluble TRAIL potently inhibits melanoma outgrowth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Waarde Aren

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced melanoma is characterized by a pronounced resistance to therapy leading to a limited patient survival of ~6 - 9 months. Here, we report on a novel bifunctional therapeutic fusion protein, designated anti-MCSP:TRAIL, that is comprised of a melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP-specific antibody fragment (scFv fused to soluble human TRAIL. MCSP is a well-established target for melanoma immunotherapy and has recently been shown to provide important tumorigenic signals to melanoma cells. TRAIL is a highly promising tumoricidal cytokine with no or minimal toxicity towards normal cells. Anti-MCSP:TRAIL was designed to 1. selectively accrete at the cell surface of MCSP-positive melanoma cells and inhibit MCSP tumorigenic signaling and 2. activate apoptotic TRAIL-signaling. Results Treatment of a panel of MCSP-positive melanoma cell lines with anti-MCSP:TRAIL induced TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death within 16 h. Of note, treatment with anti-MCSP:sTRAIL was also characterized by a rapid dephosphorylation of key proteins, such as FAK, implicated in MCSP-mediated malignant behavior. Importantly, anti-MCSP:TRAIL treatment already inhibited anchorage-independent growth by 50% at low picomolar concentrations, whereas > 100 fold higher concentrations of non-targeted TRAIL failed to reduce colony formation. Daily i.v. treatment with a low dose of anti-MCSP:TRAIL (0.14 mg/kg resulted in a significant growth retardation of established A375 M xenografts. Anti-MCSP:TRAIL activity was further synergized by co-treatment with rimcazole, a σ-ligand currently in clinical trials for the treatment of various cancers. Conclusions Anti-MCSP:TRAIL has promising pre-clinical anti-melanoma activity that appears to result from combined inhibition of tumorigenic MCSP-signaling and concordant activation of TRAIL-apoptotic signaling. Anti-MCSP:TRAIL alone, or in combination with rimcazole, may be of potential value for the

  13. TRAIL enhances paracetamol-induced liver sinusoidal endothelial cell death in a Bim- and Bid-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmann, A; Langsch, S; Keogh, A; Brunner, T; Kaufmann, T; Corazza, N

    2012-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, APAP) is a universally used analgesic and antipyretic agent. Considered safe at therapeutic doses, overdoses cause acute liver damage characterized by centrilobular hepatic necrosis. One of the major clinical problems of paracetamol-induced liver disease is the development of hemorrhagic alterations. Although hepatocytes represent the main target of the cytotoxic effect of paracetamol overdose, perturbations within the endothelium involving morphological changes of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have also been described in paracetamol-induced liver disease. Recently, we have shown that paracetamol-induced liver damage is synergistically enhanced by the TRAIL signaling pathway. As LSECs are constantly exposed to activated immune cells expressing death ligands, including TRAIL, we investigated the effect of TRAIL on paracetamol-induced LSEC death. We here demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL strongly enhances paracetamol-mediated LSEC death with typical features of apoptosis. Inhibition of caspases using specific inhibitors resulted in a strong reduction of cell death. TRAIL appears to enhance paracetamol-induced LSEC death via the activation of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins Bid and Bim, which initiate the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together this study shows that the liver endothelial layer, mainly LSECs, represent a direct target of the cytotoxic effect of paracetamol and that activation of TRAIL receptor synergistically enhances paracetamol-induced LSEC death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. TRAIL-mediated acceleration of paracetamol-induced cell death may thus contribute to the pathogenesis of paracetamol-induced liver damage. PMID:23254290

  14. TRAIL enhances paracetamol-induced liver sinusoidal endothelial cell death in a Bim- and Bid-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badmann, A; Langsch, S; Keogh, A; Brunner, T; Kaufmann, T; Corazza, N

    2012-12-20

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, APAP) is a universally used analgesic and antipyretic agent. Considered safe at therapeutic doses, overdoses cause acute liver damage characterized by centrilobular hepatic necrosis. One of the major clinical problems of paracetamol-induced liver disease is the development of hemorrhagic alterations. Although hepatocytes represent the main target of the cytotoxic effect of paracetamol overdose, perturbations within the endothelium involving morphological changes of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have also been described in paracetamol-induced liver disease. Recently, we have shown that paracetamol-induced liver damage is synergistically enhanced by the TRAIL signaling pathway. As LSECs are constantly exposed to activated immune cells expressing death ligands, including TRAIL, we investigated the effect of TRAIL on paracetamol-induced LSEC death. We here demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL strongly enhances paracetamol-mediated LSEC death with typical features of apoptosis. Inhibition of caspases using specific inhibitors resulted in a strong reduction of cell death. TRAIL appears to enhance paracetamol-induced LSEC death via the activation of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins Bid and Bim, which initiate the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together this study shows that the liver endothelial layer, mainly LSECs, represent a direct target of the cytotoxic effect of paracetamol and that activation of TRAIL receptor synergistically enhances paracetamol-induced LSEC death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. TRAIL-mediated acceleration of paracetamol-induced cell death may thus contribute to the pathogenesis of paracetamol-induced liver damage.

  15. Targeting Death Receptor TRAIL-R2 by Chalcones for TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szliszka, Ewelina; Jaworska, Dagmara; Kłósek, Małgorzata; Czuba, Zenon P.; Król, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in cancer cells without toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL binds to death receptors, TRAIL-R1 (DR4) and TRAIL-R2 (DR5) expressed on cancer cell surface and activates apoptotic pathways. Endogenous TRAIL plays an important role in immune surveillance and defense against cancer cells. However, as more tumor cells are reported to be resistant to TRAIL mediated death, it is important to search for and develop new strategies to overcome this resistance. Chalcones can sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We examined the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of TRAIL in combination with four chalcones: chalcone, isobavachalcone, licochalcone A and xanthohumol on HeLa cancer cells. The cytotoxicity was measured by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was detected using annexin V-FITC staining by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Death receptor expression was analyzed using flow cytometry. The decreased expression of death receptors in cancer cells may be the cause of TRAIL-resistance. Chalcones enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells through increased expression of TRAIL-R2. Our study has indicated that chalcones augment the antitumor activity of TRAIL and confirm their cancer chemopreventive properties. PMID:23203129

  16. Molecular Targets of TRAIL-Sensitizing Agents in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Monteleone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL, a member of the TNF superfamily, interacts with its functional death receptors (DRs and induces apoptosis in a wide range of cancer cell types. Therefore, TRAIL has been considered as an attractive agent for cancer therapy. However, many cancers are resistant to TRAIL-based therapies mainly due to the reduced expression of DRs and/or up-regulation of TRAIL pathway-related anti-apoptotic proteins. Compounds that revert such defects restore the sensitivity of cancer cells to TRAIL, suggesting that combined therapies could help manage neoplastic patients. In this article, we will focus on the TRAIL-sensitizing effects of natural products and synthetic compounds in colorectal cancer (CRC cells and discuss the molecular mechanisms by which such agents enhance the response of CRC cells to TRAIL.

  17. Aptamer-miRNA-212 Conjugate Sensitizes NSCLC Cells to TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Iaboni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a promising antitumor agent for its remarkable ability to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells, without affecting the viability of healthy bystander cells. The TRAIL tumor suppressor pathway is deregulated in many human malignancies including lung cancer. In human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, sensitization to TRAIL therapy can be restored by increasing the expression levels of the tumor suppressor microRNA-212 (miR-212 leading to inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein PED/PEA-15 implicated in treatment resistance. In this study, we exploited a previously described RNA aptamer inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase receptor Axl (GL21.T expressed on lung cancer cells, as a means to deliver miR-212 into human NSCLC cells expressing Axl. We demonstrate efficient delivery of miR-212 following conjugation of the miR to GL21.T (GL21.T-miR212 chimera. We show that the chimera downregulates PED and restores TRAIL-mediate cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Importantly, treatment of Axl+ lung cancer cells with the chimera resulted in (i an increase in caspase activation and (ii a reduction of cell viability in combination with TRAIL therapy. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the GL21.T-miR212 chimera can be employed as an adjuvant to TRAIL therapy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  18. HDAC2 attenuates TRAIL-induced apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saur Dieter

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is one of the most malignant tumors with a dismal prognosis and no effective conservative therapeutic strategies. Although it is demonstrated that histone deacetylases (HDACs, especially the class I HDACs HDAC1, 2 and 3 are highly expressed in this disease, little is known about HDAC isoenzyme specific functions. Results Depletion of HDAC2, but not HDAC1, in the pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa2 and Panc1 resulted in a marked sensitization towards the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Correspondingly, the more class I selective HDAC inhibitor (HDACI valproic acid (VPA synergized with TRAIL to induce apoptosis of MiaPaCa2 and Panc1 cells. At the molecular level, an increased expression of the TRAIL receptor 1 (DR5, accelerated processing of caspase 8, pronounced cleavage of the BH3-only protein Bid, and increased effector caspase activation was observed in HDAC2-depleted and TRAIL-treated MiaPaCa2 cells. Conclusions Our data characterize a novel HDAC2 function in PDAC cells and point to a strategy to overcome TRAIL resistance of PDAC cells, a prerequisite to succeed with a TRAIL targeted therapy in clinical settings.

  19. Modulation of TRAIL resistance in colon carcinoma cells : Different contributions of DR4 and DR5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geelen, Caroline M. M.; Pennarun, Bodvael; Le, Phuong T. K.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Background: rhTRAIL is a therapeutic agent, derived from the TRAIL cytokine, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells by activating the membrane death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). Here, we investigated each receptor's contribution to rhTRAIL sensitivity and rhTRAIL resistance. We assessed whether

  20. RGD-avidin-biotin pretargeting to alpha(v)beta(3) integrin enhances the proapoptotic activity of TNF alpha related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarrus, Marc; van der Sloot, Almer M.; Temming, Kai; Lacombe, Marie; Opdam, Frank; Quax, Wim J.; Molema, Grietje; Poelstra, Klaas; Kok, Robbert J.

    Recombinant TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered a powerful and selective inducer of tumor cell death. We hypothesize that TRAIL's potential as anticancer agent can be enhanced further by promoting its accumulation in tumor tissue. For this purpose, we developed TRAIL

  1. Minnesota State Trails - Cartographic Version

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — State trails maintained by Minnesota DNR Division of Parks and Trails, with geometry modified to support cartographic rendering and labeling. These trails have...

  2. Electronic Escape Trails for Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles; Schipper, John; Betts, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    A proposed wireless-communication and data-processing system would exploit recent advances in radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) and software to establish information lifelines between firefighters in a burning building and a fire chief at a control station near but outside the building. The system would enable identification of trails that firefighters and others could follow to escape from the building, including identification of new trails should previously established trails become blocked. The system would include a transceiver unit and a computer at the control station, portable transceiver units carried by the firefighters in the building, and RFID tags that the firefighters would place at multiple locations as they move into and through the building (see figure). Each RFID tag, having a size of the order of a few centimeters, would include at least standard RFID circuitry and possibly sensors for measuring such other relevant environmental parameters as temperature, levels of light and sound, concentration of oxygen, concentrations of hazardous chemicals in smoke, and/or levels of nuclear radiation. The RFID tags would be activated and interrogated by the firefighters and control-station transceivers. Preferably, RFID tags would be configured to communicate with each other and with the firefighters units and the control station in an ordered sequence, with built-in redundancy. In a typical scenario, as firefighters moved through a building, they would scatter many RFID tags into smoke-obscured areas by use of a compressed-air gun. Alternatively or in addition, they would mark escape trails by dropping RFID tags at such points of interest as mantraps, hot spots, and trail waypoints. The RFID tags could be of different types, operating at different frequencies to identify their functions, and possibly responding by emitting audible beeps when activated by signals transmitted by transceiver units carried by nearby firefighters.

  3. TRAIL sensitize MDR cells to MDR-related drugs by down-regulation of P-glycoprotein through inhibition of DNA-PKcs/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and activation of caspases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of new modulator possessing high efficacy, low toxicity and high selectivity is a pivotal approach to overcome P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer treatment. In this study, we suggest a new molecular mechanism that TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) down-regulates P-glycoprotein (P-gp) through inhibition of DNA-PKcs/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and activation of caspases and thereby sensitize MDR cells to MDR-related drugs. Results MDR variants, CEM/VLB10-2, CEM/VLB55-8 and CEM/VLB100 cells, with gradually increased levels of P-gp derived from human lymphoblastic leukemia CEM cells, were gradually more susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicity than parental CEM cells. The P-gp level of MDR variants was positively correlated with the levels of DNA-PKcs, pAkt, pGSK-3β and c-Myc as well as DR5 and negatively correlated with the level of c-FLIPs. Hypersensitivity of CEM/VLB100 cells to TRAIL was accompanied by the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as well as the activation of initiator caspases. In addition, TRAIL-induced down-regulation of DNA-PKcs/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and c-FLIP and up-regulation of cell surface expression of death receptors were associated with the increased susceptibility to TRAIL of MDR cells. Moreover, TRAIL inhibited P-gp efflux function via caspase-3-dependent degradation of P-gp as well as DNA-PKcs and subsequently sensitized MDR cells to MDR-related drugs such as vinblastine and doxorubicin. We also found that suppression of DNA-PKcs by siRNA enhanced the susceptibility of MDR cells to vincristine as well as TRAIL via down-regulation of c-FLIP and P-gp expression and up-regulation of DR5. Conclusion This study showed for the first time that the MDR variant of CEM cells was hypersensitive to TRAIL due to up-regulation of DR5 and concomitant down-regulation of c-FLIP, and degradation of P-gp and DNA-PKcs by activation of caspase-3 might be

  4. Osthole enhances TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through downregulation of c-FLIP expression in renal carcinoma Caki cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung-Jin; Han, Min Ae; Kim, Shin; Park, Jong-Wook; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Osthole, an active constituent isolated from the fruit of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, has been shown to induce various beneficial biochemical effects such as anti-inflammatory and antitumor. In the present study, we examined whether osthole could sensitize TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in human renal carcinoma Caki cells. We found that osthole and TRAIL alone, had no effect on apoptosis, but combined treatment with osthole and TRAIL markedly induced apoptosis in Caki (renal carcinoma), U251MG (glioma) and MDA-MB-231 (breast carcinoma) cells. In contrast, combined treatment with osthole and TRAIL did not induce apoptosis in normal human skin fibroblast cells. Osthole induced downregulation of cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) expression, and overexpression of c-FLIP markedly blocked apoptosis induced by the combined treatment with osthole and TRAIL. In addition, osthole markedly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential levels, and increased cytosolic cytochrome c release in combined treatment with osthole and TRAIL. Therefore, these data suggest that osthole may be an efficient TRAIL sensitizer.

  5. Low Circulating TRAIL Levels Are Associated with Increase of Resistin and Lipocalin-2/ngal Adipokines in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Tisato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is attracting attention for its role in the physiopathology of metabolic disease/diabetes. Evidence suggests that it might protect against metabolic abnormalities driven by obesity-induced dysregulated secretion of adipokines, but this role of TRAIL has not yet been fully established. On this basis, we aimed to investigate the potential association between TRAIL and adipokine levels in a cohort of subjects in which age/gender/hormonal interferences were excluded. Methods. Serum levels of TRAIL and a panel of adipokines were measured in postmenopausal women (n=147 stratified according to waist circumference measures as normal, overweight, or obese. The panel of adipokines included interleukin- (IL- 6, IL-8, IL-1β, adipsin, lipocalin-2/neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (ngal, TNF-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, hepatocyte growth factor, resistin, leptin, adiponectin, and nerve growth factor. Results. Low serum TRAIL concentration (deciles I–IV was significantly and inversely correlated with resistin and lipocalin 2/ngal levels (r=−0.502 and p<0.001 and r=−0.360 and p<0.01, resp.. Both associations retained their statistical significance after adjustment for confounding factors, such as waist circumference and age. Conclusions. Our data indicate a link between low circulating levels of TRAIL and markers of obesity-induced diseases (resistin and lipocalin-2/ngal, highlighting a new potential axis of TRAIL functions.

  6. Possible novel therapy for malignant gliomas with secretable trimeric TRAIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonsup Jeong

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Despite intensive clinical investigation and many novel therapeutic approaches, average survival for the patients with malignant gliomas is only about 1 year. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL has shown potent and cancer-selective killing activity and drawn considerable attention as a promising therapy for cancers, but concerns over delivery and toxicity have limited progress. We have developed a secretable trimeric TRAIL (stTRAIL and here evaluated the therapeutic potential of this stTRAIL-based gene therapy in brain tumors. An adenovirus (Ad-stTRAIL delivering stTRAIL was injected into intra-cranial human glioma tumors established in nude mice and tumor growth monitored using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Ad-stTRAIL gene therapy showed potent tumor suppressor activity with no toxic side effects at therapeutically effective doses. When compared with 1, 3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU, a conventional therapy for malignant gliomas, Ad-stTRAIL suppressed tumor growth more potently. The combination of Ad-stTRAIL and BCNU significantly increased survival compared to the control mice or mice receiving Ad-stTRAIL alone. Our data indicate that Ad-stTRAIL, either alone or combined with BCNU, has promise as a novel therapy for malignant gliomas.

  7. Downregulation of DcR3 sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang CJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaojie Liang,* Yingchen Xu,* Guangming Li, Tuanjie Zhao, Feng Xia, Guanqun Li, Dongxin Zhang, Jixiang Wu Department of General Surgery, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3 has been recently described as an antiapoptosis and prometastasis factor since it can competitively bind to FasL, TL1A, and LIGHT, and it is highly expressed in many malignant tumors. Downregulation of DcR3 can promote tumor cell apoptosis and inhibit metastasis. A previous study demonstrated that reduction of DcR3 could induce tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. However, whether such an effect is seen in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains to be explored. This study was designed to investigate the sensitivity of HCC cells to TRAIL after silencing DcR3, and this was done by evaluating the expression of DcR3 in HCC cells and the effect on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis after downregulation of DcR3. Our data showed that DcR3 was highly expressed in HepG2, BEL-7402, Hep3B, Huh-7, MHCC97H, and SMCC7721 cell lines compared with normal liver cell line LO-2. Both HepG2 and BEL-7402 were tolerant to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, and the tolerance was negatively correlated to the expression of DcR3. Silencing of DcR3 with shRNA and treatment with TRAIL induced obvious apoptosis in HepG2 and BEL-7402, with more cancer cells found in the G1 phase. SiDcR3 combined with TRAIL could induce activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9, raise the expression of the apoptotic protein Bax, and reduce the expression of antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, Mcl-1, Bcl-XL, IAP-2, and survivin. Caspase-8 inhibitor Ac-IETD-CHO significantly decreased the activation of caspase cascade, indicating that the extrinsic pathway may have a vital role in the apoptotic events induced by SiDcR3/TRAIL. Furthermore, our

  8. Targeting c-Met receptor overcomes TRAIL-resistance in brain tumors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Du, Wanlu; Uslar, Liubov; Sevala, Sindhura; Shah, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    .... We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR) 5...

  9. Targeting c-Met Receptor Overcomes TRAIL-Resistance in Brain Tumors: e95490

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wanlu Du; Liubov Uslar; Sindhura Sevala; Khalid Shah

    2014-01-01

    .... We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR) 5...

  10. Sulforaphane and TRAIL induce a synergistic elimination of advanced prostate cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labsch, Sabrina; Liu, Li; Bauer, Nathalie; Zhang, Yiyao; Aleksandrowicz, Ewa; Gladkich, Jury; Schönsiegel, Frank; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-05-01

    Advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. Apoptosis-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in AIPC and are not eliminated by current therapeutics. Novel therapeutic options, which are currently being evaluated in patient studies, include TRAIL and the broccoli-derived isothiocyanate sulforaphane. Although neither agent targets normal cells, TRAIL induces apoptosis in most cancer cells, and sulforaphane eliminates CSCs. In this study, the established AIPC cell lines DU145 and PC3, with enriched CSC features, and primary patient-derived prostate CSCs were treated with sulforaphane and recombinant soluble TRAIL. We examined the effects of these drugs on NF-κB activity, self-renewal and differentiation potential, and stem cell signaling via spheroid- and colony-forming assays, FACS and western blot analyses, immunohistochemistry, and an antibody protein array in vitro and after xenotransplantation. We largely found a stronger effect of sulforaphane on CSC properties compared to TRAIL, though the agents acted synergistically when applied in combination. This was associated with the inhibition of TRAIL-induced NF-κB binding; CXCR4, Jagged1, Notch 1, SOX 2, and Nanog expression; ALDH1 activity inhibition; and the elimination of differentiation and self-renewal potential. In vivo, tumor engraftment and tumor growth were strongly inhibited, without the induction of liver necrosis or other obvious side effects. These findings suggest that sulforaphane shifts the balance from TRAIL-induced survival signals to apoptosis and thus explains the observed synergistic effect. A nutritional strategy for high sulforaphane intake may target the cancer-specific activity of TRAIL in CSCs.

  11. Synergistic antitumor activity of recombinant human Apo2L/tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in combination with carboplatin and pemetrexed in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasello, Giulia; Urso, Loredana; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Schiavon, Marco; Cavallari, Ilaria; Marulli, Giuseppe; Nannini, Nazarena; Rea, Federico; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Favaretto, Adolfo

    2014-07-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive, currently incurable tumor with increasing incidence in industrialized countries. Tumor necrosis factor-related, apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF family, which induces cancer cell death through extrinsic apoptotic pathway, while sparing normal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor activity of recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL (dulanermin) in combination with chemotherapy in MPM in vitro and in vivo. In the present studies, we employed a panel of MPM cell lines to test the antitumor activity of recombinant human Apo2L/TRAIL (T) in combination with carboplatin and pemetrexed (CP) in vitro and SCID mice. Results demonstrated a significant increase of apoptosis in cell lines treated with CPT compared with those receiving CP or T as single agents. This synergistic effect was dependent on the ability of CP to increase the expression of the TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5 in a p53 manner. The CPT combination was also effective in blocking the growth of MPM cell lines in a SCID mice preclinical model. CPT increases MPM cell death in vitro and in vivo compared with CP. In vitro results suggest that chemotherapy sensitizes MPM to TRAIL-dependent apoptosis through p53 activation and subsequent upregulation of DRs.

  12. DRBE comet trails

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.G.Arendt@nasa.gov [CREST/UMBC, Code 665, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Re-examination of the Cosmic Background Explorer Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) data reveals the thermal emission of several comet dust trails. The dust trails of 1P/Halley, 169P/NEAT, and 3200 Phaethon have not been previously reported. The known trails of 2P/Encke and 73P/Schwassmann–Wachmann 3 are also seen. The dust trails have 12 and 25 μm surface brightnesses of <0.1 and <0.15 MJy sr{sup −1}, respectively, which is <1% of the zodiacal light intensity. The trails are very difficult to see in any single daily image of the sky, but are evident as rapidly moving linear features in movies of the DIRBE data. Some trails are clearest when crossing through the orbital plane of the parent comet, but others are best seen at high ecliptic latitudes as the Earth passes over or under the dust trail. All these comets have known associations with meteor showers. This re-examination also reveals 1 additional comet and 13 additional asteroids that had not previously been recognized in the DIRBE data.

  13. Selective induction of apoptosis in leukemic B-lymphoid cells by a CD19-specific TRAIL fusion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieglmaier, Julia; Bremer, Edwin; Kellner, Christian; Liebig, Tanja M.; ten Cate, Bram; Peipp, Matthias; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Pfeiffer, Matthias; Buehring, Hans-Joerg; Greil, Johann; Oduncu, Fuat; Emmerich, Bertold; Fey, Georg H.; Helfrich, Wijnand

    Although the treatment outcome of lymphoid malignancies has improved in recent years by the introduction of transplantation and antibody-based therapeutics, relapse remains a major problem. Therefore, new therapeutic options are urgently needed. One promising approach is the selective activation of

  14. Molecular mechanism of ER stress-induced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Yarui; Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Zhaolin; Li, Xiaohui; Wang, Huan; Ni, Mingming; Li, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, whose members are capable of inducing apoptosis and inflammation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) plays a key role in immune surveillance in macrophages. TRAIL mRNA and protein expression have previously been detected in macrophages; however, whether ERS has any effects on TRAIL expression in macrophages has not yet been determined. Here, we demonstrate that thapsigargin (TG) and tunicamycin (TM), two ERS inducers activated macrophages were able to increase TRAIL mRNA and protein expression in RAW264.7 macrophages, the culture supernatant of THP-1 cells, and mouse peritoneal macrophages, indicating that ERS as a potent inducer of TRAIL transcription and expression in macrophages. This effect was blocked by the specific JNK inhibitor SP600125 and transcription factor AP-1 inhibitor SR 1130. Interestingly, at the molecular level, regulation of TRAIL expression by ERS was accompanied by a significant decrease in cytokine signaling suppressor 3 (SOCS3). SOCS3 siRNA clearly increased the expression of TRAIL mRNA and protein under ERS by activating the AP-1 components phosphorylated c-Jun and phosphorylated c-Fos in RAW264.7 cells. In contrast, over-expression of SOCS3 reversed ERS-induced TRAIL expression. These findings provide in vitro evidence that SOCS3 plays a critical negative role in the regulation of ERS-induced TRAIL expression via the Jun N-terminal kinase/AP-1 signaling pathway in macrophages. © 2015 FEBS.

  15. The Synergistic Effects of Low Dose Fluorouracil and TRAIL on TRAIL-Resistant Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma AGS Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a TNF family member which has been under intense focus because of its remarkable ability to induce apoptosis in malignant human cells while leaving normal cells unscathed. However, many cancer cells remain resistant to TRAIL. In this study, we had investigated the synergistic effects of low dose fluorouracil (5-Fu and TRAIL on TRAIL-resistant human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cells and explored the potential mechanisms. Cell viability was analyzed by sulforhodamine B (SRB assay and the synergistic effects were evaluated by Jin’s formula and confirmed by both morphological changes under inverted microscope and flow cytometry. The expression of TRAIL-R1 (death receptor 4, DR4, TRAIL-R2 (DR5, TRAIL-R3 (decoy receptor, DcR1, TRAIL-R4 (DcR2, procaspase-3, procaspase-8, and procaspase-9 was detected by western blotting. Our results showed that there were significant synergistic effects of low dose 5-Fu and TRAIL on TRAIL-resistant AGS cells, and this effect was supposed to be mediated by decreasing DcR2 expression and increasing DR5 expression. The extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways were both activated. The data suggest that combined treatment of low dose 5-Fu and TRAIL can be an effective therapeutic approach for gastric adenocarcinoma.

  16. TRAIL-coated lipid-nanoparticles overcome resistance to soluble recombinant TRAIL in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miguel, Diego; Gallego-Lleyda, Ana; María Ayuso, José; Erviti-Ardanaz, Sandra; Pazo-Cid, Roberto; del Agua, Celia; José Fernández, Luis; Ochoa, Ignacio; Anel, Alberto; Martinez-Lostao, Luis

    2016-05-01

    Purpose. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one the types of cancer with higher prevalence and mortality. Apo2-Ligand/TRAIL is a TNF family member able to induce apoptosis in tumor cells but not in normal cells. It has been tested in clinical trials against different types of human cancer including NSCLC. However, results of clinical trials have shown a limited efficacy of TRAIL-based therapies. Recently we have demonstrated that artificial lipid nanoparticles coated with bioactive Apo2L/TRAIL (LUV-TRAIL) greatly improved TRAIL cytotoxic ability being capable of killing chemoresistant hematological cancer cells. In the present work we have extended the study to NSCLC. Methods/patients. LUV-TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity was assessed on different NSCLC cell lines with different sensitivity to soluble TRAIL and on primary human tumor cells from three patients suffering from NSCLC cancer. We also tested LUV-TRAIL-cytotoxic ability in combination with several anti-tumor agents. Results. LUV-TRAIL exhibited a greater cytotoxic effect compared to soluble TRAIL both in A549 cells and primary human NSCLC cells. LUV-TRAIL-induced cell death was dependent on caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation. Moreover, combination of LUV-TRAIL with other anti-tumor agents such as flavopiridol, and SNS-032 clearly enhanced LUV-TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity against NSCLC cancer cells. Conclusion. The novel formulation of TRAIL based on displaying it on the surface of lipid nanoparticles greatly increases its anti-tumor activity and has clinical potential in cancer treatment.

  17. Compatibility of Ohio trail users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger E. McCay; George H. Moeller

    1976-01-01

    Compatibility indexes show how Ohio trail users feel about meeting each other on the trail. All four of the major types of trail users-hikers, horseback riders, bicycle riders, and motorcycle riders-enjoy meeting their own kind. But they also feel antagonism toward the faster, more mechanized trail users; e.g., everyone likes hikers, but few like motorcycle riders....

  18. Regulation of TRAIL-Receptor Expression by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Dhifaf; D’Arcy, Padraig; Lundqvist, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand- receptor (TRAIL-R) family has emerged as a key mediator of cell fate and survival. Ligation of TRAIL ligand to TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 initiates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway characterized by the recruitment of death domains, assembly of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), caspase activation and ultimately apoptosis. Conversely the decoy receptors TRAIL-R3 and TRAIL-R4, which lack the pro-apoptotic death domain, function to dampen the apoptotic response by competing for TRAIL ligand. The tissue restricted expression of the decoy receptors on normal but not cancer cells provides a therapeutic rational for the development of selective TRAIL-mediated anti-tumor therapies. Recent clinical trials using agonistic antibodies against the apoptosis-inducing TRAIL receptors or recombinant TRAIL have been promising; however the number of patients in complete remission remains stubbornly low. The mechanisms of TRAIL resistance are relatively unexplored but may in part be due to TRAIL-R down-regulation or shedding of TRAIL-R by tumor cells. Therefore a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying TRAIL resistance is required. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been shown to regulate TRAIL-R members suggesting that pharmacological inhibition of the UPS may be a novel strategy to augment TRAIL-based therapies and increase efficacies. We recently identified b-AP15 as an inhibitor of proteasome deubiquitinase (DUB) activity. Interestingly, exposure of tumor cell lines to b-AP15 resulted in increased TRAIL-R2 expression and enhanced sensitivity to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and cell death in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, targeting the UPS may represent a novel strategy to increase the cell surface expression of pro-apoptotic TRAIL-R on cancer cells and should be considered in clinical trials targeting TRAIL-receptors in cancer patients. PMID:25318057

  19. Regulation of TRAIL-Receptor Expression by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhifaf Sarhan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand- receptor (TRAIL-R family has emerged as a key mediator of cell fate and survival. Ligation of TRAIL ligand to TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 initiates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway characterized by the recruitment of death domains, assembly of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC, caspase activation and ultimately apoptosis. Conversely the decoy receptors TRAIL-R3 and TRAIL-R4, which lack the pro-apoptotic death domain, function to dampen the apoptotic response by competing for TRAIL ligand. The tissue restricted expression of the decoy receptors on normal but not cancer cells provides a therapeutic rational for the development of selective TRAIL-mediated anti-tumor therapies. Recent clinical trials using agonistic antibodies against the apoptosis-inducing TRAIL receptors or recombinant TRAIL have been promising; however the number of patients in complete remission remains stubbornly low. The mechanisms of TRAIL resistance are relatively unexplored but may in part be due to TRAIL-R down-regulation or shedding of TRAIL-R by tumor cells. Therefore a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying TRAIL resistance is required. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS has been shown to regulate TRAIL-R members suggesting that pharmacological inhibition of the UPS may be a novel strategy to augment TRAIL-based therapies and increase efficacies. We recently identified b-AP15 as an inhibitor of proteasome deubiquitinase (DUB activity. Interestingly, exposure of tumor cell lines to b-AP15 resulted in increased TRAIL-R2 expression and enhanced sensitivity to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and cell death in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, targeting the UPS may represent a novel strategy to increase the cell surface expression of pro-apoptotic TRAIL-R on cancer cells and should be considered in clinical trials targeting TRAIL-receptors in cancer patients.

  20. State Park Trails

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set is a collection of ArcView shapefiles (by park) of trails within statutory boundaries of individual MN State Parks, State Recreation Areas and State...

  1. Continental Divide Trail

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This shapefile was created to show the proximity of the Continental Divide to the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail in New Mexico. This work was done as part...

  2. Minnesota Water Trails

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This shapefile describes water trails in the State of Minnesota as designated through legislation and recognized by the Department of Natural Resources. The...

  3. Airbag Trails-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This segment of the first color image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rover's airbag trails (upper left). These depressions in the soil were made when the airbags were deflated and retracted after landing.

  4. Amiodarone sensitizes human glioma cells but not astrocytes to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via CHOP-mediated DR5 upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Young; Kang, You Jung; Yoon, Mi Jin; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Seung U; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, In Ah; Choi, Kyeong Sook

    2011-01-01

    Amiodarone is a widely used anti-arrhythmic drug that inhibits diverse ion channels, including the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX), L-type Ca2+ channels, and Na+ channels. Here, we report that subtoxic doses of amiodarone and tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) synergistically induced apoptosis of various glioma cells. Treatment of U251MG glioma cells with amiodarone increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and enhanced the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). This upregulation of CHOP was followed by marked upregulation of the TRAIL receptor, DR5. Suppression of DR5 expression by small interfering (si) RNAs almost completely blocked amiodarone/TRAIL-induced apoptosis in U251MG glioma cells, demonstrating that DR5 is critical to this cell death. siRNA-mediated CHOP suppression reduced amiodarone-induced DR5 upregulation and attenuated the cell death induced by amiodarone plus TRAIL. In addition, omitting Ca2+ from the external medium using ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid markedly inhibited this cell death, reducing the protein levels of CHOP and DR5. These results suggest that amiodarone-induced influx of Ca2+ plays an important role in sensitizing U251MG cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through CHOP-mediated DR5 upregulation. Furthermore, subtoxic doses of bepridil and cibenzoline, two other anti-arrhythmic drugs with NCX-inhibitor activity, also sensitized glioma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, via the upregulation of both CHOP and DR5. Notably, amiodarone/TRAIL cotreatment did not induce cell death in astrocytes, nor did it affect the expression of CHOP or DR5 in these cells. These results collectively suggest that a combined regimen of amiodarone plus TRAIL may offer an effective therapeutic strategy for safely and selectively treating resistant gliomas. PMID:21292685

  5. Amiodarone sensitizes human glioma cells but not astrocytes to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via CHOP-mediated DR5 upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Young; Kang, You Jung; Yoon, Mi Jin; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Seung U; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, In Ah; Choi, Kyeong Sook

    2011-03-01

    Amiodarone is a widely used anti-arrhythmic drug that inhibits diverse ion channels, including the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX), L-type Ca(2+) channels, and Na(+) channels. Here, we report that subtoxic doses of amiodarone and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) synergistically induced apoptosis of various glioma cells. Treatment of U251MG glioma cells with amiodarone increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels and enhanced the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). This upregulation of CHOP was followed by marked upregulation of the TRAIL receptor, DR5. Suppression of DR5 expression by small interfering (si) RNAs almost completely blocked amiodarone/TRAIL-induced apoptosis in U251MG glioma cells, demonstrating that DR5 is critical to this cell death. siRNA-mediated CHOP suppression reduced amiodarone-induced DR5 upregulation and attenuated the cell death induced by amiodarone plus TRAIL. In addition, omitting Ca(2+) from the external medium using ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid markedly inhibited this cell death, reducing the protein levels of CHOP and DR5. These results suggest that amiodarone-induced influx of Ca(2+) plays an important role in sensitizing U251MG cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through CHOP-mediated DR5 upregulation. Furthermore, subtoxic doses of bepridil and cibenzoline, two other anti-arrhythmic drugs with NCX-inhibitor activity, also sensitized glioma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, via the upregulation of both CHOP and DR5. Notably, amiodarone/TRAIL cotreatment did not induce cell death in astrocytes, nor did it affect the expression of CHOP or DR5 in these cells. These results collectively suggest that a combined regimen of amiodarone plus TRAIL may offer an effective therapeutic strategy for safely and selectively treating resistant gliomas.

  6. Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Combined With Recombinant CD19-Ligand × Soluble TRAIL Fusion Protein is Highly Effective Against Radiation-resistant B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih M. Uckun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In high-risk remission B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL patients, relapse rates have remained high post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT even after the use of very intensive total body irradiation (TBI-based conditioning regimens, especially in patients with a high “minimal residual disease” (MRD burden. New agents capable of killing radiation-resistant BPL cells and selectively augmenting their radiation sensitivity are therefore urgently needed. We report preclinical proof-of-principle that the potency of radiation therapy against BPL can be augmented by combining radiation with recombinant human CD19-Ligand × soluble TRAIL (“CD19L–sTRAIL” fusion protein. CD19L–sTRAIL consistently killed radiation-resistant primary leukemia cells from BPL patients as well as BPL xenograft cells and their leukemia-initiating in vivo clonogenic fraction. Low dose total body irradiation (TBI combined with CD19L–sTRAIL was highly effective against (1 xenografted CD19+ radiochemotherapy-resistant human BPL in NOD/SCID (NS mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients as well as (2 radiation-resistant advanced stage CD19+ murine BPL with lymphomatous features in CD22ΔE12xBCR-ABL double transgenic mice. We hypothesize that the incorporation of CD19L–sTRAIL into the pre-transplant TBI regimens of patients with very high-risk BPL will improve their survival outcome after HSCT.

  7. Resistance to TRAIL is mediated by DARPP-32 in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkhiri, Abbes; Zhu, Shoumin; Chen, Zheng; Soutto, Mohammed; El-Rifai, Wael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr 32000 (DARPP-32), is overexpressed during the gastric carcinogenesis cascade. Here, we investigated the role of DARPP-32 in promoting resistance to treatment with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Experimental Design In vitro cell models including stable expression and knockdown of DARPP-32 were used. The role of DARPP-32 in regulating TRAIL-dependent apoptosis was evaluated by clonogenic survival assay, Annexin V staining, immunofluorescence, qRT-PCR, western blot, and luciferase reporter assays. Results Stable expression of DARPP-32 in MKN28 cells enhanced cell survival and suppressed TRAIL-induced cytochrome c release and activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous DARPP-32 sensitized the resistant MKN-45 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and enhanced TRAIL-mediated activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3. DARPP-32 induced BCL-xL expression through activation of Src/STAT3 signaling, and treatment with the Src-specific inhibitor PP1 abrogated DARPP-32-dependent BCL-xL up-regulation and cell survival in MKN-28 cells. The TRAIL treatment induced caspase-dependent cleavage of NF-kBp65 protein; this cleavage was prevented by DARPP-32, thus maintaining NF-kB activity and the expression of its target; FLIP(S) protein. This suggests that up-regulation of BCL-xL could play a possible role in blocking the mitochondria intrinsic apoptosis pathway whereas the DARPP-32 effect on the NF-kB/FLIP(S) axis could serve as an additional negative feedback loop that blocks TRAIL-induced activation of caspase 8. Conclusion Our findings uncover a novel mechanism of TRAIL resistance mediated by DARPP-32, whereby it inhibits the intrinsic apoptosis pathway through up-regulation of BCL-xL, and the extrinsic apoptosis pathway through the NF-kB/FLIP(S) axis. PMID:22589394

  8. Certification trails for data structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Gregory F.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    Certification trails are a recently introduced and promising approach to fault detection and fault tolerance. The applicability of the certification trail technique is significantly generalized. Previously, certification trails had to be customized to each algorithm application; trails appropriate to wide classes of algorithms were developed. These certification trails are based on common data-structure operations such as those carried out using these sets of operations such as those carried out using balanced binary trees and heaps. Any algorithms using these sets of operations can therefore employ the certification trail method to achieve software fault tolerance. To exemplify the scope of the generalization of the certification trail technique provided, constructions of trails for abstract data types such as priority queues and union-find structures are given. These trails are applicable to any data-structure implementation of the abstract data type. It is also shown that these ideals lead naturally to monitors for data-structure operations.

  9. TRAIL causes deletions at the HPRT and TK1 loci of clonogenically competent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Mark A.; Shekhar, Tanmay M. [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Hall, Nathan E. [La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Life Sciences Computation Centre, Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hawkins, Christine J., E-mail: c.hawkins@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Treatment with TRAIL or EMS provokes mutations in clonogenically viable TK6 cells. • TRAIL is 2–5-fold less mutagenic than an equivalently lethal concentration of EMS. • EMS mainly causes transition mutations at the HPRT and TK1 loci of TK6 cells. • Most loss-of-function HPRT or TK1 mutations caused by TRAIL treatment are deletions. - Abstract: When chemotherapy and radiotherapy are effective, they function by inducing DNA damage in cancerous cells, which respond by undergoing apoptosis. Some adverse effects can result from collateral destruction of non-cancerous cells, via the same mechanism. Therapy-related cancers, a particularly serious adverse effect of anti-cancer treatments, develop due to oncogenic mutations created in non-cancerous cells by the DNA damaging therapies used to eliminate the original cancer. Physiologically achievable concentrations of direct apoptosis inducing anti-cancer drugs that target Bcl-2 and IAP proteins possess negligible mutagenic activity, however death receptor agonists like TRAIL/Apo2L can provoke mutations in surviving cells, probably via caspase-mediated activation of the nuclease CAD. In this study we compared the types of mutations sustained in the HPRT and TK1 loci of clonogenically competent cells following treatment with TRAIL or the alkylating agent ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). As expected, the loss-of-function mutations in the HPRT or TK1 loci triggered by exposure to EMS were almost all transitions. In contrast, only a minority of the mutations identified in TRAIL-treated clones lacking HPRT or TK1 activity were substitutions. Almost three quarters of the TRAIL-induced mutations were partial or complete deletions of the HPRT or TK1 genes, consistent with sub-lethal TRAIL treatment provoking double strand breaks, which may be mis-repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Mis-repair of double-strand breaks following exposure to chemotherapy drugs has been implicated in the pathogenesis of

  10. RGD-avidin–biotin pretargeting to αvβ₃ integrin enhances the proapoptotic activity of TNFα related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarrus, M.; Sloot, A.M. van der; Temming, K.; Lacombe, M.; Opdam, F.; Quax, W.J.; Molema, G.; Poelstra, K.; Kok, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered a powerful and selective inducer of tumor cell death. We hypothesize that TRAIL’s potential as anticancer agent can be enhanced further by promoting its accumulation in tumor tissue. For this purpose, we developed TRAIL

  11. Monocytes inhibit hepatitis C virus-induced TRAIL expression on CD56bright NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Dalila; Mantovani, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Grossi, Giulia; Lombardi, Andrea; Mondelli, Mario U; Varchetta, Stefania

    2017-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We have previously shown that culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) enhance tumor necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression on healthy NK cells, but not on those from patients infected with HCV, which was likely dependent on accessory cells. Here we sought to elucidate the mechanisms involved in altered TRAIL upregulation in this setting. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from controls and patients infected with HCV were exposed to HCVcc. Cell depletions were performed to identify cells responsible for NK cell activation. Flow cytometry and ELISA were used to identify the cytokines involved in the NK activation process. In patients infected with HCV, soluble factors secreted by control PBMC restored the ability of NK cells to express TRAIL. Of note, CD14+ cell depletion had identical effects upon virus exposure and promoted increased degranulation. Moreover, increased concentrations of interleukin (IL)-18 binding protein a (IL-18BPa) and IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36RA) were observed after PBMC exposure to HCVcc in patients with HCV. HCVcc-induced NK cell TRAIL expression was inhibited by IL-18BPa and IL-36RA in control subjects. There were statistically significant correlations between IL-18BPa and indices of liver inflammation and fibrosis, supporting a role for this protein in the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection. During chronic HCV infection, monocytes play a key role in negative regulation of NK cell activation, predominantly via secretion of inhibitors of IL-18 and IL-36. Coordination and collaboration between immune cells are essential to fight pathogens. Herein we show that during HCV infection monocytes secrete IL-18 and IL-36 inhibitory proteins, reducing NK cell activation, and consequently inhibiting their ability to express TRAIL and kill target cells. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the

  12. Preclinical studies for pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of Ad-stTRAIL, an adenovirus delivering secretable trimeric TRAIL for gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chae-Young; Park, Soon-Hye; Jeong, Moonsup; Kwon, O-Seo; Doh, Hyounmie; Kang, Su-Hyung; Robbins, Paul D.; Kim, Byong-Moon; Seol, Dai-Wu; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2011-01-01

    Malignant glioma is the most frequent type in brain tumors. The prognosis of this tumor has not been significantly improved for the past decades and the average survival of patients is less than one year. Thus, an effective novel therapy is urgently needed. TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), known to have tumor cell-specific killing activity, has been investigated as a novel therapeutic for cancers. We have developed Ad-stTRAIL, an adenovirus delivering secretable trimeric TRAIL f...

  13. Ethanolic extract of Thevetia peruviana flowers enhances TNF-α and TRAIL-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managit, Chittima; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Saiki, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) are promising candidates for cancer treatment due to their ability to induce apoptosis through death receptor stimulation. However, their usage may be limited due to the resistance of cancer cells to TNF-α- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Currently, there is interest in screening for natural products that can sensitize cancer cells to TNF-α- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis for their use in combination with TNF-α or TRAIL. It was previously reported that the bark extract of Thevetia peruviana showed a reversal effect on TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. In the present study, the effects of the ethanolic extract of T. peruviana flowers on TNF-α- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells were investigated in vitro by determining cell viability and apoptosis using a WST-1 cell proliferation assay and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The ethanolic extract of T. peruviana flowers promoted TNF-α and TRAIL-mediated cell death through the activation of the caspase cascade, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and BH3-interacting domain death agonist cleavage. Combined treatment using the extract plus TNF-α resulted in downregulation of anti-apoptotic protein, including myeloid cell leukemia sequence-1, B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-XL), X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and survivin, while the combined treatment with TRAIL downregulated Bcl-XL. Thus, the ethanolic extract of T. peruviana flowers has potential in sensitizing the TNF-α- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells via the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. PMID:28454468

  14. Targeting c-Met receptor overcomes TRAIL-resistance in brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanlu Du

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induced apoptosis specifically in tumor cells. However, with approximately half of all known tumor lines being resistant to TRAIL, the identification of TRAIL sensitizers and their mechanism of action become critical to broadly use TRAIL as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we explored whether c-Met protein contributes to TRAIL sensitivity. We found a direct correlation between the c-Met expression level and TRAIL resistance. We show that the knock down c-Met protein, but not inhibition, sensitized brain tumor cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by interrupting the interaction between c-Met and TRAIL cognate death receptor (DR 5. This interruption greatly induces the formation of death-inducing signaling complex (DISC and subsequent downstream apoptosis signaling. Using intracranially implanted brain tumor cells and stem cell (SC lines engineered with different combinations of fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins, we show that SC expressing a potent and secretable TRAIL (S-TRAIL have a significant anti-tumor effect in mice bearing c-Met knock down of TRAIL-resistant brain tumors. To our best knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates c-Met contributes to TRAIL sensitivity of brain tumor cells and has implications for developing effective therapies for brain tumor patients.

  15. The policy trail methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holford, John; Larson, Anne; Melo, Susana

    /national/regional/local), but also by a diversification of types of actor (public/private; for-profit/not-for-profit). Multi-level governance has been particularly marked – and has taken specific forms – in the European context, but it is by no means limited to the EU. The policy trail method aims to capture the increased influence...... of transnational organisations and public-private networks in policymaking. The concept of policy trails sought to theorise how this widened policy space – including new and variously-sited actors – is negotiated and how power is distributed across sites (Holford & McKenzie, 2013). Cort (2014) developed the notion...... of the method. We argue that policy trails enable us to generate a broader and refined picture of policy in operation, and of the effectiveness and adequacy of national policies. In particular, they enable us to pinpoint in what circumstances and among which groups of workers public policy and funding...

  16. The sesquiterpene lactone eupatolide sensitizes breast cancer cells to TRAIL through down-regulation of c-FLIP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongkyu; Hwangbo, Cheol; Lee, Jung Joon; Seo, Juhee; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising candidate for cancer therapeutics due to its ability to induce apoptosis selectively in cancer cells. However, sensitivity of cancer cells for induction of apoptosis by TRAIL varies considerably. Therefore, it is important to develop agents that overcome this resistance. We show, for the first time, that eupatolide, the sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the medicinal plant Inula britannica, sensitizes human breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Treatment with TRAIL in combination with subtoxic concentrations of eupatolide enhanced the TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells, whereas each reagent alone slightly induced cell death. The combination induced sub-G1 phase DNA content and annexin V-staining in MCF-7 cells, which are major features of apoptosis. Apoptotic characteristics induced by the combined treatment were significantly inhibited by a pan-caspase inhibitor. The sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis was accompanied by the activation of caspase-8 and was concomitant with Bid and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Treatment of eupatolide alone significantly down-regulated the expression of cellular FLICE inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, enforced expression of c-FLIP significantly attenuated the apoptosis induced by this combination in MCF-7 cells, suggesting a key role for c-FLIP down-regulation in these events. We also observed that euaptolide inhibited AKT phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, inhibition of Akt by LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor, down-regulated c-FLIP expression in MCF-7 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that eupatolide could augment TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by down-regulating c-FLIP expression through the inhibition of AKT phosphorylation and be a valuable compound to overcome TRAIL resistance in

  17. 9th TRAIL Congress 2006, TRAIL in MOTION

    OpenAIRE

    TRAIL RESEARCH SCHOOL

    2006-01-01

    TRAIL is a Research School on Transport, Infrastructure and Logistics. TRAIL trains Ph.D. candidates and performs scientific and applied scientific research in the fields of mobility, transport, logistics, traffic, infrastructure and transport systems. TRAIL is a collaborative initiative of five Dutch universities, and is accredited as research school since 1997

  18. Allegheny County Blazed Trails Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shows the location of blazed trails in all Allegheny County parks. This is the same data used in the Allegheny County Parks Trails Mobile App, available for Apple...

  19. Differential expression of TRAIL and TRAIL receptors in allergic asthmatics following segmental antigen challenge: evidence for a role of TRAIL in eosinophil survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Noreen M; Zangrilli, James G; Steplewski, Andrzej; Hastie, Annette; Lindemeyer, Rochelle G; Planeta, Maria A; Smith, Mary K; Innocent, Nathalie; Musani, Ali; Pascual, Rodolfo; Peters, Stephen; Litwack, Gerald

    2002-11-15

    Asthma is a chronic lung disease exhibiting airway obstruction, hyperresponsiveness, and inflammation, characterized by the infiltration of eosinophils into the airways and the underlying tissue. Prolonged eosinophilic inflammation depends on the balance between the cell's inherent tendency to undergo apoptosis and the local eosinophil-viability enhancing activity. TRAIL, a member of the TNF family, induces apoptosis in most transformed cells; however, its role in health and disease remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that Ag-induced inflammation is associated with TRAIL/TRAIL-R interactions, we used a segmental Ag challenge (SAC) model in ragweed-allergic asthmatics and nonasthmatic patients and analyzed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) material for 2 wk. In asthmatic patients, the level of TRAIL in BAL fluid dramatically increased 24 h after SAC, which significantly correlated with BAL eosinophil counts. Immunohistochemical analysis of bronchial biopsies from asthmatic patients demonstrated that TRAIL staining was increased in epithelial, airway smooth muscle, and vascular smooth muscle cells and throughout the interstitial tissue after SAC. This was confirmed by quantitative immunocytochemical image analysis of BAL eosinophils and alveolar macrophages, which demonstrated that expression levels of TRAIL and DcR2 increased, whereas expression levels of the TRAIL-Rs DR4 and DR5 decreased in asthmatic subjects after SAC. We also determined that TRAIL prolongs eosinophil survival ex vivo. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that TRAIL expression is increased in asthmatics following Ag provocation and suggest that modulation of TRAIL and TRAIL-R interactions may play a crucial role in promoting eosinophil survival in asthma.

  20. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (cIAP-1) degradation by caspase 8 during TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicciardi, Maria Eugenia; Mott, Justin L; Bronk, Steven F; Kurita, Satoshi; Fingas, Christian D; Gores, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potential chemotherapeutic agent with high selectivity for malignant cells. Many tumors, however, are resistant to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Although cellular inhibitors of apoptosis 1 and 2 (cIAP-1 and -2) are often over-expressed in cancers, their role in mediating TRAIL resistance remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that TRAIL-induced apoptosis of liver cancer cells is associated with degradation of cIAP-1 and X-linked IAP (XIAP), whereas cIAP-2 remains unchanged. Lower concentrations of TRAIL causing minimal or no apoptosis do not alter cIAP-1 or XIAP protein levels. Silencing of cIAP-1 expression, but not XIAP or cIAP-2, as well as co-treatment with a second mitochondrial activator of caspases (SMAC) mimetic (which results in rapid depletion of cIAP-1), sensitizes the cells to TRAIL. TRAIL-induced loss of cIAP-1 and XIAP requires caspase activity. In particular, caspase 8 knockdown stabilizes both cIAP-1 and XIAP, while caspase 9 knockdown prevents XIAP, but not cIAP-1 degradation. Cell-free experiments confirmed cIAP-1 is a substrate for caspase 8, with likely multiple cleavage sites. These results suggest that TRAIL-mediated apoptosis proceeds through caspase 8-dependent degradation of cIAP-1. Targeted depletion of cIAP-1 by SMAC mimetics in conjunction with TRAIL may be beneficial for the treatment of human hepatobiliary malignancies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis as a novel approach to eliminate tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The cytokine TRAIL represents one of the most promising candidates for the apoptotic elimination of tumor cells, either alone or in combination therapies. However, its efficacy is often limited by intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to apoptosis. Programmed necrosis is an alternative, molecularly distinct mode of programmed cell death that is elicited by TRAIL under conditions when the classical apoptosis machinery fails or is actively inhibited. The potential of TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis in tumor therapy is, however, almost completely uncharacterized. We therefore investigated its impact on a panel of tumor cell lines of wide-ranging origin. Methods Cell death/viability was measured by flow cytometry/determination of intracellular ATP levels/crystal violet staining. Cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors was detected by flow cytometry, expression of proteins by Western blot. Ceramide levels were quantified by high-performance thin layer chromatography and densitometric analysis, clonogenic survival of cells was determined by crystal violet staining or by soft agarose cloning. Results TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis killed eight out of 14 tumor cell lines. Clonogenic survival was reduced in all sensitive and even one resistant cell lines tested. TRAIL synergized with chemotherapeutics in killing tumor cell lines by programmed necrosis, enhancing their effect in eight out of 10 tested tumor cell lines and in 41 out of 80 chemotherapeutic/TRAIL combinations. Susceptibility/resistance of the investigated tumor cell lines to programmed necrosis seems to primarily depend on expression of the pro-necrotic kinase RIPK3 rather than the related kinase RIPK1 or cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors. Furthermore, interference with production of the lipid ceramide protected all tested tumor cell lines. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis represents a feasible approach for the elimination of

  2. Modulation of TRAIL resistance in colon carcinoma cells: Different contributions of DR4 and DR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Elisabeth GE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background rhTRAIL is a therapeutic agent, derived from the TRAIL cytokine, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells by activating the membrane death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5. Here, we investigated each receptor's contribution to rhTRAIL sensitivity and rhTRAIL resistance. We assessed whether agonistic DR4 or DR5 antibodies could be used to circumvent rhTRAIL resistance, alone or in combination with various chemotherapies. Methods Our study was performed in an isogenic model comprised of the SW948 human colon carcinoma cell line and its rhTRAIL resistant sub-line SW948-TR. Effects of rhTRAIL and agonistic DR4/DR5 antibodies on cell viability were measured using MTT assays and identification of morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, after acridine orange staining. Sensitivity to the different death receptor ligands was stimulated using pretreatment with the cytokine IFN-gamma and the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the changes in rhTRAIL sensitivity, alterations in expression levels of targets of interest were measured by Western blot analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to determine the composition of the death-inducing signalling complex at the cell membrane. Results SW948 cells were sensitive to all three of the DR-targeting agents tested, although the agonistic DR5 antibody induced only weak caspase 8 cleavage and limited apoptosis. Surprisingly, agonistic DR4 and DR5 antibodies induced equivalent DISC formation and caspase 8 cleavage at the level of their individual receptors, suggesting impairment of further caspase 8 processing upon DR5 stimulation. SW948-TR cells were cross-resistant to all DR-targeting agents as a result of decreased caspase 8 expression levels. Caspase 8 protein expression was restored by MG-132 and IFN-gamma pretreatment, which also re-established sensitivity to rhTRAIL and agonistic DR4 antibody in SW948-TR. Surprisingly, MG-132 but not IFN

  3. Inhibition of the mitochondrial pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase by doxorubicin and brequinar sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, T; Haapa-Paananen, S; Kaminskyy, V O; Kohonen, P; Fey, V; Zhivotovsky, B; Kallioniemi, O; Perälä, M

    2014-07-03

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising agent in selectively killing tumor cells. However, TRAIL monotherapy has not been successful as many cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL. Chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin have been shown to act synergistically with TRAIL, but the exact mechanisms of actions are poorly understood. In this study, we performed high-throughput small interfering RNA screening and genome-wide gene expression profiling on doxorubicin-treated U1690 cells to explore novel mechanisms underlying doxorubicin-TRAIL synergy. The screening and expression profiling results were integrated and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) was identified as a potential candidate. DHODH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the pyrimidine synthesis pathway, and its expression was downregulated by doxorubicin. We demonstrated that silencing of DHODH or inhibition of DHODH activity by brequinar dramatically increased the sensitivity of U1690 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis both in 2D and 3D cultures, and was accompanied by downregulation of c-FLIPL as well as by mitochondrial depolarization. In addition, uridine, an end product of the pyrimidine synthesis pathway was able to rescue the sensitization effects initiated by both brequinar and doxorubicin. Furthermore, several other cancer cell lines, LNCaP, MCF-7 and HT-29 were also shown to be sensitized to TRAIL by brequinar. Taken together, our findings have identified a novel protein target and its inhibitor, brequinar, as a potential agent in TRAIL-based combinatorial cancer therapy and highlighted for the first time the importance of mitochondrial DHODH enzyme and pyrimidine pathway in mediating TRAIL sensitization in cancer cells.

  4. N-glycosylation of mouse TRAIL-R and human TRAIL-R1 enhances TRAIL-induced death : N-glycosylation of TRAIL receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Dufour, Florent; Rattier, Thibault; Shirley, Sarah; Picarda, Gaelle; Constantinescu, Andrei Alexandru; Morlé, Aymeric; Zakaria, Al Batoul; Marcion, Guillaume; Causse, Sebastien; Szegezdi, Eva; Zajonc, Dirk Michael; Seigneuric, Renaud; Guichard, Gilles; Gharbi, Tijani; Picaud, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    International audience; APO2L/TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) induces death of tumor cells through two agonist receptors, TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2. We demonstrate here that N-linked glycosylation (N-glyc) plays also an important regulatory role for TRAIL-R1-mediated and mouse TRAIL receptor (mTRAIL-R)-mediated apoptosis, but not for TRAIL-R2, which is devoid of N-glycans. Cells expressing N-glyc-defective mutants of TRAIL-R1 and mouse TRAIL-R were less sensitive to TRAIL than their...

  5. Helicobacter pylori sensitizes TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric epithelial cells through regulation of FLIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W-C; Tsai, H-F; Liao, H-J; Tang, C-H; Wu, Y-Y; Hsu, P-I; Cheng, A-L; Hsu, P-N

    2014-03-06

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Apoptosis induced by microbial infections is implicated in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here we show that human gastric epithelial cells sensitized to H. pylori confer susceptibility to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via modulation of death receptor signaling. Human gastric epithelial cells are intrinsically resistant to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. The induction of TRAIL sensitivity by H. pylori is dependent on the activation of caspase-8 and its downstream pathway. H. pylori induces caspase-8 activation via enhanced assembly of the TRAIL death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) through downregulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP). Overexpression of FLIP abolished the H. pylori-induced TRAIL sensitivity in human gastric epithelial cells. Our study thus demonstrates that H. pylori induces sensitivity to TRAIL apoptosis by regulation of FLIP and assembly of DISC, which initiates caspase activation, resulting in the breakdown of resistance to apoptosis, and provides insight into the pathogenesis of gastric damage in Helicobacter infection. Modulation of host apoptosis signaling by bacterial interaction adds a new dimension to the pathogenesis of Helicobacter.

  6. MSC(TRAIL)-mediated HepG2 cell death in direct and indirect co-cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xu-Yong; Nong, Jiang; Qin, Ke; Lu, Hong; Moniri, Mani R; Dai, Long-Jun; Warnock, Garth L

    2011-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted great interest in cancer therapy since the discovery of their tumor tropism. This study was performed to investigate the effects of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-engineered MSCs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells (HepG2) under different culture conditions. MSCs engineered with non-secreting TRAIL (MSC(TRAIL-GFP)) (GFP, green fluorescence protein) and secreting TRAIL (MSC(stTRAIL)) were used for the direct co-cultures, and conditioned media (CM) from corresponding cultures were applied to HepG2 as indirect co-cultures. Immunoblotting, ELISA and FACS analysis were used to detect the expression of TRAIL and TRAIL receptors. Cell death was assessed using live/dead assay. Death receptor (DR) 5 was identified on the HepG2 cells. The expression of TRAIL was confirmed in the cell lysates (MSC(TRAIL-GFP) >MSC(stTRAIL)) and the conditioned media (MSC(stTRAIL) >MSC(TRAIL-GFP)). Higher cell death was observed in high MSC/HepG2 ratio co-cultures. HepG2 cell death was proportionally related to CM from MSC(TRAIL-GFP) and MSC(stTRAIL). MSCs exhibit intrinsic inhibition of HepG2 which is potentiated by TRAIL-transfection.

  7. MicroRNA-221 silencing predisposed human bladder cancer cells to undergo apoptosis induced by TRAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Lu, Chao; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Xin-Ru

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common type of urologic cancer in Chinese males. The 5-year survival rate of advanced bladder cancer is approximately 20%-40%. There is an obvious urgent need for novel and effective therapies against bladder cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of noncoding RNAs; suppressing miRNA-221 might prove beneficial in several cancers. To explore novel and effective therapies against bladder cancer, we explored the effects of miRNA-221 silencing on the survival of bladder cancer cells. Northern blot analysis was used to determine miRNA-221 expression levels in bladder cancer T24 cells, RT4 cells and human normal urothelial cells. miRNA-221 was silenced with antisense oligonucleotides in T24 cells and pro-apoptotic effect of necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on miRNA-221-silenced cells was assessed with flow cytometry. The p27(kip1) protein expression in miRNA-221-silenced cells exposed to TRAIL was detected by Western blotting. The role of miRNA-221 silencing on T24 cell cycle phase distribution was investigated through flow cytometric analysis. Human miRNA-221 was significantly up-regulated in bladder cancer T24 cells and RT4 cells compared to human normal urothelial cells. T24 cell was TRAIL-resistant cell line. MiRNA-221 silencing predisposed T24 cells to undergo apoptosis induced by TRAIL and resulted in an up-modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1. MiRNA-221 suppression promoted the activation of caspase 3 induced by TRAIL in T24 cells. MiRNA-221 silencing rendered human bladder cancer T24 cells to undergo apoptosis induced by TRAIL. Our findings suggest a potential role of suppressing miRNA-221 in human bladder cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational Introduction of Catalytic Activity into Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolani, Steve J; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Siegel, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there have been several successful cases of introducing catalytic activity into proteins. One method that has been used successfully to achieve this is the theozyme placement and enzyme design algorithms implemented in Rosetta Molecular Modeling Suite. Here, we illustrate how to use this software to recapitulate the placement of catalytic residues and ligand into a protein using a theozyme, protein scaffold, and catalytic constraints as input.

  9. Optimized horse trail design for Illinois soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.J. Jones; Logan O. Park

    2014-01-01

    One of the fastest growing forms of outdoor recreation is equestrian trail riding. In a study examining long-term trends of use on Forest Service lands, equestrian-based recreation was identified as one of the top five activities experiencing growth. As the numbers of horse riders rise, the economic impact of equestrian recreation can be expected to increase across the...

  10. Evaluating the effect of therapeutic stem cells on TRAIL resistant and sensitive medulloblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Nesterenko

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are emerging as novel cell-based delivery agents; however, a thorough investigation addressing their therapeutic potential in medulloblastomas (MB has not been explored to date. In this study, we engineered human MSC to express a potent and secretable variant of a tumor specific agent, tumor necrosis factor-apoptosis-inducing ligand (S-TRAIL and assessed the ability of MSC-S-TRAIL mediated MB killing alone or in combination with a small molecule inhibitor of histone-deacetylase, MS-275, in TRAIL-sensitive and -resistant MB in vitro and in vivo. We show that TRAIL sensitivity/resistance correlates with the expression of its cognate death receptor (DR5 and MSC-S-TRAIL induces caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in TRAIL-sensitive MB lines. In TRAIL-resistant MB, we show upregulation of DR4/5 levels when pre-treated with MS-275 and a subsequent sensitization to MSC-S-TRAIL mediated apoptosis. Using intracranially implanted MB and MSC lines engineered with different combinations of fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins, we show that MSC-S-TRAIL has significant anti-tumor effects in mice bearing TRAIL-sensitive and MS-275 pre-treated TRAIL-resistant MBs. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores the use of human MSC as MB-targeting therapeutic-vehicles in vivo in TRAIL-sensitive and resistant tumors, and has implications for developing effective therapies for patients with medulloblastomas.

  11. Smac/DIABLO enhances the therapeutic potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and irradiation, and sensitizes TRAIL-resistant breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Rakesh K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance is a major concern in cancer therapy. Here, we investigate the clinical potential of the second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac/DIABLO in enhancing the apoptosis-inducing potential of commonly used anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, doxorubicin, etoposide, tamoxifen, irradiation and TRAIL in breast carcinoma. Methods Breast cancer cells were overexpressed with Smac/DIABLO gene (full-length or Δ55 Smac/DIABLO or treated with Smac/DIABLO peptide to enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and irradiation, and sensitize TRAIL-resistant cells. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured by XTT assay and DAPI staining, respectively. Protein-protein interaction was determined by immunoprecipitation followed by the Western blot analysis. Results Overexpression of Smac/DIABLO gene (full-length or Δ55 Smac/DIABLO or treatment with Smac/DIABLO peptide enhances apoptosis induced by paclitaxel, doxorubicin, etoposide, tamoxifen, and irradiation in breast cancer cells. Overexpression of Smac/DIABLO resulted in an increased interaction of Smac/DIABLO with IAPs, which correlated with an increase in caspase-3 activity and apoptosis. Furthermore, Smac/DIABLO sensitized TRAIL-resistant breast cancer cell lines to undergo apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. These data suggest that apoptotic events down-stream of mitochondria were intact in TRAIL-resistant cells since ectopic expression of Smac/DIABLO or pretreatment of cells with Smac/DIABLO peptide completely restored TRAIL sensitivity. Conclusion The ability of Smac/DIABLO agonists to enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of chemotherapeutic drugs and irradiation, and sensitize TRAIL-resistant tumor cells suggests that Smac/DIABLO may induce fundamental alterations in cell signaling pathways. Thus, Smac/DIABLO agonists can be used as promising new candidates for cancer treatment by potentiating cytotoxic therapies.

  12. Physical activity and onset of depression in adolescents : A prospective study in the general population cohort TRAILS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavrakakis, N.; Roest, A. M.; Verhulst, F.; Ormel, J.; de Jonge, P.; Oldehinkel, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although it has often been suggested that physical activity and depression are intertwined, only few studies have investigated whether specific aspects of physical activity predict the incidence of major depression in adolescents from the general population. Therefore the aim of this study was to

  13. Effective Dynamics of Microorganisms That Interact with Their Own Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, W. Till; Gelimson, Anatolij; Zhao, Kun; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2016-07-01

    Like ants, some microorganisms are known to leave trails on surfaces to communicate. We explore how trail-mediated self-interaction could affect the behavior of individual microorganisms when diffusive spreading of the trail is negligible on the time scale of the microorganism using a simple phenomenological model for an actively moving particle and a finite-width trail. The effective dynamics of each microorganism takes on the form of a stochastic integral equation with the trail interaction appearing in the form of short-term memory. For a moderate coupling strength below an emergent critical value, the dynamics exhibits effective diffusion in both orientation and position after a phase of superdiffusive reorientation. We report experimental verification of a seemingly counterintuitive perpendicular alignment mechanism that emerges from the model.

  14. Metformin sensitizes human bladder cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through mTOR/S6K1-mediated downregulation of c-FLIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Jin, Xunbo; Guo, Peng

    2014-09-01

    Metformin, an oral antidiabetic agent, has been reported to potentiate chemotherapeutic-induced cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanisms of metformin in sensitizing tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells. Metformin alone did not induce apoptosis, but markedly potentiated TRAIL-induced apoptosis in 253J and RT4 bladder cancer cells. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we examined the modulatory effects of metformin on the key components of the TRAIL signaling pathway and found that metformin did not alter the expression levels of death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), but significantly reduced the cellular Fas-associated death domain (FADD)-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme (FLICE) inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) levels, contributing toward the sensitization to TRAIL. Further experiments showed that metformin did not affect the mRNA level, proteasomal degradation, and protein stability of c-FLIPL. However, metformin inhibited the mTOR/S6K1 pathway in 253J and RT4 cells, which usually regulates protein translation; moreover, knockdown of S6K1 effectively reduced the levels of c-FLIPL, indicating that metformin downregulates c-FLIP through inhibition of the mTOR/S6K1 pathway. In addition, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor compound C did not prevent the inhibitory effects of metformin on the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and metformin-mediated sensitization to TRAIL. Taken together, our results indicate that metformin sensitizes human bladder cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through downregulation of c-FLIP, which is mediated by the mTOR/S6K1 pathway, but independent of AMPK; furthermore, these findings provide a rationale for the combined application of metformin with TRAIL in the treatment of bladder cancer.

  15. Inhibition of methyltransferases accelerates degradation of cFLIP and sensitizes B-cell lymphoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank K Braun

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs are characterized by specific abnormalities that alter cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and apoptotic signaling. It is believed that cancer cells are particularly sensitive to cell death induced by tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. However, many cancer cells show blocked TRAIL signaling due to up-regulated expression of anti-apoptotic factors, such as cFLIP. This hurdle to TRAIL's tumor cytotoxicity might be overcome by combining TRAIL-based therapy with drugs that reverse blockages of its apoptotic signaling. In this study, we investigated the impact of a pan-methyltransferase inhibitor (3-deazaneplanocin A, or DZNep on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in aggressive B-cell NHLs: mantle cell, Burkitt, and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. We characterized TRAIL apoptosis regulation and caspase activation in several NHL-derived cell lines pre-treated with DZNep. We found that DZNep increased cancer cell sensitivity to TRAIL signaling by promoting caspase-8 processing through accelerated cFLIP degradation. No change in cFLIP mRNA level indicated independence of promoter methylation alterations in methyltransferase activity induced by DZNep profoundly affected cFLIP mRNA stability and protein stability. This appears to be in part through increased levels of cFLIP-targeting microRNAs (miR-512-3p and miR-346. However, additional microRNAs and cFLIP-regulating mechanisms appear to be involved in DZNep-mediated enhanced response to extrinsic apoptotic stimuli. The capacity of DZNep to target cFLIP expression on multiple levels underscores DZNep's potential in TRAIL-based therapies for B-cell NHLs.

  16. Synaptic vesicle proteins and active zone plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Kittel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone. The complex molecular architecture of active zones mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of active zones vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct active zone states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the active zone.The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1 and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and active zone states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  17. Recreation and leisure research from an active living perspective: taking a second look at urban trail use data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gobster

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines recreation and leisure research within the context of active living, and highlights an apparent gap between the current involvement of recreation and leisure researchers and the potential they could offer to this important and expanding area of inquiry. To illustrate this potential, I looked at two previous studies that focused on the recreational...

  18. Mitogen-activated protein kinases mediate Mycobacterium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DR (HLA-DR) receptors in mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain induced lower CD44 surface expression and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, whereas H37Ra the reverse. Using highly specific ...

  19. BCDC Bay Trail Alignment 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Bay Trail provides easily accessible recreational opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts, including hikers, joggers, bicyclists and skaters. It also offers a...

  20. Estimating soil erosion on hiking trails in the Sierra Mariola Natural Park in southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena Warter, Maria; Peeters, Mattias; Kuppen, Emiel; Blok, Kas; Dilly, Lina

    2017-04-01

    Natural parks and protected natural areas provide excellent recreational opportunities for outdoor activities through the richness of the natural environment and the abundance of walking trails. Hiking, mountain biking and running have rapidly gained popularity over recent years increasing concerns about the erosion and degradation of hiking trails caused by (over)use. This is also the case in the Sierra Mariola Natural Park in southeast Spain, which is a popular destination for tourists due to its diverse fauna and flora. The increasing number of tourists together with the negative impacts of climate change necessitates a better understanding of the key soil erosion processes impacting hiking trails. There are 4 scenic trail routes in the Natural Park amounting to 21 km plus an additional network of unofficial trails. Apart from the heavy touristic traffic on the trails there are large trail running events with up to 1000 participants becoming increasingly popular, however local park authorities have voiced concerns about the impacts of these activities on the trails. Despite the popularity of walking trails around the world, there is a paucity of research exploring soil erosion from these features. Therefore, the aims of this study are: 1) to ascertain the amount of erosion that occurs on trails in the Sierra Mariola Natural Park, and 2) determine the key factors that influence soil erosion. Some 100 km of trails were evaluated (both official and unmarked trails), with route segments ranging between 2 and 10 km. A trail classification system was developed to group trail segments based on their surface characteristics (bedrock, gravel, mixed sediment, soil or man-made) and specific erosion features (rills, ditch-shaped, tilted). For each class, the average erosion rate was calculated which ranged from 262 t/ha for soil-based trails to 2006 t/ha for heavily eroded, ditch-shaped trails. The spatial distribution of the different erosion rates and trail types were

  1. Maternal Plasma Soluble TRAIL is Decreased in Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Romero, Roberto; Korzeniewski, Steven J.; Stampalija, Tamara; Than, Nandor Gabor; Dong, Zhong; Miranda, Jezid; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S

    2014-01-01

    Objective Preeclampsia (PE) is characterized by systemic intravascular inflammation. Women who develop PE are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease in later life. Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has anti-atherosclerotic effects in endothelial cells and can mediate neutrophil apoptosis. Low soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL) and high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations are associated with an increased risk of future cardiovascular disease in non-pregnant individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether maternal plasma concentrations of sTRAIL and CRP differ between women with PE and those with uncomplicated pregnancies. Methods This cross-sectional study included women with an uncomplicated pregnancy (n=93) and those with PE (n=52). Maternal plasma concentrations of sTRAIL and CRP concentrations were determined by ELISA. Results 1) The median plasma sTRAIL concentration (pg/mL) was significantly lower and the median plasma CRP concentration was significantly higher in women with PE than in those with an uncomplicated pregnancy (25.55 vs. 29.17; p = 0.03 and 8.0 vs. 4.1; p=0.001, respectively); 2) the median plasma concentration sTRAIL/CRP ratio was twofold lower in women with PE than in those with an uncomplicated pregnancy (p<0.001); and 3) women with plasma sTRAIL and CRP ratio in the lowest quartile were eight times more likely to have PE than women with concentrations in the upper three quartiles (OR 8.9; 95% CI: 2.8–27.8). Conclusion Maternal plasma sTRAIL concentrations are lower (while those of CRP are higher) in women with PE than in those with uncomplicated pregnancies. These findings are consistent with the evidence of intravascular inflammation in this disorder. PMID:23688319

  2. On Entropy Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhi, Saeed; Taghavi, Ray; Keshmiri, Shawn

    2015-11-01

    Stealth technology is developed for military aircraft to minimize their signatures. The primary attention was focused on radar signature, followed by the thermal and noise signatures of the vehicle. For radar evasion, advanced configuration designs, extensive use of carbon composites and radar-absorbing material, are developed. On thermal signature, mainly in the infra-red (IR) bandwidth, the solution was found in blended rectangular nozzles of high aspect ratio that are shielded from ground detectors. For noise, quiet and calm jets are integrated into vehicles with low-turbulence configuration design. However, these technologies are totally incapable of detecting new generation of revolutionary aircraft. These shall use all electric, distributed, propulsion system that are thermally transparent. In addition, composite skin and non-emitting sensors onboard the aircraft will lead to low signature. However, based on the second-law of thermodynamics, there is no air vehicle that can escape from leaving an entropy trail. Entropy is thus the only inevitable signature of any system, that once measured, can detect the source. By characterizing the entropy field based on its statistical properties, the source may be recognized, akin to face recognition technology. Direct measurement of entropy is cumbersome, however as a derived property, it can be easily measured. The measurement accuracy depends on the probe design and the sensors onboard. One novel air data sensor suite is introduced with promising potential to capture the entropy trail.

  3. Flavopiridol synergizes TRAIL cytotoxicity by downregulation of FLIPL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fandy, Tamer E; Ross, Douglas D; Gore, Steven D; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2007-08-01

    Flavopiridol is known to modulate the transcription of genes. We investigated the effect of flavopiridol pretreatment on TRAIL cytotoxicity and on the expression of FLIP(L) in different TRAIL-resistant cell lines, because FLIP expression is known to confer TRAIL-resistance. Apoptosis was assessed by PI staining and protein expression by Western blotting. RT-PCR was used for mRNA quantitation. siRNA gene silencing was used to knock down FLIP(L). Flavopiridol pretreatment synergized TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human myeloma and breast cancer cells. Flavopiridol treatment repressed the transcription of FLIP(L) and downregulated its expression in both myeloma and breast cancer cells. Silencing of FLIP(L) gene by siRNA sensitized myeloma cells to TRAIL. Flavopiridol treatment downregulated the expression of the proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family proteins (Bak, Bax and PUMA-alpha). The expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 members (Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L)) was not altered by flavopiridol treatment in myeloma cells. Our data indicate that flavopiridol synergizes TRAIL cytotoxicity by downregulation of FLIP(L) and this synergistic effect is Bcl-2 family independent.

  4. Targeting Trail Towards the Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahalingam, Devalingam; Oldenhuis, Corina N. A. M.; Szegezdi, Eva; Giles, Francis J.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; de Jong, Steven; Nawrocki, Steffan T.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand or Apo2 ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily that induces apoptosis upon binding to its death domain-containing transmembrane receptors. The preferential toxicity of TRAIL to cancer cells and the

  5. Trail (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) induces an inflammatory response in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Verena; Funcke, Jan-Bernd; Roos, Julian; Dahlhaus, Meike; Abd El Hay, Muad; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Marienfeld, Ralf; Kietzmann, Thomas; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Wabitsch, Martin; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2017-07-18

    High serum concentrations of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the tumor necrosis factor protein family, are found in patients with increased BMI and serum lipid levels. In a model of murine obesity, both the expression of TRAIL and its receptor (TRAIL-R) is elevated in adipose tissue. Accordingly, TRAIL has been proposed as an important mediator of adipose tissue inflammation and obesity-associated diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate if TRAIL regulates inflammatory processes at the level of the adipocyte. Using human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) cells as a model system, we found that TRAIL induces an inflammatory response in both preadipocytes and adipocytes. It stimulates the expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8) as well as the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and chemokine C-C motif ligand 20 (CCL-20) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. By using small molecule inhibitors, we found that both the NFκB and the ERK1/2 pathway are crucial for mediating the effect of TRAIL. Taken together, we identified a novel pro-inflammatory function of TRAIL in human adipocytes. Our findings suggest that targeting the TRAIL/TRAIL-R system might be a useful strategy to tackle obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation.

  6. Down-regulation of HSP27 sensitizes TRAIL-resistant tumor cell to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Hongqin; Jiang, Weiwei; Cheng, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has recently emerged as a cancer therapeutic agent because it preferentially induces apoptosis in human cancer over normal cells. Most tumor cells, including lung cancer cell line A549, unfortunately, are resistant to TRAIL...... treatment even at high dose. Recent studies indicated that TRAIL-resistant cancer cells could be sensitized to TRAIL by combination therapy. Stress and heat shock proteins such as HSP90, HSP70 and HSP27 are induced in response to a wide variety of physiological environmental insults including heat, reactive...... oxygen species or anticancer drugs. Their elevated expressions facilitate cells to survive in stress circumstances. The HSP27 expression is enhanced in many tumor cells, implying that it is involved in tumor progression and the development of treatment resistance in various tumors, including lung cancer...

  7. Doxorubicin potentiates TRAIL cytotoxicity and apoptosis and can overcome TRAIL-resistance in rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, R; Meijer, C; Van Zweeden, M; De Jong, S; Wesseling, J; Hoekstra, HJ; van der Graaf, WTA

    Doxorubicin (DOX) and ifosfamide (IFO) are the most active single agents in soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is used for STS in the setting of isolated limb perfusions. Like TNF-alpha, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis. In contrast to

  8. The Dynamics of Foraging Trails in the Tropical Arboreal Ant Cephalotes goniodontus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    The foraging behavior of the arboreal turtle ant, Cephalotes goniodontus, was studied in the tropical dry forest of western Mexico. The ants collected mostly plant-derived food, including nectar and fluids collected from the edges of wounds on leaves, as well as caterpillar frass and lichen. Foraging trails are on small pieces of ephemeral vegetation, and persist in exactly the same place for 4–8 days, indicating that food sources may be used until they are depleted. The species is polydomous, occupying many nests which are abandoned cavities or ends of broken branches in dead wood. Foraging trails extend from trees with nests to trees with food sources. Observations of marked individuals show that each trail is travelled by a distinct group of foragers. This makes the entire foraging circuit more resilient if a path becomes impassable, since foraging in one trail can continue while a different group of ants forms a new trail. The colony’s trails move around the forest from month to month; from one year to the next, only one colony out of five was found in the same location. There is continual searching in the vicinity of trails: ants recruited to bait within 3 bifurcations of a main foraging trail within 4 hours. When bait was offered on one trail, to which ants recruited, foraging activity increased on a different trail, with no bait, connected to the same nest. This suggests that the allocation of foragers to different trails is regulated by interactions at the nest. PMID:23209749

  9. The dynamics of foraging trails in the tropical arboreal ant Cephalotes goniodontus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah M Gordon

    Full Text Available The foraging behavior of the arboreal turtle ant, Cephalotes goniodontus, was studied in the tropical dry forest of western Mexico. The ants collected mostly plant-derived food, including nectar and fluids collected from the edges of wounds on leaves, as well as caterpillar frass and lichen. Foraging trails are on small pieces of ephemeral vegetation, and persist in exactly the same place for 4-8 days, indicating that food sources may be used until they are depleted. The species is polydomous, occupying many nests which are abandoned cavities or ends of broken branches in dead wood. Foraging trails extend from trees with nests to trees with food sources. Observations of marked individuals show that each trail is travelled by a distinct group of foragers. This makes the entire foraging circuit more resilient if a path becomes impassable, since foraging in one trail can continue while a different group of ants forms a new trail. The colony's trails move around the forest from month to month; from one year to the next, only one colony out of five was found in the same location. There is continual searching in the vicinity of trails: ants recruited to bait within 3 bifurcations of a main foraging trail within 4 hours. When bait was offered on one trail, to which ants recruited, foraging activity increased on a different trail, with no bait, connected to the same nest. This suggests that the allocation of foragers to different trails is regulated by interactions at the nest.

  10. The dynamics of foraging trails in the tropical arboreal ant Cephalotes goniodontus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Deborah M

    2012-01-01

    The foraging behavior of the arboreal turtle ant, Cephalotes goniodontus, was studied in the tropical dry forest of western Mexico. The ants collected mostly plant-derived food, including nectar and fluids collected from the edges of wounds on leaves, as well as caterpillar frass and lichen. Foraging trails are on small pieces of ephemeral vegetation, and persist in exactly the same place for 4-8 days, indicating that food sources may be used until they are depleted. The species is polydomous, occupying many nests which are abandoned cavities or ends of broken branches in dead wood. Foraging trails extend from trees with nests to trees with food sources. Observations of marked individuals show that each trail is travelled by a distinct group of foragers. This makes the entire foraging circuit more resilient if a path becomes impassable, since foraging in one trail can continue while a different group of ants forms a new trail. The colony's trails move around the forest from month to month; from one year to the next, only one colony out of five was found in the same location. There is continual searching in the vicinity of trails: ants recruited to bait within 3 bifurcations of a main foraging trail within 4 hours. When bait was offered on one trail, to which ants recruited, foraging activity increased on a different trail, with no bait, connected to the same nest. This suggests that the allocation of foragers to different trails is regulated by interactions at the nest.

  11. Combination of AAV-TRAIL with miR-221-Zip Therapeutic Strategy Overcomes the Resistance to TRAIL Induced Apoptosis in Liver Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sisi; Sun, Jiazeng; Guo, Yabin; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian; Shi, Juan

    2017-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) possesses the capacity to induce apoptosis in a wide variety of tumor cells without affecting most normal cells. However, it has now emerged that many primary cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL monotherapy. Overcoming the intrinsic or acquired TRAIL resistance is desirable for TRAIL-mediated cancer therapy. In this study, we found that the miR-221/222 cluster was up-regulated in TRAIL-resistant liver cancer cells. Specific inhibitors of miR-221 and/or miR-222, called sponge, TuD and miR-Zip were constructed, and their ability to overcome TRAIL resistance was compared. Among them, AAV-mediated gene therapy using co-expression of TRAIL with miR-221-Zip showed the most synergistic activity in the induction of apoptosis in vitro. In vivo treatment of nude mice bearing human TRAIL-resistant liver cancer xenografts with AAV-TRAIL-miR-221-Zip also led to growth inhibition. This sensitizing effect of miR-221-Zip was associated with increased expression of PTEN, the miR-221 target, as well as with decreasing levels of Survivin. Moreover, miR-221 expression was concomitant with promotion of Survivin expression and suppression of PTEN expression. TRAIL sensitivity of cancer cells isolated from liver cancer tissues or from patients was significantly correlated with miR-221 expression. And miR-221 blood expression levels in liver cancer patients were correlated with TRAIL sensitivity, thus it had the potential to be a predictor of TRAIL sensitivity in liver cancer. These data suggested the potential of combining AAV-TRAIL with miR-221-Zip as a therapeutic intervention for liver cancer.

  12. α-Hispanolol sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via death receptor up-regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Alba, E-mail: amota@iib.uam.es [Unidad de Terapias Farmacológicas, Área de Genética Humana, Instituto de Investigación de Enfermedades Raras (IIER), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Jiménez-Garcia, Lidia, E-mail: ljimenez@isciii.es [Unidad de Terapias Farmacológicas, Área de Genética Humana, Instituto de Investigación de Enfermedades Raras (IIER), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Herránz, Sandra, E-mail: sherranz@isciii.es [Unidad de Terapias Farmacológicas, Área de Genética Humana, Instituto de Investigación de Enfermedades Raras (IIER), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Heras, Beatriz de las, E-mail: lasheras@ucm.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid (Spain); Hortelano, Sonsoles, E-mail: shortelano@isciii.es [Unidad de Terapias Farmacológicas, Área de Genética Humana, Instituto de Investigación de Enfermedades Raras (IIER), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-01

    Hispanolone derivatives have been previously described as anti-inflammatory and antitumoral agents. However, their effects on overcoming Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) resistance remain to be elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the cytotoxic effects of the synthetic hispanolone derivative α-hispanolol (α-H) in several tumor cell lines, and we evaluated the induction of apoptosis, as well as the TRAIL-sensitizing potential of α-H in the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Our data show that α-H decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in HeLa, MDA-MB231, U87 and HepG2 cell lines, with a more prominent effect in HepG2 cells. Interestingly, α-H had no effect on non-tumoral cells. α-H induced activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9 and also increased levels of the proapoptotic protein Bax, decreasing antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, X-IAP and IAP-1) in HepG2 cells. Specific inhibition of caspase-8 abrogated the cascade of caspase activation, suggesting that the extrinsic pathway has a critical role in the apoptotic events induced by α-H. Furthermore, combined treatment of α-H with TRAIL enhanced apoptosis in HepG2 cells, activating caspase-8 and caspase-9. This correlated with up-regulation of both the TRAIL death receptor DR4 and DR5. DR4 or DR5 neutralizing antibodies abolished the effect of α-H on TRAIL-induced apoptosis, suggesting that sensitization was mediated through the death receptor pathway. Our results demonstrate that α-H induced apoptosis in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 through activation of caspases and induction of the death receptor pathway. In addition, we describe a novel function of α-H as a sensitizer on TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. - Highlights: • α-Hispanolol induced apoptosis in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. • α-Hispanolol induced activation of caspases and the death receptor pathway. • α-Hispanolol enhanced

  13. Activation of REG family proteins in colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, Atle van Beelen; Beisvag, Vidar; Torp, Sverre H; Flatberg, Arnar; Kleveland, Per Martin; Ostvik, Ann Elisabeth; Waldum, Helge L; Sandvik, Arne K

    2011-11-01

    To do a genome-wide gene expression study of active and inactive ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (inflammatory bowel disease--IBD) and examine the most differentially expressed genes. As the study showed an extreme upregulation of all regenerating islet-derived genes (REG proteins) in active IBD, we further studied the expression of REGs on protein level in active and inactive IBD, as well as in non-IBD (pseudomembranous) colitis. Microarray analysis was done on a total of 100 pinch biopsy samples from healthy controls and patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Tissue samples from IBD and pseudomembranous colitis were examined with routine histology and immunohistochemical analysis for REGIα, REGIV, DEFA6, and serotonin. REG mRNAs were up to 83 times overexpressed in diseased mucosa compared with mucosa from healthy individuals. REGIα and REGIV were overexpressed at immunohistochemistry and located to different mucosal cell types. REGIα was expressed in basal half of crypts, REGIV in mid and outer parts of crypts and in surface epithelium and seems to be stored in, and secreted from, goblets. Pseudomembranous colitis samples showed similar staining patterns, and some IBD samples stained REG positive without inflammation on routine histology. All REG family mRNAs are upregulated in IBD. REGIα and REGIV have different cellular localization, possibly reflecting different biological functions. REG protein expression also in pseudomembranous colitis shows that REG family proteins are regulated in inflammatory injury and repair, not specifically for IBD as previously thought.

  14. Laboratory investigations of the trail-following responses of four species of leaf-cutting ants with notes on the specificity of a trail pheromone of Atta texana (Buckley)

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. W. Robinson; John C. Moser; M. S. Blum; E. Amante

    1974-01-01

    Interspecific trail following activity of poison sac contents from four species of leaf-cutting ants was investigated. with only one exception, all the species teste followed trails made from each others poison sac contents. however when the ants were given a choice of following one of two separate trails, clear differences were shown in the poison sac contents of the...

  15. VT Green Mountain National Forest - Long Trail and Appalachian Trail

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) GMNFTRAILS contains minor Forest Service roads and all trails within the proclamation boundary of the Green Mountain National Forest and many of...

  16. Differences in the impacts of formal and informal recreational trails on urban forest loss and tree structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Mark; Pickering, Catherine Marina

    2015-08-15

    Recreational trails are one of the most common types of infrastructure used for nature-based activities such as hiking and mountain biking worldwide. Depending on their design, location, construction, maintenance and use, these trails differ in their environmental impacts. There are few studies, however, comparing the impacts of different trail types including between formal management-created trails and informal visitor-created trails. Although both types of trails can be found in remote natural areas, dense networks of them often occur in forests close to cities where they experience intense visitor use. To assess the relative impacts of different recreational trails in urban forests, we compared the condition of the trail surface, loss of forest strata and changes in tree structure caused by seven types of trails (total network 46.1 km) traversing 17 remnants of an endangered urban forest in Australia. After mapping and classifying all trails, we assessed their impact on the forest condition at 125 sites (15 sites per trail type, plus 15 control sites within undisturbed forest). On the trail sites, the condition of the trail surface, distance from the trail edge to four forest strata (litter, understory, midstorey and tree cover) and structure of the tree-line were assessed. Informal trails generally had poorer surface conditions and were poorly-designed and located. Per site, formal and informal trails resulted in similar loss of forest strata, with wider trails resulting in greater loss of forest. Because there were more informal trails, however, they accounted for the greatest cumulative forest loss. Structural impacts varied, with the widest informal trails and all formal hardened trails resulting in similar reductions in canopy cover and tree density but an increase in saplings. These structural impacts are likely a function of the unregulated and intense use of large informal trails, and disturbance from the construction and maintenance of formal trails

  17. SAHA-induced TRAIL-sensitisation of Multiple Myeloma cells is enhanced in 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhoma, A; Chantry, A D; Haywood-Small, S L; Cross, N A

    2017-11-15

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is currently incurable despite many novel therapies. Tumour Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a potential anti-tumour agent although effects as a single agent are limited. In this study, we investigated whether the Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA can enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis and target TRAIL resistance in both suspension culture, and 3D cell culture as a model of disseminated MM lesions that form in bone. The effects of SAHA and/or TRAIL in 6 Multiple Myeloma cell lines were assessed in both suspension cultures and in an Alginate-based 3D cell culture model. The effect of SAHA and/or TRAIL was assessed on apoptosis by assessment of nuclear morphology using Hoechst 33342/Propidium Iodide staining. Viable cell number was assessed by CellTiter-Glo luminescence assay, Caspase-8 and -9 activities were measured by Caspase-Glo™ assay kit. TRAIL-resistant cells were generated by culture of RPMI 8226 and NCI-H929 by acute exposure to TRAIL followed by selection of TRAIL-resistant cells. TRAIL significantly induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in OPM-2, RPMI 8226, NCI-H929, U266, JJN-3 MM cell lines and ADC-1 plasma cell leukaemia cells. SAHA amplified TRAIL responses in all lines except OPM-2, and enhanced TRAIL responses were both via Caspase-8 and -9. SAHA treatment induced growth inhibition that further increased in the combination treatment with TRAIL in MM cells. The co-treatment of TRAIL and SAHA reduced viable cell numbers all cell lines. TRAIL responses were further potentiated by SAHA in 3D cell culture in NCI-H929, RPMI 8226 and U266 at lower TRAIL + SAHA doses than in suspension culture. However TRAIL responses in cells that had been selected for TRAIL resistance were not further enhanced by SAHA treatment. SAHA is a potent sensitizer of TRAIL responses in both TRAIL sensitive and resistant cell lines, in both suspension and 3D culture, however SAHA did not sensitise TRAIL-sensitive cell

  18. Environmental perceptions and objective walking trail audits inform a community-based participatory research walking intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoellner Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the documented physical activity disparities that exist among low-income minority communities and the increased focused on socio-ecological approaches to address physical inactivity, efforts aimed at understanding the built environment to support physical activity are needed. This community-based participatory research (CBPR project investigates walking trails perceptions in a high minority southern community and objectively examines walking trails. The primary aim is to explore if perceived and objective audit variables predict meeting recommendations for walking and physical activity, MET/minutes/week of physical activity, and frequency of trail use. Methods A proportional sampling plan was used to survey community residents in this cross-sectional study. Previously validated instruments were pilot tested and appropriately adapted and included the short version of the validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire, trail use, and perceptions of walking trails. Walking trails were assessed using the valid and reliable Path Environmental Audit Tool which assesses four content areas including: design features, amenities, maintenance, and pedestrian safety from traffic. Analyses included Chi-square, one-way ANOVA's, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic models. Results Numerous (n = 21 high quality walking trails were available. Across trails, there were very few indicators of incivilities and safety features rated relatively high. Among the 372 respondents, trail use significantly predicted meeting recommendations for walking and physical activity, and MET/minutes/week. While controlling for other variables, significant predictors of trail use included proximity to trails, as well as perceptions of walking trail safety, trail amenities, and neighborhood pedestrian safety. Furthermore, while controlling for education, gender, and income; for every one time per week increase in using walking trails

  19. Environmental perceptions and objective walking trail audits inform a community-based participatory research walking intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Given the documented physical activity disparities that exist among low-income minority communities and the increased focused on socio-ecological approaches to address physical inactivity, efforts aimed at understanding the built environment to support physical activity are needed. This community-based participatory research (CBPR) project investigates walking trails perceptions in a high minority southern community and objectively examines walking trails. The primary aim is to explore if perceived and objective audit variables predict meeting recommendations for walking and physical activity, MET/minutes/week of physical activity, and frequency of trail use. Methods A proportional sampling plan was used to survey community residents in this cross-sectional study. Previously validated instruments were pilot tested and appropriately adapted and included the short version of the validated International Physical Activity Questionnaire, trail use, and perceptions of walking trails. Walking trails were assessed using the valid and reliable Path Environmental Audit Tool which assesses four content areas including: design features, amenities, maintenance, and pedestrian safety from traffic. Analyses included Chi-square, one-way ANOVA's, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic models. Results Numerous (n = 21) high quality walking trails were available. Across trails, there were very few indicators of incivilities and safety features rated relatively high. Among the 372 respondents, trail use significantly predicted meeting recommendations for walking and physical activity, and MET/minutes/week. While controlling for other variables, significant predictors of trail use included proximity to trails, as well as perceptions of walking trail safety, trail amenities, and neighborhood pedestrian safety. Furthermore, while controlling for education, gender, and income; for every one time per week increase in using walking trails, the odds for meeting walking

  20. Getting TRAIL back on track for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J; von Karstedt, S; Zinngrebe, J; Walczak, H

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other members of the TNF superfamily, the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, also known as Apo2L) possesses the unique capacity to induce apoptosis selectively in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This exciting discovery provided the basis for the development of TRAIL-receptor agonists (TRAs), which have demonstrated robust anticancer activity in a number of preclinical studies. Subsequently initiated clinical trials testing TRAs demonstrated, on the one hand, broad tolerability but revealed, on the other, that therapeutic benefit was rather limited. Several factors that are likely to account for TRAs' sobering clinical performance have since been identified. First, because of initial concerns over potential hepatotoxicity, TRAs with relatively weak agonistic activity were selected to enter clinical trials. Second, although TRAIL can induce apoptosis in several cancer cell lines, it has now emerged that many others, and importantly, most primary cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL monotherapy. Third, so far patients enrolled in TRA-employing clinical trials were not selected for likelihood of benefitting from a TRA-comprising therapy on the basis of a valid(ated) biomarker. This review summarizes and discusses the results achieved so far in TRA-employing clinical trials in the light of these three shortcomings. By integrating recent insight on apoptotic and non-apoptotic TRAIL signaling in cancer cells, we propose approaches to introduce novel, revised TRAIL-based therapeutic concepts into the cancer clinic. These include (i) the use of recently developed highly active TRAs, (ii) the addition of efficient, but cancer-cell-selective TRAIL-sensitizing agents to overcome TRAIL resistance and (iii) employing proteomic profiling to uncover resistance mechanisms. We envisage that this shall enable the design of effective TRA-comprising therapeutic concepts for individual cancer patients in the future. PMID:24948009

  1. Non-canonical kinase signaling by the death ligand TRAIL in cancer cells : discord in the death receptor family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azijli, K.; Weyhenmeyer, B.; Peters, G. J.; de Jong, S.; Kruyt, F. A. E.

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-based therapy is currently evaluated in clinical studies as a tumor cell selective pro-apoptotic approach. However, besides activating canonical caspase-dependent apoptosis by binding to TRAIL-specific death receptors, the TRAIL ligand

  2. Raman optical activity of proteins and glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, E

    2000-03-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA), measured in this project as a small difference in the intensity of Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarised incident laser light, offers the potential to provide more information about the structure of biological molecules in aqueous solution than conventional spectroscopic techniques. Chapter one contains a general discussion of the relative merits of different spectroscopic techniques for structure determination of biomolecules, as well as a brief introduction to ROA. In Chapter two a theoretical analysis of ROA is developed, which extends the discussion in chapter one. The spectrometer setup and sample preparation is then discussed in chapter three. Instrument and sample conditions are monitored to ensure that the best results are obtained. As with any experimental project problems occur, which may result in a degradation of the spectra obtained. The cause of these problems was explored and remedied whenever possible. Chapter four introduces a brief account of protein, glycoprotein and carbohydrate structure and function, with a particular emphasis on the structure of proteins. In the remaining chapters experimental ROA results on proteins and glycoproteins, with some carbohydrate samples, from a wide range of sources are examined. For example, in chapter five some {beta}-sheet proteins are examined. Structural features in these proteins are examined in the extended amide III region of their ROA spectra, revealing that ROA is sensitive to the rigidity or flexibility inherent in proteins. Chapter six concentrates on a group of proteins (usually glycoproteins) known as the serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins). Medically, the serpins are one of the most important groups of proteins of current interest, with wide-ranging implications in conditions such as Down's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, and emphysema with associated cirrhosis of the liver. With favourable samples and conditions ROA

  3. Eliminating the six N-terminal amino acids of the caspase 3 large subunit improved production of a biologically active IL2-Caspase3 chimeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantz, Yitav; Sabag, Ofra; Lichtenstein, Michal; Grodzovski, Inna; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Designing a chimeric protein and developing a procedure for its stable production as a biologically active protein, are key steps in its potential application to clinical trails. IL2-Caspase3 chimeric protein designed to target activated T lymphocytes was found to be a promising molecule for targeted treatment, however was found to be difficult to produce as a biological active molecule. Thus, we designed a new version of the molecule, IL2-Caspase3s, in which six amino acids (aa 29-34) from the N-terminus of the large subunit of caspase 3 were excluded. Repeated expressions, productions, and partial purifications of the IL2-Caspase3s yielded reproducible batches with consistent results. We found that IL2-Caspase3s causes cell death in a specific, dose-, and time-dependent manner. Cell death due to IL2-Caspase3s is caused by apoptosis. This improved and biologically stable IL2-Caspase3s chimeric protein may be developed in the future for clinical trails as a promising therapy for several pathologies involving activated T-cells. Moreover, this truncated caspase 3 sequence, lacking the N-terminal six amino acids of its large subunit, may be used in other caspase 3-based chimeric proteins targeted against various human diseases, using the appropriate targeting moiety. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  4. 75 FR 12254 - Official Trail Marker for the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... National Park Service Official Trail Marker for the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Official Insignia, Designation. Authority: National Trails System Act.... SUMMARY: This notice issues the official trail marker insignia of the Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail...

  5. sTRAIL-iRGD is a promising therapeutic agent for gastric cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ying; Li, Xihan; Sha, Huizi; Zhang, Lianru; Bian, Xinyu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Baorui

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively kills tumor cells and augments chemotherapeutics in vivo. Here, we developed sTRAIL-iRGD, a recombinant protein consisting of sTRAIL fused to CRGDKGPDC, a C-terminal end binding peptide with an integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (iRGD) motif. CRGDKGPDC is a tumor-homing peptide with high penetration into tumor tissue and cells. We found that sTRAIL-iRGD internalized into cultured gastric cancer tumor cell...

  6. Geomorphological hazard and tourist vulnerability along Portofino Park trails (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brandolini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The many trails existing in the coastal area of Portofino Promontory are used by tourists for trekking or as pathways to small villages and beaches. The aim of this paper is to define geomorphological hazard and tourist vulnerability in this area, within the framework of the management and planning of hiking activities in Portofino Natural Park. In particular, processes triggered by gravity, running waters and wave motion, affecting the slopes and the cliff, are considered. The typology of the trails and trail maintenance are also taken into account in relation to weather conditions that can make the excursion routes dangerous for tourists. In conclusion, an operative model is applied for the definition of possible risk scenarios. This model is founded on an inventory and the quantification of geomorphological hazards and tourist vulnerability, in comparison with trail rescue data. The model can be applied to other environments and tourist areas.

  7. Activated Cdc42-associated kinase 1 (Ack1) is required for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor recruitment to lipid rafts and induction of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderoth, Emma; Pilia, Giulia; Mahajan, Nupam P; Ferby, Ingvar

    2013-11-15

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) holds promise for treatment of cancer due to its ability to selectively kill cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Ligand-induced translocation of TRAIL receptors (TRAIL-R) 1 and 2 (also called DR4 and DR5, respectively) into lipid raft membrane microdomains is required for TRAIL-induced cell death by facilitating receptor clustering and formation of the death-inducing signaling complex, yet the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. We show here that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Ack1, previously implicated in the spatiotemporal regulation of the EGF receptor, is required for TRAIL-induced cell death in multiple epithelial cell lines. TRAIL triggered a transient up-regulation of Ack1 and its recruitment to lipid rafts along with TRAIL-R1/2. siRNA-mediated depletion of Ack1 disrupted TRAIL-induced accumulation of TRAIL-R1/2 in lipid rafts and efficient recruitment of caspase-8 to the death-inducing signaling complex. Pharmacological inhibition of Ack1 did not affect TRAIL-induced cell death, indicating that Ack1 acts in a kinase-independent manner to promote TRAIL-R1/2 accumulation in lipid rafts. These findings identify Ack1 as an essential player in the spatial regulation of TRAIL-R1/2.

  8. Osteoprotegerin decreases human osteoclast apoptosis by inhibiting the TRAIL pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, Estelle; Houde, Nicolas; L'Eriger, Karine; Roux, Sophie

    2008-08-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted decoy receptor that recognizes RANKL, and blocks the interaction between RANK and RANKL, leading to the inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and activation. As OPG is a major inhibitor of bone resorption, we wondered whether OPG could modulate osteoclast survival/apoptosis. Osteoclast apoptosis was evaluated by adding various doses of OPG to human osteoclast cultures obtained from cord blood monocytes. Surprisingly, apoptosis decreased after adding the OPG. We hypothesized that OPG may block its second ligand, TRAIL, which is involved in osteoclast apoptosis. We showed that osteoclasts expressed TRAIL, and that TRAIL levels in the culture medium dose-dependently decreased in presence of OPG, as did the level of activated caspase-8 in osteoclasts. In addition, the expression of TRAIL by osteoclasts was not affected in the presence of OPG. Our findings suggest that OPG inhibits osteoclast apoptosis, at least in part, by binding and thus inhibiting endogenously produced TRAIL in human osteoclast cultures. TRAIL could be an autocrine factor for the regulation of osteoclast survival/apoptosis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Access Control Based on Trail Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBARELO, P. C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Professionals are constantly seeking qualification and consequently increasing their knowledge in their area of expertise. Thus, it is interesting to develop a computer system that knows its users and their work history. Using this information, even in the case of professional role change, the system could allow the renewed authorization for activities, based on previously authorized use. This article proposes a model for user access control that is embedded in a context-aware environment. The model applies the concept of trails to manage access control, recording activities usage in contexts and applying this history as a criterion to grant new accesses. Despite the fact that previous related research works consider contexts, none of them uses the concept of trails. Hence, the main contribution of this work is the use of a new access control criterion, namely, the history of previous accesses (trails. A prototype was implemented and applied in an evaluation based on scenarios. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal, allowing for access control systems to use an alternative way to support access rights.

  10. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae-Hee, E-mail: leedneo@gmail.com [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of VA (United States); Jung, Chang-Hwa [Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong J. [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Park, Daeho, E-mail: daehopark@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  11. Bortezomib sensitizes primary human esthesioneuroblastoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschny, Ronald; Holland, Heidrun; Sykora, Jaromir; Erdal, Hande; Krupp, Wolfgang; Bauer, Manfred; Bockmuehl, Ulrike; Ahnert, Peter; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Walczak, Henning; Ganten, Tom M

    2010-04-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a promising novel anti-cancer cytokine of the TNF superfamily, and Bortezomib, the first-in-class clinically used proteasome inhibitor, alone or in combination have been shown to efficiently kill numerous tumor cell lines. However, data concerning primary human tumor cells are very rare. Using primary esthesioneuroblastoma cells we analyzed the anti-tumor potential and the mechanism employed by Bortezomib in combination with TRAIL for the treatment of this rare but aggressive tumor. Expression of components of the TRAIL pathway was analyzed in tumor specimens and isolated primary tumor cells at the protein level. Cells were treated with TRAIL, Bortezomib, and a combination thereof, and apoptosis induction was quantified. Clonogenicity assays were performed to elucidate the long-term effect of this treatment. Despite expressing all components of the TRAIL pathway, freshly isolated primary esthesioneuroblastoma cells were completely resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. They could, however, be very efficiently sensitized by subtoxic doses of Bortezomib. The influence of Bortezomib on the TRAIL pathway was analyzed and showed upregulation of TRAIL death receptor expression, enhancement of the TRAIL death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), and downregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins of the TRAIL pathway. Of clinical relevance, TRAIL-resistant primary tumor cells could be repeatedly sensitized by Bortezomib, providing the basis for repeated clinical application schedules. This is the first report on the highly synergistic induction of apoptosis in primary esthesioneuroblastoma cells by Bortezomib and TRAIL. This combination, therefore, represents a promising novel therapeutic option for esthesioneuroblastoma.

  12. The antidiabetic drug ciglitazone induces high grade bladder cancer cells apoptosis through the up-regulation of TRAIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Plissonnier

    Full Text Available Ciglitazone belongs to the thiazolidinediones class of antidiabetic drug family and is a high-affinity ligand for the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ. Apart from its antidiabetic activity, this molecule shows antineoplastic effectiveness in numerous cancer cell lines.Using RT4 (derived from a well differentiated grade I papillary tumor and T24 (derived from an undifferentiated grade III carcinoma bladder cancer cells, we investigated the potential of ciglitazone to induce apoptotic cell death and characterized the molecular mechanisms involved. In RT4 cells, the drug induced G2/M cell cycle arrest characterized by an overexpression of p53, p21(waf1/CIP1 and p27(Kip1 in concomitance with a decrease of cyclin B1. On the contrary, in T24 cells, it triggered apoptosis via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis occurred at high concentrations through PPARγ activation-independent pathways. We show that in vivo treatment of nude mice by ciglitazone inhibits high grade bladder cancer xenograft development. We identified a novel mechanism by which ciglitazone kills cancer cells. Ciglitazone up-regulated soluble and membrane-bound TRAIL and let TRAIL-resistant T24 cells to respond to TRAIL through caspase activation, death receptor signalling pathway and Bid cleavage. We provided evidence that TRAIL-induced apoptosis is partially driven by ciglitazone-mediated down-regulation of c-FLIP and survivin protein levels through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism.Therefore, ciglitazone could be clinically relevant as chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for the treatment of TRAIL-refractory high grade urothelial cancers.

  13. The antidiabetic drug ciglitazone induces high grade bladder cancer cells apoptosis through the up-regulation of TRAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plissonnier, Marie-Laure; Fauconnet, Sylvie; Bittard, Hugues; Lascombe, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Ciglitazone belongs to the thiazolidinediones class of antidiabetic drug family and is a high-affinity ligand for the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ (PPARγ). Apart from its antidiabetic activity, this molecule shows antineoplastic effectiveness in numerous cancer cell lines. Using RT4 (derived from a well differentiated grade I papillary tumor) and T24 (derived from an undifferentiated grade III carcinoma) bladder cancer cells, we investigated the potential of ciglitazone to induce apoptotic cell death and characterized the molecular mechanisms involved. In RT4 cells, the drug induced G2/M cell cycle arrest characterized by an overexpression of p53, p21(waf1/CIP1) and p27(Kip1) in concomitance with a decrease of cyclin B1. On the contrary, in T24 cells, it triggered apoptosis via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis occurred at high concentrations through PPARγ activation-independent pathways. We show that in vivo treatment of nude mice by ciglitazone inhibits high grade bladder cancer xenograft development. We identified a novel mechanism by which ciglitazone kills cancer cells. Ciglitazone up-regulated soluble and membrane-bound TRAIL and let TRAIL-resistant T24 cells to respond to TRAIL through caspase activation, death receptor signalling pathway and Bid cleavage. We provided evidence that TRAIL-induced apoptosis is partially driven by ciglitazone-mediated down-regulation of c-FLIP and survivin protein levels through a proteasome-dependent degradation mechanism. Therefore, ciglitazone could be clinically relevant as chemopreventive or therapeutic agent for the treatment of TRAIL-refractory high grade urothelial cancers.

  14. Tensins: Bridging AMP-Activated Protein Kinase with Integrin Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, Maria; Ivaska, Johanna

    2017-10-01

    Integrin activation is essential for cell adhesion and for connecting the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, inappropriate integrin activation has been linked to several diseases, including cancer. Recent insights demonstrate that the main fibrillar adhesion component tensin maintains β1-integrin active in these mature adhesions. Depletion or silencing of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the energy sensor involved in maintaining the energy balance of the cell, enhances integrin activity by increasing the expression of tensin and thereby promoting cell adhesion, matrix formation, and mechanotransduction. Here, we discuss the role of tensin and AMPK in the regulation of integrin activity and integrin-dependent processes and their implication in diseases such as cancer and tissue fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The oxygen trail: measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mythen, M; Clutton-Brock, T

    1999-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia may be defined as abnormal oxygen utilization such that cells are experiencing anaerobic metabolism. Tissue hypoxia can be defined biochemically by low levels of ATP, high levels of NADH, or decreased oxidized cytochrome aa3. It is possible to measure these biochemical markers in the laboratory setting with, for example, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. However, this is not as yet a clinical option. There is no 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of clinical hypoxia. We can detect the gross consequences of tissue hypoxia, such as organ dysfunction and metabolic markers of anaerobic metabolism (e.g. lactic acidosis). We have also become familiar with the measurement of both global and regional oxygen dispatch and consumption. However, organ dysfunction and metabolic acidosis consistent with established tissue hypoxia commonly exists in the presence of normal and even supra normal global measures of oxygen dispatch and consumption. Therefore, we should ideally make measurements at the end of the oxygen trail, i.e. cellular oxygen delivery and effective utilization.

  16. Importin β1 protein-mediated nuclear localization of death receptor 5 (DR5) limits DR5/tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell death of human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yuko; Nakayama, Masafumi; Nishina, Takashi; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Koyanagi, Makoto; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Ko; Yagita, Hideo

    2011-12-16

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)/death receptor 5 (DR5)-mediated cell death plays an important role in the elimination of tumor cells and transformed cells. Recently, recombinant TRAIL and agonistic anti-DR5 monoclonal antibodies have been developed and applied to cancer therapy. However, depending on the type of cancer, the sensitivity to TRAIL has been reportedly different, and some tumor cells are resistant to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Using confocal microscopy, we found that large amounts of DR5 were localized in the nucleus in HeLa and HepG2 cells. Moreover, these tumor cells were resistant to TRAIL, whereas DU145 cells, which do not have nuclear DR5, were highly sensitive to TRAIL. By means of immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis, we found that DR5 and importin β1 were physically associated, suggesting that the nuclear DR5 was transported through the nuclear import pathway mediated by importin β1. Two functional nuclear localization signals were identified in DR5, the mutation of which abrogated the nuclear localization of DR5 in HeLa cells. Moreover, the nuclear transport of DR5 was also prevented by the knockdown of importin β1 using siRNA, resulting in the up-regulation of DR5 expression on the cell surface and an increased sensitivity of HeLa and HepG2 cells to TRAIL. Taken together, our findings suggest that the importin β1-mediated nuclear localization of DR5 limits the DR5/TRAIL-induced cell death of human tumor cells and thus can be a novel target to improve cancer therapy with recombinant TRAIL and anti-DR5 antibodies.

  17. Clusterin mediates TRAIL resistance in prostate tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallman, David A; Chen, Xianghong; Zhong, Bin; Gilvary, Danielle L; Zhou, Junmin; Wei, Sheng; Djeu, Julie Y

    2007-11-01

    One of the major obstacles in curing prostate cancer is the development of drug resistance to docetaxel, which is the gold standard for the treatment of this disease. It is not only imperative to discover the molecular basis of resistance but also to find therapeutic agents that can disrupt the resistant pathways. Based on initial findings that docetaxel-resistant PC3-DR and DU145-DR prostate tumor cell lines express tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, we examined whether TRAIL could be used as an alternative method to kill PC3-DR and DU145-DR cells. However, these tumor cells were found to be TRAIL resistant. Because PC3-DR and DU-145-DR cells were previously shown by us to be clusterin positive, we examined if clusterin could play a role in TRAIL resistance. We found that resveratrol could sensitize docetaxel-resistant tumor cells to TRAIL, and it worked by blocking clusterin expression. In particular, small interfering RNA clusterin expression in the cell lines was sufficient to produce apoptosis by TRAIL. Further analysis indicated that resveratrol functions as an effective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, similar to its analogue, piceatannol, and could inhibit Src and Jak kinases, thus resulting in loss of Stat1 activation. We have shown earlier that Stat1 is essential for gene transcription of clusterin. These results, taken together, show that resveratrol could be a useful new therapeutic agent to combat docetaxel resistance.

  18. TRAIL delivery by MSC-derived extracellular vesicles is an effective anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, ZhengQiang; Kolluri, Krishna K; Gowers, Kate H C; Janes, Sam M

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are lipid membrane-enclosed nanoparticles released by cells. They mediate intercellular communication by transferring biological molecules and therefore have potential as innovative drug delivery vehicles. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis of cancer cells. Unfortunately, the clinical application of recombinant rTRAIL has been hampered by its low bioavailability and resistance of cancer cells. EV-mediated TRAIL delivery may circumvent these problems. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) produce EVs and could be a good source for therapeutic EV production. We investigated if TRAIL could be expressed in MSC-derived EVs and examined their cancer cell-killing efficacy. EVs were isolated by ultracentrifugation and were membranous particles of 50-70 nm in diameter. Both MSC- and TRAIL-expressing MSC (MSCT)-derived EVs express CD63, CD9 and CD81, but only MSCT-EVs express surface TRAIL. MSCT-EVs induced apoptosis in 11 cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner but showed no cytotoxicity in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. Caspase activity inhibition or TRAIL neutralisation blocked the cytotoxicity of TRAIL-positive EVs. MSCT-EVs induced pronounced apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant cancer cells and this effect could be further enhanced using a CDK9 inhibitor. These data indicate that TRAIL delivery by MSC-derived EVs is an effective anticancer therapy.

  19. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 by hepatitis C virus core protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, HT; Pham, Long; Kim, JW

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular proteins for its own propagation. In order to identify the cellular factors involved in HCV propagation, we performed protein microarray assays using the HCV core protein as a probe. Of ~9,000 host proteins immobilized in a microarray...... inducers. Binding of HCV core to MAPKAPK3 was confirmed by in vitro pulldown assay and further verified by coimmunoprecipitation assay. HCV core protein interacted with MAPKAPK3 through amino acid residues 41 to 75 of core and the N-terminal half of kinase domain of MAPKAPK3. In addition, both RNA...... increased HCV IRES-mediated translation and MAPKAPK3-dependent HCV IRES activity was further increased by core protein. These data suggest that HCV core may modulate MAPKAPK3 to facilitate its own propagation....

  20. Cryptolepine, isolated from Sida acuta, sensitizes human gastric adenocarcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Firoj; Toume, Kazufumi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Ishibashi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay guided separation of Sida acuta whole plants led to the isolation of an alkaloid, cryptolepine (1), along with two kaempferol glycosides (2-3). Compound 1 showed strong activity in overcoming TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μm. Combined treatment of 1 and TRAIL sensitized AGS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at the aforementioned concentrations. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Trail Pheromone Disruption of Argentine Ant Trail Formation and Foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Stringer, L.D.; Snook, K.; Banko, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Trail pheromone disruption of invasive ants is a novel tactic that builds on the development of pheromone-based pest management in other insects. Argentine ant trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, was formulated as a micro-encapsulated sprayable particle and applied against Argentine ant populations in 400 m2 field plots in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. A widely dispersed point source strategy for trail pheromone disruption was used. Traffic rates of ants in bioassays of treated filter paper, protected from rainfall and sunlight, indicated the presence of behaviorally significant quantities of pheromone being released from the formulation for up to 59 days. The proportion of plots, under trade wind conditions (2-3 m s-1), with visible trails was reduced for up to 14 days following treatment, and the number of foraging ants at randomly placed tuna-bait cards was similarly reduced. The success of these trail pheromone disruption trials in a natural ecosystem highlights the potential of this method for control of invasive ant species in this and other environments. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010.

  2. Vitamin D Modulation of TRAIL Expression in Human Milk and Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Yuvaraj; Reddy, Sakamuri V; Mulligan, Jennifer L; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Wagner, Carol L

    2017-06-28

    The vitamin D levels in mothers affect the health status of both the mother and breastfeeding infant. Vitamin D deficient mothers' infants are prone to rickets. While tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been implicated in cellular growth/apoptosis, immune cell function and bone-resorbing osteoclast formation, the expression of TRAIL in human milk as a function of vitamin D status in mothers remains unknown. We hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency alters TRAIL protein levels in human breast milk and mammary epithelial cells. Milk from vitamin D deficient mothers showed high levels of TRAIL (α and β) proteins compared to milk from vitamin D replete women. Western blot analysis of total cell lysate obtained from normal human mammary epithelial (HME-1) cells treated with variable doses (0-20 nM) of vitamin D for 24 h demonstrated that low levels (0.5 to 5 nM) significantly increased the TRAIL α but no change in β expression. In contrast, vitamin D at 20 nM concentration suppressed the expression of both TRAIL α and β proteins. Consistently, vitamin D regulated TRAIL mRNA expression in HME-1 cells. Our results indicate that vitamin D status in mothers modulates TRAIL expression in breast milk, which may have implications for both mother and infant health.

  3. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand cooperates with NSAIDs via activated Wnt signalling in (pre)malignant colon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Dianne M; Jalving, Mathilde; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; Sloots, Ineke A; Koster, Roelof; Hollema, Harry; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Koornstra, Jan J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; de Jong, Steven

    2011-02-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor agonistic agents and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are interesting agents for the chemoprevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. We investigated whether NSAIDs sensitize colon cancer and adenoma cell lines and ex vivo cultured human adenomas to recombinant human (rh)TRAIL. Involvement of the crucial Wnt signalling pathway in the sensitization of colon cancer cells was examined. Five colon cancer and two adenoma cell lines, human ex vivo adenomas and normal colonic epithelium were treated with aspirin or sulindac combined with rhTRAIL. Apoptosis levels, expression of intracellular proteins and TRAIL receptor membrane expression were assessed. Ls174T cells stably transfected with an inducible dominant negative TCF-4 (dnTCF-4) construct served to analyse the role of Wnt pathway activation. Both rhTRAIL-sensitive and -resistant colon cancer cell lines were strongly sensitized to rhTRAIL by aspirin (maximum enhancement ratio, 7.1). Remarkably, in adenoma cell lines sulindac enhanced rhTRAIL-induced apoptosis most effectively (maximum enhancement ratio, 2.5). Although membrane TRAIL receptor expression was not affected by NSAIDs, caspase-8 activation was enhanced by combinational treatment. Several proteins from different biological pathways were affected by NSAIDs, indicating complex mechanisms of sensitization. Elimination of TCF-4 completely blocked the sensitizing effect in colon cancer cells. In ex vivo adenomas the combination of sulindac and rhTRAIL increased apoptosis from 18.4% (sulindac) and 17.8% (rhTRAIL) to 28.0% (p = 0.003 and p = 0.005, respectively). It was concluded that NSAID-induced sensitization to rhTRAIL requires TCF-4 activity. Thus, the combination of TRAIL-receptor agonistic agents and NSAIDs is a potentially attractive treatment option for (pre)malignant tumours with constitutively active Wnt signalling, such as colorectal tumours. Copyright © 2010 Pathological Society

  4. Analysis of the impact of recreational trail usage for prioritising management decisions: a regression tree approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Aleksandra; Ewertowski, Marek; White, Piran; Kasprzak, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    The dual role of many Protected Natural Areas in providing benefits for both conservation and recreation poses challenges for management. Although recreation-based damage to ecosystems can occur very quickly, restoration can take many years. The protection of conservation interests at the same as providing for recreation requires decisions to be made about how to prioritise and direct management actions. Trails are commonly used to divert visitors from the most important areas of a site, but high visitor pressure can lead to increases in trail width and a concomitant increase in soil erosion. Here we use detailed field data on condition of recreational trails in Gorce National Park, Poland, as the basis for a regression tree analysis to determine the factors influencing trail deterioration, and link specific trail impacts with environmental, use related and managerial factors. We distinguished 12 types of trails, characterised by four levels of degradation: (1) trails with an acceptable level of degradation; (2) threatened trails; (3) damaged trails; and (4) heavily damaged trails. Damaged trails were the most vulnerable of all trails and should be prioritised for appropriate conservation and restoration. We also proposed five types of monitoring of recreational trail conditions: (1) rapid inventory of negative impacts; (2) monitoring visitor numbers and variation in type of use; (3) change-oriented monitoring focusing on sections of trail which were subjected to changes in type or level of use or subjected to extreme weather events; (4) monitoring of dynamics of trail conditions; and (5) full assessment of trail conditions, to be carried out every 10-15 years. The application of the proposed framework can enhance the ability of Park managers to prioritise their trail management activities, enhancing trail conditions and visitor safety, while minimising adverse impacts on the conservation value of the ecosystem. A.M.T. was supported by the Polish Ministry of

  5. TAK1 kinase determines TRAIL sensitivity by modulating reactive oxygen species and cIAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Sho; Omori, Emily; Kajino, Taisuke; Kajino-Sakamoto, Rie; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun

    2009-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potent inducer of cell death in several cancer cells, but many cells are resistant to TRAIL. The mechanism that determines sensitivity to TRAIL-killing is still elusive. Here we report that deletion of TAK1 kinase greatly increased activation of caspase-3 and induced cell death following TRAIL stimulation in keratinocytes and fibroblasts as well as cancer cells. Although TAK1 kinase is involved in NF-κB pathway, ablation of NF-κB did not alter sensitivity to TRAIL. We found that TRAIL could induce accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) when TAK1 was deleted. Furthermore, we found that TAK1 deletion induces TRAIL-dependent downregulation of cIAP, which enhances activation of caspase-3. These results demonstrate that TAK1 deletion facilitates TRAIL-induced cell death by activating caspase through ROS and downregulation of cIAP. Thus, inhibition of TAK1 can be an effective approach to increase TRAIL sensitivity. PMID:19421137

  6. Flavopiridol Strongly Sensitizes Canine Lymphoma Cells to TRAIL-induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Aleksandra; DE Miguel, Diego; Kutkowska, Justyna; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, Bożena; Rapak, Andrzej; Lostao, Luis Martinez

    2017-12-01

    Targeting the extrinsic apoptotic pathway is an interesting option for anticancer therapy. A protein which such ability is Apo2 ligand, also known as TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). The aim of this study was to examine the possibility of sensitizing resistant CLBL-1 canine lymphoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by using flavopiridol (FVP) a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKs). The CLBL-1 (canine B-cell lymphoma cell line) was used in the study. The effect of FVP and TRAIL treatment on apoptosis induction was assessed by flow cytometry and western blot. Although canine lymphoma cells were resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, combination of this death ligand with FVP was able to overcome TRAIL resistance of CLBL-1 lymphoma cells. Our results demonstrated that although canine lymphoma cells were resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, combination of this death ligand with FVP was able to overcome TRAIL resistance of CLBL-1 lymphoma cell line. Although further investigation is required to deepen the knowledge of TRAIL as an antitumor agent in canine cancers, our results open the door to future use of TRAIL-based treatment strategies in veterinary oncology. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Protein covalent modification by biologically active quinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIROSLAV J. GASIC

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The avarone/avarol quinone/hydroquinone couple shows considerable antitumor activity. In this work, covalent modification of b-lactoglobulin by avarone and its derivatives as well as by the synthetic steroidal quinone 2,5(10-estradiene-1,4,17-trione and its derivatives were studied. The techniques for studying chemical modification of b-lactoglobulin by quinones were: UV/Vis spectrophotometry, SDS PAGE and isoelectrofocusing. SDS PAGE results suggest that polymerization of the protein occurs. It could be seen that the protein of 18 kD gives the bands of 20 kD, 36 kD, 40 kD, 45 kD, 64 kD and 128 kD depending on modification agent. The shift of the pI of the protein (5.4 upon modification toward lower values (from pI 5.0 to 5.3 indicated that lysine amino groups are the principal site of the reaction of b-lactoglobulin with the quinones.

  8. Modulation of tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors in a human osteoclast model in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Stephen; Chamoux, Estelle; Bisson, Martine; Roux, Sophie

    2012-02-01

    TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) has been shown to induce apoptosis by binding to TRAIL-R1 and -R2 death receptors, but not to TRAIL-R3 or -R4, its decoy receptors that lack the internal death domain. Osteoclasts (Ocs) are sensitive to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and modulation of these receptors may change Oc sensitivity to TRAIL. Using human Oc cultures, we first investigated the gene expression profile of these receptors (TNFRSF10 -A, -B, -C, -D encoding TRAIL-Rs 1-4) by real time PCR after adding osteotropic factors during the last week of Oc cultures. We observed a significant decrease in the expression of TNFRSF10-A after the addition of TGFβ, and an increase in that of TNFRSF10-A and -B post-PTH stimulation. Protein expression of TRAIL-R1 and -R3 was upregulated in the presence of MIP-1α, but down-regulated in the presence of TGFβ (R1), TRAIL (R2) or OPG (R3). The percentage of Ocs expressing the TRAIL-R1 and/or -R2 at their surface was increased by MIP-1α and TRAIL, increased (R2) or decreased (R1) by TGFβ, and the percentage expressing TRAIL-R3 was increased by MIP-1α, TRAIL and RANKL. Although significant, the magnitude of all these changes was of about 10-15%. While a direct correlation between these changes and TRAIL-induced Oc apoptosis was less clear, a protective effect was observed in Ocs that had been treated with OPG, and an additive effect in Ocs pre-treated with TRAIL or TGFβ increased TRAIL sensitivity.

  9. Tangeretin sensitises human lung cancer cells to TRAIL- induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. (H1299 and H1975). Methods: ... Western blotting was performed to assess the expression of death receptors, apoptosis pathway proteins, JNK and ERK1/2. ...... upregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. World J.

  10. The DeISGylase USP18 limits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through the regulation of TRAIL levels: Cellular levels of TRAIL influences responsiveness to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Manini, Ivana; Sgorbissa, Andrea; Potu, Harish; Tomasella, Andrea; Brancolini, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising molecule for anti-cancer therapies. Unfortunately, cancer cells frequently acquire resistance to rhTRAIL. Various co-treatments have been proposed to overcome apoptosis resistance to TRAIL. Here we show that downregulation of the deISGylase USP18 sensitizes cancer cells to rhTRAIL, whereas, elevate levels of USP18 inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis, in a deISGylase-independent manner. USP18 influences TRAIL sign...

  11. Antioxidative Activity of Tobacco Leaf Protein Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Rao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Discarded tobacco leaf protein hydrolysate (DTLPH was prepared by enzymatic hydrolysis using papain and then separated using ultrafiltration (UF membranes with molecular mass cut-off (MMCO of 10, 5, 3 and 1 kDa. Four permeate fractions including 10-K, 5-K, 3-K and 1-K (the permeate fractions from 10, 5, 3 and 1 kDa hydrolysate fractions were obtained. The 5-K hydrolysate fraction had high oxidation inhibilitory ratio (42.62 %, which was about twofold higher than the original hydrolysate and as high as that of vitamin E (α-tocopherol. The fractionated hydrolysates were superior to the original hydrolysate in the antioxidative activity tested. Moreover, these separated hydrolysates showed the enhanced functional property. The amino acid composition of 5-K hydrolysate was analyzed and the results show that the high antioxidative activity of 5-K hydrolysate was derived from high content of histidine, methionine, cystine and tryptophan.

  12. Unfolded protein response activation in cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Bernal, Beatriz E; Torres-Bernal, Luis Fernando; Gutiérrez-Campos, Rafael R; Kershenobich Stalnikowitz, David D; Barba-Gallardo, Luis Fernando; Chayet, Arturo A; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2014-10-01

    To analyze the expression of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), 2 factors in the unfolded protein response (UPR), in age-related and diabetes-associated cataract. Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Aguascalientes, México. Experimental study. The qualitative and quantitative expression of GRP78 and ATF6 were measured in surgical samples from 11 senile cataracts, 9 diabetic-associated cataracts, and 3 normal lenses. Both proteins were detected by immunofluorescence and immunogold-conjugated antibodies. Quantitative morphometry was used to analyze the differences in GRP78 and ATF6 between samples. The Mann-Whitney test was used for statistical analysis. Scanning electron microscopy showed the characteristic organization of fibers in normal lenses with regular alignment and interdigitation between them. On the other hand, lenses from eyes with senile or diabetic cataract showed the same pattern of misalignment and disorganization of the fibers. Both proteins were detected through immunofluorescence in senile and diabetic cataracts, but not in normal lenses. Immunogold-conjugated antibodies and transmission electron microscopy showed that GRP78 and ATF6 grains were 30% higher and 35% higher, respectively, in diabetic cataracts than in senile cataracts (P<.05). These data show for the first time in humans that GRP78 and ATF6 are present in lens fibers of senile cataracts and diabetic cataracts, establishing that the UPR may be important in the process of cataractogenesis. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrative analysis of kinase networks in TRAIL-induced apoptosis provides a source of potential targets for combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    So, Jonathan; Pasculescu, Adrian; Dai, Anna Y.

    2015-01-01

    /threonine kinase (PXK) and AP2-associated kinase 1 (AAK1), which promote receptor endocytosis and may enable cells to resist TRAIL-induced apoptosis by enhancing endocytosis of the TRAIL receptors. We assembled protein interaction maps using mass spectrometry-based protein interaction analysis and quantitative...... combination therapies to selectively kill cancer cells....

  14. Combination of arginine deprivation with TRAIL treatment as a targeted-therapy for mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Wu, Chunjing; Bigford, Gregory; Theodoropoulos, George; You, Min; Li, Ying Ying; Verona-Santos, Javier; Feun, Lynn G; Nguyen, Dao M; Savaraj, Niramol

    2014-12-01

    In the present study we present data to show that certain tumor cells including malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells do not express argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), and thus are unable to synthesize arginine from citrulline. Exposure of these ASS-negative cells to the arginine degrading enzyme, arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), for 72 h results in significant increases in cleaved caspase-3. Importantly, this apoptotic signal is further strengthened by the addition of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Using flow cytometry, we showed that the combination treatment (ADI-PEG20 at 50 ng/ml and TRAIL at 10 ng/ml) for 24 h resulted in profound cell death with 67% of cells positive for caspase-3 activity, while ADI-PEG20 alone or TRAIL alone resulted in only 10-15% cell death. This positive amplification loop is mediated through the cleavage of proapototic protein "BID". Our work represents a new strategy for treating patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma using targeted molecular therapeutics based on selected tumor markers, thus avoiding the use of potentially cytotoxic chemotherapy. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. TRAIL Deficiency Contributes to Diabetic Nephropathy in Fat-Fed ApoE-/- Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartland, Siân P.; Erlich, Jonathan H.; Kavurma, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently demonstrated that TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is protective of diet-induced diabetes in mice. While TRAIL has been implicated in chronic kidney disease, its role in vivo in diabetic nephropathy is not clear. The present study investigated the role of TRAIL in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy using TRAIL-/-ApoE-/- mice. Methods TRAIL-/-ApoE-/- and ApoE-/- mice were fed a high fat diet for 20 w. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were assessed over 0, 5, 8 and 20 w. At 20 w, markers of kidney function including creatinine, phosphate, calcium and cystatin C were measured. Changes in mRNA expression of MMPs, TIMP-1, IL-1β and IL-18 were assessed in the kidney. Functional and histological changes in kidneys were examined. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. Results TRAIL-/-ApoE-/- mice had significantly increased urine protein, urine protein:creatinine ratio, plasma phosphorous, and plasma cystatin C, with accelerated nephropathy. Histologically, increased extracellular matrix, mesangial expansion and mesangial cell proliferation in the glomeruli were observed. Moreover, TRAIL-/-ApoE-/- kidneys displayed loss of the brush border and disorganisation of tubular epithelium, with increased fibrosis. TRAIL-deficient kidneys also had increased expression of MMPs, TIMP-1, PAI-1, IL-1β and IL-18, markers of renal injury and inflammation. Compared with ApoE-/- mice, TRAIL-/-ApoE-/- mice displayed insulin resistance and type-2 diabetic features with reduced renal insulin-receptor expression. Conclusions Here, we show that TRAIL-deficiency in ApoE-/- mice exacerbates nephropathy and insulin resistance. Understanding TRAIL signalling in kidney disease and diabetes, may therefore lead to novel strategies for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24667560

  16. TRAIL deficiency contributes to diabetic nephropathy in fat-fed ApoE-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân P Cartland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We recently demonstrated that TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is protective of diet-induced diabetes in mice. While TRAIL has been implicated in chronic kidney disease, its role in vivo in diabetic nephropathy is not clear. The present study investigated the role of TRAIL in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy using TRAIL(-/-ApoE(-/- mice. METHODS: TRAIL(-/-ApoE(-/- and ApoE(-/- mice were fed a high fat diet for 20 w. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were assessed over 0, 5, 8 and 20 w. At 20 w, markers of kidney function including creatinine, phosphate, calcium and cystatin C were measured. Changes in mRNA expression of MMPs, TIMP-1, IL-1β and IL-18 were assessed in the kidney. Functional and histological changes in kidneys were examined. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. RESULTS: TRAIL(-/-ApoE(-/- mice had significantly increased urine protein, urine protein:creatinine ratio, plasma phosphorous, and plasma cystatin C, with accelerated nephropathy. Histologically, increased extracellular matrix, mesangial expansion and mesangial cell proliferation in the glomeruli were observed. Moreover, TRAIL(-/-ApoE(-/- kidneys displayed loss of the brush border and disorganisation of tubular epithelium, with increased fibrosis. TRAIL-deficient kidneys also had increased expression of MMPs, TIMP-1, PAI-1, IL-1β and IL-18, markers of renal injury and inflammation. Compared with ApoE(-/- mice, TRAIL-/-ApoE-/- mice displayed insulin resistance and type-2 diabetic features with reduced renal insulin-receptor expression. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we show that TRAIL-deficiency in ApoE(-/- mice exacerbates nephropathy and insulin resistance. Understanding TRAIL signalling in kidney disease and diabetes, may therefore lead to novel strategies for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  17. Comparative Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Lindin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase MK5 is a substrate of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38, ERK3 and ERK4. Cell culture and animal studies have demonstrated that MK5 is involved in tumour suppression and promotion, embryogenesis, anxiety, cell motility and cell cycle regulation. In the present study, homology models of MK5 were used for molecular dynamics (MD simulations of: (1 MK5 alone; (2 MK5 in complex with an inhibitor; and (3 MK5 in complex with the interaction partner p38α. The calculations showed that the inhibitor occupied the active site and disrupted the intramolecular network of amino acids. However, intramolecular interactions consistent with an inactive protein kinase fold were not formed. MD with p38α showed that not only the p38 docking region, but also amino acids in the activation segment, αH helix, P-loop, regulatory phosphorylation region and the C-terminal of MK5 may be involved in forming a very stable MK5-p38α complex, and that p38α binding decreases the residual fluctuation of the MK5 model. Electrostatic Potential Surface (EPS calculations of MK5 and p38α showed that electrostatic interactions are important for recognition and binding.

  18. The novel Akt inhibitor API-1 induces c-FLIP degradation and synergizes with TRAIL to augment apoptosis independent of Akt inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Ren, Hui; Yue, Ping; Chen, Mingwei; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2012-04-01

    API-1 (pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines) is a novel small-molecule inhibitor of Akt, which acts by binding to Akt and preventing its membrane translocation and has promising preclinical antitumor activity. In this study, we reveal a novel function of API-1 in regulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) levels and TRAIL-induced apoptosis, independent of Akt inhibition. API-1 effectively induced apoptosis in tested cancer cell lines including activation of caspase-8 and caspase-9. It reduced the levels of c-FLIP without increasing the expression of death receptor 4 (DR4) or DR5. Accordingly, it synergized with TRAIL to induce apoptosis. Enforced expression of ectopic c-FLIP did not attenuate API-1-induced apoptosis but inhibited its ability to enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis. These data indicate that downregulation of c-FLIP mediates enhancement of TRAIL-induced apoptosis by API-1 but is not sufficient for API-1-induced apoptosis. API-1-induced reduction of c-FLIP could be blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Moreover, API-1 increased c-FLIP ubiquitination and decreased c-FLIP stability. These data together suggest that API-1 downregulates c-FLIP by facilitating its ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Because other Akt inhibitors including API-2 and MK2206 had minimal effects on reducing c-FLIP and enhancement of TRAIL-induced apoptosis, it is likely that API-1 reduces c-FLIP and enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis independent of its Akt-inhibitory activity. 2012 AACR

  19. Egg yolk proteins and peptides with biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Zambrowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins of food reveal biological activity. In the sequence of these proteins also numerous biologically active peptides are encrypted. These peptides are released during proteolysis naturally occurring in the gastrointestinal tract, food fermentation or during designed enzymatic hydrolysis in vitro. Biopeptides may exert multiple activities, affecting the cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous and immune systems. An especially rich source of bioactive proteins and biopeptides is egg. Bioactive peptides released from egg white proteins have been well described, whereas egg yolk proteins as precursors of biopeptides are less well characterized. This manuscript describes biologically active proteins and peptides originating from egg yolk and presents their potential therapeutic role.

  20. TRAIL/Apo-2L: Mechanisms and Clinical Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K. Srivastava

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/APO2L is a member of the TNF family that promotes apoptosis by binding to the transmembrane receptors TRAIL-R1 /DR4 and TRAIL-R2/DR5. Its cytotoxic activity is relatively selective to the human tumor cell lines without much effect on the normal cells. Hence, it exerts an antitumor activity without causing toxicity, as apparent by studies with several xenograft models. This review discusses the intracellular mechanisms by which TRAIL induces apoptosis. The major pathway of its action proceeds through the formation of DISC and activation of caspase-8. The apoptotic processes, therefore, follow two signaling pathways, namely the mitochondrial-independent activation of caspase-3, mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis due to cleavage of BID by caspase-8, the formation of apoptosomes, activation of caspase-9 and the downstream caspases. Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL have no effect on TRAILinduced apoptosis in lymphoid cells, whereas these genes block or delay apoptosis in nonlymphoid cancer cells. TRAIL participates in cytotoxicity mediated by activated NK cells, monocytes, some cytotoxic T cells. Hence, TRAIL may prove to be an effective antitumor agent. In addition, it may enhance the effectiveness of treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs and irradiation. Nontagged Apo-2L/TRAIL does not cause hepatotoxicity in monkeys and chimpanzees and in normal human hepatocytes. Thus, nontagged Apo-2L/TRAIL appears to be a promising new candidate for use in the treatment of cancer. Neoplasia. (2001

  1. Trails, Other, Proposed and existing recreational trails (excluding snowmobile trails). Proposed trails are coded as high, medium, or low priority., Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Manitowoc County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Trails, Other dataset current as of 2010. Proposed and existing recreational trails (excluding snowmobile trails). Proposed trails are coded as high, medium, or low...

  2. Tumor cell-selective apoptosis induction through targeting of KV10.1 via bifunctional TRAIL antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The search for strategies to target ion channels for therapeutic applications has become of increasing interest. Especially, the potassium channel KV10.1 (Ether-á-go-go) is attractive as target since this surface protein is virtually not detected in normal tissue outside the central nervous system, but is expressed in approximately 70% of tumors from different origins. Methods We designed a single-chain antibody against an extracellular region of KV10.1 (scFv62) and fused it to the human soluble TRAIL. The KV10.1-specific scFv62 antibody -TRAIL fusion protein was expressed in CHO-K1 cells, purified by chromatography and tested for biological activity. Results Prostate cancer cells, either positive or negative for KV10.1 were treated with the purified construct. After sensitization with cytotoxic drugs, scFv62-TRAIL induced apoptosis only in KV10.1-positive cancer cells, but not in non-tumor cells, nor in tumor cells lacking KV10.1 expression. In co-cultures with KV10.1-positive cancer cells the fusion protein also induced apoptosis in bystander KV10.1-negative cancer cells, while normal prostate epithelial cells were not affected when present as bystander. Conclusions KV10.1 represents a novel therapeutic target for cancer. We could design a strategy that selectively kills tumor cells based on a KV10.1-specific antibody. PMID:21899742

  3. The Trail Inventory of Aransas [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Aransas National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  4. 75 FR 37463 - Official Trail Marker for the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... National Park Service Official Trail Marker for the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail AGENCY: National Parks Service, Interior. ACTION: Official Insignia, Designation. Authority: National Trails System.... SUMMARY: This notice issues the official trail marker insignia of the Star-Spangled Banner National...

  5. 75 FR 37462 - Official Trail Marker for the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... National Park Service Official Trail Marker for the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail... Trails System Act, 16 U.S.C. 124(a) and 1246(c) and Protection of Official Badges, insignia, etc. in 18 U.S.C. 701. SUMMARY: This notice issues the official trail marker insignias of the Captain John Smith...

  6. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKnoch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/ involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development.

  7. TRAIL-deficiency accelerates vascular calcification in atherosclerosis via modulation of RANKL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda A Di Bartolo

    Full Text Available The osteoprotegerin (OPG and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL cytokine system, not only controls bone homeostasis, but has been implicated in regulating vascular calcification. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a second ligand for OPG, and although its effect in vascular calcification in vitro is controversial, its role in vivo is not yet established. This study aimed to investigate the role of TRAIL in vascular calcification in vitro using vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs isolated from TRAIL(-/- and wild-type mice, as well as in vivo, in advanced atherosclerotic lesions of TRAIL(-/-ApoE(-/- mice. The involvement of OPG and RANKL in this process was also examined. TRAIL dose-dependently inhibited calcium-induced calcification of human VSMCs, while TRAIL(-/- VSMCs demonstrated accelerated calcification induced by multiple concentrations of calcium compared to wild-type cells. Consistent with this, RANKL mRNA was significantly elevated with 24 h calcium treatment, while OPG and TRAIL expression in human VSMCs was inhibited. Brachiocephalic arteries from TRAIL(-/-ApoE(-/- and ApoE(-/- mice fed a high fat diet for 12 w demonstrated increased chondrocyte-like cells in atherosclerotic plaque, as well as increased aortic collagen II mRNA expression in TRAIL(-/-ApoE(-/- mice, with significant increases in calcification observed at 20 w. TRAIL(-/-ApoE(-/- aortas also had significantly elevated RANKL, BMP-2, IL-1β, and PPAR-γ expression at 12 w. Our data provides the first evidence that TRAIL deficiency results in accelerated cartilaginous metaplasia and calcification in atherosclerosis, and that TRAIL plays an important role in the regulation of RANKL and inflammatory markers mediating bone turn over in the vasculature.

  8. P-glycoprotein-dependent resistance of cancer cells toward the extrinsic TRAIL apoptosis signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galski, Hanan; Oved-Gelber, Tamar; Simanovsky, Masha; Lazarovici, Philip; Gottesman, Michael M.; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    The TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL or Apo2L) preferentially cause apoptosis of malignant cells in vitro and in vivo without severe toxicity. Therefore, TRAIL or agonist antibodies to the TRAIL DR4 and DR5 receptors are used in cancer therapy. However, many malignant cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to TRAIL. It has been previously proposed that the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) might play a role in resistance of cells to intrinsic apoptotic pathways by interfering with components of ceramide metabolism or by modulating the electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. In this study we investigated whether Pgp also confers resistance toward extrinsic death ligands of the TNF family. To this end we focused our study on HeLa cells carrying a tetracycline-repressible plasmid system which shuts down Pgp expression in the presence of tetracycline. Our findings demonstrate that expression of Pgp is a significant factor conferring resistance to TRAIL administration, but not to other death ligands such as TNF-α and Fas ligand. Moreover, blocking Pgp transport activity sensitizes the malignant cells toward TRAIL. Therefore, Pgp transport function is required to confer resistance to TRAIL. Although the resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis is Pgp specific, TRAIL itself is not a direct substrate of Pgp. Pgp expression has no effect on the level of the TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5. These findings might have clinical implications since the combination of TRAIL therapy with administration of Pgp modulators might sensitize TRAIL resistant tumors. PMID:23774624

  9. National forest trail users: planning for recreation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Daigle; Alan E. Watson; Glenn E. Haas

    1994-01-01

    National forest trail users in four geographical regions of the United States are described based on participation in clusters of recreation activities. Visitors are classified into day hiking, undeveloped recreation, and two developed camping and hiking activity clusters for the Appalachian, Pacific, Rocky Mountain, and Southwestern regions. Distance and time traveled...

  10. TRAIL-R2: a novel apoptosis-mediating receptor for TRAIL.

    OpenAIRE

    Walczak, H; Degli-Esposti, M A; Johnson, R. S.; Smolak, P J; Waugh, J Y; Boiani, N; Timour, M S; Gerhart, M J; Schooley, K A; Smith, C A; Goodwin, R G; Rauch, C T

    1997-01-01

    TRAIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family of cytokines and induces apoptosis in a wide variety of cells. Based on homology searching of a private database, a receptor for TRAIL (DR4 or TRAIL-R1) was recently identified. Here we report the identification of a distinct receptor for TRAIL, TRAIL-R2, by ligand-based affinity purification and subsequent molecular cloning. TRAIL-R2 was purified independently as the only receptor for TRAIL detectable on the surface of two different...

  11. Tissue distribution of the death ligand TRAIL and its receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, DC; de Vries, EG; Vellenga, E; van den Heuvel, FA; Koornstra, JJ; Wesseling, J; Hollema, H; de Jong, S

    Recombinant human (rh) TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) harbors potential as an anticancer agent. RhTRAIL induces apoptosis via the TRAIL receptors TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 in tumors and is non-toxic to nonhuman primates. Because limited data are available about TRAIL receptor

  12. Global variation of meteor trail plasma turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Dyrud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere, will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent? What are the factors influencing the development of turbulence? and how do these trails vary on a global scale? Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars. Turbulence also influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails; this fact is important for the inference of mesospheric temperatures from the trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and on the observation of non-specular meteor trails. We demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends for non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  13. Design and engineering of human TRAIL variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, Albert Martinus

    2006-01-01

    TRAIL is een humaan eiwit dat bepaalde typen kankercellen aanzet tot geprogrammeerde celdood (apoptose) terwijl het normale cellen met rust laat. Hierdoor is TRAIL een veel­belovend potentieel anti kanker geneesmiddel. Promovendus Almer van der Sloot optimali­seerde TRAIL voor gebruik als

  14. Human colostrum and breast milk contain high levels of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanzo, Riccardo; Zauli, Giorgio; Monasta, Lorenzo; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Abate, Maria Valentina; Ventura, Giovanna; Rimondi, Erika; Secchiero, Paola; Demarini, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a pleiotropic cytokine, which plays a key role in the immune system as well as in controlling the balance of apoptosis and proliferation in various organs and tissues. To investigate the presence and levels of soluble TRAIL in human colostrum and milk. The levels of soluble human TRAIL were measured in human colostrum (day 2 after delivery) and breast milk (day 5 after delivery). The presence of TRAIL was also measured in infant formula. Levels of soluble TRAIL in the colostrum and mature human milk were, respectively, at least 400 and 100 fold higher than those detected in human serum. No TRAIL was detected in formula. Human soluble TRAIL is present at extremely high levels in human colostrum and human milk and might have a significant role in mediating the anti-cancer activity of human milk.

  15. Managing outdoor recreation conflict on the Squamish, British Columbia Trail Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ana Elia Ramón Hidalgo; Howard. Harshaw

    2012-01-01

    Recreationists with high expectations of satisfaction from outdoor recreation activities are increasingly using trails networks near urban areas. But differences in expectations, behaviors and values of trail users may create conflicts resulting in unsatisfactory experiences. The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of management practices that may reduce...

  16. Effects of A.marina-Derived Isoquercitrin on TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand Receptor (TRAIL-R) Expression and Apoptosis Induction in Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sathishkumar; Bandil, Kapil; Proksch, Peter; Murugiyan, Kalaiselvam; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2017-06-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is an anticancer agent, which has greater apoptosis inducing capacity, but most of the cancer cells become resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The combined treatment of TRAIL with natural products could restore the cancer cell sensitivity to recombinant human TRAIL (rhTRAIL) protein and might enhance the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAIL-R) expression. This investigation was aimed to isolate flavonoids from leaves of Avicennia marina and evaluate their potential for sensitization of rhTRAIL in human cervical cancer cells (SiHa). The methanolic extract of A.marina leaves were purified and structure was elucidated as isoquercitrin by NMR and LC-MS analysis. Isolated isoquercitrin showed cytotoxicity against SiHa cell line at IC50 of 980 μM. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of TRAIL-Rs was quantified by qRT-PCR, combination of isoquercitrin, and/or rhTRAIL increased TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 gene expression by 7 folds and 4 folds, respectively. Also, FACS assay revealed that combined treatment has increased the early apoptosis up to 7.24%. In the present study, we found that isoquercitrin enhances the mRNA expression of TRAIL-Rs, but the percentage of apoptosis was meager, possibly due to the influence of other anti-apoptotic proteins.

  17. The Trail of Genetic Detectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 7. The Trail of Genetic Detectives. Vani Brahmachari. Book Review Volume 4 Issue 7 July 1999 pp 84-86. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/07/0084-0086. Author Affiliations.

  18. A Mathematics and Science Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathy Horak; Fuentes, Sarah Quebec

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to engage primary-school students in a hands-on, real-world problem-solving context, a large urban district, a mathematics and science institute housed in a college of education, and a corporate sponsor in the southwest United States, joined forces to create a mathematics and science trail for fourth- and fifth-grade students. A…

  19. On the Trail to Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The University of Hartford planned fitness trail will allow students to develop their bodies by providing a jogging route to improve cardiovascular fitness and exercise stations designed to provide warm-up exercises and improve strength, flexibility, balance, and endurance. (Author/MLF)

  20. Synthetic flavanones augment the anticancer effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szliszka, Ewelina; Kostrzewa-Susłow, Edyta; Bronikowska, Joanna; Jaworska, Dagmara; Janeczko, Tomasz; Czuba, Zenon P; Krol, Wojciech

    2012-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered as the most promising anticancer agent in the TNF superfamily because of its selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells versus normal primary cells. However, as more tumor cells are reported to be resistant to TRAIL-mediated death, it is important to develop new therapeutic strategies to overcome this resistance. Flavonoids have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The aim of this study was to examine the cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of TRAIL on HeLa cancer cells in combination with two synthetic compounds: 6-hydroxyflavanone (6-HF) and its derivative 6-propionoxy-flavanone (6-PF) and to determine the mechanism by which the flavanones overcome the TRAIL-resistance. The cytotoxicity was measured by MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was detected by annexin V-FITC fluorescence staining in flow cytometry and microscopy. Death receptor (TRAIL-R1/DR4 and TRAIL-R2/DR5) expression were analysed using flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using DePsipher staining by fluorescence microscopy. The synthetic flavanones enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells through increased expression of TRAIL-R2 death receptor and reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential. Our study indicates that the 6-HF and 6-PF augmented the anticancer effects of TRAIL and confirm a potential use of flavanones in TRAIL-based anticancer therapy and prevention.

  1. Visible light induced fast synthesis of protein-polymer conjugates: controllable polymerization and protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Lei; Chen, Gaojian; Haddleton, David M; Chen, Hong

    2014-06-21

    Herein visible light is used to induce RAFT polymerization from protein for preparing protein-polymer conjugates at ambient temperature. Polymerization is fast and can be conveniently controlled with irradiation time. By site-specific polymerization of NIPAm to protein, the protein activity is maintained and in certain cases it presents an efficient on-off-switchable property.

  2. Rapid kinetic BRET measurements to monitor G protein activation by GPCR and non-GPCR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziarz, Marcin; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are central hubs of signal transduction whose activity is controlled by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as well as by a complex network of regulatory proteins. Recently, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based assays have been used to monitor real-time activation of heterotrimeric G proteins in cells. Here we describe the use of a previously established BRET assay to monitor G protein activation upon GPCR stimulation and its adaptation to measure G protein activation by non-GPCR proteins, such as by cytoplasmic guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) like GIV/Girdin. The BRET assay monitors the release of free Gβγ from Gα-Gβγ heterotrimers as a readout of G protein activation, which is readily observable upon agonist stimulation of GPCRs. To control the signal input for non-GPCR activators, we describe the use of a chemically induced dimerization strategy to promote rapid membrane translocation of proteins containing the Gα-binding and -activating (GBA) motif found in some nonreceptor GEFs. The assay described here allows the kinetic measurement of G protein activation with subsecond temporal resolution and to compare the levels of activation induced by GPCR agonists vs those induced by the membrane recruitment of nonreceptor G protein signaling activators. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures for multipotent protein activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungsoo S.; Fyrner, Timmy; Chen, Feng; Álvarez, Zaida; Sleep, Eduard; Chun, Danielle S.; Weiner, Joseph A.; Cook, Ralph W.; Freshman, Ryan D.; Schallmo, Michael S.; Katchko, Karina M.; Schneider, Andrew D.; Smith, Justin T.; Yun, Chawon; Singh, Gurmit; Hashmi, Sohaib Z.; McClendon, Mark T.; Yu, Zhilin; Stock, Stuart R.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Hsu, Erin L.; Stupp , Samuel I. (NWU)

    2017-06-19

    Biological systems have evolved to utilize numerous proteins with capacity to bind polysaccharides for the purpose of optimizing their function. A well-known subset of these proteins with binding domains for the highly diverse sulfated polysaccharides are important growth factors involved in biological development and tissue repair. We report here on supramolecular sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures, which display a trisulfated monosaccharide on their surfaces and bind five critical proteins with different polysaccharide-binding domains. Binding does not disrupt the filamentous shape of the nanostructures or their internal β-sheet backbone, but must involve accessible adaptive configurations to interact with such different proteins. The glycopeptide nanostructures amplified signalling of bone morphogenetic protein 2 significantly more than the natural sulfated polysaccharide heparin, and promoted regeneration of bone in the spine with a protein dose that is 100-fold lower than that required in the animal model. These highly bioactive nanostructures may enable many therapies in the future involving proteins.

  4. Folding of Aggregated Proteins to Functionally Active Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Advances in the production of human therapeutic proteins in yeasts and filamentous fungi . Nat Biotechnol 2004, 22:1409-1414. 4. Wildt S, Gerngross TU: The...Folding aggregated proteins into functionally active forms Wieslaw SwietnickiThe successful expression and purification of proteins in an active form...number of proteins are being identified as potential drug targets but are difficult to obtain in a form suitable for structural or biochemical studies

  5. Comparing the impacts of hiking, skiing and horse riding on trail and vegetation in different types of forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törn, A; Tolvanen, A; Norokorpi, Y; Tervo, R; Siikamäki, P

    2009-03-01

    Nature-based tourism in protected areas has increased and diversified dramatically during the last decades. Different recreational activities have a range of impacts on natural environments. This paper reports results from a comparison of the impacts of hiking, cross-country skiing and horse riding on trail characteristics and vegetation in northern Finland. Widths and depths of existing trails, and vegetation on trails and in the neighbouring forests were monitored in two research sites during 2001 and 2002. Trail characteristics and vegetation were clearly related to the recreational activity, research site and forest type. Horse trails were as deep as hiking trails, even though the annual number of users was 150-fold higher on the hiking trails. Simultaneously, cross-country skiing had the least effect on trails due to the protective snow cover during winter. Hiking trail plots had little or no vegetation cover, horse riding trail plots had lower vegetation cover than forest plots, while skiing had no impact on total vegetation cover. On the other hand, on horse riding trails there were more forbs and grasses, many of which did not grow naturally in the forest. These species that were limited to riding trails may change the structure of adjacent plant communities in the long run. Therefore, the type of activities undertaken and the sensitivity of habitats to these activities should be a major consideration in the planning and management of nature-based tourism. Establishment of artificial structures, such as stairs, duckboards and trail cover, or complete closure of the site, may be the only way to protect the most sensitive or deteriorated sites.

  6. PEG-transferrin conjugated TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) for therapeutic tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Jo, Young Gi; Jiang, Hai Hua; Lim, Sung Mook; Youn, Yu Seok; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Byun, Youngro; Lee, Kang Choon

    2012-09-10

    Transferrin (Tf) is considered an effective tumor-targeting agent, and PEGylation effectively prolongs in vivo pharmacokinetics by delaying excretion via the renal route. The authors describe the active tumor targeting of long-acting Tf-PEG-TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand conjugate (Tf-PEG-TRAIL) for effective cancer therapy. Tf-PEG-TRAIL was prepared using a two-step N-terminal specific PEGylation procedure using different PEGs (Mw: 3.4, 5, 10 kDa). Eventually, only 10 kDa PEG was linked to Tf and TRAIL because TRAIL (66 kDa) and Tf (81 kDa) were too large to link to 3.4 and 5 kDa PEG. The final conjugate Tf-PEG(10K)-TRAIL was successfully purified and characterized by SDS-PAGE, western blotting. To determine the specific binding of Tf-PEG(10K)-TRAIL to Tf receptor, competitive receptor binding assays were performed on K 562 cells. The results obtained demonstrate that the affinity of Tf-PEG(10K)-TRAIL for Tf receptor is similar to that of native Tf. In contrast, PEG(10K)-TRAIL demonstrated no specificity. Biodistribution patterns and antitumor effects were investigated in C57BL6 mice bearing B16F10 murine melanomas and BALB/c athymic mice bearing HCT116. Tumor accumulation of Tf-PEG(10K)-TRAIL was 5.2 fold higher (at 2 h) than TRAIL, because Tf-PEG(10K)-TRAIL has both passive and active tumor targeting ability. Furthermore, the suppression of tumors by Tf-PEG(10K)-TRAIL was 3.6 and 1.5 fold those of TRAIL and PEG(10K)-TRAIL, respectively. These results suggest that Tf-PEG(10K)-TRAIL is a superior pharmacokinetic conjugate that potently targets tumors and that it should be viewed as a potential cancer therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The HIV-1 Nef protein and phagocyte NADPH oxidase activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhardt, Frederik; Plastre, Olivier; Sawada, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Nef, a multifunctional HIV protein, activates the Vav/Rac/p21-activated kinase (PAK) signaling pathway. Given the potential role of this pathway in the activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, we have investigated the effect of the HIV-1 Nef protein on the phagocyte respiratory burst. Microglia...

  8. A novel, soluble compound, C25, sensitizes to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through upregulation of DR5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Michael A; Seibel, William L; Kupert, Elena; Hu, Xiao X; Potharla, Vishwakanth Y; Anderson, Marshall W

    2015-06-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potential therapeutic agent that induces apoptosis selectively in tumor cells. However, numerous solid tumor types are resistant to TRAIL. Sensitization to TRAIL has been an area of great research interest, but has met significant challenges because of poor bioavailability, half-life, and solubility of sensitizing compounds such as curcumin. Soluble, TRAIL-sensitizing compounds were screened on the basis of similarity to the redox-active substructure of curcumin and sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We determined the effect of the lead compound, C25, in combination with TRAIL in human cancer cell lines using MTS proliferation assays, apoptosis assays, and western blotting. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of death receptor 5 (DR5) was performed to determine whether DR5 upregulation was required for TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. In-vivo efficacy was determined using human lung tumor xenograft models. C25 helped overcome TRAIL resistance by upregulating the expression of the TRAIL receptor DR5 and apoptosis in several tumor cell lines. Blockade of DR5 expression abrogated C25 sensitization to TRAIL, demonstrating the requirement for DR5 upregulation for C25-mediated potentiation of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. The combination of C25 and TRAIL effectively inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. This study demonstrates the synergistic efficacy of C25 in sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in multiple tumor cell types, including highly resistant lung and ovarian tumor cell lines. Furthermore, C25 was efficacious against tumor growth in vivo. Thus, C25 may be a potential therapeutic for cancer in combination with TRAIL or DR5 agonist therapy.

  9. A Mini Zinc-Finger Protein (MIF from Gerbera hybrida Activates the GASA Protein Family Gene, GEG, to Inhibit Ray Petal Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meixiang Han

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Petal appearance is an important horticultural trail that is generally used to evaluate the ornamental value of plants. However, knowledge of the molecular regulation of petal growth is mostly derived from analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana, and relatively little is known about this process in ornamental plants. Previously, GEG (Gerbera hybrida homolog of the gibberellin [GA]–stimulated transcript 1 [GAST1] from tomato, a gene from the GA stimulated Arabidopsis (GASA family, was reported to be an inhibitor of ray petal growth in the ornamental species, G. hybrida. To explore the molecular regulatory mechanism of GEG in petal growth inhibition, a mini zinc-finger protein (MIF was identified using yeast one-hybrid (Y1H screen. The direct binding of GhMIF to the GEG promoter was verified by using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a dual-luciferase assay. A yeast two-hybrid (Y2H revealed that GhMIF acts as a transcriptional activator. Transient transformation assay indicated that GhMIF is involved in inhibiting ray petal elongation by activating the expression of GEG. Spatiotemporal expression analyses and hormone treatment assay showed that the expression of GhMIF and GEG is coordinated during petal development. Taken together, these results suggest that GhMIF acts as a direct transcriptional activator of GEG, a gene from the GASA protein family to regulate the petal elongation.

  10. The interaction of protein S with the phospholipid surface is essential for the activated protein C-independent activity of protein S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnen, M.; Stam, J. G.; van't Veer, C.; Meijers, J. C.; Reitsma, P. H.; Bertina, R. M.; Bouma, B. N.

    1996-01-01

    Protein S is a vitamin-K dependent glycoprotein involved in the regulation of the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C (APC). Recent data showed a direct anticoagulant role of protein S independent of APC, as demonstrated by the inhibition of prothrombinase and tenase activity both in

  11. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  12. Activated protein C decreases plasminogen activator-inhibitor activity in endothelial cell-conditioned medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hinsbergh, V W; Bertina, R M; van Wijngaarden, A; van Tilburg, N H; Emeis, J J; Haverkate, F

    1985-02-01

    Confluent cultures of endothelial cells from human umbilical cord were used to study the effect of activated human protein C (APC) on the production of plasminogen activators, plasminogen activator-inhibitor, and factor VIII-related antigen. Addition of APC to the cells in a serum-free medium did not affect the production of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) or factor VIII-related antigen; under all measured conditions, no urokinase activity was found. However, less plasminogen activator-inhibitor activity accumulated in the conditioned medium in the presence of APC. This decrease was dose dependent and could be prevented by specific anti-protein C antibodies. No decrease was observed with the zymogen protein C or with diisopropylfluorophosphate-inactivated APC. APC also decreased the t-PA inhibitor activity in endothelial cell-conditioned medium in the absence of cells, which suggests that the effect of APC is at least partly due to a direct effect of APC on the plasminogen activator-inhibitor. High concentrations of thrombin-but not of factor Xa or IXa--had a similar effect on the t-PA inhibitor activity. The effect of APC on the plasminogen activator-inhibitor provides a new mechanism by which APC may enhance fibrinolysis. The data suggest that activation of the coagulation system may lead to a secondary increase of the fibrinolytic activity by changing the balance between plasminogen activator(s) and its (their) fast-acting inhibitor.

  13. The release of soluble forms of TRAIL and DR5 by neutrophils of oral cavity cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Marcinczyk

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we examined the release of the soluble form of TRAIL by neutrophils (PMN derived from patients with oral cavity cancer. Simultaneously, we estimated the ability of PMNs of these patients to release the soluble form of DR5 receptor, a natural regulatory protein of TRAIL. The obtained results were confronted with the serum levels of sTRAIL and sDR5. The cells were isolated from 21 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity at diagnosis and three weeks after surgery treatment. For comparative purposes we performed similar examinations in autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Cytoplasmic protein fractions of the cells were analyzed for the presence of TRAIL and DR5 by western blotting. Soluble TRAIL and soluble DR5 concentrations in the culture supernatants of cells were confronted with their serum levels using ELISA kit. PMN and PBMC of the whole cancer patient group expressed decreased TRAIL protein and unchanged expression of DR5 receptor in comparison with the control group. Unchanged release of sTRAIL by PMNs of patients in Stage II was accompanying the decrease of the ability of PBMC to secrete this protein. In patients in Stage IV the secretion of sTRAIL by PMNs and PBMC was impaired. In contrast to changes in sTRAIL secretion by PMN and PBMC of oral cavity cancer patients, the secretion of sDR5 by these cells was unchanged. The serum levels of sTRAIL were increased in patients in Stage II before treatment and decreased in the same patients after treatment. The altered ability of PMN of PBMC to secrete sTRAIL may have different implications for the immune response of patients with oral cavity cancer cells at different stages of disease.

  14. The science of trail surveys: Recreation ecology provides new tools for managing wilderness trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Jeffrey L.; Wimpey, Jeremy F.; Park, Logan O.

    2011-01-01

    Recreation ecology examines the effects of recreation on protected area ecosystems. One core focus of recreation ecology research is trail science, including the development of efficient protocols to assess and monitor the type and severity of resource impacts, analyses to improve knowledge of factors that influence trail conditions, and studies to assist land managers in improving trail design, maintenance, and visitor management. This article reviews alternative trail survey methodologies most useful for the management of wilderness and backcountry trail networks. Illustrations and implications from survey data for trail planning, design, and management are included.

  15. The Offshore Bucket Trail Installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Andreas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    The Bucket Trail Installation project has gathered a substantial amount of date in a unique soil database which enable update of the used standards for penetration prediction. This update will lead to less conservative design of bucket foundations and is vital for the aim of cost reduction...... in the offshore wind business. Furthermore is serial offshore operation with the bucket concept was demonstrated with achieving full installation depth and inclination within given tolerance....

  16. Circulating TRAIL shows a significant post-partum decline associated to stressful conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Zauli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since circulating levels of TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL may be important in the physiopathology of pregnancy, we tested the hypothesis that TRAIL levels change at delivery in response to stressful conditions. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a longitudinal study in a cohort of 73 women examined at week 12, week 16, delivery and in the corresponding cord blood (CB. Serum TRAIL was assessed in relationship with maternal characteristics and to biochemical parameters. TRAIL did not vary between 12 (67.6±27.6 pg/ml, means±SD and 16 (64.0±16.2 pg/ml weeks' gestation, while displaying a significant decline after partum (49.3±26.4 pg/ml. Using a cut-off decline >20 pg/ml between week 12 and delivery, the subset of women with the higher decline of circulating TRAIL (41.7% showed the following characteristics: i nullipara, ii higher age, iii operational vaginal delivery or urgent CS, iv did not receive analgesia during labor, v induced labor. CB TRAIL was significantly higher (131.6±52 pg/ml with respect to the corresponding maternal TRAIL, and the variables significantly associated with the first quartile of CB TRAIL (<90 pg/ml were higher pre-pregnancy BMI, induction of labor and fetal distress. With respect to the biochemical parameters, maternal TRAIL at delivery showed an inverse correlation with C-reactive protein (CRP, total cortisol, glycemia and insulin at bivariate analysis, but only with CRP at multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Stressful partum conditions and elevated CRP levels are associated with a decrease of circulating TRAIL.

  17. Changes in Total Protein and Transaminase Activities in Clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in Total Protein and Transaminase Activities in Clarias Gariepinus Exposed to Diazinon. ... Animal Production Research Advances ... The aim of the study was to assess the effects induced by diazinon on total protein and transaminase activities in Clarias gariepinus, a common Niger Delta wetland fish. Fish were ...

  18. Rat C-reactive protein activates the autologous complement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz Padilla, Niubel; Bleeker, Wim K.; Lubbers, Yvonne; Rigter, Gemma M. M.; van Mierlo, Gerard J.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Hack, C. Erik

    2003-01-01

    Activation of complement is a biological function of human C-reactive protein (hCRP), whereas rat CRP (rCRP) has been claimed to be unable to activate complement. As important biological functions of proteins are probably conserved among species, we re-evaluated, using various ligands, the

  19. Deterring off-trail hiking in protected natural areas: Evaluating options with surveys and unobtrusive observation: Final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, K.A.; Clark, Y.F.; Leung, J.L.; ,; Park, L.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of research conducted on the 96-acre Bear Island along the Billy Goat Trail, Section A (BGT) that evaluated visitor motivations for off-trail hiking and the efficacy of four treatments designed to reduce this activity. This research was prompted by concerns about the impact of an extensive informal (visitor-created) trail network on Bear Island, because it provides habitat for more than 50 species of rare, threatened or endangered plant and animal species.

  20. The transmembrane domains of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL receptors 1 and 2 co-regulate apoptotic signaling capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Neumann

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF ligand family that exerts its apoptotic activity in human cells by binding to two transmembrane receptors, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2. In cells co-expressing both receptors the particular contribution of either protein to the overall cellular response is not well defined. Here we have investigated whether differences in the signaling capacities of TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 can be attributed to certain functional molecular subdomains. We generated and characterized various chimeric receptors comprising TRAIL receptor domains fused with parts from other members of the TNF death receptor family. This allowed us to compare the contribution of particular domains of the two TRAIL receptors to the overall apoptotic response and to identify elements that regulate apoptotic signaling. Our results show that the TRAIL receptor death domains are weak apoptosis inducers compared to those of CD95/Fas, because TRAILR-derived constructs containing the CD95/Fas death domain possessed strongly enhanced apoptotic capabilities. Importantly, major differences in the signaling strengths of the two TRAIL receptors were linked to their transmembrane domains in combination with the adjacent extracellular stalk regions. This was evident from receptor chimeras comprising the extracellular part of TNFR1 and the intracellular signaling part of CD95/Fas. Both receptor chimeras showed comparable ligand binding affinities and internalization kinetics. However, the respective TRAILR2-derived molecule more efficiently induced apoptosis. It also activated caspase-8 and caspase-3 more strongly and more quickly, albeit being expressed at lower levels. These results suggest that the transmembrane domains together with their adjacent stalk regions can play a major role in control of death receptor activation thereby contributing to cell type specific differences in TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 signaling.

  1. The transmembrane domains of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors 1 and 2 co-regulate apoptotic signaling capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Simon; Bidon, Tobias; Branschädel, Marcus; Krippner-Heidenreich, Anja; Scheurich, Peter; Doszczak, Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family that exerts its apoptotic activity in human cells by binding to two transmembrane receptors, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2. In cells co-expressing both receptors the particular contribution of either protein to the overall cellular response is not well defined. Here we have investigated whether differences in the signaling capacities of TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 can be attributed to certain functional molecular subdomains. We generated and characterized various chimeric receptors comprising TRAIL receptor domains fused with parts from other members of the TNF death receptor family. This allowed us to compare the contribution of particular domains of the two TRAIL receptors to the overall apoptotic response and to identify elements that regulate apoptotic signaling. Our results show that the TRAIL receptor death domains are weak apoptosis inducers compared to those of CD95/Fas, because TRAILR-derived constructs containing the CD95/Fas death domain possessed strongly enhanced apoptotic capabilities. Importantly, major differences in the signaling strengths of the two TRAIL receptors were linked to their transmembrane domains in combination with the adjacent extracellular stalk regions. This was evident from receptor chimeras comprising the extracellular part of TNFR1 and the intracellular signaling part of CD95/Fas. Both receptor chimeras showed comparable ligand binding affinities and internalization kinetics. However, the respective TRAILR2-derived molecule more efficiently induced apoptosis. It also activated caspase-8 and caspase-3 more strongly and more quickly, albeit being expressed at lower levels. These results suggest that the transmembrane domains together with their adjacent stalk regions can play a major role in control of death receptor activation thereby contributing to cell type specific differences in TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 signaling.

  2. The Rim Trail at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (pisp_trail)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 4 arcs representing The Rim Trail at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. The Rim Trail was collected by a Trimble...

  3. Trails at LANL - Public Meeting and Forum - July 26, 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pava, Daniel Seth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-26

    These are the slides of a meeting about trails at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The meeting goals are the folllowing: to inform and educate citizens about LANL trails management issues that include resource protection, safety, security and trails etiquette; to explain how and why LANL trails can be closed and reopened; and to understand your concerns and ideas about LANL trails use.

  4. Hydrodynamic trail following in a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläser, Nele; Wieskotten, Sven; Otter, Christian; Dehnhardt, Guido; Hanke, Wolf

    2011-02-01

    The mystacial vibrissae of pinnipeds constitute a sensory system for active touch and detection of hydrodynamic events. Harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) can both detect hydrodynamic stimuli caused by a small sphere vibrating in the water (hydrodynamic dipole stimuli). Hydrodynamic trail following has only been shown in harbour seals. Hydrodynamical and biomechanical studies of single vibrissae of the two species showed that the specialized undulated structure of harbour seal vibrissae, as opposed to the smooth structure of sea lion vibrissae, suppresses self-generated noise in the actively moving animal. Here we tested whether also sea lions were able to perform hydrodynamic trail following in spite of their non-specialized hair structure. Hydrodynamic trails were generated by a remote-controlled miniature submarine. Linear trails could be followed with high accuracy, comparable to the performance of harbour seals, but in contrast, increasing delay resulted in a reduced performance as compared to harbour seals. The results of this study are consistent with the hypothesis that structural differences in the vibrissal hair types of otariid compared to phocid pinnipeds lead to different sensitivity of the vibrissae during forward swimming, but still reveal a good performance even in the species with non-specialized hair type.

  5. Inhibition of never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinase-4 reduces survivin expression and sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Jung; Jo, Doo Sin; Jo, Se-Young; Shin, Dong Woon; Shim, Sangmi; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Shin, Ji Hyun; Ha, Ye Jin; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Young Sam; Suh, Young-Ah; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2016-10-04

    The tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells. However, many tumors are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and resistance mechanisms are not fully understood. To identify novel regulatory molecules of TRAIL resistance, we screened a siRNA library targeting the human kinome, and NEK4 (NIMA-related kinase-4) was identified. Knockdown of NEK4 sensitized TRAIL-resistant cancer cells and in vivo xenografts to cell death. In contrast, over expression of NEK4 suppressed TRAIL-induced cell death in TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells. In addition, loss of NEK4 resulted in decrease of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin, but an increase in apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, NEK4 was highly upregulated in tumor tissues derived from patients with lung cancer and colon cancer. These results suggest that inhibition of NEK4 sensitizes cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by regulation of survivin expression.

  6. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J; Park, Daeho

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypoxia inhibits TRAIL-induced tumor cell apoptosis: involvement of lysosomal cathepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nagathihalli S; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia interferes with the efficacy of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand) is a potent apoptosis inducer that limits tumor growth without damaging normal cells and tissues in vivo. We present evidence for a central role of lysosomal cathepsins in hypoxia and/or TRAIL-induced cell death in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. Hypoxia or TRAIL-induced activation of cathepsins (B, D and L), caspases (-3 and -9), Bid cleavage, release of Bax and cytochrome c, and DNA fragmentation were blocked independently by zVAD-fmk, CA074Me or pepstatin A, consistent with the involvement of lysosomal cathepsin B and D in cell death. Lysosome stability and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced in hypoxia and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. However, TRAIL treatment under hypoxic condition resulted in diminished apoptosis rates compared to treatment under normoxia. This inhibitory effect of hypoxia on TRAIL-induced apoptosis may be based on preventing Bax activation and thus protecting mitochondria stability. Our data show that TRAIL or hypoxia independently triggered activation of cathepsin B and D leading to apoptosis through Bid and Bax, and suggest that hypoxic tissue regions provide a selective environment for highly apoptosis-resistant clonal cells. Molecular therapy approaches based on cathepsin inhibitors need to address this novel tumor-preventing function of cathepsins in OSCC.

  8. The emphysematous lung is abnormally sensitive to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milot Julie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar apoptosis is increased in the emphysematous lung. However, mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Recently, we demonstrated that levels of TRAIL receptor 1 and 2, levels of p53, and Bax/Bcl-xL ratio were elevated in the lung of subjects with emphysema, despite smoking cessation. Thus, we postulate that due to chronic pulmonary oxidative stress, the emphysematous lung would be abnormally sensitive to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Methodology A549 cells were exposed to rTRAIL, cigarette smoke extract, and/or H2O2 prior to caspase-3 activity measurement and annexin V staining assessment. In addition, freshly resected lung samples were obtained from non-emphysematous and emphysematous subjects and exposed ex vivo to rTRAIL for up to 18 hours. Lung samples were harvested and levels of active caspase-3 and caspase-8 were measured from tissue lysates. Results Both cigarette smoke extract and H2O2 were able to sensitize A549 cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, following exposure to rTRAIL, caspase-3 and -8 were activated in lung explants from emphysematous subjects while being decreased in lung explants from non-emphysematous subjects. Significance of the study Alveolar sensitivity to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is strongly increased in the emphysematous lung due to the presence of oxidative stress. This might be a new mechanism leading to increased alveolar apoptosis and persistent alveolar destruction following smoking cessation.

  9. Gold nanoparticles enhance TRAIL sensitivity through Drp1-mediated apoptotic and autophagic mitochondrial fission in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Sunkui; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Peiyan; Wang, Yange; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Keman; Ren, Lei; Ye, Shefang

    2017-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its agonistic receptors have been identified as highly promising antitumor agents preferentially eliminating cancer cells with minimal damage, the emergence of TRAIL resistance in most cancers may contribute to therapeutic failure. Thus, there is an urgent need for new approaches to overcome TRAIL resistance. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are one of the most promising nanomaterials that show immense antitumor potential via targeting various cellular and molecular processes; however, the effects of AuNPs on TRAIL sensitivity in cancer cells remain unclear. In this study, we found that AuNPs combined with TRAIL exhibited a greater potency in promoting apoptosis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells compared with TRAIL alone, suggesting that AuNPs sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL. Further experiments demonstrated that the combination of TRAIL and AuNPs was more effective in causing excessive mitochondrial fragmentation in cancer cells accompanied by a dramatic increase in mitochondrial recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), mitochondrial dysfunctions, and enhancement of autophagy induction. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of Drp1 or inhibition of autophagy could effectively alleviate apoptosis in cells exposed to TRAIL combined with AuNPs. In vivo studies revealed that AuNPs augmented TRAIL sensitivity in tumor-bearing mice. Our data indicated that AuNPs potentiate apoptotic response to TRAIL in NSCLC cells through Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and TRAIL combined with AuNPs can be a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC.

  10. The Roles of ROS and Caspases in TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhang

    Full Text Available Death signaling provided by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL can induce death in cancer cells with little cytotoxicity to normal cells; this cell death has been thought to involve caspase-dependent apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are also mediators that induce cell death, but their roles in TRAIL-induced apoptosis have not been elucidated fully. In the current study, we investigated ROS and caspases in human pancreatic cancer cells undergoing two different types of TRAIL-induced cell death, apoptosis and necroptosis. TRAIL treatment increased ROS in two TRAIL-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and BxPC-3, but ROS were involved in TRAIL-induced apoptosis only in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Unexpectedly, inhibition of ROS by either N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a peroxide inhibitor, or Tempol, a superoxide inhibitor, increased the annexin V-/propidium iodide (PI+ early necrotic population in TRAIL-treated cells. Additionally, both necrostatin-1, an inhibitor of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of RIP3 decreased the annexin V-/PI+ early necrotic population after TRAIL treatment. Furthermore, an increase in early apoptosis was induced in TRAIL-treated cancer cells under inhibition of either caspase-2 or -9. Caspase-2 worked upstream of caspase-9, and no crosstalk was observed between ROS and caspase-2/-9 in TRAIL-treated cells. Together, these results indicate that ROS contribute to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in MiaPaCa-2 cells, and that ROS play an inhibitory role in TRAIL-induced necroptosis of MiaPaCa-2 and BxPC-3 cells, with caspase-2 and -9 playing regulatory roles in this process.

  11. Ethanolic extract of Descurainia sophia seeds sensitizes A549 human lung cancer cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity by upregulating death receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Shik; Lim, Chae Jun; Bang, Ok-Sun; Kim, No Soo

    2016-04-02

    Our previous genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors 4 (DR4) and 5 (DR5) are markedly upregulated by the ethanolic extract of D. sohia seeds (EEDS) in A549 TRAIL-refractory cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the EEDS-mediated upregulation of TRAIL death receptors was associated with increased TRAIL-mediated toxicity in A549 cells in vitro. Cell proliferation and viability were determined by an automatic cell counter. Gene silencing was performed by introducing small interfering RNA into cells. Expression changes of cellular proteins were determined by western blot analysis. Apoptotic cell death was monitored by western blot analysis. Analysis of variance followed by the post-hoc Dunnett's test was used to compare the data. EEDS treatment increased both mRNA and protein levels of DR4 and DR5 in the TRAIL refractory A549 cells. Co-treatment of A549 cells with sub-lethal dose of EEDS and recombinant TRAIL increased the apoptotic cell death. Upregulation of DR5 by EEDS was mediated by an endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced transcription factor, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and knockdown of CHOP expression inhibited EEDS-induced DR5 upregulation and abolished the EEDS-associated increase in TRAIL toxicity in A549 cells. EEDS can sensitize A549 cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity by upregulation of TRAIL death receptors. Our findings suggested that EEDS is a good initial herbal source for the development of an anticancer supplement for anticancer therapeutics associated with TRAIL.

  12. Beam Trail Tracking at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicklaus, Dennis J. [Fermilab; Carmichael, Linden Ralph [Fermilab; Neswold, Richard [Fermilab; Yuan, Zongwei [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for acquiring and sorting data from select devices depending on the destination of each particular beam pulse in the Fermilab accelerator chain. The 15 Hz beam that begins in the Fermilab ion source can be directed to a variety of additional accelerators, beam lines, beam dumps, and experiments. We have implemented a data acquisition system that senses the destination of each pulse and reads the appropriate beam intensity devices so that profiles of the beam can be stored and analysed for each type of beam trail. We envision utilizing this data long term to identify trends in the performance of the accelerators

  13. Trails, Other, Major multi-use recreation trails in Washington County including the Ice Age National Scenic Trail and the Eisenbahn State Trail., Published in 2013, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Washington County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Trails, Other dataset current as of 2013. Major multi-use recreation trails in Washington County including the Ice Age National Scenic Trail and the Eisenbahn State...

  14. Regulation of protein activity with small-molecule-controlled inteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skretas, Georgios; Wood, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Inteins are the protein analogs of self-splicing RNA introns, as they post-translationally excise themselves from a variety of protein hosts. Intein insertion abolishes, in general, the activity of its host protein, which is subsequently restored upon intein excision. These protein elements therefore have the potential to be used as general molecular “switches” for the control of arbitrary target proteins. Based on rational design, an intein-based protein switch has been constructed whose splicing activity is conditionally triggered in vivo by the presence of thyroid hormone or synthetic analogs. This modified intein was used in Escherichia coli to demonstrate that a number of different proteins can be inactivated by intein insertion and then reactivated by the addition of thyroid hormone via ligand-induced splicing. This conditional activation was also found to occur in a dose-dependent manner. Rational protein engineering was then combined with genetic selection to evolve an additional intein whose activity is controlled by the presence of synthetic estrogen ligands. The ability to regulate protein function post-translationally through the use of ligand-controlled intein splicing will most likely find applications in metabolic engineering, drug discovery and delivery, biosensing, molecular computation, as well as many additional areas of biotechnology. PMID:15632292

  15. Distribution, abundance and trail characteristics of acorn worms at Australian continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. J.; Przeslawski, R.; Tran, M.

    2011-04-01

    Acorn worms (Enteropneusta), which were previously thought to be a missing link in understanding the evolution of chordates, are an unusual and potentially important component of many deep-sea benthic environments, particularly for nutrient cycling. Very little is known about their distribution, abundance, or behaviour in deep-sea environments around the world, and almost nothing is known about their distribution within Australian waters. In this study, we take advantage of two large-scale deep-sea mapping surveys along the eastern (northern Lord Howe Rise) and western continental margins of Australia to quantify the distribution, abundance and trail-forming behaviour of this highly unusual taxon. This is the first study to quantify the abundance and trail behaviour of acorn worms within Australian waters and provides the first evidence of strong depth-related distributions. Acorn worm densities and trail activity were concentrated between transect-averaged depths of 1600 and 3000 m in both eastern and western continental margins. The shallow limit of their depth distribution was 1600 m. The deeper limit was less well-defined, as individuals were found in small numbers below 3000 down to 4225 m. This distributional pattern may reflect a preference for these depths, possibly due to higher availability of nutrients, rather than a physiological constraint to greater depths. Sediment characteristics alone were poor predictors of acorn worm densities and trail activity. High densities of acorn worms and trails were associated with sandy-mud sediments, but similar sediment characteristics in either shallower or deeper areas did not support similar densities of acorn worms or trails. Trail shapes varied between eastern and western margins, with proportionally more meandering trails recorded in the east, while spiral and meandering trails were both common in the west. Trail shape varied by depth, with spiral-shaped trails dominant in areas of high acorn worm densities

  16. NF-κB targeting by way of IKK inhibition sensitizes lung cancer cells to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karacay Bahri

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer causes the highest rate of cancer-related deaths both in men and women. As many current treatment modalities are inadequate in increasing patient survival, new therapeutic strategies are required. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL selectively induces apoptosis in tumor cells but not in normal cells, prompting its current evaluation in a number of clinical trials. The successful therapeutic employment of TRAIL is restricted by the fact that many tumor cells are resistant to TRAIL. The goal of the present study was to test a novel combinatorial gene therapy modality involving adenoviral delivery of TRAIL (Ad5hTRAIL and IKK inhibition (AdIKKβKA to overcome TRAIL resistance in lung cancer cells. Methods Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry were used to detect optimum doses of adenovirus vectors to transduce lung cancer cells. Cell viability was assessed via a live/dead cell viability assay. Luciferase assays were employed to monitor cellular NF-κB activity. Apoptosis was confirmed using Annexin V binding. Results Neither Ad5hTRAIL nor AdIKKβKA infection alone induced apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells, but the combined use of Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA significantly increased the amount of A549 apoptosis. Luciferase assays demonstrated that both endogenous and TRAIL-induced NF-κB activity was down-regulated by AdIKKβKA expression. Conclusions Combination treatment with Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA induced significant apoptosis of TRAIL-resistant A549 cells, suggesting that dual gene therapy strategy involving exogenous TRAIL gene expression with concurrent IKK inhibition may be a promising novel gene therapy modality to treat lung cancer.

  17. TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) regulates adipocyte metabolism by caspase-mediated cleavage of PPARgamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuper, M; Wernstedt Asterholm, I; Scherer, P E; Westhoff, M-A; Möller, P; Debatin, K-M; Strauss, G; Wabitsch, M; Fischer-Posovszky, P

    2013-01-24

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and other members of the TNF family affect adipose tissue metabolism and contribute to the obesity-related inflammation of adipose tissue. Here, we sought to identify the effects of TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) on fat cell biology. TRAIL-receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2) and its mouse homolog DR5 were regulated upon acute and chronic energy imbalance in murine and human adipose tissue. TRAIL inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and de novo lipogenesis in human adipocytes. Interestingly, TRAIL did not interfere with the phosphorylation of insulin-stimulated kinases such as Akt or Erk and did not activate the NF-κB pathway. Instead, TRAIL activated cleavage of caspase-8 and caspase-3. The subsequent cleavage of PPARγ led to its inactivation and resulted in reduced expression of lipogenic genes, such as Glut-4, FASN, and ACC. Taken together, we discovered a so far unknown function of the death ligand TRAIL in regulating adipocyte metabolism. Our results imply that TRAIL/TRAIL-R system might provide a new target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and its co-morbidities.

  18. Antioxidant activities of buttermilk proteins, whey proteins, and their enzymatic hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Valérie; Gauthier, Sylvie F; Pouliot, Yves

    2013-01-16

    The oxygen radical absorbance capacities (ORAC) and metal chelating capacities (MCC) of protein concentrates prepared from buttermilk and cheese whey by ultrafiltration were compared with those of skim milk protein. Samples were also heat-denatured and hydrolyzed by pepsin for 2 h followed by trypsin for 3 h. The highest MCC was obtained for hydrolyzed skim milk protein. ORAC values ranged from 554.4 to 1319.6 μmol Trolox equivalents/g protein, with the highest value obtained for hydrolyzed buttermilk protein. Liquid-phase isoelectric focusing (IEF) of this hydrolysate yielded peptide fractions with lower ORAC values. LC-MS analysis of the hydrolyzed skim milk and buttermilk proteins and IEF fractions of the latter showed that peptides derived from milk fat globule membrane proteins, primarily butyrophilin, could be responsible for the superior antioxidant activity of buttermilk. These results suggest overall that hydrolyzed buttermilk protein could be used as a source of natural antioxidants.

  19. [Effect of straw apoplast protein on cellulase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Di; Chen, Hong-Zhang; Ma, Run-Yu

    2006-03-01

    We studied the alteration of the maize straw apoplast proteins in the process of preservation, and analyzed the effects of apoplast proteins on Penicillum expansum cellulase activities. The results show that: the extractable apoplast proteins are gradually decreased during the preservation of maize straw. Meanwhile, their synergistic effects on P. expensum cellulose are also attenuated. The apoplast proteins extracted from fresh maize straw possess endogenous EG activities, which is unstable and completely vanished after 6 months preservation. The apoplast proteins from the preserved straw exhibit significant synergistic effect on FPA, cotton lyase and beta-glucosidase. The maximal synergistic values are 95.32%, 102.06% and 96.6%, respectively. But interestingly, they inhibit the CMCase activity (max. 49.52%). Apoplast proteins show distinctive synergy with betaG and EG, but have no effect on CBH activity. After eliminating the effect of endogenous EG, the apoplast proteins from fresh maize straw have enhanced synergistic or inhibiting effects on FPA, Cotton lyase, betaG and CMCase than those extracted from the preserved straw. Based on our observation, the apoplast proteins play important roles in regulating the cellulase activities. The detailed analysis of the related mechanisms will greatly benefit the studies of the natural biomaterials hydrolysis.

  20. TRAIL-Based High Throughput Screening Reveals a Link between TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis and Glutathione Reductase, a Key Component of Oxidative Stress Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Rozanov

    Full Text Available A high throughput screen for compounds that induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis identified ML100 as an active chemical probe, which potentiated TRAIL activity in prostate carcinoma PPC-1 and melanoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Follow-up in silico modeling and profiling in cell-based assays allowed us to identify NSC130362, pharmacophore analog of ML100 that induced 65-95% cytotoxicity in cancer cells and did not affect the viability of human primary hepatocytes. In agreement with the activation of the apoptotic pathway, both ML100 and NSC130362 synergistically with TRAIL induced caspase-3/7 activity in MDA-MB-435 cells. Subsequent affinity chromatography and inhibition studies convincingly demonstrated that glutathione reductase (GSR, a key component of the oxidative stress response, is a target of NSC130362. In accordance with the role of GSR in the TRAIL pathway, GSR gene silencing potentiated TRAIL activity in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. Inhibition of GSR activity resulted in the induction of oxidative stress, as was evidenced by an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and peroxidation of mitochondrial membrane after NSC130362 treatment in MDA-MB-435 cells but not in human hepatocytes. The antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH fully protected MDA-MB-435 cells from cell lysis induced by NSC130362 and TRAIL, thereby further confirming the interplay between GSR and TRAIL. As a consequence of activation of oxidative stress, combined treatment of different oxidative stress inducers and NSC130362 promoted cell death in a variety of cancer cells but not in hepatocytes in cell-based assays and in in vivo, in a mouse tumor xenograft model.

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinases mediate Mycobacterium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... heat shock, UV irradiation and also to inflammatory cytokines. ERK is mainly activated by growth factors and phorbol esters. (Lewis et al. 1998; Cowan and Storey 2003). The activation of some MAPK family members by. M. tuberculosis H37Rv in human monocytes has already been reported. Song et al.

  2. Trails

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Data was hand drawn on USGS Topographic quads by foresters of the Vermont Department of Forests, Parks, & Recreation using orthophotos, survey data, and personal...

  3. Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet' (QTVR) [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Magic Carpet Close-upMagic Carpet Close-up HDThis section of the first color image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been further processed to produce a sharper look at a trail left by the one of rover's airbags. The drag mark was made after the rover landed and its airbags were deflated and retracted. Scientists have dubbed the region the 'Magic Carpet' after a crumpled portion of the soil that appears to have been peeled away (lower left side of the drag mark). Rocks were also dragged by the airbags, leaving impressions and 'bow waves' in the soil. The mission team plans to drive the rover over to this site to look for additional clues about the composition of the martian soil. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera.This extreme close-up image (see insets above) highlights the martian feature that scientists have named 'Magic Carpet' because of its resemblance to a crumpled carpet fold. Scientists think the soil here may have detached from its underlying layer, possibly due to interaction with the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's airbag after landing. This image was taken on Mars by the rover's panoramic camera.

  4. Therapy-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells inactivate FOXO3 to escape apoptosis induction by TRAIL and Noxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Andrea; Bodner, Martin; Viola, Giampietro; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Basso, Giuseppe; Hagenbuchner, Judith; Obexer, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead transcription factors (FOXO) are downstream targets of the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) protein kinase B (PKB) signaling cascade and play a pivotal role in cell differentiation, cell cycle and apoptosis. We found that cells from prednisone-resistant T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients showed cytoplasmic localization of FOXO3 in comparison to prednisone-sensitive patients suggesting its inactivation. To determine the impact of FOXO3, T-ALL cells were infected with a 4OH-tamoxifen-regulated, phosphorylation-independent FOXO3(A3)ERtm allele. After FOXO3-activation these cells undergo caspase-dependent apoptosis. FOXO3 induces the death ligand TRAIL and the BH3-only protein Noxa implicating extrinsic as well as intrinsic death signaling. Whereas dnFADD partially inhibited cell death, CrmA and dnBID efficiently rescued ALL cells after FOXO3 activation, suggesting a caspase-8 amplifying feedback loop downstream of FADD. Knockdown of TRAIL and Noxa reduced FOXO3-induced apoptosis, implicating that mitochondrial destabilization amplifies TRAIL-signaling. The-reconstitution of the cell cycle inhibitor p16INK4A, which sensitizes ALL cells to mitochondria-induced cell death, represses FOXO3 protein levels and reduces the dependency of these leukemia cells on PI3K-PKB signaling. This suggests that if p16INK4A is deleted during leukemia development, FOXO3 levels elevate and FOXO3 has to be inactivated by deregulation of the PI3K-PKB pathway to prevent FOXO3-induced cell death. PMID:23828551

  5. 33 CFR 117.401 - Trail Creek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trail Creek. 117.401 Section 117.401 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Indiana § 117.401 Trail Creek. (a) The draw of the Franklin...

  6. Back in Time on a Mathematics Trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    The recently revised "Northern Ireland Primary Curriculum" recommends that teachers make use of the environment to extend children's understanding of mathematics. One approach to using the environment in mathematics is to take children on a mathematics trail. A mathematics trail uses the resources and features within the environment as a…

  7. COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN OF RECEPTOR SELECTIVE TRAIL VARIANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sloot, Almer M.; Szegezdi, Eva; Reis, Carlos R.; Tur, Vicente; Quax, Wim J.; Samali, Afshin; Serrano, Luis; Wallach, D; Kovalenko, A; Feldman, M

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potential anticancer drug that selectively induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells by interacting with death receptors DR4 and DR5. TRAIL can also bind to decoy receptors (DcR1, DcR2, and osteoprotegerin receptor) that

  8. In-Trail Procedure (ITP) Algorithm Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this document is to provide a detailed description of the In-Trail Procedure (ITP) algorithm, which is part of the Airborne Traffic Situational Awareness In-Trail Procedure (ATSA-ITP) application. To this end, the document presents a high level description of the ITP Algorithm and a prototype implementation of this algorithm in the programming language C.

  9. LES tests on airfoil trailing edge serration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a large number of acoustic simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with different Trailing Edge Serrations (TES). The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy is used for noise prediction at trailing edge. The acoustic solver is running on the platform...

  10. Photoaffinity Labeling in Activity-Based Protein Profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurink, Paul P.; Prely, Laurette M.; van der Marel, Gijs A.; Bischoff, Rainer; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Sieber, SA

    2012-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling has come to the fore in recent years as a powerful strategy for studying enzyme activities in their natural surroundings. Substrate analogs that bind covalently and irreversibly to an enzyme active site and that are equipped with an identification or affinity tag can

  11. Decreased affinity of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL) D269H/E195R to osteoprotegerin (OPG) overcomes TRAIL resistance mediated by the bone microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Matthieu C J; Reis, Carlos R; Schuringa, Jan J; Vellenga, Edo; Quax, Wim J

    2014-01-10

    The bone marrow microenvironment provides important signals for the survival and proliferation of hematopoietic and malignant cells. In multiple myeloma, plasma cells are surrounded by stromal cells including osteoblasts. These stromal cells protect multiple myeloma cells from apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a soluble receptor of the cytokine TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), is secreted by osteoblasts and has been implicated in the prevention of cell death induced by TRAIL in malignant cells. Previously, we have designed death receptor-specific TRAIL variants that induce apoptosis exclusively via one of its death receptors. Here, we have studied in detail the interaction between recombinant human (rhTRAIL) variants and OPG. We show that a DR5-specific variant (rhTRAIL D269H/E195R) displays a significantly decreased affinity to OPG. Furthermore, this rhTRAIL variant shows a much higher activity when compared with rhTRAIL WT and retains its effectiveness in inducing cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines, in the presence of OPG secreted by stromal cells. We also demonstrate that stromal cells are largely insensitive to high concentrations of this rhTRAIL variant. In conclusion, rhTRAIL D269H/E195R is a potential therapy for multiple myeloma due to its high effectiveness and diminished binding to OPG.

  12. The contact activation proteins: a structure/function overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, J. C.; McMullen, B. A.; Bouma, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, extensive knowledge has been obtained on the structure/function relationships of blood coagulation proteins. In this overview, we present recent developments on the structure/function relationships of the contact activation proteins: factor XII, high molecular weight kininogen,

  13. Prevalence of activated protein C resistance (Factor V Leiden) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Protein C (Factor V Leiden) is the commonest genetic defect known to confer a predisposition to thrombosis. This study aims to determine the prevalence of activated protein C resistance (APCr) in Lagos, and to determine if any association exists between APCr and ABO, Rhesus blood types, and hemoglobin phenotypes.

  14. Plasma Renin Activity in Children with Protein Energy Malnutrition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    than in those who survived. Increased renin activity probably contributes to the retention of water characteris- tic of protein energy malnutrition. 5. Afr. Med. J., 48, 499 (1974). Oedema and a low mass for age are the two cardinal features of protein energy malnutrition (kwashiorkor).' In kwashiorkor, there is a failure to balance ...

  15. Ribosome Mediated Quinary Interactions Modulate In-Cell Protein Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, Christopher M; Majumder, Subhabrata; Burz, David S; Reverdatto, Sergey; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2017-08-15

    Ribosomes are present inside bacterial cells at micromolar concentrations and occupy up to 20% of the cell volume. Under these conditions, even weak quinary interactions between ribosomes and cytosolic proteins can affect protein activity. By using in-cell and in vitro NMR spectroscopy, and biophysical techniques, we show that the enzymes, adenylate kinase and dihydrofolate reductase, and the respective coenzymes, ATP and NADPH, bind to ribosomes with micromolar affinity, and that this interaction suppresses the enzymatic activities of both enzymes. Conversely, thymidylate synthase, which works together with dihydrofolate reductase in the thymidylate synthetic pathway, is activated by ribosomes. We also show that ribosomes impede diffusion of green fluorescent protein in vitro and contribute to the decrease in diffusion in vivo. These results strongly suggest that ribosome-mediated quinary interactions contribute to the differences between in vitro and in vivo protein activities and that ribosomes play a previously under-appreciated nontranslational role in regulating cellular biochemistry.

  16. Evidence for a Proangiogenic Activity of TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Secchiero

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the observation that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/ Apo-2L protein is expressed in both malignant and inflammatory cells in some highly vascularized soft tissue sarcomas, the angiogenic potential of TRAIL was investigated in a series of in vitro assays. Recombinant soluble TRAIL induced endothelial cell migration and vessel tube formation to a degree comparable to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, one of the best-characterized angiogenic factors. However, the proangiogenic activity of TRAIL was not mediated by endogenous expression of VEGF. Although TRAIL potentiated VEGF-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation and endothelial cell proliferation, the combination of TRAIL + VEGF did not show additive effects with respect to VEGF alone in inducing vessel tube formation. Thus, although TRAIL has gained attention as a potential anticancer therapeutic for its ability to induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells, our present data suggest that TRAIL might also play an unexpected role in promoting angiogenesis, which might have therapeutic implications.

  17. Structural determinants of the eosinophil cationic protein antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Ester; Salazar, Vivian A; Torrent, Marc; Pulido, David; Nogués, M Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed

    2012-08-01

    Antimicrobial RNases are small cationic proteins belonging to the vertebrate RNase A superfamily and endowed with a wide range of antipathogen activities. Vertebrate RNases, while sharing the active site architecture, are found to display a variety of noncatalytical biological properties, providing an excellent example of multitask proteins. The antibacterial activity of distant related RNases suggested that the family evolved from an ancestral host-defence function. The review provides a structural insight into antimicrobial RNases, taking as a reference the human RNase 3, also named eosinophil cationic protein (ECP). A particular high binding affinity against bacterial wall structures mediates the protein action. In particular, the interaction with the lipopolysaccharides at the Gram-negative outer membrane correlates with the protein antimicrobial and specific cell agglutinating activity. Although a direct mechanical action at the bacteria wall seems to be sufficient to trigger bacterial death, a potential intracellular target cannot be discarded. Indeed, the cationic clusters at the protein surface may serve both to interact with nucleic acids and cell surface heterosaccharides. Sequence determinants for ECP activity were screened by prediction tools, proteolysis and peptide synthesis. Docking results are complementing the structural analysis to delineate the protein anchoring sites for anionic targets of biological significance.

  18. Evidence for a Role of TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) in the Anemia of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Diana; Secchiero, Paola; Corallini, Federica; Melloni, Elisabetta; Capitani, Silvano; Lanza, Francesco; Zauli, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by impaired erythropoiesis, possibly caused by proapoptotic cytokines. We focused our study on the cytokine TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), which has been shown to exhibit an anti-differentiation activity on erythroid maturation. Immunocytochemical analysis of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) showed an increased expression of TRAIL in MDS patients with respect to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and normal BM donors. TRAIL expression was increased predominantly in myeloid precursors of granulocytic lineage and in a subset of monocytes and pro-erythroblasts. Significant levels of soluble TRAIL were released in 21 of 68 BMMC culture supernatants from MDS patients. On the other hand, TRAIL was detected less frequently in the culture supernatants of AML (4 of 33) and normal BMMC (0 of 22). Analysis of peripheral blood parameters revealed significantly lower levels of peripheral red blood cells and hemoglobin in the subset of patients whose BMMC released TRAIL in culture supernatants compared to the subgroup of patients who did not release TRAIL. Moreover, TRAIL-positive BMMC culture supernatants inhibited the differentiation of normal glycophorin A+ erythroblasts generated in serum-free liquid phase. Thus, increased expression and release of TRAIL at the bone marrow level is likely to impair erythropoiesis and to contribute to the degree of anemia, the major clinical feature of MDS. PMID:15681838

  19. Trail impacts and trail impact management related to ecotourism visitation at Torres del Paine National Park, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, T.A.; Marion, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ecotourism and protected area visitation in Central and South America are largely dependent upon a relatively undisturbed quality of natural resources. However, visitation may impact vegetation, soil, water and wildlife resources, and degrade visitor facilities such as recreation sites and trails. Findings are reported from trail impact research conducted at Torres del Paine National Park in Patagonia, Chile. The frequency and magnitude of selected trail impacts and the relative effect of the amount of use, vegetation type, trail position and trail grade are investigated. Findings differed from previous studies in that amount of use was significantly related to both trail width increases and trail erosion. Management actions to minimize trail impacts are offered.

  20. The DeISGylase USP18 limits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through the regulation of TRAIL levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manini, Ivana; Sgorbissa, Andrea; Potu, Harish; Tomasella, Andrea; Brancolini, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising molecule for anti-cancer therapies. Unfortunately, cancer cells frequently acquire resistance to rhTRAIL. Various co-treatments have been proposed to overcome apoptosis resistance to TRAIL. Here we show that downregulation of the deISGylase USP18 sensitizes cancer cells to rhTRAIL, whereas, elevate levels of USP18 inhibit TRAIL-induced apoptosis, in a deISGylase-independent manner. USP18 influences TRAIL signaling through the control of the IFN autocrine loop. In fact, cells with downregulated USP18 expression augment the expression of cellular TRAIL. Downregulation of cellular TRAIL abrogates the synergism between TRAIL and USP18 siRNA and also limits cell death induced by rhTRAIL. By comparing the apoptotic responsiveness to TRAIL in a panel of cancer cell lines, we have discovered a correlation between TRAIL levels and the apoptotic susceptibility to rhTRAIL, In cells expressing high levels of TRAIL-R2 susceptibility to rhTRAIL correlates with TRAIL expression. In conclusion, we propose that cellular TRAIL is an additional factor that can influence the apoptotic response to rhTRAIL. PMID:24153058

  1. Measurement of GPCR-G protein activity in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Kasun; Kankanamge, Dinesh; Senarath, Kanishka; Siripurapu, Praneeth; Weis, Nicole; Tennakoon, Mithila; Payton, John L; Karunarathne, Ajith

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell surface receptors in eukaryotic genomes. They control a variety of cellular and physiological processes such as hormone secretion and heart rate, and therefore are associated with a majority of pathological conditions including cancer and heart diseases. Currently established assays to measure ligand-induced activation of GPCRs and G proteins possess limitations such as being time consuming, indirect, and expensive. Thus, an efficient method to measure GPCR-G protein activation is required to identify novel pharmacological modulators to control them and gain insights about molecular underpinnings of the associated pathways. Activation of GPCRs induces dissociation of G protein heterotrimers to form GαGTP and free Gβγ. Free Gβγ subunits have been shown to translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes. Gβγ translocation therefore represents the GPCR-G protein activation, and thus, imaging of this process can be used to quantify the kinetics and magnitude of the pathway activation-deactivation in real time in living cells. The objective of this chapter is to elaborate the protocols of (i) generation and optimization of the required sensor constructs; (ii) development of cell culture, transient transfection, imaging, and optogenetic procedures; (iii) imaging and data analysis methods; and (iv) stable cell line generation, pertaining to this assay to measure GPCR-G protein activation. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of apoptosis in human melanoma and neuroblastoma cells by statins, sodium arsenite and TRAIL: a role of combined treatment versus monotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N.; Hei, Tom K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of melanoma cells by sodium arsenite or statins (simvastatin and lovastatin) dramatically modified activities of the main cell signaling pathways resulting in the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and in a downregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels. Through heme degradation and the production of carbon monoxide and biliverdin, HO-1 plays a protective role in different scenario of oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial apoptosis. Both sodium arsenite and statins could be efficient inducers of apoptosis in some melanoma cell lines, but often exhibited only modest proapoptotic activity in others, due to numerous protective mechanisms. We demonstrated in the present study that treatment by sodium arsenite or statins with an additional inhibition of HO-1 expression (or activation) caused a substantial upregulation of apoptosis in melanoma cells. Sodium arsenite- or statin-induced apoptosis was independent of BRAF status (wild type versus V600E) in melanoma lines. Monotreatment required high doses of statins (20–40 μM) for effective induction of apoptosis. As an alternative approach, pretreatment of melanoma cells with statin at decreased doses (5–20 μM) dramatically enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis, due to suppression of the NF-κB and STAT3-transcriptional targets (including COX-2) and downregulation of cFLIP-L (a caspase-8 inhibitor) protein levels. Furthermore, combined treatment with sodium arsenite and TRAIL or simvastatin and TRAIL efficiently induced apoptotic commitment in human neuroblastoma cells. In summary, our findings on enhancing effects of combined treatment of cancer cells using statin and TRAIL provide the rationale for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:21910007

  3. Preclinical differentiation between apparently safe and potentially hepatotoxic applications of TRAIL either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganten, T.M.; Koschny, R.; Sykora, J.; Schulze-Bergkamen, H.; Buchler, P.; Haas, T.L.; Schader, M.B.; Untergasser, A.; Stremmel, W.; Walczak, H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis¿inducing ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L) exhibits potent antitumor activity on systemic administration in nonhuman primates without deleterious side effects for normal tissue. However, there is a controversy about the potential toxicity of TRAIL on human

  4. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2014-12-01

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function. We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.

  5. Fascaplysin sensitizes cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis through upregulating DR5 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Chen, Haimin; Yan, Xiaojun; Zheng, Yanling

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the molecular mechanism of anti-tumor effect of fascaplysin, a nitrogenous red pigment firstly isolated from a marine sponge. Microarray analysis show that the TNF and TNF receptor superfamily in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human hepatocarcinoma cells (BEL-7402) were significantly regulated by fascaplysin. Western Blot results reveal that fascaplysin increased the expression of cleaved caspase-9, active caspase-3, and decreased the level of procaspase-8 and Bid. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests indicate that fascaplysin sensitized cells to tumor necrosis-related apoptosisinducing ligand-(TRAIL) induced apoptosis, which was markedly blocked by TRAIL R2/Fc chimera, a dominant negative form of TRAIL receptor DR5. Therefore, our results demonstrate that fascaplysin promotes apoptosis through the activation of TRAIL signaling pathway by upregulating DR5 expression.

  6. Dissociation of activated protein C functions by elimination of protein S cofactor enhancement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Shona

    2008-11-07

    Activated protein C (APC) plays a critical anticoagulant role in vivo by inactivating procoagulant factor Va and factor VIIIa and thus down-regulating thrombin generation. In addition, APC bound to the endothelial cell protein C receptor can initiate protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-mediated cytoprotective signaling. Protein S constitutes a critical cofactor for the anticoagulant function of APC but is not known to be involved in regulating APC-mediated protective PAR-1 signaling. In this study we utilized a site-directed mutagenesis strategy to characterize a putative protein S binding region within the APC Gla domain. Three single amino acid substitutions within the APC Gla domain (D35T, D36A, and A39V) were found to mildly impair protein S-dependent anticoagulant activity (<2-fold) but retained entirely normal cytoprotective activity. However, a single amino acid substitution (L38D) ablated the ability of protein S to function as a cofactor for this APC variant. Consequently, in assays of protein S-dependent factor Va proteolysis using purified proteins or in the plasma milieu, APC-L38D variant exhibited minimal residual anticoagulant activity compared with wild type APC. Despite the location of Leu-38 in the Gla domain, APC-L38D interacted normally with endothelial cell protein C receptor and retained its ability to trigger PAR-1 mediated cytoprotective signaling in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild type APC. Consequently, elimination of protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function represents a novel and effective strategy by which to separate the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of APC for potential therapeutic gain.

  7. Recreational trails as corridors for alien plants in the Rocky Mountains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Floye H.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Alien plant species often use areas of heavy human activity for habitat and dispersal. Roads and utility corridors have been shown to harbor more alien species than the surrounding vegetation and are therefore believed to contribute to alien plant persistence and spread. Recreational trails represent another corridor that could harbor alien species and aid their spread. Effective management of invasive species requires understanding how alien plants are distributed at trailheads and trails and how their dispersal may be influenced by native vegetation. Our overall goal was to investigate the distribution of alien plants at trailheads and trails in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. At trailheads, we found that although the number of alien species was less than the number of native species, alien plant cover ( x̄=50%) did not differ from native plant cover, and we observed a large number of alien seedlings in the soil seed bank, suggesting that alien plants are a large component of trailhead communities and will continue to be so in the future. Along trails, we found higher alien species richness and cover on trail (as opposed to 4 m from the trail) in 3 out of 4 vegetation types, and we observed higher alien richness and cover in meadows than in other vegetation types. Plant communities at both trailheads and trails, as well as seed banks at trailheads, contain substantial diversity and abundance of alien plants. These results suggest that recreational trails in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado may function as corridors that facilitate the spread of alien species into wildlands. Our results suggest that control of alien plants should begin at trailheads where there are large numbers of aliens and that control efforts on trails should be prioritized by vegetation type.

  8. HPA-axis activity and externalizing behavior problems in early adolescents from the general population: the role of comorbidity and gender The TRAILS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Rianne; Swinkels, Sophie H N; Rosmalen, Judith G M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ormel, Johan; Buitelaar, Jan K

    2008-07-01

    Contradictory findings on the relationship between hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and externalizing behavior problems could be due to studies not accounting for issues of comorbidity and gender. In a population-based cohort of 1768 (10- to 12-year-old) early adolescents, we used a person-oriented approach and a variable-oriented approach to investigate whether comorbidity with internalizing behavior problems and gender moderate the relationship between HPA-axis activity (cortisol awakening response and evening cortisol levels) and externalizing behavior problems. We found that: (1) in early adolescents with pure externalizing behavior problems, there was a particularly strong effect of gender, in that girls showed significantly higher total cortisol levels after awakening (AUC(G) levels) and a significantly higher cortisol awakening response (AUC(I) levels) than boys. (2) Girls with pure externalizing behavior problems showed a significantly higher cortisol awakening response (AUC(I) levels) than girls without behavior problems or girls with comorbid internalizing behavior problems. This effect was absent in boys. (3) Externalizing behavior problems, in contrast to internalizing behavior problems, were associated with higher evening cortisol levels. This effect might, however, result from girls with externalizing behavior problems showing the highest evening cortisol levels. Overall, we were unable to find the expected relationships between comorbidity and HPA-axis activity, and found girls with pure externalizing behavior problems to form a distinct group with regard to their HPA-axis activity. There is need for prospective longitudinal studies of externalizing behavior problems in boys and girls in relation to their HPA-axis activity. It would be useful to consider how other risk factors such as life events and family and parenting factors as well as genetic risks affect the complex relationship between externalizing behavior problems and HPA

  9. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin eLee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554 in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression – including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding and degradation steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes.

  10. Evaluation of preventive and therapeutic activity of novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, CG100649, in colon cancer: Increased expression of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptors enhance the apoptotic response to combination treatment with TRAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Jang, Yeong-Su; Ro, Seonggu; Cho, Joong Myung; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been suggested as the potential new class of preventive or therapeutic antitumor agents. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitumor activity of the novel NSAID, CG100649. CG100649 is a novel NSAID dual inhibitor for COX-2 and carbonic anhydrase (CA)-I/-II. In the present study, we investigated the alternative mechanism by which CG100649 mediated suppression of the colon cancer growth and development. The anchorage‑dependent and -independent clonogenic assay showed that CG100649 inhibited the clonogenicity of human colon cancer cells. The flow cytometric analysis showed that CG100649 induced the G2/M cell cycle arrest in colon cancer cells. Animal studies showed that CG100649 inhibited the tumor growth in colon cancer xenograft in nude mice. Furthermore, quantitative PCR and FACS analysis demonstrated that CG100649 upregulated the expression of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors (DR4 and DR5) but decreased the expression of decoy receptors (DcR1 and DcR2) in colon cancer cells. The results showed that CG100649 treatment sensitized TRAIL‑mediated growth suppression and apoptotic cell death. The combination treatment resulted in significant repression of the intestinal polyp formation in APCmin/+ mice. Our data clearly demonstrated that CG100649 contains preventive and therapeutic activity for colon cancer. The present study may be useful for identification of the potential benefit of the NSAID CG100649, for the achievement of a better treatment response in colon cancer.

  11. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Protein corona between nanoparticles and bacterial proteins in activated sludge: Characterization and effect on nanoparticle aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, You-Peng; Xiao, Meng-Qian; Feng, Bo; Tian, Kai-Xun; Chen, Yue-Hui; Dai, You-Zhi

    2017-11-06

    In this work, the protein coronas of activated sludge proteins on TiO2 nanoparticles (TNPs) and ZnO nanoparticles (ZNPs) were characterized. The proteins with high affinity to TNPs and ZNPs were identified by shotgun proteomics, and their effects of on the distributions of TNPs and ZNPs in activated sludge were concluded. In addition, the effects of protein coronas on the aggregations of TNPs and ZNPs were evaluated. Thirty and nine proteins with high affinities to TNPs and ZNPs were identified, respectively. The proteomics and adsorption isotherms demonstrated that activated sludge had a higher affinity to TNPs than to ZNPs. The aggregation percentages of ZNPs at 35, 53, and 106 mg/L of proteins were 13%, 14%, and 18%, respectively, whereas those of TNPs were 21%, 30%, 41%, respectively. The proteins contributed to ZNPs aggregation by dissolved Zn ion-bridging, whereas the increasing protein concentrations enhanced the TNPs aggregation through macromolecule bridging flocculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Utah Trails Initiative: Partnerships, Research, and Action

    OpenAIRE

    Burr, Steven W; Blahna, Dale J.; Reiter, Douglas K.; Butkus, Michael

    2003-01-01

    As a result of changing social values regarding the development and use of our natural resources, more and more emphasis is being placed on the vale of amenity resources, concerning scenery and aesthetics, opportunities for a diversity of recreation experiences, providing habitat for wildlife, and preserving biological diversity (Burr & Blahna, 2000; Siehl, 1990). Many people enjoy a variety of trail-based activities as a source of their recreation. With all their attributes and varieties o...

  14. HPA-axis activity and externalizing behavior problems in early adolescents from the general population : the role of comorbidity and gender The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, Rianne; Swinkels, Sophie H. N.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ormel, Johan; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    Contradictory findings on the relationship between hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and externalizing behavior problems could be due to studies not accounting for issues of comorbidity and gender. In a population-based cohort of 1768 (10- to 12-year-old) early adolescents, we used

  15. HPA-axis activity and externalizing behavior problems in early adolescents from the general population: the role of comorbidity and gender The TRAILS study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, R.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Rosmalen, J.G.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Ormel, J.; Buitelaar, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    Contradictory findings on the relationship between hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and externalizing behavior problems could be due to studies not accounting for issues of comorbidity and gender. In a population-based cohort of 1768 (10- to 12-year-old) early adolescents, we used

  16. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  17. Auto-phosphorylation Represses Protein Kinase R Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Die; de Weerd, Nicole A; Willard, Belinda; Polekhina, Galina; Williams, Bryan R G; Sadler, Anthony J

    2017-03-10

    The central role of protein kinases in controlling disease processes has spurred efforts to develop pharmaceutical regulators of their activity. A rational strategy to achieve this end is to determine intrinsic auto-regulatory processes, then selectively target these different states of kinases to repress their activation. Here we investigate auto-regulation of the innate immune effector protein kinase R, which phosphorylates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α to inhibit global protein translation. We demonstrate that protein kinase R activity is controlled by auto-inhibition via an intra-molecular interaction. Part of this mechanism of control had previously been reported, but was then controverted. We account for the discrepancy and extend our understanding of the auto-inhibitory mechanism by identifying that auto-inhibition is paradoxically instigated by incipient auto-phosphorylation. Phosphor-residues at the amino-terminus instigate an intra-molecular interaction that enlists both of the N-terminal RNA-binding motifs of the protein with separate surfaces of the C-terminal kinase domain, to co-operatively inhibit kinase activation. These findings identify an innovative mechanism to control kinase activity, providing insight for strategies to better regulate kinase activity.

  18. Organization, Structure and Activity of Proteins in Monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher,J.; Trudel, E.; Methot, M.; Desmeules, P.; Salesse, C.

    2007-01-01

    Many different processes take place at the cell membrane interface. Indeed, for instance, ligands bind membrane proteins which in turn activate peripheral membrane proteins, some of which are enzymes whose action is also located at the membrane interface. Native cell membranes are difficult to use to gain information on the activity of individual proteins at the membrane interface because of the large number of different proteins involved in membranous processes. Model membrane systems, such as monolayers at the air-water interface, have thus been extensively used during the last 50 years to reconstitute proteins and to gain information on their organization, structure and activity in membranes. In the present paper, we review the recent work we have performed with membrane and peripheral proteins as well as enzymes in monolayers at the air-water interface. We show that the structure and orientation of gramicidin has been determined by combining different methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin is indistinguishable from that in native membranes when appropriate conditions are used. We also show that the kinetics and extent of monolayer binding of myristoylated recoverin is much faster than that of the nonmyristoylated form and that this binding is highly favored by the presence polyunsaturated phospholipids. Moreover, we show that the use of fragments of RPE65 allow determine which region of this protein is most likely involved in membrane binding. Monomolecular films were also used to further understand the hydrolysis of organized phospholipids by phospholipases A2 and C.

  19. Anthelmintic activity of Leucaena leucocephala protein extracts on Haemonchus contortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Martins dos Santos Soares

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of protein extracts obtained from the plant Leucaena leucocephala on the nematode parasite Haemonchus contortus. The seeds, shell and cotyledon of L. leucocephala were separated and their proteins extracted using a sodium phosphate buffer, and named as TE (total seed extract, SE (shell extract and CE (cotyledon extract. Soluble protein content, protease, protease inhibitory and chitinase activity assays were performed. Exsheathment inhibition of H. contortus larvae were performed at concentrations of 0.6 mg mL–1, and egg hatch assays were conducted at protein concentrations of 0.8, 0.4, 0.2, 0.1 and 0.05 mg mL–1. The effective concentration for 50% hatching inhibition (EC50 was estimated by probit. Different proportions of soluble proteins, protease and chitinase were found in TE and CE. Protease inhibitory activity was detected in all extracts. The EC50 of the CE and TE extracts were 0.48 and 0.33 mg mL–1, respectively. No ovicidal effects on H. contortus were detected in SE extracts, and none of the protein extracts demonstrated larvicidal effects on H. contortus. We therefore conclude that protein extracts of L. leucocephala had a detrimental effect on nematode eggs, which can be correlated with the high protease and chitinase activity of these extracts.

  20. Nutlin-3 preferentially sensitises wild-type p53-expressing cancer cells to DR5-selective TRAIL over rhTRAIL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.; Kruyt, F. A. E.; van der Zee, A. G. J.; Hollema, H.; Le, P.; ten Hoor, K. A.; Groothuis, G. M. M.; Quax, W. J.; de Vries, E. G. E.; de Jong, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumour cell-selective activation of apoptosis by recombinant human TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL) is enhanced through co-activation of p53 by chemotherapeutic drugs. The novel anticancer agent nutlin-3 provides a promising alternative for p53 activation by disrupting the

  1. Surface TRAIL decoy receptor-4 expression is correlated with TRAIL resistance in MCF7 breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Cigdem

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells but not in normal cells. Despite this promising feature, TRAIL resistance observed in cancer cells seriously challenged the use of TRAIL as a death ligand in gene therapy. The current dispute concerns whether or not TRAIL receptor expression pattern is the primary determinant of TRAIL sensitivity in cancer cells. This study investigates TRAIL receptor expression pattern and its connection to TRAIL resistance in breast cancer cells. In addition, a DcR2 siRNA approach and a complementary gene therapy modality involving IKK inhibition (AdIKKβKA were also tested to verify if these approaches could sensitize MCF7 breast cancer cells to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL (Ad5hTRAIL. Methods TRAIL sensitivity assays were conducted using Molecular Probe's Live/Dead Cellular Viability/Cytotoxicity Kit following the infection of breast cancer cells with Ad5hTRAIL. The molecular mechanism of TRAIL induced cell death under the setting of IKK inhibition was revealed by Annexin V binding. Novel quantitative Real Time RT-PCR and flow cytometry analysis were performed to disclose TRAIL receptor composition in breast cancer cells. Results MCF7 but not MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells displayed strong resistance to adenovirus delivery of TRAIL. Only the combinatorial use of Ad5hTRAIL and AdIKKβKA infection sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to TRAIL induced cell death. Moreover, novel quantitative Real Time RT-PCR assays suggested that while the level of TRAIL Decoy Receptor-4 (TRAIL-R4 expression was the highest in MCF7 cells, it was the lowest TRAIL receptor expressed in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, conventional flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that TRAIL resistant MCF7 cells exhibited substantial levels of TRAIL-R4 expression but not TRAIL decoy receptor-3 (TRAIL-R3 on surface. On the contrary, TRAIL sensitive MDA-MB-231 cells

  2. Beyond sepsis : activated protein C and ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel; Choi, Goda; Schoots, Ivo; Schultz, Marcus; van der Poll, Tom

    OBJECTIVE: To review potential clinical situations beyond sepsis in which activated protein C might be an effective treatment. DATA SOURCE: Published articles between 1970 and 2003 on experimental and clinical studies of activation of both coagulation and inflammation in various disease states. DATA

  3. Zinc ions bind to and inhibit activated protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Tianqing; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Nickolaus, Noëlle

    2010-01-01

    Zn2+ ions were found to efficiently inhibit activated protein C (APC), suggesting a potential regulatory function for such inhibition. APC activity assays employing a chromogenic peptide substrate demonstrated that the inhibition was reversible and the apparent K I was 13 +/- 2 microM. k cat was ...

  4. Antiproliferative activity of protein extracts from the black clam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to obtain protein extracts from the clam Chione fluctifraga and determine its antiproliferative activity against cervical and breast cancer cells. The extracts were obtained by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. Antiproliferative activity was evaluated by 3-(4 ...

  5. TRAIL-induced apoptosis and expression of death receptor TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 in bladder cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenon P Czuba

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L is a member of TNF superfamily able to induce programmed death in cancer cells with no toxicity against normal tissues. TRAIL mediate apoptosis follows binding to the two death receptors, TRAIL-R1 (DR4 and/or TRAIL-R2 (DR5. In this study we investigated the cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of TRAIL on bladder cancer cells and the expression of death receptor TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 on the surface of these cancer cells. Three human bladder transitional cancer cell (TCC lines - SW780, 647V and T24 were tested for TRAIL sensitivity. The bladder cancer cells were incubated with human soluble recombinant TRAIL. Cytotoxicity was measured by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide and LDH (lactate dyhydrogenase assays. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide and by fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33342/annexin V-FITC/Ethidium Homodimer. The cell surface expression of TRAIL death receptors on bladder cancer were determined using flow cytometry with phycoerythrin-conjugated monoclonal anti-human TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2. Our investigations confirmed that SW780 cells were sensitive to TRAIL, and two other bladder cancer cell lines, 647V and T24, were resistant to TRAIL induced apoptosis. We therefore examined the expression of TRAIL death receptors on bladder cancer cell surfaces. We showed decreased expression of TRAIL-R2 receptor in TRAIL-resistant bladder cancer cells and increased expression of this death receptor in TRAIL-sensitive SW780 cells. The expression of TRAILR1 receptor was similar in all bladder cancer cell lines. TRAIL is one of the promising candidates for cancer therapeutics. However, some cancer cells are resistant to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. It is therefore important to overcome this resistance for the clinical use of TRAIL in cancer therapy. TRAIL death receptors are attractive therapeutic targets in

  6. Antitumor Effect of Periplocin in TRAIL-Resistant Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells through Downregulation of IAPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Fang Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortex periplocae is the dried root bark of Periploca sepium Bge., a traditional Chinese herb medicine. It contains high amounts of cardiac glycosides. Several cardiac glycosides have been reported to inhibit tumor growth or induce tumor cell apoptosis. We extracted and purified cortex periplocae and identified periplocin as the active ingredient that inhibited the growth of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-(TRAIL- resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The antitumor activity of periplocin was further increased by TRAIL cotreatment. Periplocin sensitized TRAIL-resistant HCC through the following two mechanisms. First, periplocin induced the expression of DR4 and FADD. Second, the cotreatment of TRAIL and periplocin suppressed several inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs. Both mechanisms resulted in the activation of caspase 3, 8, and 9 and led to cell apoptosis. In addition, intraperitoneal injection (IP of periplocin repressed the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in xenograft tumor model in mice. In summary, periplocin sensitized TRAIL-resistant HCC cells to TRAIL treatment and resulted in tumor cell apoptosis and the repression of tumor growth in vivo.

  7. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate Sensitizes Human 786-O Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ruojing; Zhu, Guodong; Jia, Ning; Yang, Wenzeng

    2015-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising anticancer agent. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a polyphenolic constituent of green tea. In this study, potentiating effect of EGCG on TRAIL-induced apoptosis human renal carcinoma cell line 786-O which is relatively resistant to TRAIL was examined, and the possible mechanism was investigated. Here, we show that co-treatment with EGCG and TRAIL induced significantly more profound apoptosis in 786-O cells. Treatment of 786-O cells with EGCG and TRAIL downregulated c-FLIP, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2 proteins in a caspase-dependent pathway. Moreover, we found that pretreatment with NAC markedly inhibited the expression levels of c-FLIP, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2 downregulated by the combinatory treatment, suggesting that the regulating effect of EGCG on these above apoptosis-relevant molecules was partially mediated by generation of ROS. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that EGCG sensitizes human 786-O renal cell carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by downregulation of c-FLIP, Mcl-1, and Bcl-2.

  8. Systems Biology Strategy Reveals PKC-delta is Key for Sensitizing TRAIL-Resistant Human Fibrosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro eHayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are highly variable and resistant to therapeutic intervention. Recently, the use of the tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induced treatment is gaining momentum, due to TRAIL’s ability to specifically target cancers with limited effect on normal cells. However, several malignant cancer types still remain non-sensitive to TRAIL. Previously, we developed a dynamic computational model, based on perturbation-response approach, and predicted protein kinase C (PKC as the most effective target, with over 95% capacity to kill human fibrosarcoma (HT1080 in TRAIL stimulation (Piras, V. et al. 2011, Scientific Reports. Here, to validate the model prediction, which has significant implications for cancer treatment, we conducted experiments on two TRAIL-resistant cancer cell lines (HT1080 and HT29. Using PKC inhibitor Bisindolylmaleimide I, we first demonstrate, as predicted by our previous model, cell viability is significantly impaired with over 95% death of both cancer types. Next, to identify crucial PKC isoform from 10 known members, we analyzed their mRNA expressions in HT1080 cells and shortlisted 4 isoforms for siRNA knock-down (KD experiments. From these KDs, PKC-delta produced the most cancer cell death in conjunction with TRAIL. Overall, systems biology approach, combining model prediction with experimental validation, holds promise for TRAIL-based cancer therapy.

  9. Distinct roles of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in viral and bacterial infections: from pathogenesis to pathogen clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyurkovska, Valeriya; Ivanovska, Nina

    2016-06-01

    Apoptotic death of different cells observed during infection is thought to limit overwhelming inflammation in response to microbial challenge. However, the underlying apoptotic death mechanisms have not been well defined. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a type II transmembrane protein belonging to the TNF superfamily, which is involved not only in tumor growth suppression but in infection control and also in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review, we have summarized data of recent studies on the influence of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor (TRAIL-R) system on the development of viral and bacterial infections. TRAIL may have a dual function in the immune system being able to kill infected cells and also to participate in the pathogenesis of multiple infections. Moreover, many pathogens have evolved mechanisms to manipulate TRAIL signaling thus increasing pathogen replication. Present data highlight an essential role for the TRAIL/TRAIL-R system in the regulation and modulation of apoptosis and show that TRAIL has distinct roles in pathogenesis and pathogen elimination. Knowledge of the factors that determine whether TRAIL is helpful or harmful supposes its potential therapeutic implications that are only beginning to be explored.

  10. New constitutive latex osmotin-like proteins lacking antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cleverson D T; Silva, Maria Z R; Bruno-Moreno, Frederico; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Moreira, Renato A; Ramos, Márcio V

    2015-11-01

    Proteins that share similar primary sequences to the protein originally described in salt-stressed tobacco cells have been named osmotins. So far, only two osmotin-like proteins were purified and characterized of latex fluids. Osmotin from Carica papaya latex is an inducible protein lacking antifungal activity, whereas the Calotropis procera latex osmotin is a constitutive antifungal protein. To get additional insights into this subject, we investigated osmotins in latex fluids of five species. Two potential osmotin-like proteins in Cryptostegia grandiflora and Plumeria rubra latex were detected by immunological cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibodies produced against the C. procera latex osmotin (CpOsm) by ELISA, Dot Blot and Western Blot assays. Osmotin-like proteins were not detected in the latex of Thevetia peruviana, Himatanthus drasticus and healthy Carica papaya fruits. Later, the two new osmotin-like proteins were purified through immunoaffinity chromatography with anti-CpOsm immobilized antibodies. Worth noting the chromatographic efficiency allowed for the purification of the osmotin-like protein belonging to H. drasticus latex, which was not detectable by immunoassays. The identification of the purified proteins was confirmed after MS/MS analyses of their tryptic digests. It is concluded that the constitutive osmotin-like proteins reported here share structural similarities to CpOsm. However, unlike CpOsm, they did not exhibit antifungal activity against Fusarium solani and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. These results suggest that osmotins of different latex sources may be involved in distinct physiological or defensive events. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The impacts of trail infrastructure on vegetation and soils: Current literature and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Mark; Pickering, Catherine Marina

    2015-12-01

    Reflecting the popularity of nature-based activities such as hiking and mountain biking, there are thousands of kilometres of recreational trails worldwide traversing a range of natural areas. These trails have environmental impacts on soils and vegetation, but where has there been research, what impacts have been found and how were they measured? Using a systematic quantitative literature review methodology, we assessed the impacts of trails on vegetation and soils, highlighting what is known, but also key knowledge gaps. Of the 59 original research papers identified on this topic that have been published in English language peer-reviewed academic journals, most were for research conducted in protected areas (71%), with few from developing countries (17%) or threatened ecosystems (14%). The research is concentrated in a few habitats and biodiversity hotspots, mainly temperate woodland, alpine grassland and Mediterranean habitats, often in the USA (32%) or Australia (20%). Most examined formal trails, with just 15% examining informal trails and 11% assessing both types. Nearly all papers report the results of observational surveys (90%), collecting quantitative data (66%) with 24% using geographic information systems. There was an emphasis on assessing trail impacts at a local scale, either on the trail itself and/or over short gradients away from the trail edge. Many assessed changes in composition and to some degree, structure, of vegetation and soils with the most common impacts documented including reduced vegetation cover, changes in plant species composition, trail widening, soil loss and soil compaction. There were 14 papers assessing how these local impacts can accumulate at the landscape scale. Few papers assessed differences in impacts among trails (7 papers), changes in impacts over time (4), species-specific responses (3) and only one assessed effects on plant community functioning. This review provides evidence that there are key research gaps

  12. Assessing soil erosion on trails: A comparison of techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark C. Jewell; William E. Hammitt

    2000-01-01

    Reports of trail degradation have been increasing in different wildernesses. This impact has become a common concern among managers. Deteriorating tread conditions of trails are increasing, as is concern at protected areas worldwide. In order to make objective and timely trail resource decisions, managers need to have effective and efficient methods of assessing trail...

  13. 36 CFR 13.1308 - Harding Icefield Trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harding Icefield Trail. 13... Provisions § 13.1308 Harding Icefield Trail. The Harding Icefield Trail from the junction with the main paved trail near Exit Glacier to the emergency hut near the terminus is closed to— (a) Camping within 1/8 mile...

  14. Activated entomopathogenic nematode infective juveniles release lethal venom proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dihong Lu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs are unique parasites due to their symbiosis with entomopathogenic bacteria and their ability to kill insect hosts quickly after infection. It is widely believed that EPNs rely on their bacterial partners for killing hosts. Here we disproved this theory by demonstrating that the in vitro activated infective juveniles (IJs of Steinernema carpocapsae (a well-studied EPN species release venom proteins that are lethal to several insects including Drosophila melanogaster. We confirmed that the in vitro activation is a good approximation of the in vivo process by comparing the transcriptomes of individual in vitro and in vivo activated IJs. We further analyzed the transcriptomes of non-activated and activated IJs and revealed a dramatic shift in gene expression during IJ activation. We also analyzed the venom proteome using mass spectrometry. Among the 472 venom proteins, proteases and protease inhibitors are especially abundant, and toxin-related proteins such as Shk domain-containing proteins and fatty acid- and retinol-binding proteins are also detected, which are potential candidates for suppressing the host immune system. Many of the venom proteins have conserved orthologs in vertebrate-parasitic nematodes and are differentially expressed during IJ activation, suggesting conserved functions in nematode parasitism. In summary, our findings strongly support a new model that S. carpocapsae and likely other Steinernema EPNs have a more active role in contributing to the pathogenicity of the nematode-bacterium complex than simply relying on their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we propose that EPNs are a good model system for investigating vertebrate- and human-parasitic nematodes, especially regarding the function of excretory/secretory products.

  15. The Relationship between Trail Running Withdrawals and Race Topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonini Philippe Roberta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: A growing amount of recent research in sport psychology has focused on trying to understand withdrawals from ultra-races. However, according to the Four E approach, the studies underestimated the embedded components of these experiences and particularly how they were linked to the specific environmental conditions in which the experiences occurred. Objective: This study aimed to characterize trail running withdrawals in relationship to race topography. Design: Qualitative design, involving self-confrontation interviews and use of a race map. Setting: Use of the race map for description of the race activity and self-confrontation interviews took place 1–3 days after the races. Participants: Ten runners who withdrew during an ultra-trail race. Data Collection and Analysis: Data on past activity traces and experiences were elicited from self-confrontation interviews. Data were coded and compared to identify common sequences and then each type of sequence was counted with regard to race topography. Results: Results showed that each sequence was related to runners’ particular possibilities for acting, feeling, and thinking, which were in turn embedded in the race topography. These sequences allowed the unfolding of the activity and increased its overall effectiveness in relation to the constraints of this specific sport. Conclusion: This study allowed us to highlight important information on how ultra-trail runners manage their races in relationship to the race environment and more specifically to its topography. The result will also help us to recommend potential adjustments to ultra-trail runners’ performance-oriented training and preparation.

  16. Enzymatic activities and protein profile of latex from Calotropis procera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cleverson Diniz T; Oliveira, Jefferson Soares; Miranda, Maria Raquel A; Macedo, Nívea Maria R; Sales, Maurício Pereira; Villas-Boas, Laurival A; Ramos, Márcio Viana

    2007-01-01

    The laticifer fluid of Calotropis procera is rich in proteins and there is evidence that they are involved in the pharmacological properties of the latex. However, not much is known about how the latex-containing proteins are produced or their functions. In this study, laticifer proteins of C. procera were pooled and examined by 1D and 2D electrophoresis, masses spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and characterized in respect of proteolytic activity and oxidative enzymes. Soluble laticifer proteins were predominantly composed of basic proteins (PI>6.0) with molecular masses varying between 5 and 95 kDa. Proteins with a molecular mass of approximately 26,000 Da were more evident. Strong anti-oxidative activity of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (1007.74+/-91.89 Ug(-1)DM) and, to a lesser extent ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.1) (0.117(d)+/-0.013 microMol H(2)O(2)g(-1)min(-1)), were detected. However, catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) was absent. The strong proteolytic activities of laticifer proteins from C. procera were shown to be shared by at least four distinct cysteine proteinases (EC 3.4.22.16) that were isolated by gel filtration chromatography. Serine and metaloproteinases were not detected and aspartic proteinase activities were barely visible. Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) were also isolated in a chitin column and their activities quantified. The presence of these enzymatic activities in latex from C. procera may confirm their involvement in resistance to phytopathogens and insects, mainly in its leaves where the latex circulates abundantly.

  17. Simulations of a rotor with active deformable trailing edge flaps in half-wake inflow: Comparison of EllipSys 3D with HAWC2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Thanasis K.; Zahle, Frederik; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    Various research projects have focused on active aerodynamic load control of wind turbines using control devices on the blades, for example flaps. The aerodynamic load predictions of utilized aeroelastic codes have not yet been fully validated with full rotor CFD or experimental results......-uniform inflow mimicking a half-wake situation, using different control methods and maximum flap angles. Three different control inputs are simulated: a prescribed flap angle based on the a priori knowledge of the inflow velocity, a controller based on the blade root flap-wise moment feedback, and finally...

  18. Heated Proteins are Still Active in a Functionalized Nanoporous Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baowei; Qi, Wen N.; Li, Xiaolin; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-08

    We report that even under the heated condition, the conformation and activity of a protein can be hoarded in a functionalized nanoporous support via non-covalent interaction, although the hoarded protein was not exhibiting the full protein activity, the protein released subsequently still maintained its native conformation and activity. Glucose oxidase (GOX) was spontaneously and largely entrapped in aminopropyl-functionalized mesoporous silica (NH2-FMS) at 20 oC via a dominant electrostatic interaction. Although FMS-GOX displayed 45% activity of the free enzyme in solution, the GOX released from FMS exhibited its 100% activity prior to the entrapment. Surprisingly, the released GOX from FMS still maintained 89% of its initial activity prior to the entrapment after FMS-GOX was incubated at 60 oC for 1 h prior to release, while the free GOX in solution lost nearly all activity under the same incubation. Intrinsic fluorescence emission of GOX and native electrophoresis demonstrated that the heating resulted in significant conformational changes and oligomeric structures of the free GOX, but FMS efficiently maintained the thermal stability of GOX therein and resisted the thermal denaturation and oligomeric aggregation.

  19. Defatted Jatropha curcas flour and protein isolate as materials for protein hydrolysates with biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrufo-Estrada, Duly M; Segura-Campos, Maira R; Chel-Guerrero, Luis A; Betancur-Ancona, David A

    2013-05-01

    Jatropha curcas L. protein hydrolysates were produced by treatment of a non-toxic genotype with Alcalase as well as the digestive enzymes pepsin and pancreatin. The J. curcas protein hydrolysate produced with the pepsin-pancreatin system from protein isolate had the highest TEAC value and was shown to undergo single-electron transfer reactions in the ABTS(+) reduction assay, demonstrating its antioxidant capacity. Testing of antimicrobial activity in the J. curcas protein hydrolysates against seven bacterial pathogens showed no growth inhibitory effect in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. More ACE-I inhibitory active peptides were produced in the Alcalase hydrolysates obtained from J. curcas protein isolate. The protein hydrolysate obtained with Alcalase from defatted J. curcas flour as well as from the protein isolate showed the highest inhibitory effect of ADP-induced aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma. It is expected that the information collated will facilitate new applications of proteins present in Jatropha plant. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Forkhead box protein A2 (FOXA2 protein stability and activity are regulated by sumoylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasimhaswamy S Belaguli

    Full Text Available The forkhead box protein A2 (FOXA2 is an important regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism and organismal energy balance. Little is known about how FOXA2 protein expression and activity are regulated by post-translational modifications. We have identified that FOXA2 is post-translationally modified by covalent attachment of a small ubiquitin related modifier-1 (SUMO-1 and mapped the sumoylation site to the amino acid lysine 6 (K6. Preventing sumoylation by mutating the SUMO acceptor K6 to arginine resulted in downregulation of FOXA2 protein but not RNA expression in INS-1E insulinoma cells. K6R mutation also downregulated FOXA2 protein levels in HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, HCT116 colon cancer cells and LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells. Further, interfering with FOXA2 sumoylation through siRNA mediated knockdown of UBC9, an essential SUMO E2 conjugase, resulted in downregulation of FOXA2 protein levels. Stability of sumoylation deficient FOXA2K6R mutant protein was restored when SUMO-1 was fused in-frame. FOXA2 sumoylation and FOXA2 protein levels were increased by PIAS1 SUMO ligase but not a SUMO ligase activity deficient PIAS1 mutant. Although expressed at lower levels, sumoylation deficient FOXA2K6R mutant protein was detectable in the nucleus indicating that FOXA2 nuclear localization is independent of sumoylation. Sumoylation increased the transcriptional activity of FOXA2 on Pdx-1 area I enhancer. Together, our results show that sumoylation regulates FOXA2 protein expression and activity.

  1. Depletion of WRN protein causes RACK1 to activate several protein kinase C isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massip, L; Garand, C; Labbé, A

    2010-01-01

    Werner's syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal disease characterized by the premature onset of several age-associated pathologies. The protein defective in patients with WS (WRN) is a helicase/exonuclease involved in DNA repair, replication, transcription and telomere maintenance. In this study, we...... activity in vitro. Interestingly, knocking down RACK1 increased the cellular frequency of DNA breaks. Depletion of the WRN protein in return caused a fraction of nuclear RACK1 to translocate out of the nucleus to bind and activate PKCdelta and PKCbetaII in the membrane fraction of cells. In contrast......, different DNA-damaging treatments known to activate PKCs did not induce RACK1/PKCs association in cells. Overall, our results indicate that a depletion of the WRN protein in normal fibroblasts causes the activation of several PKCs through translocation and association of RACK1 with such kinases....

  2. Sensitization of human bladder tumor cells to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis with a small molecule IAP antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Thomas S; Kucaba, Tamara A; O'Donnell, Michael A; Burns, Jennifer; Benetatos, Christopher; McKinlay, Mark A; Condon, Stephen; Chunduru, Srinivas

    2011-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder accounts for approximately 5% of all cancer deaths in humans. The large majority of bladder tumors are non-muscle invasive at diagnosis, but even after local surgical therapy there is a high rate of local tumor recurrence and progression. Current treatments extend time to recurrence but do not significantly alter disease survival. The objective of the present study was to investigate the tumoricidal potential of combining the apoptosis-inducing protein TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) with a small molecule inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) antagonist to interfere with intracellular regulators of apoptosis in human bladder tumor cells. Our results demonstrate that the IAP antagonist Compound A exhibits high binding affinity to the XIAP BIR3 domain. When Compound A was used at nontoxic concentrations in combination with TRAIL, there was a significant increase in the sensitivity of TRAIL-sensitive and TRAIL-resistant bladder tumor lines to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. In addition, modulation of TRAIL sensitivity in the TRAIL-resistant bladder tumor cell line T24 with Compound A was reciprocated by XIAP small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of XIAP expression, suggesting the importance of XIAP-mediated resistance to TRAIL in these cells. These results suggest the potential of combining Compound A with TRAIL as an alternative therapy for bladder cancer.

  3. Minnesota State Park Trails and Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This shapefile covers the trails in the State of Minnesota Parks, Recreation Areas, and Waysides as designated through legislation and recognized by the Department...

  4. VT Green Mountain National Forest - Trails

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) GMNFTRAILS contains minor Forest Service roads and all trails within the proclamation boundary of the Green Mountain National Forest and many of...

  5. Where ends the TRAIL in arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hahne

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the pseudo-tumoral expansion of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS, as these cells invade and finally destroy the joint structure. RA FLS have been proposed therefore as a therapeutic target. The TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL has gained much attention as a possible therapeutic reagent for the treatment of tumors, as TRAIL was described originally to induce apoptosis specifically in cancer cells but not in normal cells. The fact that FLS in RA patients exhibit tumor-like features led to investigations on the effect of TRAIL on ex-vivo RA FLS. In this review we aim to summarize what is presently known on the role of TRAIL in RA.

  6. Estimating the economic value and impacts of recreational trails: a case study of the Virginia creeper rail trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Bowker; John C. Bergstrom; Joshua Gill

    2007-01-01

    Many communities are interested in developing and maintaining recreational trails to benefit trail users and as tourist attractions to stimulate economic growth. In this paper, a study is described which estimates the net economic value to trail users and the local economic impacts of the Virginia Creeper Rail Trail in south-western Virginia, USA. The monetary...

  7. Stress-induced activation of protein kinase CK2 by direct interaction with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayed, M; Kim, S O; Salh, B S

    2000-01-01

    in the human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by up to 8-fold, and this could be blocked by the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580. We show that p38alpha MAP kinase, in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, can directly interact with the alpha and beta subunits of CK2 to activate the holoenzyme through what appears......Protein kinase CK2 has been implicated in the regulation of a wide range of proteins that are important in cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we demonstrate that the stress signaling agents anisomycin, arsenite, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulate the specific enzyme activity of CK2...... to be an allosteric mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anisomycin- and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser-392, which is important for the transcriptional activity of this growth suppressor protein, requires p38 MAP kinase and CK2 activities....

  8. Modelling of trail degradation based on detailed multi-temporal digital elevation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Aleksandra; Ewertowski, Marek

    2017-04-01

    anthropogenic forces prepare the soil for erosion and transport by water flow. The natural agents are mainly erosion and transport by water flow; however, during autumn and spring seasons the presence of needle ice is also important. It leads to loosening of the soil and similarly to anthropogenic processes that prepare the soil for erosion and transport. Additional natural processes occur on the sides of the trail. In case of significant incision, mass movements (mainly small scale landslides, mass flows, slumps and falls) occur. They destroy steep sidewalls of trails and provide the material for further transport by water. In case of wide trails, deflation also plays some role in transporting the finest particles. 3) Senile stage: This stage begins when the trail incision reaches the bedrock. In such cases, processes acting on the trail tread are significantly slowed or even stopped. The only active geomorphological processes occur on trail sides. They are mainly mass movements which destroy steep trail sides and deliver material to the trail tread, from which it is subsequently transported by water. The research was founded by Polish National Science Centre

  9. Ant trail pheromone biosynthesis is triggered by a neuropeptide hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Yeon Choi

    Full Text Available Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200 have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia or PBAN receptor gene (in DG expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta.

  10. Ant Trail Pheromone Biosynthesis Is Triggered by a Neuropeptide Hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  11. TRAIL Is Decreased Before 20 Weeks Gestation in Women with Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhou

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated maternal plasma protein profiles before the onset of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP to assess the relationship between maternal plasma tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL and HDP before 20 weeks gestation and to evaluate the discriminatory performance of plasma TRAIL levels for HDP.A 2-phase discovery/validation study was designed. In the discovery phase, a nested case-controlled study was performed using plasma sampled at 8 to 20 weeks gestation from 20 women who later developed HDP and from 20 age- and gestational week-matched controls. Plasma was analyzed using a human protein microarray technology designed to simultaneously detect 507 proteins. The functional annotation and clustering of the differentially expressed proteins were performed using DAVID and the GO database. TRAIL levels were further validated in an independent study using plasma obtained at 8 to 20 weeks gestation from 53 women who later developed HDP and from 106 matched controls, and 62 clinical risk factors were investigated.In the protein microarray analysis, 23 proteins were differentially expressed between the two groups. The ELISA showed that women who later developed HDP had significantly lower TRAIL levels compared to women with uncomplicated pregnancies. The multivariable Cox regression analysis identified the following three factors that were entered into the final Cox regression model: gravidity (OR = 2.02, 95% CI 1.00-4.09, pre-pregnancy BMI (OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.21-1.76 and TRAIL levels (OR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.94-0.99. The model had a significantly better discriminatory power (AUC = 0.83, 95% CI 0.75-0.88 compared to TRAIL alone as an independent predictor of HDP (AUC = 0.59, 95% CI 0.51-0.67.Twenty-three differentially expressed proteins before 20 weeks gestation might be associated with the pathogenesis of HDP. Plasma TRAIL levels were associated with the development of HDP, and the combination of

  12. Activated macrophage survival is coordinated by TAK1 binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    September R Mihaly

    Full Text Available Macrophages play diverse roles in tissue homeostasis and immunity, and canonically activated macrophages are critically associated with acute inflammatory responses. It is known that activated macrophages undergo cell death after transient activation in some settings, and the viability of macrophages impacts on inflammatory status. Here we report that TGFβ- activated kinase (TAK1 activators, TAK1-binding protein 1 (TAB1 and TAK1-binding protein 2 (TAB2, are critical molecules in the regulation of activated macrophage survival. While deletion of Tak1 induced cell death in bone marrow derived macrophages even without activation, Tab1 or Tab2 deletion alone did not profoundly affect survival of naïve macrophages. However, in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated macrophages, even single deletion of Tab1 or Tab2 resulted in macrophage death with both necrotic and apoptotic features. We show that TAB1 and TAB2 were redundantly involved in LPS-induced TAK1 activation in macrophages. These results demonstrate that TAK1 activity is the key to activated macrophage survival. Finally, in an in vivo setting, Tab1 deficiency impaired increase of peritoneal macrophages upon LPS challenge, suggesting that TAK1 complex regulation of macrophages may participate in in vivo macrophage homeostasis. Our results demonstrate that TAB1 and TAB2 are required for activated macrophages, making TAB1 and TAB2 effective targets to control inflammation by modulating macrophage survival.

  13. Facile one-pot formulation of TRAIL-embedded paclitaxel-bound albumin nanoparticles for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sun Young; Byeon, Hyeong Jun; Lee, Changkyu; Seo, Jisoo; Lee, Eun Seong; Shin, Beom Soo; Choi, Han-Gon; Lee, Kang Choon; Youn, Yu Seok

    2015-10-15

    Nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab™) technology is an effective way of delivering hydrophobic chemotherapeutics. We developed a one-pot/one-step formulation of paclitaxel (PTX)-bound albumin nanoparticles with embedded tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL/PTX HSA-NP) for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. TRAIL/PTX HSA-NPs were fabricated using a high-pressure homogenizer at a TRAIL feeding ratio of 0.2%, 1.0%, and 2.0%. TRAIL/PTX HSA-NPs were spherical and became larger in size (170-230 nm) with increasing TRAIL amount (0.2-2.0%). The loading efficiencies of PTX were in the range of ∼86.4% and significantly low at 2.0% TRAIL (60.4%). Specifically, the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of TRAIL (1.0 or 2.0%)/PTX HSA-NPs were >20-fold lower than that of plain PTX-HSA NP (0.032±0.06, 0.022±0.005, and 0.96±0.15 ng/ml, respectively) in pancreatic Mia Paca-2 cells. Considering TRAIL loading, bioactivity, and particle size, TRAIL(1.0%)/PTX HSA-NPs were determined as the optimal candidate for further studies. TRAIL(1.0%)/PTX HSA-NPs displayed substantially greater apoptotic activity than plain PTX HSA-NP in both FACS and TUNEL analysis. The loaded PTX and TRAIL were gradually released from the TRAIL(1.0%)/PTX HSA-NPs until ∼24 h, which is considered to be a sufficient time for delivery to the tumor tissue. TRAIL(1.0%)/PTX HSA-NP displayed markedly more antitumor efficacy than plain PTX HSA-NP in Mia Paca-2 cell-xenografted mice in terms of tumor volume (size) and weight (213.9 mm(3) and 0.18 g vs. 1126.8 mm(3) and 0.80 g, respectively). These improved in vitro and in vivo performances were due to the combined synergistic effects of PTX and TRAIL. We believe that this TRAIL/PTX HSA-NP would have potential as a novel apoptosis-based anticancer agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Apurinic endonuclease activity of yeast Apn2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unk, I; Haracska, L; Johnson, R E; Prakash, S; Prakash, L

    2000-07-21

    Abasic (apurinic/apyrimidinic; AP) sites are generated in vivo through spontaneous base loss and by enzymatic removal of bases damaged by alkylating agents and reactive oxygen species. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the APN1 and APN2 genes function in alternate pathways of AP site removal. Apn2-like proteins have been identified in other eukaryotes including humans, and these proteins form a distinct subfamily within the exonuclease III (ExoIII)/Ape1/Apn2 family of proteins. Apn2 and other members of this subfamily contain a carboxyl-terminal extension not present in the ExoIII/Ape1-like proteins. Here, we purify the Apn2 protein from yeast and show that it is a class II AP endonuclease. Deletion of the carboxyl terminus does not affect the AP endonuclease activity of the protein, but this protein is defective in the removal of AP sites in vivo. The carboxyl terminus may enable Apn2 to complex with other proteins, and such a multiprotein assembly may be necessary for the efficient recognition and cleavage of AP sites in vivo.

  15. Synergistic antitumor effect of AAV-mediated TRAIL expression combined with cisplatin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Minghong; Liu, Zheng; Xiang, Yang; Ma, Hong; Liu, Shilian; Liu, Yanxin; Zheng, Dexian

    2011-02-03

    Adeno-associated virus-2 (AAV-2)-mediated gene therapy is quite suitable for local or regional application in head and neck cancer squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, its low transduction efficiency has limited its further development as a therapeutic agent. DNA damaging agents have been shown to enhance AAV-mediated transgene expression. Cisplatin, one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, has been recognized to cause cancer cell death by apoptosis with a severe toxicity. This study aims to evaluate the role of cisplatin in AAV-mediated tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression and the effect on HNSCC both in vitro and in vivo. Five human HNSCC cell lines were treated with recombinant soluble TRAIL (rsTRAIL) and infected with AAV/TRAIL to estimate the sensitivity of the cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity. KB cells were infected with AAV/EGFP with or without cisplatin pretreatment to evaluate the effect of cisplatin on AAV-mediated gene expression. TRAIL expression was detected by ELISA and Western blot. Cytotoxicity was measured by MTT assay and Western blot analysis for caspase-3 and -8 activations. Following the in vitro experiments, TRAIL expression and its tumoricidal activity were analyzed in nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of HNSCC. HNSCC cell lines showed different sensitivities to rsTRAIL, and KB cells possessed both highest transduction efficacy of AAV and sensitivity to TRAIL among five cell lines. Preincubation of KB cells with subtherapeutic dosage of cisplatin significantly augmented AAV-mediated transgene expression in a heparin sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-dependent manner. Furthermore, cisplatin enhanced the killing efficacy of AAV/TRAIL by 3-fold on KB cell line. The AAV mediated TRAIL expression was observed in the xenografted tumors and significantly enhanced by cisplatin. AAV/TRAIL suppressed the tumors growth and cisplatin augmented the tumoricidal activity by two-fold. Furthermore

  16. Synergistic antitumor effect of AAV-mediated TRAIL expression combined with cisplatin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yanxin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adeno-associated virus-2 (AAV-2-mediated gene therapy is quite suitable for local or regional application in head and neck cancer squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. However, its low transduction efficiency has limited its further development as a therapeutic agent. DNA damaging agents have been shown to enhance AAV-mediated transgene expression. Cisplatin, one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, has been recognized to cause cancer cell death by apoptosis with a severe toxicity. This study aims to evaluate the role of cisplatin in AAV-mediated tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL expression and the effect on HNSCC both in vitro and in vivo. Methods Five human HNSCC cell lines were treated with recombinant soluble TRAIL (rsTRAIL and infected with AAV/TRAIL to estimate the sensitivity of the cancer cells to TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity. KB cells were infected with AAV/EGFP with or without cisplatin pretreatment to evaluate the effect of cisplatin on AAV-mediated gene expression. TRAIL expression was detected by ELISA and Western blot. Cytotoxicity was measured by MTT assay and Western blot analysis for caspase-3 and -8 activations. Following the in vitro experiments, TRAIL expression and its tumoricidal activity were analyzed in nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of HNSCC. Results HNSCC cell lines showed different sensitivities to rsTRAIL, and KB cells possessed both highest transduction efficacy of AAV and sensitivity to TRAIL among five cell lines. Preincubation of KB cells with subtherapeutic dosage of cisplatin significantly augmented AAV-mediated transgene expression in a heparin sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG-dependent manner. Furthermore, cisplatin enhanced the killing efficacy of AAV/TRAIL by 3-fold on KB cell line. The AAV mediated TRAIL expression was observed in the xenografted tumors and significantly enhanced by cisplatin. AAV/TRAIL suppressed the tumors growth and cisplatin augmented

  17. Outer Membrane Protein 25 of Brucella Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signal Pathway in Human Trophoblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane protein 25 (OMP25, a virulence factor from Brucella, plays an important role in maintaining the structural stability of Brucella. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signal pathway widely exists in eukaryotic cells. In this study, human trophoblast cell line HPT-8 and BALB/c mice were infected with Brucella abortus 2308 strain (S2308 and 2308ΔOmp25 mutant strain. The expression of cytokines and activation of MAPK signal pathway were detected. We found that the expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, and interleukin-10 (IL-10 were increased in HPT-8 cells infected with S2308 and 2308ΔOmp25 mutant. S2308 also activated p38 phosphorylation protein, extracellular-regulated protein kinases (ERK, and Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK from MAPK signal pathway. 2308ΔOmp25 could not activate p38, ERK, and JNK branches. Immunohistochemistry experiments showed that S2308 was able to activate phosphorylation of p38 and ERK in BABL/c mice. However, 2308ΔOmp25 could weakly activate phosphorylation of p38 and ERK. These results suggest that Omp25 played an important role in the process of Brucella activation of the MAPK signal pathway.

  18. The novel Raf inhibitor Raf265 decreases Bcl-2 levels and confers TRAIL-sensitivity to neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzmann, Kathrin; de Toni, Enrico; von Rüden, Janina; Brand, Stephan; Göke, Burkhard; Laubender, Rüdiger P; Auernhammer, Christoph J

    2011-04-01

    The tumour-selective death receptor ligand tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising agent for the treatment of human cancer. However, many tumours have evolved mechanisms to resist TRAIL-induced apoptosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that aberrant PI(3)K-Akt-mTOR survival signalling may confer TRAIL resistance by altering the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Here, we show that neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cell lines of heterogeneous origin exhibit a range of TRAIL sensitivities and that TRAIL sensitivity correlates with the expression of FLIP(S), caspase-8, and Bcl-2. Neither single mTOR inhibition by everolimus nor dual mTOR/PI(3)K inhibition by NVP-BEZ235 was able to enhance TRAIL susceptibility in any of the tested cell lines. In contrast, dual PI(3)K-Akt-mTOR and Raf-MEK-Erk pathway inhibition by the IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541 effectively restored TRAIL sensitivity in NCI-H727 bronchus carcinoid cells. Furthermore, blocking Raf-MEK-Erk signalling by the novel Raf inhibitor Raf265 significantly enhanced TRAIL sensitivity in NCI-H727 and CM insulinoma cells. While having no effect on FLIP(S) or caspase-8 expression, Raf265 strongly decreased Bcl-2 levels in those cell lines susceptible to its TRAIL-sensitizing action. Taken together, our findings suggest that combinations of Raf-MEK-Erk pathway inhibitors and TRAIL might offer a novel therapeutic strategy in NET disease.

  19. Amyloid precursor protein knockout diminishes synaptic vesicle proteins at the presynaptic active zone in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Bajjalieh, Sandra M; Muller, Ulrike; Volknandt, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has previously been allocated to an organellar pool residing in the Golgi apparatus and in endosomal compartments, and in its mature form to a presynaptic active zone-localized pool. By analyzing homozygous APP knockout mice we evaluated the impact of APP on synaptic vesicle protein abundance at synaptic release sites. Following immunopurification of synaptic vesicles and the attached presynaptic plasma membrane, individual proteins were subjected to quantitative Western blot analysis. We demonstrate that APP deletion in knockout animals reduces the abundance of the synaptic vesicle proteins synaptophysin, synaptotagmin-1, and SV2A at the presynaptic active zone. Conversely, deletion of the additional APP family members, APLP1 and APLP2 resulted in an increase in synaptophysin, synaptogamin-1, and SV2A abundance. When transmembrane APP is lacking in APPsα-KI/APLP2-KO mice synaptic vesicle protein abundance corresponds to that in APP -KO mice. Deletion of the synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) A and B had no effect on APP and synaptophysin abundance but decreased synaptotagmin-1. Our data suggest that APP controls the abundance of synaptic vesicle proteins at the presynaptic release sites and thus impacts synaptic transmission.

  20. Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complex Inhibits Growth and Metastasis of Breast Cancer Cells by Suppressing FAK signaling with Enhancement of TRAIL-induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenqiang; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Ruthenium-based complexes have emerged as promising antitumor and antimetastatic agents during the past decades. However, the limited understanding of the antimetastatic mechanisms of these agents is a roadblock to their clinical application. Herein, we reported that, RuPOP, a ruthenium polypyridyl complex with potent antitumor activity, was able to effectively inhibit growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells and synergistically enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The selective intracellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of RuPOP was found associated with transferring receptor (TfR)-mediated endocytosis. Further investigation on intracellular mechanisms reveled that RuPOP notably suppressed FAK-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Pretreatment of cells with ERK inhibitor (U0126) and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) significantly potentiated the inhibitory effect of RuPOP on cell growth, migration and invasion. Moreover, the alternation in the expression levels of metastatic regulatory proteins, including uPA, MMP-2/-9, and inhibition of VEGF secretion were also observed after RuPOP treatment. These results demonstrate the inhibitory effect of RuPOP on the growth and metastasis of cancer cells and the enhancement of TRAIL-induced apoptosis though suppression of FAK-mediated signaling. Furthermore, RuPOP exhibits the potential to be developed as a metal-based antimetastatic agent and chemosensitizer of TRAIL for the treatment of human metastatic cancers.

  1. Evaluation of antioxidant activities of zein protein fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Zhuang, Hong

    2014-11-01

    Zein protein was extracted from the by-product corn gluten meal. The obtained zein protein was 1st hydrolyzed by 4 different proteases. The antioxidant activities of the hydrolysates or peptides were evaluated by free radical scavenging activity, metal ion chelating activity, and lipid peroxidation inhibitory capacity. Among hydrolysates produced, alkaline protease hydrolysates exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. A regression model was established by uniform design to optimize the alkaline protease hydrolysis conditions. The hydrolysates with molecular weight antioxidant activities in all relevant assays. The hydrolysates with molecular weight antioxidant activities. Two peptides were identified from fraction F3 using LC-ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS as Pro-Phe (263.13 Da) and Leu-Pro-Phe (375.46 Da). These peptides exhibited good free radical scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation inhibitory effect. The results clearly indicated that zein protein fractions are good sources for the development of natural antioxidants for the food industry. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Antioxidant activity of whey protein hydrolysates in milk beverage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Bimlesh; Kumari, Anuradha; Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, Rajan; Prajapati, Kishore; Mahboob, Shaik; Athira, S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of flavoured milk enriched with antioxidative whey protein hydrolysates (WPHs) by radical scavenging method. Whey protein concentrate (WPC) was hydrolyzed by using three commercial proteases; flavouzyme, alcalase and corolase PP and these WPHs were analyzed for degree of hydrolysis and antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activities of these WPHs were evaluated using ABTS method. Trolox equivalent antioxidant activity of all the hydrolysates i.e. flavourzyme (0.81 ± 0.04), alcalase (1.16 ± 0.05) and corolase (1.42 ± 0.12) was higher than the WPC (0.19 ± 0.01). Among these, whey protein hydrolysates prepared using corolase showed maximum antioxidant activity. Total 15 β-lactoglobulin, 1 α-lactoalbumin, and 6 β-casein derived peptide fragments were identified in the WPHs by LC-MS/MS. Due to their size and characteristic amino acid composition, all the identified peptides may contribute for the antioxidant activity. The strawberry and chocolate flavoured milk was supplemented with WPC and WPHs and 2 % addition has shown increase in antioxidant activity upto 42 %. The result suggests that WPH could be used as natural biofunctional ingredients in enhancing antioxidant properties of food products.

  3. Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Lipid Bilayer Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbleib, Kristina; Pesek, Kristina; Covino, Roberto; Hofbauer, Harald F; Wunnicke, Dorith; Hänelt, Inga; Hummer, Gerhard; Ernst, Robert

    2017-08-17

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved homeostatic program that is activated by misfolded proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recently, it became evident that aberrant lipid compositions of the ER membrane, referred to as lipid bilayer stress, are equally potent in activating the UPR. The underlying molecular mechanism, however, remained unclear. We show that the most conserved transducer of ER stress, Ire1, uses an amphipathic helix (AH) to sense membrane aberrancies and control UPR activity. In vivo and in vitro experiments, together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, identify the physicochemical properties of the membrane environment that control Ire1 oligomerization. This work establishes the molecular mechanism of UPR activation by lipid bilayer stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bcl-xL inhibition by molecular-targeting drugs sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Yoko; Harashima, Nanae; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Harada, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in various types of cancer cells without damaging normal cells. However, in terms of pancreatic cancer, not all cancer cells are sensitive to TRAIL. In this study, we examined a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines for TRAIL sensitivity and investigated the effects of Bcl-2 family inhibitors on their response to TRAIL. Both ABT-263 and ABT-737 inhibited the function of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-w. Of the nine pancreatic cancer cell lines tested, six showed no or low sensitivity to TRAIL, which correlated with protein expression of Bcl-xL. ABT-263 significantly sensitized four cell lines (AsPC-1, Panc-1, CFPAC-1, and Panc10.05) to TRAIL, with reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis. Knockdown of Bcl-xL, but not Bcl-2, by siRNA transfection increased the sensitivity of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells to TRAIL. ABT-263 treatment had no effect on protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, or c-FLIPs. In Panc-1 cells, ABT-263 increased the surface expression of death receptor (DR) 5; the NF-κB pathway, but not endoplasmic reticulum stress, participated in the increase. In xenograft mouse models, the combination of TRAIL and ATB-737 suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells. These results indicate that Bcl-xL is responsible for TRAIL resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells, and that Bcl-2 family inhibitors could represent promising reagents to sensitize human pancreatic cancers in DR-targeting therapy. PMID:26506422

  5. TNF–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL and erythropoiesis: a role for PKCe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vitale

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of the hematopoietic stem cell pool size and the processes of cell differentiation along the hematopoietic lineages involve apoptosis. Among the different factors with a recognized activity on blood progenitor cells, TRAIL - a member of the TNF family of cytokines - has an emerging role in the modulation of normal hematopoiesis. PKCÂ levels are regulated by EPO in differentiating erythroid progenitors and control the protection against the apoptogenic effect of TRAIL. EPO-induced erythroid CD34 cells are insensitive to the apoptogenic effect of TRAIL between day 0 and day 3, due to the lack of specific surface receptors expression. Death receptors appear after day 3 of differentiation and consequently erythoid cells became sensitive to TRAIL up to day 9/10, when the EPO-driven up-regulation of PKCe intracellular levels inhibits the TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, via Bcl-2. In the time interval between day 3 and 9, therefore, the number of erythroid progenitors can be limited by the presence of soluble or membrane-bound TRAIL present in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  6. Expression of osteoprotegerin and its ligands, RANKL and TRAIL, in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Genre, Fernanda; López-Mejías, Raquel; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Verónica; Pina, Trinitario; Corrales, Alfonso; Blanco, Ricardo; Martín, Javier; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2016-07-12

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor-ΚB ligand (RANKL) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) have been involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathophysiology. In this study, we assessed messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of these molecules by qPCR in peripheral blood from 26 patients with RA (12 of them with ischemic heart disease -IHD) and 10 healthy controls. Correlation coefficients between OPG, RANKL and TRAIL expression levels in RA patients and their clinical and demographic characteristics were also evaluated. Whereas OPG and OPG/TRAIL ratio expression were significantly increased in RA patients compared to controls (fold change = 1.79, p = 0.013 and 2.07, p = 0.030, respectively), RANKL/OPG ratio was significantly decreased (fold change = 0.50, p = 0.020). No significant differences were found between patients and controls in RANKL and TRAIL expression. Interestingly, TRAIL expression was significantly higher in RA patients with IHD compared to those without IHD (fold change = 1.46, p = 0.033). Moreover, biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) significantly decreased RANKL expression in RA patients (p = 0.016). Our study supports an important role of OPG and TRAIL in RA. Furthermore, it highlights an effect of biologic DMARDs in the modulation of RANKL.

  7. PhiC31/PiggyBac modified stromal stem cells: effect of interferon γ and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on murine melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrambeigi, Vahid; Ahmadi, Nafiseh; Moisyadi, Stefan; Urschitz, Johann; Salehi, Rasoul; Haghjooy Javanmard, Shaghayegh

    2014-11-26

    TRAIL and IFNγ are promising anti-cancer cytokines and it has been shown that IFNγ may sensitize cancer cells to TRAIL. Adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) are attractive vehicles for delivering anti-cancer agents. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of PhiC31 (φC31) recombinase and/or piggyBac transposase (pBt) modified ADSCs expressing either TRAIL, IFNγ, or co-expressing TRAIL/IFNγ in mouse models of melanoma. The expression and bioactivity of mouse IFNγ and TRAIL in φC31 and pBt modified cells were confirmed. We examined the effects of modified ADSCs on signal intensity of red fluorescence protein expressed by melanoma cells in subcutaneous tumors or established lung metastases and on survival (6 mice per group). We also conducted a flow cytometric analysis of systemic CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs) and histological analysis of melanoma tumors. Data were analyzed by Student t test, ANOVA, and log-rank tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. We demonstrated non-viral DNA-integrating vectors can be used for stable transgene expression. IFNγ inhibited melanoma cell growth in vitro probably via IFNγ-induced JAK/STAT1 signaling pathway activation. Murine TRAIL induced apoptosis in the human cell lines CAOV-4 and Ej-138, while MCF7 and B16F10 cells appeared to be insensitive to TRAIL. Treatment of melanoma cells with IFNγ did not influence their response to TRAIL. In contrast, results from in vivo studies showed that IFNγ-expressing ADSCs, engrafted into tumor stroma, inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis, prevented systemic increase of Tregs, increased PD-L1 expression and CD8+ infiltration (but not interleukin-2+ cells), and prolonged the survival of mice (68 days, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 52 to 86 days compared to 36 days, 95% CI = 29 to 39 days for control, P < .001). For the first time, we employed DNA integrating vectors for safe and stable modification of MSCs. Our data indicate potential

  8. Sensitive red protein calcium indicators for imaging neural activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dana, Hod; Mohar, Boaz; Sun, Yi; Narayan, Sujatha; Gordus, Andrew; Hasseman, Jeremy P; Tsegaye, Getahun; Holt, Graham T.; Hu, Amy; Walpita, Deepika; Patel, Ronak; Macklin, John J.; Bargmann, Cornelia I; Ahrens, Misha B.; Schreiter, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    eLife digest Neurons encode information with brief electrical pulses called spikes. Monitoring spikes in large populations of neurons is a powerful method for studying how networks of neurons process information and produce behavior. This activity can be detected using fluorescent protein indicators, or ?probes?, which light up when neurons are active. The best existing probes produce green fluorescence. However, red fluorescent probes would allow us to see deeper into the brain, and could al...

  9. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Na; Ding, Ye; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target...

  10. Avaliação de atividade de Educação Ambiental em trilha interpretativa, dois a três anos após sua realização - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.174 Evaluation of environmental education activity in the interpretative trail, two to three years after its implementation - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.174

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Angelini

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho conduzir uma avaliação de crianças que, nos anos de 2002 e 2003, foram submetidas a uma prática de Educação Ambiental (EA na Trilha Interpretativa da UEG. Essas crianças (grupo teste foram contatadas em suas escolas e juntamente com outras crianças, que nunca participaram da atividade (grupo controle, percorreram a trilha e responderam a um questionário. Os resultados dos questionários do grupo teste, em comparação com o desempenho da atividade anterior, evidenciaram ganhos cognitivos nesse intervalo de um ou dois anos da primeira exposição à atividade. Todavia, quando comparado com o grupo controle, essa diferença não foi estatisticamente significativa (pThe objective of this work was to carry out a re-evaluation of children which participated in an environmental education (EE activity in the Interpretative Trail of the UEG, during 2002 and 2003. These children (test group were contacted in their schools and together with other children, who had never participated in the activity (control group, they had to go through the trail and answer a questionnaire, which was compared with the after-trail questionnaire of the previous activity. Results show that: questionnaires of the test group evidenced cognitive profits in this interval of one or two years of the first exposition to the EE program; however, when compared with the control group, this difference was not significant (p<0.05. This shows that a punctual activity of EE could not be effective in knowledge upgrading. In this sense, many authors recognize the difficulties to evaluate and analyze the repercussions of EE activities.

  11. DR4 specific TRAIL variants are more efficacious than wild-type TRAIL in pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Rui; Albarenque, Stella Maris; Cool, Robbert H.; Quax, Wim J.; Mohr, Andrea; Zwacka, Ralf M.

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment modalities for pancreatic carcinoma afford only modest survival benefits. TRAIL, as a potent and specific inducer of apoptosis in cancer cells, would be a promising new treatment option. However, since not all pancreatic cancer cells respond to TRAIL, further improvements and

  12. The antitumor activity of hydrophobin SC3, a fungal protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akanbi, Marijke Haas Jimoh; Post, Eduard; van Putten, Sander M; de Vries, Louwe; Smisterova, Jarmila; Meter-Arkema, Anita H; Wösten, Han A B; Rink, Rick; Scholtmeijer, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The use of mushroom extracts has been common practice in traditional medicine for centuries, including the treatment of cancer. Proteins called hydrophobins are very abundant in mushrooms. Here, it was examined whether they have antitumor activity. Hydrophobin SC3 of Schizophyllum commune was

  13. VHH Activators and Inhibitors for Protein Kinase C Epsilon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Summanen, M.M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), which is one of the novel PKC isozymes, is widely expressed throughout the body and has important roles in the function of the nervous, cardiovascular and immune systems. In order to better understand PKCε regulated pathways, isozyme specific activity modulators are

  14. Salt bridge integrates GPCR activation with protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Conn, P Michael

    2010-03-02

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play central roles in almost all physiological functions; mutations in GPCRs are responsible for more than 30 disorders. There is a great deal of information about GPCR structure but little information that directly relates structure to protein trafficking or to activation. The gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor, because of its small size among GPCRs, is amenable to preparation of mutants and was used in this study to establish the relation among a salt bridge, protein trafficking, and receptor activation. This bridge, between residues E(90) [located in transmembrane segment (TM) 2] and K(121) (TM3), is associated with correct trafficking to the plasma membrane. Agonists, but not antagonists, interact with residue K(121), and destabilize the TM2-TM3 association of the receptor in the plasma membrane. The hGnRHR mutant E(90)K has a broken salt bridge, which also destabilizes the TM2-TM3 association and is typically retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that this mutant, if rescued to the plasma membrane by either of two different means, has constitutive activity and shows modified ligand specificity, revealing a role for the salt bridge in receptor activation, ligand specificity, trafficking, and structure. The data indicate that destabilizing the TM2-TM3 relation for receptor activation, while requiring an intact salt bridge for correct trafficking, provides a mechanism that protects the cell from plasma membrane expression of constitutive activity.

  15. A role for TRAIL/TRAIL-R2 in radiation-induced apoptosis and radiation-induced bystander response of human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2014-03-01

    Adult neurons, which are terminally differentiated cells, demonstrate substantial radioresistance. In contrast, human neural stem cells (NSC), which have a significant proliferative capacity, are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation. Cranial irradiation that is widely used for treatment of brain tumors may induce death of NSC and further cause substantial cognitive deficits such as impairing learning and memory. The main goal of our study was to determine a mechanism of NSC radiosensitivity. We observed a constitutive high-level expression of TRAIL-R2 in human NSC. On the other hand, ionizing radiation through generation of reactive oxygen species targeted cell signaling pathways and dramatically changed the pattern of gene expression, including upregulation of TRAIL. A significant increase of endogenous expression and secretion of TRAIL could induce autocrine/paracrine stimulation of the TRAIL-R2-mediated signaling cascade with activation of caspase-3-driven apoptosis. Furthermore, paracrine stimulation could initiate bystander response of non-targeted NSC that is driven by death ligands produced by directly irradiated NSC. Experiments with media transfer from directly irradiated NSC to non-targeted (bystander) NSC confirmed a role of secreted TRAIL for induction of a death signaling cascade in non-targeted NSC. Subsequently, TRAIL production through elimination of bystander TRAIL-R-positive NSC might substantially restrict a final yield of differentiating young neurons. Radiation-induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis could be partially suppressed by anti-TRAIL antibody added to the cell media. Interestingly, direct gamma-irradiation of SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells using clinical doses (2-5 Gy) resulted in low levels of apoptosis in cancer cells that was accompanied however by induction of a strong bystander response in non-targeted NSC. Numerous protective mechanisms were involved in the maintenance of radioresistance of neuroblastoma cells, including

  16. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID

    KAUST Repository

    Zourelidou, Melina

    2014-06-19

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the-in many cells-asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant.

  17. Cholesterol-Lowering Activity of Tartary Buckwheat Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengnan; Zhang, Rui; Li, Yuk Man; Liang, Ning; Zhao, Yimin; Zhu, Hanyue; He, Zouyan; Liu, Jianhui; Hao, Wangjun; Jiao, Rui; Ma, Ka Ying; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2017-03-08

    Previous research has shown that Tartary buckwheat flour is capable of reducing plasma cholesterol. The present study was to examine the effect of rutin and Tartary buckwheat protein on plasma total cholesterol (TC) in hypercholesterolemia hamsters. In the first animal experiment, 40 male hamsters were divided into four groups fed either the control diet or one of the three experimental diets containing 8.2 mmol rutin, 8.2 mmol quercetin, or 2.5 g kg -1 cholestyramine, respectively. Results showed that only cholestyramine but not rutin and its aglycone quercetin decreased plasma TC, which suggested that rutin was not the active ingredient responsible for plasma TC-lowering activity of Tartary buckwheat flour. In the second animal experiment, 45 male hamsters were divided into five groups fed either the control diet or one of the four experimental diets containing 24% Tartary buckwheat protein, 24% rice protein, 24% wheat protein, or 5 g kg -1 cholestyramine, respectively. Tartary buckwheat protein reduced plasma TC more effectively than cholestyramine (45% versus 37%), while rice and wheat proteins only reduced plasma TC by 10-13%. Tartary buckwheat protein caused 108% increase in the fecal excretion of total neutral sterols and 263% increase in the fecal excretion of total acidic sterols. real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analyses showed that Tartary buckwheat protein affected the gene expression of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like protein 1 (NPC1L1), acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), and ATP binding cassette transporters 5 and 8 (ABCG5/8) in a down trend, whereas it increased the gene expression of hepatic cholesterol-7α -hydroxylase (CYP7A1). It was concluded that Tartary buckwheat protein was at least one of the active ingredients in Tartary buckwheat flour to lower plasma TC, mainly mediated by enhancing the excretion of bile acids via up-regulation of hepatic CYP7A1 and also by inhibiting the absorption of dietary

  18. Comparing impacts between formal and informal recreational trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Catherine Marina; Norman, Patrick

    2017-05-15

    Globally there are hundreds of thousands of kilometres of recreational trails traversing natural areas of high conservation value: but what are their impacts and do impacts differ among trails? We compared the effects of four common types of recreational trails [(1) narrow and (2) medium width informal bare earth trails and (3) gravel and (4) tarmac/concrete formal trails] on vegetation adjacent to trails in a high conservation value plant community that is popular for mountain biking and hiking in Australia. Plant species composition was recorded in quadrats along the edge of the four types of trails and in control sites away from trails. Vegetation cover, the cover of individual growth forms, and species richness along the edges of all four types of trails were similar to the controls, although the wider trails affected plant composition, with the tarmac and gravel trails favouring different species. With very few comparative studies, more research is required to allow managers and researchers to directly compare differences in the severity and types of impacts on vegetation among trails. In the meantime, limiting damage to vegetation on the edge of hardened trails during construction, use and maintenance is important, and hardening trails may not always be appropriate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase by Metformin Induces Protein Acetylation in Prostate and Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, Luciano; Gatla, Himavanth; Vancurova, Ivana; Vancura, Ales

    2016-11-25

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy sensor and master regulator of metabolism. AMPK functions as a fuel gauge monitoring systemic and cellular energy status. Activation of AMPK occurs when the intracellular AMP/ATP ratio increases and leads to a metabolic switch from anabolism to catabolism. AMPK phosphorylates and inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), which catalyzes carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, the first and rate-limiting reaction in de novo synthesis of fatty acids. AMPK thus regulates homeostasis of acetyl-CoA, a key metabolite at the crossroads of metabolism, signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Nucleocytosolic concentration of acetyl-CoA affects histone acetylation and links metabolism and chromatin structure. Here we show that activation of AMPK with the widely used antidiabetic drug metformin or with the AMP mimetic 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide increases the inhibitory phosphorylation of ACC and decreases the conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, leading to increased protein acetylation and altered gene expression in prostate and ovarian cancer cells. Direct inhibition of ACC with allosteric inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid also increases acetylation of histones and non-histone proteins. Because AMPK activation requires liver kinase B1, metformin does not induce protein acetylation in liver kinase B1-deficient cells. Together, our data indicate that AMPK regulates the availability of nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA for protein acetylation and that AMPK activators, such as metformin, have the capacity to increase protein acetylation and alter patterns of gene expression, further expanding the plethora of metformin's physiological effects. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase by Metformin Induces Protein Acetylation in Prostate and Ovarian Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, Luciano; Gatla, Himavanth; Vancurova, Ivana; Vancura, Ales

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy sensor and master regulator of metabolism. AMPK functions as a fuel gauge monitoring systemic and cellular energy status. Activation of AMPK occurs when the intracellular AMP/ATP ratio increases and leads to a metabolic switch from anabolism to catabolism. AMPK phosphorylates and inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), which catalyzes carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, the first and rate-limiting reaction in de novo synthesis of fatty acids. AMPK thus regulates homeostasis of acetyl-CoA, a key metabolite at the crossroads of metabolism, signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Nucleocytosolic concentration of acetyl-CoA affects histone acetylation and links metabolism and chromatin structure. Here we show that activation of AMPK with the widely used antidiabetic drug metformin or with the AMP mimetic 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide increases the inhibitory phosphorylation of ACC and decreases the conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, leading to increased protein acetylation and altered gene expression in prostate and ovarian cancer cells. Direct inhibition of ACC with allosteric inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid also increases acetylation of histones and non-histone proteins. Because AMPK activation requires liver kinase B1, metformin does not induce protein acetylation in liver kinase B1-deficient cells. Together, our data indicate that AMPK regulates the availability of nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA for protein acetylation and that AMPK activators, such as metformin, have the capacity to increase protein acetylation and alter patterns of gene expression, further expanding the plethora of metformin's physiological effects. PMID:27733682

  1. Reassessing the Potential Activities of Plant CGI-58 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Abdallah; Arhab, Yani; Bentebibel, Assia; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Noiriel, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58) is a widespread protein found in animals and plants. This protein has been shown to participate in lipolysis in mice and humans by activating Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the initial enzyme responsible for the triacylglycerol (TAG) catabolism cascade. Human mutation of CGI-58 is the cause of Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome, an orphan disease characterized by a systemic accumulation of TAG which engenders tissue disorders. The CGI-58 protein has also been shown to participate in neutral lipid metabolism in plants and, in this case, a mutation again provokes TAG accumulation. Although its roles as an ATGL coactivator and in lipid metabolism are quite clear, the catalytic activity of CGI-58 is still in question. The acyltransferase activities of CGI-58 have been speculated about, reported or even dismissed and experimental evidence that CGI-58 expressed in E. coli possesses an unambiguous catalytic activity is still lacking. To address this problem, we developed a new set of plasmids and site-directed mutants to elucidate the in vivo effects of CGI-58 expression on lipid metabolism in E. coli. By analyzing the lipid composition in selected E. coli strains expressing CGI-58 proteins, and by reinvestigating enzymatic tests with adequate controls, we show here that recombinant plant CGI-58 has none of the proposed activities previously described. Recombinant plant and mouse CGI-58 both lack acyltransferase activity towards either lysophosphatidylglycerol or lysophosphatidic acid to form phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid and recombinant plant CGI-58 does not catalyze TAG or phospholipid hydrolysis. However, expression of recombinant plant CGI-58, but not mouse CGI-58, led to a decrease in phosphatidylglycerol in all strains of E. coli tested, and a mutation of the putative catalytic residues restored a wild-type phenotype. The potential activities of plant CGI-58 are subsequently discussed. PMID:26745266

  2. Acupuncture upregulates G protein coupled activity in SAMP8 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Benhua; Zhao, Lan; Zhang, Xuezhu; Kan, Bohong; Liu, Yunhe; Jia, Yujie; Han, Jingxian; Yu, Jianchun

    2017-08-01

    Transmembrane and intracellular signal transduction of G protein is closely related to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To explore the effects of Sanjiao acupuncture on G protein signal transduction pathways in the pathogenesis of AD. 36 senescence-accelerated (SAM) prone 8 mice were divided into three groups that remained untreated (SAMP8, n=12) or received Sanjiao acupuncture (SAMP8+SA, n=12) or control acupuncture (SAMP8+CA, n=12). An additional control group of SAM resistant 1 mice was included (SAMR1 group, n=12). Morris water maze tests were used to investigate learning and memory abilities. Immunoprecipitation and Western blotting were used to study expression of G protein subunits and their activities in the cortex/hippocampus. Behavioural analysis showed that acupuncture attenuated the severe cognitive deficits observed in untreated/CA-treated SAMP8 mice. The findings of the G protein activation assays via immunoprecipitation and Western blots were that the physiologically coupled activation rate (PCAR) and maximal coupled activation rate (MCAR) of Gα s and Gα i were decreased in the cortex of SAMP8 vs SAMR1 mice. Sanjiao acupuncture induced an upregulation in the PCAR of Gα s and Gα i . In the hippocampus of untreated SAMP8 mice, the PCAR of Gα s and MCAR of both Gα s and Gα i declined, and Sanjiao acupuncture was associated with an upregulation in the MCAR of Gα s and Gα i . There were no significant differences in Gα s and Gα i expression between the groups. Sanjiao acupuncture attenuates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of AD via upregulation of G protein activity and stabilisation of the cellular signal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Insights on distinct pathways of thiazolidinediones (PPARgamma ligand)-promoted apoptosis in TRAIL-sensitive or -resistant malignant urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plissonnier, Marie Laure; Fauconnet, Sylvie; Bittard, Hugues; Lascombe, Isabelle

    2010-10-15

    Thiazolidinediones, including rosiglitazone and troglitazone, are insulin-sensitizing drugs and high-affinity ligands for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). Apart from their antidiabetic activity, these molecules possess antitumor properties. We investigated their potential apoptotic effects on RT4 (derived from a well-differentiated Grade I papillary tumor) and T24 (derived from an undifferentiated Grade III carcinoma) bladder cancer cells. Rosiglitazone induced G2/M or G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in RT4 and T24 cells, respectively. Only troglitazone triggered apoptosis via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways in both cell lines. Interestingly, rosiglitazone amplified TRAIL-induced apoptosis in TRAIL-sensitive RT4 cells or let TRAIL-resistant T24 cells to respond to TRAIL. Thiazolidinediones acted through PPARgamma activation-independent mechanisms. The underlying mechanisms involved for the first time in cancer cells the upregulation of soluble and/or membrane-bound TRAIL. This was associated with increased cell surface death receptor 5 expression and c-FLIP and survivin downregulation, mediated in part through proteasome-dependent degradation in troglitazone-promoted cell death. Therefore, the combination of rosiglitazone and TRAIL could be clinically relevant as chemopreventive or therapeutic agents for the treatment of TRAIL-resistant high-grade urothelial cancers.

  4. Fungal aegerolysin-like proteins: distribution, activities, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Maruša; Kraševec, Nada; Skočaj, Matej; Maček, Peter; Anderluh, Gregor; Sepčić, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The aegerolysin protein family (from aegerolysin of the mushroom Agrocybe aegerita) comprises proteins of ∼15-20 kDa from various eukaryotic and bacterial taxa. Aegerolysins are inconsistently distributed among fungal species, and variable numbers of homologs have been reported for species within the same genus. As such noncore proteins, without a member of a protein family in each of the sequenced fungi, they can give insight into different species-specific processes. Some aegerolysins have been reported to be hemolytically active against mammalian erythrocytes. However, some function as bi-component proteins that have membrane activity in concert with another protein that contains a membrane attack complex/perforin domain. The function of most of aegerolysins is unknown, although some have been suggested to have a role in development of the organism. Potential biotechnological applications of aegerolysins are already evident, despite the limited scientific knowledge available at present. Some mushroom aegerolysins, for example, can be used as markers to detect and label specific membrane lipids. Others can be used as biomarkers of fungal exposure, where their genes can serve as targets for detection of fungi and their progression during infectious diseases. Antibodies against aegerolysins can also be raised as immuno-diagnostic tools. Aegerolysins have been shown to serve as a species determination tool for fungal phytopathogen isolates in terms of some closely related species, where commonly used internal transcribed spacer barcoding has failed. Moreover, strong promoters that regulate aegerolysin genes can promote secretion of heterologous proteins from fungi and have been successfully applied in simultaneous multi-gene expression techniques.

  5. TRAIL-R1 is a negative regulator of pro-inflammatory responses and modulates long-term sequelae resulting from Chlamydia trachomatis infections in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufadhal Al-Kuhlani

    Full Text Available The immune system eliminates Chlamydia trachomatis infection through inflammation. However, uncontrolled inflammation can enhance pathology. In mice, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAIL-R, known for its effects on apoptosis, also regulates inflammation. In humans, the four homologues of TRAIL-R had never been investigated for effects on inflammation. Here, we examined whether TRAIL-R regulates inflammation during chlamydial infection. We examined TRAIL-R1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in an Ecuadorian cohort with and without C. trachomatis infections. There was a highly significant association for the TRAIL+626 homozygous mutant GG for infection vs no infection in this population. To confirm the results observed in the human population, primary lung fibroblasts and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs were isolated from wildtype (WT and TRAIL-R-deficient mice, and TRAIL-R1 levels in human cervical epithelial cells were depleted by RNA interference. Infection of BMDMs and primary lung fibroblasts with C. trachomatis strain L2, or the murine pathogen C. muridarum, led to higher levels of MIP2 mRNA expression or IL-1β secretion from TRAIL-R-deficient cells than WT cells. Similarly, depletion of TRAIL-R1 expression in human epithelial cells resulted in a higher level of IL-8 mRNA expression and protein secretion during C. trachomatis infection. We conclude that human TRAIL-R1 SNPs and murine TRAIL-R modulate the innate immune response against chlamydial infection. This is the first evidence that human TRAIL-R1 is a negative regulator of inflammation and plays a role in modulating Chlamydia pathogenesis.

  6. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koul Sweaty

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy.

  7. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Interaction of calreticulin with CD40 ligand, TRAIL and Fas ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, K; Pagh, R T; Holmskov, U

    2007-01-01

    found to bind calreticulin strongly. A low level or no binding was observed for adiponectin, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), CD30L, surfactant protein-A and -D and collagen VIII. The interaction with calreticulin required a conformational change in CD40L, TRAIL and FasL and showed the same...

  9. Relative quantification of proteasome activity by activity-based protein profiling and LC-MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, N.; Kuo, C.L.; Paniagua, G.; Elst, H. van den; Verdoes, M.; Willems, L.I.; Linden, W.A. van der; Ruben, M.; Genderen, E. van; Gubbens, J.; Wezel, G.P. van; Overkleeft, H.S.; Florea, B.I.

    2013-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a functional proteomics technique for directly monitoring the expression of active enzymes in cell extracts and living cells. The technique relies on irreversible inhibitors equipped with reactive groups (warheads) that covalently attach to the active site

  10. The trail pheromone of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashaly, Ashraf Mohamed Ali; Ahmed, Ashraf Mohamed; Al-Abdullah, Mosa Abdullah; Al-Khalifa, Mohamed Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Ant species use branching networks of pheromone trails for orientation between nest and resources. The current study demonstrated that workers of the venomous samsum ant, Pachycondyla sennaarensis (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), employ recruitment trail pheromones discharged from the Dufour's gland. Secretions of other abdomen complex glands, as well as hindgut gland secretions, did not evoke trail following. The optimum concentration of trail pheromone was found to be 0.1 gland equivalent/40 cm trail. This concentration demonstrated effective longevity for about one hour. This study also showed that P. sennaarensis and Tapinoma simrothi each respond to the trail pheromones of the other species as well as their own.

  11. Environmental Service and Outdoor Adventure as a Context for Positive Youth Development: An Evaluation of the Crow River Trail Guards Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Ernst

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Trail Guards, a community-based organization in Minnesota, offers youth the opportunity to participate in park/trail maintenance and enhancement projects. Through these environmental service projects, Trail Guards seeks to foster the following developmental outcomes in youth participants: self-awareness of skills and strengths; self-worth; personal and social self-efficacy; sense of belonging and acceptance; team work and cooperation skills; and a sense of community responsibility. Trail Guards ultimately aims for youth to transfer these skills and socially appropriate behaviors to settings and activities beyond Trail Guards and to participate in the community in other positive ways. A program evaluation indicated Trail Guards seems to be achieving these youth development outcomes, and that the success of the program may be attributed to the program leader serving as a positive adult role model and providing a safe and caring environment, as well as to community involvement. Implications are discussed.

  12. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Daniel L. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  13. Antibacterial activity of a lectin-like Burkholderia cenocepacia protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Canck, Evelien; Wattiau, Pierre; Van Winge, Iris; Loris, Remy; Coenye, Tom; De Mot, René

    2013-08-01

    Bacteriocins of the LlpA family have previously been characterized in the γ-proteobacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. These proteins are composed of two MMBL (monocot mannose-binding lectin) domains, a module predominantly and abundantly found in lectins from monocot plants. Genes encoding four different types of LlpA-like proteins were identified in genomes from strains belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) and the Burkholderia pseudomallei group. A selected recombinant LlpA-like protein from the human isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia AU1054 displayed narrow-spectrum genus-specific antibacterial activity, thus representing the first functionally characterized bacteriocin within this β-proteobacterial genus. Strain-specific killing was confined to other members of the Bcc, with mostly Burkholderia ambifaria strains being susceptible. In addition to killing planktonic cells, this bacteriocin also acted as an antibiofilm agent. © 2013 The Authors. Microbiology Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Inhibition of protein translocation at the endoplasmic reticulum promotes activation of the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, Craig; Mares, Alina; Piacenti, Michela; Williams, Helen; Roboti, Peristera; Puumalainen, Marjo; Callan, Anna C; Lesiak-Mieczkowska, Karolina; Linder, Stig; Harant, Hanna; High, Stephen; Flitsch, Sabine L; Whitehead, Roger C; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2012-03-15

    Selective small-molecule inhibitors represent powerful tools for the dissection of complex biological processes. ES(I) (eeyarestatin I) is a novel modulator of ER (endoplasmic reticulum) function. In the present study, we show that in addition to acutely inhibiting ERAD (ER-associated degradation), ES(I) causes production of mislocalized polypeptides that are ubiquitinated and degraded. Unexpectedly, our results suggest that these non-translocated polypeptides promote activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response), and indeed we can recapitulate UPR activation with an alternative and quite distinct inhibitor of ER translocation. These results suggest that the accumulation of non-translocated proteins in the cytosol may represent a novel mechanism that contributes to UPR activation.

  15. Therapeutic applications of TRAIL receptor agonists in cancer and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    TRAIL/Apo-2L is a member of the TNF superfamily first described as an apoptosis-inducing cytokine in 1995. Similar to TNF and Fas ligand, TRAIL induces apoptosis in caspase-dependent manner following TRAIL death receptor trimerization. Because tumor cells were shown to be particularly sensitive to this cytokine while normal cells/tissues proved to be resistant along with being able to synthesize and release TRAIL, it was rapidly appreciated that TRAIL likely served as one of our major physiologic weapons against cancer. In line with this, a number of research laboratories and pharmaceutical companies have attempted to exploit the ability of TRAIL to kill cancer cells by developing recombinant forms of TRAIL or TRAIL receptor agonists (e.g., receptor-specific mAb) for therapeutic purposes. In this review article we will describe the biochemical pathways used by TRAIL to induce different cell death programs. We will also summarize the clinical trials related to this pathway and discuss possible novel uses of TRAIL-related therapies. In recent years, the physiological importance of TRAIL has expanded beyond being a tumoricidal molecule to one critical for a number of clinical settings — ranging from infectious disease and autoimmunity to cardiovascular anomalies. We will also highlight some of these conditions where modulation of the TRAIL/TRAIL receptor system may be targeted in the future. PMID:26343199

  16. Cathepsin B mediates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nagathihalli S; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    The death ligand TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand) triggers apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells, which implies the potential for therapeutic applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B (CB) in mediating TRAIL-induced cell death in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. OSCC cell lines from primary tumor and lymph node metastasis were examined for expression of apoptosis markers by Western blots, enzyme activity assays, nuclear fragmentation assays, and FACS analysis. Gene-specific ribozymes or chemical inhibitors were used to inhibit CB or caspases in target cells. TRAIL-induced activation of caspase-3, cleavage of Bid and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, release of cytochrome c, and DNA fragmentation were blocked either by a pan-caspase inhibitor (zVAD-fmk) or a CB inhibitor (CA074Me), consistent with the involvement of TRAIL as well as CB in cell death. The primary tumor cells were more susceptible to apoptosis than their corresponding lymph node metastatic cells. Stable transfection of a ribozyme which inhibited CB expression also decreased the apoptotic process. We conclude that TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death in OSCC cells is mediated through CB or through caspase activation. Our data point to a new tumor-suppressive role for CB in OSCC which is opposed to the invasion- and metastasis-promoting functions of lysosomal proteases.

  17. TRAIL Death Receptor-4, Decoy Receptor-1 and Decoy Receptor-2 Expression on CD8+ T Cells Correlate with the Disease Severity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisgin Atil

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorder. Although the pathogenesis of disease is unclear, it is well known that T cells play a major role in both development and perpetuation of RA through activating macrophages and B cells. Since the lack of TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL expression resulted in defective thymocyte apoptosis leading to an autoimmune disease, we explored evidence for alterations in TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression on peripheral T lymphocytes in the molecular mechanism of RA development. Methods The expression of TRAIL/TRAIL receptors on T cells in 20 RA patients and 12 control individuals were analyzed using flow cytometry. The correlation of TRAIL and its receptor expression profile was compared with clinical RA parameters (RA activity scored as per DAS28 using Spearman Rho Analysis. Results While no change was detected in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells between controls and RA patient groups, upregulation of TRAIL and its receptors (both death and decoy was detected on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in RA patients compared to control individuals. Death Receptor-4 (DR4 and the decoy receptors DcR1 and DcR2 on CD8+ T cells, but not on CD4+ T cells, were positively correlated with patients' DAS scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that TRAIL/TRAIL receptor expression profiles on T cells might be important in revelation of RA pathogenesis.

  18. Contractions activate hormone-sensitive lipase in rat muscle by protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donsmark, Morten; Langfort, Jozef; Holm, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    and contractions. Adrenaline acts via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The signalling mediating the effect of contractions is unknown and was explored in this study. Incubated soleus muscles from 70 g male rats were electrically stimulated to perform repeated tetanic contractions for 5 min. The contraction...... of the inhibitors reduced adrenaline-induced HSL activation in soleus muscle. Both phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), which activates PKC and, in turn, ERK, and caffeine, which increases intracellular Ca2+ without eliciting contraction, increased HSL activity. Activated ERK increased HSL activity in supernatant...... from basal but not from electrically stimulated muscle. In conclusion, in muscle, PKC can stimulate HSL through ERK. Contractions and adrenaline enhance muscle HSL activity by different signalling mechanisms. The effect of contractions is mediated by PKC, at least partly via the ERK pathway....

  19. Study of airfoil trailing edge bluntness noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise with special focus on airfoils with blunt trailing edges. Two methods are employed to calculate airfoil noise: The flow/acoustic splitting method and the semi-empirical method. The flow/acoustic splitting method is derived from compressible Navier......-Stokes equations. It provides us possibilities to study details about noise generation mechanism. The formulation of the semi-empirical model is based on acoustic analogy and then curve-fitted with experimental data. Due to its high efficiency, such empirical relation is used for purpose of low noise airfoil...... design or optimization. Calculations from both methods are compared with exist experiments. The airfoil blunt noise is found as a function of trailing edge bluntness, Reynolds number, angle of attack, etc....

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein activates the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in dedifferentiated hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarn, Chi; Zou, Lin; Hullinger, Ronald L; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2002-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (pX) is implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Employing a cellular model linked to pX-mediated transformation, we investigated the role of the previously reported Stat3 activation by pX in hepatocyte transformation. Our model is composed of a differentiated hepatocyte (AML12) 3pX-1 cell line that undergoes pX-dependent transformation and a dedifferentiated hepatocyte (AML12) 4pX-1 cell line that does not exhibit transformation by pX. We report that pX-dependent Stat3 activation occurs only in non-pX-transforming 4pX-1 cells and conclude that Stat3 activation is not linked to pX-mediated transformation. Maximum Stat3 transactivation requires Ser727 phosphorylation, mediated by mitogenic pathway activation. Employing dominant negative mutants and inhibitors of mitogenic pathways, we demonstrate that maximum, pX-dependent Stat3 transactivation is inhibited by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-specific inhibitor SB 203580. Using transient-transreporter and in vitro kinase assays, we demonstrate for the first time that pX activates the p38 MAPK pathway only in 4pX-1 cells. pX-mediated Stat3 and p38 MAPK activation is Ca(2+) and c-Src dependent, in agreement with the established cellular action of pX. Importantly, pX-dependent activation of p38 MAPK inactivates Cdc25C by phosphorylation of Ser216, thus initiating activation of the G(2)/M checkpoint, resulting in 4pX-1 cell growth retardation. Interestingly, pX expression in the less differentiated hepatocyte 4pX-1 cells activates signaling pathways known to be active in regenerating hepatocytes. These results suggest that pX expression in the infected liver effects distinct mitogenic pathway activation in less differentiated versus differentiated hepatocytes.

  1. Optimization Studies on Prokaryotic Cell Expression of the Human Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Shi, Zheng-Duo; Pang, Kun; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Dong, Yang; Han, Cong-Hui

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to optimize the in vitro induction and expression of the human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and also study the processes of its denaturation, renaturation, and purification. The pGEX-6P-1/TRAIL114-281 plasmid was induced by isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the expressed target protein was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The protein expressed in the form of inclusion body was first denaturalized and then renaturalized by dilution and dialysis technique. GST-rTRAIL114-281 fusion protein was purified by Glutathione-Superflow Resin affinity chromatography and confirmed by Western blot. The molecular weight of GST-rTRAIL expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) was approximately 40 kDa. GST-rTRAIL was mainly expressed in the form of inclusion bodies. An optimum expression was induced by IPTG at a concentration of 0.2 mM for 8 h at 37 °C. Glutathione-Superflow Resin affinity chromatography yielded the purified GST-rTRAIL protein which was confirmed by Western blot using anti-GST mouse monoclonal antibody. The optimum prokaryotic cell expression of the human GST-rTRAIL was obtained by 0.2 mM IPTG induction for 8 h at 37 °C. The denatured inclusion body protein can be refolded by dilution and dialysis and purified by Glutathione-Superflow Resin affinity chromatography.

  2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera.

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera. PMID:26257761

  4. Milling solid proteins to enhance activity after melt-encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Parker W; Maia, João; Pokorski, Jonathan K

    2017-11-25

    Polymeric systems for the immobilization and delivery of proteins have been extensively used for therapeutic and catalytic applications. While most devices have been created via solution based methods, hot melt extrusion (HME) has emerged as an alternative due to the high encapsulation efficiencies and solvent-free nature of the process. HME requires high temperatures and mechanical stresses that can result in protein aggregation and denaturation, but additives and chemical modifications have been explored to mitigate these effects. This study explores the use of solid-state ball milling to decrease protein particle size before encapsulation within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) via HME. The impact of milling on particle dispersion, retained enzymatic activity, secondary structure stability, and release was explored for lysozyme, glucose oxidase, and the virus-like particle derived from Qβ to fully understand the impact of milling on protein systems with different sizes and complexities. The results of this study describe the utility of milling to further increase the stability of protein/polymer systems prepared via HME. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. C4b-binding protein inhibits the factor V-dependent but not the factor V-independent cofactor activity of protein S in the activated protein C-mediated inactivation of factor VIIIa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poel, R. H.; Meijers, J. C.; Bouma, B. N.

    2001-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is an important inactivator of coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. In the inactivation of factors Va and VIIIa, protein S serves as a cofactor to APC. Protein S can bind to C4b-binding protein (C4BP), and thereby loses its cofactor activity to APC. By modulating free protein

  6. Emerging Roles of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    or has focused on specific physiological situations and tissues. The present PhD thesis has addressed the role of AMPK in regulation of: 1) substrate utilisation during and in recovery from exercise, 2) adipose tissue metabolism during weight loss, and 3) autophagy in skeletal muscle during exercise......The cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated, when the energy balance of the cell decreases. AMPK has been proposed to regulate multiple metabolic processes. However, much of the evidence for these general effects of AMPK relies on investigations in cell systems...... be of importance for prioritising energy dissipation, inhibition of lipid storage pathways and regulation of mitochondrial and metabolic proteins, but this needs further investigations. In addition, we provide evidence that AMPK is regulating autophagic signalling in skeletal muscle. Thus, in skeletal muscle AMPK...

  7. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) as a novel metabolic target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Angel; Habegger, Kirk M; Clemmensen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    to block FAP enzymatic activity. RESULTS: TB administration to diet-induced obese (DIO) animals led to profound decreases in body weight, reduced food consumption and adiposity, increased energy expenditure, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and lowered cholesterol levels. Total...... on body weight or any other measures of metabolism. In support of these results we observed no enzymatic degradation of human FGF21 at either end of the protein when FAP was inhibited in vitro by TB. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that pharmacological inhibition of FAP enhances levels of FGF21 in obese mice......OBJECTIVE: Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease belonging to a S9B prolyl oligopeptidase subfamily. This enzyme has been implicated in cancer development and recently reported to regulate degradation of FGF21, a potent metabolic hormone. Using a known FAP inhibitor, talabostat...

  8. Is the color trails culture free?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasfous, Ahmed F; Puente, Antonio E; Pérez-Marfil, María Nieves; Cruz-Quintana, Francisco; Peralta-Ramirez, Isabel; Pérez-García, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    Increasingly clinical neuropsychology has been addressing the effects of culture on neuropsychological functioning. However, that focus has been on comparing performance on standardized tests across two or more groups, often Hispanic. In this study, Arabic children were tested in Morocco using a "culture-free test," Children's Color Trails. Children of different ages and living in rural and urban centers were tested. The results suggest that the Color Trails Test scores from Arab children differed from U.S. norms available. Furthermore, the location of testing and the age of the child were of significance. The role of culture-specific tests was considered.

  9. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory activity of protein hydrolyzates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory activity of protein hydrolyzates from Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. Grain and their influence on postprandial glycemia in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. S-S Jorge, R-B Raúl, G-L Isabel, P-A Edith, E-BH Bernardo, A-PJ César, D-G Gerardo, R-R Rubén ...

  10. Synergistic Effect of Subtoxic-dose Cisplatin and TRAIL to Mediate Apoptosis by Down-regulating Decoy Receptor 2 and Up-regulating Caspase-8, Caspase-9 and Bax Expression on NCI-H460 and A549 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Although tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL can selectively induce apoptosis in tumor cells, more than half of tumors including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC exhibit TRAIL-resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether subtoxic-dose cisplatin and TRAIL could synergistically enhance apoptosis on NSCLC cells and investigate its underlying mechanisms. Materials and Methods:NCI-H460 and A549 cells were treated with TRAIL alone, cisplatin alone or combination treatment in this study. The cytotoxicity was evaluated according to Sulforhodamine B assay, and apoptosis was examined using Hoechst 33342 staining and flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein levels of TRAIL receptors and apoptotic proteins including caspase-8, caspase-9, Bcl-2 and Bax were determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results:Our results showed that NCI-H460 cells were sensitive to TRAIL, whereas A549 cells were resistant. However, subtoxic-dose cisplatin could enhance the both cells to TRAIL-mediated cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis. The underlying mechanisms might be associated with the down-regulation of DcR2 and up-regulation of Caspase-8, Caspase-9 and Bax. Conclusion:Subtoxic-dose cisplatin could enhance both TRAIL- sensitive and TRAIL- resistant NSCLC cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. These findings motivated further studies to evaluate such a combinatory therapeutic strategy against NSCLC in the animal models.

  11. The Trail Inventory of Monte Vista NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  12. The Trail Inventory of Monte Vista NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  13. The Trail Inventory of Patoka River NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  14. The Trail Inventory of Parker River NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  15. The Trail Inventory of Mackay Island NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  16. The Trail Inventory of Mackay Island NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  17. The Trail Inventory of Ten Thousand Islands NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory...

  18. The Trail Inventory of Cokeville Meadows NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  19. The Trail Inventory of Desert National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Desert National Wildlife Range. Trails in this inventory are eligible for...

  20. The Trail Inventory of Desert NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Desert National Wildlife Range. Trails in this inventory are eligible for...

  1. The Trail Inventory of Key Cave NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Key Cave National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  2. The Trail Inventory of Fort Niobrara NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  3. The Trail Inventory of Assabet River NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  4. The Trail Inventory of Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  5. The Trail Inventory of Steigerwald Lake NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  6. The Trail Inventory of Bear Lake NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  7. The Trail Inventory of Ridgefield NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  8. The Trail Inventory of Hatchie NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  9. The Trail Inventory of Yazoo NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible for...

  10. The Trail Inventory of Target Rock NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Target Rock National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  11. The Trail Inventory of Harrison Lake NFH [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Harrison Lake National Fish Hatchery. Trails in this inventory are...

  12. The Trail Inventory of Havasu National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Havasu National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  13. The Trail Inventory of Imperial NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Imperial National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  14. The Trail Inventory of Shiawassee NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  15. The Trail Inventory of Vieques NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Vieques National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  16. The Trail Inventory of Rydell NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Rydell National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  17. The Trail Inventory of Two Ponds NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Two Ponds National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  18. The Trail Inventory of Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  19. The Trail Inventory of Ankeny NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  20. The Trail Inventory of Tewaukon NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Tewaukon National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  1. The Trail Inventory of Tishomingo NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  2. The Trail Inventory of Berkshire NFH [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Berkshire Trout Hatchery. Trails in this inventory are eligible for...

  3. The Trail Inventory of Patuxent Research Refuge [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Patuxent Research Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible for...

  4. The Trail Inventory of Montezuma NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  5. The Trail Inventory of Lake Ophelia NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Lake Ophelia National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  6. The Trail Inventory of Kellys Slough NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Kellys Slough National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  7. The Trail Inventory of Boyer Chute NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  8. The Trail Inventory of Wertheim NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  9. The Trail Inventory of Chincoteague NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  10. The Trail Inventory of Grand Cote NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Grand Cote National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  11. The Trail Inventory of Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  12. The Trail Inventory of Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  13. The Trail Inventory of Fox River NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Fox River National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  14. The Trail Inventory of Berkshire NFH [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Berkshire Trout Hatchery. Trails in this inventory are eligible for...

  15. The Trail Inventory of Coachella Valley NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Coachella Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  16. The Trail Inventory of Tijuana Slough NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Tijuana Slough National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  17. The Trail Inventory of Medicine Lake NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Medicine Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  18. The Trail Inventory of Pinckney Island NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Pinckney Island National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  19. The Trail Inventory of Warm Springs NFH [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery. Trails in this inventory are...

  20. The Trail Inventory of Warm Springs NFH [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery. Trails in this inventory are...

  1. The Trail Inventory of Carolina Sandhills NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  2. The Trail Inventory of Cahaba River NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  3. The Trail Inventory of Tennessee NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  4. The Trail Inventory of Whittlesey Creek NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  5. Study on antibacterial activity of hydrogel from irradiated silk protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunnak, J.; Chaisupakitsin, M. [King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Lardkrabang, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2001-03-01

    Hydrogels for biomedical application were prepared from solution blends of 3% silk protein and 3%, 10% poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and followed with irradiation. Mixture of hydrogels were gamma irradiated at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 kGy under N{sub 2} atmosphere. To clarify anti-bacterial activity of hydrogels, modified of the Agar disk diffusion method and American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists, AATCC Test Method 90-1977, were carried out. The four kinds of bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, were used. It was found that a 1:3 volume ratio of 3% silk protein and 3% PVA respectively, at 50 kGy irradiation, is suitable conditions for preparation hydrogels and trend to indicate the highest of an antibacterial activity against E. coli, B. subtilis and S. aureus. However the antibacterial activity of hydrogels against S. epidermidis was not clearly. These results are very useful to expand the application of hydrogel from irradiated silk protein to the medical products. (author)

  6. 5'-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Moloud; Roy, Richard

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is one of the central regulators of cellular and organismal metabolism in eukaryotes. Once activated by decreased energy levels, it induces ATP production by promoting catabolic pathways while conserving ATP by inhibiting anabolic pathways. AMPK plays a crucial role in various aspects of cellular function such as regulating growth, reprogramming metabolism, autophagy, and cell polarity. In this chapter, we focus on how recent breakthroughs made using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans have contributed to our understanding of AMPK function and how it can be utilized in the future to elucidate hitherto unknown aspects of AMPK signaling.

  7. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2009-02-27

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  8. Platelet factor 4 impairs the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Preston, Roger J S

    2012-02-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule chemokine released following platelet activation. PF4 interacts with thrombomodulin and the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of protein C, thereby enhancing activated protein C (APC) generation by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex. However, the protein C Gla domain not only mediates protein C activation in vivo, but also plays a critical role in modulating the diverse functional properties of APC once generated. In this study we demonstrate that PF4 significantly inhibits APC anti-coagulant activity. PF4 inhibited both protein S-dependent APC anticoagulant function in plasma and protein S-dependent factor Va (FVa) proteolysis 3- to 5-fold, demonstrating that PF4 impairs protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function. Using recombinant factor Va variants FVa-R506Q\\/R679Q and FVa-R306Q\\/R679Q, PF4 was shown to impair APC proteolysis of FVa at position Arg(306) by 3-fold both in the presence and absence of protein S. These data suggest that PF4 contributes to the poorly understood APC resistance phenotype associated with activated platelets. Finally, despite PF4 binding to the APC Gla domain, we show that APC in the presence of PF4 retains its ability to initiate PAR-1-mediated cytoprotective signaling. In summary, we propose that PF4 acts as a critical regulator of APC generation, but also differentially targets APC toward cytoprotective, rather than anticoagulant function at sites of vascular injury with concurrent platelet activation.

  9. Protective effects of soybean protein and egg white protein on the antibacterial activity of nisin in the presence of trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dan; Zhang, Dong; Hao, Limin; Lin, Songyang; Kang, Qiaozhen; Liu, Xin; Lu, Laizheng; Lu, Jike

    2018-01-15

    The using of nisin to prevent foodborne pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes) from contamination has received broad attentions during meat processing. However, the application of nisin has been limited because its antibacterial activity may be inhibited by trypsin. In this study, the protective effects of soybean protein and egg white protein on antibacterial activity of nisin were evaluated. It could be concluded that exogenous trypsin decreased the antibacterial activity of nisin, soybean protein and egg white protein could keep the nisin activity from enzymolysis of trypsin. Trypsin inhibitors in soybean protein and egg white protein could protect the antibacterial activity of nisin. Nisin with soybean protein or egg white protein in cooked meat product presented better quality preservation effects than nisin alone in the presence of trypsin. The total viable counts (TVC) and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) of nisin-treated group were significantly higher than these in nisin-soybean protein-treated and nisin-egg white protein-treated groups with trypsin. This study showed the potential of using soybean protein and egg white protein to stabilize the antibacterial activity of nisin under high trypsin conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dual regulation of G proteins and the G-protein-activated K+ channels by lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhy Tselnicker, Isabella; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Rishal, Ida; Kahanovitch, Uri; Dessauer, Carmen W; Dascal, Nathan

    2014-04-01

    Lithium (Li(+)) is widely used to treat bipolar disorder (BPD). Cellular targets of Li(+), such as glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and G proteins, have long been implicated in BPD etiology; however, recent genetic studies link BPD to other proteins, particularly ion channels. Li(+) affects neuronal excitability, but the underlying mechanisms and the relevance to putative BPD targets are unknown. We discovered a dual regulation of G protein-gated K(+) (GIRK) channels by Li(+), and identified the underlying molecular mechanisms. In hippocampal neurons, therapeutic doses of Li(+) (1-2 mM) increased GIRK basal current (Ibasal) but attenuated neurotransmitter-evoked GIRK currents (Ievoked) mediated by Gi/o-coupled G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Molecular mechanisms of these regulations were studied with heterologously expressed GIRK1/2. In excised membrane patches, Li(+) increased Ibasal but reduced GPCR-induced GIRK currents. Both regulations were membrane-delimited and G protein-dependent, requiring both Gα and Gβγ subunits. Li(+) did not impair direct activation of GIRK channels by Gβγ, suggesting that inhibition of Ievoked results from an action of Li(+) on Gα, probably through inhibition of GTP-GDP exchange. In direct binding studies, Li(+) promoted GPCR-independent dissociation of Gαi(GDP) from Gβγ by a Mg(2+)-independent mechanism. This previously unknown Li(+) action on G proteins explains the second effect of Li(+), the enhancement of GIRK's Ibasal. The dual effect of Li(+) on GIRK may profoundly regulate the inhibitory effects of neurotransmitters acting via GIRK channels. Our findings link between Li(+), neuronal excitability, and both cellular and genetic targets of BPD: GPCRs, G proteins, and ion channels.

  11. FAS activation induces dephosphorylation of SR proteins - Dependence on the de novo generation of ceramide and activation of protein phosphatase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalfant, CE; Ogretmen, B; Galadari, S; Kroesen, BJ; Pettus, BJ; Hannun, YA

    2001-01-01

    The search for potential targets for ceramide action led to the identification of ceramide-activated protein phosphatases (CAPP). To date, two serine/threonine protein phosphatases, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), have been demonstrated to function as

  12. Delineation of protein structure classes from multivariate analysis of protein Raman optical activity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fujiang; Tranter, George E; Isaacs, Neil W; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D

    2006-10-13

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA), measured as a small difference in the intensity of Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right and left-circularly polarized incident light, or as the intensity of a small circularly polarized component in the scattered light, is a powerful probe of the aqueous solution structure of proteins. On account of the large number of structure-sensitive bands in protein ROA spectra, multivariate analysis techniques such as non-linear mapping (NLM) are especially favourable for determining structural relationships between different proteins. Here NLM is used to map a dataset of 80 polypeptide, protein and virus ROA spectra, considered as points in a multidimensional space with axes representing the digitized wavenumbers, into readily visualizable two and three-dimensional spaces in which points close to or distant from each other, respectively, represent similar or dissimilar structures. Discrete clusters are observed which correspond to the seven structure classes all alpha, mainly alpha, alphabeta, mainly beta, all beta, mainly disordered/irregular and all disordered/irregular. The average standardised ROA spectra of the proteins falling within each structure class have distinct features characteristic of each class. A distinct cluster containing the wheat protein A-gliadin and the plant viruses potato virus X, narcissus mosaic virus, papaya mosaic virus and tobacco rattle virus, all of which appear in the mainly alpha cluster in the two-dimensional representation, becomes clearly separated in the direction of increasing disorder in the three-dimensional representation. This suggests that the corresponding five proteins, none of which to date has yielded high-resolution X-ray structures, consist mainly of alpha-helix and disordered structure with little or no beta-sheet. This combination of structural elements may have functional significance, such as facilitating disorder-to-order transitions (and vice versa) and suppressing

  13. Molecular mechanism by which AMP-activated protein kinase activation promotes glycogen accumulation in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Roger W; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE During energy stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) promotes glucose transport and glycolysis for ATP production, while it is thought to inhibit anabolic glycogen synthesis by suppressing the activity of glycogen synthase (GS) to maintain the energy balance in muscle. Paradoxically...

  14. TRAF-6 dependent signaling pathway is essential for TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induces osteoclast differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Men-Luh Yen

    Full Text Available Human osteoclast formation from mononuclear phagocyte precursors involves interactions between tumor necrosis factor (TNF ligand superfamily members and their receptors. Recent evidence indicates that in addition to triggering apoptosis, the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL induces osteoclast differentiation. To understand TRAIL-mediated signal transduction mechanism in osteoclastogenesis, we demonstrated that TRAIL induces osteoclast differentiation via a Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF-6-dependent signaling pathway. TRAIL-induced osteoclast differentiation was significantly inhibited by treatment with TRAF-6 siRNA and TRAF6 decoy peptides in both human monocytes and murine RAW264.7 macrophage cell lines, as evaluated in terms of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive multinucleated cells and bone resorption activity. Moreover, TRAIL-induced osteoclast differentiation was also abolished in TRAF6 knockout bone marrow macrophages. In addition to induction of NFATc1, treatment of TRAIL also induced ubiquitination of TRAF6 in osteoclast differentiation. Thus, our data demonstrate that TRAIL induces osteoclastic differentiation via a TRAF-6 dependent signaling pathway. This study suggests TRAF6-dependent signaling may be a central pathway in osteoclast differentiation, and that TNF superfamily molecules other than RANKL may modify RANK signaling by interaction with TRAF6-associated signaling.

  15. Plasma Protein Turnover Rates in Rats Using Stable Isotope Labeling, Global Proteomics, and Activity-Based Protein Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.; Tyrrell, Kimberly J.; Hansen, Joshua R.; Thomas, Dennis G.; Murphree, Taylor A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Luders, Teresa; Madden, James M.; Li, Yunying; Wright, Aaron T.; Piehowski, Paul D.

    2017-12-06

    Protein turnover is important for general health on cellular and organism scales providing a strategy to replace old, damaged, or dysfunctional proteins. Protein turnover also informs of biomarker kinetics, as a better understanding of synthesis and degradation of proteins increases the clinical utility of biomarkers. Here, turnover rates of plasma proteins in rats were measured in vivo using a pulse-chase stable isotope labeling experiment. During the pulse, rats (n=5) were fed 13C6-labeled lysine (“heavy”) feed for 23 days to label proteins. During the chase, feed was changed to an unlabeled equivalent feed (“light”), and blood was repeatedly sampled from rats over 10 time points for 28 days. Plasma samples were digested with trypsin, and analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). MaxQuant was used to identify peptides and proteins, and quantify heavy:light lysine ratios. A system of ordinary differential equations was used to calculate protein turnover rates. Using this approach, 273 proteins were identified, and turnover rates were quantified for 157 plasma proteins with half-lives ranging 0.3-103 days. For the ~70 most abundant proteins, variability in turnover rates among rats was low (median coefficient of variation: 0.09). Activity-based protein profiling was applied to pooled plasma samples to enrich serine hydrolases using a fluorophosphonate (FP2) activity-based probe. This enrichment resulted in turnover rates for an additional 17 proteins. This study is the first to measure global plasma protein turnover rates in rats in vivo, measure variability of protein turnover rates in any animal model, and utilize activity-based protein profiling for enhancing measurements of targeted, low-abundant proteins, such as those commonly used as biomarkers. Measured protein turnover rates will be important for understanding of the role of protein turnover in cellular and organism health as well as increasing the utility of protein

  16. 36 CFR 212.21 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.21 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail as defined by the National Trails Systems... necessary to meet emergencies or to enable landowners or land users to have reasonable access to their lands...

  17. Classification of mountain bike trails using vehicle-pavement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Classification of mountain bike trails using vehicle-pavement interaction principles. ... South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... The objective of this paper was to describe the different aspects that contribute to the degree of difficulty of a mountain bike trail and adopt an existing trail ...

  18. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Trail. 7.100 Section 7.100 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.100 Appalachian National Scenic Trail...? (1) You may cross the Appalachian National Scenic Trail corridor by using established, State-approved...

  19. 36 CFR 261.20 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Trail. 261.20 Section 261.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.20 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. It is prohibited to use a motorized vehicle on the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail without a special-use...

  20. 78 FR 25762 - Notice of Availability of the Final Trail Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... includes the addition of 37 miles of trails, including 10 miles of trails for off-road bicycle use... management related to the restoration of existing trails, planning and design for new trails and trail...