WorldWideScience

Sample records for active solute transport

  1. Modeling preferential water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil using the active region model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, F.; Wang, K.; Zhang, R.; Liu, H.H.

    2009-03-15

    Preferential flow and solute transport are common processes in the unsaturated soil, in which distributions of soil water content and solute concentrations are often characterized as fractal patterns. An active region model (ARM) was recently proposed to describe the preferential flow and transport patterns. In this study, ARM governing equations were derived to model the preferential soil water flow and solute transport processes. To evaluate the ARM equations, dye infiltration experiments were conducted, in which distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration were measured. Predicted results using the ARM and the mobile-immobile region model (MIM) were compared with the measured distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration. Although both the ARM and the MIM are two-region models, they are fundamental different in terms of treatments of the flow region. The models were evaluated based on the modeling efficiency (ME). The MIM provided relatively poor prediction results of the preferential flow and transport with negative ME values or positive ME values less than 0.4. On the contrary, predicted distributions of soil water content and Cl- concentration using the ARM agreed reasonably well with the experimental data with ME values higher than 0.8. The results indicated that the ARM successfully captured the macroscopic behavior of preferential flow and solute transport in the unsaturated soil.

  2. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2-4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute...... back into lis, i.e., the solute would have to be recirculated. With input variables from toad intestine (Nedergaard, S., E.H. Larsen, and H.H. Ussing, J. Membr. Biol. 168:241-251), computations predict that 60-80% of the pumped flux stems from serosal bath in agreement with the experimental estimate...... of the recirculation flux. Robust solutions are obtained with realistic concentrations and pressures of lis, and with the following features. Rate of fluid absorption is governed by the solute permeability of mucosal membrane. Maximum fluid flow is governed by density of pumps on lis-membranes. Energetic efficiency...

  3. Solute transport in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Leijnse, A.

    2013-01-01

    Solute transport is of importance in view of the movement of nutrient elements, e.g. towards the plant root system, and because of a broad range of pollutants. Pollution is not necessarily man induced, but may be due to geological or geohydrological causes, e.g. in the cases of pollution with arseni

  4. A systems approach to hemostasis: 3. Thrombus consolidation regulates intrathrombus solute transport and local thrombin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalker, Timothy J; Welsh, John D; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Wu, Jie; Colace, Thomas V; Diamond, Scott L; Brass, Lawrence F

    2014-09-11

    Hemostatic thrombi formed after a penetrating injury have a distinctive structure in which a core of highly activated, closely packed platelets is covered by a shell of less-activated, loosely packed platelets. We have shown that differences in intrathrombus molecular transport emerge in parallel with regional differences in platelet packing density and predicted that these differences affect thrombus growth and stability. Here we test that prediction in a mouse vascular injury model. The studies use a novel method for measuring thrombus contraction in vivo and a previously characterized mouse line with a defect in integrin αIIbβ3 outside-in signaling that affects clot retraction ex vivo. The results show that the mutant mice have a defect in thrombus consolidation following vascular injury, resulting in an increase in intrathrombus transport rates and, as predicted by computational modeling, a decrease in thrombin activity and platelet activation in the thrombus core. Collectively, these data (1) demonstrate that in addition to the activation state of individual platelets, the physical properties of the accumulated mass of adherent platelets is critical in determining intrathrombus agonist distribution and platelet activation and (2) define a novel role for integrin signaling in the regulation of intrathrombus transport rates and localization of thrombin activity. PMID:24951426

  5. Earliest Results in the Use of Activated Composite Membranes for the Transport of Silver Ions from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucundo Mendoza-Tolentino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results concerning the first use of activated composite membranes (ACMs for the facilitated transport of silver ions containing di-(2-ethylhexyl-dithiophosphoric acid (DTPA as the carrier. DTPA was immobilized by interfacial polymerization in a dense layer that was deposited in a porous layer, which was prepared on a nonwoven fabric support by phase inversion. The influence of fundamental parameters affecting the transport of silver ion as the carrier concentration in the membrane phase and stripping agent variation of the stripping solution have been studied. In the optimal conditions, the amount of silver transported across the ACMs was greater than 50%, whereas if the content of the carrier is modified, more than the 90% of the initial silver is removed from the feed phase.

  6. Column Holdup Formula of Soil Solute Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The shortcomings of the present two formulae for describing column holdup are analyzed and deductions are made to find a new formula. The column holdup, Hw, described by the new formula is dimensional,and related to soil solute transport kinesis and column physical properties. Compared with the other two column holdups, Hw is feasible to describe dimensional column holdup during solute transport process. The relationships between Hw and retardation factor, R, in different solute transport boundary conditions are established.

  7. Types of solutions improving passenger transport interconnectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika BĄK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to present different types of solutions which could improve interconnectivity of passenger transport especially within interconnections between long and short transport distance. The topic has particular relevance at the European level because the European transport networks’ role as integrated international networks is compromised by poor interconnectivity and because the next generation of European transport policies will have to be sensitive to the differences between short, medium and long-term transport markets and the market advantages of each transport mode. In this context, a realistic assessment of intermodal opportunities is a key ingredient to future policy development.Effective interconnection requires the provision of integrated networks and services which are attractive to potential users and this is likely to require co-operation between a range of authorities and providers in the public and private sectors and may necessitate a wider vision than might otherwise prevail.The paper is based on the results of the project realised by the team of the University of Gdansk in the EU funded 7 Framework Programme - INTERCONNECT (Interconnection between short- and long-distance transport networks with partners in the UK, Germany, Denmark, Poland, Spain and Italy. Different types of solutions will be summarized in the paper including e.g. local link infrastructure solutions, improved local public transport services, improvements at the interchange, solutions involving improved procedures for check-in or luggage transfer & documentation, pricing and ticketing solutions, solutions involving marketing, information and sales.

  8. The solute carrier 6 family of transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bröer, Stefan; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of the human genome comprises transporters for neurotransmitters, amino acids, osmolytes and energy metabolites. Members of this family play critical roles in neurotransmission, cellular and whole body homeostasis. Malfunction or altered expression...... of these transporters is associated with a variety of diseases. Pharmacological inhibition of the neurotransmitter transporters in this family is an important strategy in the management of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review provides an overview of the biochemical and pharmacological properties...

  9. BACTERIAL SOLUTE TRANSPORT PROTEINS IN THEIR LIPID ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TVELD, GI; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN; Veld, Gerda in 't

    1993-01-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria is a selective barrier that restricts entry and exit of solutes. Transport of solutes across this membrane is catalyzed by specific membrane proteins. Integral membrane proteins usually require specific lipids for optimal activity and are inhibited by other lipid

  10. Microforces and the Theory of Solute Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Fried, Eliot; Sellers, Shaun

    1999-01-01

    A generalized continuum framework for the theory of solute transport in fluids is proposed and systematically developed. This framework rests on the introduction of a generic force balance for the solute, a balance distinct from the macroscopic momentum balance associated with the mixture. Special forms of such a force balance have been proposed and used going back at least as far as Nernst's 1888 theory of diffusion. Under certain circumstances, this force balance yields a Fickian constituti...

  11. Linear transport models for adsorbing solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, K.; Jury, W. A.

    1993-04-01

    A unified linear theory for the transport of adsorbing solutes through soils is presented and applied to analyze movement of napropamide through undisturbed soil columns. The transport characteristics of the soil are expressed in terms of the travel time distribution of the mobile phase which is then used to incorporate local interaction processes. This approach permits the analysis of all linear transport processes, not only the small subset for which a differential description is known. From a practical point of view, it allows the direct use of measured concentrations or fluxes of conservative solutes to characterize the mobile phase without first subjecting them to any model. For complicated flow regimes, this may vastly improve the identification of models and estimation of their parameters for the local adsorption processes.

  12. On the solution of ion transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different techniques have been used to solve the Boltzmann-transport equation describing the penetration of light ions through solids in the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA), namely maximum entropy and flux-limited.The solution- obtained for the scalar flux function θο(ξ,s) by using the flux-limited as well by means of the maximum entropy are agree with obtained by Chandrasekhar method

  13. Modeling reactive geochemical transport of concentrated aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin

    2005-02-01

    Aqueous solutions with ionic strength larger than 1 M are usually considered concentrated aqueous solutions. These solutions can be found in some natural systems and are also industrially produced and released into accessible natural environments, and as such, they pose a big environmental problem. Concentrated aqueous solutions have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. They are usually strongly acidic or strongly alkaline, with the ionic strength possibly reaching 30 M or higher. Chemical components in such solutions are incompletely dissociated. The thermodynamic activities of both ionic and molecular species in these solutions are determined by the ionic interactions. In geological media the problem is further complicated by the interactions between the solutions and sediments and rocks. The chemical composition of concentrated aqueous solutions when migrating through the geological media may be drastically altered by these strong fluid-rock interactions. To effectively model reactive transport of concentrated aqueous solutions, we must take into account the ionic interactions. For this purpose we substantially extended an existing reactive transport code, BIO-CORE2D©, by incorporating a Pitzer ion interaction model to calculate the ionic activity. In the present paper, the model and two test cases of the model are briefly introduced. We also simulate a laboratory column experiment in which the leakage of highly alkaline waste fluid stored at Hanford (a U.S. Department of Energy site, located in Washington State) was studied. Our simulation captures the measured pH evolution and indicates that all the reactions controlling the pH evolution, including cation exchanges and mineral dissolution/precipitation, are coupled.

  14. Fuzzy Optimal Solution to Fuzzy Transportation Problem: A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohanaselvi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a new algorithm for the initial fuzzy feasible solution to a fully fuzzy transportation problem. Then by using fuzzy version of modified distribution method, we obtain the fuzzy optimal solution for the fully fuzzy transportation problem without converting to a classical transportation problem. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the proposed algorithm. It can be seen that the proposed algorithm gives a better fuzzy optimal solution to the given fuzzy transportation problem.

  15. Combinatorial model of solute transport in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妙仙; 张丽萍

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of solute transport is a key issue in the area of soil physics and hydrogeology. The most common approach (the convection-dispersion equation) considers an average convection flow rate and Fickian-like dispersion. Here,we propose a solute transport model in porous media of continuously expanding scale, according to the combinatorics principle. The model supposed actual porous media as a combinative body of many basic segments. First, we studied the solute transport process in each basic segment body, and then deduced the distribution of pore velocity in each basic segment body by difference approximation, finally assembled the solute transport process of each basic segment body into one of the combinative body. The simulation result coincided with the solute transport process observed in test. The model provides useful insight into the solute transport process of the non-Fickian dispersion in continuously expanding scale.

  16. Fuzzy Optimal Solution to Fuzzy Transportation Problem: A New Approach

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mohanaselvi; K. Ganesan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new algorithm for the initial fuzzy feasible solution to a fully fuzzy transportation problem. Then by using fuzzy version of modified distribution method, we obtain the fuzzy optimal solution for the fully fuzzy transportation problem without converting to a classical transportation problem. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the proposed algorithm. It can be seen that the proposed algorithm gives a better fuzzy optimal solution to the given fuzzy transp...

  17. Transport phenomena during nanofiltration of concentrated solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bargeman, Gerrald

    2016-01-01

    In most scientific studies on nanofiltration either the development of new membrane materials or the characterization of membranes is reported. In the latter case most studies use single solute salt or sugar solutions and/or investigate nanofiltration of solutions with mixtures of ions at low concen

  18. An adaptive approach to implementing innovative urban transport solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchau, V.; Walker, W.; Van Duin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Urban transport is facing an increasing number of problems. Innovative technological solutions have been proposed for many of these problems. The implementation of these solutions, however, is surrounded by many uncertainties—for example, future relevant developments for urban transport demand and s

  19. Controls of macropore network characteristics on preferential solute transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Larsbo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the relationships between macropore network characteristics, hydraulic properties and state variables and measures of preferential transport in undisturbed columns sampled from four agricultural topsoils of contrasting texture and structure. Macropore network characteristics were computed from 3-dimensional X-ray tomography images of the soil pore system. Non-reactive solute transport experiments were carried out at five steady-state water flow rates from 2 to 12 mm h−1. The degree of preferential transport was evaluated by the normalised 5% solute arrival time and the apparent dispersivity calculated from the resulting breakthrough curves. Near-saturated hydraulic conductivities were measured on the same samples using a tension disk infiltrometer placed on top of the columns. Results showed that many of the macropore network characteristics were inter-correlated. For example, large macroporosities were associated with larger specific macropore surface areas and better local connectivity of the macropore network. Generally, an increased flow rate resulted in earlier solute breakthrough and a shifting of the peak concentration towards smaller drained volumes. Columns with smaller macroporosities, poorer local connectivity of the macropore network and smaller near-saturated hydraulic conductivities exhibited a greater degree of preferential transport. This can be explained by the fact that, with only two exceptions, global (i.e. sample-scale continuity of the macropore network was still preserved at low macroporosities. Thus, for any given flow rate pores of larger diameter were actively conducting solute in soils of smaller near-saturated hydraulic conductivity. With less time for equilibration between the macropores and the surrounding matrix the transport became more preferential. Conversely, the large specific macropore surface area and well-connected macropore networks associated with columns with large

  20. A Finite-Difference Solution of Solute Transport through a Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Godongwana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents a theoretical analysis of the transport of solutes through a fixed-film membrane bioreactor (MBR, immobilised with an active biocatalyst. The dimensionless convection-diffusion equation with variable coefficients was solved analytically and numerically for concentration profiles of the solutes through the MBR. The analytical solution makes use of regular perturbation and accounts for radial convective flow as well as axial diffusion of the substrate species. The Michaelis-Menten (or Monod rate equation was assumed for the sink term, and the perturbation was extended up to second-order. In the analytical solution only the first-order limit of the Michaelis-Menten equation was considered; hence the linearized equation was solved. In the numerical solution, however, this restriction was lifted. The solution of the nonlinear, elliptic, partial differential equation was based on an implicit finite-difference method (FDM. An upwind scheme was employed for numerical stability. The resulting algebraic equations were solved simultaneously using the multivariate Newton-Raphson iteration method. The solution allows for the evaluation of the effect on the concentration profiles of (i the radial and axial convective velocity, (ii the convective mass transfer rates, (iii the reaction rates, (iv the fraction retentate, and (v the aspect ratio.

  1. Modelling multicomponent solute transport in structured soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinum, van G.W.

    2007-01-01

    The mobility of contaminants in soil is an important factor in determining their ability to spread into the wider environment. For non-volatile substances, transport within the soil is generally dominated by transport of dissolved fractions in the soil water phase, via either diffusion or convection

  2. Specific transport and storage solutions for residues return programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    France, like other countries including Japan, UK, Russia and China, has chosen the closed fuel cycle, where Spent Fuel is recycled at 96% of its content. This treatment, performed in France at AREVA's La Hague plant allows recovering uranium 95% and plutonium 1% for recycling, the remaining 4% being considered as ultimate waste. Most of the ultimate waste can be sorted into two categories: - High level activity waste (HLW) composed of fission products and minor actinides, which account for the largest share of radioactivity; this type of waste is vitrified. - Long-lived intermediate level waste (ILW) composed of structural elements of used nuclear fuel (hulls and end pieces); this type of waste is compacted. Whether vitrified or compacted, the waste is conditioned in the same universal and multipurpose container, named the Universal Canister. The resulting residue is named CSD-V for vitrified waste and CSD-C for compacted waste, they both remain property of the utilities and must be returned to countries of origin. In order to transport Universal Canisters in the best technical and economical conditions, TN International designs two cask solutions for its customers, either for transport only or for dual purpose, storage and transport, depending on the facility receiving the canisters. Since the mid-1990's, TN International has transported CSD-V waste to Belgium, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Germany and Japan. As most of these CSD-V return programs are nearing completion, TN International is now preparing the CSD-C return program which is scheduled to begin in 2009 for the first three countries and within several years for Germany and Japan. The purpose of this paper is to explain how the experience gained during the return program of CSD-V has been used to optimize the CSD-C return organization, in terms of design and licensing of casks and of transport organization, suited to the specific constraints of each country. In some cases, casks developed for CSD

  3. Solute transport scales in an unsaturated stony soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Dyck, Miles; Basile, Angelo; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Kassab, Mohamed; Comegna, Vincenzo

    2011-06-01

    Solute transport parameters are known to be scale-dependent due mainly to the increasing scale of heterogeneities with transport distance and with the lateral extent of the transport field examined. Based on a transect solute transport experiment, in this paper we studied this scale dependence by distinguishing three different scales with different homogeneity degrees of the porous medium: the observation scale, transport scale and transect scale. The main objective was to extend the approach proposed by van Wesenbeeck and Kachanoski to evaluating the role of textural heterogeneities on the transition from the observation scale to the transport scale. The approach is based on the scale dependence of transport moments estimated from solute concentrations distributions. In our study, these moments were calculated starting from time normalized resident concentrations measured by time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes at three depths in 37 soil sites 1 m apart along a transect during a steady state transport experiment. The Generalized Transfer Function (GTF) was used to describe the evolution of apparent solute spreading along the soil profile at each observation site by analyzing the propagation of the moments of the concentration distributions. Spectral analysis was used to quantify the relationship between the solid phase heterogeneities (namely, texture and stones) and the scale dependence of the solute transport parameters. Coupling the two approaches allowed us to identify two different transport scales (around 4-5 m and 20 m, respectively) mainly induced by the spatial pattern of soil textural properties. The analysis showed that the larger transport scale is mainly determined by the skeleton pattern of variability. Our analysis showed that the organization in hierarchical levels of soil variability may have major effects on the differences between solute transport behavior at transport scale and transect scale, as the transect scale parameters will include

  4. Regulators of Slc4 bicarbonate transporter activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Thornell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Slc4 family of transporters is comprised of anion exchangers (AE1-4, Na-coupled bicarbonate transporters (NCBTs including electrogenic Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCe1 and NBCe2, electroneutral Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCn1 and NBCn2, and the electroneutral Na-driven Cl-bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE, as well as a borate transporter (BTR1. These transporters regulate intracellular pH (pHi and contribute to steady-state pHi, but are also involved in other physiological processes including CO2 carriage by red blood cells and solute secretion/reabsorption across epithelia. Acid-base transporters function as either acid extruders or acid loaders, with the Slc4 proteins moving HCO3– either into or out of cells. According to results from both molecular and functional studies, multiple Slc4 proteins and/or associated splice variants with similar expected effects on pHi are often found in the same tissue or cell. Such apparent redundancy is likely to be physiologically important. In addition to regulating pHi, a HCO3– transporter contributes to a cell’s ability to fine tune the intracellular regulation of the cotransported/exchanged ion(s (e.g., Na+ or Cl–. In addition, functionally similar transporters or splice variants with different regulatory profiles will optimize pH physiology and solute transport under various conditions or within subcellular domains. Such optimization will depend on activated signaling pathways and transporter expression profiles. In this review, we will summarize and discuss both classical and more recently identified regulators of the Slc4 proteins. Some of these regulators include traditional second messengers, lipids, binding proteins, autoregulatory domains, and less conventional regulators. The material presented will provide insight into the diversity and physiological significance of multiple members within the Slc4 gene family.

  5. THE GENERATION OF METABOLIC ENERGY BY SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, W.N; Lolkema, J.S.; Poolman, B.

    1995-01-01

    Secondary metabolic-energy-generating systems generate a proton motive force (pmf) or a sodium ion motive force (smf) by a process that involves the action of secondary transporters. The (electro)chemical gradient of the solute(s) is converted into the electrochemical gradient of protons or sodium i

  6. Sustainable freight transport in South Africa:Domestic intermodal solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan H. Havenga

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid deregulation of freight transport in South Africa two decades ago, and low historical investment in rail (with resultant poor service delivery, an integrated alternative to road and rail competition was never developed. High national freight logistics costs, significant road infrastructure challenges and environmental impact concerns of a road-dominated freight transport market have, however, fuelled renewed interest in intermodal transport solutions. In this article, a high-level business case for domestic intermodal solutions in South Africa is presented. The results demonstrate that building three intermodal terminals to connect the three major industrial hubs (i.e. Gauteng, Durban and Cape Town through an intermodal solution could reduce transport costs (including externalities for the identified 11.5 million tons of intermodalfriendly freight flows on the Cape and Natal corridors by 42% (including externalities.

  7. A stochastic method of solution of the Parker transport equation

    CERN Document Server

    Wawrzynczak, A; Gil, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the stochastic model of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles transport in the heliosphere. Based on the solution of the Parker transport equation we developed models of the short-time variation of the GCR intensity, i.e. the Forbush decrease (Fd) and the 27-day variation of the GCR intensity. Parker transport equation being the Fokker-Planck type equation delineates non-stationary transport of charged particles in the turbulent medium. The presented approach of the numerical solution is grounded on solving of the set of equivalent stochastic differential equations (SDEs). We demonstrate the method of deriving from Parker transport equation the corresponding SDEs in the heliocentric spherical coordinate system for the backward approach. Features indicative the preeminence of the backward approach over the forward is stressed. We compare the outcomes of the stochastic model of the Fd and 27-day variation of the GCR intensity with our former models established by the finite difference method. Both ...

  8. End-Member Formulation of Solid Solutions and Reactive Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtner, Peter C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A model for incorporating solid solutions into reactive transport equations is presented based on an end-member representation. Reactive transport equations are solved directly for the composition and bulk concentration of the solid solution. Reactions of a solid solution with an aqueous solution are formulated in terms of an overall stoichiometric reaction corresponding to a time-varying composition and exchange reactions, equivalent to reaction end-members. Reaction rates are treated kinetically using a transition state rate law for the overall reaction and a pseudo-kinetic rate law for exchange reactions. The composition of the solid solution at the onset of precipitation is assumed to correspond to the least soluble composition, equivalent to the composition at equilibrium. The stoichiometric saturation determines if the solid solution is super-saturated with respect to the aqueous solution. The method is implemented for a simple prototype batch reactor using Mathematica for a binary solid solution. Finally, the sensitivity of the results on the kinetic rate constant for a binary solid solution is investigated for reaction of an initially stoichiometric solid phase with an undersaturated aqueous solution.

  9. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive transport invariably-fractured layered media: 1. Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George J.

    2001-10-10

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity.

  10. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Transport in Variably-Fractured Layered Media: 1. Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Moridis

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity.

  11. Radioactive solutions and reagents with certified activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international directory of radioactive solutions and reagents with certified activity is compiled. Data are given in tables on radioactivity concentration, uncertainty, volume, supplier, availability and form of solutions and reagents

  12. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  13. The separation of radionuclide migration by solution and particle transport in LLRW repository buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory-scale lysimeter experiments were performed with simulated waste forms placed in candidate buffer materials which have been chosen for a low-level radioactive waste repository. Radionuclide releases into the effluent water and radionuclide capture by the buffer material were determined. The results could not be explained by traditional solution transport mechanisms, and transport by particles released from the waste form and/or transport by buffer particles were suspected as the dominant mechanism for radionuclide release from the lysimeters. To elucidate the relative contribution of particle and solution transport, the waste forms were replaced by a wafer of neutron-activated buffer soaked with selected soluble isotopes. Particle transport was determined by the movement of gamma-emitting neutron-activation products through the lysimeter. Solution transport was quantified by comparing the migration of soluble radionuclides relative to the transport of neutron activation products. The new approach for monitoring radionuclide migration in soil is presented. It facilitates the determination of most of the fundamental coefficients required to model the transport process

  14. Fundamental solution of an integro-differential transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems connected with the construction of generalized functions of the fundamental solution of a stationary single-velocity integro-differential neutron transport equation on the basis of the integral transformation technique and its applications are analyzed. A number of concrete expressions for the fundamental solutions in the tree-dimensional (spherical coordinates) and two-dimensional (cylindrical coordinates) geometries are derived. The most of the formula are apparently published for the first time

  15. Transport-constrained extensions of collision and track length estimators for solutions of radiative transport problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Rong, E-mail: kongr413@yahoo.com [Veros Software Inc., 2333 N. Broadway, Santa Ana, CA 92706 (United States); Spanier, Jerome, E-mail: jspanier@uci.edu [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, 1002 Health Science Road E., University of California, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track length estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems.

  16. Transport of reactive solutes in heterogeneous porous formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, W.J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Transport and spreading behaviour of reactive solutes in heterogeneous porous formations is considered. Spatial variability is modeled by assuming a random space function (RSF) for the spatially variable properties. In the available literature, the effect of random spatial variability is mostly limi

  17. Solute transport through porous media using asymptotic dispersivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sharma; Teodrose Atnafu Abgaze

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, multiprocess non-equilibrium transport equation has been used, which accounts for both physical and chemical non-equilibrium for reactive transport through porous media. An asymptotic distance dependent dispersivity is used to embrace the concept of scale-dependent dispersion for solute transport in heterogeneous porous media. Semi-analytical solution has been derived of the governing equations with an asymptotic distance dependent dispersivity by using Laplace transform technique and the power series method. For application of analytical model, we simulated observed experimental breakthrough curves from 1500 cm long soil column experiments conducted in the laboratory. The simulation results of break-through curves were found to deviate from the observed breakthrough curves for both mobile–immobile and multiprocess non-equilibrium transport with constant dispersion models. However, multiprocess non-equilibrium with an asymptotic dispersion model gives better fit of experimental breakthrough curves through long soil column and hence it is more useful for describing anomalous solute transport through hetero-geneous porous media. The present model is simpler than the stochastic numerical method.

  18. Political activity for physical activity: health advocacy for active transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amun Qa-t-a

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Effective health advocacy is a priority for efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Local councils are an important audience for this advocacy. The aim of the current study was to describe features of advocacy for active transport via submissions to city council annual plans in New Zealand, and the impact of an information sheet to encourage the health sector to be involved in this process. Written submissions to city council's annual consultation process were requested for 16 city councils over the period of three years (2007/08, 2008/09, and 2009/10. Submissions were reviewed and categories of responses were created. An advocacy information sheet encouraging health sector participation and summarising some of the evidence-base related to physical activity, active transport and health was released just prior to the 2009/10 submission time. Over the period of the study, city councils received 47,392 submissions, 17% of which were related to active transport. Most submissions came from city residents, with a small proportion (2% from the health sector. The largest category of submissions was in support of pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, design and maintenance of facilities and additional features to support use of these transport modes. Health arguments featured prominently in justifications for active transport initiatives, including concerns about injury risk, obesity, physical inactivity, personal safety and facilities for people with disabilities. There was evidence that the information sheet was utilised by some health sector submitters (12.5%, providing tentative support for initiatives of this nature. In conclusion, the study provides novel information about the current nature of health advocacy for active transport and informs future advocacy efforts about areas for emphasis, such as health benefits of active transport, and potential alliances with other sectors such as environmental

  19. Win-Win transportation solutions price reforms with multiple benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reform strategies in the transportation market, such as the Win-Win Transportation Solutions, can provide several economic, social and environmental benefits. The strategies are cost effective, technically feasible reforms based on market principles which help create a more equitable and efficient transportation system that supports sustainable economic development. The benefits they provide include reduced traffic congestion, road and parking facility savings, consumer savings, equity, safety and environmental protection. They also increase economic productivity. If fully implemented, they could reduce motor vehicle impacts by 15 to 30 per cent and could help achieve the Kyoto emission reduction targets. Examples of Win-Win strategies at the federal level include: (1) removal of subsidies to oil production and internalized costs, and (2) tax exempt employer provided transfer benefits. Examples of Win-Win strategies at the state/provincial level include: (1) distance-based vehicle insurance and registration fees, (2) least-coast transportation planning and funding, (3) revenue-neutral tax shifting, (4) road pricing, (5) reform motor carrier regulations for competition and efficiency, (6) local and regional transportation demand management programs, (7) more efficient land use, (8) more flexible zoning requirements, (9) parking cash out, (10) transportation management associations, (11) location-efficient housing and mortgages, (12) school and campus trip management, (13) car sharing, (14) non-motorized transport improvements, and (15) traffic calming. It was noted that any market reform that leads to more efficient use of existing transportation systems can provide better economic development benefits. 9 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  20. Win-Win transportation solutions price reforms with multiple benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litman, T. [Victoria Transport Policy Institute, BC (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Reform strategies in the transportation market, such as the Win-Win Transportation Solutions, can provide several economic, social and environmental benefits. The strategies are cost effective, technically feasible reforms based on market principles which help create a more equitable and efficient transportation system that supports sustainable economic development. The benefits they provide include reduced traffic congestion, road and parking facility savings, consumer savings, equity, safety and environmental protection. They also increase economic productivity. If fully implemented, they could reduce motor vehicle impacts by 15 to 30 per cent and could help achieve the Kyoto emission reduction targets. Examples of Win-Win strategies at the federal level include: (1) removal of subsidies to oil production and internalized costs, and (2) tax exempt employer provided transfer benefits. Examples of Win-Win strategies at the state/provincial level include: (1) distance-based vehicle insurance and registration fees, (2) least-coast transportation planning and funding, (3) revenue-neutral tax shifting, (4) road pricing, (5) reform motor carrier regulations for competition and efficiency, (6) local and regional transportation demand management programs, (7) more efficient land use, (8) more flexible zoning requirements, (9) parking cash out, (10) transportation management associations, (11) location-efficient housing and mortgages, (12) school and campus trip management, (13) car sharing, (14) non-motorized transport improvements, and (15) traffic calming. It was noted that any market reform that leads to more efficient use of existing transportation systems can provide better economic development benefits. 9 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  1. A Data-Driven Approach for Upscaling Solute Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this study is to use a machine learning tool, genetic programming (GP), a domain independent model generator, to search for an upscaled hydrologic model. The development of upscaled models of hydrologic processes has long been a concern of researchers, because computational limitations prevent the use of high-resolution models capable of resolving all of the spatial variability of model domains. In particular, researchers have struggled for decades to develop upscaled numerical models for solute transport in porous media, where the scale of variability can range from the order of a few meters in the horizontal direction but only ten to twenty centimeters in the vertical direction. A wide variety of methods have been employed to develop upscaled solute transport models, including stochastic analysis, spatial filtering, and homogenization. However, these methods all rely upon various simplifying assumptions (e.g. small conductivity variance, a grid-scale significantly larger than the largest scale of heterogeneity). Moreover, these methods usually make additional assumptions about the physics of the sub-grid processes. This study examines the use of GP to search for an upscaled model of transport of a solute pulse by horizontal flow in a perfectly stratified aquifer. GP was chosen because it creates mathematical models of input data from which information about the underlying physical processes can be extracted. This type of transport system was selected as the first application of the proposed upscaling method, because it has been extensively studied in the literature, and thus will allow for a direct comparison that will demonstrate the efficacy of the data-driven upscaling method. It has been suggested that if the upscaled model domain of this type of system is a depth averaged representation of the aquifer, the plume evolution can be modeled in a Lagrangian coordinate system as a Fickian dispersive process with a time dependent dispersion coefficient

  2. Conservative and reactive solute transport in constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, S.H.; Barber, L.B.; Runkel, R.L.; Ryan, J.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Wass, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    The transport of bromide, a conservative tracer, and rhodamine WT (RWT), a photodegrading tracer, was evaluated in three wastewater-dependent wetlands near Phoenix, Arizona, using a solute transport model with transient storage. Coupled sodium bromide and RWT tracer tests were performed to establish conservative transport and reactive parameters in constructed wetlands with water losses ranging from (1) relatively impermeable (15%), (2) moderately leaky (45%), and (3) significantly leaky (76%). RWT first-order photolysis rates and sorption coefficients were determined from independent field and laboratory experiments. Individual wetland hydraulic profiles influenced the extent of transient storage interaction in stagnant water areas and consequently RWT removal. Solute mixing and transient storage interaction occurred in the impermeable wetland, resulting in 21% RWT mass loss from main channel and storage zone photolysis (10%) and sorption (11%) reactions. Advection and dispersion governed solute transport in the leaky wetland, limiting RWT photolysis removal (1.2%) and favoring main channel sorption (3.6%). The moderately leaky wetland contained islands parallel to flow, producing channel flow and minimizing RWT losses (1.6%).

  3. The secret to successful solute-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling subsurface solute transport is difficult—more so than modeling heads and flows. The classical governing equation does not always adequately represent what we see at the field scale. In such cases, commonly used numerical models are solving the wrong equation. Also, the transport equation is hyperbolic where advection is dominant, and parabolic where hydrodynamic dispersion is dominant. No single numerical method works well for all conditions, and for any given complex field problem, where seepage velocity is highly variable, no one method will be optimal everywhere. Although we normally expect a numerically accurate solution to the governing groundwater-flow equation, errors in concentrations from numerical dispersion and/or oscillations may be large in some cases. The accuracy and efficiency of the numerical solution to the solute-transport equation are more sensitive to the numerical method chosen than for typical groundwater-flow problems. However, numerical errors can be kept within acceptable limits if sufficient computational effort is expended. But impractically long

  4. TRACKING AND TRACING SOLUTION FOR DANGEROUS GOODS CARRIED BY INTERMODAL TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kvet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of designing a complex tracking and tracing solution for dangerous goods transportation with the support of modern information technologies. This research activity presents a part of the “ChemLogTT” [2] project solved at the University of Žilina. The main goal of our contribution is to present basic conception of a complex developed software tool for monitoring and analyzing mentioned dangerous goods transportation.

  5. Antitubercular Agent Delamanid and Metabolites as Substrates and Inhibitors of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Masakazu; Hashizume, Kenta; Hamasako, Yusuke; Ohzone, Yoshihiro; Kashiyama, Eiji; Umehara, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Delamanid (Deltyba, OPC-67683) is the first approved drug in a novel class of nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazoles developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis require treatment with multiple drugs, several of which have known drug-drug interactions. Transporters regulate drug absorption, distribution, and excretion; therefore, the inhibition of transport by one agent may alter the pharmacokinetics of another, leading to unexpected adverse events. Therefore, it is important to understand how delamanid affects transport activity. In the present study, the potencies of delamanid and its main metabolites as the substrates and inhibitors of various transporters were evaluated in vitro Delamanid was not transported by the efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), solute carrier (SLC) transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, or organic cation transporter 1. Similarly, metabolite 1 (M1) was not a substrate for any of these transporters except P-gp. Delamanid showed no inhibitory effect on ABC transporters MDR1, BCRP, and bile salt export pump (BSEP; ABCB11), SLC transporters, or organic anion transporters. M1 and M2 inhibited P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport but did so only at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (M1, 4.65 and 5.71 μmol/liter, respectively; M2, 7.80 and 6.02 μmol/liter, respectively), well above the corresponding maximum concentration in plasma values observed following the administration of multiple doses in clinical trials. M3 and M4 did not affect the activities of any of the transporters tested. These in vitro data suggest that delamanid is unlikely to have clinically relevant interactions with drugs for which absorption and disposition are mediated by this group of transporters. PMID:27021329

  6. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  7. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  8. Transport processes in space physics and astrophysics problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Dosch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

     This is the problems and solution manual for the graduate text with the same title and published as Lecture Notes in Physics Vol 877 which provides the necessary mathematical and physics background to understand the transport of gases, charged particle gases, energetic charged particles, turbulence, and radiation in an astrophysical and space physics context. The very detailed and self-contained problems and solutions will be an essential part of the training of any graduate student wishing to enter and pursuing research in this field. .

  9. General approach for modeling solute transport in structured soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical convective-dispersive type transport models are often found to be of limited use for predicting in structured soils or fractured aquifer systems. Recently a number of deterministic two-region type models have appeared in the literature that consider transport in structured soils from a microscopic (macropore-scale) point of view. In these models, the chemical is assumed to be transported through a single pore or crack of known geometry, or through the voids between well-defined, uniformly-sized aggregates. In addition, diffusion-type equations are used to describe solute transfer from the larger pores into the soil matrix. This paper describes a method that extends the two-region modeling approach to more general conditions involving aggregates of arbitrary geometry. The method is based on the use of a geometry-dependent shape factor (f) that transforms an aggregate of given shape and size (platy, columnar, prismatic) into an equivalent sphere with similar diffusion characteristics as the original aggregate. Using conversions between known analytical solutions as test cases, the transformation was found to very accurate for most aggregate geometries commonly encountered in the field. A similar transformation was also used to quantify the unknown mass transfer coefficient in a previously employed first-order rate expression for solute exchange between mobile (interaggregate) and immobile (intra-aggregate) regions. 19 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  10. Comparison of approaches for predicting solute transport: sandbox experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illman, Walter A; Berg, Steven J; Yeh, Tian-Chyi Jim

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to compare three approaches for predicting solute transport. The approaches include: (1) an effective parameter/macrodispersion approach (Gelhar and Axness 1983); (2) a heterogeneous approach using ordinary kriging based on core samples; and (3) a heterogeneous approach based on hydraulic tomography. We conducted our comparison in a heterogeneous sandbox aquifer. The aquifer was first characterized by taking 48 core samples to obtain local-scale hydraulic conductivity (K). The spatial statistics of these K values were then used to calculate the effective parameters. These K values and their statistics were also used for kriging to obtain a heterogeneous K field. In parallel, we performed a hydraulic tomography survey using hydraulic tests conducted in a dipole fashion with the drawdown data analyzed using the sequential successive linear estimator code (Yeh and Liu 2000) to obtain a K distribution (or K tomogram). The effective parameters and the heterogeneous K fields from kriging and hydraulic tomography were used in forward simulations of a dipole conservative tracer test. The simulated and observed breakthrough curves and their temporal moments were compared. Results show an improvement in predictions of drawdown behavior and tracer transport when the K tomogram from hydraulic tomography was used. This suggests that the high-resolution prediction of solute transport is possible without collecting a large number of small-scale samples to estimate flow and transport properties that are costly to obtain at the field scale.

  11. Solute transport benchmark studies for TRACR3D code verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional code called TRACR3D, which is applicable to solute transport in both unsaturated and saturated media, is being used to model hypothetical transport of radioactive and nonradioactive constituents from calcined high-level radioactive waste (HLW) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The modeling studies are part of a documentation process which will be required for evaluation of onsite disposal in a near-surface facility as a possible alternative strategy for the long-term management of ICPP HLW. This report discusses the results of a benchmark study for code verification. The problems modeled were: (1) A one-dimensional problem involving the transport of the pertechnetate ion (TcO4-) through a 5-cm diameter by 30-cm-long soil column at ICPP. (2) A one-dimensional problem involving the transport of the iodide ion (I-) through a large caisson (3-m diameter by 6-m depth) at LANL. (3) A three-dimensional problem involving the transport of radioactive ruthenium (Ru-106) from a single-shell tank leak into the vadose zone at the Hanford site. For the three benchmark studies performed, it was concluded that the predicted results from TRACR3D were in agreement with documented and reported solute transport problems, that the input data files were properly configured, and that the code correctly performed the mathematical operations specified in the numerical models. These results will provide a greater degree of confidence in results obtained for planned modeling studies at ICPP. 6 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Bruha, Jan; Bruhova-Foltynova, Hana; Desqueyroux, Hélène; Praznoczy, Corinne; Ragettli, Martina S; Tainio, Marko; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling) have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16-64) in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation. PMID:26930213

  13. Hydrogeochemistry and simulated solute transport, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Stanley G.; Saulnier, George J.

    1980-01-01

    Oil-shale mining activities in Piceance basin in northwestern Colorado could adversely affect the ground- and surface-water quality in the basin. This study of the hydrology and geochemistry of the area used groundwater solute-transport-modeling techniques to investigate the possible impact of the mines on water quality. Maps of the extent and structure of the aquifer were prepared and show that a saturated thickness of 2,000 feet occurs in the northeast part of the basin. Ground-water recharge in the upland areas in the east, south, and west parts of the basin moves down into deeper zones in the aquifer and laterally to the discharge areas along Piceance and Yellow Creeks. The saline zone and the unsaturated zone provide the majority of the dissolved solids found in the ground water. Precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also occurring in the aquifer. Model simulations of groundwater pumpage in tracts C-a and C-b indicate that the altered direction of groundwater movement near the pumped mines will cause an improvement in groundwater quality near the mines and a degradation of water quality downgradient from the tracts. Model simulations of mine leaching in tract C-a and C-b indicate that equal rates of mine leaching in the tracts will produce much different effects on the water quality in the basin. Tract C-a, by virtue of its remote location from perennial streams, will primarily degrade the groundwater quality over a large area to the northeast of the tract. Tract C-b, by contrast, will primarily degrade the surface-water quality in Piceance Creek, with only localized effects on the groundwater quality. (USGS)

  14. Solute transport through large uniform and layered soil columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, I.; Wierenga, P. J.; Hills, R. G.

    1993-04-01

    Solute transport experiments are often conducted with homogeneous soils, whereas transport in real situations takes place in heterogeneous soils. An experiment was conducted to compare unsaturated solute transport through uniform and layered soils. Pulse inputs of tritiated water, bromide and chloride were applied under steady flow conditions to the tops of two large (0.95 m diameter by 6 m deep) soil columns. One column was uniformly filled with loamy fine sand and the other filled with alternating 20-cm-thick layers of loamy fine sand and silty clay loam. Soil solution samples were collected during the experiment with suction candles installed at various depths in the columns. Solute transport parameters were estimated by fitting the convection-dispersion equation to the observed breakthrough curves for each solute at various depths in each column. The match between the resulting calibrated curves and the experiment was better for the layered soil column than for the uniform soil column. The results displayed no clear relationship between the dispersion coefficients and depth for any of the tracers for either column. However, dispersivities were greater in the uniform column (3.5 cm) than in the layered column (1.2 cm), while retardation factors for bromide and chloride were similar (0.8 and 0.83, respectively, for the uniform and layered columns). A retardation factor less than one is attributed to anion exclusion. There was evidence of preferential flow in the uniform soil column. The peak concentrations at 5 m depth were greater than those observed at 4 m. Such behavior is inconsistent with one-dimensional flow. Similar results were observed in an experiment performed 3.5 years earlier using the same soil column and approximately the same flow rates, but using a different tracer and associated chemical analysis, different soil saturation prior to the execution of the experiment, and different experimental personnel. This supports the thesis that the anomalous

  15. JOVIAN STRATOSPHERE AS A CHEMICAL TRANSPORT SYSTEM: BENCHMARK ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xi; Shia Runlie; Yung, Yuk L., E-mail: xiz@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    We systematically investigated the solvable analytical benchmark cases in both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) chemical-advective-diffusive systems. We use the stratosphere of Jupiter as an example but the results can be applied to other planetary atmospheres and exoplanetary atmospheres. In the 1D system, we show that CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} are mainly in diffusive equilibrium, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} profile can be approximated by modified Bessel functions. In the 2D system in the meridional plane, analytical solutions for two typical circulation patterns are derived. Simple tracer transport modeling demonstrates that the distribution of a short-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) is dominated by the local chemical sources and sinks, while that of a long-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is significantly influenced by the circulation pattern. We find that an equator-to-pole circulation could qualitatively explain the Cassini observations, but a pure diffusive transport process could not. For slowly rotating planets like the close-in extrasolar planets, the interaction between the advection by the zonal wind and chemistry might cause a phase lag between the final tracer distribution and the original source distribution. The numerical simulation results from the 2D Caltech/JPL chemistry-transport model agree well with the analytical solutions for various cases.

  16. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  17. Phononic heat transport in the transient regime: An analytic solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuovinen, Riku; Säkkinen, Niko; Karlsson, Daniel; Stefanucci, Gianluca; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the time-resolved quantum transport properties of phonons in arbitrary harmonic systems connected to phonon baths at different temperatures. We obtain a closed analytic expression of the time-dependent one-particle reduced density matrix by explicitly solving the equations of motion for the nonequilibrium Green's function. This is achieved through a well-controlled approximation of the frequency-dependent bath self-energy. Our result allows for exploring transient oscillations and relaxation times of local heat currents, and correctly reduces to an earlier known result in the steady-state limit. We apply the formalism to atomic chains, and benchmark the validity of the approximation against full numerical solutions of the bosonic Kadanoff-Baym equations for the Green's function. We find good agreement between the analytic and numerical solutions for weak contacts and baths with a wide energy dispersion. We further analyze relaxation times from low to high temperature gradients.

  18. Proton-associated sucrose transport of mammalian solute carrier family 45: an analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartölke, Rabea; Heinisch, Jürgen J; Wieczorek, Helmut; Vitavska, Olga

    2014-12-01

    The members of the solute carrier 45 (SLC45) family have been implicated in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis in the brain (SLC45A1), with skin and hair pigmentation (SLC45A2), and with prostate cancer and myelination (SLC45A3). However, apart from SLC45A1, a proton-associated glucose transporter, the function of these proteins is still largely unknown, although sequence similarities to plant sucrose transporters mark them as a putative sucrose transporter family. Heterologous expression of the three members SLC45A2, SLC45A3 and SLC45A4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed that they are indeed sucrose transporters. [(14)C]Sucrose-uptake measurements revealed intermediate transport affinities with Km values of approximately 5 mM. Transport activities were best under slightly acidic conditions and were inhibited by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrating an H(+)-coupled transport mechanism. Na(+), on the other hand, had no effect on sucrose transport. Competitive inhibition assays indicated a possible transport also of glucose and fructose. Real-time PCR of mouse tissues confirmed mRNA expression of SLC45A2 in eyes and skin and of SLC45A3 primarily in the prostate, but also in other tissues, whereas SLC45A4 showed a predominantly ubiquitous expression. Altogether the results provide new insights into the physiological significance of SLC45 family members and challenge existing concepts of mammalian sugar transport, as they (i) transport a disaccharide, and (ii) perform secondary active transport in a proton-dependent manner. PMID:25164149

  19. Modeling solute transport by DLA in soils of northeastern Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Yasser Ahmed; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Persson, Magnus; Berndtsson, Ronny; Wang, Xin-ping

    2015-01-01

    Arid soils in Egypt display large variability in solute transport properties, causing problems in soil management. To characterize this variability, dye infiltration experiments were conducted on four plots representing three main soil types in northeastern Egypt. The plots represented both cultivated and uncultivated land use. The observed dye patterns displayed a large variability and especially the clay soils indicated a high degree of preferential flow. The loamy sand and sandy soils displayed a more uniform dye distribution indicating more homogeneous soil properties. The observed dye patterns were modeled using a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model. The DLA is a random walk model where model parameters can be optimized using genetic algorithms (GA). The DLA model reproduced the observed dye patterns for all soils in an excellent way. The best fit was obtained with a specific combination of directional random walk probabilities Pu, Pd, Pr, and Pl for each plot (correlation 0.97-0.99). To account for soil layers with different hydraulic properties a two layer DLA model was developed. For all plots the Pu (upward random walk probability) was higher for the upper more homogeneous soil layer. The overall results showed that spatial variability resulting from solute transport for the investigated soils can be modeled using a DLA approach. PMID:25790463

  20. Modeling solute transport by DLA in soils of northeastern Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Ahmed Hamed

    Full Text Available Arid soils in Egypt display large variability in solute transport properties, causing problems in soil management. To characterize this variability, dye infiltration experiments were conducted on four plots representing three main soil types in northeastern Egypt. The plots represented both cultivated and uncultivated land use. The observed dye patterns displayed a large variability and especially the clay soils indicated a high degree of preferential flow. The loamy sand and sandy soils displayed a more uniform dye distribution indicating more homogeneous soil properties. The observed dye patterns were modeled using a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA model. The DLA is a random walk model where model parameters can be optimized using genetic algorithms (GA. The DLA model reproduced the observed dye patterns for all soils in an excellent way. The best fit was obtained with a specific combination of directional random walk probabilities Pu, Pd, Pr, and Pl for each plot (correlation 0.97-0.99. To account for soil layers with different hydraulic properties a two layer DLA model was developed. For all plots the Pu (upward random walk probability was higher for the upper more homogeneous soil layer. The overall results showed that spatial variability resulting from solute transport for the investigated soils can be modeled using a DLA approach.

  1. Transport Visualization for Studying Mass Transfer and Solute Transport in Permeable Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding and predicting mass transfer coupled with solute transport in permeable media is central to several energy-related programs at the US Department of Energy (e.g., CO2 sequestration, nuclear waste disposal, hydrocarbon extraction, and groundwater remediation). Mass transfer is the set of processes that control movement of a chemical between mobile (advection-dominated) domains and immobile (diffusion- or sorption-dominated) domains within a permeable medium. Consequences of mass transfer on solute transport are numerous and may include (1) increased sequestration time within geologic formations; (2) reduction in average solute transport velocity by as much as several orders of magnitude; (3) long ''tails'' in concentration histories during removal of a solute from a permeable medium; (4) poor predictions of solute behavior over long time scales; and (5) changes in reaction rates due to mass transfer influences on pore-scale mixing of solutes. Our work produced four principle contributions: (1) the first comprehensive visualization of solute transport and mass transfer in heterogeneous porous media; (2) the beginnings of a theoretical framework that encompasses both macrodispersion and mass transfer within a single set of equations; (3) experimental and analytical tools necessary for understanding mixing and aqueous reaction in heterogeneous, granular porous media; (4) a clear experimental demonstration that reactive transport is often not accurately described by a simple coupling of the convection-dispersion equation with chemical reaction equations. The work shows that solute transport in heterogeneous media can be divided into 3 regimes--macrodispersion, advective mass transfer, and diffusive mass transfer--and that these regimes can be predicted quantitatively in binary media. We successfully predicted mass transfer in each of these regimes and verified the prediction by completing quantitative visualization experiments in each of the regimes, the

  2. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestel, J. K.; Luong, N. M.; Nørgaard, T.; Vendelboe, A. L.; Moldrup, P.; Jarvis, N. J.; Lamandé, M.; Iversen, B. V.; Wollesen de Jonge, L.

    2012-04-01

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness of the relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land management practices (e.g. Beven, K., 1991, Modeling preferential flow - an uncertain future, Preferential Flow, 1-11). In our study, we present evidence that disproves this notion. We evaluated breakthrough curve experiments under a constant irrigation rate of 1 cm/h conducted on 65 soil columns (20 cm diameter and 20 height) which had been sampled from an approximately 1 ha large loamy field-site in Silstrup, Denmark. We show that the holdback factor, which is an indicator for the strength of preferential transport, is strongly correlated to the bulk density, which in turn is correlated to the organic matter content. By applying multiple linear regression in a bootstrapping framework, we could estimate the holdback factor from the bulk density and the very fine sand fraction with a coefficient of determination of 0.65. Our results raise hopes that it is indeed possible to establish pedotransfer functions for soil susceptibility to preferential flow and transport.

  3. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J;

    2016-01-01

    reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists...

  4. TURBULENCE TRANSPORT OF SURFACTANT SOLUTION FLOW DURING DRAG REDUCTION DEGENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Wei-guo; WANG De-zhong

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence transport of surfactant solution flow during drag reduction degeneration is investigated experimentally in a two-dimensional channel.Particle Image Velocimetry (P1V) system is used to take two-dimensional velocity frames in the streamwise and wall-normal plane.The additive of surfactant is cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) with the mass concentration of 25 ppm.Drag reduction degeneration happens in the CTAC solution flow,exhibiting the maximal drag reduction at Re =25000and losing drag reduction completely at Re =40 000.The velocity frames are statistically analyzed in four quadrants which are divided by the u -axis and v-axis.It is found that the phenomenon of“Zero Reynolds shear stress” is caused by the decrease of wallnormal fluctuations and its symmetrical distribution in quadrants.The increase of Reynolds number leads to the enhancement of turbulence burst phenomenon.During thc drag reduction degeneration,the CTAC solution flow contains both high turbulence intensity and drag reduction states.

  5. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  6. Solute transport theory in application of deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of nuclide transport is an important subject in deep geological disposal system of high-level radioactive waste. The transport and distribution of solute are influenced by groundwater movement in the porous media. In order to understand the advances in underground water movement, the process, the mechanism and practical application of solute transport in groundwater system are reviewed. The theories and numerical simulations on dispersion, adsorption, transport of solutes in groundwater system are discussed in the presented paper. (authors)

  7. Coupling of solute transport and cell expansion in pea stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstig, J. G.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    As cells expand and are displaced through the elongation zone of the epicotyl of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings, there is little net dilution of the cell sap, implying a coordination between cell expansion and solute uptake from the phloem. Using [14C] sucrose as a phloem tracer (applied to the hypogeous cotyledons), the pattern of label accumulation along the stem closely matched the growth rate pattern: high accumulation in the growing zone, little accumulation in nongrowing regions. Several results suggest that a major portion of phloem contents enters elongating cells through the symplast. We propose that the coordination between phloem transport and cell expansion is accomplished via regulatory pathways affecting both plasmodesmata conductivity and cell expansion.

  8. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine;

    management practices (e.g. Beven, K., 1991, modeling preferential flow - an uncertain future, Preferential Flow, 1-11). In our study, we present evidence that disproves this notion. We evaluated breakthrough curve experiments under a constant irrigation rate of 1 cm/h conducted on 65 soil columns (20 cm......An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness...... of the relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land...

  9. The quasi-diffusive approximation in transport theory: Local solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The one velocity, plane geometry integral neutron transport equation is transformed into a system of two equations, one of them being the equation of continuity and the other a generalized Fick's law, in which the usual diffusion coefficient is replaced by a self-adjoint integral operator. As the kernel of this operator is very close to the Green function of a diffusion equation, an approximate inversion by means of a second order differential operator allows to transform these equations into a purely differential system which is shown to be equivalent, in the simplest case, to a diffusion-like equation. The method, the principles of which have been exposed in a previous paper, is here extended and applied to a variety of problems. If the inversion is properly performed, the quasi-diffusive solutions turn out to be quite accurate, even in the vicinity of the interface between different material regions, where elementary diffusion theory usually fails. 16 refs., 3 tabs

  10. Improved parallel solution techniques for the integral transport matrix method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerr, R. Joseph, E-mail: rjz116@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Azmy, Yousry Y., E-mail: yyazmy@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Burlington Engineering Laboratories, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Alternative solution strategies to the parallel block Jacobi (PBJ) method for the solution of the global problem with the integral transport matrix method operators have been designed and tested. The most straightforward improvement to the Jacobi iterative method is the Gauss-Seidel alternative. The parallel red-black Gauss-Seidel (PGS) algorithm can improve on the number of iterations and reduce work per iteration by applying an alternating red-black color-set to the subdomains and assigning multiple sub-domains per processor. A parallel GMRES(m) method was implemented as an alternative to stationary iterations. Computational results show that the PGS method can improve on the PBJ method execution time by up to 10´ when eight sub-domains per processor are used. However, compared to traditional source iterations with diffusion synthetic acceleration, it is still approximately an order of magnitude slower. The best-performing cases are optically thick because sub-domains decouple, yielding faster convergence. Further tests revealed that 64 sub-domains per processor was the best performing level of sub-domain division. An acceleration technique that improves the convergence rate would greatly improve the ITMM. The GMRES(m) method with a diagonal block pre conditioner consumes approximately the same time as the PBJ solver but could be improved by an as yet undeveloped, more efficient pre conditioner. (author)

  11. Improved parallel solution techniques for the integral transport matrix method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerr, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azmy, Yousry Y [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV.

    2010-11-23

    Alternative solution strategies to the parallel block Jacobi (PBJ) method for the solution of the global problem with the integral transport matrix method operators have been designed and tested. The most straightforward improvement to the Jacobi iterative method is the Gauss-Seidel alternative. The parallel red-black Gauss-Seidel (PGS) algorithm can improve on the number of iterations and reduce work per iteration by applying an alternating red-black color-set to the subdomains and assigning multiple sub-domains per processor. A parallel GMRES(m) method was implemented as an alternative to stationary iterations. Computational results show that the PGS method can improve on the PBJ method execution by up to {approx}50% when eight sub-domains per processor are used. However, compared to traditional source iterations with diffusion synthetic acceleration, it is still approximately an order of magnitude slower. The best-performing case are opticaUy thick because sub-domains decouple, yielding faster convergence. Further tests revealed that 64 sub-domains per processor was the best performing level of sub-domain division. An acceleration technique that improves the convergence rate would greatly improve the ITMM. The GMRES(m) method with a diagonal block preconditioner consumes approximately the same time as the PBJ solver but could be improved by an as yet undeveloped, more efficient preconditioner.

  12. Activity transport models for PWR primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion products activated in the primary circuit form a major source of occupational radiation dose in the PWR reactors. Transport of corrosion activity is a complex process including chemistry, reactor physics, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. All the mechanisms involved are not known and there is no comprehensive theory for the process, so experimental test loops and plant data are very important in research efforts. Several activity transport modelling attempts have been made to improve the water chemistry control and to minimise corrosion in PWR's. In this research report some of these models are reviewed with special emphasis on models designed for Soviet VVER type reactors. (51 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.)

  13. Modelling activity transport behavior in PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activation and transport of corrosion products around a PWR circuit is a major concern to PWR plant operators as these may give rise to high personnel doses. The understanding of what controls dose rates on ex-core surfaces and shutdown releases has improved over the years but still several questions remain unanswered. For example the relative importance of particle and soluble deposition in the core to activity levels in the plant is not clear. Wide plant to plant and cycle to cycle variations are noted with no apparent explanations why such variations are observed. Over the past few years this group have been developing models to simulate corrosion product transport around a PWR circuit. These models form the basis for the latest version of the BOA code and simulate the movement of Fe and Ni around the primary circuit. Part of this development is to include the activation and subsequent transport of radioactive species around the circuit and this paper describes some initial modelling work in this area. A simple model of activation, release and deposition is described and then applied to explain the plant behaviour at Sizewell B and Vandellos II. This model accounts for activation in the core, soluble and particulate activity movement around the circuit and for activity capture ex-core on both the inner and outer oxides. The model gives a reasonable comparison with plant observations and highlights what controls activity transport in these plants and importantly what factors can be ignored. (authors)

  14. Transportation activities for BWR fuels at NFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Fuel Industries, LTD. (NFI) supplies fuel assemblies for both PWR and BWR in Japan. We can also manage transportation of the fuel assemblies from our fabrication facilities to the nuclear power plants of Japanese utilities. For the transportation of fuel assembly, we designed and fabricated the transportation containers to meet the requirements of the IAEA regulations, and licensed in Japan. This paper introduced the recent activity and R and D of NFI concerning transportation of BWR fuel assembly. NT-XII transportation container was developed for fresh BWR fuel assemblies. NT-XII container consists of inner container and outer container. Two BWR fuel assemblies with up to 5 wt.-% 235-U enriched are enclosed in an inner container. In the concept of NT-XII container design, we made the best priority to transportation efficiency, as well as ensuring fuel integrity during transportation. NT-XII has been used since 2002 in Japan. Thanks to the lightening weight of containers, the number of containers to be loaded to one transportation truck was increased up to 9 containers (equivalent to 18 fuel assemblies) compared with former type container (NT-IV transportation container) which can be loaded up to 6 containers (equivalent to 12 fuel assemblies). In addition to the design of brand-new container, we promote the improvement of the packaging methods. In Japan, in order to reduce the damage to the fuel rod and fuel spacer while transporting, polyethylene sleeves which are called 'packing separators' are inserted in the rod-to-rod gap of fuel assembly. However, packing separators requires time and cost for the installation at fuel fabrication facility. In the same way, huge time and cost are needed for removal of packing separators at nuclear power plant. For the improvement of preparation efficiency before and after transportation, we investigated the influence of vibration to fuel integrity in case of transportation without packing separators. Based on the above

  15. Stochastic steps in secondary active sugar transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Joshua L; Ghezzi, Chiara; Bisignano, Paola; Loo, Donald D F; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Rosenberg, John M; Wright, Ernest M; Grabe, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Secondary active transporters, such as those that adopt the leucine-transporter fold, are found in all domains of life, and they have the unique capability of harnessing the energy stored in ion gradients to accumulate small molecules essential for life as well as expel toxic and harmful compounds. How these proteins couple ion binding and transport to the concomitant flow of substrates is a fundamental structural and biophysical question that is beginning to be answered at the atomistic level with the advent of high-resolution structures of transporters in different structural states. Nonetheless, the dynamic character of the transporters, such as ion/substrate binding order and how binding triggers conformational change, is not revealed from static structures, yet it is critical to understanding their function. Here, we report a series of molecular simulations carried out on the sugar transporter vSGLT that lend insight into how substrate and ions are released from the inward-facing state of the transporter. Our simulations reveal that the order of release is stochastic. Functional experiments were designed to test this prediction on the human homolog, hSGLT1, and we also found that cytoplasmic release is not ordered, but we confirmed that substrate and ion binding from the extracellular space is ordered. Our findings unify conflicting published results concerning cytoplasmic release of ions and substrate and hint at the possibility that other transporters in the superfamily may lack coordination between ions and substrate in the inward-facing state. PMID:27325773

  16. Pedometer-determined physical activity and active transport in girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schofield Grant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that the risk of insufficient physical activity is greater in girls than in boys, especially during the adolescent years. The promotion of active transport (AT to and from school has been posited as a practical and convenient solution for increasing girls' total daily activity. However, there is limited information describing the associations between AT choices and girls' physical activity across a range of age, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. The objectives of this study were to (1 investigate physical activity patterns in a large multiethnic sample of female children and adolescents, and to (2 estimate the physical activity associated with AT to and from school. Methods A total of 1,513 girls aged 5–16 years wore sealed multiday memory (MDM pedometers for three weekdays and two weekend days. The ethnic composition of this sample was 637 European (42.1%, 272 Pacific Island (18.0%, 207 East Asian (13.7%, 179 Maori (11.8%, 142 South Asian (9.4%, and 76 from other ethnic groups (5%. Pedometer compliance and school-related AT were assessed by questionnaire. Results Mean weekday step counts (12,597 ± 3,630 were higher and less variable than mean weekend steps (9,528 ± 4,407. A consistent decline in daily step counts was observed with age: after adjustment for ethnicity and SES, girls in school years 9–10 achieved 2,469 (weekday and 4,011 (weekend fewer steps than girls in years 1–2. Daily step counts also varied by ethnicity, with Maori girls the most active and South Asian girls the least active. Overall, 44.9% of participants used AT for school-related travel. Girls who used AT to and from school averaged 1,052 more weekday steps than those who did not use AT. However, the increases in steps associated with AT were significant only in older girls (school years 5–10 and in those of Maori or European descent. Conclusion Our data suggest that adolescent-aged girls and girls of Asian descent are

  17. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  18. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rojas-Rueda

    Full Text Available Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16-64 in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter <2.5 μm, as well as traffic fatalities in the cities of Barcelona, Basel, Copenhagen, Paris, Prague, and Warsaw. All scenarios produced health benefits in the six cities. An increase in bicycle trips to 35% of all trips (as in Copenhagen produced the highest benefits among the different scenarios analysed in Warsaw 113 (76-163 annual deaths avoided, Prague 61 (29-104, Barcelona 37 (24-56, Paris 37 (18-64 and Basel 5 (3-9. An increase in walking trips to 50% of all trips (as in Paris resulted in 19 (3-42 deaths avoided annually in Warsaw, 11(3-21 in Prague, 6 (4-9 in Basel, 3 (2-6 in Copenhagen and 3 (2-4 in Barcelona. The scenarios would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year. Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation.

  19. Finite element based composite solution for neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A finite element treatment for solving neutron transport problems is presented. The employs region-wise discontinuous finite elements for the spatial representation of the neutron angular flux, while spherical harmonics are used for directional dependence. Composite solutions has been obtained by using different orders of angular approximations in different parts of a system. The method has been successfully implemented for one dimensional slab and two dimensional rectangular geometry problems. An overall reduction in the number of nodal coefficients (more than 60% in some cases as compared to conventional schemes) has been achieved without loss of accuracy with better utilization of computational resources. The method also provides an efficient way of handling physically difficult situations such as treatment of voids in duct problems and sharply changing angular flux. It is observed that a great wealth of information about the spatial and directional dependence of the angular flux is obtained much more quickly as compared to Monte Carlo method, where most of the information in restricted to the locality of immediate interest. (author)

  20. An optimized transport-of-intensity solution for phase imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Partha; Basunia, Mahmudunnabi; Poon, Ting-Chung; Zhang, Hongbo

    2016-05-01

    The transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) is often used to determine the phase and amplitude profile of a complex object by monitoring the intensities at different distances of propagation or around the image plane. TIE results from the imaginary part of the paraxial wave equation and is equivalent to the conservation of energy. The real part of the paraxial wave equation gives the eikonal equation in the presence of diffraction. Since propagation of the optical field between different planes is governed by the (paraxial) wave equation, both real and imaginary parts need to be satisfied at every propagation plane. In this work, the solution of the TIE is optimized by using the real part of the paraxial wave equation as a constraint. This technique is applied to the more exact determination of imaging the induced phase of a liquid heated by a focused laser beam, which has been previously computed using TIE only. Retrieval of imaged phase using the TIE is performed by using the constraint that naturally arises from the real part of the paraxial wave equation.

  1. Analytical and experimental analysis of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Gao, Bin; Tian, Yuan; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is crucial to monitor contaminant fate and transport in soil and groundwater systems. In this study, we present new findings from experimental and mathematical analysis to improve current understanding of solute transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. Three saturated columns packed with different sand combinations were used to examine the breakthrough behavior of bromide, a conservative tracer. Experimental results showed that bromide had different breakthrough responses in the three types of sand combinations, indicating that heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity has a significant effect on the solute transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. Simulations from analytical solutions of a two-domain solute transport model matched experimental breakthrough data well for all the experimental conditions tested. Experimental and model results show that under saturated flow conditions, advection dominates solute transport in both fast-flow and slow-flow domains. The sand with larger hydraulic conductivity provided a preferential flow path for solute transport (fast-flow domain) that dominates the mass transfer in the heterogeneous porous media. Importantly, the transport in the slow-flow domain and mass exchange between the domains also contribute to the flow and solute transport processes and thus must be considered when investigating contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media. PMID:24279625

  2. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive tracer transport in layered fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, G.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-10-10

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  3. Study of reactive solutes transport and PAH migration in unsaturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies about solute transport in soil have most of the time been conducted under saturated conditions, whereas studies with unsaturated media are usually limited to hydrodynamic analysis. Those are mainly concerning the prediction of water flow, which is the main vector for the transport of contaminants in soil. Only a few studies have made the link between unsaturated flow and physical, chemical and biological interactions, which are controlling the availability of pollutants. However, the presence of a gaseous phase in soil can modify not only the movement of soil solution, but also chemical interactions and exchanges between soil aggregates and solution. Study of reactive solute transport in the vadose zone seems thus to be a necessary stage to predict contaminant fate in natural soils, for risk assessment as well as for the design of effective processes for the remediation of contaminated soils. This question is the main objective of the present work developed in the frame of our French Scientific Interest Group Industrial Wastelands called 'GISFI' (www.gisfi.prd.fr), based around a scientific and technological project dedicated to acquisition of knowledge for sustainable requalification of degraded sites polluted by past industrial activities. We will focus here on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which are among the most widely discussed environmental contaminants because of their toxicity for human health and ecosystems. They are present in large quantities in soils polluted by former industrial activities, especially in relation to the coal extraction, exploitation and treatment. An experimental system has been specifically designed at the laboratory scale to carry out experiments under controlled conditions, with an unsaturated steady-state flow. The first experiments are performed on model soils, in order to investigate unsaturated steady-state flow in relation to interactions mechanisms. We have thus chosen to use a sandy

  4. Final Technical Report Transport Task Force Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transport Task Force has functioned as the primary scientific organization in the area of magnetic-fusion confinement and transport since its inception in 1988. It has defined and set research directions, coordinated broad research efforts, advocated new funding initiatives, and created a highly successful and widely admired interactive culture between experiment, theory and modeling. The Transport Task Force carries out its activities under the direction of its chair and the Executive Committee. The Executive Committee is comprised of the leaders and deputy leaders of the scientific working groups. The working groups are structured and organized according to research needs and priorities and have been organized around the areas of Core Transport, H Mode and Pedestal, Fast Particle Transport, Transient Transport Phenomena, and Modeling and Simulation. A steering committee provides advise on TTF activities. Further information on the working groups and the structure and management of the TTF can be found at http://psfcwww2.psfc.mit.edu/ttf/index.html. The TTF holds an annual workshop. A summary of the workshops held during the period of this report is given in Appendix I. During the period of this report the Transport Task Force was involved in several significant activities. Foremost of these was a sweeping review of the status of transport science, the key research tasks for progress during the next 5-10 years, and a proposal for a funding initiative to ensure application of adequate resources to these problems. The conclusions of this study were incorporated into a white paper, which is copied below in Appendix II. Other significant activities have included the introduction of an extended, ongoing discussion on verification and validation as a requisite for defining and codifying the path toward predictive capability, the orchestration of a gradual shift of focus from ion thermal confinement to electron thermal confinement, and a joining of efforts on edge

  5. GLOBAL EXISTENCE AND ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOR OF THE SOLUTION TO 1-D ENERGY TRANSPORT MODEL FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎勇; 陈丽

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behavior of global smooth solution to the initial boundary problem for the 1-D energy transport model in semiconductor science. We prove that the smooth solution of the problem converges to a stationary solution exponentially fast as t - ∞ when the initial data is a small perturbation of the stationary solution.

  6. Links between soil properties and steady-state solute transport through cultivated topsoil at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J. K.; Norgaard, T.; Minh, Luong Nhat;

    2013-01-01

    consequence to larger water saturation and the activation of larger macropores. Our study provides further evidence that it should be possible to estimate solute transport properties from soil properties such as soil texture or bulk density. We also demonstrated that estimation approaches established for the......It is known that solute transport through soil is heterogeneous at all spatial scales. However, little data are available to allow quantification of these heterogeneities at the field scale or larger. In this study, we investigated the spatial patterns of soil properties, hydrologic state variables...... transport was positively correlated with the bulk density and the degree of water saturation. The latter suggests that preferential macropore transport was the dominating transport process. Increased bulk densities were presumably related with a decrease in near-saturated hydraulic conductivities and as a...

  7. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21-87) years; median time on PD 19 (3-100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS), fraction of ultrasmall pores (α u), osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG), and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters). Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters--rather than solute transport parameters--are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26989432

  8. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During peritoneal dialysis (PD, the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21–87 years; median time on PD 19 (3–100 months underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS, fraction of ultrasmall pores (αu, osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG, and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters. Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters—rather than solute transport parameters—are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane.

  9. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21-87) years; median time on PD 19 (3-100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS), fraction of ultrasmall pores (α u), osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG), and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters). Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters--rather than solute transport parameters--are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane.

  10. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : Swap model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale level. The ma

  11. New methods For Modeling Transport Of Water And Solutes In Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møldrup, Per

    Recent models for water and solute transport in unsaturated soils have been mechanistically based but numerically very involved. This dissertation concerns the development of mechanistically-based but numerically simple models for calculating and analyzing transport of water and solutes in soil...

  12. Specific transport and storage solutions: Waste management facing current and future stakes of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With major projects ongoing or being planned, and also with the daily management of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, the role of transport and/or storage packaging has been often overlooked. Indeed, the packaging development process and transport solutions implemented are a key part of the waste management challenge: protection of people and environment. During over four decades, the AREVA Group has developed a complete and coherent system for the transport of waste produced by nuclear industries. The transport solutions integrate the factors to consider, as industrial transportation needs, various waste forms, associated hazards and current regulations. Thus, COGEMA LOGISTICS has designed, licensed and manufactured a large number of different transport, storage and dual purpose cask models for residues and all kinds of radioactive wastes. The present paper proposes to illustrate how a company acting both as a cask designer and a carrier is key to the waste management issue and how it can support the waste management policy of nuclear producers through their operational choices. We will focus on the COGEMA LOGISTICS technical solutions implemented to guarantee safe and secure transportation and storage solutions. We will describe different aspects of the cask design process, insisting on how it enables to fulfill both customer needs and regulation requirements. We will also mention the associated services developed by the AREVA Business Unit Logistics (COGEMA LOGISTICS, TRANSNUCLEAR, MAINCO, and LEMARECHAL CELESTIN) in order to manage transportation of liquid and solid waste towards interim or final storage sites. The paper has the following contents: About radioactive waste; - Radioactive waste classification; - High level activity waste and long-lived intermediate level waste; - Long-lived low level waste; - Short-lived low- and intermediate level waste; - Very low level waste; - The radioactive waste in nuclear fuel cycle; - Packaging design and

  13. Hydrodynamics of steady state phloem transport with radial leakage of solute

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo eCabrita; Michael eThorpe; Gregor Johannes Huber

    2013-01-01

    Long-distance phloem transport occurs under a pressure gradient generated by the osmotic exchange of water associated with solute exchange in source and sink regions. But these exchanges also occur along the pathway, and yet their physiological role has almost been ignored in mathematical models of phloem transport. Here we present a steady state model for transport phloem which allows solute leakage, based on the Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations which describe fluid motion ri...

  14. High Order Numerical Solution of Integral Transport Equation in Slab Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈智军; 袁光伟; 沈隆钧

    2002-01-01

    @@ There are some common numerical methods for solving neutron transport equation, which including the well-known discrete ordinates method, PN approximation and integral transport methods[1]. There exists certain singularities in the solution of transport equation near the boundary and interface[2]. It gives rise to the difficulty in the construction of high order accurate numerical methods. The numerical solution obtained by now can not attain the second order convergent accuracy[3,4].

  15. A modified two-state empirical valence bond model for proton transport in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabuchi, Takuya, E-mail: mabuchi@nanoint.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Fukushima, Akinori; Tokumasu, Takashi [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-07-07

    A detailed analysis of the proton solvation structure and transport properties in aqueous solutions is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations. A refined two-state empirical valence bond (aTS-EVB) method, which is based on the EVB model of Walbran and Kornyshev and the anharmonic water force field, is developed in order to describe efficiently excess proton transport via the Grotthuss mechanism. The new aTS-EVB model clearly satisfies the requirement for simpler and faster calculation, because of the simplicity of the two-state EVB algorithm, while providing a better description of diffusive dynamics of the excess proton and water in comparison with the previous two-state EVB models, which significantly improves agreement with the available experimental data. The results of activation energies for the excess proton and water calculated between 300 and 340 K (the temperature range used in this study) are also found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  16. Activity transport in nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to give a basic understanding of the operational limitations caused by radiation fields in the present design of CANDU-PHW reactors. A simple model of activity transport is described, and the significance of various radioisotopes identified. The impact which radiation fields have at the Divisional, Station Manager and Operation levels, is outlined in the context of typical work situations. (author)

  17. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    be very similar and likely functionally related. Our experimental field data were used for modelling water flow and solute transport in floating fens, using HYDRUS 2D. Fluctuations of surface water and root mat, as well as geometry and unsaturated zone parameters can have a major influence on groundwater fluctuations and the exchange between rain and surface water and the water in the root mats. In combination with the duration of salt pulses in surface water, and sensitivity of fen plants to salinity (Stofberg et al. 2014, submitted), risks for rare plants can be anticipated.

  18. Road Transport System in Southeast Asia; Problems and Economic Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Kaffashi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In Southeast Asian countries (SEA, road transport accounts for the main energy consumption and CO2 emission. Air pollution is a major concern in densely populated cities such as Bangkok, Manila, and Kuala Lumpur. The main objective of this paper is to give insights on trends of transport development, car ownership, and CO2 emissions in Southeast Asia. This study also attempts to review the successful transportation policies around the globe and to introduce the possible instruments that can help reduce air pollution in Southeast Asian countries. Economic instruments to estimate the benefits of a cleaner environment due to new policies are introduced as well. The results of this research could help policy makers consider approaches that could internalize external costs of transportation and maximize the societal welfare.

  19. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Saiers, James E.; Newlin, Jessica T.

    2005-05-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the ``main flow zone''). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  20. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J.W.; Saiers, J.E.; Newlin, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the "main flow zone"). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  1. Solute transport in a layered field soil: Experiments and modelling using the convection-dispersion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, V. O.; Clothier, B. E.; Scotter, D. R.; White, R. E.

    1994-09-01

    Greater understanding of the processes affecting solute transport in field soils is required to meet the ever-increasing demand for improved management of field-applied chemicals. In this study, we sought to elucidate the effect of distinct interfaces between horizons of strongly-contrasting texture on solute transport. Field experiments of solute transport were performed on a soil consisting of three layers of different texture in which porous cup samplers had been installed at four depths in twenty sites. Similar experiments were done in a lysimeter of area 2 m 2 and 1 m deep. Convection-dispersion modelling was first attempted using the lysimeter data. This was successful, provided that the surface 250 mm of soil were not used to calibrate the model coefficients. Layering within the profile appeared to have little effect on solute transport. The transport porosity was found to be just two-thirds of the water-filled porosity. However, convection-dispersion modelling of the field data was not particularly successful, probably due to the spatially-variable nature of solute transport coupled with variation in the water application pattern. Textural differences in the soil seemed to be overwhelmed by both small-scale heterogeneity of water application and local variation of solute movement through the soil, especially near to the soil surface. It appears that the hydraulic processes occurring in the surface soil require more attention by modellers of solute transport than they have been afforded in the past.

  2. Dynamics of water and solute transport in polymeric reverse osmosis membranes via molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Meng; Lueptow, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    The Angstrom-scale transport characteristics of water and six different solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membrane, FT-30, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. Results indicate that water transport increases with an increasing fraction of connected percolated free volume, or water-accessible open space, in the membrane polymer structure. This free volume is enhanced by the dynamic structure of the membrane at the molecular level as it swells when hydrated and vibrates due to molecular collisions allowing a continuous path connecting the opposite membrane surfaces. The tortuous paths available for transport of solutes result in Brownian motion of solute molecules and hopping from pore to pore as they pass through the polymer network structure of the membrane. The transport of alcohol solutes decreases for solutes with larger Van der Waals volume, which corresponds to less available percolated free volume, or sol...

  3. Effect of chelating agents on the transport of radioactive solutes in subsurface porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of chelating agents on the transport of radioactive solutes in subsurface porous media is analyzed by formulating an advective-dispersive transport model which incorporates chelate formation, adsorption, decay, and degradation of transporting radioactive solutes. The governing equations are formulated by introducing the concept of a tenad. Particularly the governing equation for the tenad of a radioactive solute, is presented as a linear partial differential form and solved analytically by introducing an extended concept of distribution coefficient, KD. The calculated results from the model show that the transport rate of the tenad of a chelating agent, is much greater than that of the tenad. This faster transport of may be due to the low retardation factor of comparing to that of. Therefore, it is concluded that presence of chelating agents even in a small amount greatly accelerates the transport of radioactive wastes from a geologic radioactive waste repository

  4. Solute or Heat Transport in a Flat Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady state solute and heat transfer for laminar flow in a flat duct has been widely studied[1-4]. The same problem in a circular tube is called the Graetz Problem[5,6]. The transfer rate of solute and heat from fluids is of importance in a number of processes, such as diffusion of drugs in the blood stream and the uptake of environmental contaminants by animals in aquatic media[7]. In this study the rate of solute or heat transfer from fluids was determined by solving the associated differential equation. Solution by the series approach in the complex plane was used with a series that had a gaussian factor. The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues involved were examined for two different sets of boundary conditions.

  5. A dual-porosity model for simulating solute transport in oil shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    A model is described for simulating three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport in oil shale and associated geohydrologic units. The model treats oil shale as a dual-porosity medium by simulating flow and transport within fractures using the finite-element method. Diffusion of solute between fractures and the essentially static water of the shale matrix is simulated by including an analytical solution that acts as a source-sink term to the differential equation of solute transport. While knowledge of fracture orientation and spacing is needed to effectively use the model, it is not necessary to map the locations of individual fractures. The computer program listed in the report incorporates many of the features of previous dual-porosity models while retaining a practical approach to solving field problems. As a result the theory of solute transport is not extended in any appreciable way. The emphasis is on bringing together various aspects of solute transport theory in a manner that is particularly suited to the unusual groundwater flow and solute transport characteristics of oil shale systems. (Author 's abstract)

  6. Brine transport in porous media self-similar solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, C.J. van; Peletier, L.A.; Schotting, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a model for brine transport in porous media, which includes a mass balance for the fluid, a mass balance for salt, Darcy's law and an equation of state, which relates the fluid density to the salt mass fraction. This model incorporates the effect of local volume changes due

  7. Geomorphic and substrate controls on spatial variability in river solute transport and biogeochemical cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaen, Phillip; Kurz, Marie; Knapp, Julia; Mendoza-Lera, Clara; Lee-Cullin, Joe; Klaar, Megan; Drummond, Jen; Jaeger, Anna; Zarnetske, Jay; Lewandowski, Joerg; Marti, Eugenia; Ward, Adam; Fleckenstein, Jan; Datry, Thibault; Larned, Scott; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient concentrations in surface waters and groundwaters are increasing in many agricultural catchments worldwide as a result of anthropogenic activities. Increasing geomorphological heterogeneity in river channels may help to attenuate nutrient pollution by facilitating water exchange fluxes with the hyporheic zone; a site of intense microbial activity where biogeochemical transformation rates (e.g. denitrification) can be high. However, the controls on spatial variability in biogeochemical cycling, particularly at scales relevant for river managers, are not well understood. Here, we aimed to assess: 1) how differences in geomorphological heterogeneity control river solute transport and rates of biogeochemical cycling at sub-reach scales (102 m); and 2) the relative magnitude of these differences versus those relating to reach scale substrate variability (103 m). We used the reactive 'smart' tracer resazurin (Raz), a weakly fluorescent dye that transforms to highly fluorescent resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, as a proxy to assess rates of biogeochemical cycling in a lowland river in southern England. Solute tracer tests were conducted in two reaches with contrasting substrates: one sand-dominated and the other gravel-dominated. Each reach was divided into sub-reaches that varied in geomorphic complexity (e.g. by the presence of pool-riffle sequences or the abundance of large woody debris). Slug injections of Raz and the conservative tracer fluorescein were conducted in each reach during baseflow conditions (Q ≈ 80 L/s) and breakthrough curves monitored using in-situ fluorometers. Preliminary results indicate overall Raz:Rru transformation rates in the gravel-dominated reach were more than 50% higher than those in the sand-dominated reach. However, high sub-reach variability in Raz:Rru transformation rates and conservative solute transport parameters suggests small-scale targeted management interventions to alter geomorphic heterogeneity may be

  8. Analysis of the sodium recirculation theory of solute-coupled water transport in small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkaer

    2002-01-01

    Our previous mathematical model of solute-coupled water transport through the intestinal epithelium is extended for dealing with electrolytes rather than electroneutral solutes. A 3Na+-2K+ pump in the lateral membranes provides the energy-requiring step for driving transjunctional and translateral......, computations predict that the concentration differences between lis and bathing solutions are small for all three ions. Nevertheless, the diffusion fluxes of the ions out of lis significantly exceed their mass transports. It is concluded that isotonic transport requires recirculation of all three ions....... The computed sodium recirculation flux that is required for isotonic transport corresponds to that estimated in experiments on toad small intestine. This result is shown to be robust and independent of whether the apical entrance mechanism for the sodium ion is a channel, a SGLT1 transporter driving inward...

  9. Monte Carlo solution of a semi-discrete transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present the S∞ method, a hybrid neutron transport method in which Monte Carlo particles traverse discrete space. The goal of any deterministic/stochastic hybrid method is to couple selected characters from each of the methods in hopes of producing a better method. The S∞ method has the features of the lumped, linear-discontinuous (LLD) spatial discretization, yet it has no ray-effects because of the continuous angular variable. They derive the S∞ method for the solid-state, mono-energetic transport equation in one-dimensional slab geometry with isotropic scattering and an isotropic internal source. They demonstrate the viability of the S∞ method by comparing their results favorably to analytic and deterministic results

  10. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : Swap model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dam

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale level. The main features and theoretical concepts of SWAP are described.A serious limitation of many model applications is the availability of accurate input parameters. With the rapid increase of processor cal...

  11. Solute transport in nearly saturated porous media under landfill clay liners: A finite deformation approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, H. J.; Jeng, Dong-Sheng; Barry, David Andrew; Seymour, Brian R.; Li, Ling

    2013-01-01

    For solute transport in a deformable clay liner, the importance of consolidation in the presence of sorption and consolidation-induced advection are well known. Here a one-dimensional coupled consolidation and solute transport model for a partially saturated porous medium, including the new features of finite strain and geometric and material nonlinearity, is proposed. A new boundary condition at the compacted clay liner base is also introduced. A comprehensive comparison demonstrates the sig...

  12. Transport anb Structural Properties of Aqueous Solutions of Organic Solvents.

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto Draghi, Carlos Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulation technique has been used in this work to obtain equilibrium as well as transport properties of different aqueoussolutions. The peculiar behavior observed in pure water and its mixtures with other substances at different thermodynamic conditions, and the knowledge and understanding of the properties of these systems are the motivations of this work. We have made a direct connection between the local tetrahedral structure of water, created by the presence of hydroge...

  13. A note on the solution of fuzzy transportation problem using fuzzy linear system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Senthilkumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the solution of a fuzzy transportation problem, with fuzzy quantities. The problem is solved in two stages. In the first stage, the fuzzy transportation problem is reduced to crisp system by using the lower and upper bounds of fuzzy quantities. In the second stage, the crisp transportation problems are solved by usual simplex method. The procedure is illustrated with numerical examples.

  14. Local- and field-scale stochastic-advective vertical solute transport in horizontally heterogeneous unsaturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Richa; Prakash, A.; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2014-08-01

    Description of field-scale solute transport in unsaturated soils is essential for assessing the degree of contamination, estimating fluxes past a control plane and for designing remedial measures. The flow field is usually described by numerical solution of the Richards equation followed by numerical solution of the advection-dispersion equation to describe contaminant movement. These numerical solutions are highly complex, and do not provide the insights that are possible from simpler analytical representations. In this study, analytical solutions at the local scale are developed to describe purely advective vertical transport of a conservative solute along the principle characteristic of the flow field. Local-scale model development is simplified by using a sharp-front approximation for water movement. These local solutions are then upscaled to field-scale solute transport by adopting a lognormally distributed horizontal hydraulic conductivity field to represent the natural heterogeneity observed in field soils. Analytical expressions are developed for the mean behavior of solute transport at the field scale. Comparisons with experimental observations find that trends of field-scale solute behavior are reasonably reproduced by the model. The accuracy of the proposed solution improves with increasing spatial variability in the hydraulic conductivity as revealed by further comparisons with numerical results of the Richards equation-based field-scale solute movement. In some cases, the sharp-front approximation may lead to anomalous field-scale behavior depending on the role of pre and postponded conditions in the field, and this limitation is discussed. The proposed method shows promise for describing field-scale solute movement in loamy sand and sandy loam soils.

  15. Analytical solutions of solute transport in a fracture-matrix system with different reaction rates for fracture and matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yonghui; Zhan, Hongbin; Jin, Menggui

    2016-08-01

    This study deals with the problem of reactive solute transport in a fracture-matrix system using both analytical and numerical modeling methods. The groundwater flow velocity in the fracture is assumed to be high enough (no less than 0.1 m/day) to ensure the advection-dominant transport in the fracture. The problem includes advection along the fracture, transverse diffusion in the matrix, with linear sorption as well as first-order reactions operative in both the fracture and the matrix. A constant-concentration boundary condition and a decay source boundary condition in the fracture are considered. With a constant-concentration source, we obtain closed-form analytical solutions that account for the transport without reaction as well as steady-state solutions with different first-order reactions in the two media. With a decay source, a semi-analytical solution is obtained. The analytical and semi-analytical solutions are in excellent agreement with the numerical simulation results obtained using COMSOL Multiphysics. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to assess the relative importance of matrix diffusion coefficient, fracture aperture, and matrix porosity. We conclude that the first-order reaction as well as the matrix diffusion in the fractured rock would decrease the solute peak concentration and shorten the penetration distance into the fracture. The solutions can be applied to assess the spatial-temporal distribution of concentrations in the fracture and the matrix as well as to assess the contaminant mass stored in the rock matrix. All of these are useful for designing remediation plans for contaminated fractured rocks or for risk assessment of contaminated fracture-matrix systems.

  16. Liquid sample shuffler for gamma active solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, T.W.

    1987-02-01

    An instrument is proposed by Los Alamos National Laboratory for measuring low levels of fission-product-contaminated fissile solutions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The proposed unit uses neutrons from a /sup 252/Cf neutron source to induce fissions, and delayed neutrons from the induced fissions are counted once the neutron source is withdrawn. Lead is used to shield the neutron detectors from the gamma-ray dose of the fission products found in the solutions at the INEL plant. The designed sensitivity is 5 mg/l of /sup 235/U in 100 s with a 4-standard-deviation confidence.

  17. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  18. Propagator solutions of partial differential equations applied to plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of partial differential equations may be solved efficiently and easily, using a single algorithm which is based on the propagator (or Green's function) for equations of the Fokker-Planck type. The numerical method employed is always at least as fast as finite differencing, but is especially efficient in cases where flow dominates over diffusion, and is consequently potentially widely applicable in fluid dynamics. Two transport problems in a small toroidal magnetic confinement device (IMS) have been considered. First, the ion distribution function and the potential in the sheath were calculated in the presence of charge exchange collisions for a wide range of neutral densities. Second, radial particle transport was modeled allowing for strong convection in the bulk plasma, and the density n(r,θ) was obtained for various plausible forms of the flow velocity, consistent with the observed average radial velocity. The best agreement with experiment is obtained with a vertical flow, which is also suggested by the measured potential profiles. 17 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  19. A Polymer "Pollution Solution" Classroom Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helser, Terry L.

    1996-01-01

    Explains an approach to presenting polymer chemistry to nonmajors that employs polystyrene foam, foam peanuts made from water soluble starch, and water soluble plastic bags. Students are presented with a pollution scenario and are guided to the discovery of solutions. (DDR)

  20. Activities of binary baths with 1% solute as standard states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The relationships of activities with 1% solute as standard state and mass fraction of solute, and hot-dip temperature, were given on the base of Miedema's model, Tanaka expression, some basic thermodynamic relationships; and discussion was carried out on Zn-Mn and Zn-Ti binary alloys by calculation, in which varied colors can be achieved on the hot-dip steel sheets. The results indicate that the activity of solute shows positive deviation relative to Henry's law for both Zn-Mn and Zn-Ti binary dilute solution. The degree of deviation increases with increasing solute and decreases with increasing bath temperature. As the solution is very dilute solution (w(Mn)≤40% for Zn-Mn alloy,w(Ti)≤8% for Zn-Ti alloy), the two binary baths can all be treated as ideal dilute solutions.

  1. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables

  2. Information entropy to measure the spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyao; Huang, Guanhua; Xiong, Yunwu

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of the spatial structure of porous media, randomness of groundwater recharge and discharge (rainfall, runoff, etc.) has led to groundwater movement complexity, physical and chemical interaction between groundwater and porous media cause solute transport in the medium more complicated. An appropriate method to describe the complexity of features is essential when study on solute transport and conversion in porous media. Information entropy could measure uncertainty and disorder, therefore we attempted to investigate complexity, explore the contact between the information entropy and complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media using information entropy theory. Based on Markov theory, two-dimensional stochastic field of hydraulic conductivity (K) was generated by transition probability. Flow and solute transport model were established under four conditions (instantaneous point source, continuous point source, instantaneous line source and continuous line source). The spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport process was characterized and evaluated using spatial moment and information entropy. Results indicated that the entropy increased as the increase of complexity of solute transport process. For the point source, the one-dimensional entropy of solute concentration increased at first and then decreased along X and Y directions. As time increased, entropy peak value basically unchanged, peak position migrated along the flow direction (X direction) and approximately coincided with the centroid position. With the increase of time, spatial variability and complexity of solute concentration increase, which result in the increases of the second-order spatial moment and the two-dimensional entropy. Information entropy of line source was higher than point source. Solute entropy obtained from continuous input was higher than instantaneous input. Due to the increase of average length of lithoface, media continuity increased, flow and

  3. Role of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters in the Placental Transport of Lamivudine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceckova, Martina; Reznicek, Josef; Ptackova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Müller, Fabian; Kacerovsky, Marian; Fromm, Martin F; Glazier, Jocelyn D; Staud, Frantisek

    2016-09-01

    Lamivudine is one of the antiretroviral drugs of choice for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) in HIV-positive women. In this study, we investigated the relevance of drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1 [ABCB1]), BCRP (ABCG2), MRP2 (ABCC2), and MATE1 (SLC47A1) for the transmembrane transport and transplacental transfer of lamivudine. We employed in vitro accumulation and transport experiments on MDCK cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters, in situ-perfused rat term placenta, and vesicular uptake in microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles isolated from human term placenta. MATE1 significantly accelerated lamivudine transport in MATE1-expressing MDCK cells, whereas no transporter-driven efflux of lamivudine was observed in MDCK-MDR1, MDCK-MRP2, and MDCK-BCRP monolayers. MATE1-mediated efflux of lamivudine appeared to be a low-affinity process (apparent Km of 4.21 mM and Vmax of 5.18 nmol/mg protein/min in MDCK-MATE1 cells). Consistent with in vitro transport studies, the transplacental clearance of lamivudine was not affected by P-gp, BCRP, or MRP2. However, lamivudine transfer across dually perfused rat placenta and the uptake of lamivudine into human placental MVM vesicles revealed pH dependency, indicating possible involvement of MATE1 in the fetal-to-maternal efflux of the drug. To conclude, placental transport of lamivudine does not seem to be affected by P-gp, MRP2, or BCRP, but a pH-dependent mechanism mediates transport of lamivudine in the fetal-to-maternal direction. We suggest that MATE1 might be, at least partly, responsible for this transport. PMID:27401571

  4. Specific transport and storage solutions: Waste management facing current and future stakes of the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deniau, Helene; Gagner, Laurent; Gendreau, Francoise; Presta, Anne [COGEMA LOGISTICS - AREVA Group, 1 rue des herons, Montigny le bretonneux 78180 (France)

    2006-07-01

    With major projects ongoing or being planned, and also with the daily management of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities, the role of transport and/or storage packaging has been often overlooked. Indeed, the packaging development process and transport solutions implemented are a key part of the waste management challenge: protection of people and environment. During over four decades, the AREVA Group has developed a complete and coherent system for the transport of waste produced by nuclear industries. The transport solutions integrate the factors to consider, as industrial transportation needs, various waste forms, associated hazards and current regulations. Thus, COGEMA LOGISTICS has designed, licensed and manufactured a large number of different transport, storage and dual purpose cask models for residues and all kinds of radioactive wastes. The present paper proposes to illustrate how a company acting both as a cask designer and a carrier is key to the waste management issue and how it can support the waste management policy of nuclear producers through their operational choices. We will focus on the COGEMA LOGISTICS technical solutions implemented to guarantee safe and secure transportation and storage solutions. We will describe different aspects of the cask design process, insisting on how it enables to fulfill both customer needs and regulation requirements. We will also mention the associated services developed by the AREVA Business Unit Logistics (COGEMA LOGISTICS, TRANSNUCLEAR, MAINCO, and LEMARECHAL CELESTIN) in order to manage transportation of liquid and solid waste towards interim or final storage sites. The paper has the following contents: About radioactive waste; - Radioactive waste classification; - High level activity waste and long-lived intermediate level waste; - Long-lived low level waste; - Short-lived low- and intermediate level waste; - Very low level waste; - The radioactive waste in nuclear fuel cycle; - Packaging design and

  5. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 Theory Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2005-11-01

    This document presents the mathematical theory implemented in the CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator. The simulator is a three-dimensional finite element model that can be used for evaluating flow and solute mass transport. Although the theory for thermal transport is presented in this guide, it has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. The flow module is capable of simulating both confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. Mesh construction employs “collapsible”, hexahedral finite elements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. CFEST uses the Galerkin finite element method to convert the partial differential equations to algebraic form. To solve the coupled equations for momentum, solute and heat transport, either Picard or Newton-Raphson iterative schemes are used to treat nonlinearities. An upstream weighted residual finite-element method is used to solve the advective-dispersive transport and energy transfer equations, which circumvents problems of numerical oscillation problems. Matrix solutions of the flow and transport problems are performed using efficient iterative solvers available in ITPACK and PETSc, solvers that are available in the public domain. These solvers are based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient and ORTHOMIN methods for symmetric and a nonsymmetric matrices, respectively.

  6. BWR startup and shutdown activity transport control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes BWR industry experience on good practices for controlling the transport of corrosion product activity during shutdowns, particularly refueling outages, and for startup chemistry control to minimize IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking). For shutdown, overall goals are to minimize adverse impacts of crud bursts and the time required to remove activated corrosion products from the reactor coolant during the shutdown process prior to refueling, and to assist plants in predicting and controlling radiation exposure during outages. For startup, the overall goals are to highlight conditions during early heatup and startup when sources of reactor coolant oxidants are high, when there is a greater likelihood for chemical excursions associated with refueling outage work activities, and when hydrogen injection is not available to mitigate IGSCC due to system design limitations. BWR water chemistry has changed significantly in recent years with the adoption of hydrogen water chemistry, zinc addition and noble metal chemical applications. These processes have, in some instances, resulted in significant activity increases during shutdown evolutions, which together with reduced time for cleanup because of shorter outages, has consequently increased outage radiation exposure. A review several recent outages shows that adverse effects from these conditions can be minimized, leading to the set of good practice recommendations for shutdown chemistry control. Most plants lose the majority of their hydrogen availability hours during early startup because feedwater hydrogen injection systems were not originally designed to inject hydrogen below 20% power. Hydrogen availability has improved through modifications to inject hydrogen at lower power levels, some near 5%. However, data indicate that IGSCC is accelerated during early startup, when dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide levels are high and reactor coolant temperatures are in the 300 to 400 oF (

  7. Active transport and accumulation of bicarbonate by a unicellular cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A G; Colman, B

    1980-09-01

    The rates of inorganic carbon accumulation and carbon fixation in light by the unicellular cyanobacterim Coccohloris peniocystis have been determined. Cells incubated in the light in medium containing H14CO3- were rapidly separated from the medium by centrifugation through silicone oil into a strongly basic terminating solution. Samples of these inactivated cells were assayed to determine total 14C accumulation, and acid-treated samples were assayed to determine 14C fixation. The rate of transport of inorganic into illuminated cells was faster than the rate of CO2 production in the medium from HCO3- dehydration. This evidence for HCO3- transport in these cells is in agreement with our previous results based upon measurements of photosynthetic O2 evolution. A substantial pool of inorganic carbon was bulit up within the cells presumably as HCO3- before the onset of the maximum rate of photosynthesis. Large accumulation ratios were observed, greater than 1,000 times the external HCO3- concentration. Accumulation did not occur in the dark and was greatly suppressed by the photosynthesis inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea and 3-chloro-carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone. These results indicate that the accumulation of inorganic carbon in these cells involves a light-dependent active transport process. PMID:6773925

  8. Molecular cell biology and physiology of solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Michael J.; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; Zhang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review An enormous body of research has been focused on exploring the mechanisms through which epithelial cells establish their characteristic polarity. It is clear that under normal circumstances cell–cell contacts mediated by the calcium-dependent adhesion proteins of the intercellular adhesion junctions are required to initiate complete polarization. Furthermore, formation of the tight, or occluding, junctions that limit paracellular permeability has long been thought to help to establish polarity by preventing the diffusion of membrane proteins between the two plasmalemmal domains. This review will discuss several selected kinases and protein complexes and highlight their relevance to transporting epithelial cell polarization. Recent findings Recent work has shed new light on the roles of junctional complexes in establishing and maintaining epithelial cell polarity. In addition, work from several laboratories, suggests that the formation of these junctions is tied to processes that regulate cellular energy metabolism. Summary Junctional complexes and energy sensing kinases constitute a novel class of machinery whose capacity to generate and modulate epithelial cell polarity is likely to have wide ranging and important physiological ramifications. PMID:18695392

  9. Stochastic models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, V.N.; Korotkin, I.A.; Pruess, K.; Goloviznin, V.M.; Sorokovikova, O.S.

    2009-09-15

    A stochastic model of anomalous diffusion was developed in which transport occurs by random motion of Brownian particles, described by distribution functions of random displacements with heavy (power-law) tails. One variant of an effective algorithm for random function generation with a power-law asymptotic and arbitrary factor of asymmetry is proposed that is based on the Gnedenko-Levy limit theorem and makes it possible to reproduce all known Levy {alpha}-stable fractal processes. A two-dimensional stochastic random walk algorithm has been developed that approximates anomalous diffusion with streamline-dependent and space-dependent parameters. The motivation for introducing such a type of dispersion model is the observed fact that tracers in natural aquifers spread at different super-Fickian rates in different directions. For this and other important cases, stochastic random walk models are the only known way to solve the so-called multiscaling fractional order diffusion equation with space-dependent parameters. Some comparisons of model results and field experiments are presented.

  10. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, G. W.

    1999-10-01

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  11. Automodel solutions for Lévy flight-based transport on a uniform background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    A wide class of non-stationary superdiffusive transport on a uniform background with a power-law decay at large distances of the step-length probability distribution function (PDF) is shown to possess an approximate automodel solution. The solution for the Green’s function is constructed using the scaling laws for the propagation front (relevant-to-superdiffusion average displacement) and asymptotic solutions far beyond and far in advance of the propagation front. These scaling laws are determined essentially by the long-free-path carriers (Lévy flights). The validity of the suggested automodel solution is proved by its comparison with numerical solutions in the one-dimensional (1D) case of the transport equation with a simple long-tailed PDF with various power-law exponents and in the 3D case of the Biberman–Holstein equation of the resonance radiation transfer for various (Doppler, Lorentz, Voigt and Holtsmark) spectral line shapes.

  12. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS ON SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A PARTIAL TRANSFIXION SINGLE FRACTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Jin-long; ZHOU Zhi-fang; HUANG Yong

    2011-01-01

    In the study of solute transport in rough single fracture,the contact area is an important factor.The single fracture is defined as two categories in this article:the full transfixion single freeture and the partial transfixion single fracture.The purpose of this article is to research how the contact area affects the solute transport in partial transfixion single fracture.The contact area is generalized as square blocks with three sizes,and contact rate is variable,a series of experiments for solute transport were conducted in a simulation model which can simulate the two types of fractures in the laboratory.Based on the analysis of the breakthrough curves and the experiment phenomena,it is concluded that the difference of breakthrough curves of various contact rates is evident and increases with the increase of contact rate,the relative error curves reflect the difference of block sizes,and the maximum errors increase from smaller than 0.2 to about 0.8 with the increase of contact rate.These phenomena are also explained qualitatively in this article.It is concluded that the contact area strongly affects solute transport,and the research of channels formed by contact area is useful to further understand the rule of solute transport in partial transfixion single fracture.

  13. FLUID-SOLID COUPLING MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN UNSATURATED ZONE AND ITS ASYMPTOTICAL SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛强; 梁冰; 刘晓丽; 李宏艳

    2003-01-01

    The process of contaminant transport is a problem of multicomponent and multiphase flow in unsaturated zone. Under the presupposition that gas existence affects water transport , a coupled mathematical model of contaminant transport in unsaturated zone has been established based on fluid-solid interaction mechanics theory. The asymptotical solutions to the nonlinear coupling mathematical model were accomplished by the perturbation and integral transformation method. The distribution law of pore pressure,pore water velocity and contaminant concentration in unsaturated zone has been presented under the conditions of with coupling and without coupling gas phase. An example problem was used to provide a quantitative verification and validation of the model. The asymptotical solution was compared with Faust model solution. The comparison results show reasonable agreement between asymptotical solution and Faust solution, and the gas effect and media deformation has a large impact on the contaminant transport. The theoretical basis is provided for forecasting contaminant transport and the determination of the relationship among pressure-saturation-permeability in laboratory.

  14. Water flow and solute transport using environmental isotopes and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deep unsaturated zone may be a useful hydrological archive in desert environments characterized by scant or sporadic rainfall and slow percolation of rainwater over decades or even centuries. This moisture archive provides a useful way to distinguish the net downward flow of recharge water, whereas the isotopic composition and concentration of the conservative solutes of the preserved moisture could be used to reconstruct the history of recharge under the prevailing deficient water balance. The major advantage of such coupled approach is to obtain independent estimates of groundwater recharge rates which are normally difficult to evaluate using the hydrological methods applied in the temperate zones. The study was conducted in the Shiekh-Zoweid/Raffa area in the northeastern coastal strip of Sinai Peninsula. Bore-holes were dry-drilled in a line perpendicular to the sea shoreline (using an 8-inch diameter hand-operated rotary rig) for the unsaturated sediment collection from successive 0.5m thick layers down to a depth of 20m. Samples were investigated for the moisture contents and the chemical and isotope composition of this moisture was determined. Physical parameters were also assessed including porosity and volumetric moisture content. Chloride mass-balance was used to calculate recharge rates through the unsaturated zone by predicting the position of the 1963-Tritium peak in the unsaturated column. Analysis of moisture, chloride and deuterium profiles showed three principle peaks (along with minor ones) in Karafin site indicating few major recharge events that have taken place during the last few decades. Adjustment of these episodes has also been attempted using two historical major rainfall events (known from nearby meteorological stations). Application of the methodology in water resources management in arid regions is discussed. (author)

  15. Continuous time random walk analysis of solute transport in fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, Andrea; Cortis, Andrea; Birkholzer, Jens

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this work is to discuss solute transport phenomena in fractured porous media, where the macroscopic transport of contaminants in the highly permeable interconnected fractures can be strongly affected by solute exchange with the porous rock matrix. We are interested in a wide range of rock types, with matrix hydraulic conductivities varying from almost impermeable (e.g., granites) to somewhat permeable (e.g., porous sandstones). In the first case, molecular diffusion is the only transport process causing the transfer of contaminants between the fractures and the matrix blocks. In the second case, additional solute transfer occurs as a result of a combination of advective and dispersive transport mechanisms, with considerable impact on the macroscopic transport behavior. We start our study by conducting numerical tracer experiments employing a discrete (microscopic) representation of fractures and matrix. Using the discrete simulations as a surrogate for the 'correct' transport behavior, we then evaluate the accuracy of macroscopic (continuum) approaches in comparison with the discrete results. However, instead of using dual-continuum models, which are quite often used to account for this type of heterogeneity, we develop a macroscopic model based on the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) framework, which characterizes the interaction between the fractured and porous rock domains by using a probability distribution function of residence times. A parametric study of how CTRW parameters evolve is presented, describing transport as a function of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between fractured and porous domains.

  16. Temporal moment analysis of solute transport in a coupled fracture-skin-matrix system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Renu; G Suresh Kumar

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, method of temporal moments has been used to analyse the transport characteristics of reactive solute along fracture in a coupled fracture-skin-matrix system. In order to obtain the concentration distribution within the fracture, a system of coupled partial differential equations for fracture, fractureskin and rock-matrix has been solved numerically in a pseudo two-dimensional domain using implicit finite difference method. Subsequently, lower order temporal moments of solute have been computed from the concentration distribution to analyse the transport characteristics of solutes in the fracture. This study has been done by considering an inlet boundary condition of constant continuous source in a single fracture. The effect of various fracture-skin parameters like porosity, thickness and diffusion coefficient on the transport of solutes have been studied by doing sensitivity analyses. The effect of nonlinear sorption and radioactive decay of solutes have also been analysed by carrying out simulations for different sorption intensities and decay constants. Numerical results suggested that the presence of fracture-skin significantly influences the transport characteristics of reactive solutes along the fracture.

  17. Kinetically influenced terms for solute transport affected by heterogeneous and homogeneous classical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper extends a four-step derivation procedure, previously presented for cases of transport affected by surface reactions, to transport problems involving homogeneous reactions. Derivations for these classes of reactions are used to illustrate the manner in which mathematical differences between reaction classes are reflected in the mathematical derivation procedures required to identify kinetically influenced terms. Simulation results for a case of transport affected by a single solution phase complexation reaction and for a case of transport affected by a precipitation-dissolution reaction are used to demonstrate the nature of departures from equilibrium-controlled transport as well as the use of kinetically influenced terms in determining criteria for the applicability of the local equilibrium assumption. A final derivation for a multireaction problem demonstrates the application of the generalized procedure to a case of transport affected by reactions of several classes. -from Author

  18. Determination of the activity of a molecular solute in saturated solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordstroem, Fredrik L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Rasmuson, Ake C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: rasmuson@ket.kth.se

    2008-12-15

    Prediction of the solubility of a solid molecular compound in a solvent, as well as, estimation of the solution activity coefficient from experimental solubility data both require estimation of the activity of the solute in the saturated solution. The activity of the solute in the saturated solution is often defined using the pure melt at the same temperature as the thermodynamic reference. In chemical engineering literature also the activity of the solid is usually defined on the same reference state. However, far below the melting temperature, the properties of this reference state cannot be determined experimentally, and different simplifications and approximations are normally adopted. In the present work, a novel method is presented to determine the activity of the solute in the saturated solution (=ideal solubility) and the heat capacity difference between the pure supercooled melt and solid. The approach is based on rigorous thermodynamics, using standard experimental thermodynamic data at the melting temperature of the pure compound and solubility measurements in different solvents at various temperatures. The method is illustrated using data for ortho-, meta-, and para-hydroxybenzoic acid, salicylamide and paracetamol. The results show that complete neglect of the heat capacity terms may lead to estimations of the activity that are incorrect by a factor of 12. Other commonly used simplifications may lead to estimations that are only one-third of the correct value.

  19. Impact of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kone, T.; Golfier, F.; Orgogozo, L.; Oltéan, C.; Lefèvre, E.; Block, J. C.; Buès, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    In subsurface systems, biofilm may degrade organic or organometallic pollutants contributing to natural attenuation and soil bioremediation techniques. This increase of microbial activity leads to change the hydrodynamic properties of aquifers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media and more specifically on dispersivity. We pursued this goal by (i) monitoring both spatial concentration fields and solute breakthrough curves from conservative tracer experiments in a biofilm-supporting porous medium, (ii) characterizing in situ the changes in biovolume and visualizing the dynamics of the biological material at the mesoscale. A series of experiments was carried out in a flow cell system (60 cm3) with a silica sand (Φ = 50-70 mesh) as solid carrier and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as bacterial strain. Biofilm growth was monitored by image acquisition with a digital camera. The biofilm volume fraction was estimated through tracer experiments with the Blue Dextran macromolecule as in size-exclusion chromatography, leading to a fair picture of the biocolonization within the flow cell. Biofilm growth was achieved in the whole flow cell in 29 days and up to 50% of void space volume was plugged. The influence of biofilm maturation on porous medium transport properties was evaluated from tracer experiments using Brilliant Blue FCF. An experimental correlation was found between effective (i.e., nonbiocolonized) porosity and biofilm-affected dispersivity. Comparison with values given by the theoretical model of Taylor and Jaffé (1990b) yields a fair agreement.

  20. Air pollution exposure: An activity pattern approach for active transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew D.; Yiannakoulias, Nikolaos; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of personal air pollution exposure during trips made by active transportation using activity patterns without personal monitors. We calculate exposure as the inhaled dose of particulate matter 2.5 μg or smaller. Two modes of active transportation are compared, and they include cycling and walking. Ambient conditions are calculated by combining mobile and stationary monitoring data in an artificial neural network space-time model. The model uses a land use regression framework and has a prediction accuracy of R2 = 0.78. Exposure is calculated at 10 m or shorter intervals during the trips using inhalation rates associated with both modes. The trips are children's routes between home and school. The average dose during morning cycling trips was 2.17 μg, during morning walking trips was 3.19 μg, during afternoon cycling trips was 2.19 μg and during afternoon walking trips was 3.23 μg. The cycling trip dose was significantly lower than the walking trip dose. The air pollution exposure during walking or cycling trips could not be strongly predicted by either the school or household ambient conditions, either individually or in combination. Multiple linear regression models regressing both the household and school ambient conditions against the dose were only able to account for, at most, six percent of the variance in the exposure. This paper demonstrates that incorporating activity patterns when calculating exposure can improve the estimate of exposure compared to its calculation from ambient conditions.

  1. A fully resolved active musculo-mechanical model for esophageal transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kou, Wenjun; Griffith, Boyce E; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal transport is a physiological process that mechanically transports an ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach via the esophagus, a multi-layered muscular tube. This process involves interactions between the bolus, the esophagus, and the neurally coordinated activation of the esophageal muscles. In this work, we use an immersed boundary (IB) approach to simulate peristaltic transport in the esophagus. The bolus is treated as a viscous fluid that is actively transported by the muscular esophagus, which is modeled as an actively contracting, fiber-reinforced tube. A simplified version of our model is verified by comparison to an analytic solution to the tube dilation problem. Three different complex models of the multi-layered esophagus, which differ in their activation patterns and the layouts of the mucosal layers, are then extensively tested. To our knowledge, these simulations are the first of their kind to incorporate the bolus, the multi-layered esophagus tube, and muscle activation i...

  2. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  3. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, Yuri E

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we solve analytically a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  4. Active transport among Czech school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pavelka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active transport is a very important factor for increasing the level of physical activity in children, which is significant for both their health and positive physical behaviour in adult age. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to establish the proportion of Czech children aged 11 to 15 who select active transport to and from school and, at the same time, describe socio-economic and socio-demographic factors influencing active transport to and from school among children. METHODS: To establish the socio-demographic factors affecting active transport, data of a national representative sample of 11 to 15 year-old elementary school children in the Czech Republic (n = 4,425. Research data collection was performed within an international research study called Health Behaviour in School Aged Children in June 2010. Statistical processing of the results was made using a logistic regression analysis in the statistical programme IBM SPSS v 20. RESULTS: Active transport to and from school is opted for in the Czech Republic by approximately 2/3 of children aged 11 to 15. Differences between genders are not statistically significant; most children opting for active transport are aged 11 (69%. An important factor increasing the probability of active transport as much as 16 times is whether a child's place of residence is in the same municipality as the school. Other factors influencing this choice include BMI, time spent using a computer or a privateroom in a family. A significant factor determining active transport by children is safety; safe road crossing, opportunity to leave a bicycle safely at school, no fear of being assaulted on the way or provision of school lockers where children can leave their items. CONCLUSIONS: Active transport plays an important role in increasing the overall level of physical activity in children. Promotion of active transport should focus on children who spend more time using a computer; attention should also be

  5. Parallelism to solute transport code MT3DMS and case study in TU. Freiberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Leb, Hai Ha

    2014-05-01

    A parallel software for 3-D Multi-Species Transport Model MT3DMS was developed. Open Multiprocessing (OpenMP) was used for communication within the processors. MT3DMS emulated the solute transport by dividing the calculation into flow and transport steps. A new preconditioner, derived from Symmetric Successive Over Relaxation (SSOR), is added into the generalized conjugate gradient solver. A case study in the test field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg was used to produce the results and analyze the code performance. A demonstration test field indicated that the parallel mode for MT3DMS is accessible within a processor and problem size. A low timeframe occurs due to speedups for the field test of the solute transport model.

  6. Beyond fast rate approximations: General analytic solutions to coupled transport equations during cosmic phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    White, G A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a general method to analytically solve transport equations during a cosmic phase transition without making approximations based on the assumption that any transport coefficient is large. Using the MSSM as an example we derive the solutions to a set of $3$ transport equations derived under the assumption of supergauge equilibrium and the diffusion approximation. The result is then rederived efficiently using a technique we present involving a parametrized ansatz which turns the process of deriving a solution into an almost elementary problem. We then show how both the derivation and the parametrized ansatz technique can be generalized to solve an arbitrary number of transport equations. Finally we derive a perturbative series that relaxes the usual approximation that inactivates VEV dependent relaxation and CP violating source terms at the bubble wall and through the symmetric phase.

  7. Modeling of water and solute transport under variably saturated conditions: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the equations used in deterministic models of mass and energy transport in variably saturated porous media. Analytic, quasi-analytic, and numerical solution methods to the nonlinear forms of transport equations are discussed with respect to their advantages and limitations. The factors that influence the selection of a modeling method are discussed in this paper; they include the following: (1) the degree of coupling required among the equations describing the transport of liquids, gases, solutes, and energy; (2) the inclusion of an advection term in the equations; (3) the existence of sharp fronts; (4) the degree of nonlinearity and hysteresis in the transport coefficients and boundary conditions; (5) the existence of complex boundaries; and (6) the availability and reliability of data required by the models

  8. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jacek Waniewski; Stefan Antosiewicz; Daniel Baczynski; Jan Poleszczuk; Mauro Pietribiasi; Bengt Lindholm; Zofia Wankowicz

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21–87) years; median time on PD 19 (3–100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient ag...

  9. Passenger transport and household activity patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Review of Danish passenger transport patterns and analysis of energy consumption, emissions and safety impacts for selected typical households' travelling......Review of Danish passenger transport patterns and analysis of energy consumption, emissions and safety impacts for selected typical households' travelling...

  10. The Influence of Calcium Chloride Salt Solution on the Transport Properties of Cementitious Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghoob Farnam; Taylor Washington; Jason Weiss

    2015-01-01

    The chemical interaction between calcium chloride (CaCl2) and cementitious binder may alter the transport properties of concrete which are important in predicting the service life of infrastructure elements. This paper presents a series of fluid and gas transport measurements made on cementitious mortars before and after exposure to various solutions with concentrations ranging from 0% to 29.8% CaCl2 by mass. Fluid absorption, oxygen diffusivity, and oxygen permeability were measured on morta...

  11. Solute transport via alternating-direction collocation using the modified method of characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Myron B.; Khosravani, Azar

    We present a finite-element collocation method for modeling underground solute transport in two space dimensions when advection is dominant. The scheme uses a modified method of characteristics to approximate advective terms, thereby reducing the temporal truncation error and allowing accurate transport of solute by the velocity field. In conjunction with this approach, we employ an alternating-direction algorithm to yield a highly parallelizable algorithm for solving two-dimensional problems as sequences of simpler problems having one-dimensional matrix structure.

  12. Kinetic theory the Chapman-Enskog solution of the transport equation for moderately dense gases

    CERN Document Server

    Brush, S G

    1972-01-01

    Kinetic Theory, Volume 3: The Chapman-Enskog Solution of the Transport Equation for Moderately Dense Gases describes the Chapman-Enskog solution of the transport equation for moderately dense gases. Topics covered range from the propagation of sound in monatomic gases to the kinetic theory of simple and composite monatomic gases and generalizations of the theory to higher densities. The application of kinetic theory to the determination of intermolecular forces is also discussed. This volume is divided into two sections and begins with an introduction to the work of Hilbert, Chapman, and Ensko

  13. Analytical solution of electrohydrodynamic flow and transport in rectangular channels: inclusion of double layer effects

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, V.

    2013-01-25

    Upscaling electroosmosis in porous media is a challenge due to the complexity and scale-dependent nonlinearities of this coupled phenomenon. "Pore-network modeling" for upscaling electroosmosis from pore scale to Darcy scale can be considered as a promising approach. However, this method requires analytical solutions for flow and transport at pore scale. This study concentrates on the development of analytical solutions of flow and transport in a single rectangular channel under combined effects of electrohydrodynamic forces. These relations will be used in future works for pore-network modeling. The analytical solutions are valid for all regimes of overlapping electrical double layers and have the potential to be extended to nonlinear Boltzmann distribution. The innovative aspects of this study are (a) contribution of overlapping of electrical double layers to the Stokes flow as well as Nernst-Planck transport has been carefully included in the analytical solutions. (b) All important transport mechanisms including advection, diffusion, and electromigration have been included in the analytical solutions. (c) Fully algebraic relations developed in this study can be easily employed to upscale electroosmosis to Darcy scale using pore-network modeling. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  14. Spectroscopic and transport measurements of single molecules in solution using an electrokinetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; Moerner, W. E.

    2014-03-01

    In aqueous solution, diffusion generally limits the observation window of a nano-meter sized single molecule to milliseconds and prevents quantitative determination of spectroscopic and transport properties molecule-by-molecule. The anti-Brownian electrokinetic (ABEL) trap is a feedback-based microfluidic device that enables prolonged (multiseconds) observation of single molecules in solution. The amount of information that can be extracted from each molecule in solution is thus boosted by three orders of magnitude. We describe recent advances in extending the ABEL trap to conduct both spectroscopic and transport measurements of single trapped molecules. First, by combining the trap with multi-parameter fluorescence detection, synchronized dynamics in different observables can be visualized in solution. We use single molecules of Atto 633 as an example and show that this popular label switches between different emissive states under common imaging conditions. Next, we show how transport properties of trapped single molecules can be extracted in addition to spectroscopic readouts. Due to their direct sensitivity to molecular size and charge, measured transport coefficients can be used to distinguish different molecular species and trace biomolecular interactions in solution. We demonstrate this new paradigm by monitoring DNA hybridization/melting in real-time.

  15. Strategic network design of Java Island fuel supply with production-transportation solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianawati, Fauzia; Farizal, -; Surjandari, Isti; Marzuli, Rully

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to find more efficient supply network, from refineries / imports to fuel terminal, which still uses the Tanker, Tank Trucks or Rail Tank Wagon with an alternative pipeline that are considered more efficient than other transport modes, as well as gaining pipeline transportation network optimization analysis tailored to the capabilities/ capacity of refinery production and capacity of the pipe mode. With the complexity of the number of 3 point sources of supply, 19 destination of terminal, 4 kinds of products and 4 types of transport modes, transport-production model modified by adding multi-modal transport and investment costs of new pipeline. Then coded in Lingo program which adopts Branch & Bound technique and input the processed data in order to obtain an optimal distribution pattern produced the lowest distribution costs. This B&B solution was also compared with SCO solution which is a metaheuristic method. The results of this study lead to the development of new modes of pipeline connections in amount of 4 alternatives, generated from the optimal solution, but still potentially earned savings of about IDR 1 Trillion per year from cost-efficiency of product procurement and transportation costs.

  16. Collocation method for the solution of the neutron transport equation with both symmetric and asymmetric scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    A collocation method is developed for the solution of the one-dimensional neutron transport equation in slab geometry with both symmetric and polarly asymmetric scattering. For the symmetric scattering case, it is found that the collocation method offers a combination of some of the best characteristics of the finite-element and discrete-ordinates methods. For the asymmetric scattering case, it is found that the computational cost of cross-section data processing under the collocation approach can be significantly less than that associated with the discrete-ordinates approach. A general diffusion equation treating both symmetric and asymmetric scattering is developed and used in a synthetic acceleration algorithm to accelerate the iterative convergence of collocation solutions. It is shown that a certain type of asymmetric scattering can radically alter the asymptotic behavior of the transport solution and is mathematically equivalent within the diffusion approximation to particle transport under the influence of an electric field. The method is easily extended to other geometries and higher dimensions. Applications exist in the areas of neutron transport with highly anisotropic scattering (such as that associated with hydrogenous media), charged-particle transport, and particle transport in controlled-fusion plasmas. 23 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Estimates for solutions to the transport equation under the perturbation of its attenuation and scattering terms

    OpenAIRE

    Daiki Tanaka; Nobuyuki Higashimori; Yuusuke Iso

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to give $L^p$-estimates for the weak solution to the transport equation with $L^\\infty$-perturbation both of the attenuation coefficient and of the scattering kernel. We try to clarify the constants in our estimates, and we show the estimates by a direct calculation. We introduce the albedo operator for the solutions, and we show stability of perturbed albedo operators.

  18. Estimates for solutions to the transport equation under the perturbation of its attenuation and scattering terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiki Tanaka

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to give $L^p$-estimates for the weak solution to the transport equation with $L^\\infty$-perturbation both of the attenuation coefficient and of the scattering kernel. We try to clarify the constants in our estimates, and we show the estimates by a direct calculation. We introduce the albedo operator for the solutions, and we show stability of perturbed albedo operators.

  19. On the Boltzmann Equation with Stochastic Kinetic Transport: Global Existence of Renormalized Martingale Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Punshon-Smith, Samuel; Smith, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article studies the Cauchy problem for the Boltzmann equation with stochastic kinetic transport. Under a cut-off assumption on the collision kernel and a coloring hypothesis for the noise coefficients, we prove the global existence of renormalized (in the sense of DiPerna/Lions) martingale solutions to the Boltzmann equation for large initial data with finite mass, energy, and entropy. Our analysis includes a detailed study of weak martingale solutions to a class of linear stochastic kin...

  20. Impact of Soil Water Flux on Vadose Zone Solute Transport Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The transport processes of solutes in two soil columns filled with undisturbed soil material collected from an unsaturated sandy aquifer formation in Belgium subjected to a variable upper boundary condition were identified from breakthrough curves measured by means of time domain refiectometry (TDR). Solute breakthrough was measured with 3 TDR probes inserted into each soil column at three different depths at a 10 minutes time interval. In addition, soil water content and pressure head were measured at 3 different depths. Analytical solute transport models were used to estimate the solute dispersion coefficient and average pore-water velocity from the observed breakthrough curves. The results showed that the analytical solutions were suitable in fitting the observed solute transport. The dispersion coefficient was found to be a function of the soil depth and average pore-water velocity, imposed by the soil water flux. The mobile moisture content on the other hand was not correlated with the average pore-water velocity and the dispersion coefficient.

  1. Solution of the neutron transport problem with anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry by the decomposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, G.A. [UFRGS, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Av. Osvaldo Aranha 99, 4o andar, Porto Alegre, RS 90046-900 (Brazil); Bogado Leite, S.Q. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Coordenacao Geral de Reatores e Ciclo do Combustivel, Rua General Severiano, 90, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22294-900 (Brazil)], E-mail: bogado@cnen.gov.br; Vilhena, M.T. de [UFRGS, Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, Porto Alegre, RS 91509-900 (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the one-speed stationary neutron transport problem, in an infinitely long cylinder with anisotropic scattering by the decomposition method. Series expansions of the angular flux distribution are proposed in terms of suitably constructed functions, recursively obtainable from the isotropic solution, to take into account anisotropy. As for the isotropic problem, an accurate closed-form solution was chosen for the problem with internal source and constant incident radiation, obtained from an integral transformation technique and the F{sub N} method.

  2. Nanoporous activated carbon cloth for capacitive deionization of aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Han-Jun [Department of Materials Science, Hanseo University, Seosan, 352-820 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Ho [Department of Chemistry, Hanseo University, Seosan, 352-820 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hong-Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yongsoo [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Changwon, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Jig [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Choong-Soo [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul, 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: cschi@kookmin.ac.kr

    2006-09-25

    Activated nanostructured-carbon cloths with a high ratio of surface area to volume are used as electrode for capacitive deionization. The electrochemical properties on capacitive deionization for NaCl solution have been investigated to improve efficiency of capacitive deionization properties from aqueous solution, employing chemical surface-modification by etching in alkaline and acidic solution. The removal efficiency of inorganic salts of activated carbon cloths by chemical modification significantly increased. Specially the carbon cloth surface modified in HNO{sub 3} showed an effect of improvement in the CDI efficiency due to not only ion adsorption by an electric double layer, but also electron transfer by Faradaic reaction.

  3. PERSiST: the precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff simulator for solute transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Futter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available While runoff is often a first-order control on water quality, runoff generation processes and pathways can vary widely between catchments. Credible simulations of solute and pollutant transport in surface waters are dependent on models which facilitate appropriate representations of perceptual models of the runoff generation process. With a few exceptions, models used in solute transport simulations enforce a single, potentially inappropriate representation of the runoff generation process. Here, we present a flexible, semi-distributed landscape scale rainfall-runoff model suitable for simulating a broad range of user-specified perceptual models of runoff generation and stream flow occurring in different climatic regions and landscape types. PERSiST, the Precipitation, Evapotranspiration and Runoff Simulator for Solute Transport; is designed for simulating present day conditions and projecting possible future effects of climate or land use change on runoff, catchment water storage and solute transport. PERSiST has limited data requirements and is calibrated using observed time series of precipitation, air temperature and runoff at one or more points in a river network. Here, we present a first application of the model to the Thames River in the UK and describe a Monte Carlo tool for parameter optimization and sensitivity analysis.

  4. The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem: Applications and solution methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Simon; Klose, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The single-sink fixed-charge transportation problem (SSFCTP) consists in finding a minimum cost flow from a number of supplier nodes to a single demand node. Shipping costs comprise costs proportional to the amount shipped as well as a fixed-charge. Although the SSFCTP is an important special case....... Finally, we briefly compare some exact solution algorithms for this problem....

  5. Pore-network modeling of solute transport and biofilm growth in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Chao Zhong; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a pore-network (PN) model for solute transport and biofilm growth in porous media was developed. Compared to previous studies of biofilm growth, it has two new features. First, the constructed pore network gives a better representation of a porous medium. Second, instead of using a con

  6. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  7. Examining the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields on conservative solute transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bill X; Meerschaert, Mark M; Barrash, Warren; Hyndman, David W; He, Changming; Li, Xinya; Guo, Luanjing

    2009-09-01

    It is widely recognized that groundwater flow and solute transport in natural media are largely controlled by heterogeneities. In the last three decades, many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on flow and transport processes, but there has been much less attention to the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields. In this study, we use porosity and particle size measurements from boreholes at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) to evaluate the importance of characterizing the spatial structure of porosity and grain size data for solute transport modeling. Then we develop synthetic hydraulic conductivity fields based on relatively simple measurements of porosity from borehole logs and grain size distributions from core samples to examine and compare the characteristics of tracer transport through these fields with and without inclusion of porosity heterogeneity. In particular, we develop horizontal 2D realizations based on data from one of the less heterogeneous units at the BHRS to examine effects where spatial variations in hydraulic parameters are not large. The results indicate that the distributions of porosity and the derived hydraulic conductivity in the study unit resemble fractal normal and lognormal fields respectively. We numerically simulate solute transport in stochastic fields and find that spatial variations in porosity have significant effects on the spread of an injected tracer plume including a significant delay in simulated tracer concentration histories. PMID:19683833

  8. Low-flow transport models for conservative and sorbed solutes; Uvas Creek, near Morgan Hill, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, A.P.; Walters, R.A.; Kennedy, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Models describing low-flow transport of conservative (nonreactive) and reactive solutes, which adsorb on the streambed, are developed and tested. Temporary storage within the bed plays an important role in solute movement. Three different models of bed-storage processes are developed for conservative solutes. One model assumes the bed is a well-mixed, nondiffusing, nonreacting zone. Solute flux into the bed is then proportional to the difference between stream and bed-solute concentrations. A second model assumes that solute is transported within the bed by a vertical diffusion process. The bed-solute concentration, which matches the stream concentration at the interface, varies with depth in the bed according to Fick 's law. A third model assumes convection in the downstream direction occurs in certain parts of the bed, while the mechanism of the first model functions elsewhere. Storage of absorbing species is assumed to occur by equilibrium adsorption within streambed particles. Uptake rate is described by an intraparticle diffusion process. Model equations were solved using finite element numerical methods. Models were calibrated using data from a 24-hour injection of conservative chloride and adsorptive Sr ions at Uvas Creek near Morgan Hill, California. All models predict well except for some overestimation by the adsorption model during dieaway. (USGS)

  9. New Travelling Wave Solutions of Burgers Equation with Finite Transport Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, Rathinasamy; Chun, Changbum; Lee, Jonu

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear evolution equations with finite memory have a wide range of applications in science and engineering. The Burgers equation with finite memory transport (time-delayed) describes convection-diffusion processes. In this paper, we establish the new solitary wave solutions for the time-delayed Burgers equation. The extended tanh method and the exp-function method have been employed to reveal these new solutions. Further, we have calculated the numerical solutions of the time-delayed Burgers equation with initial conditions by using the homotopy perturbation method (HPM). Our results show that the extended tanh and exp-function methods are very effective in finding exact solutions of the considered problem and HPM is very powerful in finding numerical solutions with good accuracy for nonlinear partial differential equations without any need of transformation or perturbation

  10. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE NON-DARCY FLOW AND SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A CHANNELED SINGLE FRACTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhou; QIAN Jia-zhong; QIN Hua

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of fracture rocks is always a key issue in understanding the flow and solute transport in fractured media.This article studies the solute transport in a Channeled Single Fracture (CSF),a single fracture with contact in certain areas.The flow in a CSF often has preferential pathways and the transport in a CSF often has Break Through Curves (BTCs) with long tails.The Surface Contact Ratio (SCR),the ratio of the contact area to the total fracture area,is an important indicator for the fracture surface roughness.To study the flow and solute transport in a CSF,a controlled physical model is constructed and a series of flow and tracer test experiments are carried out.Under our experimental conditions,the flow in a CSF is found to follow the Forchheimer equation J =av+bv2,where J and v are the hydraulic gradient and the average pore velocity,respectively and a and b are two parameters related to the viscous and inertial flow components,respectively.Furthermore,it is found that b decreases with the decrease of SCR.For the solute transport,it is found that the BTCs often deviate from the traditional Fickian behavior,by the early-arrival and the long tailing.More interestingly,the observed BTCs often have a double-peak or a multi-peak,that would be difficult to explain using the existing transport theory such as the Advection-Dispersion Equation (ADE).In addition,the longitudinal dispersion coefficient DL is found to be scale-dependent in a CSF and the DL -l relationship is of exponential type.

  11. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  12. A Review of Darcy's Law: Limitations and Alternatives for Predicting Solute Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, Tammo; Kung, K.-J. Sam; Jaynes, Dan; Helling, Charles S.; Gish, Tim; Kladivko, Eileen

    2016-04-01

    Darcy's Law that was derived originally empirically 160 years ago, has been used successfully in calculating the (Darcy) flux in porous media throughout the world. However, field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the Darcy flux employed in the convective disperse equation could only successfully predict solute transport under two conditions: (1) uniformly or densely packed porous media; and (2) field soils under relatively dry condition. Employing the Darcy flux for solute transport in porous media with preferential flow pathways was problematic. In this paper we examine the theoretical background behind these field and laboratory observations and then provide an alternative to predict solute movement. By examining the characteristics of the momentum conservation principles on which Darcy's law is based, we show under what conditions Darcy flux can predict solute transport in porous media of various complexity. We find that, based on several case studies with capillary pores, Darcy's Law inherently merges momentum and in that way erases information on pore-scale velocities. For that reason the Darcy flux cannot predict flow in media with preferential flow conduits where individual pore velocities are essential in predicting the shape of the breakthrough curve and especially "the early arrival" of solutes. To overcome the limitations of the assumption in Darcy's law, we use Jury's conceptualization and employ the measured chemical breakthrough curve as input to characterize the impact of individual preferential flow pathways on chemical transport. Specifically, we discuss how best to take advantage of Jury's conceptualization to extract the pore-scale flow velocity to accurately predict chemical transport through soils with preferential flow pathways.

  13. Alkaline pH activates the transport activity of GLUT1 in L929 fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnink, Stephen M; Kerk, Samuel A; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Alabi, Ola D; Kuipers, David P; Praamsma, Riemer C; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2014-04-01

    The widely expressed mammalian glucose transporter, GLUT1, can be acutely activated in L929 fibroblast cells by a variety of conditions, including glucose deprivation, or treatment with various respiration inhibitors. Known thiol reactive compounds including phenylarsine oxide and nitroxyl are the fastest acting stimulators of glucose uptake, implicating cysteine biochemistry as critical to the acute activation of GLUT1. In this study, we report that in L929 cells glucose uptake increases 6-fold as the pH of the uptake solution is increased from 6 to 9 with the half-maximal activation at pH 7.5; consistent with the pKa of cysteine residues. This pH effect is essentially blocked by the pretreatment of the cells with either iodoacetamide or cinnamaldehyde, compounds that form covalent adducts with reduced cysteine residues. In addition, the activation by alkaline pH is not additive at pH 8 with known thiol reactive activators such as phenylarsine oxide or hydroxylamine. Kinetic analysis in L929 cells at pH 7 and 8 indicate that alkaline conditions both increases the Vmax and decreases the Km of transport. This is consistent with the observation that pH activation is additive to methylene blue, which activates uptake by increasing the Vmax, as well as to berberine, which activates uptake by decreasing the Km. This suggests that cysteine biochemistry is utilized in both methylene blue and berberine activation of glucose uptake. In contrast a pH increase from 7 to 8 in HCLE cells does not further activate glucose uptake. HCLE cells have a 25-fold higher basal glucose uptake rate than L929 cells and the lack of a pH effect suggests that the cysteine biochemistry has already occurred in HCLE cells. The data are consistent with pH having a complex mechanism of action, but one likely mediated by cysteine biochemistry. PMID:24333987

  14. Control and optimization of solute transport in a thin porous tube

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting the distribution of solutes or particles in flows within porous-walled tubes is essential to inform the design of devices that rely on cross-flow filtration, such as those used in water purification, irrigation devices, field-flow fractionation, and hollow-fibre bioreactors for tissue-engineering applications. Motivated by these applications, a radially averaged model for fluid and solute transport in a tube with thin porous walls is derived by developing the classical ideas of Taylor dispersion. The model includes solute diffusion and advection via both radial and axial flow components, and the advection, diffusion, and uptake coefficients in the averaged equation are explicitly derived. The effect of wall permeability, slip, and pressure differentials upon the dispersive solute behaviour are investigated. The model is used to explore the control of solute transport across the membrane walls via the membrane permeability, and a parametric expression for the permeability required to generate a given solute distribution is derived. The theory is applied to the specific example of a hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor, where a uniform delivery of nutrient across the membrane walls to the extra-capillary space is required to promote spatially uniform cell growth. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Laboratory experiments on solute transport in bimodal porous media under cyclic precipitation-evaporation boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface is strongly governed by atmospheric boundary conditions. Erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles lead to alternating upward and downward flow, as well as spatially and temporally varying water contents and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing materials. Thus presenting a highly complicated, dynamic system. Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to assess e.g. the entry of, potentially hazardous, solutes to the groundwater and nutrient uptake by plant roots and can be gained in many ways. Besides field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. With the aim to gain a better understanding and to quantify solute transport in the unsaturated shallow subsurface under natural precipitation conditions in heterogeneous media, we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell that is filled with two types of sand and apply cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases at the soil surface. Pressure at the bottom of the domain is kept constant. Following recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a), heterogeneity is introduced by a sharp vertical interface between coarse and fine sand. Fluorescent tracers are used to i) qualitatively visualize transport paths within the domain and ii) quantify solute leaching at the bottom of the domain. Temporal and spatial variations in water content during the experiment are derived from x-ray radiographic images. Monitored water contents between infiltration and evaporation considerably changed in the coarse sand while the fine sand remained saturated throughout the experiments. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both directions at different depths of the investigated soil columns were observed. This depended on the flow rate applied at the soil surface and

  16. Low band gap polymeric solar cells using solution-processable copper iodide as hole transporting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Kesari, J. P.; Chaudhary, Rajiv; Patra, Asit

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have shown the performance of solution-processable copper iodide (CuI) as an alternative hole transporting layer (HTL) for polymeric solar cells. Optical spectra of the CuI thin film reveal highly transparent and practically no absorption in the range vis-NIR region (450-1110 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of CuI exhibits as a p-type semiconductor as well as crystalline nature. The photovoltaic devices were fabricated using PCDTBT and PTB7 as donor materials blended with PC71BM as an acceptor material. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on CuI as an HTL have been achieved to up to 3.04% and 4.48% for PCDTBT and PTB7 based donor materials respectively with a configuration based on ITO/CuI(40 nm)/active layer (60 nm)/Al (120 nm). This study clearly indicated that the devices made with CuI as an HTL showed superior performance than the device fabricated from PEDOT:PSS layer as an HTL. Morphological characterization of the HTL using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried for better understanding.

  17. Numerical Investigations of Vadose Zone Transport of Saturated Sodium Thiosulfate Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. D.; Ward, A. L.

    2001-12-01

    Compared with water, hypersaline liquid wastes ([NaNO3] > 10 N) from the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) process at the Hanford site have elevated viscosity (μ > 1.2 cP), density (ρ > 1.4 gm/cm3), and surface tension (σ > 100 dyn/cm). Such liquids have infiltrated into the vadose zone at Hanford from leaking underground storage tanks. The migration behavior of saturated or hypersaline salt solutions through unsaturated soils is largely unknown. Laboratory tests with tank-waste simulants suggest that the elevated density, viscosity, and surface tension properties of these liquids can influence the wetting front behavior, altering its shape and migration rate. Conditions under which these mechanisms are active in the field and the extent to which they contribute to transport through the vadose zone are largely unknown, making it impossible to accurately predict the post-leak distribution of these fluids in the field. To investigate the effects of fluid properties on subsurface migration of hypersaline saline solutions, numerical simulations were conducted of a field-scale, tank-leak experiment. The field experiments consisted of five 4000-L injections, at a depth of 5 m, of saturated sodium thiosulfate brine (used as a surrogate for REDOX type wastes) over a 5-week period, followed by three 4000-L injections of Columbia River water. Pre-test modeling of river water injections at this Hanford field site predicted significant lateral spreading of the moisture plume and were confirmed by geophysical logging. A series of three-dimensional, multifluid (i.e., aqueous and gas phases) numerical simulations were conducted that systematically considered the effects of elevated density, viscosity, and surface tension, and reduced vapor pressure on vadose-zone transport. Hydrologic properties were determined from cores collected at the field site and calibrated using river-water injection experiments. Isothermal conditions were assumed for the simulations, however, the effects of

  18. Interpretation and nonuniqueness of CTRW transition distributions: Insights from an alternative solute transport formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K.; Berkowitz, Brian

    2014-12-01

    The continuous time random walk (CTRW) has both an elegant mathematical theory and a successful record at modeling solute transport in the subsurface. However, there are some interpretation ambiguities relating to the relationship between the discrete CTRW transition distributions and the underlying continuous movement of solute that have not been addressed in existing literature. These include the exact definition of "transition", and the extent to which transition probability distributions are unique/quantifiable from data. Here, we present some theoretical results which address these uncertainties in systems with an advective bias. Simultaneously, we present an alternative, reduced parameter CTRW formulation for general advective transport in heterogeneous porous media, which models early- and late-time transport by use of random transition times between sparse, imaginary planes normal to flow. We show that even in the context of this reduced-parameter formulation there is nonuniqueness in the definitions of both transition lengths and waiting time distributions, and that neither may be uniquely determined from experimental data. For practical use of this formulation, we suggest Pareto transition time distributions, leading to a two-degree-of-freedom modeling approach. We then demonstrate the power of this approach in fitting two sets of existing experimental data. While the primary focus is the presentation of new results, the discussion is designed to be pedagogical and to provide a good entry point into practical modeling of solute transport with the CTRW.

  19. The adjoint neutron transport equation and the statistical approach for its solution

    CERN Document Server

    Saracco, Paolo; Ravetto, Piero

    2016-01-01

    The adjoint equation was introduced in the early days of neutron transport and its solution, the neutron importance, has ben used for several applications in neutronics. The work presents at first a critical review of the adjoint neutron transport equation. Afterwards, the adjont model is constructed for a reference physical situation, for which an analytical approach is viable, i.e. an infinite homogeneous scattering medium. This problem leads to an equation that is the adjoint of the slowing-down equation that is well-known in nuclear reactor physics. A general closed-form analytical solution to such adjoint equation is obtained by a procedure that can be used also to derive the classical Placzek functions. This solution constitutes a benchmark for any statistical or numerical approach to the adjoint equation. A sampling technique to evaluate the adjoint flux for the transport equation is then proposed and physically interpreted as a transport model for pseudo-particles. This can be done by introducing appr...

  20. Hydrodynamics of steady state phloem transport with radial leakage of solute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo eCabrita

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance phloem transport occurs under a pressure gradient generated by the osmotic exchange of water associated with solute exchange in source and sink regions. But these exchanges also occur along the pathway, and yet their physiological role has almost been ignored in mathematical models of phloem transport. Here we present a steady state model for transport phloem which allows solute leakage, based on the Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations which describe fluid motion rigorously. Sieve tube membrane permeability Ps for passive solute exchange (and correspondingly, membrane reflection coefficient influenced model results strongly, and had to lie in the bottom range of the values reported for plant cells for the results to be realistic. This smaller permeability reflects the efficient specialization of sieve tube elements, minimizing any diffusive solute loss favoured by the large concentration difference across the sieve tube membrane. We also found there can be a specific reflection coefficient for which pressure profiles and sap velocities can both be similar to those predicted by the Hagen-Poiseuille equation for a completely impermeable tube.

  1. Differential Evolution Algorithm Based Solution Approaches for Solving Transportation Network Design Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Başkan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Differential Evolution algorithm has effectively been used to solve engineering optimization problems recently. The Differential Evolution algorithm, which uses similar principles with Genetic Algorithms, is more robust on obtaining optimal solution than many other heuristic algorithms with its simpler structure. In this study, Differential Evolution algorithm is applied to the transportation network design problems and its effectiveness on the solution is investigated. In this context, Differential Evolution based models are developed using bi-level programming approach for the solution of the transportation network design problem and determination of the on-street parking places in urban road networks. In these models, optimal investment and parking strategies are investigated on the upper level. On the lower level, deterministic traffic assignment problem, which represents drivers' responses, is solved using Frank-Wolfe algorithm and VISUM traffic modeling software. In order to determine the effectiveness of the proposed models, numerical applications are carried out on Sioux-Falls test network. Results showed that the Differential Evolution algorithm may effectively been used for the solution of transportation network design problems.

  2. Unsteady solute-transport simulation in streamflow using a finite-difference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Larry F.

    1978-01-01

    This report documents a rather simple, general purpose, one-dimensional, one-parameter, mass-transport model for field use. The model assumes a well-mixed conservative solute that may be coming from an unsteady source and is moving in unsteady streamflow. The quantity of solute being transported is in the units of concentration. Results are reported as such. An implicit finite-difference technique is used to solve the mass transport equation. It consists of creating a tridiagonal matrix and using the Thomas algorithm to solve the matrix for the unknown concentrations at the new time step. The computer program pesented is designed to compute the concentration of a water-quality constituent at any point and at any preselected time in a one-dimensional stream. The model is driven by the inflowing concentration of solute at the upstream boundary and is influenced by the solute entering the stream from tributaries and lateral ground-water inflow and from a source or sink. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Investigation of flow and solute transport at the field scale through heterogeneous deformable porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-09-01

    This work describes an investigation of the spatial statistical structure of specific discharge field and solute transport process of a nonreactive solute at the field scale through a heterogeneous deformable porous medium. The flow field is driven by a vertical gradient in the excess pore water pressure induced by a step increase in load applied on the upper part of a finite-thickness aquifer. The non-stationary spectral representation is adopted to characterize the spatial covariance of the specific discharge field necessary for the development of the solute particle trajectory statistics using the Lagrangian formalism. We show that the statistics of the specific discharge and particle trajectory derived herein are non-stationary and functions of the coefficient of soil compressibility, μ. The effect of μ on the relative variation of specific discharge and the solute particle trajectory statistics are analyzed upon evaluating our expressions.

  4. One-dimensional unsteady solute transport along unsteady flow through inhomogeneous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay K Yadav; Atul Kumar; Dilip K Jaiswal; Naveen Kumar

    2011-04-01

    The one-dimensional linear advection–diffusion equation is solved analytically by using the Laplace integral transform. The solute transport as well as the flow field is considered to be unsteady, both of independent patterns. The solute dispersion occurs through an inhomogeneous semi-infinite medium. Hence, velocity is considered to be an increasing function of the space variable, linearly interpolated in a finite domain in which solute dispersion behaviour is studied. Dispersion is considered to be proportional to the square of the spatial linear function. Thus, the coefficients of the advection–diffusion equation are functions of both the independent variables, but the expression for each coefficient is considered in degenerate form. These coefficients are reduced into constant coefficients with the help of a new space variable, introduced in our earlier works, and new time variables. The source of the solute is considered to be a stationary uniform point source of pulse type.

  5. Field scale variability of solute transport parameters and related soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lennartz

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of transport parameters has to be taken into account for a reliable assessment of solute behaviour in natural field soils. Two field sites were studied by collecting 24 and 36 small undisturbed soil columns at an uniform grid of 15 m spacing. Displacement experiments were conducted in these columns with bromide traced water under unsaturated steady state transport conditions. Measured breakthrough curves (BTCs were evaluated with the simple convective-dispersive equation (CDE. The solute mobility index (MI calculated as the ratio of measured to fitted pore water velocity and the dispersion coefficient (D were used to classify bromide breakthrough behaviour. Experimental BTCs were classified into two groups: type I curves expressed classical solute behaviour while type II curves were characterised by the occurrence of a bromide concentration maximum before 0.35 pore volumes of effluent (MI<0.35 resulting from preferential flow conditions. Six columns from site A and 8 from site B were identified as preferential. Frequency distributions of the transport parameters (MI and D of both sites were either extremely skewed or bimodal. Log-transformation did not lead to a normal distribution in any case. Contour maps of bromide mass flux at certain time steps indicated the clustering of preferential flow regions at both sites. Differences in the extent of preferential flow between sites seemed to be governed by soil structure. Linear cross correlations among transport parameters and independently measured soil properties revealed relations between solute mobility and volumetric soil water content at time of sampling, texture and organic carbon content. The volumetric field soil water content, a simple measure characterising the soil hydraulic behaviour at the sampling location, was found to be a highly sensitive parameter with respect to solute mobility and preferential flow situations. Almost no relation was found between solute

  6. Electroosmotic fluid motion and late-time solute transport at non-negligible zeta potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-12-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to determine the electric potential, fluid velocity and late-time solute distribution for electroosmotic flow in a tube and channel when the zeta potential is not small. The electric potential and fluid velocity are in general obtained by numerical means. In addition, new analytical solutions are presented for the velocity in a tube and channel in the extremes of large and small Debye layer thickness. The electroosmotic fluid velocity is used to analyze late-time transport of a neutral non-reacting solute. Zeroth and first-order solutions describing axial variation of the solute concentration are determined analytically. The resulting expressions contain eigenvalues representing the dispersion and skewness of the axial concentration profiles. These eigenvalues and the functions describing transverse variation of the concentration field are determined numerically using a shooting technique. Results are presented for both tube and channel geometries over a wide range of the normalized Debye layer thickness and zeta potential. Simple analytical approximations to the eigenvalues are also provided for the limiting cases of large and small values of the Debye layer thickness. The methodology developed here for electroosmotic flow is also applied to the Taylor problem of late-time transport and dispersion in pressure-driven flows.

  7. Flux-Averaged and Volume-Averaged Concentrations in Continuum Approaches to Solute Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. C.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    1984-07-01

    Transformations between volume-averaged pore fluid concentrations and flux-averaged concentrations are presented which show that both modes of concentration obey convective-dispersive transport equations of identical mathematical form for nonreactive solutes. The pertinent boundary conditions for the two modes, however, do not transform identically. Solutions of the convection-dispersion equation for a semi-infinite system during steady flow subject to a first-type inlet boundary condition is shown to yield flux concentrations, while solutions subject to a third-type boundary condition yield volume-averaged concentrations. These solutions may be applied with reasonable impunity to finite as well as semi-infinite media if back mixing at the exit is precluded. Implications of the distinction between resident and flux concentrations to laboratory and field studies of solute transport are discussed. It is suggested that perceived limitations of the convection-dispersion model for media with large variations in pore water velocities may in certain cases be attributable to a failure to distinguish between volume-averaged and flux-averaged concentrations.

  8. An analytical solution to contaminant transport through composite liners with geomembrane defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the performance of landfill composite liner system,a one-dimensional model was developed for solute transport through composite liners containing geomembrane defects.An analytical solution to the model was obtained by the method of Laplace transformation.The results obtained by the presented solution agree well with those obtained by the numerical method.Results show that leachate head and construction quality of geomembrane(GM) have significant influences on the performance of the composite liners for heavy metal ions.The breakthrough time of lead decreases from 50 a to 19 a when the leachate head increases from 0.3 m to 10 m.It is also indicated that the contaminant mass flux of volatile organic compounds(VOCs) induced by leakage can not be neglected in case of poor construction quality of the landfill barrier system.It is shown that diffusion coefficient and partition coefficient of GM have great influences on solute transport through composite liners for VOCs.The breakthrough time of heavy metal ions will be greatly overestimated if the effects of diffusion and adsorption of clay and geosynthetic clay liner(GCL) are neglected.The composite liner consisting of a geomembrane and a GCL provides a poor barrier for VOCs.The presented analytical solution is relatively simple to apply and can be used for preliminary design of composite liners,evaluating experimental results,and verifying more complex numerical models.

  9. Note on the Solution of Transport Equation by Tau Method and Walsh Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahab Kadem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the combined Walsh function for the three-dimensional case. A method for the solution of the neutron transport equation in three-dimensional case by using the Walsh function, Chebyshev polynomials, and the Legendre polynomials are considered. We also present Tau method, and it was proved that it is a good approximate to exact solutions. This method is based on expansion of the angular flux in a truncated series of Walsh function in the angular variable. The main characteristic of this technique is that it reduces the problems to those of solving a system of algebraic equations; thus, it is greatly simplifying the problem.

  10. Constructing Soliton and Kink Solutions of PDE Models in Transport and Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vsevolod A. Vladimirov

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of our recent works directed towards discovery of a periodic, kink-like and soliton-like travelling wave solutions within the models of transport phenomena and the mathematical biology. Analytical description of these wave patterns is carried out by means of our modification of the direct algebraic balance method. In the case when the analytical description fails, we propose to approximate invariant travelling wave solutions by means of an infinite series of exponential functions. The effectiveness of the method of approximation is demonstrated on a hyperbolic modification of Burgers equation.

  11. An Abiotic Glass-Bead Collector Exhibiting Active Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Youhei; Kanda, Masato; Yamamoto, Daigo; Shioi, Akihisa

    2015-09-01

    Animals relocate objects as needed by active motion. Active transport is ubiquitous in living organisms but has been difficult to realize in abiotic systems. Here we show that a self-propelled droplet can gather scattered beads toward one place on a floor and sweep it clean. This is a biomimetic active transport with loadings and unloadings, because the transport was performed by a carrier and the motion of the carrier was maintained by the energy of the chemical reaction. The oil droplet produced fluctuation of the local number density of the beads on the floor, followed by its autocatalytic growth. This mechanism may inspire the technologies based on active transport wherein chemical and physical substances migrate as in living organisms.

  12. Convergent radial tracing of viral and solute transport in Gneiss Saprolite

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, R.; Tindmugaya, C.; Barker, John; MacDonald, David; Kulabako, R.

    2010-01-01

    Deeply weathered crystalline rock aquifer systems comprising unconsolidated saprolite and underlying fractured bedrock (saprock) underlie 40% of sub-Saharan Africa. The vulnerability of this aquifer system to contamination, particularly in rapidly urbanizing areas, remains poorly understood. In order to assess solute and viral transport in saprolite derived from Precambrian gneiss, forced-gradient tracer experiments using chloride and Escherichia coli phage ΦX174 were conducted in southeaster...

  13. Solution, surface, and single molecule platforms for the study of DNA-mediated charge transport

    OpenAIRE

    Muren, Natalie B.; Olmon, Eric D.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2012-01-01

    The structural core of DNA, a continuous stack of aromatic heterocycles, the base pairs, which extends down the helical axis, gives rise to the fascinating electronic properties of this molecule that is so critical for life. Our laboratory and others have developed diverse experimental platforms to investigate the capacity of DNA to conduct charge, termed DNA-mediated charge transport (DNA CT). Here, we present an overview of DNA CT experiments in solution, on surfaces, and with single molecu...

  14. THE TIME FACTOR IN MARITIME TRANSPORT AND PORT LOGISTICS ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin NICOLAE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Execution of the carriage contract requires compliance to all the conditions in it, by all those involved in the transport. Main obligations incumbent upon the vessel, and obviously, to other transporters, who must provide transportation according to deadlines and safety. Contract compliance is certifying transport participants about their seriousness and an appropriate market quotation. Therefore, present work pragmatically sets schematics reference time associated implementation of the carriage contract. Also, are demonstrated relationships established between maritime transport “players” and sequence of activities related to the operation of the vessel in port. The authors propose a set of concepts and terms whose utility is established to solve practical problems in this area of activity.

  15. Simplified Solutions for Activity Deposited on Moving Filter Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L; Chabot, George E

    2016-10-01

    Simplified numerical solutions for particulate activity viewed on moving filter continuous air monitors are developed. The monitor configurations include both rectangular window (RW) and circular window (CW) types. The solutions are demonstrated first for a set of basic airborne radioactivity cases, for a series of concentration pulses, and for indicating the effects of step changes in reactor coolant system (RCS) leakage for a pressurized water reactor. The method is also compared to cases from the prior art. These simplified solutions have additional benefits: They are easily adaptable to multiple radionuclides, they will accommodate collection and detection efficiencies that vary in known ways across the collection area, and they also ease the solution programming. PMID:27575345

  16. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  17. Unsaturated flow and solute transport in a porous column using spherical ore particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-xiu Miao; Ai-xiang Wu; Bao-hua Yang; Jin-zhi Liu; Sheng-hua Yin; Hong-jiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    This paper dealt with the development of a two-dimensional (2D) mathematical model for column leaching and confirmed the important simulation parameters through experiment. The unsaturated state of the variably saturated flow column and the solute transport of copper ions were studied during leaching. The fluid flow problem was handled using the Richards equation on the premise of an ambient pressure column air, where the van Genuchten formulas were applied to define the nonlinear relationships of pressure head with the retention and permeability properties. The ore column permeability test gave a varied hydraulic conductivity, which was analyzed in the model. In the solute transport problem, the copper ion concentration was solved using the advection-diffusion-reaction equation whose reaction term was determined by the joint analysis of experimental copper leaching rate and the shrinking core model. Particle-and column-scale leaching tests were carried out to illustrate the difference and connection of copper extraction in both processes. This fluid flow and solute transport cou-pled model was determined through the finite element method using the numerical simulation software, COMSOL Multiphysics.

  18. On Existence of $L^2$-solutions of Coupled Boltzmann Continuous Slowing Down Transport Equation System

    CERN Document Server

    Tervo, J; Frank, M; Herty, M

    2016-01-01

    The paper considers a coupled system of linear Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), and its Continuous Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA). This system can be used to model the relevant transport of particles used e.g. in dose calculation in radiation therapy. The evolution of charged particles (e.g. electrons and positrons) are in practice often modelled using the CSDA version of BTE because of the so-called forward peakedness of scattering events contributing to the particle fluencies (or particle densities), which causes severe problems for numerical methods. First, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solutions, under sufficient criteria and in appropriate $L^2$-based spaces, of a single (particle) CSDA-equation by using two complementary techniques, the Lions-Lax-Milgram Theorem (variational approach), and the theory evolution operators (semigroup approach). The necessary a priori estimates are shown. In addition, we prove the corresponding results and estimates for the system of coupled transport equat...

  19. Benchmark solutions for transport in $d$-dimensional Markov binary mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Larmier, Coline; Malvagi, Fausto; Mazzolo, Alain; Zoia, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Linear particle transport in stochastic media is key to such relevant applications as neutron diffusion in randomly mixed immiscible materials, light propagation through engineered optical materials, and inertial confinement fusion, only to name a few. We extend the pioneering work by Adams, Larsen and Pomraning \\cite{benchmark_adams} (recently revisited by Brantley \\cite{brantley_benchmark}) by considering a series of benchmark configurations for mono-energetic and isotropic transport through Markov binary mixtures in dimension $d$. The stochastic media are generated by resorting to Poisson random tessellations in $1d$ slab, $2d$ extruded, and full $3d$ geometry. For each realization, particle transport is performed by resorting to the Monte Carlo simulation. The distributions of the transmission and reflection coefficients on the free surfaces of the geometry are subsequently estimated, and the average values over the ensemble of realizations are computed. Reference solutions for the benchmark have never be...

  20. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Bao-Quan, E-mail: aibq@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, 510006 Guangzhou (China); He, Ya-Feng [College of Physics Science and Technology, Hebei University, 071002 Baoding (China); Zhong, Wei-Rong, E-mail: wrzhong@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Siyuan Laboratory, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, 510632 Guangzhou (China)

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  1. Stochastic approach to the numerical solution of the non-stationary Parker's transport equation

    CERN Document Server

    Wawrzynczak, A; Gil, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the newly developed stochastic model of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles transport in the heliosphere. Mathematically Parker transport equation (PTE) describing non-stationary transport of charged particles in the turbulent medium is the Fokker-Planck type. It is the second order parabolic time-dependent 4-dimensional (3 spatial coordinates and particles energy/rigidity) partial differential equation. It is worth to mention that, if we assume the stationary case it remains as the 3-D parabolic type problem with respect to the particles rigidity R. If we fix the energy it still remains as the 3-D parabolic type problem with respect to time. The proposed method of numerical solution is based on the solution of the system of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) being equivalent to the Parker's transport equation. We present the method of deriving from PTE the equivalent SDEs in the heliocentric spherical coordinate system for the backward approach. The obtained stochastic model of the Forbu...

  2. Characterization of solute transport parameters in leach ore:inverse modeling based on column experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng PENG

    2009-01-01

    Heap leaching is essentially a process in which metals are extracted from mine ores with lixiant. For a better understanding and modeling of this process, solute transport parameters are required to characterize the solute transport system of the leach heap. For porous media like leach ores, which contain substantial gravelly particles and have a broad range of particle size distributions, traditional small-scale laboratory experimental apparatus is not appropriate. In this paper, a 2.44m long, 0.3 m inner diameter column was used for tracer test with boron as the tracer. Tracer tests were conducted for 2 bulk densities (1.92 and 1.62g/cm3) and 2 irrigation rates (2 and 5 L/(mE. h-i)). Inverse modeling with two-region transport model using computer code CXTFIT was conducted based on the measured breakthrough curves to estimate the transport parameters. Fitting was focused on three parameters: dispersion coefficient D, partition coefficient r, and mass transfer coefficient ω. The results turned out to fall within reasonable ranges. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for the three parameters and showed that the order of sensitivity is β > ω > D. In addition, scaling of these parameters was discussed and applied to a real scale heap leach to predict the tracer breakthrough.

  3. Representing solute transport through the multi-barrier disposal system by simplified concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Nordman, H.; Pulkkanen, V-M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kekaelaeinen, P. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. pf Physics; Hautojaervi, A.

    2012-02-15

    The repository system chosen in Finland for spent nuclear fuel is composed of multiple successive transport barriers. If a waste canister is leaking, this multi-barrier system retards and limits the release rates of radionuclides into the biosphere. Analysis of radionuclide migration in the previous performance assessments has largely been based on numerical modelling of the repository system. The simplified analytical approach introduced here provides a tool to analyse the performance of the whole system using simplified representations of the individual transport barriers. This approach is based on the main characteristics of the individual barriers and on the generic nature of the coupling between successive barriers. In the case of underground repository the mass transfer between successive transport barriers is strongly restricted by the interfaces between barriers leading to well-mixed conditions in these barriers. The approach here simplifies the barrier system so that it can be described with a very simple compartment model, where each barrier is represented by a single, or in the case of buffer, by not more than two compartments. This system of compartments could be solved in analogy with a radioactive decay chain. The model of well mixed compartments lends itself to a very descriptive way to represent and analyse the barrier system because the relative efficiency of the different barriers in hindering transport of solutes can be parameterised by the solutes half-times in the corresponding compartments. In a real repository system there will also be a delay between the start of the inflow and the start of the outflow from the barrier. This delay can be important for the release rates of the short lived and sorbing radionuclides, and it was also included in the simplified representation of the barrier system. In a geological multi-barrier system, spreading of the outflowing release pulse is often governed by the typical behaviour of one transport barrier

  4. Numerical investigations of solute transport in bimodal porous media under dynamic boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa; Bechtold, Michel; Vanderborght, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface adjacent to the atmosphere is decisive to prevent groundwater pollution and conserve groundwater quality, to develop successful remediation strategies and to understand nutrient cycling. In nature, due to erratic precipitation-evaporation patterns, soil moisture content and related hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone are not only variable in space but also in time. Flow directions and flow paths locally change between precipitation and evaporation periods. This makes the identification and description of solute transport processes in the vadose zone a complex problem. Recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a) focused on the investigation of upward transport of solutes during evaporation in heterogeneous soil columns, where heterogeneity was introduced by a sharp vertical material interface between two types of sand. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both (lateral) directions was observed at different depths of the investigated soil columns. Following recent approaches, we conduct two-dimensional numerical simulations in a similar setup which is composed of two sands with a sharp vertical material interface. The investigation is broadened from the sole evaporation to combined precipitation-evaporation cycles in order to quantify transport processes resulting from the combined effects of heterogeneous soil structure and dynamic flow conditions. Simulations are performed with a coupled finite volume and random walk particle tracking algorithm (Ippisch et al., 2006; Bechtold et al., 2011b). By comparing scenarios with cyclic boundary conditions and stationary counterparts with the same net flow rate, we found that duration and intensity of precipitation and evaporation periods potentially have an influence on lateral redistribution of solutes and thus leaching rates. Whether or not dynamic boundary conditions lead to significant deviations in the transport

  5. Effect of the background solution and material composition on the transport of silver nanoparticles in saturated aquifer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Yorck; Schneidewind, Uwe; Fernandez-Steeger, Tomas; Azzam, Rafig

    2016-04-01

    Engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are used in various consumer products such as cloth or personal care products due to their antimicrobial properties (Benn et al., 2010). Their transport behavior in the environment is still under investigation. Previous studies have been focusing on the transport of AgNP in simple test systems with glass beads or soil materials (Braun et al., 2015), but studies investigating aquifer material are rare. However, the protection of fresh water resources in the subsurface is an important part in the protection of human health and the assurance of future economic activities. Therefore, expert knowledge regarding the transport and fate of engineered nanoparticles as potential contaminants in aquifers is essential. Within the scope of the research project NanoMobil funded by German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the transport and retention behavior of AgNP in aquifer material was investigated under saturated conditions in laboratory columns for different flow velocities, ionic strengths (IS) and background solutions. The used aquifer material consisted mainly of quartz and albite. The quartz grains were partially coated with iron hydroxides and oxides. Furthermore, 1% hematite was present in the silicate dominated aquifer material. The experiments were conducted using NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2 background solutions to examine the effects of monovalent and divalent cations on the transport of AgNP. Flow velocities in the columns were chosen to represent typical flow velocities of groundwater in the subsurface. For the experiments two mean grain sizes of 0.3 and 0.7 mm were used to investigate the effect of the grain size on the transport behavior. Particle concentration was measured using ICP-MS and particle size was determined using flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). HYDRUS-1D (Šimůnek et al., 2013) was used to elucidate the transport and retention processes of the AgNP in the aquifer material. The obtained results show

  6. Impact of space-time mesh adaptation on solute transport modeling in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfandiar, Bahman; Porta, Giovanni; Perotto, Simona; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    We implement a space-time grid adaptation procedure to efficiently improve the accuracy of numerical simulations of solute transport in porous media in the context of model parameter estimation. We focus on the Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) for the interpretation of nonreactive transport experiments in laboratory-scale heterogeneous porous media. When compared to a numerical approximation based on a fixed space-time discretization, our approach is grounded on a joint automatic selection of the spatial grid and the time step to capture the main (space-time) system dynamics. Spatial mesh adaptation is driven by an anisotropic recovery-based error estimator which enables us to properly select the size, shape, and orientation of the mesh elements. Adaptation of the time step is performed through an ad hoc local reconstruction of the temporal derivative of the solution via a recovery-based approach. The impact of the proposed adaptation strategy on the ability to provide reliable estimates of the key parameters of an ADE model is assessed on the basis of experimental solute breakthrough data measured following tracer injection in a nonuniform porous system. Model calibration is performed in a Maximum Likelihood (ML) framework upon relying on the representation of the ADE solution through a generalized Polynomial Chaos Expansion (gPCE). Our results show that the proposed anisotropic space-time grid adaptation leads to ML parameter estimates and to model results of markedly improved quality when compared to classical inversion approaches based on a uniform space-time discretization.

  7. Solute transport in fractured media - The important mechanisms for performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important mechanisms that control the release of contaminants from a repository for nuclear or chemical waste have been studied. For the time scale of interest for the disposal of nuclear or even chemical waste, diffusion into the rock matrix is an important factor which retards and dilutes the contaminants. It is found that the water flow-rate distribution and the flow-wetted surface are the entities that primarily determine the solute transport. If the diffusion in the rock matrix is negligible, the solute transport is determined by the water flow-rate and the flow porosity. This is shown by simulations using analytical solutions obtained for simple geometries, such as the flow in a fracture or a channel. Similar results are obtained for more complex systems, such as flow in a fracture with variable aperture and through a network of channels. It is also found that the use of a retardation factor relating the travel times of interacting and noninteracting solutes is inappropriate and may be misleading. 11 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  8. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  9. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  10. Expression of human solute carrier family transporters in skin: possible contributor to drug-induced skin disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ryoichi Fujiwara; Saya Takenaka; Mitsuhiro Hashimoto; Tomoya Narawa; Tomoo Itoh

    2014-01-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) transporters play important roles in absorption and disposition of drugs in cells; however, the expression pattern of human SLC transporters in the skin has not been determined. In the present study, the expression patterns of 28 human SLC transporters were determined in the human skin. Most of the SLC transporter family members were either highly or moderately expressed in the liver, while their expression was limited in the skin and small intestine. Treatment of human k...

  11. A dual-permeability approach to preferential water flow and solute transport in shrinking soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; Comegna, Alessandro; Gerke, Horst H.; Basile, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The pore systems in most natural soils is dynamically changing due to alternating swelling and shrinkage processes, which induces changes in pore volume and pore size distribution including deformations in pore geometry. This is a serious difficulty for modeling flow and transport in dual permeability approaches, as it will also require that the geometrical deformation of both the soil matrix and the fracture porous systems be taken into account, as well as the dynamics of soil hydraulic properties in response to the domain deformations. This study follows up a previous work by the same authors extending the classical rigid (RGD) approach formerly proposed by Gerke and van Genuchten, to account for shrinking effects (SHR) in modeling water flow and solute transport in dual-permeability porous media. In this study we considered three SHR scenarios, assuming that aggregate shrinkage may change either: (i) the hydraulic properties of the two pore domains, (ii) their relative fractions, and (iii) both, hydraulic properties and fractions of the two domains. The objective was to compare simulation results obtained under the RGD and the SHR assumptions to illustrate the impact of matrix volume changes on water storage, water fluxes and solute concentrations during: 1) An infiltration process bringing an initially dry soil to saturation, 2) A drainage process starting from an initially saturated soil. For an infiltration process, the simulated wetting front and the solute concentration propagation velocity, as well as the water fluxes, water and solute exchange rates, for the three SHR scenarios significantly deviated from the RGD. By contrast, relatively similar water content profiles evolved under all scenarios during drying. Overall, compared to the RGD approach, the effect of changing the hydraulic properties and the weight of the two domains according to the shrinkage behavior of the soil aggregates induced a much more rapid response in terms of water fluxes and

  12. Modelling transport of water and solutes in future wetlands in Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikstroem, Maria; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran [DHI Water and Environment AB, Vaexjoe (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    been analyzed. Results from the transport modelling show that a solute in the bedrock is transported quickly towards the peat surface in discharge areas for Bolundsfjaerden. After around 10 years, a stationary condition is reached. For the recharge area that develops in large parts of the mire, the solute is transported through horizontal dispersion, which results in much lower concentrations. The solute concentration is at the lowest where the overland water pressure is at the highest close to the south western inlet. Puttan has a vertical flow pattern that differs from Bolundsfjaerden. The pressure from water on the peat surface is considerably lower and for a major part of the year Puttan is a discharge area with an upwards flow direction. The spatial distribution of solutes is more even over the surface than for Bolundsfjaerden, but higher concentrations are found around today's shoreline. A solute reaching the wetland through surface runoff is transported relatively slow through the mire at Bolundsfjaerden. Due to the recharge conditions, the solute is spread to the underlying soil layers. The vertical solute transport follows the discharge and recharge areas, where high concentrations, up to the source strength, are reached in major parts of the formation, while lower concentrations are reached in the discharge areas and underneath clay sediment.

  13. Control of colloid transport via solute gradients in dead-end channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Um, Eujin; Warren, Patrick; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Transport of colloids in dead-end channels is involved in widespread applications ranging from drug delivery to geophysical flows. In such geometries, Brownian motion may be considered as the sole mechanism that enables transport of colloidal particles into or out of the channels, which is, unfortunately, an extremely inefficient transport mechanism for microscale particles. Here, we explore the possibility of diffusiophoresis as a means to control the colloid transport by introducing a solute gradient along the dead-end channels. We demonstrate that the transport of colloidal particles into the dead-end channels can be either enhanced or completely prevented via diffusiophoresis. We also observe a size-dependent focusing of the particles where, as the particle size increases, the particles tend to concentrate more, and they tend to reside deeper in the channel. Our findings have implications for all manners of controlled release processes, especially for site-specific drug delivery systems where localized targeting of drugs with minimal dispersion to the non-target is essential.

  14. Capillary-Driven Solute Transport and Precipitation in Porous Media during Dry-Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Holger; Andrew, Matthew; Blunt, Martin; Snippe, Jeroen

    2014-05-01

    The injection of dry or under-saturated gases or supercritical (SC) fluids into water bearing formations might lead to a formation dry-out in the vicinity of the injection well. The dry-out is caused by the evaporation/dissolution of formation water into the injected fluid and the subsequent transport of dissolved water in the injected fluid away from the injection well. Dry-out results in precipitation from solutes of the formation brine and consequently leads to a reduction of the rock's pore space (porosity) and eventually to a reduction of permeability near the injection well, or even to the loss of injectivity. Recently evidence has been found that the complexity of the pore space and the respective capillary driven solute transport plays a key role. While no effective-permeability (Keff) reduction was observed in a single-porosity sandstone, multi porosity carbonate rocks responded to precipitation with a strong reduction of Keff. The reason for the different response of Keff to salt precipitation is suspected to be in the exact location of the precipitate (solid salt) in the pore space. In this study, we investigate dry-out and salt precipitation due to supercritical CO2 injection in single and multi-porosity systems under near well-bore conditions. We image fluid saturation changes by means of μCT scanning during desaturation. We are able to observe capillary driven transport of the brine phase and the respective transport of solutes on the rock's pore scale. Finally we have access to the precipitated solid-salt phase and their distribution. The results can proof the thought models behind permeability porosity relationships K(φ) for injectivity modeling. The topic and the mechanisms we show are of general interest for drying processes in porous material such as soils and paper.

  15. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ryan T.; Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  16. Global sensitivity analysis and Bayesian parameter inference for solute transport in porous media colonized by biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, A.; Delay, F.; Fajraoui, N.; Fahs, M.; Mara, T. A.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of dual flowing continuum is a promising approach for modeling solute transport in porous media that includes biofilm phases. The highly dispersed transit time distributions often generated by these media are taken into consideration by simply stipulating that advection-dispersion transport occurs through both the porous and the biofilm phases. Both phases are coupled but assigned with contrasting hydrodynamic properties. However, the dual flowing continuum suffers from intrinsic equifinality in the sense that the outlet solute concentration can be the result of several parameter sets of the two flowing phases. To assess the applicability of the dual flowing continuum, we investigate how the model behaves with respect to its parameters. For the purpose of this study, a Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) and a Statistical Calibration (SC) of model parameters are performed for two transport scenarios that differ by the strength of interaction between the flowing phases. The GSA is shown to be a valuable tool to understand how the complex system behaves. The results indicate that the rate of mass transfer between the two phases is a key parameter of the model behavior and influences the identifiability of the other parameters. For weak mass exchanges, the output concentration is mainly controlled by the velocity in the porous medium and by the porosity of both flowing phases. In the case of large mass exchanges, the kinetics of this exchange also controls the output concentration. The SC results show that transport with large mass exchange between the flowing phases is more likely affected by equifinality than transport with weak exchange. The SC also indicates that weakly sensitive parameters, such as the dispersion in each phase, can be accurately identified. Removing them from calibration procedures is not recommended because it might result in biased estimations of the highly sensitive parameters.

  17. Hierarchical simulation of aquifer heterogeneity: implications of different simulation settings on solute-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunian, Alessandro; De Micheli, Leonardo; Lazzati, Claudio; Felletti, Fabrizio; Giacobbo, Francesca; Giudici, Mauro; Bersezio, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    The fine-scale heterogeneity of porous media affects the large-scale transport of solutes and contaminants in groundwater and it can be reproduced by means of several geostatistical simulation tools. However, including the available geological information in these tools is often cumbersome. A hierarchical simulation procedure based on a binary tree is proposed and tested on two real-world blocks of alluvial sediments, of a few cubic meters volume, that represent small-scale aquifer analogs. The procedure is implemented using the sequential indicator simulation, but it is so general that it can be adapted to various geostatistical simulation tools, improving their capability to incorporate geological information, i.e., the sedimentological and architectural characterization of heterogeneity. When compared with a standard sequential indicator approach on bi-dimensional simulations, in terms of proportions and connectivity indicators, the proposed procedure yields reliable results, closer to the reference observations. Different ensembles of three-dimensional simulations based on different hierarchical sequences are used to perform numerical experiments of conservative solute transport and to obtain ensembles of equivalent pore velocity and dispersion coefficient at the scale length of the blocks (meter). Their statistics are used to estimate the impact of the variability of the transport properties of the simulated blocks on contaminant transport modeled on bigger domains (hectometer). This is investigated with a one-dimensional transport modeling based on the Kolmogorov-Dmitriev theory of branching stochastic processes. Applying the proposed approach with diverse binary trees and different simulation settings provides a great flexibility, which is revealed by the differences in the breakthrough curves.

  18. Global sensitivity analysis and Bayesian parameter inference for solute transport in porous media colonized by biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, A; Delay, F; Fajraoui, N; Fahs, M; Mara, T A

    2016-08-01

    The concept of dual flowing continuum is a promising approach for modeling solute transport in porous media that includes biofilm phases. The highly dispersed transit time distributions often generated by these media are taken into consideration by simply stipulating that advection-dispersion transport occurs through both the porous and the biofilm phases. Both phases are coupled but assigned with contrasting hydrodynamic properties. However, the dual flowing continuum suffers from intrinsic equifinality in the sense that the outlet solute concentration can be the result of several parameter sets of the two flowing phases. To assess the applicability of the dual flowing continuum, we investigate how the model behaves with respect to its parameters. For the purpose of this study, a Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) and a Statistical Calibration (SC) of model parameters are performed for two transport scenarios that differ by the strength of interaction between the flowing phases. The GSA is shown to be a valuable tool to understand how the complex system behaves. The results indicate that the rate of mass transfer between the two phases is a key parameter of the model behavior and influences the identifiability of the other parameters. For weak mass exchanges, the output concentration is mainly controlled by the velocity in the porous medium and by the porosity of both flowing phases. In the case of large mass exchanges, the kinetics of this exchange also controls the output concentration. The SC results show that transport with large mass exchange between the flowing phases is more likely affected by equifinality than transport with weak exchange. The SC also indicates that weakly sensitive parameters, such as the dispersion in each phase, can be accurately identified. Removing them from calibration procedures is not recommended because it might result in biased estimations of the highly sensitive parameters. PMID:27182791

  19. Benchmarking the invariant embedding method against analytical solutions in model transport problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahlberg Malin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the invariant embedding method in a few model transport problems for which it is also possible to obtain an analytical solution. The use of the method is demonstrated in three different areas. The first is the calculation of the energy spectrum of sputtered particles from a scattering medium without absorption, where the multiplication (particle cascade is generated by recoil production. Both constant and energy dependent cross-sections with a power law dependence were treated. The second application concerns the calculation of the path length distribution of reflected particles from a medium without multiplication. This is a relatively novel application, since the embedding equations do not resolve the depth variable. The third application concerns the demonstration that solutions in an infinite medium and in a half-space are interrelated through embedding-like integral equations, by the solution of which the flux reflected from a half-space can be reconstructed from solutions in an infinite medium or vice versa. In all cases, the invariant embedding method proved to be robust, fast, and monotonically converging to the exact solutions.

  20. Heterogeneous nucleation promotes carrier transport in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ruipeng

    2012-09-04

    A new way to investigate and control the growth of solution-cast thin films is presented. The combination of in situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements with dissipation capabilities (QCM-D) and in situ grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in an environmental chamber provides unique quantitative insights into the time-evolution of the concentration of the solution, the onset of nucleation, and the mode of growth of the organic semiconductor under varied drying conditions. It is demonstrated that careful control over the kinetics of solution drying enhances carrier transport significantly by promoting phase transformation predominantly via heterogeneous nucleation and sustained surface growth of a highly lamellar structure at the solid-liquid interface at the expense of homogeneous nucleation. A new way to investigate and control the growth of drop-cast thin films is presented. The solution-processing of small-molecule thin films of TIPS-pentacene is investigated using time-resolved techniques to reveal the mechanisms of nucleation and growth leading to solid film formation. By tuning the drying speed of the solution, the balance between surface and bulk growth modes is altered, thereby controlling the lamellar formation and tuning the carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistors Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effects of Pisha sandstone content on solute transport in a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Qing; Zheng, Jiyong; He, Honghua; Han, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xingchang

    2016-02-01

    In sandy soil, water, nutrients and even pollutants are easily leaching to deeper layers. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of Pisha sandstone on soil solute transport in a sandy soil. The miscible displacement technique was used to obtain breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Br(-) as an inert non-adsorbed tracer and Na(+) as an adsorbed tracer. The incorporation of Pisha sandstone into sandy soil was able to prevent the early breakthrough of both tracers by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity compared to the controlled sandy soil column, and the impeding effects increased with Pisha sandstone content. The BTCs of Br(-) were accurately described by both the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R), and the T-R model fitted the experimental data slightly better than the CDE. The two-site nonequilibrium model (T-S) accurately fit the Na(+) transport data. Pisha sandstone impeded the breakthrough of Na(+) not only by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity but also by increasing the adsorption capacity of the soil. The measured CEC values of Pisha sandstone were up to 11 times larger than those of the sandy soil. The retardation factors (R) determined by the T-S model increased with increasing Pisha sandstone content, and the partition coefficient (K(d)) showed a similar trend to R. According to the results of this study, Pisha sandstone can successfully impede solute transport in a sandy soil column.

  2. A simple two layer model for simulation of adsorbing and nonadsorbing solute transport through field soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Akhtar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available While rapid movement of solutes through structured soils constitutes the risk of groundwater contamination, simulation of solute transport in field soils is challenging. A modification in an existing preferential flow model was tested using replicated Chloride and Lithium leachings carried out at constant flow rates through four soils differing in grades and type of structure. Flow rates generated by +10 mm, −10 mm, −40 mm, and −100 mm water heads at the surface of 35 cm diameter 50 cm height field columns. Three well-structured silty clay soils under ponding had concurrent breakthrough of Chloride and Lithium within a few cm of drainage, and a delayed and reduced peak concentration of Lithium with decrease in flow rate controlled by the negative heads. Massive sandy loam soil columns had delayed but uniform breakthrough of the solutes over the flow rates. Macropore flow in well-structured silty clay/clay loam soils reduced retardation, R (1.5 to 4.5 and effective porosity, θe (0.05 to 0.15, and increased macropore velocity, vm (20 to 30 cm cm−1 drainage compared to the massive sandy soils. The existing simple preferential flow equation (single layer fitted the data well only when macropore flow was dominant. The modified preferential flow equations (two layers fitted equally well both for the adsorbing and nonadsorbing solutes. The later had high goodness of fit for a large number of solute breakthroughs, and gave almost identical retardation coefficient R as that calculated by two-domain CDE. With fewer parameters, the modified preferential flow equation after testing on some rigorous model selection criteria may provide a base for future modeling of chemical transport.

  3. Eulerian Lagrangian Adaptive Fup Collocation Method for solving the conservative solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko

    2014-05-01

    Contaminant transport in natural aquifers is a complex, multiscale process that is frequently studied using different Eulerian, Lagrangian and hybrid numerical methods. Conservative solute transport is typically modeled using the advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Despite the large number of available numerical methods that have been developed to solve it, the accurate numerical solution of the ADE still presents formidable challenges. In particular, current numerical solutions of multidimensional advection-dominated transport in non-uniform velocity fields are affected by one or all of the following problems: numerical dispersion that introduces artificial mixing and dilution, grid orientation effects, unresolved spatial and temporal scales and unphysical numerical oscillations (e.g., Herrera et al, 2009; Bosso et al., 2012). In this work we will present Eulerian Lagrangian Adaptive Fup Collocation Method (ELAFCM) based on Fup basis functions and collocation approach for spatial approximation and explicit stabilized Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev temporal integration (public domain routine SERK2) which is especially well suited for stiff parabolic problems. Spatial adaptive strategy is based on Fup basis functions which are closely related to the wavelets and splines so that they are also compactly supported basis functions; they exactly describe algebraic polynomials and enable a multiresolution adaptive analysis (MRA). MRA is here performed via Fup Collocation Transform (FCT) so that at each time step concentration solution is decomposed using only a few significant Fup basis functions on adaptive collocation grid with appropriate scales (frequencies) and locations, a desired level of accuracy and a near minimum computational cost. FCT adds more collocations points and higher resolution levels only in sensitive zones with sharp concentration gradients, fronts and/or narrow transition zones. According to the our recent achievements there is no need for solving the large

  4. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Scharinger; Ulrich Rabl; Christian H. Kasess; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Tina Hofmaier; Kersten Diers; Lucie Bartova; Gerald Pail; Wolfgang Huf; Zeljko Uzelac; Beate Hartinger; Klaudius Kalcher; Thomas Perkmann; Helmuth Haslacher; Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy...

  5. Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Robin [Montana State University

    2014-10-31

    Background. The use of biological and chemical processes that degrade or immobilize contaminants in subsurface environments is a cornerstone of remediation technology. The enhancement of biological and chemical processes in situ, involves the transport, displacement, distribution and mixing of one or more reactive agents. Biological and chemical reactions all require diffusive transport of solutes to reaction sites at the molecular scale and accordingly, the success of processes at the meter-scale and larger is dictated by the success of phenomena that occur at the micron-scale. However, current understanding of scaling effects on the mixing and delivery of nutrients in biogeochemically dynamic porous media systems is limited, despite the limitations this imposes on the efficiency and effectiveness of the remediation challenges at hand. Objectives. We therefore proposed to experimentally characterize and computationally describe the growth, evolution, and distribution of microbial activity and mineral formation as well as changes in transport processes in porous media that receive two or more reactive amendments. The model system chosen for this project was based on a method for immobilizing 90Sr, which involves stimulating microbial urea hydrolysis with ensuing mineral precipitation (CaCO3), and co-precipitation of Sr. Studies at different laboratory scales were used to visualize and quantitatively describe the spatial relationships between amendment transport and consumption that stimulate the production of biomass and mineral phases that subsequently modify the permeability and heterogeneity of porous media. Biomass growth, activity, and mass deposition in mixing zones was investigated using two-dimensional micro-model flow cells as well as flow cells that could be analyzed using synchrotron-based x-ray tomography. Larger-scale flow-cell experiments were conducted where the spatial distribution of media properties, flow, segregation of biological activity and

  6. Solution-Processed Metal Oxides as Efficient Carrier Transport Layers for Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Wallace C H; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-27

    Carrier (electron and hole) transport layers (CTLs) are essential components for boosting the performance of various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes. Considering the drawbacks of conventional CTLs (easily oxidized/unstable, demanding/costly fabrication, etc.), transition metal oxides with good carrier transport/extraction and superior stability have drawn extensive research interest as CTLs for next-generation devices. In recent years, many research efforts have been made toward the development of solution-based metal oxide CTLs with the focus on low- or even room-temperature processes, which can potentially be compatible with the deposition processes of organic materials and can significantly contribute to the low-cost and scale-up of organic devices. Here, the recent progress of different types of solution-processed metal oxide CTLs are systematically reviewed in the context of organic photovoltaics, from synthesis approaches to device performance. Different approaches for further enhancing the performance of solution-based metal oxide CTLs are also discussed, which may push the future development of this exciting field.

  7. Substrate regulation of ascorbate transport activity in astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrocytes possess a concentrative L-ascorbate (vitamin C) uptake mechanism involving a Na(+)-dependent L-ascorbate transporter located in the plasma membrane. The present experiments examined the effects of deprivation and supplementation of extracellular L-ascorbate on the activity of this transport system. Initial rates of L-ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating primary cultures of rat astrocytes with L-[14C]ascorbate for 1 min at 37 degrees C. We observed that the apparent maximal rate of uptake (Vmax) increased rapidly (less than 1 h) when cultured cells were deprived of L-ascorbate. In contrast, there was no change in the apparent affinity of the transport system for L-[14C]ascorbate. The increase in Vmax was reversed by addition of L-ascorbate, but not D-isoascorbate, to the medium. The effects of external ascorbate on ascorbate transport activity were specific in that preincubation of cultures with L-ascorbate did not affect uptake of 2-deoxy-D-[3H(G)]glucose. We conclude that the astroglial ascorbate transport system is modulated by changes in substrate availability. Regulation of transport activity may play a role in intracellular ascorbate homeostasis by compensating for regional differences and temporal fluctuations in external ascorbate levels

  8. Approximate analytic transport problem solution of particle reflection from solid target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of thesis deals with the analytic investigation of the energy and time independent particle transport in plane geometry described by a common anisotropic scattering function. Regarding particles with specific diffusion histories in infinite or semi-infinite medium, new particular solutions of the corresponding transport equations are exactly derived by means of the Fourier inversion technique. Aiming at preserving the analytic outcome, the two groups of particles scattered after each successive collision into directions μ0, were considered. Its Fourier transformed transport equations have solutions without logarithmic singular points, in the upper part or the down part of the complex k-plane. Consequently, the Fourier inversion of solutions are carried out analytically and the closing expressions in real space are acquired as a compound of the elementary exponential functions over space coordinate x. Opposite to the exact solution for the whole angular flux density - being a key result of the rigorous transport theory, these particular solutions do not comprise elements with the exponential singular integrals and could be easily applied in subsequent calculations. It has been shown that these formulae represent a valid generalization of the expressions for the flux of once scattered particles. Moreover, they incorporate a great fraction of all particles and, at least in the case of a small multiplication constant c, they closely approach the entire angular flux density. Using the particular solutions previously derived, an approximate analytic method for solving the energy and time independent transport equation in plane geometry is developed. The procedure is based on the particle flux decomposition in two components. The first component is exactly obtained and the second one is determined approximately by the ordinary DPN method of low order. The infinite medium Green's function and the half-space reflection coefficient were calculated. A careful

  9. The Influence of Calcium Chloride Salt Solution on the Transport Properties of Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoob Farnam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical interaction between calcium chloride (CaCl2 and cementitious binder may alter the transport properties of concrete which are important in predicting the service life of infrastructure elements. This paper presents a series of fluid and gas transport measurements made on cementitious mortars before and after exposure to various solutions with concentrations ranging from 0% to 29.8% CaCl2 by mass. Fluid absorption, oxygen diffusivity, and oxygen permeability were measured on mortar samples prepared using Type I and Type V cements. Three primary factors influence the transport properties of mortar exposed to CaCl2: (1 changes in the degree of saturation, (2 calcium hydroxide leaching, and (3 formation of chemical reaction products (i.e., Friedel’s salt, Kuzel’s salt, and calcium oxychloride. It is shown that an increase in the degree of saturation decreases oxygen permeability. At lower concentrations (~12%, the formation of chemical reaction products (mainly calcium oxychloride is a dominant factor decreasing the fluid and gas transport in concrete.

  10. A lithofacies approach for modeling non-Fickian solute transport in a heterogeneous alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Marco; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic realizations of lithofacies assemblage based on lithological data from a relatively small number of boreholes were used to simulate solute transport at the well-known Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Mississippi (USA). With sharp vertical contrasts and lateral connectivity explicitly accounted for in the corresponding hydraulic conductivity fields, experimental results from a large-scale tracer experiment were adequately reproduced with a relatively simple model based on advection and local dispersion. The geologically based model of physical heterogeneity shows that one well-interconnected lithofacies, with a significantly higher hydraulic conductivity and accounting for 12% of the total aquifer volume, may be responsible for the observed non-Fickian transport behavior indicated by the asymmetric shape of the plumes and by variations of the dispersion rate in both space and time. This analysis provides a lithological basis to the hypothesis that transport at MADE site is controlled by a network of high-conductivity sediments embedded in a less permeable matrix. It also explains the calibrated value of the ratio of mobile to total porosities used in previous modeling studies based on the dual-domain mass transfer approach. The results of this study underscore the importance of geologically plausible conceptualizations of the subsurface for making accurate predictions of the fate and transport of contaminants in highly heterogeneous aquifers. These conceptualizations may be developed through integration of raw geological data with expert knowledge, interpretation, and appropriate geostatistical methods.

  11. The Bicycle – Future’s Solution for an Eco-friendly Urban Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ciovică

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Even though more and more cities across the globe impose restrictive measures regarding theuse of cars and offer instead incentives in order to choose alternative means of transport, they do not slowdown their economic growth, but on the contrary they prove their skills towards providing citizens a betterlife. Under these circumstances, the bicycle appears as a viable solution for most of us, and the publicprograms that support its use have started to develop globally, at European level, and in Romania as well.The current paper wishes to point out the stimulating perspectives brought by the slight increase in thenumber of bicycles sold in our country in recent years towards the future of urban transport.

  12. Transport and dosimetric solutions for the ELIMED laser-driven beam line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Amato, A. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Candiano, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Cuttone, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Giove, D. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, Milano (Italy); Korn, G.; Krasa, J. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Leanza, R. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Universitá degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Manna, R. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell' Universitá 2 - 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Marchese, V. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Margarone, D. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i. (FZU), ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Milluzzo, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Universitá degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Petringa, G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Cannizzaro, Via Messina 829 - 95100 Catania (Italy); Schillaci, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62 - 95125 Catania (Italy); Medical Physics School, University of Catania, Via S. Sofia 64 - 95125 Catania (Italy); and others

    2015-10-01

    Within 2017, the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications) transport beam-line and dosimetric systems for laser-generated beams will be installed at the ELI-Beamlines facility in Prague (CZ), inside the ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser–Ion Acceleration) interaction room. The beam-line will be composed of two sections: one in vacuum, devoted to the collecting, focusing and energy selection of the primary beam and the second in air, where the ELIMED beam-line dosimetric devices will be located. This paper briefly describes the transport solutions that will be adopted together with the main dosimetric approaches. In particular, the description of an innovative Faraday Cup detector with its preliminary experimental tests will be reported.

  13. Modeling study of solute transport in the unsaturated zone: Workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, E.P.; Fuentes, H.R. (eds.)

    1987-04-01

    Issues addressed were the adequacy of the data for the various models, effectiveness of the models to represent the data, particular information provided by the models, the role of caisson experiments in providing fundamental knowledge of porous-media water flow and solute transport, and the importance of geochemistry to the transport of nonconservative tracers. These proceedings include the presentations made by each of the modelers; the summary document written by the panel; and a transcript of the discussions, both the discussions that followed individual presentations and the general discussion held on the second day. This publication completes the series on the workshop. Volume I in the series (NUREG/CR-4615, Vol. I) contains background information and the data sets provided each modeler.

  14. Signature of non-Fickian solute transport in complex heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijeljic, Branko; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Blunt, Martin J

    2011-11-11

    We simulate transport of a solute through three-dimensional images of different rock samples, with resolutions of a few microns, representing geological media of increasing pore-scale complexity: a sandpack, a Berea sandstone, and a Portland limestone. We predict the propagators (concentration as a function of distance) measured on similar cores in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and the dispersion coefficient as a function of Péclet number and time. The behavior is explained using continuous time random walks with a truncated power-law distribution of travel times: transport is qualitatively different for the complex limestone compared to the sandstone or sandpack, with long tailing, an almost immobile peak concentration, and a very slow approach to asymptotic dispersion.

  15. Upscaling of solute transport in disordered porous media by wavelet transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Mahsa; de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Modeling flow and solute transport in large-scale (e.g.) on the order of 103 m heterogeneous porous media involves substantial computational burden. A common approach to alleviate the problem is to utilize an upscaling method that generates models that require less intensive computations. The method must also preserve the important properties of the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field. We use an upscaling method based on the wavelet transformations (WTs) that coarsens the computational grid based on the spatial distribution of K. The technique is applied to a porous formation with broadly distributed and correlated K values, and the governing equation for solute transport in the formation is solved numerically. The WT upscaling preserves the resolution of the initial highly-resolved computational grid in the high K zones, as well as that of the zones with sharp contrasts between the neighboring K, whereas the low-K zones are averaged out. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method, we simulate fluid flow and nonreactive solute transport in both the high-resolution and upscaled grids, and compare the concentration profiles and the breakthrough times. The results indicate that the WT upscaling of a K field generates non-uniform upscaled grids with a number of grid blocks that on average is about two percent of the number of the blocks in the original high-resolution computational grids, while the concentration profiles, the breakthrough times and the second moment of the concentration distribution, computed for both models, are virtually identical. A systematic parametric study is also carried out in order to investigate the sensitivity of the method to the broadness of the K field, the nature of the correlations in the field (positive versus negative), and the size of the computational grid. As the broadness of the K field and the size of the computational domain increase, better agreement between the results for the high-resolution and

  16. A cellular automaton model adapted to sandboxes to simulate the transport of solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, Boris; Donado, Leonardo; Castro, Eduardo; Bayuelo, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    The increasingly use of groundwater sources for human consumption and the growth of the levels of these hydric sources contamination make imperative to reach a deeper understanding how the contaminants are transported by the water, in particular through a heterogeneous porous medium. Accordingly, the present research aims to design a model, which simulates the transport of solutes through a heterogeneous porous medium, using cellular automata. Cellular automata (CA) are a class of spatially (pixels) and temporally discrete mathematical systems characterized by local interaction (neighborhoods). The pixel size and the CA neighborhood were determined in order to reproduce accurately the solute behavior (Ilachinski, 2001). For the design and corresponding validation of the CA model were developed different conservative tracer tests using a sandbox packed heterogeneously with a coarse sand (size # 20 grain diameter 0,85 to 0,6 mm) and clay. We use Uranine and a saline solution with NaCl as a tracer which were measured taking snapshots each 20 seconds. A calibration curve (pixel intensity Vs Concentration) was used to obtain concentration maps. The sandbox was constructed of acrylic (caliber 0,8 cms) with 70 x 45 x 4 cms of dimensions. The "sandbox" had a grid of 35 transversal holes with a diameter of 4 mm each and an uniform separation from one to another of 10 cms. To validate the CA-model it was used a metric consisting in rating the number of correctly predicted pixels over the total per image throughout the entire test run. The CA-model shows that calibrations of pixels and neighborhoods allow reaching results over the 60 % of correctly predictions usually. This makes possible to think that the application of the CA- model could be useful in further researches regarding the transport of contaminants in hydrogeology.

  17. Advocacy for active transport: advocate and city council perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenby Marieah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective advocacy is an important part of efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Research about effective health advocacy is scarce, however, the health sector can learn from the experiences and knowledge of community advocates and those who are on the receiving end of this advocacy. The aim of this study is to explore advocacy for active transport from the perspectives of community advocates and representatives from City councils. Methods Cycling and walking advocates were identified from the local contact list of Cycling Advocates Network and Living Streets Aotearoa. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with cycle and walking advocates from throughout New Zealand. Advocates also nominated a suitable council officer at their local City council to be interviewed. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and categories of responses for each of the questions created. Results Several processes were used by advocates to engage with council staff, including formal council submissions, meetings, stakeholder forums and partnership in running community events promoting active transport. Several other agencies were identified as being influential for active transport, some as potential coalition partners and others as potential adversaries. Barriers to improving conditions for active transport included a lack of funding, a lack of will-power among either council staff or councillors, limited council staff capacity (time or training and a culture of providing infrastructure for motor vehicles instead of people. Several suggestions were made about how the health sector could contribute to advocacy efforts, including encouraging political commitment, engaging the media, communicating the potential health benefits of active transport to the general public and being role models in terms of personal travel mode choice and having workplaces that support participation in active transport

  18. Presentation and exhibition activities for promoting theexportof transport services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya Vladimirovna Nesterova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of presentation and exhibition activities is considered as an important factor in providing new competitive advantages at the strategic markets for exporting of transportation services. A specific role for exhibition activities as a factor to overcome market failures arose from imperfect information and incomplete markets is displayed. Exhibitions are considered as a true reflection of most market parameters, as a means to get correct information concerning market capacity and its borders, as an instrument to access to new markets. At the firm level presentation and branding activities should be considered as a modern technology (especially it concerns Russian companies which provide to hold up already existed markets and to conquer new ones. Presentation and branding activities are an effective technology to promote company trade-mark, competitive advantages for market demand increasing. Comparative analysis of the main exhibitions on transport and logistics issues is fulfilled on the data basecollected by authors. Data observes geographical distribution of transport exhibition and exhibition facilities development at several regions for the last years. The analyses allow to revealing a geographical structure of the exhibitions and its distribution by type of transport. The most promising and economically favorable exhibition areas for the promotion of Russian transport services are shown.

  19. Particle Swarm Optimization for inverse modeling of solute transport in fractured gneiss aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Zambrano-Bigiarini, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has received considerable attention as a global optimization technique from scientists of different disciplines around the world. In this article, we illustrate how to use PSO for inverse modeling of a coupled flow and transport groundwater model (MODFLOW2005-MT3DMS) in a fractured gneiss aquifer. In particular, the hydroPSO R package is used as optimization engine, because it has been specifically designed to calibrate environmental, hydrological and hydrogeological models. In addition, hydroPSO implements the latest Standard Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (SPSO-2011), with an adaptive random topology and rotational invariance constituting the main advancements over previous PSO versions. A tracer test conducted in the experimental field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) is used as case study. A double-porosity approach is used to simulate the solute transport in the fractured Gneiss aquifer. Tracer concentrations obtained with hydroPSO were in good agreement with its corresponding observations, as measured by a high value of the coefficient of determination and a low sum of squared residuals. Several graphical outputs automatically generated by hydroPSO provided useful insights to assess the quality of the calibration results. It was found that hydroPSO required a small number of model runs to reach the region of the global optimum, and it proved to be both an effective and efficient optimization technique to calibrate the movement of solute transport over time in a fractured aquifer. In addition, the parallel feature of hydroPSO allowed to reduce the total computation time used in the inverse modeling process up to an eighth of the total time required without using that feature. This work provides a first attempt to demonstrate the capability and versatility of hydroPSO to work as an optimizer of a coupled flow and transport model for contaminant migration.

  20. Problem solution as a guided activity with Mexican schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solovieva, Yulia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to describe the organization of a guided activity for problem solution in primary school. The method, which was applied to mathematical problems, allowed us to propose a specific orientation for the proper solution of arithmetic problems by pupils. The study was based on the activity-theory approach applied to the process of teaching and learning. It was carried out with pupils in the second grade of a private school in the city of Puebla (Mexico. The method was used in the classroom during 30 school sessions of 1 hour per day. The methodology of formative experiment was used in the study. Qualitative analysis of the pedagogical process of teaching and learning was conducted. The results show that, after participation in the formative process, the schoolchildren became able to identify essential elements, data, and all relationships among them in order to solve mathematical problems. At the end of the program the verbal external level was raised for the process of orientation and the solution of problems together with the ability to use logarithms independently. We conclude that orientation, as a guided form of activity in primary school, is essential for the development of the ability to analyze problems.

  1. Core-scale solute transport model selection using Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Malama, Bwalya; James, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Model applicability to core-scale solute transport is evaluated using breakthrough data from column experiments conducted with conservative tracers tritium (H-3) and sodium-22, and the retarding solute uranium-232. The three models considered are single-porosity, double-porosity with single-rate mobile-immobile mass-exchange, and the multirate model, which is a deterministic model that admits the statistics of a random mobile-immobile mass-exchange rate coefficient. The experiments were conducted on intact Culebra Dolomite core samples. Previously, data were analyzed using single- and double-porosity models although the Culebra Dolomite is known to possess multiple types and scales of porosity, and to exhibit multirate mobile-immobile-domain mass transfer characteristics at field scale. The data are reanalyzed here and null-space Monte Carlo analysis is used to facilitate objective model selection. Prediction (or residual) bias is adopted as a measure of the model structural error. The analysis clearly shows ...

  2. The solution of the multigroup neutron transport equation using spherical harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solution of the multi-group neutron transport equation in up to three space dimensions is presented. The flux is expanded in a series of unnormalised spherical harmonics. Using the various recurrence formulae a linked set of first order differential equations is obtained for the moments psisup(g)sub(lm)(r), γsup(g)sub(lm)(r). Terms with odd l are eliminated resulting in a second order system which is solved by two methods. The first is a finite difference formulation using an iterative procedure, secondly, in XYZ and XY geometry a finite element solution is given. Results for a test problem using both methods are exhibited and compared. (orig./RW)

  3. Solution to the transport equation for electron backscattering on massive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scattering of a monoenergetic electron beam (Albedo problem) vertical to the plane of the boundary layer of a massive material is treated as transportproblem using the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). The strong anistropic to 1 standardized differential effective cross section (DEC) of the single scattering of the electrons enters into the integral term. A complete, orthogonal set of solution units of the BTE can be given by a new type of approximation of the DEC in a generalization of a solution method from CASE 1960. By continuously changing an anisotropy parameter, the region of strong anisotropic and isotropic single scattering is simultaneously determined, the case results are taken as special case. (orig./RW)

  4. Regulation of human hepatic drug transporter activity and expression by diesel exhaust particle extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Le Vee

    Full Text Available Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs are common environmental air pollutants primarily affecting the lung. DEPs or chemicals adsorbed on DEPs also exert extra-pulmonary effects, including alteration of hepatic drug detoxifying enzyme expression. The present study was designed to determine whether organic DEP extract (DEPe may target hepatic drug transporters that contribute in a major way to drug detoxification. Using primary human hepatocytes and transporter-overexpressing cells, DEPe was first shown to strongly inhibit activities of the sinusoidal solute carrier (SLC uptake transporters organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP 1B1, 1B3 and 2B1 and of the canalicular ATP-binding cassette (ABC efflux pump multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, with IC50 values ranging from approximately 1 to 20 μg/mL and relevant to environmental exposure situations. By contrast, 25 μg/mL DEPe failed to alter activities of the SLC transporter organic cation transporter (OCT 1 and of the ABC efflux pumps P-glycoprotein and bile salt export pump (BSEP, whereas it only moderately inhibited those of sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. Treatment by 25 μg/mL DEPe was next demonstrated to induce expression of BCRP at both mRNA and protein level in cultured human hepatic cells, whereas it concomitantly repressed mRNA expression of various transporters, including OATP1B3, OATP2B1, OCT1 and BSEP. Such changes in transporter expression were found to be highly correlated to those caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a reference activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR pathway. This suggests that DEPe, which is enriched in known ligands of AhR like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alters drug transporter expression via activation of the AhR cascade. Taken together, these data established human hepatic transporters as targets of organic chemicals containing in DEPs, which may contribute

  5. A conservative, positivity preserving scheme for reactive solute transport problems in moving domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuza, Sibusiso; Kuzmin, Dmitri; Čanić, Sunčica; Bukač, Martina

    2014-11-01

    We study the mathematical models and numerical schemes for reactive transport of a soluble substance in deformable media. The medium is a channel with compliant adsorbing walls. The solutes are dissolved in the fluid flowing through the channel. The fluid, which carries the solutes, is viscous and incompressible. The reactive process is described as a general physico-chemical process taking place on the compliant channel wall. The problem is modeled by a convection-diffusion adsorption-desorption equation in moving domains. We present a conservative, positivity preserving, high resolution ALE-FCT scheme for this problem in the presence of dominant transport processes and wall reactions on the moving wall. A Patankar type time discretization is presented, which provides conservative treatment of nonlinear reactive terms. We establish CFL-type constraints on the time step, and show the mass conservation of the time discretization scheme. Numerical simulations are performed to show validity of the schemes against effective models under various scenarios including linear adsorption-desorption, irreversible wall reaction, infinite adsorption kinetics, and nonlinear Langmuir kinetics. The grid convergence of the numerical scheme is studied for the case of fixed meshes and moving meshes in fixed domains. Finally, we simulate reactive transport in moving domains under linear and nonlinear chemical reactions at the wall, and show that the motion of the compliant channel wall enhances adsorption of the solute from the fluid to the channel wall. Consequences of this result are significant in the area of, e.g., nano-particle cancer drug delivery. Our result shows that periodic excitation of the cancerous tissue using, e.g., ultrasound, may enhance adsorption of cancer drugs carried by nano-particles via the human vasculature. For Taylor dispersion and for other convection dominated flows, numerical schemes for solute transport may lead to undesirable numerical artefacts. These

  6. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks

    CERN Document Server

    Greulich, Philip

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment and investigate the formation of particle clusters. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, cluster sizes exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The results are compared with a diffusion limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size-scale if the relevant time-scales and particle densities are considered.

  7. Solute transport in coupled inland-coastal water systems. General conceptualisation and application to Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarsjoe, Jerker; Destouni, Georgia; Persson, Klas; Prieto, Carmen (Dept. of Physical Geography, Quaternary Geology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    We formulate a general theoretical conceptualisation of solute transport from inland sources to downstream recipients, considering main recipient load contributions from all different nutrient and pollutant sources that may exist within any catchment. Since the conceptualisation is model independent, its main hydrological factors and mass delivery factors can be quantified on the basis of inputs to and outputs from any considered analytical or numerical model. Some of the conceptually considered source contribution and transport pathway combinations are however commonly neglected in catchment-scale solute transport and attenuation modelling, in particular those related to subsurface sources, diffuse sources at the land surface and direct groundwater transport into the recipient. The conceptual framework provides a possible tool for clarification of underlying and often implicit model assumptions, which can be useful for e.g. inter-model comparisons. In order to further clarify and explain research questions that may be of particular importance for transport pathways from deep groundwater surrounding a repository, we concretise and interpret some selected transport scenarios for model conditions in the Forsmark area. Possible uncertainties in coastal discharge predictions, related to uncertain spatial variation of evapotranspiration within the catchment, were shown to be small for the relatively large, focused surface water discharges from land to sea, because local differences were averaged out along the length of the main water flow paths. In contrast, local flux values within the diffuse groundwater flow field from land to sea are more uncertain, although estimates of mean values and total sums of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) along some considerable coastline length may be robust. The present results show that 80% to 90% of the total coastal discharge of Forsmark occurred through focused flows in visible streams, whereas the remaining 10% to 20% was

  8. Transport of ions in mesoporous carbon electrodes during capacitive deionization of high-salinity solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, K; Kim, Y-H; Gabitto, J; Mayes, R T; Yiacoumi, S; Bilheux, H Z; Walker, L M H; Dai, S; Tsouris, C

    2015-01-27

    Desalination of high-salinity solutions has been studied using a novel experimental technique and a theoretical model. Neutron imaging has been employed to visualize lithium ions in mesoporous carbon materials, which are used as electrodes in capacitive deionization (CDI) for water desalination. Experiments were conducted with a flow-through CDI cell designed for neutron imaging and with lithium-6 chloride ((6)LiCl) as the electrolyte. Sequences of neutron images have been obtained at a relatively high concentration of (6)LiCl solution to provide information on the transport of ions within the electrodes. A new model that computes the individual ionic concentration profiles inside mesoporous carbon electrodes has been used to simulate the CDI process. Modifications have also been introduced into the simulation model to calculate results at high electrolyte concentrations. Experimental data and simulation results provide insight into why CDI is not effective for desalination of high ionic-strength solutions. The combination of experimental information, obtained through neutron imaging, with the theoretical model will help in the design of CDI devices, which can improve the process for high ionic-strength solutions. PMID:25533167

  9. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the soil has led to scientific and/or personal interactions with several Australian scientists such as John Philip, David Smiles, Greg Davis and John Knight. Along with John Philip and Robin Wooding, Peter was an early user of the Gardner (1958) linearised model of soil water flow, which brought him into competition with John Philip. I will discuss some of Peter's solutions relevant to infiltration from line and point sources, cavities and basins. A visit to Canberra, Australia in the early 1980s led to joint work on soil water flow, and on combined water and solute movement with David Smiles and others. In 1983 Peter was on the PhD committee for Greg Davis at the University of Wollongong, and some of the methods in his thesis 'Mathematical modelling of rate-limiting mechanisms of pyritic oxidation in overburden dumps' were later used by Peter's student Sjoerd van der Zee. David Smiles and Peter wrote a survey article 'Hydrology of swelling clay soils' in 2005. In the last decade Peter has been investigating the history of groundwater and vadose zone hydrology, and recently he and I have been bringing to light the largely forgotten work of Lewis Fry Richardson on finite difference solution of the heat equation, drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  10. Active Reflectors: Possible Solutions Based on Reflectarrays and Fresnel Reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Cabria

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview about some of the recent Spanish developments on active reflectors is presented. In the first part, a novel beamsteering active reflectarray is deeply studied. It is based on implementing in each elementary radiator an IQ modulator structure, in which amplitude and phase control of the scattered field is achieved. Finally, a special effort is made in offering solutions to overcome the active antenna integration problems. In the second part, the active concept is firstly extended to Fresnel reflectors. Thanks to the development of a proper simulator, this special structure can be easily analysed. This simulator allows the study of performance of this kind of reflectors and, applying evolutionary algorithms, to find optimal configurations of reflector in accordance with the given specifications for the conformal radiation pattern.

  11. Measured and computed solute transport behaviour in the saturated zone of a fractured and slightly karstified chalk aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    Dassargues, Alain; Goderniaux, Pascal; Daoudi, Moubarak; Orban, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Solute transport in the saturated zone of a micro-fissured, fractured and even locally slightly karstified aquifer has been studied by multi-tracer tests in groundwater convergent flow conditions to pumping wells or towards a collecting gallery. Different behaviour has been detected that can be described by three kinds of typical breakthrough curves: (a) transport with a dominant advective component, producing narrow and symmetrical observed breakthrough curves, characteristic of solute trans...

  12. Computer model of two-dimensional solute transport and dispersion in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Bredehoeft, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents a model that simulates solute transport in flowing ground water. The model is both general and flexible in that it can be applied to a wide range of problem types. It is applicable to one- or two-dimensional problems involving steady-state or transient flow. The model computes changes in concentration over time caused by the processes of convective transport, hydrodynamic dispersion, and mixing (or dilution) from fluid sources. The model assumes that the solute is non-reactive and that gradients of fluid density, viscosity, and temperature do not affect the velocity distribution. However, the aquifer may be heterogeneous and (or) anisotropic. The model couples the ground-water flow equation with the solute-transport equation. The digital computer program uses an alternating-direction implicit procedure to solve a finite-difference approximation to the ground-water flow equation, and it uses the method of characteristics to solve the solute-transport equation. The latter uses a particle- tracking procedure to represent convective transport and a two-step explicit procedure to solve a finite-difference equation that describes the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion, fluid sources and sinks, and divergence of velocity. This explicit procedure has several stability criteria, but the consequent time-step limitations are automatically determined by the program. The report includes a listing of the computer program, which is written in FORTRAN IV and contains about 2,000 lines. The model is based on a rectangular, block-centered, finite difference grid. It allows the specification of any number of injection or withdrawal wells and of spatially varying diffuse recharge or discharge, saturated thickness, transmissivity, boundary conditions, and initial heads and concentrations. The program also permits the designation of up to five nodes as observation points, for which a summary table of head and concentration versus time is printed at the end of the

  13. An analytical solution of the generalized equation of energy transport in one-dimensional semi-infinite domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulish Vladimir V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an integral solution of the generalized one-dimensional equation of energy transport with the convective term.The solution of the problem has been achieved by the use of a novel technique that involves generalized derivatives (in particular, derivatives of noninteger orders. Confluent hypergeometric functions, known as Whittaker's functions, appear in the course of the solution procedure upon applying the Laplace transform to the original transport equation.The analytical solution of the problem is written in the integral form and provides a relationship between the local values of the transported property (e.g., temperature, mass, momentum, etc. and its flux.The solution is valid everywhere within the domain, including the domain boundary.

  14. A laboratory study of colloid and solute transport in surface runoff on saturated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Congrong; Gao, Bin; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael; Tian, Yuan; Wu, Lei; Perez-Ovilla, Oscar

    2011-05-01

    SummaryColloids in surface runoff may pose risks to the ecosystems not only because some of them (e.g., pathogens) are toxic, but also because they may facilitate the transport of other contaminants. Although many studies have been conducted to explore colloid fate and transport in the environment, current understanding of colloids in surface runoff is still limited. In this study, we conducted a range of laboratory experiments to examine the transport behavior of colloids in a surface runoff system, made of a soil box packed with quartz sand with four soil drainage outlets and one surface flow outlet. A natural clay colloid (kaolinite) and a conservative chemical tracer (bromide) were applied to the system under a simulated rainfall event (64 mm/h). Effluent soil drainage and surface flow samples were collected to determine the breakthrough concentrations of bromide and kaolinite. Under the experimental conditions tested, our results showed that surface runoff dominated the transport processes. As a result, kaolinite and bromide were found more in surface flow than in soil drainage. Comparisons between the breakthrough concentrations of bromide and kaolinite showed that kaolinite had lower mobility than bromide in the subsurface flow (i.e., soil drainage), but behaved almost identical to bromide in the surface runoff. Student's t-test confirmed the difference between kaolinite and bromide in subsurface flow ( p = 0.02). Spearman's test and linear regression analysis, however, showed a strong 1:1 correlation between kaolinite and bromide in surface runoff ( p < 0.0001). Our result indicate that colloids and chemical solutes may behave similarly in overland flow on bare soils with limited drainage when surface runoff dominates the transport processes.

  15. Sediment and solute transport in a mountainous watershed in Valle del Cauca, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Christian; Hoyos Villada, Fanny; Morales Vargas, Amalia; Rivera, Baudelino; Da Silva, Mayesse; Moreno Padilla, Pedro; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2015-04-01

    Sediment samples and solute concentrations were measured from the La Vega micro watershed in the southwestern region of the Colombian Andes. A main goal of this study was to improve prediction of soil surface and soil nutrient changes, based on field measurements, within small basin of the Aguaclara watershed network receiving different types of conservation measures. Two modeling approaches for stream discharge and sediment transport predictions were used with one of these based on infiltration-excess and the other on saturation-excess runoff. These streams are a part of a recent initiative from a water fund established by Asobolo, Asocaña, and Cenicaña in collaboration with the Natural Capital Project to improve conservation efforts and monitor their effects. On-site soil depth changes, groundwater depth measurements, and soil nutrient concentrations were also monitored to provide more information about changes within this mountainous watershed during one part of the yearly rainy season. This information is being coupled closely with the outlet sediment concentration and solute concentration patterns to discern correlations between scales. Lateral transects in the upper, middle, and lower part of the hillsides in the La Vega micro watershed showed differences in soil nutrient status and soil surface depth changes. The model based on saturation-excess, semi-distributed hydrology was able to reproduce discharge and sediment transport rates as well as the initially used infiltration excess model indicating available options for comparison of conservation changes in the future.

  16. Field-scale experiments of unsaturated flow and solute transport in a heterogeneous porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Craig; Smith, Leslie; Beckie, Roger

    2005-05-01

    A multiyear flow and conservative tracer test has been carried out in unsaturated mine waste rock to examine the physical mechanisms by which water moves through this coarse, heterogeneous, granular material. The experimental system has a footprint of 8 m × 8 m, is 5 m high, and is built on a contiguous grid of 16 zero-tension lysimeters. A chloride tracer was applied during a single rainfall event. Subsequently, the system has been subject to both natural and applied rainfall events in which no further tracer was added. Water flow and tracer transport is monitored using in situ measurements of moisture content, matric suction, and soil water solution samplers. Results demonstrate for transient infiltration conditions the influence and interaction of matrix flow in a heterogeneous granular matrix, preferential flow in macropores, and noncapillary pathways. Tracer migration through preferential flow paths dominates the initial and peak breakthrough concentrations. Point measurements of tracer concentration from in situ solution samplers yield a relatively poor indication of the flux-averaged transport of mass that is recorded at the base of the experiment, in addition to overestimating the stored mass and underestimating residence time.

  17. Transport of active ellipsoidal particles in ratchet potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Bao-Quan, E-mail: aibq@scnu.edu.cn; Wu, Jian-Chun [Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, 510006 Guangzhou (China)

    2014-03-07

    Rectified transport of active ellipsoidal particles is numerically investigated in a two-dimensional asymmetric potential. The out-of-equilibrium condition for the active particle is an intrinsic property, which can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the perfect sphere particle can facilitate the rectification, while the needlelike particle destroys the directed transport. There exist optimized values of the parameters (the self-propelled velocity, the torque acting on the body) at which the average velocity takes its maximal value. For the ellipsoidal particle with not large asymmetric parameter, the average velocity decreases with increasing the rotational diffusion rate, while for the needlelike particle (very large asymmetric parameter), the average velocity is a peaked function of the rotational diffusion rate. By introducing a finite load, particles with different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities) will move to the opposite directions, which is able to separate particles of different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities)

  18. Getting the tail to wag the dog: Incorporating groundwater transport into catchment solute transport models using rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Surface water hydrologic models are increasingly used to analyze the transport of solutes through the landscape, such as nitrate. However, many of these models cannot adequately capture the effect of groundwater flow paths, which can have long travel times and accumulate legacy contaminants, releasing them to streams over decades. If these long lag times are not accounted for, the short-term efficacy of management activities to reduce nitrogen loads may be overestimated. Models that adopt a simple 'well-mixed' assumption, leading to an exponential transit time distribution at steady state, cannot adequately capture the broadly skewed nature of groundwater transit times in typical watersheds. Here I will demonstrate how StorAge Selection functions can be used to capture the long lag times of groundwater in a typical subwatershed-based hydrologic model framework typical of models like SWAT, HSPF, HBV, PRMS and others. These functions can be selected and calibrated to reproduce historical data where available, but can also be fitted to the results of a steady-state groundwater transport model like MODFLOW/MODPATH, allowing those results to directly inform the parameterization of an unsteady surface water model. The long tails of the transit time distribution predicted by the groundwater model can then be completely captured by the surface water model. Examples of this application in the Chesapeake Bay watersheds and elsewhere will be given.

  19. Quantum transport in one-dimensional systems via a master equation approach: Numerics and an exact solution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marko Žnidarič

    2011-11-01

    We discuss recent findings about properties of quantum nonequilibrium steady states. In particular we focus on transport properties. It is shown that the time-dependent density matrix renormalization method can be used successfully to find a stationary solution of Lindblad master equation. Furthermore, for a specific model an exact solution is presented.

  20. Modelling The Transport Of Solutes And Colloids In The Grimsel Migration Shear Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes modelling of the transport of solutes and colloids in an experimental system comprising an artificial dipole flow field in a water-conducting shear zone at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in the central Swiss Alps. The modelling work forms part of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retardation Project (CRR), which includes a series of field transport experiments and a supporting laboratory programme, as well as modelling studies. Four independent groups representing different organisations or research institutes have conducted the modelling, with each group employing its own modelling approach or approaches. Only the work conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is described in the present report. The modelling approaches used in the present study may not be directly applicable to safety assessment problems and the direct implications of the results of this study for safety assessment are limited. It can, however, be said that the study has demonstrated the high degree of mobility of bentonite and other colloids in a system that is at least in some ways comparable to those of interest in safety assessment, and has shown that bentonite colloids can at least potentially affect the transport of some safety relevant radionuclides over longer temporal and spatial scales than those addressed here. (author)

  1. Modelling The Transport Of Solutes And Colloids In The Grimsel Migration Shear Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosakowski, G.; Smith, P

    2005-02-01

    This report describes modelling of the transport of solutes and colloids in an experimental system comprising an artificial dipole flow field in a water-conducting shear zone at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in the central Swiss Alps. The modelling work forms part of the Colloid and Radionuclide Retardation Project (CRR), which includes a series of field transport experiments and a supporting laboratory programme, as well as modelling studies. Four independent groups representing different organisations or research institutes have conducted the modelling, with each group employing its own modelling approach or approaches. Only the work conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is described in the present report. The modelling approaches used in the present study may not be directly applicable to safety assessment problems and the direct implications of the results of this study for safety assessment are limited. It can, however, be said that the study has demonstrated the high degree of mobility of bentonite and other colloids in a system that is at least in some ways comparable to those of interest in safety assessment, and has shown that bentonite colloids can at least potentially affect the transport of some safety relevant radionuclides over longer temporal and spatial scales than those addressed here. (author)

  2. Conservative solute approximation to the transport of a remedial reagent in a vertical circulation flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Cheng, Chung-Ting; Liu, Chen-Wuing

    2010-09-01

    SummaryThis study presents a novel mathematical model for describing the transport of the remedial reagent in a vertical circulation flow field in an anisotropic aquifer. To develop the mathematical model, the radial and vertical components of the pore water velocity are calculated first by using an analytical solution for steady-state drawdown distribution near a vertical circulation well. Next, the obtained radial and vertical components of the pore water velocity are then incorporated into a three-dimensional axisymmetrical advection-dispersion equation in cylindrical coordinates from which to build the reagent transport equation. The Laplace transform finite difference technique is applied to solve the three-dimensional axisymmetrical advection-dispersion equation with spatial variable-dependent coefficients. The developed mathematical model is used to investigate the effects of various parameters such as hydraulic conductivity anisotropy, longitudinal and transverse dispersivities, the placement of the extraction and injection screened intervals of the vertical circulation well and the injection modes on the transport regime of the remedial reagent. Results show that those parameters have different degrees of impacts on the distribution of the remedial reagent. The mathematical model provides an effective tool for designing and operating an enhanced groundwater remediation in an anisotropic aquifer using the vertical circulation well technology.

  3. Concentration statistics of solute transport for the near field zone of an estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galesic, Morena; Andricevic, Roko; Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko

    2016-08-01

    Rivers are considered as one of the most influential hydrological pathways for the waterborne transport and therefore estuaries are critical areas for a pollution hazard that might lead to eutrophication and general water quality deterioration. This paper is investigating the near field mixing in the estuary as the result of a combination of small scale turbulent diffusion and a larger scale variation of the advective mean velocities. In this work concentration moments were developed directly from the fundamental advection-diffusion equation for the case of continuous, steady, conservative solute transport with the dominant stream flow mean velocity. The concentration statistics were developed considering depth integrated velocity field with mean velocity attenuation due to the wind induced currents and sea tides. In order to perform further studies of developed concentration moments, a set of velocity measurements in the local river Žrnovnica estuary near Split, Croatia, was conducted and numerical random walk particle tracking model was used to run the transport simulations based on measured velocity fields. The numerical model has confirmed quantitatively first two concentration moments, which are utilized to calculate the point concentration probability density function (pdf) often needed to assess the risk of exceeding the allowed concentration values in the estuary.

  4. Solute transport and extraction by a single root in unsaturated soils: model development and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A contaminant transport model was developed to simulate the fate and transport of organic compounds such as TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), using the single-root system. Onions were planted for this system with 50-ml plastic tubes. Mass in the soil, soil solution, root and leaf was monitored using 14C-TNT. Model parameters were acquired from the experiments in the single-root system and were used to simulate total TNT concentration in soil, providing the average concentrations in the rhizosphere and bulk soil as well as root and leaf compartments. Because the existing RCF (root concentration factor) and TSCF (transpiration stream concentration factor) equations based on log Kow (octanol-water partition coefficient) were not correlated to TNT uptake, a new term, root uptake rate (Rur), and a new Tscf equation, based on the experimental data, were introduced in the proposed model. The results from both modeling and experimental studies showed higher concentrations of TNT in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil, because mass transported from the surrounding soil into the rhizosphere was higher than that by root uptake

  5. Asymptotic Behavior of Heat Transport for a Class of Exact Solutions in Rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Grooms, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The non-hydrostatic, quasigeostrophic approximation for rapidly rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection admits a class of exact `single mode' solutions. These solutions correspond to steady laminar convection with a separable structure consisting of a horizontal planform characterized by a single wavenumber multiplied by a vertical amplitude profile, with the latter given as the solution of a nonlinear boundary value problem. The heat transport associated with these solutions is studied in the regime of strong thermal forcing (large reduced Rayleigh number $\\widetilde{Ra}$). It is shown that the Nusselt number $Nu$, a nondimensional measure of the efficiency of heat transport by convection, for this class of solutions is bounded below by $Nu\\gtrsim \\widetilde{Ra}^{3/2}$, independent of the Prandtl number, in the limit of large reduced Rayleigh number. Matching upper bounds include only logarithmic corrections, showing the accuracy of the estimate. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear boundary value problem for ...

  6. Advocacy for active transport: advocate and city council perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenby Marieah; Reeder Anthony I; Murdoch Linda; Richards Rosalina

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Effective advocacy is an important part of efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Research about effective health advocacy is scarce, however, the health sector can learn from the experiences and knowledge of community advocates and those who are on the receiving end of this advocacy. The aim of this study is to explore advocacy for active transport from the perspectives of community advocates and representatives from City councils. Methods Cycl...

  7. Experimental investigation on rainfall infiltration and solute transport in layered porous and fractured media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-fang; WANG Ming-yu

    2012-01-01

    Layered structures with upper porous and lower fractured media are widely distributed in the world.An experimental investigation on rainfall infiltration and solute transport in such layered structures can provide the necessary foundation for effectively preventing and forecasting water bursting in mines,controlling contamination of mine water,and accomplishing ecological restoration of mining areas.A typical physical model of the layered structures with porous and fractured media was created in this study.Then rainfall infiltration experiments were conducted after salt solution was sprayed on the surface of the layered structure.The volumetric water content and concentration of chlorine ions at different specified positions along the profile of the experiment system were measured in real-time.The experimental results showed that the lower fractured media,with a considerably higher permeability than that of the upper porous media,had significant effects on preventing water infiltration.Moreover,although the porous media were homogeneous statistically in the whole domain,spatial variations in the features of effluent concentrations with regards to time,or so called breakthrough curves,at various sampling points located at the horizontal plane in the porous media near the porous-fractured interface were observed,indicating the diversity of solute transport at small scales.Furthermore,the breakthrough curves of the outflow at the bottom,located beneath the underlying fractured rock,were able to capture and integrate features of the breakthrough curves of both the upper porous and fractured media,which exhibited multiple peaks,while the peak values were reduced one by one with time.

  8. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioni, C

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  9. Berberine acutely activates the glucose transport activity of GLUT1

    OpenAIRE

    Cok, Alexandra; Plaisier, Christina; Salie, Matthew J.; Oram, Daniel S.; Chenge, Jude; Louters, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Berberine, which has a long history of use in Chinese medicine, has recently been shown to have efficacy in the treatment of diabetes. While the hypoglycemic effect of berberine has been clearly documented in animal and cell line models, such as 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myotube cells, the mechanism of action appears complex with data implicating activation of the insulin signaling pathway as well as activation of the exercise or AMP kinase-mediated pathway. There have been no reports of the a...

  10. Core-scale solute transport model selection using Monte Carlo analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; James, Scott C.

    2013-06-01

    Model applicability to core-scale solute transport is evaluated using breakthrough data from column experiments conducted with conservative tracers tritium (3H) and sodium-22 (22Na ), and the retarding solute uranium-232 (232U). The three models considered are single-porosity, double-porosity with single-rate mobile-immobile mass-exchange, and the multirate model, which is a deterministic model that admits the statistics of a random mobile-immobile mass-exchange rate coefficient. The experiments were conducted on intact Culebra Dolomite core samples. Previously, data were analyzed using single-porosity and double-porosity models although the Culebra Dolomite is known to possess multiple types and scales of porosity, and to exhibit multirate mobile-immobile-domain mass transfer characteristics at field scale. The data are reanalyzed here and null-space Monte Carlo analysis is used to facilitate objective model selection. Prediction (or residual) bias is adopted as a measure of the model structural error. The analysis clearly shows single-porosity and double-porosity models are structurally deficient, yielding late-time residual bias that grows with time. On the other hand, the multirate model yields unbiased predictions consistent with the late-time -5/2 slope diagnostic of multirate mass transfer. The analysis indicates the multirate model is better suited to describing core-scale solute breakthrough in the Culebra Dolomite than the other two models.

  11. Reactive transport modeling of column experiments on the evolution of saline-alkaline waste solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zuoping; Zhang, Guoxiang; Wan, Jiamin

    2008-04-01

    Leakage of saline-alkaline tank waste solutions often creates a serious environmental contamination problem. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the fate of such waste solutions in the Hanford vadose zone, we simulated reactive transport in columns designed to represent local site conditions. The Pitzer ion interaction module was used, with principal geochemical processes considered in the simulation including quartz dissolution, precipitation of brucite, calcite, and portlandite, multi-component cation exchange, and aqueous complexation reactions. Good matches were observed between the simulated and measured column data at ambient temperature ( approximately 21 degrees C). Relatively good agreement was also obtained at high temperature ( approximately 70 degrees C). The decrease of pH at the plume front is examined through formation of secondary mineral phases and/or quartz dissolution. Substantial formation of secondary mineral phases resulting from multi-component cation exchange suggests that these phases are responsible for a decrease in pH within the plume front. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted with respect to cation exchange capacity, selectivity coefficient, mineral assemblage, temperature, and ionic strength. This study could serve as a useful guide to subsequent experimental work, to thermodynamic models developed for the concentrated solutions at high ionic strength and to other types of waste plume studies. PMID:18313795

  12. Reactive transport modeling of column experiments on the evolution of saline alkaline waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zuoping; Zhang, Guoxiang; Wan, Jiamin

    2008-04-01

    Leakage of saline-alkaline tank waste solutions often creates a serious environmental contamination problem. To better understand the mechanisms controlling the fate of such waste solutions in the Hanford vadose zone, we simulated reactive transport in columns designed to represent local site conditions. The Pitzer ion interaction module was used, with principal geochemical processes considered in the simulation including quartz dissolution, precipitation of brucite, calcite, and portlandite, multi-component cation exchange, and aqueous complexation reactions. Good matches were observed between the simulated and measured column data at ambient temperature (˜ 21 °C). Relatively good agreement was also obtained at high temperature (˜ 70 °C). The decrease of pH at the plume front is examined through formation of secondary mineral phases and/or quartz dissolution. Substantial formation of secondary mineral phases resulting from multi-component cation exchange suggests that these phases are responsible for a decrease in pH within the plume front. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted with respect to cation exchange capacity, selectivity coefficient, mineral assemblage, temperature, and ionic strength. This study could serve as a useful guide to subsequent experimental work, to thermodynamic models developed for the concentrated solutions at high ionic strength and to other types of waste plume studies.

  13. Low-temperature solution-processed graphene oxide derivative hole transport layer for organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiao; Fang, Guojia; Cheng, Fei; Lei, Hongwei; Qin, Pingli; Zhan, Caimao

    2013-04-01

    A Mo6+ cation modified graphene oxide (GO) derivative of GO-Mo was synthesized by a low-temperature solution method with different amounts of ammonium heptamolybdate (Mo-precursor) added into the GO solutions. The GO-Mo products were characterized through Raman microspectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and their photoelectric properties were systematically investigated. Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells with GO-Mo as the hole transport layer (HTL) were fabricated and their performance as a function of the number of GO-Mo layers was also studied. The performance of these devices was much better than that of the device with GO as the HTL. The best performance of the device with a power conversion efficiency of 2.61%, an open-circuit voltage of 0.59 V and a short-circuit current density of 9.02 mA cm-2 were obtained. Finally, the effect of the Mo-precursor weight in the GO solution on the device performance was discussed.

  14. The next generation in optical transport semiconductors: IC solutions at the system level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomatam, Badri N.

    2005-02-01

    In this tutorial overview, we survey some of the challenging problems facing Optical Transport and their solutions using new semiconductor-based technologies. Advances in 0.13um CMOS, SiGe/HBT and InP/HBT IC process technologies and mixed-signal design strategies are the fundamental breakthroughs that have made these solutions possible. In combination with innovative packaging and transponder/transceiver architectures IC approaches have clearly demonstrated enhanced optical link budgets with simultaneously lower (perhaps the lowest to date) cost and manufacturability tradeoffs. This paper will describe: *Electronic Dispersion Compensation broadly viewed as the overcoming of dispersion based limits to OC-192 links and extending link budgets, *Error Control/Coding also known as Forward Error Correction (FEC), *Adaptive Receivers for signal quality monitoring for real-time estimation of Q/OSNR, eye-pattern, signal BER and related temporal statistics (such as jitter). We will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of these receiver and transmitter architectures, provide examples of system performance and conclude with general market trends. These Physical layer IC solutions represent a fundamental new toolbox of options for equipment designers in addressing systems level problems. With unmatched cost and yield/performance tradeoffs, it is expected that IC approaches will provide significant flexibility in turn, for carriers and service providers who must ultimately manage the network and assure acceptable quality of service under stringent cost constraints.

  15. The SPX domain of the yeast low-affinity phosphate transporter Pho90 regulates transport activity

    OpenAIRE

    Hürlimann, Hans Caspar; Pinson, Benoît; Stadler-Waibel, Martha; Zeeman, Samuel C; Freimoser, Florian M

    2009-01-01

    Yeast has two phosphate-uptake systems that complement each other: the high-affinity transporters (Pho84 and Pho89) are active under phosphate starvation, whereas Pho87 and Pho90 are low-affinity transporters that function when phosphate is abundant. Here, we report new regulatory functions of the amino-terminal SPX domain of Pho87 and Pho90. By studying truncated versions of Pho87 and Pho90, we show that the SPX domain limits the phosphate-uptake velocity, suppresses phosphate efflux and aff...

  16. Effect of linear sorption on solute transport in a coupled fracture-matrix system with sinusoidal fracture geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Natarajan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of solute transport through fractured rock is an important component of in many disciplines especially groundwater contamination and nuclear waste disposal. Several studies have been conducted on single rock fracture using parallel plate model and recently solute and thermal transport has been numerically modeled in the sinusoidal fracture matrix coupled system. The effect of linear sorption has been studied on the same. Results suggest the high matrix porosity and matrix diffusion coefficient enhance the sorption process and reduce the matrix diffusion of solutes. The velocity of the fluid reduces with increment in fracture aperture.

  17. An analytical model for solute transport in an infiltration tracer test in soil with a shallow groundwater table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Chen, Jui-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    It is recommended that an in-situ infiltration tracer test is considered for simultaneously determining the longitudinal and transverse dispersion coefficients in soil. Analytical solutions have been derived for two-dimensional advective-dispersive transport in a radial geometry in the literature which can be used for interpreting the result of such a tracer test. However, these solutions were developed for a transport domain with an unbounded-radial extent and an infinite thickness of vadose zone which might not be realistically manifested in the actual solute transport during a field infiltration tracer test. Especially, the assumption of infinite thickness of vadose zone should be invalid for infiltration tracer tests conducted in soil with a shallow groundwater table. This paper describes an analytical model for interpreting the results of an infiltration tracer test based on improving the transport domain with a bounded-radial extent and a finite thickness of vadose zone. The analytical model is obtained with the successive application of appropriate integral transforms and their corresponding inverse transforms. A comparison of the newly derived analytical solution against the previous analytical solutions in which two distinct sets of radial extent and thickness of vadose zone are considered is conducted to determine the influence of the radial and exit boundary conditions on the solute transport. The results shows that both the radial and exit boundary conditions substantially affect the trailing segment of the breakthrough curves for a soil medium with large dispersion coefficients. Previous solutions derived for a transport domain with an unbounded-radial and an infinite thickness of vadose zone boundary conditions give lower concentration predictions compared with the proposed solution at late times. Moreover, the differences between two solutions are amplified when the observation positions are near the groundwater table. In addition, we compare our

  18. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo

  19. Sugar transport and nitrate reductase activity rate in roots affect plant adaptation to cold and warm climate plants

    OpenAIRE

    Kafkafi, Uzi

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism in the root is controlled by 2 fluxes: 1) nitrate intake from the external solution. 2) Transport of sugar from the leaves. Nitrate reduction to ammonium or direct ammonium uptake produce ammonia in the root cell. When the rate of sugar transport to root cells is slower than their sugar consumption for respiration, ammonia will accumulate and the root cells will die from ammonia toxicity. In nature, plants can be defined with regard to the activity of their root nitrate re...

  20. Numerical solution of neutron transport equations in discrete ordinates and slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An unified formalism to solve numerically, between other equation, the neutron transport in discrete ordinates, slab geometry, several energy groups and independents of time, has been developed recently. Such a formalism cover some of the conventional schemes as diamond difference, (WDD) characteristic step (SC) lineal characteristic (LC), quadratic characteristic (QC) and lineal discontinuous. Unified formation gives before hand the convergence order of the previously selected scheme. In fact it allows besides to generate a big amount of numerical schemes, with which is also possible to solve numerical equations as soon as neutron transport. The essential purpose of this work was to solve the neutron transport equations in slab geometry and discrete ordinates considering several energy groups without to take under advisement time dependence based in the above mentioned unified formalism. To reach this purpose it was necesary to design a computer code with the name TNOD1 (Neutron transport in discrete ordinates and 1 dimension) which includes each one of the schemes already pointed out. there exist two numerical schemes, also recently developed, quadratic continuous (QC) and cubic continuous (CN), although covered by unified formalism, it has been possible to include them inside this computer code without make substantial changes in its structure. In chapter I, derivative of neutron transport equation independent of time is taken, for angular flux, including boundary conditions and discontinuity. In chapter II the neutron transport equations are obtained in multigroups, independents of time, for approximation of discrete ordinates. Description of theory related with unified formalism and its relationship with mentioned discretization schemes is presented in chapter III. Chapter IV describes the computer code developed and finally, in chapter V different numerical results obtained with TNOD1 program are shown. In Appendix A theorems and mathematical arguments used

  1. Thermally activated long range electron transport in living biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Matthew D; Golden, Joel P; Roy, Jared; Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M; Tsoi, Stanislav; Erickson, Jeffrey S; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Calabrese Barton, Scott; Tender, Leonard M

    2015-12-28

    Microbial biofilms grown utilizing electrodes as metabolic electron acceptors or donors are a new class of biomaterials with distinct electronic properties. Here we report that electron transport through living electrode-grown Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms is a thermally activated process with incoherent redox conductivity. The temperature dependency of this process is consistent with electron-transfer reactions involving hemes of c-type cytochromes known to play important roles in G. sulfurreducens extracellular electron transport. While incoherent redox conductivity is ubiquitous in biological systems at molecular-length scales, it is unprecedented over distances it appears to occur through living G. sulfurreducens biofilms, which can exceed 100 microns in thickness. PMID:26611733

  2. Validation testing of solute transport modelling using SHETRAN. The Calder Hollow experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill-slope plot experiments were conducted at Calder Hollow, near Sellafield in West Cumbria, using lanthanum chloride (strongly sorbing) and strontium chloride (weakly sorbing) tracers in solution. Water and solute were injected via boreholes into a sand layer in a sequence of Quaternary drift deposits and the resulting subsurface transport plumes studied using core extraction and laboratory measurement of lanthanum, and fluid conductivity and bulk resistivity monitoring of strontium in an array of observation boreholes. Simulations of the field experiments were run using the SHETRAN hydrological modelling system. SHETRAN is a physically based, spatially distributed system. It was used to simulate the combined subsurface water flow (calibrated against field observations of piezometric head) and solute transport (uncalibrated, and run without any knowledge of the field observations for solute) taking place during the experiments. The results of the simulations were used to gauge the ability of SHETRAN to predict the subsurface transport of the lanthanum chloride and strontium chloride tracers in a validation exercise. The validation approach is based on the 'blind' method of Ewen and Parkin (1996), and involved using SHETRAN as it would be used in a real application. Ranges were established for the measured values of the physical properties of the porous media, supplemented by values from the literature, and these were used in conjunction with an analysis of calibrated flow simulations to create 48 SHETRAN parameter datasets for the lanthanum experiment and 16 for the strontium experiment. The datasets each led to a physically plausible simulation consistent with all the available information. A number of 'tests' were defined to compare model simulation results against field measurements. The simulations were used as a starting point to derive upper and lower 'bounds' for the model generated results, in order to incorporate uncertainty. Two teams produced distinct

  3. The SPX domain of the yeast low-affinity phosphate transporter Pho90 regulates transport activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürlimann, Hans Caspar; Pinson, Benoît; Stadler-Waibel, Martha; Zeeman, Samuel C; Freimoser, Florian M

    2009-01-01

    Yeast has two phosphate-uptake systems that complement each other: the high-affinity transporters (Pho84 and Pho89) are active under phosphate starvation, whereas Pho87 and Pho90 are low-affinity transporters that function when phosphate is abundant. Here, we report new regulatory functions of the amino-terminal SPX domain of Pho87 and Pho90. By studying truncated versions of Pho87 and Pho90, we show that the SPX domain limits the phosphate-uptake velocity, suppresses phosphate efflux and affects the regulation of the phosphate signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, split-ubiquitin assays and co-immunoprecipitation suggest that the SPX domain of both Pho90 and Pho87 interacts physically with the regulatory protein Spl2. This work suggests that the SPX domain inhibits low-affinity phosphate transport through a physical interaction with Spl2. PMID:19590579

  4. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  5. Electrically facilitated molecular transport. Analysis of the relative contributions of diffusion, migration, and electroosmosis to solute transport in an ion-exchange membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, B D; White, H S; Scott, E R

    2000-02-01

    Electrically facilitated molecular transport in an ion-exchange membrane (Nafion, 1100 equiv wt) has been studied using a scanning electrochemical microscope. The transport rates of ferrocenylmethyltrimethylammonium (a cation), acetaminophen (a neutral molecule), and ascorbate (an anion) through approximately 120-micron-thick membranes were measured as a function of the iontophoretic current passed across the membrane (-1.0 to +1.0 A/cm2). Transport rates were analyzed by employing the Nernst-Planck equation, modified to account for electric field-driven convective transport. Excellent agreement between experimental and theoretical values of the molecular flux was obtained using a single fitting parameter for each molecule (electroosmotic drag coefficient). The electroosmotic velocity of the neutral molecule, acetaminophen, was shown to be a factor of approximately 500 larger than that of the cation ferrocenylmethyltrimethylammonium, a consequence of the electrostatic interaction of the cation with the negatively charged pore walls of the ion-exchange membrane. Electroosmotic transport of ascorbate occurred at a negligible rate due to repulsion of the anion by the cation-selective membrane. These results suggest that electroosmotic velocities of solute molecules are determined by specific chemical interactions of the permeant and membrane and may be very different from the average solution velocity. The efficiency of electroosmotic transport was also shown to be a function of the membrane thickness, in addition to membrane/solute interactions. PMID:10695125

  6. Preferential flow and solute transport in a large lysimeter, under controlled boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, R.; Gaudet, J. P.; Bariac, T.

    1999-02-01

    Laboratory studies of solute transport in soils (soil columns) are not totally representative of field conditions (spatial variability, soil structure etc.). Field studies hardly allow quantification of fluxes and mechanisms. In this article, and intermediate approach is suggested, using a lysimeter (1.7 m 3) of an almost undisturbed soil, with controlled boundary conditions, the aim being to be able to quantify fluxes and mechanisms at a scale closer to field conditions, thus yielding results that better depict reality. Two experiments, with constant water fluxes of 1.05 and 1.48 mm h -1 were conducted. Solutes were introduced as concentration pulses. Species 2H 2O, C1 - and Br - were used as tracers, and K +, NH 4+, NO 3-, atrazine as interactive and/or reactive solutes. Elution curves were analyzed by the method of moments. Results show that about 20% of the water are immobile. As a consequence of anion exclusion, anion tracers appear at the outlet with an advance of about 10% in time as compared to isotopic tracers. The added NH 4+is mostly nitrified, and K + undergoes cation exchange with Ca 2+ and Mg 2+. Under our experimental conditions, leaching of atrazine is significant with low degradation. A third experiment was conducted, in which the flow was interrupted while the solute peak was within the lysimeter, and 400 soil samples were extracted from the lysimeter. Soil-water content distributions exhibit coefficients of variation within layers between 5% and 27%. Concentration distributions exhibit coefficients of variation within layers between 22% and 59%. There is no correlation between concentration and water content. The observed spatial variability suggests the occurrence of preferential flow. Concentrations in suction cups were 55%-136% of those measured in corresponding soil samples.

  7. Simple solution-processed titanium oxide electron transport layer for efficient inverted polymer solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium oxide (TiOX) is an effective electron transport layer (ETL) in polymer solar cells (PSCs). We report efficient inverted PSCs with a simple solution-processed amorphous TiOX (s-TiOX) film as an ETL. The s-TiOX film with high light transmittance was prepared by spin-coating titanium (IV) isopropoxide isopropanol solution on indium tin oxide coated glass in inert and then placed in air under room temperature for 60 min. The introduction of s-TiOX ETL greatly improved the short circuit current density of the devices. PSCs based on poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester and poly(4,8-bis-alkyloxy-benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-alt-alkylcarbonyl -thieno[3,4-b]thiophene):[6,6]-phenyl- C71-butyric acid methyl ester using s-TiOX film as ETL shows high power conversion efficiency of 4.29% and 6.7% under the illumination of AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm2, which shows enhancements compared to the conventional PSCs with poly(styrenesulfonate)-doped poly(ethylenedioxythiophene) as anode buffer layer. In addition, the device exhibits good stability in a humid ambient atmosphere without capsulation. The results indicate that the annealing-free, simple solution processed s-TiOX film is an efficient ETL for high-performance PSCs. - Highlights: • High quality s-TiOX films were prepared by a simple, solution method without thermal treatment. • The s-TiOX films with high transmittance are very smooth. • The organic photovoltaic performance with s-TiOX film improved greatly and exhibited good stability. • The annealing-free, simple prepared s-TiOX film will be much compatible with flexible substrates

  8. Solute transport processes in flow-event-driven stream-aquifer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter G.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between streams and groundwater controls key features of the stream hydrograph and chemograph. Since surface runoff is usually less saline than groundwater, flow events are usually accompanied by declines in stream salinity. In this paper, we use numerical modelling to show that, at any particular monitoring location: (i) the increase in stream stage associated with a flow event will precede the decrease in solute concentration (arrival time lag for solutes); and (ii) the decrease in stream stage following the flow peak will usually precede the subsequent return (increase) in solute concentration (return time lag). Both arrival time lag and return time lag increase with increasing wave duration. However, arrival time lag decreases with increasing wave amplitude, whereas return time lag increases. Furthermore, while arrival time lag is most sensitive to parameters that control river velocity (channel roughness and stream slope), return time lag is most sensitive to groundwater parameters (aquifer hydraulic conductivity, recharge rate, and dispersitivity). Additionally, the absolute magnitude of the decrease in river concentration is sensitive to both river and groundwater parameters. Our simulations also show that in-stream mixing is dominated by wave propagation and bank storage processes, and in-stream dispersion has a relatively minor effect on solute concentrations. This has important implications for spreading of contaminants released to streams. Our work also demonstrates that a high contribution of pre-event water (or groundwater) within the flow hydrograph can be caused by the combination of in-stream and bank storage exchange processes, and does not require transport of pre-event water through the catchment.

  9. A Method for Specific Activity Measurement of 241Am Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the principle of coincidence theory, the specific activity of 241Am solution was determined on 4πα+4πγ counting standard device by γ efficiency extrapolation, and the problems of constant correction coefficients of self-absorption and scattering in α ionization chamber method were solved. The method was based on the alteration of detection efficiency when the height of elevator was altered, and the activity was obtained by γ fitting extrapolation according to detection efficiency. The results of more than 20 alpha radioactive sources by this method in our work are accordant with those of 2πα ionization chamber, and their uncertainties are improved to 0.4%. (authors)

  10. Radioprotector modifying influence upon the ion transport ATPase activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of aminothiol and biogenic amine radioprotectors (β-mercaptoethylamine, AET, serotonin, dopamine, histamine) on the basic ion transport enzymes, such as Na, K-ATP ase and Mg, Ca-ATPase activities were investigated in the tissues of numerous organs, with different radiosensitivity in the wistar rats. Experimental results showed that intraperitoneal injection of the used radioprotectors caused preliminary inhibition of the Na, K-ATPase activity in tissues from organs with different radioresistance, but had no influence on the Mg, Ca-ATPase activity in membranes of erythrocytes and rat brain cells. (2 tabs.)

  11. Corrosion in systems for storage and transportation of petroleum products and biofuels identification, monitoring and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Groysman, Alec

    2014-01-01

    This book treats corrosion as it occurs and affects processes in real-world situations, and thus points the way to practical solutions. Topics described include the conditions in which petroleum products are corrosive to metals; corrosion mechanisms of petroleum products; which parts of storage tanks containing crude oils and petroleum products undergo corrosion; dependence of corrosion in tanks on type of petroleum products; aggressiveness of petroleum products to polymeric material; how microorganisms take part in corrosion of tanks and pipes containing petroleum products; which corrosion monitoring methods are used in systems for storage and transportation of petroleum products; what corrosion control measures should be chosen; how to choose coatings for inner and outer surfaces of tanks containing petroleum products; and how different additives (oxygenates, aromatic solvents) to petroleum products and biofuels influence metallic and polymeric materials. The book is of interest to corrosion engineers, mat...

  12. Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willert, Jeffrey; Taitano, William T.; Knoll, Dana

    2014-09-15

    In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration.

  13. Smart Energy Systems for coherent 100% renewable energy and transport solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik; Connolly, David;

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that in order to identify least cost solutions of the integration of fluctuating renewable energy sources into current or future 100% renewable energy supplies one has to take a Smart Energy Systems approach. This paper outline why and how to do so. Traditionally......, heating and transport sectors, in combination with various intra-hour, hourly, daily, seasonal and biannual storage options, to create the flexibility necessary to integrate large penetrations of fluctuating renewable energy. However, in this paper we present the development and design of coherent Smart...... (such as wind, solar, wave power and low value heat sources) to utilise new sources of flexibility such as solid, gaseous, and liquid fuel storage, thermal storage and heat pumps and battery electric vehicles. Smart Energy Systems also enable a more sustainable and feasible use of bioenergy than...

  14. Leveraging Anderson Acceleration for improved convergence of iterative solutions to transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this note we demonstrate that using Anderson Acceleration (AA) in place of a standard Picard iteration can not only increase the convergence rate but also make the iteration more robust for two transport applications. We also compare the convergence acceleration provided by AA to that provided by moment-based acceleration methods. Additionally, we demonstrate that those two acceleration methods can be used together in a nested fashion. We begin by describing the AA algorithm. At this point, we will describe two application problems, one from neutronics and one from plasma physics, on which we will apply AA. We provide computational results which highlight the benefits of using AA, namely that we can compute solutions using fewer function evaluations, larger time-steps, and achieve a more robust iteration

  15. Solution-printed organic semiconductor blends exhibiting transport properties on par with single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad R; Li, Ruipeng; Qiang Li, Er; Kirmani, Ahmad R; Abdelsamie, Maged; Wang, Qingxiao; Pan, Wenyang; Payne, Marcia M; Anthony, John E; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Amassian, Aram

    2015-01-01

    Solution-printed organic semiconductors have emerged in recent years as promising contenders for roll-to-roll manufacturing of electronic and optoelectronic circuits. The stringent performance requirements for organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) in terms of carrier mobility, switching speed, turn-on voltage and uniformity over large areas require performance currently achieved by organic single-crystal devices, but these suffer from scale-up challenges. Here we present a new method based on blade coating of a blend of conjugated small molecules and amorphous insulating polymers to produce OTFTs with consistently excellent performance characteristics (carrier mobility as high as 6.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), low threshold voltages ofsemiconductor films with transport properties and other figures of merit on par with their single-crystal counterparts.

  16. Reactive solute transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media with multimodal reactive mineral facies: the Lagrangian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanian, Mohamad Reza; Ritzi, Robert W; Dai, Zhenxue; Huang, Chao Cheng

    2015-03-01

    Physical and chemical heterogeneities have a large impact on reactive transport in porous media. Examples of heterogeneous attributes affecting reactive mass transport are the hydraulic conductivity (K), and the equilibrium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd). This paper uses the Deng et al. (2013) conceptual model for multimodal reactive mineral facies and a Lagrangian-based stochastic theory in order to analyze the reactive solute dispersion in three-dimensional anisotropic heterogeneous porous media with hierarchical organization of reactive minerals. An example based on real field data is used to illustrate the time evolution trends of reactive solute dispersion. The results show that the correlation between the hydraulic conductivity and the equilibrium sorption distribution coefficient does have a significant effect on reactive solute dispersion. The anisotropy ratio does not have a significant effect on reactive solute dispersion. Furthermore, through a sensitivity analysis we investigate the impact of changing the mean, variance, and integral scale of K and Kd on reactive solute dispersion. PMID:25532767

  17. Bacteriology testing of cardiovascular tissues: comparison of transport solution versus tissue testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Rodríguez, R; Van Hoeck, B; Mujaj, B; Ngakam, R; Fan, Y; Bogaerts, K; Jashari, R

    2016-06-01

    Bacteriology testing is mandatory for quality control of recovered cardiovascular allografts (CVA). In this paper, two different bacteriology examinations (A tests) performed before tissue antibiotic decontamination were compared: transport solution filtration analysis (A1) and tissue fragment direct incubation (A2). For this purpose, 521 CVA (326 heart and 195 artery tissues) from 280 donors were collected and analyzed by the European Homograft Bank (EHB). Transport solution (A1) tested positive in 43.25 % of hearts and in 48.21 % of arteries, whereas the tissue samples (A2) tested positive in 38.34 % of hearts and 33.85 % of arteries. The main species identified in both A1 and A2 were Staphylococcus spp. in 55 and 26 % of cases, and Propionibacterium spp. in 8 and 19 %, respectively. Mismatches in bacteriology results between both initial tests A1 and A2 were found. 18.40 % of the heart valves were identified as positive by A1 whilst 13.50 % were considered positive by A2. For arteries, 20.51 % of cases were positive in A1 and negative in A2, and just 6.15 % of artery allografts presented contamination in the A2 test but were considered negative for the A1 test. Comparison between each A test with the B and C tests after antibiotic treatment of the allograft was also performed. A total decontamination rate of 70.8 % of initial positive A tests was obtained. Due to the described mismatches and different bacteria identification percentage, utilization of both A tests should be implemented in tissue banks in order to avoid false negatives.

  18. The use of laboratory experiments for the study of conservative solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, S. E.; Zheng, L.; Conwell, P.

    Laboratory experiments on heterogeneous porous media (otherwise known as intermediate scale experiments, or ISEs) have been increasingly relied upon by hydrogeologists for the study of saturated and unsaturated groundwater systems. Among the many ongoing applications of ISEs is the study of fluid flow and the transport of conservative solutes in correlated permeability fields. Recent advances in ISE design have provided the capability of creating correlated permeability fields in the laboratory. This capability is important in the application of ISEs for the assessment of recent stochastic theories. In addition, pressure-transducer technology and visualization methods have provided the potential for ISEs to be used in characterizing the spatial distributions of both hydraulic head and local water velocity within correlated permeability fields. Finally, various methods are available for characterizing temporal variations in the spatial distribution (and, thereby, the spatial moments) of solute concentrations within ISEs. It is concluded, therefore, that recent developments in experimental techniques have provided an opportunity to use ISEs as important tools in the continuing study of fluid flow and the transport of conservative solutes in heterogeneous, saturated porous media. Résumé Les hydrogéologues se sont progressivement appuyés sur des expériences de laboratoire sur des milieux poreux hétérogènes (connus aussi par l'expression "Expériences àéchelle intermédiaire", ISE) pour étudier les zones saturées et non saturées des aquifères. Parmi les nombreuses applications en cours des ISE, il faut noter l'étude de l'écoulement de fluide et le transport de solutés conservatifs dans des champs aux perméabilités corrélées. Les récents progrès du protocole des ISE ont donné la possibilité de créer des champs de perméabilités corrélées au laboratoire. Cette possibilité est importante dans l'application des ISE pour l'évaluation des th

  19. Investigation of Interactive Effects on Water Flow and Solute Transport in Sandy Loam Soil Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Merdun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC, and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different

  20. Investigation of interactive effects on water flow and solute transport in sandy loam soil using time domain reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR)) and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI) techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different approaches may allow better understanding

  1. Carrier Transport Enhancement in Conjugated Polymers through Interfacial Self-Assembly of Solution-State Aggregates

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Kui

    2016-07-13

    We demonstrate that local and long range orders of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) semicrystalline films can be synergistically improved by combining chemical functionalization of the dielectric surface with solution-state disentanglement and pre-aggregation of P3HT in a theta solvent, leading to a very significant enhancement of the field effect carrier mobility. The pre-aggregation and surface functionalization effects combine to enhance the carrier mobility nearly 100-fold as compared with standard film preparation by spin-coating, and nearly 10-fold increase over the benefits of pre-aggregation alone. In situ quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) experiments reveal enhanced deposition of pre-aggregates on surfaces modified with an alkyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in comparison to un-aggregated polymer chains. Additional investigations reveal the combined pre-aggregation and surface functionalization significantly enhances local order of the conjugated polymer through planarization and extension of the conjugated backbone of the polymer which clearly translate to significant improvements of carrier transport at the semiconductor-dielectric interface in organic thin film transistors. This study points to opportunities in combining complementary routes, such as well-known pre-aggregation with substrate chemical functionalization, to enhance the polymer self-assembly and improve its interfacial order with benefits for transport properties.

  2. Importance of considering intraborehole flow in solute transport modeling under highly dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tonkin, Matt; Zachara, John M

    2011-04-01

    Correct interpretation of tracer test data is critical for understanding transport processes in the subsurface. This task can be greatly complicated by the presence of intraborehole flows in a highly dynamic flow environment. At a new tracer test site (Hanford IFRC) a dynamic flow field created by changes in the stage of the adjacent Columbia River, coupled with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution, leads to considerable variations in vertical hydraulic gradients. These variations, in turn, create intraborehole flows in fully-screened (6.5m) observation wells with frequently alternating upward and downward movement. This phenomenon, in conjunction with a highly permeable aquifer formation and small horizontal hydraulic gradients, makes modeling analysis and model calibration a formidable challenge. Groundwater head data alone were insufficient to define the flow model boundary conditions, and the movement of the tracer was highly sensitive to the dynamics of the flow field. This study shows that model calibration can be significantly improved by explicitly considering (a) dynamic flow model boundary conditions and (b) intraborehole flow. The findings from this study underscore the difficulties in interpreting tracer tests and understanding solute transport under highly dynamic flow conditions. PMID:21216023

  3. Finite-bias electronic transport of molecules in a water solution

    KAUST Repository

    Rungger, Ivan

    2010-06-04

    The effects of water wetting conditions on the transport properties of molecular nanojunctions are investigated theoretically by using a combination of empirical-potential molecular-dynamics and first-principles electronic-transport calculations. These are at the level of the nonequilibrium Green’s-function method implemented for self-interaction corrected density-functional theory. We find that water effectively produces electrostatic gating to the molecular junction with a gating potential determined by the time-averaged water dipole field. Such a field is large for the polar benzene-dithiol molecule, resulting in a transmission spectrum shifted by about 0.6 eV with respect to that of the dry junction. The situation is drastically different for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In fact, because of their hydrophobic nature the gating is almost negligible so that the average transmission spectrum of wet Au/CNT/Au junctions is essentially the same as that in dry conditions. This suggests that CNTs can be used as molecular interconnects also in water-wet situations, for instance, as tips for scanning tunnel microscopy in solution or in biological sensors.

  4. Solution-printed organic semiconductor blends exhibiting transport properties on par with single crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Niazi, Muhammad R.

    2015-11-23

    Solution-printed organic semiconductors have emerged in recent years as promising contenders for roll-to-roll manufacturing of electronic and optoelectronic circuits. The stringent performance requirements for organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) in terms of carrier mobility, switching speed, turn-on voltage and uniformity over large areas require performance currently achieved by organic single-crystal devices, but these suffer from scale-up challenges. Here we present a new method based on blade coating of a blend of conjugated small molecules and amorphous insulating polymers to produce OTFTs with consistently excellent performance characteristics (carrier mobility as high as 6.7 cm2 V−1 s−1, low threshold voltages of<1 V and low subthreshold swings <0.5 V dec−1). Our findings demonstrate that careful control over phase separation and crystallization can yield solution-printed polycrystalline organic semiconductor films with transport properties and other figures of merit on par with their single-crystal counterparts.

  5. Comparison of some popular Monte Carlo solution for proton transportation within pCT problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evseev, Ivan; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Yevseyeva, Olga [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico], E-mail: evseev@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.br, E-mail: yevseyeva@iprj.uerj.br; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Cardoso, Jose J.B.; Silva, Ademir X. da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: jjbrum@oi.com.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br; Vinagre Filho, Ubirajara M. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear IEN/CNEN-RJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: bira@ien.gov.br; Hormaza, Joel M. [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias], E-mail: jmesa@ibb.unesp.br; Schelin, Hugo R.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Setti, Joao A.P.; Milhoretto, Edney [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: schelin@cpgei.cefetpr.br, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: jsetti@gmail.com, E-mail: edneymilhoretto@yahoo.com

    2007-07-01

    The proton transport in matter is described by the Boltzmann kinetic equation for the proton flux density. This equation, however, does not have a general analytical solution. Some approximate analytical solutions have been developed within a number of significant simplifications. Alternatively, the Monte Carlo simulations are widely used. Current work is devoted to the discussion of the proton energy spectra obtained by simulation with SRIM2006, GEANT4 and MCNPX packages. The simulations have been performed considering some further applications of the obtained results in computed tomography with proton beam (pCT). Thus the initial and outgoing proton energies (3 / 300 MeV) as well as the thickness of irradiated target (water and aluminum phantoms within 90% of the full range for a given proton beam energy) were considered in the interval of values typical for pCT applications. One from the most interesting results of this comparison is that while the MCNPX spectra are in a good agreement with analytical description within Fokker-Plank approximation and the GEANT4 simulated spectra are slightly shifted from them the SRIM2006 simulations predict a notably higher mean energy loss for protons. (author)

  6. Solution Procedure for Transport Modeling in Effluent Recharge Based on Operator-Splitting Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutang Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of groundwater movement and reactive transport during groundwater recharge with wastewater leads to a complicated mathematical model, involving terms to describe convection-dispersion, adsorption/desorption and/or biodegradation, and so forth. It has been found very difficult to solve such a coupled model either analytically or numerically. The present study adopts operator-splitting techniques to decompose the coupled model into two submodels with different intrinsic characteristics. By applying an upwind finite difference scheme to the finite volume integral of the convection flux term, an implicit solution procedure is derived to solve the convection-dominant equation. The dispersion term is discretized in a standard central-difference scheme while the dispersion-dominant equation is solved using either the preconditioned Jacobi conjugate gradient (PJCG method or Thomas method based on local-one-dimensional scheme. The solution method proposed in this study is applied to the demonstration project of groundwater recharge with secondary effluent at Gaobeidian sewage treatment plant (STP successfully.

  7. Structure and Transport Properties of the BiCuSeO-BiCuSO Solid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Berardan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on the crystal structure and the electrical and thermal transport properties of the BiCuSe1−xSxO series. From the evolution of the structural parameters with the substitution rate, we can confidently conclude that a complete solid solution exists between the BiCuSeO and BiCuSO end members, without any miscibility gap. However, the decrease of the stability of the materials when increasing the sulfur fraction, with a simultaneous volatilization, makes it difficult to obtain S-rich samples in a single phase. The band gap of the materials linearly increases between 0.8 eV for BiCuSeO and 1.1 eV in BiCuSO, and the covalent character of the Cu-Ch (Ch = chalcogen element, namely S or Se here bond slightly decreases when increasing the sulfur fraction. The thermal conductivity of the end members is nearly the same, but a significant decrease is observed for the samples belonging to the solid solution, which can be explained by point defect scattering due to atomic mass and radii fluctuations between Se and S. When increasing the sulfur fraction, the electrical resistivity of the samples strongly increases, which could be linked to an evolution of the energy of formation of copper vacancies, which act as acceptor dopants in these materials.

  8. Activation of CFTR-mediated Cl- Transport by Magnolin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Ling-ling; LIU Xin; SUN Yan; LIN Sen; ZHOU Na; XU Li-na; YU BO; HOU Shu-guang; YANG Hong

    2008-01-01

    Magnolin is a herbal compound from Magnolia biondii Pamp.It possesses numerous biological activities.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR)is all epithelial chloride channel that plays a key role in the fluid secretion of various exocrine organs.In the present study,the activation of CFTR-mediated chloride transport by magnolin is indentified and characterized.In CFTR stably trailsfected FRT cells.magnolin increases CFTR Cl- currents in a concentration-dependent manner.The activation of magnolin on CFTR is rapid,reversible,and cAMP-dependent.Magnolin does not elevate cellular cAMP level.indicating that it activates CFTR by direct binding and interaction with CFTR protein.Magnolin selectively activates wildtype CFTR rather than mutant CFTIL Magnolin may present a novel class of therapeutic lead compound for the treatment of diseases associated with reduced CFTR function such as keratoconjunctivitis sicca,idiopathic chronic pancreatiti,and chromc constipation.

  9. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  10. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, Yannis; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess nonreciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport and optical isolation functionality.

  11. Active flow control systems architectures for civil transport aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Jabbal, M; Liddle, SC; Crowther, WJ

    2010-01-01

    Copyright @ 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics This paper considers the effect of choice of actuator technology and associated power systems architecture on the mass cost and power consumption of implementing active flow control systems on civil transport aircraft. The research method is based on the use of a mass model that includes a mass due to systems hardware and a mass due to the system energy usage. An Airbus A320 aircraft wing is used as a case-study applicatio...

  12. Modeling of Macroscopic/Microscopic Transport and Growth Phenomena in Zeolite Crystal Solutions Under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatsonis, Nikos A.; Alexandrou, Andreas; Shi, Hui; Ongewe, Bernard; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Crystals grown from liquid solutions have important industrial applications. Zeolites, for instance, a class of crystalline aluminosilicate materials, form the backbone of the chemical process industry worldwide, as they are used as adsorbents and catalysts. Many of the phenomena associated with crystal growth processes are not well understood due to complex microscopic and macroscopic interactions. Microgravity could help elucidate these phenomena and allow the control of defect locations, concentration, as well as size of crystals. Microgravity in an orbiting spacecraft could help isolate the possible effects of natural convection (which affects defect formation) and minimize sedimentation. In addition, crystals will stay essentially suspended in the nutrient pool under a diffusion-limited growth condition. This is expected to promote larger crystals by allowing a longer residence time in a high-concentration nutrient field. Among other factors, the crystal size distribution depends on the nucleation rate and crystallization. These two are also related to the "gel" polymerization/depolymerization rate. Macroscopic bulk mass and flow transport and especially gravity, force the crystals down to the bottom of the reactor, thus forming a sedimentation layer. In this layer, the growth rate of the crystals slows down as crystals compete for a limited amount of nutrients. The macroscopic transport phenomena under certain conditions can, however, enhance the nutrient supply and therefore, accelerate crystal growth. Several zeolite experiments have been performed in space with mixed results. The results from our laboratory have indicated an enhancement in size of 30 to 70 percent compared to the best ground based controls, and a reduction of lattice defects in many of the space grown crystals. Such experiments are difficult to interpret, and cannot be easily used to derive empirical or other laws since many physical parameters are simultaneously involved in the process

  13. Rapid calculation of hydrodynamic and transport properties in concentrated solutions of colloidal particles and macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James W.; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    A new method for calculating the resistance tensors of arbitrarily shaped particles and the translational and rotational self-diffusivity in suspensions of such particles is developed. This approach can be harnessed to efficiently and accurately predict the hydrodynamic and transport properties of large macromolecules such as antibodies in solution. Particles are modeled as a rigid composite of spherical beads, and the continuum equations for low Reynolds number fluid mechanics are used to calculate the drag on the composite or its diffusivity in a solution of other composites. The hydrodynamic calculations are driven by a graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation of the particle-mesh-Ewald technique which offers log-linear scaling with respect to the complexity of the composite-bead particles modeled as well as high speed execution leveraging the hyper-parallelization of the GPU. Matrix-free expressions for the hydrodynamic resistance and translational and rotational diffusivity of composite bead particles are developed, which exhibit substantial improvements in computational complexity over existing approaches. The effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated through a series of calculations for composite-bead particles having a spherical geometry, and the results are compared to exact solutions for spheres. Included in the supplementary material is an implementation of the proposed algorithm which functions as a plug-in for the GPU molecular dynamics suite HOOMD-blue (http://codeblue.umich.edu/hoomd-blue) [J. A. Anderson, C. D. Lorenz, and A. Travesset, "General purpose molecular dynamics simulations fully implemented on graphics processing units," J. Comput. Phys. 227(10), 5342-5359 (2008) and Glaser et al., "Strong scaling of general-purpose molecular dynamics simulations on GPUs," Comput. Phys. Commun. 192, 97-107 (2015)].

  14. Changes in ATP Content, Hexokinase Activity, and Glucose Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast tumours responding to chemotherapy exhibit decreased [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG incorporation. Underlying mechanisms of these changes is poorly understood. Here, in MCF-7 cells, responding to chemotherapy drugs commonly utilised in the treatment of breast cancer, [18F]FDG incorporation and several pivotal factors associated with [18F]FDG incorporation investigated. Methods. IC50 and subclinical doxorubicin, docetaxel, and tamoxifen doses determined using MTT assay. [18F]FDG incorporation by cells treated with IC50 drug doses for 48 hours and 72 hours were determined and FDG dephosphorylation estimated by measuring loss of 18F from [18F]FDG-preincubated cells (pulse-chase. Glucose transport determined by measuring initial uptake rate of non-metabolised glucose analogue omethylglucose; hexokinase activity and ATP content measured in cell homogenates; Cell cycle distribution determined using flow cytometry of propidium iodide stained nuclei. Results. [18F]FDG incorporation and ATP content decreased in cells after 72 hours treatment with IC50 doses of tamoxifen, doxorubicin, and docetaxel compared with untreated controls. Decreased glucose transport and/or hexokinase activity accompanied decreased [18F]FDG incorporation by MCF-7 cells treated with tamoxifen or doxorubicin but not docetaxel. Conclusions. Tumour cell [18F]FDG incorporation along with ATP content decreased by treatment with tamoxifen, doxorubicin and docetaxel paralleling clinical observations for solid tumours. Effect of each treatment on glucose transport and hexokinase activity was chemotherapy-drug dependent.

  15. 78 FR 68908 - Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Transportation Service Data Collection); Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Veterans Transportation Service Data Collection); Activity... needed to evaluate the Veterans Transportation Service Data Collection program to ensure Veterans... Control No. 2900-NEW (Veterans Transportation Service Data Collection)'' in any correspondence. During...

  16. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Paulo H. S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical non-equilibrium dual-porosity type formulation for solute transport. A Bayesian parameter estimation approach was used in which the unknown parameters were estimated with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method through implementation of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Sensitivity coefficients were examined in order to determine the most meaningful measurements for identifying the unknown hydraulic and transport parameters. Results obtained using the measured pressure head and solute concentration data collected during the unsaturated soil column experiment revealed the robustness of the proposed approach.

  17. Temperature dependence of ion transport in dilute tetrabutylammonium triflate-acetate solutions and self-diffusion in pure acetate liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopege, Dharshani N; Petrowsky, Matt; Fleshman, Allison M; Frech, Roger; Johnson, Matthew B

    2012-01-12

    Conductivities and static dielectric constants for 0.0055 M tetrabutylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate in n-butyl acetate, n-pentyl acetate, n-hexyl acetate, n-octyl acetate, and n-decyl acetate have been collected over the temperature range of 0-80 °C. Self-diffusion coefficients and static dielectric constants of pure acetates were obtained over the same temperature range. Both temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients and ionic conductivities of these pure acetates and dilute acetate solutions can be accurately described by the compensated Arrhenius formalism. Activation energies were calculated from compensated Arrhenius plots for both conductivity and diffusion data. Activation energies are higher for conductivity data of 0.0055 M TbaTf-acetates compared to diffusion data of pure acetates. The plot of the exponential prefactor versus the dielectric constant yields a single master curve for both conductivity and diffusion data. These data support the argument that mass and charge transport are thermally activated processes in the acetates, as previously observed in alcohol-based electrolytes. PMID:22145961

  18. Electrochemical activation of a tetrathiafulvalene halogen bond donor in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R; Groni, S; Fave, C; Branca, M; Mavré, F; Lorcy, D; Fourmigué, M; Schöllhorn, B

    2016-06-21

    The halogen bond donor properties of iodo-tetrathiafulvalene (I-TTF) can be electrochemically switched and controlled via reversible oxidation in the solution phase. Interestingly the activation of only one single halogen bond yielded already a strong and selective interaction, quantified by cyclic voltammetry. The standard potentials of the redox couples I-TTF(0/1+) and I-TTF(1+/2+) were observed to shift upon the addition of halides. These anions selectively stabilize the cationic I-TTF species through halogen bonding in polar liquid electrolytes. The thermodynamic affinity constants for chloride and bromide binding to the oxidized species have been determined. Competition in halide binding between I-TTF(1+) and other halogen bond donors allowed for comparing the relative donor strength of the respective electrophilic species. Furthermore it has been shown that halogen bonding can prevail over hydrogen bonding in the investigated system. PMID:27231819

  19. Heavy metal removal from aqueous solutions by activated phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elouear, Z. [Laboratoire Eau Energie et Environnement, Departement de genie geologique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038, Sfax (Tunisia)], E-mail: zouheir.elouaer@tunet.tn; Bouzid, J.; Boujelben, N. [Laboratoire Eau Energie et Environnement, Departement de genie geologique, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038, Sfax (Tunisia); Feki, M. [Unite de chimie industriel I, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Jamoussi, F. [Laboratoire de Georessources CERTE BP 95, 2050 Hamam-Lif (Tunisia); Montiel, A. [Societe Anonyme de Gestion des Eaux de Paris, 9 rue Schoelcher, 75675 Paris cedex 14 (France)

    2008-08-15

    The use of natural adsorbent such as phosphate rock to replace expensive imported synthetic adsorbent is particularly appropriate for developing countries such as Tunisia. In this study, the removal characteristics of lead, cadmium, copper and zinc ions from aqueous solution by activated phosphate rock were investigated under various operating variables like contact time, solution pH, initial metal concentration and temperature. The kinetic and the sorption process of these metal ions were compared for phosphate rock (PR) and activated phosphate rock (APR). To accomplish this objective we have: (a) characterized both (PR) and (APR) using different techniques (XRD, IR) and analyses (EDAX, BET-N{sub 2}); and, (b) qualified and quantified the interaction of Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} with these sorbents through batch experiments. Initial uptake of these metal ions increases with time up to 1 h for (PR) and 2 h for (APR), after then, it reaches equilibrium. The maximum sorption obtained for (PR) and (APR) is between pH 2 and 3 for Pb{sup 2+} and 4 and 6 for Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. The effect of temperature has been carried out at 10, 20 and 40 deg. C. The data obtained from sorption isotherms of metal ions at different temperatures fit to linear form of Langmuir sorption equation. The heat of sorption ({delta}H{sup o}), free energy ({delta}G{sup o}) and change in entropy ({delta}S{sup o}) were calculated. They show that sorption of Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}on (PR) and (APR) an endothermic process. These findings are significant for future using of (APR) for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater under realistic competitive conditions in terms of initial heavy metals, concentrations and pH.

  20. Differences in associations between active transportation and built environmental exposures when expressed using different components of individual activity spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heeswijck, Torbjorn; Paquet, Catherine; Kestens, Yan; Thierry, Benoit; Morency, Catherine; Daniel, Mark

    2015-05-01

    This study assessed relationships between built environmental exposures measured within components of individual activity spaces (i.e., travel origins, destinations and paths in-between), and use of active transportation in a metropolitan setting. Individuals (n=37,165) were categorised as using active or sedentary transportation based on travel survey data. Generalised Estimating Equations analysis was used to test relationships with active transportation. Strength and significance of relationships between exposures and active transportation varied for different components of the activity space. Associations were strongest when including travel paths in expression of the built environment. Land use mix and greenness were negatively related to active transportation.

  1. Examining Changes in Radioxenon Isotope Activity Ratios during Subsurface Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annewandter, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE) has demonstrated and modelled the usefulness of barometric pumping induced gas transport and subsequent soil gas sampling during On-Site inspections. Generally, gas transport has been widely studied with different numerical codes. However, gas transport of radioxenons and radioiodines in the post-detonation regime and their possible fractionation is still neglected in the open peer-reviewed literature. Atmospheric concentrations of the radioxenons Xe-135, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-131m can be used to discriminate between civilian releases (nuclear power plants or medical isotope facilities), and nuclear explosion sources. It is based on the multiple isotopic activity ratio method. Yet it is not clear whether subsurface migration of the radionuclides, with eventual release into the atmosphere, can affect the activity ratios due to fractionation. Fractionation can be caused by different mass diffusivities due to mass differences between the radionuclides. Cyclical changes in atmospheric pressure can drive subsurface gas transport. This barometric pumping phenomenon causes an oscillatoric flow in upward trending fractures or highly conductive faults which, combined with diffusion into the porous matrix, leads to a net transport of gaseous components - a so-called ratcheting effect. We use a general purpose reservoir simulator (Complex System Modelling Platform, CSMP++) which is recognized by the oil industry as leading in Discrete Fracture-Matrix (DFM) simulations. It has been applied in a range of fields such as deep geothermal systems, three-phase black oil simulations, fracture propagation in fractured, porous media, and Navier-Stokes pore-scale modelling among others. It is specifically designed to account for structurally complex geologic situation of fractured, porous media. Parabolic differential equations are solved by a continuous Galerkin finite-element method, hyperbolic differential equations by a complementary finite

  2. Classification of the Group Invariant Solutions for Contaminant Transport in Saturated Soils under Radial Uniform Water Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Potsane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport of chemicals through soils to the groundwater or precipitation at the soils surfaces leads to degradation of these resources. Serious consequences may be suffered in the long run. In this paper, we consider macroscopic deterministic models describing contaminant transport in saturated soils under uniform radial water flow backgrounds. The arising convection-dispersion equation given in terms of the stream functions is analyzed using classical Lie point symmetries. A number of exotic Lie point symmetries are admitted. Group invariant solutions are classified according to the elements of the one-dimensional optimal systems. We analyzed the group invariant solutions which satisfy the physical boundary conditions.

  3. Reactive solute transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media with multimodal reactive mineral facies: The Lagrangian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Soltanian, Mohamad Reza; Dai, Zhenxue; Huang, Chaocheng

    2014-01-01

    Physical and chemical heterogeneities have a large impact on reactive transport in porous media. Examples of heterogeneous attributes affecting reactive mass transport are the hydraulic conductivity (K), and the equilibrium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd). This paper uses the Deng et al. (2013) conceptual model for multimodal reactive mineral facies and a Lagrangian-based stochastic theory in order to analyze the reactive solute dispersion in three-dimensional anisotropic heterogeneous porous media with hierarchical organization of reactive minerals. An example based on real field data is used to illustrate the time evolution trends of reactive solute dispersion. The results show that the correlation between the hydraulic conductivity and the equilibrium sorption distribution coefficient does have a significant effect on reactive solute dispersion. The anisotropy ratio does not have a significant effect on reactive solute dispersion. Furthermore, through a sensitivity analysis we investigate the impact...

  4. A solution of the monoenergetic neutral particle transport equation for adjacent half-spaces with anisotropic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapol, B. D.; Mostacci, D.; Previti, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present highly accurate solutions to the neutral particle transport equation in a half-space. While our initial motivation was in response to a recently published solution based on Chandrasekhar's H-function, the presentation to follow has taken on a more comprehensive tone. The solution by H-functions certainly did achieved high accuracy but was limited to isotropic scattering and emission from spatially uniform and linear sources. Moreover, the overly complicated nature of the H-function approach strongly suggests that its extension to anisotropic scattering and general sources is not at all practical. For this reason, an all encompassing theory for the determination of highly precise benchmarks, including anisotropic scattering for a variety of spatial source distributions, is presented for particle transport in a half-space. We illustrate the approach via a collection of cases including tables of 7-place flux benchmarks to guide transport methods developers. The solution presented can be applied to a considerable number of one and two half-space transport problems with variable sources and represents a state-of-the-art benchmark solution.

  5. Application of synthetic diffusion method in the numerical solution of the equations of neutron transport in slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main problems in reactor physics is to determine the neutron distribution in reactor core, since knowing that, it is possible to calculate the rapidity of occurrence of different nuclear reaction inside the reactor core. Within different theories existing in nuclear reactor physics, is neutron transport the one in which equation who govern the exact behavior of neutronic distribution are developed even inside the proper neutron transport theory, there exist different methods of solution which are approximations to exact solution; still more, with the purpose to reach a more precise solution, the majority of methods have been approached to the obtention of solutions in numerical form with the aim of take the advantages of modern computers, and for this reason a great deal of effort is dedicated to numerical solution of the equations of neutron transport. In agreement with the above mentioned, in this work has been developed a computer program which uses a relatively new techniques known as 'acceleration of synthetic diffusion' which has been applied to solve the neutron transport equation with 'classical schemes of spatial integration' obtaining results with a smaller quantity of interactions, if they compare to done without using such equation (Author)

  6. Simple solution-processed titanium oxide electron transport layer for efficient inverted polymer solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Liang [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shen, Wenfei [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Institute of Hybrid Materials, Laboratory of New Fiber Materials and Modern Textile—The Growing Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, Qingdao 266071 (China); Chen, Weichao [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Bao, Xichang, E-mail: baoxc@qibebt.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China); Wang, Ning; Dou, Xiaowei; Han, Liangliang; Wen, Shuguang [CAS Key Laboratory of Bio-based Materials, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266101 (China)

    2014-12-31

    Titanium oxide (TiO{sub X}) is an effective electron transport layer (ETL) in polymer solar cells (PSCs). We report efficient inverted PSCs with a simple solution-processed amorphous TiO{sub X} (s-TiO{sub X}) film as an ETL. The s-TiO{sub X} film with high light transmittance was prepared by spin-coating titanium (IV) isopropoxide isopropanol solution on indium tin oxide coated glass in inert and then placed in air under room temperature for 60 min. The introduction of s-TiO{sub X} ETL greatly improved the short circuit current density of the devices. PSCs based on poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester and poly(4,8-bis-alkyloxy-benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-alt-alkylcarbonyl -thieno[3,4-b]thiophene):[6,6]-phenyl- C71-butyric acid methyl ester using s-TiO{sub X} film as ETL shows high power conversion efficiency of 4.29% and 6.7% under the illumination of AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm{sup 2}, which shows enhancements compared to the conventional PSCs with poly(styrenesulfonate)-doped poly(ethylenedioxythiophene) as anode buffer layer. In addition, the device exhibits good stability in a humid ambient atmosphere without capsulation. The results indicate that the annealing-free, simple solution processed s-TiO{sub X} film is an efficient ETL for high-performance PSCs. - Highlights: • High quality s-TiO{sub X} films were prepared by a simple, solution method without thermal treatment. • The s-TiO{sub X} films with high transmittance are very smooth. • The organic photovoltaic performance with s-TiO{sub X} film improved greatly and exhibited good stability. • The annealing-free, simple prepared s-TiO{sub X} film will be much compatible with flexible substrates.

  7. Geochemical and numerical modelling of interactions between solid solutions and an aqueous solution. Extension of a reactive transport computer code called Archimede and application to reservoirs diagenesis; Modelisation geochimique et numerique des interactions entre des solutions solides et une solution aqueuse: extension du logiciel de reaction-transport archimede et application a la diagenese des reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nourtier-Mazauric, E.

    2003-03-15

    This thesis presents a thermodynamic and kinetic model of interactions between a fluid and ideal solid solutions represented by several end-members. The reaction between a solid solution and the aqueous solution results from the competition between the stoichiometric dissolution of the initial solid solution and the co-precipitation of the least soluble solid solution in the fluid at considered time. This model was implemented in ARCHIMEDE, a computer code of reactive transport in porous media, then applied to various examples. In the case of binary solid solutions, a graphical method allowed to determine the compositions of the precipitating solid solutions, with the aid of the end-member chemical potentials. The obtained program could be used to notably model the diagenesis of clayey or carbonated oil reservoirs, or the ground pollutant dispersion. (author)

  8. Platelet serotonin transporter function predicts default-mode network activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Scharinger

    Full Text Available The serotonin transporter (5-HTT is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence.A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD activity and platelet Vmax.The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity.This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation.

  9. Physical activity parenting measurement and research: challenges, explanations, and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Kirsten K; Mâsse, Louise C; Timperio, Anna; Frenn, Marilyn D; Saunders, Julie; Mendoza, Jason A; Gobbi, Erica; Hanson, Phillip; Trost, Stewart G

    2013-08-01

    Physical activity (PA) parenting research has proliferated over the past decade, with findings verifying the influential role that parents play in children's emerging PA behaviors. This knowledge, however, has not translated into effective family-based PA interventions. During a preconference workshop to the 2012 International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity annual meeting, a PA parenting workgroup met to: (1) Discuss challenges in PA parenting research that may limit its translation, (2) identify explanations or reasons for such challenges, and (3) recommend strategies for future research. Challenges discussed by the workgroup included a proliferation of disconnected and inconsistently measured constructs, a limited understanding of the dimensions of PA parenting, and a narrow conceptualization of hypothesized moderators of the relationship between PA parenting and child PA. Potential reasons for such challenges emphasized by the group included a disinclination to employ theory when developing measures and examining predictors and outcomes of PA parenting as well as a lack of agreed-upon measurement standards. Suggested solutions focused on the need to link PA parenting research with general parenting research, define and adopt rigorous standards of measurement, and identify new methods to assess PA parenting. As an initial step toward implementing these recommendations, the workgroup developed a conceptual model that: (1) Integrates parenting dimensions from the general parenting literature into the conceptualization of PA parenting, (2) draws on behavioral and developmental theory, and (3) emphasizes areas which have been neglected to date including precursors to PA parenting and effect modifiers. PMID:23944918

  10. Treatment and solidification of high active fission product solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On reprocessing spent fuel elements, > 97% of the fission products are found in the high active waste (HAW) solution. In order to avoid large amounts of sludge formation arising from phosphates produced by TBP degradation during evaporation and storage of these high level wastes, the suspended and dissolved TBP must be removed immediately from the HAW. It is proposed to separate the TBP by steam-stripping. The the HAW will be concentrated in an evaporator, the concentration factor depending on the amount of sludge formation and the heat content of the concentrate. These concentrates may be stored for short periods in stainless steel tanks. Acid concentration and waste volume may be further reduced by in-tank denitration and evaporation. For vitrification of the HAW liquid feed, ceramic melters are being developed universally. The first active plant to use a liquid feed ceramic melter is the German plant PAMELA, which is being built at Mol in Belgium, with an operational date of 1985

  11. Np(V) transport in clayey porous medium: study of solution chemistry, sorption and flow coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the safety of radioactive waste disposal, the behaviour of radionuclides in porous media has to be known. The solute transport is controlled by hydrodynamics, physicochemical interactions and aqueous chemistry. When each main term is known independently, their coupling can be predicted. The aim is to study the migration of Np(V). Experiments are carried out on chromatography columns packed with a mixture of sand and Fo-Ca-7 clay. Column hydrodynamics is characterised with RTD measurements and is modelled thanks to a cell network model. Sorption properties of the clay are determined thanks to sodium/calcium and sodium/caesium exchange experiments. The sorption is modelled with ion exchange on three sites. The Na+/H+, Na+/Ca2+ and Na+/Cs+ exchange constants have been determined. Transport experiments of Np(V) have been carried out in IM Na+ bicarbonate/carbonate media and is interpreted with H+/NpO2+/Na+ cationic exchanges on the third site of the clay, and NpO2CO3-, NpO2(CO3)23- and NpO2(CO3)35- formation. This mechanism has been validated by varying pH and carbonate concentration. An anion exchange site of low exchange capacity has been found through 14C experiments. A selective elimination of goethite contained in Fo-Ca-7 shows that this iron oxide is not responsible for the anions retention. As expected, temperature influence on calcium and neptunium migration is quite small. It is used to estimate entropy and enthalpy changes for the corresponding ionic exchange reactions. (author)

  12. On evaluating characteristics of the solute transport in the arid vadose zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Dong, Weiquan; Young, Michael H; Li, Yiping; Yang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    The transport of bromide (Br) under matric heads of 0, -2, -5, and -10 cm using undisturbed soil columns was investigated for understanding the solute transport in arid soils. Undisturbed soil cores were collected at ground surface, directly below where tension infiltrometer measurements were made in the Amargosa Desert, Nevada, United States. Laboratory experiments were conducted by introducing water containing Br tracer into a soil column maintained at steady-state conditions. The observed data of breakthrough curves (BTC) were well fitted to an one-region model, except for the cores at saturation, and a core at the matric head of -5 cm, from which the observed data were better fitted to a two-region model. Fitted pore water velocities with the one-region model ranged from 1.2 to 56.6 cm/h, and fitted dispersion coefficients (D) ranged from 2.2 to 100 cm² /h. Results for the core analyzed with the two-region model indicated that D ranged from 27.6 to 70.9 cm² /h at saturation, and 25.7 cm² /h at the matric head of -5 cm; fraction of mobile water (β) ranged from 0.18 to 0.65, and mass transfer coefficient (ω) ranged from 0.006 to 0.03. In summary, the water fluxes and Br dispersion coefficients at investigated matric heads were very high due to the coarseness of the soils and possibly due to preferential flow pathways. These high water fluxes and Br dispersion coefficients would lead to a higher risk of deeper leaching accumulating nitrate nitrogen to the groundwater, and have significant effects on the desert ecosystem. PMID:23406385

  13. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karup, Dan; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Norgaard, Trine; Greve, Mogens H.; de Jonge, Lis W.

    2016-09-01

    Solute transport through the soil matrix is non-uniform and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. Attempts have been made in previous studies to use infiltration experiments to identify the degree of preferential flow, but these attempts have often been based on small datasets or data collected from literature with differing initial and boundary conditions. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. From six agricultural fields in Denmark, 193 intact surface soil columns 20 cm in height and 20 cm in diameter were collected. The soils exhibited a wide range in texture, with clay and organic carbon (OC) contents ranging from 0.03 to 0.41 and 0.01 to 0.08 kg kg- 1, respectively. All experiments were carried out under the same initial and boundary conditions using tritium as a conservative tracer. The breakthrough characteristics ranged from being near normally distributed to gradually skewed to the right along with an increase in the content of the mineral fines (particles ≤ 50 μm). The results showed that the mineral fines content was strongly correlated to functional soil structure and the derived tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), whereas the OC content appeared less important for the shape of the BTC. Organic carbon was believed to support the stability of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5% and up to 50% of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. Predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points as a function of time up to 50% of applied tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical advection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer

  14. Carbohydrate Electrolyte Solutions Enhance Endurance Capacity in Active Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Hua Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of supplementation with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES in active females during a prolonged session of submaximal running to exhaustion. Eight healthy active females volunteered to perform a session of open-ended running to exhaustion at 70% of their maximal oxygen consumption on a treadmill during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle on two occasions. During each run, the subjects consumed either 3mL·kg−1 body mass of a 6% CES or a placebo drink (PL every 20 min during exercise. The trials were administered in a randomized double-blind, cross-over design. During the run, the subjects ingested similar volumes of fluid in two trials (CES: 644 ± 75 mL vs. PL: 593 ± 66 mL, p > 0.05. The time to exhaustion was 16% longer during the CES trial (106.2 ± 9.4 min than during the PL trial (91.6 ± 5.9 min (p < 0.05. At 45 min during exercise, the plasma glucose concentration in the CES trial was higher than that in PL trial. No differences were observed in the plasma lactate level, respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate, perceived rate of exertion, sensation of thirst, or abdominal discomfort between the two trials (p > 0.05. The results of the present study confirm that CES supplementation improves the moderate intensity endurance capacity of active females during the follicular phases of the menstrual cycle. However, the exogenous oxidation of carbohydrate does not seem to explain the improved capacity after CES supplementation.

  15. Saharan Dust, Transport Processes, and Possible Impacts on Hurricane Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present observational evidence of significant relationships between Saharan dust outbreak, and African Easterly wave activities and hurricane activities. We found two dominant paths of transport of Saharan dust: a northern path, centered at 25degN associated with eastward propagating 6-19 days waves over northern Africa, and a southern path centered at 15degN, associated with the AEW, and the Atlantic ITCZ. Seasons with stronger dust outbreak from the southern path are associated with a drier atmosphere over the Maximum Development Region (MDR) and reduction in tropical cyclone and hurricane activities in the MDR. Seasons with stronger outbreak from the northern path are associated with a cooler N. Atlantic, and suppressed hurricane in the western Atlantic basin.

  16. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  17. Evaluation of unsaturated-zone solute-transport models for studies of agricultural chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Bayless, E. Randall; Green, Christopher T.; Garg, Sheena; Voss, Frank D.; Lampe, David C.; Barbash, Jack E.; Capel, Paul D.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Seven unsaturated-zone solute-transport models were tested with two data sets to select models for use by the Agricultural Chemical Team of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The data sets were from a bromide tracer test near Merced, California, and an atrazine study in the White River Basin, Indiana. In this study the models are designated either as complex or simple based on the water flux algorithm. The complex models, HYDRUS2D, LEACHP, RZWQM, and VS2DT, use Richards' equation to simulate water flux and are well suited to process understanding. The simple models, CALF, GLEAMS, and PRZM, use a tipping-bucket algorithm and are more amenable to extrapolation because they require fewer input parameters. The purpose of this report is not to endorse a particular model, but to describe useful features, potential capabilities, and possible limitations that emerged from working with the model input data sets. More rigorous assessment of model applicability involves proper calibration, which was beyond the scope of this study.

  18. Technical Note: Simple formulations and solutions of the dual-phase diffusive transport for biogeochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Representation of gaseous diffusion in variably saturated near-surface soils is becoming more common in land biogeochemical models, yet the formulations and numerical solution algorithms applied vary widely. We present three different but equivalent formulations of the dual-phase (gaseous and aqueous tracer diffusion transport problem that is relevant to a wide class of volatile tracers in land biogeochemical models. Of these three formulations (i.e., the gas-primary, aqueous-primary, and bulk tracer based formulations, we contend the gas-primary formulation is the most convenient for modeling tracer dynamics in biogeochemical models. We then provide finite volume approximation to the gas-primary equation and evaluate its accuracy against three analytical models: one for steady-state soil CO2 dynamics, one for steady-state soil CO2 dynamics, and one for transient tracer diffusion from a constant point source into two different sequentially aligned medias. All evaluations demonstrated good accuracy of the numerical approximation. We expect our result will standardize an efficient mechanistic numerical method for solving relatively simple, multi-phase, one-dimensional diffusion problems in land models.

  19. Measuring the combinatorial expression of solute transporters and metalloproteinases transcripts in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosgrove Leah

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was hypothesised that colorectal cancer (CRC could be diagnosed in biopsies by measuring the combined expression of a small set of well known genes. Genes were chosen based on their role in either the breakdown of the extracellular matrix or with changes in cellular metabolism both of which are associated with CRC progression Findings Gene expression data derived from quantitative real-time PCR for the solute transporter carriers (SLCs and the invasion-mediating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs were examined using a Linear Descriminant Analysis (LDA. The combination of MMP-7 and SLC5A8 was found to be the most predictive of CRC. Conclusion A combinatorial analysis technique is an effective method for both furthering our understanding on the molecular basis of some aspects of CRC, as well as for leveraging well defined cancer-related gene sets to identify cancer. In this instance, the combination of MMP-7 and SLC5A8 were optimal for identifying CRC.

  20. Integrating Water Flow, Solute Transport and Crop Production Models At The Farm-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assinck, F. B. T.; de Vos, J. A.

    Minimising nitrate pollution of ground and surface water and optimising agricultural yields are problems which have to be addressed at the farm-scale. However, simulation models usually operate at the field-scale. We coupled the subsurface hydrology model SWAP with other existing deterministic (sub)models for solute transport, organic mat- ter dynamics, crop growth, and dairy farm management at the farm-scale, resulting in the model WATERPAS. The (sub)models are coupled in a Framework environment obeying the principles of object oriented modelling. Based on daily weather data, groundwater regimes, soil and farm characteristics WATERPAS is able to simulate the water and nutrient balances, grass production, economical benefits, nitrate leaching and greenhouse gas emissions at a farm. Problems of coupling, such as data-transfer, quality checks, over-parameterisation, complexity and sensitivity of the systems are discussed. Application of deducted simpler models and expert judgement can be use- ful for practical use. However, we believe that integrated models are a powerful tool to understand the complex relationships between the different processes. It also gives opportunities to perform scenario analysis for future boundary conditions, i.e. due to changing farm management, (sea) water levels and climate change.

  1. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and vadose zone processes on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, laboratory scale transport experiments were performed. The complex coupled effects of ionic strength, size of QD aggregates, surface tension, contact angle, infiltrat...

  2. Transport of E. coli D21g with runoff water under different solution chemistry conditions and surface slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracer and indicator microbe runoff experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of solution chemistry on the transport, retention, and release of Escherichia coli D21g. Experiments were conducted in a chamber (2.25 m long, 0.15 m wide, and 0.16 m high) packed with ultrapure quartz sand (...

  3. DSMC method consistent with the Pauli exclusion principle and comparison with deterministic solutions for charge transport in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Vittorio; Majorana, Armando; Coco, Marco

    2015-12-01

    A new algorithm for Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport in semiconductors is devised in order to properly deal with Pauli's exclusion principle in the degenerate case. Applications are presented in the case of monolayer graphene and comparisons with solutions of the Boltzmann equation obtained by using a discontinuous Galerkin method furnish a cross-validation of the proposed approach.

  4. Active Solution Space and Search on Job-shop Scheduling Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masato; Ida, Kenichi; Gen, Mitsuo

    In this paper we propose a new searching method of Genetic Algorithm for Job-shop scheduling problem (JSP). The coding method that represent job number in order to decide a priority to arrange a job to Gannt Chart (called the ordinal representation with a priority) in JSP, an active schedule is created by using left shift. We define an active solution at first. It is solution which can create an active schedule without using left shift, and set of its defined an active solution space. Next, we propose an algorithm named Genetic Algorithm with active solution space search (GA-asol) which can create an active solution while solution is evaluated, in order to search the active solution space effectively. We applied it for some benchmark problems to compare with other method. The experimental results show good performance.

  5. A three-dimensional finite-volume Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) for solute-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberton, C.I.; Russell, T.F.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the U.S. Geological Survey Eulerian-Lagrangian Localized Adjoint Method (ELLAM) algorithm that solves an integral form of the solute-transport equation, incorporating an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive and sink terms. Like the algorithm in the original version of the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model, ELLAM uses a method of characteristics approach to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The ELLAM algorithm, however, is based on an integral formulation of conservation of mass and uses appropriate numerical techniques to obtain global conservation of mass. The implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for an explicit formulation. Consequently, ELLAM allows large transport time increments to be used. ELLAM can produce qualitatively good results using a small number of transport time steps. A description of the ELLAM numerical method, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. The ELLAM algorithm was evaluated for the same set of problems used to test and evaluate Version 1 and Version 2 of MOC3D. These test results indicate that ELLAM offers a viable alternative to the explicit and implicit solvers in MOC3D. Its use is desirable when mass balance is imperative or a fast, qualitative model result is needed. Although accurate solutions can be generated using ELLAM, its efficiency relative to the two previously documented solution algorithms is problem dependent.

  6. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy: eigenfunction solutions in spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberrath, J.; Brinkmann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The term active plasma resonance spectroscopy denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe: a radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded, and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density. The mathematical model of an arbitrarily shaped probe-plasma system can be written in an abstract but very compact equation. It contains an appropriate operator, which describes the dynamical behavior and can be split into a conservative and a dissipative part. Based on the cold plasma model, this manuscript provides a solution strategy to determine the electrical admittance of a specific probe-plasma system derived from the abstract dynamical equation. Focusing on probes with a spherical-shaped probe tip the general admittance can be derived analytically. Therefore, the matrix representation of the resolvent of the dynamical operator is determined. This matrix representation is derived by means of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the conservative operator. It can be shown that these eigenvalues represent the resonance frequencies of the probe-plasma system which are simply connected to the electron density. As an example, the result is applied to established probe designs: the spherical impedance probe and the multipole resonance probe.

  7. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy: eigenfunction solutions in spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The term active plasma resonance spectroscopy denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe: a radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded, and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density. The mathematical model of an arbitrarily shaped probe–plasma system can be written in an abstract but very compact equation. It contains an appropriate operator, which describes the dynamical behavior and can be split into a conservative and a dissipative part. Based on the cold plasma model, this manuscript provides a solution strategy to determine the electrical admittance of a specific probe–plasma system derived from the abstract dynamical equation. Focusing on probes with a spherical-shaped probe tip the general admittance can be derived analytically. Therefore, the matrix representation of the resolvent of the dynamical operator is determined. This matrix representation is derived by means of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the conservative operator. It can be shown that these eigenvalues represent the resonance frequencies of the probe–plasma system which are simply connected to the electron density. As an example, the result is applied to established probe designs: the spherical impedance probe and the multipole resonance probe. (paper)

  8. Entanglements in Marginal Solutions: A Means of Tuning Pre-Aggregation of Conjugated Polymers with Positive Implications for Charge Transport

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Hanlin

    2015-06-17

    The solution-processing of conjugated polymers, just like commodity polymers, is subject to solvent and molecular weight-dependent solubility, interactions and chain entanglements within the polymer, all of which can influence the crystallization and microstructure development in semi-crystalline polymers and consequently affect charge transport and optoelectronic properties. Disentanglement of polymer chains in marginal solvents was reported to work via ultrasonication, facilitating the formation of photophysically ordered polymer aggregates. In this contribution, we explore how a wide range of technologically relevant solvents and formulations commonly used in organic electronics influence chain entanglement and the aggregation behaviour of P3HT using a combination of rheological and spectrophotometric measurements. The specific viscosity of the solution offers an excellent indication of the degree of entanglements in the solution, which is found to be related to the solubility of P3HT in a given solvent. Moreover, deliberately disentangling the solution in the presence of solvophobic driving forces, leads consistently to formation of photophysically visible aggregates which is indicative of local and perhaps long range order in the solute. We show for a broad range of solvents and molecular weights that disentanglement ultimately leads to significant ordering of the polymer in the solid state and a commensurate increase in charge transport properties. In doing so we demonstrate a remarkable ability to tune the microstructure which has important implications for transport properties. We discuss its potential implications in the context of organic photovoltaics.

  9. Adult active transport in the Netherlands: an analysis of its contribution to physical activity requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Fishman

    Full Text Available Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling.Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 - 2012, this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling contributes to meeting minimum level of physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity throughout the week. The sample includes 74,465 individuals who recorded at least some travel on the day surveyed. As physical activity benefits are cumulative, all walking and cycling trips are analysed, including those to and from public transport. These trips are then converted into an established measure of physical activity intensity, known as metabolic equivalents of tasks. Multivariate Tobit regression models were performed on a range of socio-demographic, transport resources, urban form and meteorological characteristics.The results reveal that Dutch men and women participate in 24 and 28 minutes of daily physical activity through walking and cycling, which is 41% and 55% more than the minimum recommended level. It should be noted however that some 57% of the entire sample failed to record any walking or cycling, and an investigation of this particular group serves as an important topic of future research. Active transport was positively related with age, income, bicycle ownership, urban density and air temperature. Car ownership had a strong negative relationship with physically active travel.The results of this analysis demonstrate the significance of active transport to counter the emerging issue of sedentary lifestyle disease. The Dutch experience provides other countries with a highly relevant case study in the creation of environments and cultures that

  10. Meta-analysis of the effects of soil properties, site factors and experimental conditions on solute transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Koestel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Preferential flow is a widespread phenomenon that is known to strongly affect solute transport in soil, but our understanding and knowledge is still poor of the site factors and soil properties that promote it. To investigate these relationships, we assembled a database from the peer-reviewed literature containing information on 733 breakthrough curve experiments under steady-state flow conditions. Most of the collected experiments (585 of the 733 datasets had been conducted on undisturbed soil columns, although some experiments on repacked soil, clean sands, and glass beads were also included. In addition to the apparent dispersivity, we focused our attention on three indicators of preferential solute transport: namely the 5%-arrival time, the holdback factor, and the ratio of piston-flow and average transport velocities. Our results suggest that, in contrast to the 5%-arrival time and the holdback factor, the piston-flow to transport velocity ratio is not related to preferential macropore transport but rather to the exclusion or retardation of the applied tracer. Confirming that the apparent longitudinal dispersivity is positively correlated with the travel distance of the tracer, our results also illustrate that this relationship is refined if the normalized 5%-tracer arrival time is also taken into account. In particular, we found that the degree of preferential solute transport increases with apparent dispersivity and decreases with travel distance. A similar but weaker relationship was observed between apparent dispersivity, 5%-tracer arrival time, and lateral observation scale, such that the degree of preferential transport increases with lateral observation scale. However, we also found that the travel distance and the lateral observation scale in the investigated dataset are correlated, which makes it difficult to distinguish their influence on these transport characteristics. We also found that the strength of preferential transport

  11. Meta-analysis of the effects of soil properties, site factors and experimental conditions on preferential solute transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Koestel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Preferential flow is a widespread phenomenon that is known to strongly affect solute transport in soil, but our understanding and knowledge is still poor of the site factors and soil properties that promote it. To investigate these relationships, we assembled a database from the peer-reviewed literature containing information on 793 breakthrough curve experiments under steady-state flow conditions. Most of the collected experiments (642 of the 793 datasets had been conducted on undisturbed soil columns, although some experiments on repacked soil, clean sands, and glass beads were also included. In addition to the apparent dispersivity, we focused attention on three potential indicators of preferential solute transport, namely the 5%-arrival time, the holdback factor, and the ratio of piston-flow and average transport velocities. Our results suggest that in contrast to the 5%-arrival time and the holdback factor, the piston-flow to transport velocity ratio is not related to preferential macropore transport but rather to the exclusion or retardation of the applied tracer. Confirming that the apparent longitudinal dispersivity is positively correlated with the travel distance of the tracer, our results also illustrate that this correlation is refined if the normalized 5%-tracer arrival time is also taken into account. In particular, we found that the degree of preferential solute transport increases with apparent dispersivity and decreases with travel distance. A similar but weaker relationship was observed between apparent dispersivity, 5%-tracer arrival time, and lateral observation scale, such that the strength of preferential transport increases with lateral observation scale. However, we also found that the travel distance and the lateral observation scale in the investigated dataset are correlated which makes it difficult to distinguish their influence on these transport characteristics. We observed that anionic tracers exhibited larger

  12. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, H.F. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  13. X-ray CT-Derived Soil Characteristics Explain Varying Air, Water, and Solute Transport Properties across a Loamy Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Katuwal, Sheela; Møldrup, Per;

    2016-01-01

    when the limiting macroporosity (the minimum macroporosity for every 0.6-mm layer along the soil column) was used, suggesting that soil layers with the narrowest macropore section restricted the flow through the whole soil column. Water, air, and solute transport were related with the CT......The characterization of soil pore space geometry is important for explaining fluxes of air, water, and solutes through soil and understanding soil hydrogeochemical functions. X-ray computed tomography (CT) can be applied for this characterization, and in this study CT-derived parameters were used...... to explain water, air, and solute transport through soil. Forty-five soil columns (20 by 20 cm) were collected from an agricultural field in Estrup, Denmark, and subsequently scanned using a medical CT scanner. Nonreactive tracer leaching experiments were performed in the laboratory along with measurements...

  14. Numerical methods for solution of the stochastic differential equations equivalent to the non-stationary Parker's transport equation

    CERN Document Server

    Wawrzynczak, A; Kluczek, M

    2015-01-01

    We derive the numerical schemes for the strong order integration of the set of the stochastic differential equations (SDEs) corresponding to the non-stationary Parker transport equation (PTE). PTE is 5-dimensional (3 spatial coordinates, particles energy and time) Fokker- Planck type equation describing the non-stationary the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles transport in the heliosphere. We present the formulas for the numerical solution of the obtained set of SDEs driven by a Wiener process in the case of the full three-dimensional diffusion tensor. We introduce the solution applying the strong order Euler-Maruyama, Milstein and stochastic Runge-Kutta methods. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the presented numerical methods in the context of increasing the accuracy of the solution of the PTE.

  15. The derivation and moments solution of approximate transport equations for the implantation of ions into amorphous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, D. G.; Bowyer, M. D. J.; Oven, R.

    1995-06-01

    Commencing with the LSS integro-differential equation, an approximate transport equation is derived from which the moments of the range distribution may be obtained. The resulting equation set is known as the Kent Range ALgorithm (KRAL). The method for numerical solution of these equations, when written as a set of coupled second order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) of the initial value type, is then outlined. Solution is achieved by recasting the equation set in the form of first order ODEs designed for iterative solution. The technique used is an iterative refinement (or residual correction) procedure and the set of first order ODEs is called the Kent Optimised Range ALgorithm (KORAL). Finally, the first three moments from KORAL, first and second order PRAL codes and the full transport equation code KUBBIC-91 are compared with Monte Carlo data obtained from a TRIM code modified to treat targets of infinite extent. Comparisons are performed using consistent nuclear and electronic energy loss models.

  16. Oscillations and multiple steady states in active membrane transport models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, F M; Bisch, P M

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of some non-linear extensions of the six-state alternating access model for active membrane transport is investigated. We use stoichio-metric network analysis to study the stability of steady states. The bifurcation analysis has been done through standard numerical methods. For the usual six-state model we have proved that there is only one steady state, which is globally asymptotically stable. When we added an autocatalytic step we found self-oscillations. For the competition between a monomer cycle and a dimer cycle, with steps of dimer formation, we have also found self-oscillations. We have also studied models involving the formation of a complex with other molecules. The addition of two steps for formation of a complex of the monomer with another molecule does not alter either the number or the stability of steady states of the basic six-state model. The model which combines the formation of a complex with an autocatalytic step shows both self-oscillations and multiple steady states. The results lead us to conclude that oscillations could be produced by active membrane transport systems if the transport cycle contains a sufficiently large number of steps (six in the present case) and is coupled to at least one autocatalytic reaction,. Oscillations are also predicted when the monomer cycle is coupled to a dimer cycle. In fact, the autocatalytic reaction can be seen as a simplification of the model involving competition between monomer and dimer cycles, which seems to be a more realistic description of biological systems. A self-regulation mechanism of the pumps, related to the multiple stationary states, is expected only for a combined effect of autocatalysis and formation of complexes with other molecules. Within the six-state model this model also leads to oscillation.

  17. The Influence of Urban Land-Use and Public Transport Facilities on Active Commuting in Wellington, New Zealand: Active Transport Forecasting Using the WILUTE Model

    OpenAIRE

    Joreintje Dingena Mackenbach; Edward Randal; Pengjun Zhao; Philippa Howden-Chapman

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity has numerous physical and mental health benefits, and active commuting (walking or cycling to work) can help meet physical activity recommendations. This study investigated socioeconomic differences in active commuting, and assessed the impact of urban land-use and public transport policies on active commuting in the Wellington region in New Zealand. We combined data from the New Zealand Household Travel Survey and GIS data on land-use and public transport facilities with th...

  18. Water Flow and Solute Transport in Heterogeneous Soils: A new Multicompartment Sampler and a Theoretical Toolkit for Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, G. H.; Hogervorst, F. A.; Bloem, E.; Stagnitti, F.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    Water flow and solute transport in soils are invariably affected by heterogeneity and often by preferential flow, both typically occurring within 1 square meter. Paradoxically, we need to understand flow and transport at this small scale to quantify them at the field and regional scales. This paradox arises from the geometry of soils: the scale in the direction of the flow is orders of magnitude smaller than the scales perpendicular to it. We present a coherent package of experimental and theoretical tools to observe and analyze small-scale variations (within 0.1- 1 square meter) of water and solute fluxes. Multicompartment samplers can measure small-scale water and solute movement in space and time, particularly in temperate climates. The latest generation of samplers allows repeated extraction of percolate samples in situ under controlled suction to minimize disturbance of the unsaturated flow field. After discussing the general principle of such samplers, a method will be presented to estimate the required total sampling area of a sampler from the degree of flow convergence in a soil. In recent years, we improved our ability to analyze the data produced by multicompartment samplers. The spatial solute distribution curve as the spatial equivalent of the travel time distribution was parameterized and physically interpreted. Both distributions were unified in the leaching surface, which has tremendous potential for detailed interpretation and model evaluation. Multicompartment samplers can also help identify the nature of the solute transport process. Recently, we expanded the theory of solute dilution to make it applicable to multicompartment sampler data. We will demonstrate how dilution theory can be used to determine the predominance of a convective-dispersive or a stochastic-convective transport regime during a tracer experiment.

  19. Comparison between field measurements and numerical simulation of steady-state solute transport in a heterogeneous soil profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vanderborght

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Field-scale solute dispersion is determined by water flow heterogeneity which results from spatial variability of soil hydraulic properties and soil moisture state. Measured variabilities of soil hydraulic properties are highly sensitive to the experimental method. Field-scale dispersion derived from leaching experiments in a macroporous loam soil was compared with field-scale dispersion obtained with numerical simulations in heterogeneous random fields. Four types of random fields of hydraulic properties having statistical properties derived from four different types of laboratory measurements were considered. Based on this comparison, the measurement method depicting heterogeneities of hydraulic properties most relevant to field-scale solute transport was identified. For unsaturated flow, the variability of the hydraulic conductivity characteristic measured on a small soil volume was the most relevant parameter. For saturated flow, simulated dispersion underestimated the measured dispersion and it was concluded that heterogeneity of macroscopic hydraulic properties could not represent solute flow heterogeneity under these flow conditions. Field-scale averaged solute concentrations depend both on the detection method and the averaging procedure. Flux-averaged concentrations (relevant to practical applications differ from volume-averaged or resident concentrations (easy to measure, especially when water flow is more heterogeneous. Simulated flux and resident concentrations were subsequently used to test two simple one-dimensional transport models in predicting flux concentrations when they are calibrated on resident concentrations. In the first procedure, solute transport in a heterogeneous soil is represented by a 1-D convection dispersion process. The second procedure was based on the relation between flux and resident concentrations for a stochastic convective process. Better predictions of flux concentrations were obtained using

  20. Water flow and solute transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum: Upscaling from rhizosphere to root zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovitch, Naftali; Perelman, Adi; Guerra, Helena; Vanderborght, Jan; Pohlmeier, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Root water and nutrient uptake are among the most important processes considered in numerical models simulating water content and fluxes in the subsurface, as they control plant growth and production as well as water flow and nutrient transport out of the root zone. Root water uptake may lead to salt accumulation at the root-soil interface, resulting in rhizophere salt concentrations much higher than in the bulk soil. This salt accumulation is caused by soluble salt transport towards the roots by mass flow through the soil, followed by preferential adsorption of specific nutrients by active uptake, thereby excluding most other salts at the root-soil interface or in the root apoplast. The salinity buildup can lead to large osmotic pressure gradients across the roots thereby effectively reducing root water uptake. The initial results from rhizoslides (capillary paper growth system) show that sodium concentration is decreasing with distance from the root, compared with the bulk that remained more stable. When transpiration rate was decreased under high salinity levels, sodium concentration was more homogenous compared with low salinity levels. Additionally, sodium and gadolinium distributions were measured nondestructively around tomato roots using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique could also observe the root structure and water content around single roots. Results from the MRI confirm the solutes concentration pattern around roots and its relation to their initial concentration. We conclude that local water potentials at the soil-root interface differ from bulk potentials. These relative differences increase with decreasing root density, decreasing initial salt concentration and increasing transpiration rate. Furthermore, since climate may significantly influence plant response to salinity a dynamic climate-coupled salinity reduction functions are critical in while using macroscopic numerical models.

  1. Socioeconomic and regional differences in active transportation in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Pereira, Rafael Henrique Moraes; Duran, Ana Clara; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To present national estimates regarding walking or cycling for commuting in Brazil and in 10 metropolitan regions. METHODS By using data from the Health section of 2008’s Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílio (Brazil’s National Household Sample Survey), we estimated how often employed people walk or cycle to work, disaggregating our results by sex, age range, education level, household monthly income per capita, urban or rural address, metropolitan regions, and macro-regions in Brazil. Furthermore, we estimated the distribution of this same frequency according to quintiles of household monthly income per capita in each metropolitan region of the country. RESULTS A third of the employed men and women walk or cycle from home to work in Brazil. For both sexes, this share decreases as income and education levels rise, and it is higher among younger individuals, especially among those living in rural areas and in the Northeast region of the country. Depending on the metropolitan region, the practice of active transportation is two to five times more frequent among low-income individuals than among high-income individuals. CONCLUSIONS Walking or cycling to work in Brazil is most frequent among low-income individuals and the ones living in less economically developed areas. Active transportation evaluation in Brazil provides important information for public health and urban mobility policy-making PMID:27355465

  2. The Influence of Active Transport Systems on Morphine -6-Glucuronide Transport in MDCKII and MDCK-PGP Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SO. Mashayekhi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G is a potent metabolite of morphine which has high penetration into the brain despite its high polarity, which could be the result of an active transport system involved in M6G transport through blood brain barrier. Examples of such transporters are p-glycoprotein (PGP, probenecid-sensitive transport mechanism, multidrug resistance related protein 1-3, the organic anion transporter family, and the organic anion transporter polypeptide family. The aim of present study was to elucidate the mechanisms involved in transporting morphine's potent metabolite, M6G.Methods: M6G permeability via two cell lines; MDCKII and MDCK-PGP, was compared with that of sucrose. M6G transport was examined in different concentrations and in the presence of inhibitors of different transport systems such as cyclosporine, digoxin and probenecid. M6G concentration was measured using ELISA assay. The method was sensitive, reliable and reproducible.Results: The results confirmed that M6G could cross a layer of MDCK II or MDR-PGP cells more than sucrose could. It was also observed that M6G is a PGP transporter substrate. Its permeability was increased by the use of a PGP expressed cell line, and also in the presence of a strong PGP inhibitor. Digoxin related transporters such as Oatp2 may also involved in transport of M6G. M6G seemed to be a glucose transporter 1 substrate, but was not a substrate to probenecid sensitive transporters.Major conclusion: It is concluded that different transporters are responsible for M6G transports via different membrane, which could have effects on its pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics.

  3. Future car transport, Evaluating optimal solutions for future transport in the Netherlands focussing on the electric and hydrogen car

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierie, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The modern world we are living in today, consumes fasts amounts of fossil fuels in many sectors. One of these sectors is transport which is almost completely dependent on oil derivatives. This heavy dependency on oil and other types of fossil fuel makes i

  4. Core 2D. A code for non-isothermal water flow and reactive solute transport. Users manual version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J.; Juncosa, R.; Delgado, J.; Montenegro, L. [Universidad de A Coruna (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Understanding natural groundwater quality patterns, quantifying groundwater pollution and assessing the effects of waste disposal, require modeling tools accounting for water flow, and transport of heat and dissolved species as well as their complex interactions with solid and gases phases. This report contains the users manual of CORE ''2D Version V.2.0, a COde for modeling water flow (saturated and unsaturated), heat transport and multicomponent Reactive solute transport under both local chemical equilibrium and kinetic conditions. it is an updated and improved version of CORE-LE-2D V0 (Samper et al., 1988) which in turns is an extended version of TRANQUI, a previous reactive transport code (ENRESA, 1995). All these codes were developed within the context of Research Projects funded by ENRESA and the European Commission. (Author)

  5. Analytical solutions Of three-dimensional contaminant transport in uniform flow field in porous media: A library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongtao WANG; Huayong WU

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a library of analytical solutions for the three-dimensional contam-inant transport in uniform flow field in porous media with the first-order decay, linear sorption, and zero-order pro-duction. The library is constructed using Green's function method (GFM) in combination with available solutions.The library covers a wide range of solutions for various conditions. The aquifer can be vertically finite, semi-infin-itive or infinitive, and laterally semi-infinitive or infinitive.The geometry of the sources can be of point, line, plane or volumetric body; and the source release can be continuous,instantaneous, or by following a given function over time.Dimensionless forms of the solutions are also proposed. A computer code FlowCAS is developed to calculate the solutions. Calculated results demonstrate the correctness of the presented solutions. The library is widely applicable to solve contaminant transport problems of one- or multiple- dimensions in uniform flow fields.

  6. Body Composition, Physical Activity and Active Transportation in Adolescents of Metropolitan Region of Curitiba, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandra Ulbrict

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical activity is a part of a healthy lifestyle, however sed entary habits are currently prevalent among adolescents which impacts rates of overweight and obesity in this group. This study aims to describe the relationship of physical activity with the use of active transportation to school (ATS and its relationshi p with body composition in adolescents. Materials and Methods: Information about physical activity, sedentary behavior and active transportation were collected through two survey instruments, one completed by a responsible parent/guardian and other by the adolescent. Body composition was assessed by dual - energy x - ray absorptiometry (DXA. Excess body fat was defined as ≥ 25% in male and ≥ 30% among female adolescents. Less than 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous daily physical activity defined one as sede ntary and greater than 2 hours of screen time per day was defined as excessive. Results: The prevalence of excess body fat was 46.5%. Only 24.7% of the sample performed recommended amounts of physical activity and 92.3% engaged in excess screen time. Appro ximately one - fifth of our sample (19.2% used ATS. The main barriers to active transport were traffic, distance and safety. Those that used ATS had lower body fat and fewer hours of sedentary behavior.

  7. Temperature dependence of transport and equilibrium properties of alkylpyridinium surfactants in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Mohsin Ahmad; Dar, Aijaz Ahmed; Amin, Adil; Rashid, Peer Irfan [Department of Chemistry, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal Srinagar - 190006, J and K (India); Rather, Ghulam Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal Srinagar - 190006, J and K (India)], E-mail: gmrather2002@yahoo.com

    2007-11-15

    Conductivity measurements at varying concentrations and temperatures for two alkyl pyridinium surfactants-dodecylpyridinium chloride (DPC) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) in aqueous medium have been performed. The resulting data in the lower concentration range were used for the determination of limiting transport parameters of the surfactant ions. Temperature dependence of limiting ion conductance {lambda}{sub +(surf.cation)}{sup 0} and limiting ion mobility u{sub +(surf.cation)}{sup 0} of surfactant ions were used for determination of standard partial molar enthalpy of activation for ion migration ({delta}H{sub {lambda}{sub +0}}) and the change in activation energy for translational mobility ({delta}E{sub trans}{sup 0}) of water molecules from surfactant ion hydration shell. The conductivity data at higher concentrations were used for determination of equilibrium micellar parameters, viz. critical micelle concentration (cmc), degree of counter ion dissociation ({alpha}), and aggregation number (n). Comparison of such parameters of the two surfactants at different temperatures was made in the light of molecular structure, ion-solvent, ion-ion, and solvent-solvent interactions.

  8. Low-cost copper complexes as p-dopants in solution processable hole transport layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the usage of the Lewis-acidic copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(hfac)2) and copper(II)trifluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(tfac)2) as low-cost p-dopants for conductivity enhancement of solution processable hole transport layers based on small molecules in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The materials were clearly soluble in mixtures of environmentally friendly anisole and xylene and spin-coated under ambient atmosphere. Enhancements of two and four orders of magnitude, reaching 4.0 × 10−11 S/cm with a dopant concentration of only 2 mol% Cu(hfac)2 and 1.5 × 10−9 S/cm with 5 mol% Cu(tfac)2 in 2,2′,7,7′-tetra(N,N-ditolyl)amino-9,9-spiro-bifluorene (spiro-TTB), respectively, were achieved. Red light emitting diodes were fabricated with reduced driving voltages and enhanced current and power efficiencies (8.6 lm/W with Cu(hfac)2 and 5.6 lm/W with Cu(tfac)2) compared to the OLED with undoped spiro-TTB (3.9 lm/W). The OLED with Cu(hfac)2 doped spiro-TTB showed an over 8 times improved LT50 lifetime of 70 h at a starting luminance of 5000 cd/m2. The LT50 lifetime of the reference OLED with PEDOT:PSS was only 8 h. Both non-optimized OLEDs were operated at similar driving voltage and power efficiency

  9. Low-cost copper complexes as p-dopants in solution processable hole transport layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellermann, Renate [Department for Materials Science and Engineering, Chair for Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Siemens AG – Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Taroata, Dan; Maltenberger, Anna; Hartmann, David; Schmid, Guenter [Siemens AG – Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Department for Materials Science and Engineering, Chair for Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91058 (Germany)

    2015-09-07

    We demonstrate the usage of the Lewis-acidic copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(hfac){sub 2}) and copper(II)trifluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(tfac){sub 2}) as low-cost p-dopants for conductivity enhancement of solution processable hole transport layers based on small molecules in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The materials were clearly soluble in mixtures of environmentally friendly anisole and xylene and spin-coated under ambient atmosphere. Enhancements of two and four orders of magnitude, reaching 4.0 × 10{sup −11} S/cm with a dopant concentration of only 2 mol% Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 1.5 × 10{sup −9} S/cm with 5 mol% Cu(tfac){sub 2} in 2,2′,7,7′-tetra(N,N-ditolyl)amino-9,9-spiro-bifluorene (spiro-TTB), respectively, were achieved. Red light emitting diodes were fabricated with reduced driving voltages and enhanced current and power efficiencies (8.6 lm/W with Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 5.6 lm/W with Cu(tfac){sub 2}) compared to the OLED with undoped spiro-TTB (3.9 lm/W). The OLED with Cu(hfac){sub 2} doped spiro-TTB showed an over 8 times improved LT{sub 50} lifetime of 70 h at a starting luminance of 5000 cd/m{sup 2}. The LT{sub 50} lifetime of the reference OLED with PEDOT:PSS was only 8 h. Both non-optimized OLEDs were operated at similar driving voltage and power efficiency.

  10. Pore-scale and Continuum Simulations of Solute Transport Micromodel Benchmark Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Mehmani, Yashar; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Tang, Y.; Liu, H.; Yoon, Hongkyu; Kang, Qinjun; Joekar Niasar, Vahid; Balhoff, Matthew; Dewers, T.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Leist, Emily AE; Hess, Nancy J.; Perkins, William A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2016-08-01

    Four sets of micromodel nonreactive solute transport experiments were conducted with flow velocity, grain diameter, pore-aspect ratio, and flow focusing heterogeneity as the variables. The data sets were offered to pore-scale modeling groups to test their simulators. Each set consisted of two learning experiments, for which all results was made available, and a challenge experiment, for which only the experimental description and base input parameters were provided. The experimental results showed a nonlinear dependence of the dispersion coefficient on the Peclet number, a negligible effect of the pore-aspect ratio on transverse mixing, and considerably enhanced mixing due to flow focusing. Five pore-scale models and one continuum-scale model were used to simulate the experiments. Of the pore-scale models, two used a pore-network (PN) method, two others are based on a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) approach, and one employed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The learning experiments were used by the PN models to modify the standard perfect mixing approach in pore bodies into approaches to simulate the observed incomplete mixing. The LB and CFD models used these experiments to appropriately discretize the grid representations. The continuum model use published non-linear relations between transverse dispersion coefficients and Peclet numbers to compute the required dispersivity input values. Comparisons between experimental and numerical results for the four challenge experiments show that all pore-scale models were all able to satisfactorily simulate the experiments. The continuum model underestimated the required dispersivity values and, resulting in less dispersion. The PN models were able to complete the simulations in a few minutes, whereas the direct models needed up to several days on supercomputers to resolve the more complex problems.

  11. A Stream Morphology Classification for Eco-hydraulic Purposes Based on Geospatial Data: a Solute Transport Application Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Jaramillo, M. A.; Camacho Botero, L. A.; Vélez Upegui, J. I.

    2010-12-01

    Variation in stream morphology along a basin drainage network leads to different hydraulic patterns and sediment transport processes. Moreover, solute transport processes along streams, and stream habitats for fisheries and microorganisms, rely on stream corridor structure, including elements such as bed forms, channel patterns, riparian vegetation, and the floodplain. In this work solute transport processes simulation and stream habitat identification are carried out at the basin scale. A reach-scale morphological classification system based on channel slope and specific stream power was implemented by using digital elevation models and hydraulic geometry relationships. Although the morphological framework allows identification of cascade, step-pool, plane bed and pool-riffle morphologies along the drainage network, it still does not account for floodplain configuration and bed-forms identification of those channel types. Hence, as a first application case in order to obtain parsimonious three-dimensional characterizations of drainage channels, the morphological framework has been updated by including topographical floodplain delimitation through a Multi-resolution Valley Bottom Flatness Index assessing, and a stochastic bed form representation of the step-pool morphology. Model outcomes were tested in relation to in-stream water storage for different flow conditions and representative travel times according to the Aggregated Dead Zone -ADZ- model conceptualization of solute transport processes.

  12. Active-active and active-sterile neutrino oscillation solutions to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción; Peres, O L G; Valle, José W F

    1999-01-01

    We perform a fit to the full data set corresponding to 25.5 kt-yr of data of the Super-Kamiokande experiment as well as to all other experiments in order to compare the two most likely solutions to the atmospheric neutrino anomaly in terms of oscillations in the $\

  13. Variability and seasonality of active transportation in USA: evidence from the 2001 NHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingham C Raymond

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active transportation including walking and bicycling is an important source of physical activity. Promoting active transportation is a challenge for the fields of public health and transportation. Descriptive data on the predictors of active transportation, including seasonal patterns in active transportation in the US as a whole, is needed to inform interventions and policies. Methods This study analyzed monthly variation in active transportation for the US using National Household Travel Survey 2001 data. For each age group of children, adolescents, adults and elderly, logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of the odds of active transportation including gender, race/ethnicity, household income level, geographical region, urbanization level, and month. Results The probability of engaging in active transportation was generally higher for children and adolescents than for adults and the elderly. Active transportation was greater in the lower income groups (except in the elderly, was lower in the South than in other regions of the US, and was greater in areas with higher urbanization. The percentage of people using active transportation exhibited clear seasonal patterns: high during summer months and low during winter months. Children and adolescents were more sensitive to seasonality than other age groups. Women, non-Caucasians, persons with lower household income, who resided in the Midwest or Northeast, and who lived in more urbanized areas had greater seasonal variation. Conclusions These descriptive results suggest that interventions and policies that target the promotion of active transportation need to consider socio-demographic factors and seasonality.

  14. First TRUE Stage - Transport of solutes in an interpreted single fracture. Proceedings from the 4th international seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    The First Stage of the Tracer Retention Understanding Experiments (TRUE-1) was initiated in 1994 and the experimental activities were officially concluded in December 1998 with the termination of the final test with radioactive sorbing tracers. The programme also included a laboratory programme focused on both generic (Aespoe HRL) and site-specific (Feature A) geological material. Modelling, both scopings, predictions and evaluation of the final tests with sorbing tracers has been performed parallel to the experimental work. The work and conclusions of the SKB TRUE project team have been published in a SKB technical report. The TRUE-1 experiments have also been subject to blind prediction and evaluation by an international group of modelling teams within the auspices of the Aespoe Task Force on Groundwater on Modelling of Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport. A list of relevant reports and publications related to the First TRUE Stage are presented in Appendix A. The present seminar provides a venue to present and discuss the results of the TRUE-1 experiments in terms of identified transport and retention processes and concepts/approaches used to model. However, given the fact that may international programs, including that of SKB, are either underway or preparing for site characterisation programs, the seminar provides a possibility to discuss research priorities and the specific data needs for development of a geological repository. In his opening address, the director of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory emphasised the need to carefully integrate available experience from other research sites, e.g. Grimsel (Switzerland), Stripa (Sweden) and El Berrocal (Spain). The two important questions to be asked are; What do we know? What is the way forward? For the subsequent discussions four different discussion themes were identified; 1. Identification of transport processes. 2. Model concepts. 3. Site-specific data needs for a geological repository. 4. Research priorities

  15. Reliability and validity of the transport and physical activity questionnaire (TPAQ for assessing physical activity behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J Adams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No current validated survey instrument allows a comprehensive assessment of both physical activity and travel behaviours for use in interdisciplinary research on walking and cycling. This study reports on the test-retest reliability and validity of physical activity measures in the transport and physical activity questionnaire (TPAQ. METHODS: The TPAQ assesses time spent in different domains of physical activity and using different modes of transport for five journey purposes. Test-retest reliability of eight physical activity summary variables was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC and Kappa scores for continuous and categorical variables respectively. In a separate study, the validity of three survey-reported physical activity summary variables was assessed by computing Spearman correlation coefficients using accelerometer-derived reference measures. The Bland-Altman technique was used to determine the absolute validity of survey-reported time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA. RESULTS: In the reliability study, ICC for time spent in different domains of physical activity ranged from fair to substantial for walking for transport (ICC = 0.59, cycling for transport (ICC = 0.61, walking for recreation (ICC = 0.48, cycling for recreation (ICC = 0.35, moderate leisure-time physical activity (ICC = 0.47, vigorous leisure-time physical activity (ICC = 0.63, and total physical activity (ICC = 0.56. The proportion of participants estimated to meet physical activity guidelines showed acceptable reliability (k = 0.60. In the validity study, comparison of survey-reported and accelerometer-derived time spent in physical activity showed strong agreement for vigorous physical activity (r = 0.72, p<0.001, fair but non-significant agreement for moderate physical activity (r = 0.24, p = 0.09 and fair agreement for MVPA (r = 0.27, p = 0.05. Bland

  16. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Analysis of Transport Properties in the Nanofiltration of Ionic Liquid-Water Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua P. Wang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Thenanofiltration of aqueous solutions of the ionic liquids (ILs 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim]BF4, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([Bmim]Br with a polyamide nanofiltration membrane was investigated. The practical transport coefficients, including hydrodynamic permeability (Lp, reflection (σ and solute permeability (ω were calculated in terms of a non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach. It was found that Lp and σ diminished as the concentration of the IL solutions increased. These characteristics are similar to those observed in inorganic electrolyte-water systems. In addition, it was shown that the rejection and volume flux for both ionic liquid solutions rose with feed pressure, while it decreased with feed concentration. The maximum rejection efficiencies for [Bmim]Br and [Bmim]BF4 are 67 % and 60 %, respectively, on our experimental scale. All the data suggests that a highly efficient process for IL separation could be developed when the operating conditions are optimized further.

  17. Resistive switching behavior of photochemical activation solution-processed thin films at low temperatures for flexible memristor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinghui; Xu, Zhimou; Yu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Fei; Sun, Tangyou; Ma, Zhichao; Li, Zeping; Wang, Shuangbao

    2015-03-01

    This study explores deep ultraviolet photochemically activated solution-processed metal-oxide thin films at room temperature for fabrication of flexible memristor active resistive layers. An annealing treatment was not required during the process. Solution processed undoped and Mn-doped ZnO thin films served as active layers in the resistive random access memory structure, prepared at 145 °C. The carrier transports in high and low electrical fields were dominated by Frenkel-Poole emission and thermionic emission, respectively. The trap energy level, which originated primarily from Vo or the singly charged oxygen vacancy, was calculated at 0.49 eV. A flexible structure consisting of Ag/DUV-ZnO/indium tin oxide/polyethylene terephthalate was fabricated successfully and its mechanical performance was investigated.

  18. Effects of a Danish multicomponent physical activity intervention on active school transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Lars; Toftager, Mette; Ersbøll, Annette K.;

    2014-01-01

    AbstractIntroduction Walking and bicycling to school yields great potential in increasing the physical activity levels of adolescents, but to date very few intervention studies have been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multicomponent school-based physical activity...... intervention on adolescent active school transport (AST) and three intermediate outcomes: perceived school route safety, parent support and attitude towards bicycling. Methods In total, 1014 adolescents at 14 schools filled in a transport diary at baseline and at a two-year follow-up and were included...... in the primary outcome analysis. Mean age at baseline was 12.6 years (range: 11.0–14.4 years). Seven of the schools were randomized to the intervention which was designed to change the organizational and structural environment at the schools, thereby increasing non-curricular physical activity i.e. recess...

  19. Measuring Solution Viscosity and its Effect on Enzyme Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Uribe Salvador; Sampedro José G.

    2003-01-01

    In proteins, some processes require conformational changes involving structural domain diffusion. Among these processes are protein folding, unfolding and enzyme catalysis. During catalysis some enzymes undergo large conformational changes as they progress through the catalytic cycle. According to Kramers theory, solvent viscosity results in friction against proteins in solution, and this should result in decreased motion, inhibiting catalysis in motile enzymes. Solution viscosity was increas...

  20. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  1. Thermally activated charge transport in microbial protein nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampa-Pastirk, Sanela; Veazey, Joshua P; Walsh, Kathleen A; Feliciano, Gustavo T; Steidl, Rebecca J; Tessmer, Stuart H; Reguera, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the expression of conductive protein filaments or pili to respire extracellular electron acceptors such as iron oxides and uranium and to wire electroactive biofilms, but the contribution of the protein fiber to charge transport has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate efficient long-range charge transport along individual pili purified free of metal and redox organic cofactors at rates high enough to satisfy the respiratory rates of the cell. Carrier characteristics were within the orders reported for organic semiconductors (mobility) and inorganic nanowires (concentration), and resistivity was within the lower ranges reported for moderately doped silicon nanowires. However, the pilus conductance and the carrier mobility decreased when one of the tyrosines of the predicted axial multistep hopping path was replaced with an alanine. Furthermore, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy demonstrated the thermal dependence of the differential conductance at the low voltages that operate in biological systems. The results thus provide evidence for thermally activated multistep hopping as the mechanism that allows Geobacter pili to function as protein nanowires between the cell and extracellular electron acceptors. PMID:27009596

  2. How are flexible tanks becoming a solution for wine in bulk transportation?

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Alisa

    2015-01-01

    Past decades have proven that logistics is taking a crucial role in both domestic and international trade. Additionally, logistics have played an essential role in wars recorded in past human history. Bulk shipping is becoming an increasingly attractive option for wine shippers around the world because this method of shipping allows transporting up to 13,400 litres more of the product when compared to the conventional method of wine transportation, which dramatically cuts transportation costs...

  3. Solution processable semiconductor thin films: Correlation between morphological, structural, optical and charge transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Dilek

    This Ph.D. thesis is a result of multidisciplinary research bringing together fundamental concepts in thin film engineering, materials science, materials processing and characterization, electrochemistry, microfabrication, and device physics. Experiments were conducted by tackling scientific problems in the field of thin films and interfaces, with the aim to correlate the morphology, crystalline structure, electronic structure of thin films with the functional properties of the films and the performances of electronic devices based thereon. Furthermore, novel strategies based on interfacial phenomena at electrolyte/thin film interfaces were explored and exploited to control the electrical conductivity of the thin films. Three main chemical systems were the object of the studies performed during this Ph.D., two types of organic semiconductors (azomethine-based oligomers and polymers and soluble pentacene derivatives) and one metal oxide semiconductor (tungsten trioxide, WO3). To explore the morphological properties of the thin films, atomic force microscopy was employed. The morphological properties were further investigated by hyperspectral fluorescence microscopy and tentatively correlated to the charge transport properties of the films. X-ray diffraction (Grazing incidence XRD, GIXRD) was used to investigate the crystallinity of the film and the effect of the heat treatment on such crystallinity, as well as to understand the molecular arrangement of the organic molecules in the thin film. The charge transport properties of the films were evaluated in thin film transistor configuration. For electrolyte gated thin film transistors, time dependent transient measurements were conducted, in parallel to more conventional transistor characterizations, to explore the specific effects played on the gating by the anion and cation constituting the electrolyte. The capacitances of the electrical double layers at the electrolyte/WO3 interface were obtained from

  4. P1 Nonconforming Finite Element Method for the Solution of Radiation Transport Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kab S.

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of radiation transport in the optically thick flux-limited diffusion regime has been identified as one of the most time-consuming tasks within large simulation codes. Due to multimaterial complex geometry, the radiation transport system must often be solved on unstructured grids. In this paper, we investigate the behavior and the benefits of the unstructured P(sub 1) nonconforming finite element method, which has proven to be flexible and effective on related transport problems, in solving unsteady implicit nonlinear radiation diffusion problems using Newton and Picard linearization methods. Key words. nonconforrning finite elements, radiation transport, inexact Newton linearization, multigrid preconditioning

  5. Effects of solution P H on the adsorption of aromatic compounds from aqueous solutions by activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption of p-Cresol, Benzoic acid and Nitro Benzene by activated carbon from dilute aqueous solutions was carried out under controlled ph conditions at 310 k. In acidic conditions, well below the pKa of all solutes, it was observed that the adsorbate solubility and the electron density of its aromatic ring were the influencing factors on the extent of the adsorption by affecting the extent of London dispersion forces. In higher solution ph conditions, on the other hand, it was found that the electrostatic forces played a significant role on the extent of adsorption. The Effect of ph must be considered from its combined effects on the carbon surface and on the solute molecules. It was found that the uptake of the molecular forms of the aromatic solutes was dependent on the substituents of the aromatic ring. Adsorption of the solutes in higher P H values was found to be dependent on the concentration of anionic form of the solutes. All isotherms were fitted into Freundlich Isotherm Equations

  6. Application of integer programming on logistics solution for load transportation: the solver tool and its limitations in the search for the optimal solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo França Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work tries to solve a typical logistics problem of Navy of Brazil regards the allocation, transportation and distribution of genera refrigerated for Military Organizations within Grande Rio (RJ. After a brief review of literature on Linear/Integer Programming and some of their applications, we proposed the use of Integer Programming, using the Excel’s Solver as a tool for obtaining the optimal load configuration for the fleet, obtaining the lower distribution costs in order to meet the demand schedule. The assumptions were met in a first attempt with a single spreadsheet, but it could not find a convergent solution, without degeneration problems and with a reasonable solution time. A second solution was proposed separating the problem into three phases, which allowed us to highlight the potential and limitations of the Solver tool. This study showed the importance of formulating a realistic model and of a detailed critical analysis, which could be seen through the lack of convergence of the first solution and the success achieved by the second one.

  7. A Nonlinear Solute Transport Model and Data Reconstruction with Parameter Determination in an Undisturbed Soil-Column Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongsheng Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A real undisturbed soil-column infiltrating experiment in Zibo, Shandong, China, is investigated, and a nonlinear transport model for a solute ion penetrating through the column is put forward by using nonlinear Freundlich's adsorption isotherm. Since Freundlich's exponent and adsorption coefficient and source/sink terms in the model cannot be measured directly, an inverse problem of determining these parameters is encountered based on additional breakthrough data. Furthermore, an optimal perturbation regularization algorithm is introduced to determine the unknown parameters simultaneously. Numerical simulations are carried out and then the inversion algorithm is applied to solve the real inverse problem and reconstruct the measured data successfully. The computational results show that the nonlinear advection-dispersion equation discussed in this paper can be utilized by hydrogeologists to research solute transport behaviors with nonlinear adsorption in porous medium.

  8. Activity and travel choice(s) in multimodal public transport systems

    OpenAIRE

    Krygsman, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    Transport planners and policymakers are increasingly considering multimodal public transport and travel demand management (TDM) strategies to stem the unsustainable travel behaviour trends associated with modern-day, car-dominated travel. Multimodal public transport, however, implies that people change transport mode, which may mean that they can no longer implement their usual activity patterns, perhaps even resulting in increased car use. The quality of public transport is determined not on...

  9. Evaluation of Front Morphological Development of Reactive Solute Transport Using Behavior Diagrams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Sheng Chen

    2009-01-01

    -uniformity strength ratio and reaction rate constant are identified as two important factors that govern the interaction of dissolution and solute transport in groundwater systems.

  10. Solution-Processed Cu2O and CuO as Hole Transport Materials for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chuantian; Ding, Liming

    2015-11-01

    Solution-processed Cu2 O and CuO are used as hole transport materials in perovskite solar cells. The cells show significantly enhanced open circuit voltage Voc, short-circuit current Jsc, and power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared with PEDOT cells. A PCE of 13.35% and good stability are achieved for Cu2O cells, making Cu2O a promising material for further application in perovskite solar cells. PMID:26312602

  11. The state-of-the-art of the LTAN method in the solution of the transport equation in a slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we report the state-of-the-art of the LTAN method, reporting the derivation of the LTAN homogeneous and particular solution in a slab for large N (N N method. We show that the LTAN method, consequently the Laplace transform technique, is a quite general approach to solve a wide class of transport problems in a slab mainly the ones requiring an arbitrary source and large N

  12. Buoyancy-driven flow in a peat moss layer as a mechanism for solute transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappoldt, C.; Pieters, G.J.J.M.; Adema, E.B.; Baaijens, G.J.; Grootjans, A.P.; Duijn, van C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Transport of nutrients, CO2, methane, and oxygen plays an important ecological role at the surface of wetland ecosystems. A possibly important transport mechanism in a water-saturated peat moss layer (usually Sphagnum cuspidatum) is nocturnal buoyancy flow, the downward flow of relatively cold surfa

  13. Built Environment and Active Transport to School (BEATS) Study: protocol for a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Mandic, Sandra; Williams, John; Moore, Antoni; Hopkins, Debbie; Flaherty, Charlotte; Wilson, Gordon; García Bengoechea, Enrique; Spence, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Active transport to school (ATS) is a convenient way to increase physical activity and undertake an environmentally sustainable travel practice. The Built Environment and Active Transport to School (BEATS) Study examines ATS in adolescents in Dunedin, New Zealand, using ecological models for active transport that account for individual, social, environmental and policy factors. The study objectives are to: (1) understand the reasons behind adolescents and their parents' choice of...

  14. CHALLENGES AND TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS OF USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE TRANSPORT OF AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Material and technical resources form a large part of the costs in agricultural production and determine the level of intensity of agriculture, productivity and competitiveness of the industry. The most important role in agricultural production is played by transport operation, from productivity and quality of which directly depends the volume and the grade of final products. More preferable is tractor transport, particularly for on-farm transport, taking into account the impact of navigation systems on the ground. Continuous growth in the saturation of tractors carried out around the world, improves the performance of tractor transport aggregate by increasing their capacity and speed, either on the road or in the field. However, if you increase the saturation of tractors, it encounters problems related to the deterioration of the controllability of the tractor and transport unit. The reduced controllability leads to an increase of damage to transported agricultural products owing to increased oscillatory processes in the system of "road – trailer – tractor – operator" when driving on-farm trails, deteriorating the smoothness and braking properties. Especially sharp these questions relate to transportation of easy-to-damage agricultural products at farm transportation. The feature of data traffic lies in the sharp drop in grade products (products receive numerous mechanical damages, deteriorating its quality, and lose marketability and accordingly reduced its cost. Influence on fruit and vegetable products of unfavorable factors can lead not only to a dramatic loss of quality at the time of transportation, but also reduce the resistance during further storage. To solve the problems emerging when increasing the saturation of tractors, we have proposed devices, allowing reducing negative impact on the production of elevated oscillatory processes, to increase the permeability and straightness of movement of tractor-transport unit

  15. Thermoelectric coefficients of n -doped silicon from first principles via the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentini, Mattia; Bonini, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    We present a first-principles computational approach to calculate thermoelectric transport coefficients via the exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann transport equation, also including the effect of nonequilibrium phonon populations induced by a temperature gradient. We use density functional theory and density functional perturbation theory for an accurate description of the electronic and vibrational properties of a system, including electron-phonon interactions; carriers' scattering rates are computed using standard perturbation theory. We exploit Wannier interpolation (both for electronic bands and electron-phonon matrix elements) for an efficient sampling of the Brillouin zone, and the solution of the Boltzmann equation is achieved via a fast and stable conjugate gradient scheme. We discuss the application of this approach to n -doped silicon. In particular, we discuss a number of thermoelectric properties such as the thermal and electrical conductivities of electrons, the Lorenz number and the Seebeck coefficient, including the phonon drag effect, in a range of temperatures and carrier concentrations. This approach gives results in good agreement with experimental data and provides a detailed characterization of the nature and the relative importance of the individual scattering mechanisms. Moreover, the access to the exact solution of the Boltzmann equation for a realistic system provides a direct way to assess the accuracy of different flavors of relaxation time approximation, as well as of models that are popular in the thermoelectric community to estimate transport coefficients.

  16. A three dimensional Green's function solution technique for the transport of heavy ions in laboratory and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Candice Rockell

    In the future, astronauts will be sent into space for longer durations of time compared to previous missions. The increased risk of exposure to ionizing radiation, such as Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Particle Events, is of great concern. Consequently, steps must be taken to ensure astronaut safety by providing adequate shielding. The shielding and exposure of space travelers is controlled by the transport properties of the radiation through the spacecraft, its onboard systems and the bodies of the individuals themselves. Meeting the challenge of future space programs will therefore require accurate and efficient methods for performing radiation transport calculations to analyze and predict shielding requirements. One such method, which is developed in this dissertation, is based on a three dimensional Green's function solution technique for the transport of heavy ions in both laboratory and space.

  17. Water activated doping and transport in multilayered germanane crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of germanane (GeH) has opened the door for covalently functionalizable 2D materials in electronics. Herein, we demonstrate that GeH can be electronically doped by incorporating stoichiometric equivalents of phosphorus dopant atoms into the CaGe2 precursor. The electronic properties of these doped materials show significant atmospheric sensitivity, and we observe a reduction in resistance by up to three orders of magnitude when doped samples are measured in water-containing atmospheres. This variation in resistance is a result of water activation of the phosphorus dopants. Transport measurements in different contact geometries show a significant anisotropy between in-plane and out-of-plane resistances, with a much larger out-of-plane resistance. These measurements along with finite element modeling results predict that the current distribution in top-contacted crystals is restricted to only the topmost, water activated crystal layers. Taken together, these results pave the way for future electronic and optoelectronic applications utilizing group IV graphane analogues. (paper)

  18. The Influence of Urban Land-Use and Public Transport Facilities on Active Commuting in Wellington, New Zealand: Active Transport Forecasting Using the WILUTE Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joreintje Dingena Mackenbach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has numerous physical and mental health benefits, and active commuting (walking or cycling to work can help meet physical activity recommendations. This study investigated socioeconomic differences in active commuting, and assessed the impact of urban land-use and public transport policies on active commuting in the Wellington region in New Zealand. We combined data from the New Zealand Household Travel Survey and GIS data on land-use and public transport facilities with the Wellington Integrated Land-Use, Transportation and Environment (WILUTE model, and forecasted changes in active commuter trips associated with changes in the built environment. Results indicated high income individuals were more likely to commute actively than individuals on low income. Several land-use and transportation factors were associated with active commuting and results from the modelling showed a potential increase in active commuting following an increase in bus frequency and parking fees. In conclusion, regional level policies stimulating environmental factors that directly or indirectly affect active commuting may be a promising strategy to increase population level physical activity. Access to, and frequency of, public transport in the neighbourhood can act as a facilitator for a more active lifestyle among its residents without negatively affecting disadvantaged groups.

  19. Physical Activity - A Neat Solution to An Impending Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Alison M. McManus

    2007-01-01

    Childhood obesity is arguably the most significant global public health threat, yet effective strategies to contain or prevent the disease are not available. This review examines the physical activity patterns of children and the role physical activity plays in daily energy expenditure. The prevailing focus on moderate to vigorous activity in childhood means there is limited objective information on either sedentary behaviour or non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), the energy expended ...

  20. The Shortlist Method for fast computation of the Earth Mover's Distance and finding optimal solutions to transportation problems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Gottschlich

    Full Text Available Finding solutions to the classical transportation problem is of great importance, since this optimization problem arises in many engineering and computer science applications. Especially the Earth Mover's Distance is used in a plethora of applications ranging from content-based image retrieval, shape matching, fingerprint recognition, object tracking and phishing web page detection to computing color differences in linguistics and biology. Our starting point is the well-known revised simplex algorithm, which iteratively improves a feasible solution to optimality. The Shortlist Method that we propose substantially reduces the number of candidates inspected for improving the solution, while at the same time balancing the number of pivots required. Tests on simulated benchmarks demonstrate a considerable reduction in computation time for the new method as compared to the usual revised simplex algorithm implemented with state-of-the-art initialization and pivot strategies. As a consequence, the Shortlist Method facilitates the computation of large scale transportation problems in viable time. In addition we describe a novel method for finding an initial feasible solution which we coin Modified Russell's Method.

  1. The Shortlist Method for fast computation of the Earth Mover's Distance and finding optimal solutions to transportation problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschlich, Carsten; Schuhmacher, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Finding solutions to the classical transportation problem is of great importance, since this optimization problem arises in many engineering and computer science applications. Especially the Earth Mover's Distance is used in a plethora of applications ranging from content-based image retrieval, shape matching, fingerprint recognition, object tracking and phishing web page detection to computing color differences in linguistics and biology. Our starting point is the well-known revised simplex algorithm, which iteratively improves a feasible solution to optimality. The Shortlist Method that we propose substantially reduces the number of candidates inspected for improving the solution, while at the same time balancing the number of pivots required. Tests on simulated benchmarks demonstrate a considerable reduction in computation time for the new method as compared to the usual revised simplex algorithm implemented with state-of-the-art initialization and pivot strategies. As a consequence, the Shortlist Method facilitates the computation of large scale transportation problems in viable time. In addition we describe a novel method for finding an initial feasible solution which we coin Modified Russell's Method.

  2. The Shortlist Method for fast computation of the Earth Mover's Distance and finding optimal solutions to transportation problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschlich, Carsten; Schuhmacher, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Finding solutions to the classical transportation problem is of great importance, since this optimization problem arises in many engineering and computer science applications. Especially the Earth Mover's Distance is used in a plethora of applications ranging from content-based image retrieval, shape matching, fingerprint recognition, object tracking and phishing web page detection to computing color differences in linguistics and biology. Our starting point is the well-known revised simplex algorithm, which iteratively improves a feasible solution to optimality. The Shortlist Method that we propose substantially reduces the number of candidates inspected for improving the solution, while at the same time balancing the number of pivots required. Tests on simulated benchmarks demonstrate a considerable reduction in computation time for the new method as compared to the usual revised simplex algorithm implemented with state-of-the-art initialization and pivot strategies. As a consequence, the Shortlist Method facilitates the computation of large scale transportation problems in viable time. In addition we describe a novel method for finding an initial feasible solution which we coin Modified Russell's Method. PMID:25310106

  3. Chloride transport and its sensitivities to different boundary conditions in reclaimed soil solutions filled with fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yang CHEN; Jia-Ping YAN; Shi-Wen ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Chloride ion transport in reclaimed soil solutions filled with fly ash (FA) was investigated by measuring the hydraulic parameters (i.e.water retention curves and hydraulic conductivity) of three substrates,namely GSL,GFA,and CFA.Similar simulations were carried out under certain weather conditions.The different boundary conditions of chloride transport were also discussed from FA texture,cover soil thickness,groundwater table level,and initial chloride concentration.Furthcrmore,the sensitivities of chloride ions to these effect factors were analyzed.The results show that the different top soil thickness and initial chloride concentration have no effect on salinity of topsoil solution in the monitoring points,but they can clearly change the chloride concentration of FA layers.The sensibilities from top soil thickness and initial chloride content are exceedingly weak to the salinity balance based on two dimensions of the time and concentration.While the different FA texture and groundwater table not only affect the salinity equilibrium process of the whole reclaimed soil profile,but also change its balance state.Generally,coarse FA particles and high groundwater table can defer the salinity balance process of the reclaimed soil solution,and they also increase the chloride concentration of FA layer solutions,and even topsoil ones.

  4. Common Problems and Solutions for Being Physically Active

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the road again… Take workout clothes when you travel. Use your hotel's health club or pool. If there isn't one, ... Concerns • What Can I Expect? Introduction Getting Physically Active - Introduction - Physical Activity & Health - What Type of Activity is Best? - Develop a ...

  5. Concepts and dimensionality in modeling unsaturated water flow and solute transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.; Rooij, de G.H.; Heinen, M.; Stagnitti, F.

    2004-01-01

    Many environmental studies require accurate simulation of waterand solute fluxes in the unsaturated zone. This paper evaluatesone- and multi-dimensional approaches for soil water flow as wellas different spreading mechanisms to model solute behavior atdifferent scales. For quantification of soil wat

  6. Measuring Solution Viscosity and its Effect on Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe Salvador

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In proteins, some processes require conformational changes involving structural domain diffusion. Among these processes are protein folding, unfolding and enzyme catalysis. During catalysis some enzymes undergo large conformational changes as they progress through the catalytic cycle. According to Kramers theory, solvent viscosity results in friction against proteins in solution, and this should result in decreased motion, inhibiting catalysis in motile enzymes. Solution viscosity was increased by adding increasing concentrations of glycerol, sucrose and trehalose, resulting in a decrease in the reaction rate of the H+-ATPase from the plasma membrane of Kluyveromyces lactis. A direct correlation was found between viscosity (&eegr; and the inhibition of the maximum rate of catalysis (V max. The protocol used to measure viscosity by means of a falling ball type viscometer is described, together with the determination of enzyme kinetics and the application of Kramers’ equation to evaluate the effect of viscosity on the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the H+-ATPase.

  7. Numerical Solution of Electronic Transport in Nanotransistors in Ballistic Regime for One and Two Dimensional System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Aslaninejad ‎

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available For accessing to higher speed and more densities in packaging, FET structures have become small increasing from day to day. Devices as small as 18nm can still exhibit acceptable transistor characteristics but At such small sizes, the nature of carrier transport in the device begins to change. In such MOSFETs that the device size becomes smaller than the carrier scattering length, it is statistically very probable for carriers to traverse the channel from the source to drain electrodes without encountering a scattering event. Such transport is called ballistic transport technically. In this article, we have conducted a survey on the electron transport in nanotransistor and using the semi-classical approach based on Boltzmann Equations for ballistic regimes, the electrical currents for a two dimensional structure as well as a quantum wire have been calculated that this calculations are based on model that is indicated by A. Rahman, J. Guo, S. Datta.

  8. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  9. Simplifying solute transport modelling of the geological multi-barrier disposal system

    OpenAIRE

    Poteri, Antti

    2013-01-01

    A simplified model was developed to represent radionuclide migration from a deep geological nuclear waste repository system to the biosphere. The modelled repository system is based on the concept of multiple nested transport barriers. The model can be used to assess migration and migration properties of single nuclides (no decay chains) through the repository system. Radionuclide transport processes included to the model are diffusion and sorption in the repository near-field and advection, ...

  10. Effect of membrane filtration of antimalarial drug solutions on in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum*

    OpenAIRE

    Baird, J K; Lambros, C.

    1984-01-01

    Antimalarial activities of chloroquine, mefloquine, amodiaquine, and quinine in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum were diminished as a consequence of membrane filtration. Filtered drug solutions gave ID50 values up to 25-fold greater than those of non-filtered (ethanol-sterilized) drug solutions. Loss of activity by filtration was overcome by increasing the drug concentration prior to filtration. Water solutions filtered through Millex-GS filter units consistently showed an absorbance maxim...

  11. Evaluation of Proposed In Vivo Probe Substrates and Inhibitors for Phenotyping Transporter Activity in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momper, Jeremiah D; Tsunoda, Shirley M; Ma, Joseph D

    2016-07-01

    Drug transporters are present in various tissues and have a significant role in drug absorption, distribution, and elimination. The International Transporter Consortium has identified 7 transporters of increasing importance from evidence of clinically significant transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions. The transporters are P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein, organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP1B3, organic cation transporter 2, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1, and OAT3. Decision trees were created based on in vitro experiments to determine whether an in vivo transporter-mediated drug-drug interaction study is needed. Phenotyping is a methodology that evaluates real-time in vivo transporter activity, whereby changes in a probe substrate or probe inhibitor reflect alternations in the activity of the specified transporter. In vivo probe substrates and/or probe inhibitors have been proposed for each aforementioned transporter. In vitro findings and animal models provide the strongest evidence regarding probe specificity. However, such findings have not conclusively correlated with human phenotyping studies. Furthermore, the extent of contribution from multiple transporters in probe disposition complicates the ability to discern if study findings are the result of a specific transporter and thus provide a recommendation for a preferred probe for a drug transporter. PMID:27385182

  12. A WiMAX Solution For Real-Time Video Surveillance in Public Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftekhar Ahmad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Video surveillance is a highly useful tool to the public transport authorities, which is now widely used asa measure to ensure passenger safety and security. While video surveillance application in staticenvironments like airports, shopping malls, train stations has been a huge success, real-time videosurveillance in moving public transport experiences serious technological challenges mainly due to lowdata rates at vehicular speeds offered by existing communication technologies. Success of live videosurveillance in public transport depends on future communication technologies. WiMAX has emerged asan exciting technology with promises to offer high throughput, a key requirement for video surveillance inpublic transport. WiMAX, however, offers limited throughput at high vehicular speeds mainly because ofmultipath fading that causes high bit error rate at the receiver. In this paper, we propose a forward errorcontrol (FEC scheme for WiMAX that proactively and dynamically adjusts the size of extra parity bits oferror correcting codes for real-time applications like video surveillance based on the estimated bit errorprobability at various vehicular speeds. We further propose a model to improve the utility gain of a livevideo surveillance system in public transport that uses WiMAX technology. Simulation results confirmthat the proposed scheme significantly improves the throughput and utility of the video surveillancesystem in public transport.

  13. The Association between Access to Public Transportation and Self-Reported Active Commuting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Djurhuus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Active commuting provides routine-based regular physical activity which can reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Using public transportation involves some walking or cycling to a transit stop, transfers and a walk to the end location and users of public transportation have been found to accumulate more moderate physical activity than non-users. Understanding how public transportation characteristics are associated with active transportation is thus important from a public health perspective. This study examines the associations between objective measures of access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting. Self-reported time spent either walking or cycling commuting each day and the distance to workplace were obtained for adults aged 16 to 65 in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 (n = 28,928. Access to public transportation measures were computed by combining GIS-based road network distances from home address to public transit stops an integrating their service level. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the association between access to public transportation measures and active commuting. Distance to bus stop, density of bus stops, and number of transport modes were all positively associated with being an active commuter and with meeting recommendations of physical activity. No significant association was found between bus services at the nearest stop and active commuting. The results highlight the importance of including detailed measurements of access to public transit in order to identify the characteristics that facilitate the use of public transportation and active commuting.

  14. School Travel Planning: Mobilizing School and Community Resources to Encourage Active School Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buliung, Ron; Faulkner, Guy; Beesley, Theresa; Kennedy, Jacky

    2011-01-01

    Background: Active school transport (AST), school travel using an active mode like walking, may be important to children's overall physical activity. A "school travel plan" (STP) documents a school's transport characteristics and provides an action plan to address school and neighborhood barriers to AST. Methods: We conducted a pilot STP…

  15. Investigation of cross-linking characteristics of novel hole-transporting materials for solution-processed phosphorescent OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaemin; Ameen, Shahid; Lee, Changjin

    2016-04-01

    After the success of commercialization of the vacuum-evaporated organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), solutionprocessing or printing of OLEDs are currently attracting much research interests. However, contrary to various kinds of readily available vacuum-evaporable OLED materials, the solution-processable OLED materials are still relatively rare. Hole-transporting layer (HTL) materials for solution-processed OLEDs are especially limited, because they need additional characteristics such as cross-linking to realize multilayer structures in solution-processed OLEDs, as well as their own electrically hole-transporting characteristics. The presence of such cross-linking characteristics of solutionprocessable HTL materials therefore makes them more challenging in the development stage, and also makes them essence of solution-processable OLED materials. In this work, the structure-property relationships of thermally crosslinkable HTL materials were systematically investigated by changing styrene-based cross-linking functionalities and modifying the carbazole-based hole-transporting core structures. The temperature dependency of the cross-linking characteristics of the HTL materials was systematically investigated by the UV-vis. absorption spectroscopy. The new HTL materials were also applied to green phosphorescent OLEDs, and their device characteristics were also investigated based on the chemical structures of the HTL materials. The device configuration was [ITO / PEDOT:PSS / HTL / EML / ETL / CsF / Al]. We found out that the chemical structures of the cross-linking functionalities greatly affect not only the cross-linking characteristics of the resultant HTL materials, but also the resultant OLED device characteristics. The increase of the maximum luminance and efficiency of OLEDs was evident as the cross-linking temperature decreases from higher than 200°C to at around 150°C.

  16. Activity-Based Costing Application in an Urban Mass Transport Company

    OpenAIRE

    Popesko Boris; Novák Petr

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a basic overview of the application of Activity-Based Costing in an urban mass transport company which operates land public transport via buses and trolleys within the city. The case study was conducted using the Activity-Based Methodology in order to calculate the true cost of individual operations and to measure the profitability of particular transport lines. The case study analysis showed the possible effects of the application of the Activity-Based...

  17. Effect of cyclic aromatics on sodium active transport in frog skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankemeyer, J.T.; Bowerman, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

    1993-01-01

    A modified glass Ussing-chamber was used to mount the skin. The electrical potential difference (PD) was measured by two 3% agar-frog Ringer's bridges. Current (i.e. short-circuit current, or ISC) was passed by Ag-AgCl electrodes placed so that current density was uniform across the skin. Ringer's solution, bathing each side of the frog skin, was stirred and aerated by gas-lift pumps. The effect of toxicants on the ISC was determined by using the 15 min prior to toxicant administration as a control period, then calculating the change in ISC during the toxicant period as a percent of the control ISC. Phenol and benzene are components of crude oil and crude oil waste. These hydrocarbons and phenanthrene were tested for their effect on frog skin. The results show that the effect of organics on sodium active transport of an epithelium is to alter the active transport of sodium ions. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Regulation of dopamine transporter activity by carboxypeptidase E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dopamine transporter (DAT plays a critical role in terminating the action of dopamine by rapid reuptake into the presynaptic neuron. Previous studies have revealed that the DAT carboxyl terminus (DAT-CT can directly interact with other cellular proteins and regulate DAT function and trafficking. Results Here, we have identified that carboxypeptidase E (CPE, a prohormone processing exopeptidase and sorting receptor for the regulated secretory pathway, interacts with the DAT-CT and affects DAT function. Mammalian cell lines coexpressing CPE and DAT exhibited increased DAT-mediated dopamine uptake activity compared to cells expressing DAT alone. Moreover, coexpression of an interfering DAT-CT minigene inhibited the effects of CPE on DAT. Functional changes caused by CPE could be attributed to enhanced DAT expression and subsequent increase in DAT cell surface localization, due to decreased DAT degradation. In addition, CPE association could reduce the phosphorylation state of DAT on serine residues, potentially leading to reduced internalization, thus stabilizing plasmalemmal DAT localization. Conclusion Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for CPE in the regulation of DAT trafficking and DAT-mediated DA uptake, which may provide a novel target in the treatment of dopamine-governed diseases such as drug addiction and obesity.

  19. Multifunctional and biologically active matrices from multicomponent polymeric solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor); Rabolt, John (Inventor); Casper, Cheryl (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A functionalized electrospun matrix for the controlled-release of biologically active agents, such as growth factors, is presented. The functionalized matrix comprises a matrix polymer, a compatibilizing polymer and a biomolecule or other small functioning molecule. In certain aspects the electrospun polymer fibers comprise at least one biologically active molecule functionalized with low molecular weight heparin.

  20. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  1. An overview of the Boltzmann transport equation solution for neutrons, photons and electrons in cartesian geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Questions regarding accuracy and efficiency of deterministic transport methods are still on our mind today, even with modern supercomputers. The most versatile and widely used deterministic methods are the PN approximation, the SN method (discrete ordinates method) and their variants. In the discrete ordinates (SN) formulations of the transport equation, it is assumed that the linearized Boltzmann equation only holds for a set of distinct numerical values of the direction-of-motion variables. In this work, looking forward to confirm the capabilities of deterministic methods in obtaining accurate results, we present a general overview of deterministic methods to solve the Boltzmann transport equation for neutral and charged particles. First, we describe a review in the Laplace transform technique applied to SN two dimensional transport equation in a rectangular domain considering Compton scattering. Next, we solved the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, an alternative approach for the Boltzmann transport equation, assuming a monoenergetic electron beam in a rectangular domain. The main idea relies on applying the PN approximation, a recent advance in the class of deterministic methods, in the angular variable, to the two dimensional Fokker-Planck equation and then applying the Laplace Transform in the spatial x-variable. Numerical results are given to illustrate the accuracy of deterministic methods presented. (author)

  2. First-principles studies of conformation and solution effects on DNA transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bikan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2014-03-01

    The electrical conductivity of DNA molecules is of fundamental interest in the life sciences. We use first-principles techniques combined with molecular dynamical (MD) simulations to calculate transport properties of B-DNA connected to carbon nanotubes via alkane linkers. The quantum transport properties are calculated for over a hundred of snapshots recorded in MD trajectories. We discover that the DNA conformation and especially the overlaps between sequential guanine bases play a critical role in electron transport. DNA charge transport is indeed governed by charge delocalization with wavefunctions extent controlled by geometrical overlaps. Solvent atoms also affect the conductivity, with counterions decreasing the conductance by a factor of 2-3. In addition, we find that water molecules around the double helix screen the negatively-charged phosphate groups suppressing the conductance of DNA. Comparing transport properties of 4-base-pair (BP) with 10-BP DNA, we find weak distance dependence of the conductivity. Finally, we discuss the effect of sequence on DNA conductivity.

  3. Use of Ambient Contamination and Stream Tracer Injections to Assess Solute Transport in an Urbanizing Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, R. J.; Packman, A. I.; Welty, C.; Kilham, S. S.

    2002-05-01

    As part of a comprehensive investigation of the effects of urbanization on Valley Creek watershed near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, we are attempting to utilize documented historical and ongoing changes to the watershed to elucidate process-based watershed dynamics, particularly as related to the connections between the surface and groundwater systems. Valley Creek is underlain principally by fractured limestone and dolomite. The watershed is extensively developed, as quantified by 17% impervious area. This percentage is expected to increase due to ongoing and planned development projects. A variety of methods are being utilized to characterize the hydrologic and nutrient dynamics of the watershed. For example, a limestone quarry located upstream of the geographic and hydrologic center of the watershed has historically discharged accumulated groundwater seepage into the stream on an approximately 3 -1/2 hour cyclical basis. At the peak pumping rate, the quarry flow has constituted 20% to 50% of the surface water discharge of the entire watershed, as measured at a USGS gauging station located near the mouth of the main stem of Valley Creek. At the same time, a hazardous waste site on the property of an abandoned mineral processing plant located in the headwaters of the main stem of Valley Creek has resulted in a significant steady concentration of bromide entering the stream through faults and fractures of the limestone formation. This has resulted in bromide-free groundwater from the quarry entering the main stem of bromide-laden Valley Creek on a cyclical basis, thus allowing bromide from the mineral plant to be used as a tracer to assess the stream response to the quarry inflow. We measured the fluctuating bromide concentration at three stations over a 24-hour period. The decreasing amplitude and phase shift of the bromide sinusoidal wave as it moved 7 km downstream was evident. We have calibrated a transient hydrodynamic and transport model to the resulting data

  4. Global existence of weak solution to the heat and moisture transport system in fibrous porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Buyang; Wang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with theoretical analysis of a heat and moisture transfer model arising from textile industries, which is described by a degenerate and strongly coupled parabolic system. We prove the global (in time) existence of weak solution by constructing an approximate solution with some standard smoothing. The proof is based on the physcial nature of gas convection, in which the heat (energy) flux in convection is determined by the mass (vapor) flux in convection.

  5. Dialysate interleukin-6 predicts increasing peritoneal solute transport rate in incident peritoneal dialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Yeoungjee; Johnson, David W.; Vesey, David A; Hawley, Carmel M; Pascoe, Elaine M.; Clarke, Margaret; Topley, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Background Repeated exposure to peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions contributes to cumulative intraperitoneal inflammation and peritoneal injury. The present study aimed to explore the capacity of dialysate interleukin-6(IL-6) to a) predict peritoneal membrane function and peritonitis in incident PD patients, and b) to evaluate the influence of neutral pH, low glucose degradation product (GDP) PD solution on dialysate IL-6 levels. Methods The study included 88 incident participants from the ba...

  6. Clinical application of transcriptional activators of bile salt transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Baghdasaryan, Anna; Chiba, Peter; Trauner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hepatobiliary bile salt (BS) transporters are critical determinants of BS homeostasis controlling intracellular concentrations of BSs and their enterohepatic circulation. Genetic or acquired dysfunction of specific transport systems causes intrahepatic and systemic retention of potentially cytotoxic BSs, which, in high concentrations, may disturb integrity of cell membranes and subcellular organelles resulting in cell death, inflammation and fibrosis. Transcriptional regulation of canalicular...

  7. The effect of precipitation on contaminant dissolution and transport: Analytic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analysed the effect of precipitation on the dissolution and transport rates of a nondecaying contaminant. Precipitation near the waste surface can have a profound effect on dissolution and transport rates. The mass-transfer rate at the waste surface is controlled by the solid-liquid reaction rate to an extent determined by the modified reaction-rate modulus, α. At later times extending to steady state, the mass-transfer rate depends on the location of the precipitation front r/sub p/ and on the solubility ratio C/sub o//C/sub p/. A precipitation front very near the waste surface can change the dissolution mechanism from solubility-diffusion-controlled to chemical-reaction-rate controlled. Precipitation limits the concentration of the contaminant at r > r/sub p/ to C/sub p/, steepening the concentration gradient for dissolution on the waste package side of the front and flattening the gradient for transport in the region outside the front. This increases the rate of contaminant transport from the waste to the front while decreasing the rate of transport away from the front, when compared to the situation without precipitation. The difference in the transport rates at the front is the rate of precipitation. For large changes in solubility, most of the contaminant is immobilized by precipitation, as was observed in a parallel study. The effect of a precipitation front located nearby in surrounding rock is to increase the release rate at the waste surface/rock interface. The increase in release rate at the waste surface is greater the closer the precipitation and the larger the ratio C/sub o//C/sub p/, also observed by others. The release rates of other waste constituents that dissolve congruently with the solubility-controlling matrix can be increased by a local high-solubility region between the waste surface and the precipitation front. 10 refs., 5 figs

  8. Vapour pressure osmometry determination of water activity of binary and ternary aqueous (polymer + polymer) solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • VPO determination of water activity for binary and ternary aqueous polymer solutions. • Vapour pressure of binary and ternary aqueous polymer solutions were determined. • Water activities were correlated using the segment-based NRTL and Wilson models. • Molar Gibbs free energy changes due to mixing were determined. - Abstract: Precise water activity measurements at T = 308.15 K were carried out on several binary (water + polymer) and ternary {water + polymer (1) + polymer (2)} systems using the vapour pressure osmometry (VPO) technique. Polymers were polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG6000), polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG400), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and dextran (DEX). The water activity results obtained were used to calculate the vapour pressure of solutions as a function of concentration and the segment-based local composition models, NRTL and Wilson, were used to correlate the experimental water activity values. It was found that, for the polymer concentration range studied here, the values of the water activity obtained for the binary (water + polymer) solutions decrease in the order DEX > PVP > PEG6000 > PPG400 > PEG400. Furthermore, water activities of solutions of each polymer in the aqueous solutions of (5, 10, 15 and 20)% (w/w) other polymers investigated were also measured at T = 308.15 K. The ability of polymer (1) in decreasing the water activity of binary {water + polymer (2)} solutions was discussed on the basis of the (polymer + water) and {polymer (1) + polymer (2)} interactions

  9. Is the Bus Running Late? : New Technological Solutions in the Transportation Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Halvardsson, Marie; Herö, Carl-Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    From having relied on its employees in the interaction with customers, the service industry now move towards an increased adoption of technology to enhance the value of the service offering to the customer. This development has also reached the public transport sector which is traditionally seen as low-tech. In this study we investigate how the customers experience the use of high-tech supporting services within a low-tech context. The case that is used is the city-bus transport provider Karl...

  10. Geological characterization and solute transport model investigations of contaminated sites in urban areas (Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Theis Raaschou; Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Thomsen, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    In Denmark, contaminations from industry and farming represent a significant threat to groundwater resources. On a national level, there is a focus on identifying and locating these contaminated sites. Once located, contaminations are mapped and monitored and remediation efforts are undertaken...... of the two sites were constructed. The 3D geological models serve as a basis for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the field sites. The study demonstrates how detailed information about the geological setting in conjunction with contaminant transport modelling, can minimize...

  11. Nuclear techniques in the study of pollutant transport in the environment. Interaction of solutes with geological media (methodological aspects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume includes a summary of the 5-year co-ordinated research programme to use nuclear techniques for the study of the transport of pollutants (both radioactive and non-radioactive) in the environment as well as twelve individual reports of the different activities performed under the programme. These have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Modeling of Flow, Transport and Controlled Sedimentation Phenomena during Mixing of Salt Solutions in Complex Porous Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Eugene D.; Jaho, Sofia; Pavlakou, Efstathia I.; Sygouni, Varvara; Petsi, Anastasia; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of salts in porous media is a major engineering phenomenon encountered in a plethora of industrial and environmental applications where in some cases is desirable and in other not (oil production, geothermal systems, soil stabilization etc). Systematic approach of these problems requires knowledge of the key mechanisms of precipitating salts within the porous structures, in order to develop new methods to control the process. In this work, the development and the solution of spatiotemporally variable mass balances during salt solution mixing along specific pores were performed. Both analytical models and finite differences CFD models were applied for the study of flow and transport with simultaneous homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation (by crystal growth on the surface of the pores) in simple geometries, while unstructured finite elements and meshless methods were developed and implemented for spatial discretization, reconstruction, and solution of transport equations and homogeneous / heterogeneous reactions in more complex geometries. At initial stages of this work, critical problem parameters were identified, such as the characteristics of the porosity, the number of dissolved components, etc. The parameters were then used for solving problems which correspond to available experimental data. For each combination of ions and materials, specific data and process characteristics were included: (a) crystal kinetics (nucleation, growth rates or reaction surface rates of crystals, critical suspension concentrations), (b) physico-chemical properties (bulk density, dimensions of generated crystals, ion diffusion coefficients in the solution), (c) operating parameters (macroscopic velocity, flow, or pressure gradient of the solution, ion concentration) (d) microfluidic data (geometry, flow area), (e) porosity data in Darcy description (initial porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity). During the modeling of flow and transport in three

  13. Modeling fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in loaded bone: potential applications in measuring fluid and solute transport in the osteocytic lacunar-canalicular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaozhou; Novotny, John E; Wang, Liyun

    2008-12-01

    Solute transport through the bone lacunar-canalicular system is essential for osteocyte viability and function, and it can be measured using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The mathematical model developed here aims to analyze solute transport during FRAP in mechanically loaded bone. Combining both whole bone-level poroelasticity and cellular-level solute transport, we found that load-induced solute transport during FRAP is characterized by an exponential recovery rate, which is determined by the dimensionless Strouhal (St) number that characterizes the oscillation effects over the mean flows, and that significant transport occurs only for St values below a threshold, when the solute stroke displacement exceeds the distance between the source and sink (the canalicular length). This threshold mechanism explains the general flow behaviors such as increasing transport with increasing magnitude and decreasing frequency. Mechanical loading is predicted to enhance transport of all tracers relative to diffusion, with the greatest enhancement for medium-sized tracers and less enhancement for small and large tracers. This study provides guidelines for future FRAP experiments, based on which the model can be used to quantify bone permeability, solute-matrix interaction, and flow velocities. These studies should provide insights into bone adaptation and metabolism, and help to treat various bone diseases and conditions. PMID:18810639

  14. News on Accounting and Tax Treatment Related to the Activity of Intracommunitarian Goods Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Pravãþ Ionela-Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The economical activity of transport fits within the broad category of services, but in terms of taxation, transport services are treated as an exception, compared to how services are approached in general. Among the categories of transportation services, intracommunitarian transport shows certain particularities. Therefore, we proposed in this work to address from a theoretical point of view a series of news occured in the tax and accounting treatment of specific business operations of intra...

  15. Molecular Engineering of Non-Halogenated Solution-Processable Bithiazole based Electron Transport Polymeric Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Boyi

    2015-04-01

    The electron deficiency and trans planar conformation of bithiazole is potentially beneficial for the electron transport performance of organic semiconductors. However, the incorporation of bithiazole into polymers through a facile synthetic strategy remains a challenge. Herein, 2,2’-bithiazole was synthesized in one step and copolymerized with dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole to afford poly(dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-bithiazole), PDBTz. PDBTz exhibited electron mobility reaching 0.3 cm2V-1s-1 in organic field-effect transistor (OFET) configuration; this contrasts with a recently discussed isoelectronic conjugated polymer comprising an electron rich bithiophene and dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole, which displays merely hole transport characteristics. This inversion of charge carrier transport characteristics confirms the significant potential for bithiazole in the development of electron transport semiconducting materials. Branched 5-decylheptacyl side chains were incorporated into PDBTz to enhance polymer solubility, particularly in non-halogenated, more environmentally compatible solvents. PDBTz cast from a range of non-halogenated solvents exhibited film morphologies and field-effect electron mobility similar to those cast from halogenated solvents.

  16. Real-time Container Transport Planning with Decision Trees based on Offline Obtained Optimal Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Riessen (Bart); R.R. Negenborn (Rudy); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHinterland networks for container transportation require planning methods in order to increase efficiency and reliability of the inland road, rail and waterway connections. In this paper we aim to derive real-time decision rules for suitable allocations of containers to inland services b

  17. Stochastic Modeling Of Field-Scale Water And Solute Transport Through The Unsaturated Zone Of Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loll, Per

    of pesticides and nutrients, and risk identification and assessment at polluted (industrial) sites. One of the key factors requiring our attention when we are trying to predict field-scale chemical leaching is spatial variability of the soil and the influence it exerts on both water and chemical transport...

  18. Prediction of groundwater quality in recharge areas of pumping wells by simulation models. Solute input into groundwater, solute transport and solute transformation in the aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrate input into groundwater from arable land was analyzed. From a sandy soil the 14-year mean concentration in the groundwater recharge was 20, in years with a winter catch crop 14 mg NO3-N/l. Changes in the nitrate content in the rooting zone during winter depend very strongly upon differences in soil and climate. The aquifer of the model area Fuhrberger Feld consists of sandy sediments with an upper denitrification zone and a lower desulfurication zone. The stream-tube model gives first insight into solute concentrations in groundwater and pumped raw water. Case studies with the 2D-vertical model show the dependence of the nitrate and sulfate concentrations from the reserve and distribution of the reduced sulfur compounds. Case studies with a 2D-horizontal model prove, that the stepwise increase of the sulfate concentration in the pumped water from 80 to over 250 mg/l is caused by different periods with conversion of permanent grassland into arable land. (orig.)

  19. The PHREEQC modeling of CO2 transport in highly saline solutions of a final radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safe confinement of radioactive materials in the containment providing zone of the host rock (CPRZ) over a period of one million years is required for a final repository for highly radioactive heat-generating waste (BMU 2010). In order to assess the safe containment of radionuclides in the CPRZ a sound understanding of the ongoing processes in a repository is necessary. These processes include the transport and chemical interactions of the radionuclide 14C in the gas phase and in highly saline solutions in a final repository for radioactive waste. The geochemical code PHREEQC /PAR 13/ was used to study the chemical interactions of CO2 and 14C as 14CO2 during transport in the gas phase and highly saline solutions. The model and scenario was based on the concept for a repository in Gorleben /BOL 11/. A gas generation of CO2 containing 14C was assumed since the disposed containers with the radioactive waste corrode /LAR 13/. The advective transport is triggered by gas generation. The physical dissolution of CO2, chemical equilibria with aquatic carbon-containing species (e. g. HCO3-(aq), CO32-(aq)) and solid phases (e. g. magnesite, MgCO3) coupled with transport were modelled. Due to the addition of dissolved MgCl2 in the crushed salt backfill of the main drift the aquatic species MgCO3(aq) and the mineral MgCO3(s) is formed. The influence of CO2 partial pressure and the chemical interactions in the presence of dissolved Fe2+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and K+ were studied. Due to the physical solution, the CO2 partial pressure has a major influence on the transport of 14C. In the presence of calcium CaCO3(aq), the minerals calcite (CaCO3(s)) and dolomite (MgCa(CO3)2(s)) were formed in the highly saline solutions. No siderite (FeCO3) in the presence of Fe2+ was formed. The transport of 14C was delayed due to the retention as carbonate in the solid phase. The formation of the aquatic species decreases CO2(aq), the gas volume and the partial pressure. The formation of dissolved and

  20. The explicitly-interfaced method and the response matrix method: Two methods for the solution of the transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase space finite element method when applied to the first order transport equation results in a matrix equation that can only be solved directly. While the direct solution procedure is competitive with more established transport methods for one-dimensional geometries, it is much too slow in two or more dimensions. This summary presents two alternative implementations of the finite element method. Both reduce the size of the matrix to be solved by dividing the spatial domain into smaller regions, and both realize increased efficiency in multi-dimensional applications. Following brief derivations of the methods, computational results for both one-dimensional and two-dimensional applications will be presented and compared for the two distinct approaches

  1. Solar energised transport solution and customer preferences and opinions about alternative fuel Vehicles – the case of slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž KNEZ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Authorities in Slovenia and other EU member states are confronted with problems of city transportation. Fossil-fuel based transport poses two chief problems – local and global pollution, and dwindling supplies and ever increasing costs. An elegant solution is to gradually replace the present automobile fleet with low emission vehicles. This article first explores the economics and practical viability of the provision of solar electricity for the charging of electric vehicles by installation of economical available PV modules and secondly the customer preferences and opinions about alternative low emission vehicles. Present estimates indicate that for the prevailing solar climate of Celje – a medium-sized Slovenian town – the cost would be only 2.11€ cents/kWh of generated solar electricity. Other results have also revealed that the most relevant factor for purchasing low emission vehicle is total vehicle price.

  2. The phosphine oxides Cyanex 921 and Cyanex 923 as carriers for facilitated transport of chromium (VI)-chloride aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguacil, Francisco José; López-Delgado, Aurora; Alonso, Manuel; Sastre, Ana Maria

    2004-11-01

    The behaviour of the phosphine oxides Cyanex 921 and Cyanex 923 in the facilitated transport of chromium (VI) from chloride solutions is described. Transport is studied as a function of several variables such as stirring speeds of the aqueous phases, membrane phase diluent, hydrochloric acid concentration in the source phase and chromium and carrier concentrations. The separation of chromium (VI) from other metals presented in the source phase as well as the behaviour of phosphine oxides with respect to other neutral organophosphorous derivatives (tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) and dibutyl butylphosphonate (DBBP)) are also investigated. Moreover, by using hydrazine sulphate in the receiving phase, Cr(VI) is immediately reduced to the less toxic Cr(III).

  3. The `transport cocktail` : the solution to stop the decline of public transit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrecque, M.; Boivin, R.

    1998-12-01

    A website has been established by Le Group Velo which is dedicated to providing information regarding the use of bicycles and their environmental benefits for car-centred North America. The `transport cocktail` was described as a tool aimed at inducing large percentage of motorists to occasionally give up their cars. The concept can be defined as an interlinking and alliance of interests between large public transit companies such as subway, bus, commuter train and railway companies and `private` modes of transportation such as bicycles, taxis, car rental and car-sharing companies to meet the travel needs of the population, especially travel to and within urban cores. It was argued that despite major technological advances in reducing fuel consumption and polluting greenhouse gas emissions from combustion engines, the combined impact of the increase in the number of vehicles on the road and the distance travelled has negated any efforts to reduce greenhouse gases. It was also argued that teleworking, which was supposed to lead to a reduction in travel, will actually increase urban sprawl and the distance and duration of travel in off-peak periods. Advantages and disadvantages of the concept of `transport cocktail` were explored, and some of the preconditions necessary for it to succeed were outlined. These include a concerted effort to focus on fare combination, fare integration and fare advantages among the various modes of transport. Interlinking of infrastructures and services to facilitate the transfer from one mode to another is a key aspect of the concept. It is acknowledged that the concept of the `transport cocktail` will not be an easy sell; convincing results are not likely to be achieved without coercive measures aimed at the single-occupant automobile. 5 tabs.

  4. Elevation of cortical serotonin transporter activity upon peripheral immune challenge is regulated independently of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and transporter phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamborn, Robert; Brown, Eric; Haase, Jana

    2016-05-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for high-affinity serotonin (5-HT) uptake from extracellular fluid and is a prominent pharmacological target in the treatment of depression. In recent years, depression has also been linked to immune system activation. Inflammatory conditions can cause sickness behaviour and depression-like symptoms in both animals and humans. Since SERT has been proposed as one of the molecular targets in inflammation-induced depression, we applied the widely used lipopolysaccharides (LPS) model to study the effects of peripheral inflammation on SERT activity in the brain. We show that 24 h after intraperitoneal LPS administration, SERT-mediated 5-HT uptake is significantly enhanced in the frontal cortex. Analysis of uptake kinetics revealed that the transport capacity (Vmax ) of cortical SERT was increased in LPS-injected animals, while the Km value remained unchanged. The increase in Vmax was neither due to increased SERT protein expression nor increased synaptic surface exposure. The suppression of SERT activity upon inhibition of p38 MAPK was not selective for LPS-induced enhancement of SERT function. In addition, SERT activity changes in LPS-treated rats are unaffected by nitric oxide synthase and protein kinase G inhibitors. Using the Phos-Tag method, we identified five SERT-specific protein bands representing distinct phosphorylation states of SERT. However, the enhancement of SERT activity in LPS-treated rats was not correlated with altered transporter phosphorylation. Together with previous studies by others, our results suggest that SERT is regulated by multiple mechanisms in response to peripheral immune system activation. Peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces characteristic sickness and depression-like behaviour in rats over a period of at least 24 h. We show here that the activity of the serotonin transporter (SERT), a prominent antidepressant target, is up-regulated 24 h following LPS

  5. Physical activity parenting measurement and research: Challenges, explanations, and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical activity (PA) parenting research has proliferated over the past decade, with findings verifying the influential role that parents play in children's emerging PA behaviors. This knowledge, however, has not translated into effective family-based PA interventions. During a preconference worksh...

  6. The air transportation hub-and-spoke design problem: comparison between a continuous and a discrete solution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guina Sotomayor Alzamora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hub-and-spoke network design problem, also known as the hub location problem, aims to find the concentration points in a given network flow so that the sum of the distances of the linkages is minimized. In this work, we compare discrete solutions of this problem, given by the branch-and-cut method applied to the p-hub median model, with continuous solutions, given by the hyperbolic smoothing technique applied to a min-sum-min model. Computational experiments for particular instances of the Brazilian air transportation system, with the number of hubs varying from 2 to 8, are conducted with the support of a discretization heuristic and the Voronoi diagram.

  7. On the solution of transport equation in multiregions with anisotropic scattering using the F sub(N) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the solution of the linear, monoenergetic, transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in multiregions using the F sub(n) method. In this method the mathematical analysis used is based on the singular eigenfunction expansion method, in which a set of coupled integral equations are first derived for the angular distributions at the contour and interfaces. These distributions are then approximated by polynomials of order N and in conjunction with surface conditions, a linear algebraic system of equation is derived for the coefficients of the polynomial approximation. The coefficients allows the computation of the angular fluxes at boundaries and interfaces as well as the albedo and transmission factor. Numerical results for sample problems are shown, in order to demonstrate the accuracy of the method in the solution of deep penetration shielding problems. (author)

  8. Finite element solution of multi-scale transport problems using the least squares based bubble function enrichment

    CERN Document Server

    Yazdani, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an optimum technique based on the least squares method for the derivation of the bubble functions to enrich the standard linear finite elements employed in the formulation of Galerkin weighted-residual statements. The element-level linear shape functions are enhanced with supplementary polynomial bubble functions with undetermined coefficients. The best least squares minimization of the residual functional obtained from the insertion of these trial functions into model equations results in an algebraic system of equations whose solution provides the unknown coefficients in terms of element-level nodal values. The normal finite element procedures for the construction of stiffness matrices may then be followed with no extra degree of freedom incurred as a result of such enrichment. The performance of the proposed method has been tested on a number of benchmark linear transport equations with the results compared against the exact and standard linear element solutions. It has been observed th...

  9. Calculations of reactivity based in the solution of the Neutron transport equation in X Y geometry and Lineal perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our country, in last congresses, Gomez et al carried out reactivity calculations based on the solution of the diffusion equation for an energy group using nodal methods in one dimension and the TPL approach (Lineal Perturbation Theory). Later on, Mugica extended the application to the case of multigroup so much so much in one as in two dimensions (X Y geometry) with excellent results. Presently work is carried out similar calculations but this time based on the solution of the neutron transport equation in X Y geometry using nodal methods and again the TPL approximation. The idea is to provide a calculation method that allows to obtain in quick form the reactivity solving the direct problem as well as the enclosed problem of the not perturbed problem. A test problem for the one that results are provided for the effective multiplication factor is described and its are offered some conclusions. (Author)

  10. Modeling impacts of subscale heterogeneities on dispersive solute transport in subsurface systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishal, Vikrant; Leung, Juliana Y.

    2015-11-01

    Previous works in the literature demonstrated that dispersion increases with heterogeneities and travel distance in heterogeneous reservoirs. However, it remains challenging to quantify the effects of subscale heterogeneities on dispersion. Scale-up of input dispersivity and other reservoir attributes to the transport modeling scale should account for subscale heterogeneity and its variability. A method is proposed to quantify the uncertainties in reservoir attributes and dispersivity introduced by scale-up. A random walk particle tracking (RWPT) method, which is not prone to numerical dispersion, is used for transport modeling. First, to scale-up rock properties including porosity and permeability, volume variance at the transport modeling scale is computed corresponding to a given spatial correlation model; numerous sets of "conditioning data" are sampled from probability distributions whose mean is the block average of the actual measure values and the variance is the variance of block mean. Stochastic simulations are subsequently performed to generate multiple realizations at the transport modeling scale. Next, multiple sub-grid geostatistical realizations depicting detailed fine-scale heterogeneities and of the same physical sizes as the transport modeling grid block are subjected to RWPT simulation. Effective longitudinal and transverse (horizontal) dispersivities in two-dimensional models are determined simultaneously by matching the corresponding breakthrough concentration history for each realization with an equivalent medium consisting of averaged homogeneous rock properties. Aggregating results derived with all realizations, we generate probability distributions of scaled-up dispersivities conditional to particular averaged rock properties, from which values representative of the transport modeling scale are randomly drawn. The method is applied to model a tracer injection process. Results obtained from coarse-scale models, where reservoir properties and

  11. Modeling impacts of subscale heterogeneities on dispersive solute transport in subsurface systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishal, Vikrant; Leung, Juliana Y

    2015-11-01

    Previous works in the literature demonstrated that dispersion increases with heterogeneities and travel distance in heterogeneous reservoirs. However, it remains challenging to quantify the effects of subscale heterogeneities on dispersion. Scale-up of input dispersivity and other reservoir attributes to the transport modeling scale should account for subscale heterogeneity and its variability. A method is proposed to quantify the uncertainties in reservoir attributes and dispersivity introduced by scale-up. A random walk particle tracking (RWPT) method, which is not prone to numerical dispersion, is used for transport modeling. First, to scale-up rock properties including porosity and permeability, volume variance at the transport modeling scale is computed corresponding to a given spatial correlation model; numerous sets of "conditioning data" are sampled from probability distributions whose mean is the block average of the actual measure values and the variance is the variance of block mean. Stochastic simulations are subsequently performed to generate multiple realizations at the transport modeling scale. Next, multiple sub-grid geostatistical realizations depicting detailed fine-scale heterogeneities and of the same physical sizes as the transport modeling grid block are subjected to RWPT simulation. Effective longitudinal and transverse (horizontal) dispersivities in two-dimensional models are determined simultaneously by matching the corresponding breakthrough concentration history for each realization with an equivalent medium consisting of averaged homogeneous rock properties. Aggregating results derived with all realizations, we generate probability distributions of scaled-up dispersivities conditional to particular averaged rock properties, from which values representative of the transport modeling scale are randomly drawn. The method is applied to model a tracer injection process. Results obtained from coarse-scale models, where reservoir properties and

  12. Blood-Brain Barrier Active Efflux Transporters: ATP-Binding Cassette Gene Family

    OpenAIRE

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Potschka, Heidrun

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to brain homeostasis by protecting the brain from potentially harmful endogenous and exogenous substances. BBB active drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family are increasingly recognized as important determinants of drug distribution to, and elimination from, the CNS. The ABC efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) has been demonstrated as a key element of the BBB that can actively transport a huge variety of lip...

  13. Comparing Nafion and ceramic separators used in electrochemical purification of spent chromium plating solutions: cationic impurity removal and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Lin; Holsen, Thomas M; Chou, Tse-Chuan; Selman, J Robert

    2003-05-01

    This study focuses on the electrolytic regeneration of spent chromium plating solutions. These solutions contain a significant amount of chromium and a lesser amount of other heavy metals, which makes them a significant environmental concern and an obvious target for recycling and reuse. The type of separator used is extremely critical to the performance of the process because they are the major resistance in the transport-related impurity (Cu(II), Ni(II), and Fe(III)) removals from contaminated chromic acid solutions. A Nafion 117 membrane and a ceramic diaphragm separator traditionally used in the industry were tested for comparison. It was found that the mobilities of Cu(II) and Ni(II) were similar and higher than that of Fe(III) using both separators. The mobility of each cation was smaller in the Nafion membrane than in the ceramic diaphragm. The measured conductivity of the ceramic diaphragm was slightly higher than that of Nafion membrane. However, the Nafion membrane was much thinner than the ceramic diaphragm resulting in the system using the Nafion membrane having higher impurity removal rates than the system using the ceramic diaphragm. The removal rates were approximately equal for Cu(II) and Ni(II) and lowest for Fe(III). Both current and initial concentration affected the removal rates of the impurities. Modeling results indicated that a system using a Nafion separator and a small catholyte/anolyte volume ratio was better than a system using a ceramic separator for removing impurities from concentrated plating solutions if the impurities transported into the catholyte are deposited or precipitated. PMID:12775076

  14. Electric two wheelers, zero emission solution for urban door to door transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    The noise and exhaust pollution coupled with increasing congestion faced by urban centres demands new personal mobility solution for faster door to door connectivity. The advancement in electric power train and lowering cost of Li-ion battery is made it possible to develop light weight fully...... electric two wheeler with a range sufficient to cover urban commuting distance....

  15. Activities of the components in a spinel solid solution of the Fe-Al-O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykasov, A. A.; Kimyashev, A. A.

    2011-09-01

    The conditions of the equilibrium between the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution and wustite are determined by measuring the EMF of galvanic cells containing a solid electrolyte, and the activities of the components in the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution are calculated by treating the results of the experiment on the equilibrium between the spinel solution and wustite. Their properties are found to be different from those of ideal solutions at temperatures of 1000-1300 K. A significant positive deviation from the Raoult's law is believed to indicate the tendency of the solution to decompose. The experimental data are treated in terms of the theory of regular solutions, assuming the energy of mixing to be a function of temperature only. The critical temperature of decomposition for the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solution is found to be 1084 K.

  16. ASYMPTOTIC SOLUTION OF ACTIVATOR INHIBITOR SYSTEMS FOR NONLINEAR REACTION DIFFUSION EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi MO; Wantao LIN

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear reaction diffusion equations for activator inhibitor systems is considered. Under suitable conditions, firstly, the outer solution of the original problem is obtained, secondly, using the variables of multiple scales and the expanding theory of power series the formal asymptotic expansions of the solution are constructed, and finally, using the theory of differential inequalities the uniform validity and asymptotic behavior of the solution are studied.

  17. Oil Industry Activities in Ghana: Community Perceptions and Sustainable Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Agyei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and exploitation of oil reserves in Ghana has generated different expectations and reactions from the local population about the inevitable consequences for industrialization and economic development in the oil producing area. In pursuit of the perceptions and expectations of communities closer to the offshore operations, a mixture of semi-structured, open ended questions were randomly administered. In analyzing the perceptions and reactions of the local population to the prospects created by the oil discovery in commercial quantities, insights in sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR were considered. The study reveals that the people in the communities closer to the offshore operations share the same convictions and aspirations; that is they are comfortable with their existing sources of livelihood, afraid that these sources might be hurt from oil-related activities and demanding a just allocation of the expected economic benefits through a harmonization of local fishing, farming and oil extraction activities.

  18. Child labour: is international activism the solution or the problem?

    OpenAIRE

    Doepke, Matthias; Zilibotti, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Through actions like product boycotts or imposing international labour standards, governments and consumer groups in rich countries put pressure on poor countries to discourage the use of child labour. But the child-labour problem in developing countries shows no sign of abating. Our research suggests that international activism may be partially to blame, because it can thwart regulation of child labour within developing countries.

  19. Study of grapevine solute transporters involved in berry quality. A biochemical and molecular approach

    OpenAIRE

    Noronha, Henrique Luis Silva de

    2015-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Biologia de Plantas Due to its sessile nature, plants must take up mineral nutrients and water from the soil, and fix carbon in leaves from atmospheric CO2. The resulting photoassimilates must be precisely delivered to each plant organ, including leaves, roots and fruits. The present dissertation explored key biochemical mechanisms involved in the transport and compartmentation of sugars and water in grapevine. The fixation of carbon in chloroplasts, ...

  20. A concept set for take-off? Lightweight idea may be heavyweight transportation solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentein, J.

    2004-12-01

    This paper described the use of airships in changing the bulk transport business. Mercatus Ventures Inc. is working with Ontario-based 21st Century Airships Inc. on developing a heavy lift spherical airship that could replace the need for roads to remote oil and gas mining development sites. Airships would be particularly useful in Canada's North where bulk products cannot be transported outside of ice road season. Transportation accounts for 60 per cent of the cost of drilling a natural gas well in areas that lack all-weather road access. In addition to being environmentally sound, a $10 million or $20 million airship could save companies many millions of dollars in transportation costs. The design of the 21st Century models can be readily adapted to carry heavy loads. A prototype is currently under development to carry 20 to 40 tonnes of equipment including coil tubing rigs and parts of drilling platforms to remote work locations. The Century 21st spherical airship is equipped with panoramic windows and a glass bottom floor and can also be used for high altitude communications and surveillance. Test flights have sailed at altitudes of 6,234 meters. An unmanned version is under development to soar up to 20,000 meters, well above problematic weather systems. An airship equipped with fuel cells and solar panels can stay aloft for more than a year at that level. New airship models use non-flammable helium to support the ship's weight. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  1. Physical Activity Associated with Public Transport Use—A Review and Modelling of Potential Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Greenaway; Adrian Bauman; Nada Curac; Chris Rissel

    2012-01-01

    Active travel, particularly walking and cycling, has been recommended because of the health benefits associated with increased physical activity. Use of public transport generally involves some walking to bus stops or train stations. This paper is a systematic review of how much time is spent in physical activity among adults using public transport. It also explores the potential effect on the population level of physical activity if inactive adults in NSW, Australia, increased their walking ...

  2. Relative Transport Behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum in Packed Bed Column Systems: Influence of Solution Chemistry and Cell Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of solution chemistry and cell concentration on bacterial pathogen transport has been examined using Salmonella pullorum and Escherichia coli O157:H7. A packed bed column was employed to determine the transport behavior and deposition kinetics on real aquifer sand particles over a ran...

  3. Transport properties investigation of aqueous protic ionic liquid solutions through conductivity, viscosity, and NMR self-diffusion measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anouti, Mérièm; Jacquemin, Johan; Porion, Patrice

    2012-04-12

    We present a study on the transport properties through conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and self-diffusion coefficient (D) measurements of two pure protic ionic liquids--pyrrolidinium hydrogen sulfate, [Pyrr][HSO(4)], and pyrrolidinium trifluoroacetate, [Pyrr][CF(3)COO]--and their mixtures with water over the whole composition range at 298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. Based on these experimental results, transport mobilities of ions have been then investigated in each case through the Stokes-Einstein equation. From this, the proton conduction in these PILs follows a combination of Grotthuss and vehicle-type mechanisms, which depends also on the water composition in solution. In each case, the displacement of the NMR peak attributed to the labile proton on the pyrrolidinium cation with the PILs concentration in aqueous solution indicates that this proton is located between the cation and the anion for a water weight fraction lower than 8%. In other words, for such compositions, it appears that this labile proton is not solvated by water molecules. However, for higher water content, the labile protons are in solution as H(3)O(+). This water weight fraction appears to be the solvation limit of the H(+) ions by water molecules in these two PILs solutions. However, [Pyrr][HSO(4)] and [Pyrr][CF(3)COO] PILs present opposed comportment in aqueous solution. In the case of [Pyrr][CF(3)COO], η, σ, D, and the attractive potential, E(pot), between ions indicate clearly that the diffusion of each ion is similar. In other words, these ions are tightly bound together as ion pairs, reflecting in fact the importance of the hydrophobicity of the trifluoroacetate anion, whereas, in the case of the [Pyrr][HSO(4)], the strong H-bond between the HSO(4)(-) anion and water promotes a drastic change in the viscosity of the aqueous solution, as well as on the conductivity which is up to 187 mS·cm(-1) for water weight fraction close to 60% at 298 K.

  4. Solute transport through fractured rock: Radial diffusion into the rock matrix with several geological layers for an arbitrary length decay chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Batoul; Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a model development to derive a semi-analytical solution to describe reactive solute transport through a single channel in a fracture with cylindrical geometry. The model accounts for advection through the channel, radial diffusion into the adjacent heterogeneous rock matrix comprising different geological layers, adsorption on both the channel surface, and the geological layers of the rock matrix and radioactive decay chain. Not only an arbitrary-length decay chain, but also as many number of the rock matrix layers with different properties as observed in the field can be handled. The solution, which is analytical in the Laplace domain, is transformed back to the time domain numerically e.g. by use of de Hoog algorithm. The solution is verified against experimental data and analytical solutions of limiting cases of solute transport through porous media. More importantly, the relative importance and contribution of different processes on solute transport retardation in fractured rocks are investigated by simulating several cases of varying complexity. The simulation results are compared with those obtained from rectangular model with linear matrix diffusion. It is found that the impact of channel geometry on breakthrough curves increases markedly as the transport distance along the flow channel and away into the rock matrix increase. The effect of geometry is more pronounced for transport of a decay chain when the rock matrix consists of a porous altered layer.

  5. A thermodynamic approach to assess organic solute adsorption onto activated carbon in water

    KAUST Repository

    De Ridder, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrophobicity of 13 activated carbons is determined by various methods; water vapour adsorption, immersion calorimetry, and contact angle measurements. The quantity and type of oxygen-containing groups on the activated carbon were measured and related to the methods used to measure hydrophobicity. It was found that the water-activated carbon adsorption strength (based on immersion calorimetry, contact angles) depended on both type and quantity of oxygen-containing groups, while water vapour adsorption depended only on their quantity. Activated carbon hydrophobicity measurements alone could not be related to 1-hexanol and 1,3-dichloropropene adsorption. However, a relationship was found between work of adhesion and adsorption of these solutes. The work of adhesion depends not only on activated carbon-water interaction (carbon hydrophobicity), but also on solute-water (solute hydrophobicity) and activated carbon-solute interactions. Our research shows that the work of adhesion can explain solute adsorption and includes the effect of hydrogen bond formation between solute and activated carbon. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of photoluminescence of carbon nanotube/ZnO nanostructures synthesized by gas- and solution-phase transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Changhyun; Lee, Seawook; Kim, Chang-Wan; Park, Suyoung; Lee, Chongmu; Lee, Dongjin

    2015-02-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/ZnO heterostructures were synthesized by two different processes: (1) gas-phase transport (GPT) and nucleation of Zn powders and (2) solution-phase transport (SPT) chemical reaction of zinc nitrate solution on the MWCNTs. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the ZnO nanostructures on the MWCNTs from the GPT and SPT processes were poly- and single-crystal hexagonal wurtzite structure, respectively. The major photoluminescence (PL) spectra of our MWCNT/ZnO hybrid, excited at 380 nm and 550 nm, were presented. The PL intensity of the MWCNT/ZnO coaxial nanostructures behaves differently depending on the ZnO synthesis methods on the MWCNTs. The MWCNT/ZnO heterostructures synthesized using the GPT process were more efficient than those synthesized by SPT process in enhancing the PL intensity around the near-band-edge emission region. However, the emission enhancement around defect region was mostly attributed to increase in the O vacancy concentration in the ZnO on the MWCNTs during the SPT process.

  7. Simulation of experimental breakthrough curves using multiprocess non-equilibrium model for reactive solute transport in stratified porous media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Swami; P K Sharma; C S P Ojha

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we have studied the behaviour of reactive solute transport through stratified porous medium under the influence of multi-process nonequilibrium transport model. Various experiments were carried out in the laboratory and the experimental breakthrough curves were observed at spatially placed sampling points for stratified porous medium. Batch sorption studies were also performed to estimate the sorption parameters of the material used in stratified aquifer system. The effects of distance dependent dispersion and tailing are visible in the experimental breakthrough curves. The presence of physical and chemical non-equilibrium are observed from the pattern of breakthrough curves. Multi-process non-equilibrium model represents the combined effect of physical and chemical non-ideality in the stratified aquifer system. The results show that the incorporation of distance dependent dispersivity in multi-process non-equilibrium model provides best fit of observed data through stratified porous media. Also, the exponential distance dependent dispersivity is more suitable for large distances and at small distances, linear or constant dispersivity function can be considered for simulating reactive solute in stratified porous medium.

  8. What Moves Them? Active Transport among Inhabitants of Dutch Deprived Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Saris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Active modes of transport like walking and cycling have been shown to be valuable contributions to daily physical activity. The current study investigates associations between personal and neighbourhood environmental characteristics and active transport among inhabitants of Dutch deprived districts. Method. Questionnaires about health, neighbourhoods, and physical activity behaviour were completed by 742 adults. Data was analysed by means of multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Being younger, female, and migrant and having a normal weight were associated with more walking for active transport. Being younger, male, and native Dutch and having a normal weight were associated with more cycling for active transport. Neighbourhood characteristics were generally not correlated with active transport. Stratified analyses, based on significant person-environment interactions, showed that migrants and women walked more when cars did not exceed maximum speed in nearby streets and that younger people walked more when speed of traffic in nearby streets was perceived as low. Among migrants, more cycling was associated with the perceived attractiveness of the neighbourhood surroundings. Discussion and Conclusion. Results indicated that among inhabitants of Dutch deprived districts, personal characteristics were associated with active transport, whereas neighbourhood environmental characteristics were generally not associated with active transport. Nevertheless, interaction effects showed differences among subgroups that should be considered in intervention development.

  9. Determination of uranium and plutonium in high active solution by extractive spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for determination of uranium and plutonium in high active solution by extractive spectrophotometry was developed. TOPO in xylene was used as extractant for uranium and plutonium from irradiated plutonium carbide and uranium carbide

  10. A Methodology for Confirmatory Testing of Numerical Models of Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport in Fractured Crystalline Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, L.; Follin, S.; Rhen, I.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Three-dimensional, regional, numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured crystalline rock are used for two sites in Sweden that are considered for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The models are used to underpin the conceptual modeling that is based on multi-disciplinary data and include descriptions of the geometry of geological features (deformation zones and fracture networks), transient hydrological and chemical boundary conditions, strong spatial heterogeneity in the hydraulic properties, density driven flow, solute transport including rock matrix diffusion, and mixing of different water types in a palaeo-hydrogeological perspective (last 10,000 years). From a credibility point of view, comparisons between measured and simulated data are important and provide a means to address our ability to understand complex hydrogeological systems, and hence what particular applications of a hydrogeological model of a physical system that are justified, e.g. in subsequent repository performance assessment studies. For instance, it has been suggested that an understanding of the hydrochemical evolution throughout geological time is a powerful tool to predict the future evolution of groundwater flow and its chemical composition. The general approach applied in the numerical modeling was to first parameterize the deformation zones and fracture networks hydraulically using fracture and inflow data from single-hole tests. Second, the confirmatory step relies on using essentially the same groundwater flow and solute transport model in terms of grid discretization and parameter settings for matching three types of independent field data: 1) large-scale cross-hole (interference) tests, 2) long-term monitoring of groundwater levels, and 3) hydrochemical composition of fracture water and matrix pore water in deep boreholes. We demonstrate here the modelling approach of the second step - confirmatory testing - using data from the site

  11. Adenosine 5'triphosphate transport and accumulation during the cold preservation of rat hepatocytes in University of Wisconsin solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    María E. Mamprin; Félix Vega; Joaquín V. Rodriguez

    2005-01-01

    AIM: We used isolated hepatocytes to investigate how different concentrations of ATP in the University of Wisconsin (UW) solution affected both cellular ATP content and cell viability during the cold storage and the rewarming step. The mechanism involved in ATP transport and accumulation in hypothermia was also determined.METHODS: The cells were preserved up to 72 h in different conditions: UW solution without ATP (a-group),UW+5 mmol/L ATP (b-group), and UW+10 mmol/L ATP (c-group). The ATP content and the cell viability (LDH release) were determined during the cold storage and the rewarming step. In the groups a and c, the respiratory function of the cells at rewarming was studied. In addition,the cell volume of hepatocytes and the mechanism involved in ATP transport and accumulation were assessed. The extracellular degradation of exogenous nucleotides during transport experiments was investigated by a HPLC technique.RESULTS: After three days of cold storage a loss of cellular ATP content was observed in hepatocytes preserved either without nucleotides (a-group) or with 5 mmol/L ATP (b-group). In contrast, 10 mmol/L ATP (c-group) was able to maintain a normal ATP cellular content, with only a 6% diminution after 72 h of cold storage. The respiratory function was significantly different in hepatocytes preserved with 10 mmol/L ATP than without ATP. No significant change was detected for the three groups in cellular volume during the cold storage. We also report that the time course accumulation of [3H]-ATP by cold stored hepatocytes is a rapid process that is completed after 180 s with linear dependence on the extracellular ATP concentration (linear fitting results in a slope of 0.5624±0.1179 mmol/L ATP intracell/mmol/L ATP extracell).CONCLUSION: Our results show that, during hypothermic storage in UW solution, hepatocytes are permeable to ATP by a diffusive mechanism. Also, we found that it is ATP the main extracellular nucleotide available for transport and it is

  12. Cytoplasmic electric fields and electroosmosis: possible solution for the paradoxes of the intracellular transport of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor P Andreev

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to show that electroosmotic flow might play an important role in the intracellular transport of biomolecules. The paper presents two mathematical models describing the role of electroosmosis in the transport of the negatively charged messenger proteins to the negatively charged nucleus and in the recovery of the fluorescence after photobleaching. The parameters of the models were derived from the extensive review of the literature data. Computer simulations were performed within the COMSOL 4.2a software environment. The first model demonstrated that the presence of electroosmosis might intensify the flux of messenger proteins to the nucleus and allow the efficient transport of the negatively charged phosphorylated messenger proteins against the electrostatic repulsion of the negatively charged nucleus. The second model revealed that the presence of the electroosmotic flow made the time of fluorescence recovery dependent on the position of the bleaching spot relative to cellular membrane. The magnitude of the electroosmotic flow effect was shown to be quite substantial, i.e. increasing the flux of the messengers onto the nucleus up to 4-fold relative to pure diffusion and resulting in the up to 3-fold change in the values of fluorescence recovery time, and therefore the apparent diffusion coefficient determined from the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Based on the results of the modeling and on the universal nature of the electroosmotic flow, the potential wider implications of electroosmotic flow in the intracellular and extracellular biological processes are discussed. Both models are available for download at ModelDB.

  13. New Solution to High-Field Transport in Semiconductors: I. Elastic Scattering without Energy Relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Natori, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    High-field transport in a semiconductor diode structure at room temperature is newly analyzed in a reflection–transmission regime. The Boltzmann equation with a constant electric field E is applied to a semiconductor channel of length L, and a pair of flux equations is analytically solved. For applied fields larger than ∼500 V/cm for silicon, the energy relaxation by the acoustic phonon scattering hardly catches up with the energy gain from the field, and the kinetic energy accumulates genera...

  14. Non-stationarity of solute travel time distribution observed in a controlled hydrologic transport volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queloz, P.; Bertuzzo, E.; Carraro, L.; Botter, G.; Miglietta, F.; Rao, P. S.; Rinaldo, A.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental data were collected over a year-long period in a transport experiment carried out within a controlled transport volume (represented by a 2m-deep, 1m-diameter lysimeter fitted with bottom drainage). The soil surface was shielded from natural rainfall, replaced by an artificial injection (Poisson process) at the daily timescale. Bottom drainage out-flows were continuously monitored with leakage tipping bucket and evapotranspiration (prompted by a willow tree growing within the system) was measured trough precision load cells, which also allow an accurate and continuous reading of the total water storage. Five artificial soluble tracers (species of fluorobenzoic acid, FBAs, mutually passive) were selected based on low-reactivity and low-retardation in our specific soil and used to individually mark five rainfall inputs of different amplitudes and occurring at various initial soil moisture conditions. Tracer discharge concentration and hydrologic fluxes measurements provide a direct method for the assessment of the bulk effects of transport on the (backward and forward) travel time distributions in the hydrological setting. The large discrepancies observed in terms of mass recovery in the discharge (supported by ex post FBAs quantification in the soil and in the vegetation) and tracer out-fluxes dynamics emphasized the dependence of the forward travel time on the various injection times and the stages experienced by the system during the migration of the pulse. Rescaling the measured travel time distribution by using the cumulative drainage volume as an independent variable instead of the time elapsed since the injection also fails to yield to stationary distributions, as it was argued by Niemi (1997). Our experimental results support earlier theoretical speculations centered on the key role of non-stationarity on the characterization of the properties of hydrologic flow and transport phenomena. A travel time based model, with all in- and out- hydrological

  15. Solution-Grown Monocrystalline Hybrid Perovskite Films for Hole-Transporter-Free Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Wei

    2016-03-02

    High-quality perovskite monocrystalline films are successfully grown through cavitation-triggered asymmetric crystallization. These films enable a simple cell structure, ITO/CH3NH3PbBr3/Au, with near 100% internal quantum efficiency, promising power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) >5%, and superior stability for prototype cells. Furthermore, the monocrystalline devices using a hole-transporter-free structure yield PCEs ≈6.5%, the highest among other similar-structured CH3NH3PbBr3 solar cells to date.

  16. Structure-activity-relationships (SAR) in pyrimidine nucleoside transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several series of pyrimidine nucleosides were evaluated as part of a larger program to develop non-invasive brain imaging agents. The interaction of these antitumor/antiviral nucleosides with an NBMPR-sensitive murine erythroctye nucleoside transporter was evaluated by determining their inhibitory effect (Ki) on zero-trans influx of thymidine. Within each series of compounds, which had F, Cl, Br or I as halogen substituents, an increase in size of the halogen atom or a decrease in electronegativity decreased affinity for the transporter. Partition coefficients (P) of these pyrimidine nucleosides were measured to determine their potential to diffuse across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Most of the pyrimidine nucleosides had lower P values (log P i for nucleosides with a particular sugar moiety. Within a nucleoside series with a given sugar component, the binding affinity for the transporter was inversely proportional to lipophilicity. 25 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Are characteristics of the school district associated with active transportation to school in Danish adolescents?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stock, Christiane; Bloomfield, Kim; Ejstrud, Bo;

    2012-01-01

    models determined the effects of individual (gender, family affluence, enjoyment of school and academic performance) and school district factors (educational level, household savings, land use and size) on active transportation to school (by foot, bicycle or other active means) among 10 380 pupils aged...... 13-15 years nested in 407 school districts. RESULTS: Of all students, 64.4% used active transportation to school daily. Boys, those with perceived higher school performance and those with lower family affluence were more likely to use active transportation to school. After adjustment for all...

  18. HYDROCOIN [hydrologic code intercomparison] Level 1: Benchmarking and verification test results with CFEST [Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport] code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) participated in the international hydrologic code intercomparison (HYDROCOIN) project organized by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate for the purpose of improving our knowledge about the influence of various strategies for ground-water flow modeling for the safety assessment of final repositories for nuclear waste. The HYDROCOIN project consisted of three levels of effort: (1) Level 1 was concerned with verifying the numerical accuracy of the code, (2) Level 2 was involved with validation of models using field experiments, and (3) Level 3 was concerned with sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. In the HYDROCOIN Level 1 effort, seven cases were defined. The definition of each case included the input parameters, governing equations, output specifications, and format. The Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code was applied to solve Cases 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; the Finite-Element Three-Dimensional Ground-Water (FE3DGW) Flow Model was used to solve Case 6. Case 3 was ignored because unsaturated flow was not pertinent to the Salt Repository Project. This report presents the Level 1 results furnished by the project teams. The numerical accuracy of the codes is determined by: (1) comparing the computational results with analytical solutions for cases that have analytical solutions (Cases 1 and 4), and (2) intercomparing results from codes for cases that do not have analytical solutions (Cases 2, 5, 6, and 7). Cases 1, 2, 6, and 7 relate to flow analyses, whereas Cases 4 and 5 require nonlinear solutions. 7 refs., 71 figs., 10 tabs

  19. A parallel multi-domain solution methodology applied to nonlinear thermal transport problems in nuclear fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A.; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P.; Sampath, Rahul S.; Clarno, Kevin T.; Dilts, Gary A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors is described. Details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstrating the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Furthermore, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods. Finally, we demonstrate the power of the coupling methodology by considering problems with couplings between surface and volume physics and coupling of nonlinear thermal transport in fuel rods to an external radiation transport code.

  20. A Combined Approach to Model Reduction for Nonlinear Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Simulations Using POD and DEIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko, Z.; Boyce, S. E.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    2015-12-01

    Model reduction techniques using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) have been very effective in applications to confined groundwater flow models. These techniques consist of performing a projection of the solution of the full model onto a reduced basis. POD combined with the snapshot approach has been successfully applied to highly discretized linear models. In many cases, the reduced model is orders of magnitude smaller than the full model and runs 1,000 times faster. For nonlinear models, such as the unconfined groundwater flow, direct application of POD requires additional calls to the full model to generate additional snapshots. This is time consuming and increases the dimension of the reduced model. The discrete empirical interpolation method (DEIM) is a technique that avoids the additional full model calls and captures the dynamics of the nonlinear term while reducing the dimensions. Here, POD and DEIM are combined to reduce both the nonlinear unconfined groundwater flow and solute transport equations. To prove the concept, simple one-dimensional models are created for MODFLOW and MT3DMS separately. The dual approach is then tested on a density-dependent flow and transport simulation using the LMT package developed for MODFLOW. For each iteration of the nonlinear flow solver and the transport solver, the respective reduced models are solved instead. Numerical experiments show that significant reduction is obtainable before errors become too large. This method is well suited for a coastal aquifer seawater intrusion scenario, where nonlinearities only exist in small subregions of the model domain. A fine discretization can be utilized and POD will effectively eliminate unnecessary parameterization by projecting the full model system matrix onto a subspace with fewer column dimensions. DEIM can then reduce the row dimension of the original system by using only those state variable nodes with the most influence. This combined approach allows for full

  1. Repeat-swap homology modeling of secondary active transporters: updated protocol and prediction of elevator-type mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Kaufmann, Desirée; Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transporters are critical for neurotransmitter clearance and recycling during synaptic transmission and uptake of nutrients. These proteins mediate the movement of solutes against their concentration gradients, by using the energy released in the movement of ions down pre-existing concentration gradients. To achieve this, transporters conform to the so-called alternating-access hypothesis, whereby the protein adopts at least two conformations in which the substrate binding sites are exposed to one or other side of the membrane, but not both simultaneously. Structures of a bacterial homolog of neuronal glutamate transporters, GltPh, in several different conformational states have revealed that the protein structure is asymmetric in the outward- and inward-open states, and that the conformational change connecting them involves a elevator-like movement of a substrate binding domain across the membrane. The structural asymmetry is created by inverted-topology repeats, i.e., structural repeats with similar overall folds whose transmembrane topologies are related to each other by two-fold pseudo-symmetry around an axis parallel to the membrane plane. Inverted repeats have been found in around three-quarters of secondary transporter folds. Moreover, the (a)symmetry of these systems has been successfully used as a bioinformatic tool, called "repeat-swap modeling" to predict structural models of a transporter in one conformation using the known structure of the transporter in the complementary conformation as a template. Here, we describe an updated repeat-swap homology modeling protocol, and calibrate the accuracy of the method using GltPh, for which both inward- and outward-facing conformations are known. We then apply this repeat-swap homology modeling procedure to a concentrative nucleoside transporter, VcCNT, which has a three-dimensional arrangement related to that of GltPh. The repeat-swapped model of VcCNT predicts that nucleoside transport also

  2. BILEVEL PROGRAMMING MODEL AND SOLUTION METHOD FOR MIXED TRANSPORTATION NETWORK DESIGN PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haozhi ZHANG; Ziyou GAO

    2009-01-01

    By handling the travel cost function artfully, the authors formulate the transportation mixed network design problem (MNDP) as a mixed-integer, nonlinear bilevel programming problem, in which the lower-level problem, comparing with that of conventional bilevel DNDP models, is not a side constrained user equilibrium assignment problem, but a standard user equilibrium assignment problem. Then, the bilevel programming model for MNDP is reformulated as a continuous version of bilevel programming problem by the continuation method. By virtue of the optimal-value function, the lower-level assignment problem can be expressed as a nonlinear equality constraint. Therefore, the bilevel programming model for MNDP can be transformed into an equivalent single-level optimization problem. By exploring the inherent nature of the MNDP, the optimal-value function for the lower-level equilibrium assignment problem is proved to be continuously differentiable and its functional value and gradient can be obtained efficiently. Thus, a continuously differentiable but still nonconvex optimization formulation of the MNDP is created, and then a locally convergent algorithm is proposed by applying penalty function method. The inner loop of solving the subproblem is mainly to implement an all-or-nothing assignment. Finally, a small-scale transportation network and a large-scale network are presented to verify the proposed model and algorithm.

  3. Measurement of solute transport in the endothelial glycocalyx using indicator dilution techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lujia; Lipowsky, Herbert H

    2009-09-01

    A new method is presented to quantify changes in permeability of the endothelial glycocalyx to small solutes and fluid flow using techniques of indicator dilution. Following infusion of a bolus of fluorescent solutes (either FITC or FITC conjugated Dextran70) into the rat mesenteric circulation, its transient dispersion through post-capillary venules was recorded and analyzed offline. To represent dispersion of solute as a function of radial position in a microvessel, a virtual transit time (VTT) was calculated from the first moment of fluorescence intensity-time curves. Computer simulations and subsequent in vivo measurements showed that the radial gradient of VTT within the glycocalyx layer (Delta VTT/Delta r) may be related to the hydraulic resistance within the layer along the axial direction in a post-capillary venule and the effective diffusion coefficient within the glycocalyx. Modeling the inflammatory process by superfusion of the mesentery with 10(-7) M fMLP, Delta VTT/Delta r was found to decrease significantly from 0.23 +/- 0.08 SD s/microm to 0.18 +/- 0.09 SD s/microm. Computer simulations demonstrated that Delta VTT/Delta r is principally determined by three independent variables: glycocalyx thickness (delta), hydraulic resistivity (K(r)) and effective diffusion coefficient of the solute (D(eff)) within the glycocalyx. Based upon these simulations, the measured 20% decrease in Delta VTT/Delta r at the endothelial cell surface corresponds to a 20% increase in D(eff) over a broad range in K(r), assuming a constant thickness delta. The absolute magnitude of D(eff) required to match Delta VTT/Delta r between in vivo measurements and simulations was found to be on the order of 2.5 x 10(-3) x D(free), where D(free) is the diffusion coefficient of FITC in aqueous media. Thus the present method may provide a useful tool for elucidating structural and molecular alterations in the glycocalyx as occur with ischemia, metabolic and inflammatory events.

  4. Solution of Nonlinear Coupled Heat and Moisture Transport Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Krejčí

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a numerical solution of coupled of heat and moisture transfer using the finite element method. The mathematical model consists of balance equations of mass, energy and linear momentum and of the appropriate constitutive equations. The chosen macroscopic field variables are temperature, capillary pressures, gas pressure and displacement. In contrast with pure mechanical problems, there are several difficulties which require special attention. Systems of algebraic equations arising from coupled problems are generally nonlinear, and the matrices of such systems are nonsymmetric and indefinite. The first experiences of solving complicated coupled problems are mentioned in this paper. 

  5. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.W.

    1980-06-01

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 313/sup 0/K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

  6. Particles and solutes migration in porous medium : radionuclides and clayey particles simultaneous transport under the effect of a salinity gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the radiation protection of high-level and long-life radioactive waste storages. The colloids presence in ground waters can accelerate the radionuclides migration in natural geological deposits. The aim of this thesis is then to control particularly the particles motion in porous medium in order to anticipate quantitatively their migration. Liquid chromatography columns are filled with a clayey sand and fed with a decreasing concentration sodium chloride solution in order to study the particles outlet under a salinity gradient. When the porous medium undergoes a decrease of salinity it deteriorates. The adsorption of the cations : sodium 22, calcium 45, cesium 137 and neptunium 237 is then studied by the ions exchange method. The radionuclide solution is injected before the decrease of the feed solution salinity. The decrease of the sodium chloride concentration leads to the decrease of the radionuclides concentration because the adsorption competition between the sodium ion and the injected cation is lower. The particles transport, without fouling of the porous medium, is carried out in particular physical and chemical conditions which are described. (O.L.). 71 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs

  7. A unifying mode-coupling theory for transport properties of electrolyte solutions. II. Results for equal-sized ions electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburto, Claudio Contreras; Nägele, Gerhard

    2013-10-01

    On the basis of a versatile mode-coupling theory (MCT) method developed in Paper I [C. Contreras Aburto and G. Nägele, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 134109 (2013)], we investigate the concentration dependence of conduction-diffusion linear transport properties for a symmetric binary electrolyte solution. The ions are treated in this method as charged Brownian spheres, and the solvent-mediated ion-ion hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for also in the ion atmosphere relaxation effect. By means of a simplified solution scheme, convenient semi-analytic MCT expressions are derived for the electrophoretic mobilities, and the molar conductivity, of an electrolyte mixture with equal-sized ions. These expressions reduce to the classical Debye-Falkenhagen-Onsager-Fuoss results in the limit of very low ion concentration. The MCT expressions are numerically evaluated for a binary electrolyte, and compared to experimental data and results by another theoretical method. Our analysis encloses, in addition, the electrolyte viscosity. To analyze the dynamic influence of the hydration shell, the significance of mixed slip-stick hydrodynamic surface boundary conditions, and the effect of solvent permeability are explored. For the stick boundary condition employed in the hydrodynamic diffusivity tensors, our theoretical results for the molar conductivity and viscosity of an aqueous 1:1 electrolyte are in good overall agreement with reported experimental data for aqueous NaCl solutions, for concentrations extending even up to two molar.

  8. Evaluation of the matrix exponential for use in ground-water-flow and solute-transport simulations; theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, A.M.; Gorelick, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    It is possible to obtain analytic solutions to the groundwater flow and solute transport equations if space variables are discretized but time is left continuous. From these solutions, hydraulic head and concentration fields for any future time can be obtained without ' marching ' through intermediate time steps. This analytical approach involves matrix exponentiation and is referred to as the Matrix Exponential Time Advancement (META) method. Two algorithms are presented for the META method, one for symmetric and the other for non-symmetric exponent matrices. A numerical accuracy indicator, referred to as the matrix condition number, was defined and used to determine the maximum number of significant figures that may be lost in the META method computations. The relative computational and storage requirements of the META method with respect to the time marching method increase with the number of nodes in the discretized problem. The potential greater accuracy of the META method and the associated greater reliability through use of the matrix condition number have to be weighed against this increased relative computational and storage requirements of this approach as the number of nodes becomes large. For a particular number of nodes, the META method may be computationally more efficient than the time-marching method, depending on the size of time steps used in the latter. A numerical example illustrates application of the META method to a sample ground-water-flow problem. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Flexible ITO-free organic solar cells applying aqueous solution-processed V2O5 hole transport layer: An outdoor stability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, F. Anderson S.; Beliatis, Michail J.; Roth, Bérenger;

    2016-01-01

    Solution processable semiconductor oxides have opened a new paradigm for theenhancement of the lifetime of thin film solar cells. Their fabrication by low-costand environmentally friendly solution-processable methods makes them ideal barrier(hole and electron) transport layers. In this work, we...... fabricate flexible ITO-freeorganic solar cells (OPV) by printing methods applying an aqueous solution-processedV2O5 as the hole transport layer (HTL) and compared them to devices applyingPEDOT:PSS. The transparent conducting electrode was PET/Ag/PEDOT/ZnO, andthe OPV configurationwas PET/Ag/PEDOT/ZnO/P3HT...

  10. Structural and transport properties of Nafion in hydrobromic-acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusoglu, A; Cho, KT; Prato, RA; Weber, AZ

    2013-12-01

    Proton-exchange membranes are key solid-state ion carriers in many relevant energy technologies including flow batteries, fuel cells, and solar-fuel generators. In many of these systems, the membranes are in contact with electrolyte solutions. In this paper, we focus on the impact of different HBr, a flow-battery and exemplary acid electrolyte, external concentrations on the conductivity of Nafion, a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane that is commonly used in many energy-related applications. The peak and then decrease in conductivity is correlated with measured changes in the water and HBr content within the membrane. In addition, small-angle x-ray scattering is used to probe the nanostructure to correlate how the interactions of the bromide ion with the fixed sulfonic-acid sites impact conductivity and hydrophilic domain distance. It is also shown that membrane pretreatment has a large impact on the underlying structure/function relationship. The obtained data and results are useful for delineation of optimal operating regimes for flow batteries and similar technologies as well as in understanding underlying structure/function relationships of ionomers in electrolyte solutions. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Probing Contaminant Transport to and from Clay Surfaces in Organic Solvents and Water Using Solution Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmohammadbagher, Amin; Shaw, John M

    2015-09-15

    Clays, in tailings, are a significant ongoing environmental concern in the mining and oilsands production industries, and clay rehabilitation following contamination poses challenges episodically. Understanding the fundamentals of clay behavior can lead to better environmental impact mitigation strategies. Systematic calorimetric measurements are shown to provide a framework for parsing the synergistic and antagonistic impacts of trace (i.e., parts per million level) components on the surface compositions of clays. The enthalpy of solution of as-received and "contaminated" clays, in as-received and "contaminated" organic solvents and water, at 60 °C and atmospheric pressure, provides important illustrative examples. Clay contamination included pre-saturation of clays with water and organic liquids. Solvent contamination included the addition of trace water to organic solvents and trace organic liquids to water. Enthalpy of solution outcomes are interpreted using a quantitative mass and energy balance modeling framework that isolates terms for solvent and trace contaminant sorption/desorption and surface energy effects. Underlying surface energies are shown to dominate the energetics of the solvent-clay interaction, and organic liquids as solvents or as trace contaminants are shown to displace water from as-received clay surfaces. This approach can be readily extended to include pH, salts, or other effects and is expected to provide mechanistic and quantitative insights underlying the stability of clays in tailings ponds and the behaviors of clays in diverse industrial and natural environments. PMID:26296102

  12. Weathering and solute transport to the Salar de Atacama, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynek, S. A.; Munk, L. A.; Boutt, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The Salar de Atacama is situated in a tectonic basin on the Tropic of Capricorn, adjacent to the Central Andean Volcanic Zone in hyper-arid northern Chile. This basin has been hydrographically closed for most, if not all, of the Cenozoic. Since the late Miocene, chemical sediment (primarily halite, but also sulphate) and Na-Cl brines have accumulated. The volume of these deposits provides a constraint on long term average solute fluxes. We have undertaken an extensive multiple isotope study of surface and shallow groundwater in the basin to constrain processes and pathways affecting solute fluxes to the basin. By comparing these inflow waters to brackish waters and brines, we are able to place constraints on modern weathering with the ultimate goal of comparing it to longer term fluxes estimated from the geologic record. The volcanic arc and extensive large volume silicic magma chambers provide potential sources of solutes to the basin which are not a direct result of surficial weathering (hydrothermal waters/magmatic brines). For most freshwater, this possibility is ruled out. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in water provide no strong evidence for high temperature water-rock interaction. Further, the isotopic composition of helium dissolved in groundwater demonstrates that most groundwater carries an atmospheric signal (air saturated water), though some evidence for the influence of magmatic brines is found in shallow groundwater with high concentrations of helium-3, methane, and carbon dioxide. The strontium isotopic composition of waters and brines exhibits geographic variation that is related to at least four sources; 1) weathering of Andean volcanic arc along the eastern margin of the basin (87/86 ratios ~0.708), 2) thermal waters sourced in the northern headwaters of the Río San Pedro and 3) high calcium weathering fluxes from the Cordón de Lila on the southern margin of the basin, both of which have more radiogenic 87/86 ratios than the Andean volcanic arc

  13. Tank Waste Transport Stability: Summary of Slurry and Salt-Solution Studies for FY 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, T.D.

    2002-06-07

    Despite over 50 years of experience in transporting radioactive tank wastes to and from equipment and tanks at the Department of Energy's Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites, waste slurry transfer pipelines and process piping become plugged on occasion. At Hanford, several tank farm pipelines are no longer in service because of plugs. At Savannah River, solid deposits in the outlet line of the 2H evaporator have resulted in an unplanned extended downtime. Although waste transfer criteria and guidelines intended to prevent pipeline plugging are in place, they are not always adequate. To avoid pipeline plugging in the future, other factors that are not currently embodied in the transfer criteria may need to be considered. The work summarized here is being conducted to develop a better understanding of the chemical and waste flow dynamics during waste transfer. The goal is to eliminate pipeline plugs by improving analysis and engineering tools in the field that incorporate this understanding.

  14. The EGS4 Code System: Solution of Gamma-ray and Electron Transport Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. R.; Namito, Yoshihito

    1990-03-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the EGS4 Code System -- a general purpose package for the Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of electrons and photons. During the last 10-15 years EGS has been widely used to design accelerators and detectors for high-energy physics. More recently the code has been found to be of tremendous use in medical radiation physics and dosimetry. The problem-solving capabilities of EGS4 will be demonstrated by means of a variety of practical examples. To facilitate this review, we will take advantage of a new add-on package, called SHOWGRAF, to display particle trajectories in complicated geometries. These are shown as 2-D laser pictures in the written paper and as photographic slides of a 3-D high-resolution color monitor during the oral presentation. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  15. Data from a solute transport experiment in the Leviathan Mine drainage, Alpine County, California, October 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, M.R.; Bencala, K.E.; Zellweger, G.W.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A twenty-four hour injection of chloride and sodium was made into Leviathan Creek, Alpine County, California to aid interpretation of the coupled interactions between physical transport processes and geochemical reactions. Leviathan Creek was chosen because it receives acid mine drainage from Leviathan Mine, an abandoned open-pit sulfur mine. Water samples were collected at 15 sites along a 4.39 kilometer reach and analyzed for chloride, sodium, sulfate and fluoride. Dissolved concentrations are presented in tabular format and time-series plots. Duplicate samples were analyzed by two laboratories: the Central Laboratory, Denver, Colorado and a research laboratory in Menlo Park, California. A tabular comparison of the analyses and plots of the differences between the two laboratories is presented. Hydrographs and instantaneous discharge measurements are included. (USGS)

  16. Subsurface-water flow and solute transport: federal glossary of selected terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isensee, Alan R.; Johnson, Lynn; Thornhill, Jerry; Nicholson, Thomas J.; Meyer, Gerald; Vecchioli, John; Laney, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a glossary of selected terms for saturated and unsaturated flow and related processes involved in transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The glossary contains five tables. Table 1 is a list of parameters with associated symbols and units. Tables 2 to 5 are conversion charts. The original manuscript was prepared by Thomas J. Nicholson, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It was subsequently examined by the Ground-Water Glossary Working Group and experts within and outside the Federal Government, whose recommendations were accommodated where appropriate in the glossary. It is hoped that the glossary will aid in the communications between soil scientists, hydrologists, and hydrogeologists.

  17. Tank Waste Transport Stability: Summaries of Hanford Slurry and Salt-Solution Studies in FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, T.D.

    2002-07-08

    This report is a collection of summary articles on FY 2000 studies of slurry transport and salt-well pumping related to Hanford tank waste transfers. These studies are concerned with the stability (steady, uninterrupted flow) of tank waste transfers, a subset of the Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Tank (TFA) Waste Chemistry effort. This work is a collaborative effort of AEA Technology plc, the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory at Mississippi State University (DIAL-MSU), the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology at Florida International University (HCET-FIU), Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of this report is to provide, in a single document, an overview of these studies to help the reader identify contacts and resources for obtaining more detailed information and to help promote useful interchanges between researchers and users. Despite over 50 years of experience in transporting radioactive tank wastes to and from equipment and tanks at the Department of Energy's Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites, waste slurry transfer pipelines and process piping become plugged on occasion. At Hanford, several tank farm pipelines are no longer in service because of plugs. At Savannah River, solid deposits in the outlet line of the 2H evaporator have resulted in an unplanned extended downtime. Although waste transfer criteria and guidelines intended to prevent pipeline plugging are in place, they are not always adequate. To avoid pipeline plugging in the future, other factors that are not currently embodied in the transfer criteria may need to be considered. The work summarized here is being conducted to develop a better understanding of the chemical and waste flow dynamics during waste transfer. The goal is to eliminate pipeline plugs by improving analysis and engineering tools in the field that incorporate this understanding.

  18. Adsorption of cadmium ions from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and activated clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasewar, Kailas L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), Nagpur, Maharashtra (India); Kumar, Pradeep; Teng, Tjoon Tow [Environmental Technology Division, School of Industrial Technology, University Science of Malaysia, Minden, Penang (Malaysia); Chand, Shri; Padmini, Bina N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2010-07-15

    The present study was aimed at removing cadmium ions from aqueous solution through batch studies using adsorbents, such as, granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated clay (A-clay). GAC was of commercial grade where as the A-clay was prepared by acid treatment of clay with 1 mol/L of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Bulk densities of A-clay and GAC were 1132 and 599 kg/m{sup 3}, respectively. The surface areas were 358 m{sup 2}/g for GAC and 90 m{sup 2}/g for A-clay. The adsorption studies were carried out to optimize the process parameters, such as, pH, adsorbent dosage, and contact time. The results obtained were analyzed for kinetics and adsorption isotherm studies. The pH value was optimized at pH 6 giving maximum Cd removal of 84 and 75.2% with GAC and A-clay, respectively. The adsorbent dosage was optimized and was found to be 5 g/L for GAC and 10 g/L for A-clay. Batch adsorption studies were carried out with initial adsorbate (Cd) concentration of 100 mg/L and adsorbent dosage of 10 g/L at pH 6. The optimum contact time was found to be 5 h for both the adsorbents. Kinetic studies showed Cd removal a pseudo second order process. The isotherm studies revealed Langmuir isotherm to better fit the data than Freundlich isotherm. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Physical Activity Associated with Public Transport Use—A Review and Modelling of Potential Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Greenaway

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Active travel, particularly walking and cycling, has been recommended because of the health benefits associated with increased physical activity. Use of public transport generally involves some walking to bus stops or train stations. This paper is a systematic review of how much time is spent in physical activity among adults using public transport. It also explores the potential effect on the population level of physical activity if inactive adults in NSW, Australia, increased their walking through increased use of public transport. Of 1,733 articles, 27 met the search criteria, and nine reported on absolute measures of physical activity associated with public transport. A further 18 papers reported on factors associated with physical activity as part of public transport use. A range of 8–33 additional minutes of walking was identified from this systematic search as being attributable to public transport use. Using “bootstrapping” statistical modelling, if 20% of all inactive adults increased their walking by only 16 minutes a day for five days a week, we predict there would be a substantial 6.97% increase in the proportion of the adult population considered “sufficiently active”. More minutes walked per day, or a greater uptake of public transport by inactive adults would likely lead to significantly greater increases in the adult population considered sufficiently active.

  20. The effect of activating solution on the mechanical strength, reaction rate, mineralogy, and microstructure of alkali-activated fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.; Hu. J.; Ye, G.

    2012-01-01

    Alkali-activated fly ash (AAF) is a promising material that exhibits comparable material properties as cement-based materials but with much less CO2 emission. In the present work, the effect of activating solution (SiO2 and Na2O content) on the performance of AAF was studied by means of isothermal c