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Sample records for active recombinant cathepsin

  1. Expression and Purification of Active Recombinant Cathepsin C (Dipeptidyl Aminopeptidase I of Kuruma Prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus in Insect Cells

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    Gao-Feng Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin C (CTSC is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. Our previous study showed that CTSC precursor (zymogen is localized exclusively in cortical rods (CRs of mature oocyte in the kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, suggesting that CTSC might have roles on regulating release and/or formation of a jelly layer. In this study, enzymically active CTSC of the kuruma prawn was prepared by recombinant expression in the High Five insect cell line. The recombinant enzyme with a polyhistidine tag at its C-terminus was considered to be initially secreted into the culture medium as an inactive form of zymogen, because Western blot with anti-CTSC antibody detected a 51 kDa protein corresponding to CTSC precursor. After purification by affinity chromatography on nickel-iminodiacetic acid resin, the enzyme displayed three forms of 51, 31, and 30 kDa polypeptides. All of the forms can be recognized by antiserum raised against C-terminal polyhistidine tag, indicating that the 31 and 30 kDa forms were generated from 51 kDa polypeptide by removal of a portion of the N-terminus of propeptide. Following activation at pH 5.5 and 37∘C for 40 hours under native conditions, the recombinant CTSC (rCTSC exhibited increased activity against the synthetic substrate Gly-Phe-β-naphthylamide and optimal pH at around 5. The purified rCTSC will be useful for further characterization of its exact physiological role on CRs release and/or formation of a jelly layer in kuruma prawn.

  2. Production of recombinant cathepsin C from human blood fluke

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    Illichová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma cause schistosomiasis, a serious parasitic disease occurring in tropical and subtropical areas. Cathepsin C (EC 3.4.14.1) is a digestive enzyme of the blood flukes which participates in the degradation of hemoglobin through its dipeptidyl aminopeptidase activity. This enzyme is critical for metabolism of the parasite and represents a potential target for the development of antischistosomal drugs. Cathepsin C has not yet been studied in detail. This bachel...

  3. Immuno-diagnosis of bubaline fasciolosis with Fasciola gigantica cathepsin-L and recombinant cathepsin L 1-D proteases.

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    Raina, O K; Yadav, S C; Sriveny, D; Gupta, S C

    2006-05-01

    Fasciola gigantica cathepsin-L cysteine proteinase and recombinant cathepsin L 1-D were assessed for their potential in the immuno-diagnosis of F. gigantica infection in buffaloes. A diagnostic ELISA, based on these two antigens, was developed to detect antibodies against F. gigantica in water buffaloes. Sensitivity of the ELISA was assessed using sera from buffaloes experimentally or naturally infected with F. gigantica from F. gigantica endemic areas and its specificity by probing the sera of the host from F. gigantica non-endemic area. Our earlier studies under experimental setting showed 100% sensitivity of cathepsin-L ELISA in the diagnosis of fasciolosis in buffaloes, with the earliest detection of infection at 4 weeks post-infection. However, under field situation of natural F. gigantica infection, this sensitivity declined to 97.1% but specificity of the test remained 100%. Cross-reactivity of the antigen was checked with Schistosoma indicum, S. spindale, Paramphistomum epiclitum, Gastrothylax spp., Gigantocotyle explanatum, hydatid and Strongyloides papilossus in the bubaline host, naturally infected with these helminths. F. gigantica cathepsin-L and the recombinant cathepsin L-1D does not cross-react with these helminth parasites in natural mono or mixed infection of the host. The present ELISA contributes a relatively sensitive and reliable tool for the early serodiagnosis of bubaline fasciolosis.

  4. High Expression of Human Cathepsin S by Recombinant Pichia pastoris with Cod Skin as an Organic Co-Nitrogen Source.

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    Li, Guiying Y; Fu, Man; Qin, Mei; Xue, Liming M

    2018-02-06

    Human cathepsin S production by recombinant Pichia pastoris using cod skin as the co-nitrogen source was investigated in this study. The addition of carbon sources of glycerol in the fed-batch phase and of methanol in the induction stage was also investigated. A new approach to the highly expression of human cathepsin S was developed using 90 g/L of cod skin (wet weight). After 24 h of the initial fermentation, 4% glycerol (v/v, glycerol/culture) was added once to enhance the cell density (OD600) in the cultivation. Then, adding and maintaining methanol at 0.5% (v/v, methanol/cultivation) after about 48 h of fermentation achieved a high expression of human cathepsin S in a 5-L bioreactor. The results demonstrate that the maximum activity of human cathepsin S in the fermentation supernatant reached 7,152 U/L after 96 h of methanol induction. The methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris grown in the medium containing cod skin (90 g/L) as the co-nitrogen source provided a 21% higher cell density (OD600) and 18.3% higher human cathepsin S yield than P. pastoris grown in BMGY medium. For the first time, human cathepsin S was successfully expressed by P. pastoris with cod skin as the co-nitrogen source. The glycerol fed-batch controlling strategy and method of maintaining methanol at a constant concentration of 0.5% (v/v, methanol/cultivation) in the induction stage was efficient for P. pastoris growth and the expression of human cathepsin S. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Monoclonal antibody against recombinant Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L1H could detect juvenile and adult cathepsin Ls of Fasciola gigantica.

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    Wongwairot, Sirima; Kueakhai, Pornanan; Changklungmoa, Narin; Jaikua, Wipaphorn; Sansri, Veerawat; Meemon, Krai; Songkoomkrong, Sineenart; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Sobhon, Prasert

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin Ls (CatLs), the major cysteine protease secreted by Fasciola spp., are important for parasite digestion and tissue invasion. Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L1H (FgCatL1H) is the isotype expressed in the early stages for migration and invasion. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against recombinant F. gigantica cathepsin L1H (rFgCatL1H) was produced by hybridoma technique using spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant proFgCatL1H (rproFgCatL1H). This MoAb is an immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 with κ light chain isotype. The MoAb reacted specifically with rproFgCatL1H, the native FgCatL1H at a molecular weight (MW) 38 to 48 kDa in the extract of whole body (WB) of metacercariae and newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) and cross-reacted with rFgCatL1 and native FgCatLs at MW 25 to 28 kDa in WB of 2- and 4-week-old juveniles, adult, and adult excretory-secretory (ES) fractions by immunoblotting and indirect ELISA. It did not cross-react with antigens in WB fractions from other parasites, including Gigantocotyle explanatum, Paramphistomum cervi, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Setaria labiato-papillosa, and Fischoederius cobboldi. By immunolocalization, MoAb against rFgCatL1H reacted with the native protein in the gut of metacercariae and NEJ and also cross-reacted with CatL1 in 2- and 4-week-old juveniles and adult F. gigantica. Therefore, FgCatL1H and its MoAb may be used for immunodiagnosis of both early and late fasciolosis in ruminants and humans.

  6. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

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    Speshock, Janice L.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Szymanski, Eric R.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  7. On Blastocystis secreted cysteine proteases: a legumain-activated cathepsin B increases paracellular permeability of intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

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    Nourrisson, C; Wawrzyniak, I; Cian, A; Livrelli, V; Viscogliosi, E; Delbac, F; Poirier, P

    2016-11-01

    Blastocystis spp. pathogenic potential remains unclear as these anaerobic parasitic protozoa are frequently isolated from stools of both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. In silico analysis of the whole genome sequence of Blastocystis subtype 7 revealed the presence of numerous proteolytic enzymes including cysteine proteases predicted to be secreted. To assess the potential impact of proteases on intestinal cells and gut function, we focused our study on two cysteine proteases, a legumain and a cathepsin B, which were previously identified in Blastocystis subtype 7 culture supernatants. Both cysteine proteases were produced as active recombinant proteins. Activation of the recombinant legumain was shown to be autocatalytic and triggered by acidic pH, whereas proteolytic activity of the recombinant cathepsin B was only recorded after co-incubation with the legumain. We then measured the diffusion of 4-kDa FITC-labelled dextran across Caco-2 cell monolayers following exposition to either Blastocystis culture supernatants or each recombinant protease. Both Blastocystis culture supernatants and recombinant activated cathepsin B induced an increase of Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability, and this effect was significantly inhibited by E-64, a specific cysteine protease inhibitor. Our results suggest that cathepsin B might play a role in pathogenesis of Blastocystis by increasing intestinal cell permeability.

  8. Extracellular cathepsin L stimulates axonal growth in neurons.

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    Tohda, Chihiro; Tohda, Michihisa

    2017-11-23

    Cathepsin L, a lysosomal endopeptidase expressed in most eukaryotic cells, is a member of the papain-like family of cysteine proteases. Although commonly recognized as a lysosomal protease, cathepsin L is also secreted and involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. Previous studies demonstrated that the secretion of cathepsin L was stimulated by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and bFGF-enhanced axonal terminal sprouting of motor neurons. Based on these results, although it has never been directly investigated, we hypothesized that extracellular cathepsin L may induce axonal growth. To confirm the hypothesis, the axonal growth activity of recombinant cathepsin L was evaluated in cultured cortical and spinal cord neurons. Treatment with recombinant cathepsin L significantly enhanced axonal growth, but not dendritic growth. This result indicated that extracellular cathepsin L may act as a new neuronal network modulator.

  9. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Rautela, J.; Duivenvoorden, H.M.; Jayatilleke, K.M.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Bogyo, M.; Parker, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor

  10. Bone Microenvironment Modulates Expression and Activity of Cathepsin B in Prostate Cancer

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    Izabela Podgorski

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancers metastasize to bone leading to osteolysis. Here we assessed proteolysis of DOcollagen I (a bone matrix protein and, for comparison, DO-collagen IV, by living human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. Both collagens were degraded, this degradation was reduced by inhibitors of matrix metallo, serine, cysteine proteases. Because secretion of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in human breast fibroblasts grown on collagen I gels, we analyzed cathepsin B levels and secretion in prostate cells grown on collagen I gels. Levels and secretion were increased only in DU145 cells-cells that expressed the highest baseline levels of cathepsin B. Secretion of cathepsin B was also elevated in DU145 cells grown in vitro on human bone fragments. We further investigated the effect of the bone microenvironment on cathepsin B expression and activity in vivo in a SCID-human model of prostate bone metastasis. High levels of cathepsin B protein and activity were found in DU145, PC3, LNCaP bone tumors, although the PC3 and LNCaP cells had exhibited low cathepsin B expression in vitro. Our results suggest that tumor-stromal interactions in the context of the bone microenvironment can modulate the expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B.

  11. Multiple Cathepsins Promote Pro-IL-1β Synthesis and NLRP3-Mediated IL-1β Activation.

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    Orlowski, Gregory M; Colbert, Jeff D; Sharma, Shruti; Bogyo, Matthew; Robertson, Stephanie A; Rock, Kenneth L

    2015-08-15

    Sterile particles induce robust inflammatory responses that underlie the pathogenesis of diseases like silicosis, gout, and atherosclerosis. A key cytokine mediating this response is IL-1β. The generation of bioactive IL-1β by sterile particles is mediated by the NOD-like receptor containing a pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, although exactly how this occurs is incompletely resolved. Prior studies have found that the cathepsin B inhibitor, Ca074Me, suppresses this response, supporting a model whereby ingested particles disrupt lysosomes and release cathepsin B into the cytosol, somehow activating NLRP3. However, reports that cathepsin B-deficient macrophages have no defect in particle-induced IL-1β generation have questioned cathepsin B's involvement. In this study, we examine the hypothesis that multiple redundant cathepsins (not just cathepsin B) mediate this process by evaluating IL-1β generation in murine macrophages, singly or multiply deficient in cathepsins B, L, C, S and X. Using an activity-based probe, we measure specific cathepsin activity in living cells, documenting compensatory changes in cathepsin-deficient cells, and Ca074Me's dose-dependent cathepsin inhibition profile is analyzed in parallel with its suppression of particle-induced IL-1β secretion. Also, we evaluate endogenous cathepsin inhibitors cystatins C and B. Surprisingly, we find that multiple redundant cathepsins, inhibited by Ca074Me and cystatins, promote pro-IL-1β synthesis, and to our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that cathepsin X plays a nonredundant role in nonparticulate NLRP3 activation. Finally, we find cathepsin inhibitors selectively block particle-induced NLRP3 activation, independently of suppressing pro-IL-1β synthesis. Altogether, we demonstrate that both small molecule and endogenous cathepsin inhibitors suppress particle-induced IL-1β secretion, implicating roles for multiple cathepsins in both pro-IL-1β synthesis and NLRP3 activation. Copyright

  12. Fasciola gigantica: production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against recombinant cathepsin B3.

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    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Songkoomkrong, Sineenart; Sethadavit, Manussabhorn; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Sobhon, Prasert

    2011-02-01

    A number of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against a recombinant cathepsin B3 (rCatB3) of Fasciola gigantica were produced in BALB/c mice. Reactivity and specificity of these MoAbs were assessed by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Six stable clones, namely 1C4, 1E9, 2E5, 2F9, 5B4, 5D7 were obtained. All MoAbs reacted with rCatB3 at molecular weight (MW) 37 kDa as well as the glycosylated peptide at 55-75 kDa and with the native CatB3 at MW 37 kDa in WB extracts of metacercariae (Met) and newly excysted juveniles (NEJ). It was found to be IgG(1) and λ light chain isotypes. Immunolocalization of CatB3 in metacercariae, NEJ, 4-week-old juvenile and adult F. gigantica performed by immunoperoxidase technique by using these MoAbs as probes indicated that CatB3 was present in high concentration in the caecal epithelium and caecal lumen of the Met and NEJ, but not in the 4-week-old juvenile and adult fluke. The MoAbs show no cross-reactions with antigens of other parasites including Gigantocotyl explanatum, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Paramphistomum cervi, Schistosoma spindale, S. mansoni, Haemonchus placei and Setaria labiato-papillosa. Thus, it is possible that these MoAbs could be a good candidate for immunodiagnosis of fasciolosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The development and characterization of an ELISA specifically detecting the active form of cathepsin K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, S; Karsdal, M A; Bay-Jensen, A C

    2013-01-01

    , such as osteoporosis or ankylosing spondylitis. METHODS: Presently there are no robust assays for the assessment of active cathepsin K in serum, and therefore an ELISA specifically detecting the N-terminal of the active form of cathepsin K was developed. RESULTS: The assay was technically robust, with a lowest limit...... of detection (LOD) of 0.085ng/mL. The average intra- and inter-assay CV% were 6.60% and 8.56% respectively. The dilution recovery and spike recovery tests in human serum were within 100±20% within the range of the assay. A comparison of latent and active cathepsin K confirmed specificity towards the active...

  14. Quantitative electrochemical detection of cathepsin B activity in breast cancer cell lysates using carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays toward identification of cancer formation.

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    Swisher, Luxi Z; Prior, Allan M; Gunaratna, Medha J; Shishido, Stephanie; Madiyar, Foram; Nguyen, Thu A; Hua, Duy H; Li, Jun

    2015-10-01

    The proteolytic activity of cathepsin B in complex breast cell lysates has been measured with alternating current voltammetry (ACV) using ferrocene (Fc)-labeled-tetrapeptides immobilized on nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). Four types of breast cells have been tested, including normal breast cells (HMEC), transformed breast cells (MCF-10A), breast cancer cells (T47D), and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). The detected protease activity was found increased in cancer cells, with the MDA-MB-231 metastatic cancer cell lysate showing the highest cathepsin B activity. The equivalent cathepsin B concentration in MDA-MB-231 cancer cell lysate was quantitatively determined by spiking recombinant cathepsin B into the immunoprecipitated MDA-MB-231 lysate and the HMEC whole cell lysate. The results illustrated the potential of this technique as a portable multiplex electronic device for cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring through rapid profiling the activity of specific cancer-relevant proteases. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. In this report, the authors applied the technique of nanoelectrode arrays to try to detect and compare cathepsin B activities in normal and breast cancer cells. It was found that protease activity correlated positively with the degree of malignancy cancer cells. Taking this further, this technique may be useful for rapid diagnosis of cancer in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lack of cathepsin activities alter or prevent the development of lung granulomas in a mouse model of sarcoidosis

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    Percival M David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Remodeling of lung tissues during the process of granuloma formation requires significant restructuring of the extra-cellular matrix and cathepsins K, L and S are among the strongest extra-cellular matrix degrading enzymes. Cathepsin K is highly expressed in various pathological granulomatous infiltrates and all three enzymes in their active form are detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from patients with sarcoidosis. Granulomatous inflammation is driven by T-cell response and cathepsins S and L are actively involved in the regulation of antigen presentation and T-cell selection. Here, we show that the disruption of the activities of cathepsins K, L, or S affects the development of lung granulomas in a mouse model of sarcoidosis. Methods Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice lacking cathepsin K or L were fed Paigen diet for 16 weeks and lungs were analyzed and compared with their cathepsin-expressing littermates. The role of cathepsin S in the development of granulomas was evaluated using mice treated for 8 weeks with a potent and selective cathepsin S inhibitor. Results When compared to wild-type litters, more cathepsin K-deficient mice had lung granulomas, but individually affected mice developed smaller granulomas that were present in lower numbers. The absence of cathepsin K increased the number of multinucleated giant cells and the collagen content in granulomas. Cathepsin L deficiency resulted in decreased size and number of lung granulomas. Apoe-/- mice treated with a selective cathepsin S inhibitor did not develop lung granulomas and only individual epithelioid cells were observed. Conclusions Cathepsin K deficiency affected mostly the occurrence and composition of lung granulomas, whereas cathepsin L deficiency significantly reduced their number and cathepsin S inhibition prevented the formation of granulomas.

  16. The imbalance of cathepsin B-like activity in acromegalic patients--preliminary report.

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    Daroszewski, Jacek; Bolanowski, Marek; Kaluzny, Marcin; Siewinski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease due to growth hormone (GH) excess. Patients must be carefully follow up because of mortality and co-morbidity increased risks. Since routinely used GH and insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1) estimations are not always sufficient, patients require assessment of organ- or tissue-specific tests. Cysteine proteases (CP), including cathepsin B, have been tested in a number of pathologies in respect of a role in pathogenesis and potential utility in the disease activity and prognosis assessment. There is lack of data on CP activity in acromegaly. In present study cathepsin B-like and cysteine peptidase inhibitor (CPI) activities have been tested in 29 acromegaly patients and in 15 healthy controls. Cathepsin B activity was assayed with N-bansoyl-DL-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (BANA) as substrate by the Barrett method. CPI activity was determined by measuring the inhibition of papain. Serum cathepsin B activity (median: 1.38 U/ml) and CPI activity (median: 93.08 U/ml) were higher in acromegaly then in controls (0.93 U/ml and 82.55 U/ml, p=0.000017 and 0.00285, respectively). Neither cathepsin B nor CPI activity was correlated with GH or IGF-1 level. No correlation was recorded between cathepsin B and CPI activity. It was shown for the first time that cathepsin B and CPI activities are increased in acromegaly. These findings suggest to study cathepsin system as an adjuvant parameter in the assessment of the overall acromegaly complications. Moreover, CP may be involved in pathomechanism of organ complications in acromegaly and may interfere with IGF-1 action.

  17. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against recombinant cathepsin L1 of Fasciola gigantica.

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    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Srirakam, Thippawan; Pandonlan, Sudarat; Changklungmoa, Narin; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Meemon, Krai; Sobhon, Prasert

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against a recombinant cathepsin L1 of Fasciola gigantica (rFgCatL1) were produced in vitro by fusion of BALB/c mice spleen cells immunized with rFgCatL1 and mouse myeloma cells. Reactivity and specificity of these MoAbs were evaluated by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Seven MoAb clones were selected from the stable hybridoma clones, namely 1E10, 1F5, 3D11, 4B10, 4D3, 4E3 and 5E7. Clones 1E10, 1F5 and 3D11 were IgM, whereas clones 4B10, 4D3, 4E3 and 5E7 were IgG1. All MoAbs had kappa light chain isotypes. All MoAbs reacted with rCatL1 at molecular weight (MW) 30kDa and with the native CatL1 at MW 27kDa in whole body (WB) extracts of metacercariae (Met), newly excysted juveniles (NEJ), 1, 3, 5-week-old juveniles (Ju), adult WB and adult excretory-secretory (ES) fractions, but not with adult tegumental antigens (TA). All of these MoAbs showed no cross-reactions with antigens of other parasites commonly found in ruminants and human, including Paramphistomum cervi, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Gigantocotyle explanatum, Schistosoma spindale, Schistosoma mansoni, Moniezia benedeni, Avitellina centripunctata, Trichuris sp., Haemonchus placei and Setaria labiato-papillosa. Localization of CatL1 in each developmental stages of F. gigantica by immunoperoxidase technique, using these MoAbs as probes, indicated that CatL1 was present at high concentration in the caecal epithelium and caecal lumen of metacercariae, NEJ, 1, 3, 5-week-old juveniles and adult fluke. This finding indicated that CatL1 is a copiously expressed parasite protein that is released into the ES, thus CatL1 and its MoAb could be a good candidate for immunodiagnosis of fasciolosis in ruminant and human. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cathepsin L activity correlates with proteinuria in chronic kidney disease in humans.

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    Cao, Yu; Liu, Xing; Li, Ying; Lu, Yao; Zhong, Hua; Jiang, Weihong; Chen, Alex F; Billiar, Timothy R; Yuan, Hong; Cai, Jingjing

    2017-08-01

    The presence and severity of proteinuria is considered an important prognostic marker in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with mortality and morbidity. Cathepsin L is highly expressed in the foot processes of podocytes in the kidney, which serves as an ultrafiltration barrier. Cathepsin L is also up-regulated in the setting of inflammation as a feature of CKD. Therefore, we postulated that proteinuria severity in CKD patients might correlate with increased serum levels of cathepsin L. In this retrospective observational study, a total of 135 patients diagnosed with CKD, 31 renal transplant patients and 48 healthy controls were included. The demographic characteristics and clinical indicators were analyzed. Serum cathepsin L activity was significantly higher in patients with CKD than in renal transplant recipients and healthy controls (P L activity compared to those with moderate or mild proteinuria (P L activity positively associated with age, body mass index, nitrite level, neutrophil count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) and 24-h proteinuria. In the ROC analysis, the sensitivity of cathepsin L activity in diagnosis of moderate and heavy is 0.86 and the specificity is 0.73. Moreover, CKD patients with higher cathepsin L activity had a significantly higher hospital admission rate. The data also showed patients with statin administration present significantly lower cathepsin L activity (P L activity is significantly elevated in CKD patients and its level correlates with the severity of proteinuria as well as prognosis, suggesting that serum cathepsin L may serve as a potential biomarker for CKD. Further prospective study is needed to explore its clinical implications in the future.

  19. [Changes in active cysteine cathepsins in lysosomes from tissues thyroid papillary carcinomas with various biological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, O V; Myshunina, T M; Tron'ko, M D

    2013-01-01

    To clarify possible role of cysteine cathepsin H, B and L in the proteolytic processes that contribute to the progression of tumor growth in the thyroid, we studied their activity in lysosomes isolated from the tissue of papillary carcinomas. It was shown that for these enzymes there is a dependence of the changes in their activity on a number of biological characteristics of the tumors. Thus, the sharp increase in the activity ofcathepsin H observed in lysosomes of tissue carcinomas category T2 and T3, with intra-and ekstrathyroid and lymphatic invasion of tumor cells. An increase in the activity of cathepsin B is set in the lysosomes of tissue heterogeneous follicular structure, especially in the presence of solid areas, in comparison with typical papillary tumors and in the lysosomes of tissue carcinomas in intrathyroid and cathepsin L-at extrathyroid invasion. A common feature of the enzymes is to increase the activity of cathepsins in lysosomes of tissue nonencapsulated papillary carcinomas. These enzymes probably do not take part in the invasion of tumor cells into blood vessels and in the mechanisms of tumor metastasis to regional lymph nodes. The latter shows no changes in the activity of cathepsins in lysosomes of tissue carcinomas category N1. The results indicate the different role of cathepsin H, B and L in thyroid carcinogenesis, where each enzyme has its specific function.

  20. Active subsite properties, subsite residues and targeting to lysosomes or midgut lumen of cathepsins L from the beetle Tenebrio molitor.

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    Damasceno, Ticiane F; Dias, Renata O; de Oliveira, Juliana R; Salinas, Roberto K; Juliano, Maria A; Ferreira, Clelia; Terra, Walter R

    2017-10-01

    Cathepsins L are the major digestive peptidases in the beetle Tenebrio molitor. Two digestive cathepsins L (TmCAL2 and TmCAL3) from it had their 3D structures solved. The aim of this paper was to study in details TmCAL3 specificity and properties and relate them to its 3D structure. Recombinant TmCAL3 was assayed with 64 oligopeptides with different amino acid replacements in positions P2, P1, P1' and P2'. Results showed that TmCAL3 S2 specificity differs from the human enzyme and that its specificities also explain why on autoactivation two propeptide residues remain in the enzyme. Data on free energy of binding and of activation showed that S1 and S2' are mainly involved in substrate binding, S1' acts in substrate binding and catalysis, whereas S2 is implied mainly in catalysis. Enzyme subsite residues were identified by docking with the same oligopeptide used for kinetics. The subsite hydrophobicities were calculated from the efficiency of hydrolysis of different amino acid replacements in the peptide and from docking data. The results were closer for S1 and S2' than for S1' and S2, indicating that the residue subsites that were more involved in transition state binding are different from those binding the substrate seen in docking. Besides TmCAL1-3, there are nine other cathepsins L, most of them more expressed at midgut. They are supposed to be directed to lysosomes by a Drosophila-like Lerp receptor and/or motifs in their prodomains. The mannose 6-phosphate lysosomal sorting machinery is absent from T. molitor transcriptome. Cathepsin L direction to midgut contents seems to depend on overexpression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bifunctional Probes of Cathepsin Protease Activity and pH Reveal Alterations in Endolysosomal pH during Bacterial Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanman, L.E.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Bogyo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are lysosomal proteases involved in regulation of both normal cellular processes and disease. Biochemical studies with peptide substrates indicate that cathepsins have optimal activity at acidic pH and highly attenuated activity at neutral pH. In contrast, there is mounting

  2. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and cathepsin K contribute differently to osteoclastic activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Andersen, Thomas L; Engsig, Michael T

    2003-01-01

    The best established proteolytic event of osteoclasts is bone matrix solubilization by the cysteine proteinase cathepsin K. Here, however, we draw the attention on osteoclastic activities depending on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We discuss the observations supporting that MMPs contribute...... significantly to bone matrix solubilization in specific areas of the skeleton and in some developmental and pathological situations. Our discussion takes into account (1) the characteristics of the bone remodeling persisting in the absence of cathepsin K, (2) the ultrastructure of the resorption zone...... in response to inactivation of MMPs and of cathepsin K in different bone types, (3) bone resorption levels in MMP knockout mice compared to wild-type mice, (4) the identification of MMPs in osteoclasts and surrounding cells, and (5) the effect of different bone pathologies on the serum concentrations...

  3. Live imaging of cysteine-cathepsin activity reveals dynamics of focal inflammation, angiogenesis, and polyp growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Gounaris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that up to 30% of detectable polyps in patients regress spontaneously. One major challenge in the evaluation of effective therapy of cancer is the readout for tumor regression and favorable biological response to therapy. Inducible near infra-red (NIR fluorescent probes were utilized to visualize intestinal polyps of mice hemizygous for a novel truncation of the Adenomatous Polyposis coli (APC gene. Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy in live mice allowed visualization of cathepsin activity in richly vascularized benign dysplastic lesions. Using biotinylated suicide inhibitors we quantified increased activities of the Cathepsin B & Z in the polyps. More than (3/4 of the probe signal was localized in CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC and CD11b(+F4/80(+ macrophages infiltrating the lesions. Polyposis was attenuated through genetic ablation of cathepsin B, and suppressed by neutralization of TNFalpha in mice. In both cases, diminished probe signal was accounted for by loss of MDSC. Thus, in vivo NIR imaging of focal cathepsin activity reveals inflammatory reactions etiologically linked with cancer progression and is a suitable approach for monitoring response to therapy.

  4. Comparative Assessment of ELISAs Using Recombinant Saposin-Like Protein 2 and recombinant Cathepsin L-1 from Fasciola hepatica for the Serodiagnosis of Human Fasciolosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Bruno; Schneeberger, Marianne; Boubaker, Ghalia; Merkle, Bernadette; Huber, Cristina; Spiliotis, Markus; Müller, Norbert; Garate, Teresa; Doherr, Marcus G.

    2014-01-01

    Two recombinant Fasciola hepatica antigens, saposin-like protein-2 (recSAP2) and cathepsin L-1 (recCL1), were assessed individually and in combination in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for the specific serodiagnosis of human fasciolosis in areas of low endemicity as encountered in Central Europe. Antibody detection was conducted using ProteinA/ProteinG (PAG) conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. Test characteristics as well as agreement with results from an ELISA using excretory–secretory products (FhES) from adult stage liver flukes was assessed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, specificity, sensitivity, Youdens J and overall accuracy. Cross-reactivity was assessed using three different groups of serum samples from healthy individuals (n = 20), patients with other parasitic infections (n = 87) and patients with malignancies (n = 121). The best combined diagnostic results for recombinant antigens were obtained using the recSAP2-ELISA (87% sensitivity, 99% specificity and 97% overall accuracy) employing the threshold (cut-off) to discriminate between positive and negative reactions that maximized Youdens J. The findings showed that recSAP2-ELISA can be used for the routine serodiagnosis of chronic fasciolosis in clinical laboratories; the use of the PAG-conjugate offers the opportunity to employ, for example, rabbit hyperimmune serum for the standardization of positive controls. PMID:24922050

  5. Comparative assessment of ELISAs using recombinant saposin-like protein 2 and recombinant cathepsin L-1 from Fasciola hepatica for the serodiagnosis of human Fasciolosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gottstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Two recombinant Fasciola hepatica antigens, saposin-like protein-2 (recSAP2 and cathepsin L-1 (recCL1, were assessed individually and in combination in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA for the specific serodiagnosis of human fasciolosis in areas of low endemicity as encountered in Central Europe. Antibody detection was conducted using ProteinA/ProteinG (PAG conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. Test characteristics as well as agreement with results from an ELISA using excretory-secretory products (FhES from adult stage liver flukes was assessed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC analysis, specificity, sensitivity, Youdens J and overall accuracy. Cross-reactivity was assessed using three different groups of serum samples from healthy individuals (n=20, patients with other parasitic infections (n=87 and patients with malignancies (n=121. The best combined diagnostic results for recombinant antigens were obtained using the recSAP2-ELISA (87% sensitivity, 99% specificity and 97% overall accuracy employing the threshold (cut-off to discriminate between positive and negative reactions that maximized Youdens J. The findings showed that recSAP2-ELISA can be used for the routine serodiagnosis of chronic fasciolosis in clinical laboratories; the use of the PAG-conjugate offers the opportunity to employ, for example, rabbit hyperimmune serum for the standardization of positive controls.

  6. Live Cell Imaging and Profiling of Cysteine Cathepsin Activity Using a Quenched Activity-Based Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E; Bogyo, Matthew; Verdoes, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    Since protease activity is highly regulated by structural and environmental influences, the abundance of a protease often does not directly correlate with its activity. Because in most of the cases it is the activity of a protease that gives rise to its biological relevance, tools to report on this activity are of great value to the research community. Activity-based probes (ABPs) are small molecule tools that allow for the monitoring and profiling of protease activities in complex biological systems. The class of fluorescent quenched ABPs (qABPs), being intrinsically "dark" and only emitting fluorescence after reaction with the target protease, are ideally suited for imaging techniques such as small animal noninvasive fluorescence imaging and live cell fluorescence microscopy. An additional powerful characteristic of qABPs is their covalent and irreversible modification of the labeled protease, enabling in-depth target characterization. Here we describe the synthesis of a pan-cysteine cathepsin qABP BMV109 and the application of this probe to live cell fluorescence imaging and fluorescent SDS-PAGE cysteine cathepsin activity profiling.

  7. Photodynamic quenched cathepsin activity based probes for cancer detection and macrophage targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, Yael; Merquiol, Emmanuelle; Brandis, Alexander; Turk, Boris; Scherz, Avigdor; Blum, Galia

    2015-01-01

    Elevated cathepsins levels and activities are found in several types of human cancer, making them valuable biomarkers for detection and targeting therapeutics. We designed small molecule quenched activity-based probes (qABPs) that fluoresce upon activity-dependent covalent modification, yielding cell killing by Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). These novel molecules are highly selective theranostic probes that enable both detection and treatment of cancer with minimal side effects. Our qABPs carry a photosensitizer (PS), which is activated by light, resulting in oxidative stress and subsequent cell ablation, and a quencher that when removed by active cathepsins allow the PS to fluoresce and demonstrate PD properties. Our most powerful and stable PS-qABP, YBN14, consists of a selective cathepsin recognition sequence, a QC-1 quencher and a new bacteriochlorin derivative as a PS. YBN14 allowed rapid and selective non-invasive in vivo imaging of subcutaneous tumors and induced specific tumor macrophage apoptosis by light treatment, resulting in a substantial tumor shrinkage in an aggressive breast cancer mouse model. These results demonstrate for the first time that the PS-qABPs technology offers a functional theranostic tool, which can be applied to numerous tumor types and other inflammation-associated diseases.

  8. GILT expression in B cells diminishes cathepsin S steady-state protein expression and activity

    OpenAIRE

    Phipps-Yonas, Hannah; Semik, Vikki; Hastings, Karen Taraszka

    2012-01-01

    MHC class II-restricted Ag processing requires protein degradation in the endocytic pathway for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) facilitates Ag processing by reducing protein disulfide bonds in this compartment. Lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin S (CatS) contains disulfide bonds and mediates essential steps in MHC class II-restricted processing, including proteolysis of large polypeptides and cleavage of the invariant chain. We so...

  9. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae: A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taíse Fernanda da Silva Ferrara

    Full Text Available Huanglonbing (HLB is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB. DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM. The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control.

  10. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Taíse Fernanda da Silva; Schneider, Vanessa Karine; Kishi, Luciano Takeshi; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Alves, Marcio Fernando Madureira; Belasque-Júnior, Jose; Rosa, José César; Hunter, Wayne Brian; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Soares-Costa, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Huanglonbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB). DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM) and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM). The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM) and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM) and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM). RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control.

  11. Cathepsin activities and thermal properties of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus meat during ambient storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulakhun Nonthaput

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the postmortem changes at ambient aquatic temperature can be useful for estimating the time of death in environmental forensic studies when little information is available. Muscle degradation was investigated in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus in terms of the specific activities of cathepsins (B, H and L and the scavenging activities and thermal transition properties of myosin and actin, to assess postmortem changes with time (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after death. The study results are relevant to ambient temperatures in Thailand, (about 30 °C. The specific activities of the three cathepsin enzymes increased significantly with postmortem time (p < 0.05 and had a highly significant positive relationship (r = 0.987−0.997, p < 0.01, n = 32. Cathepsin H had the lowest specific activity and exhibited a different type of time profile. Its lowest specific activity was observed at 8 h, which indicated a significant role at this point in time after death. The radical scavenging activities substantially decreased with the time since death, especially within the first 1 h, while no changes occurred from 2 to 8 h, or from 12 to 24 h. The thermal properties of myosin and actin were observed up to a 24 h delay. The degradation of each protein fluctuated with the delay time; actin was more sensitive to postmortem delay than myosin. Overall, the findings from the current study might be used as primary data to estimate the time of death of an aquatic animal. A potential application is for environmental forensics in relation to fish kill events associated with pollution crimes or the mass death of exported fish under transportation insurance, as well as in animal cruelty investigations.

  12. Treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal IgG antibody against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis-prone pigs reduces cathepsin S in coronary lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bo; Al-Mashhadi, Ahmed Ludvigsen; Von Wachenfeldt, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunization with oxidized LDL (oxLDL) reduces atherosclerosis in rodents. We tested the hypothesis that treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal antibody against oxLDL will reduce the burden or composition of atherosclerotic lesions in hypercholesterolemic minipigs. Methods...... and results Thirty-eight hypercholesterolemic minipigs with defective LDL receptors were injected with an oxLDL antibody or placebo weekly for 12 weeks. An 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scan (n = 9) was performed before inclusion and after 3 months of treatment. Blood samples.......03) with no difference in CD68 or CD163 positivity. Conclusions In hypercholesterolemic minipigs, treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal antibody against oxLDL reduced cathepsin S in coronary lesions without any effect on the burden of atherosclerosis or aortic FDG-PET signal....

  13. Cathepsin B-like cysteine proteases confer intestinal cysteine protease activity in Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shompole, S; Jasmer, D P

    2001-01-26

    Cathepsin B-like cysteine protease genes (cbls) constitute large multigene families in parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes. Although expressed in the intestine of some nematodes, the biological and biochemical functions of the CBL proteins remain unresolved. Di- and tetra-oligopeptides were used as fluorogenic substrates and irreversible/competitive inhibitors to establish CBL functions in the intestine of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Cysteine protease activity was detected against diverse substrates including the cathepsin B/L substrate FR, the caspase 1 substrate YVAD, the cathepsin B substrate RR, but not the CED-3 (caspase 3) substrate DEVD. The pH at which maximum activity was detected varied according to substrate and ranged from pH 5.0 to 7.0. Individual CBLs were affinity isolated using FA and YVAD substrates. pH influenced CBL affinity isolation in a substrate-specific manner that paralleled pH effects on individual substrates. N-terminal sequencing identified two isolated CBLs as H. contortus GCP-7 (33 kDa) and AC-4 (37 kDa). N termini of each began at a position consistent with proregion cleavage and protease activation. Isolation of the GCP-7 band by each peptide was preferentially inhibited when competed with a diazomethane-conjugated inhibitor, Z-FA-CHN(2), demonstrating one functional difference among CBLs and among inhibitors. Substrate-based histological analysis placed CBLs on the intestinal microvilli. Data indicate that CBLs are responsible for cysteine protease activity described from H. contortus intestine. Results also support a role of CBLs in nutrient digestion.

  14. Assessment of cathepsin mRNA expression and enzymatic activity during early embryonic development in the yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Jaime; Herrera, Giannina; Torres-Fuentes, Jorge; Dettleff, Phillip; Patel, Alok; Martínez, Víctor

    2017-05-01

    In pelagic species such as Seriola lalandi, survival of both the eggs and embryos depends on yolk processing during oocyte maturation and embryo development. The main enzymes involved in these processes are the cathepsins, which are essential for the hydration process, acquiring buoyancy and nutrition of the embryo before hatching. This study aimed to investigate the mRNA expression profiles of cathepsins B, D and L (catb, catd and catl) and the activity of these enzymes during early development in S. lalandi. We included previtellogenic oocytes (PO). All three enzymes were highly expressed in PO, but the expression was reduced throughout development. Between PO and recently spawned eggs (E1) the transcript to catb and catd decreased, unlike catl. Cathepsin B activity, showed stable levels between PO until blastula stage (E4). High activities levels of cathepsins D and L were observed in E1 in comparison with later developmental stages. Cathepsin L activity remained constant until E1, consistent with observations in other pelagic spawners, where its participation in a second protolithic cleavage of the yolk proteins, has been proposed for this enzyme. Their profiles of both mRNA expression and enzymatic activity indicate the importance of these enzymes during early development and suggest different roles in egg yolk processing for the hydration process and nutrition in early embryos in this species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators

    OpenAIRE

    L?vgren, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need ...

  16. The activity of cathepsin D in saliva of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dabrowska

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is genetically determined illness, which is caused by the mutation in the CFTR gene. CFTR protein is also expressed in epithelial cells of parotid glands, therefore parotid glands are also affected in CF patients. Cathepsin D is one of the proteolitic cascade enzymes. Physiological wearing out result in occurrence of trace quantities of this enzyme in serum and body fluids, including saliva. Among different enzymes, saliva contains cathepsin D (CTSD, EC 3.4.23.5. The aim of this study was to determine cathepsin D activity in mixed saliva in cystic fibrosis patients and healthy controls. The study was performed in a group of 26 CF patients (10F, 16M. The results obtained in CF group was compared with the results of thirty healthy subjects (12F, 14M. From each subject 8 ml of mixed saliva was obtained: before and after the stimulation of saliva excretion using paraffin pledgets. Protein and glycoprotein content was assessed using Winzler's method. Protein concentration in controls and CF group before stimulation of excretion was 1.15+/-0.714 mg/mL and 1.54+/-0.925 mg/mL. After stimulation protein concentration in saliva has lowered to 0.88+/-0.77 mg/mL in CF group and 1.24+/-1.213 mg/mL in controls. Glycoprotein concentration in controls and in CF group was respectively: before stimulation 1.08+/-0.271 mg/mL and 1.05+/-0.344 mg/mL; after stimulation 0.92+/-0.292 mg/mL and 0.86+/-0.283 mg/mL. The activity of CTSD in controls was 45.9+/-24.98 Tyr nmol/mL/4h before stimulation and 109.3+/-56.94 Tyr nmol/mL/4h after stimulation of excretion. In CF group CTSD activity before stimulation was 134.5+/-81.80 Tyr nmol/mL/4h and after stimulation 134.4+/-62.18 Tyr nmol/mL/4h. Comparing the CTSD activity in both groups statistically significant difference has been revealed in samples collected before stimulation of excretion (p=0.013. The activity of cathepsin D in saliva of cystic fibrosis patient is significantly higher than in healthy

  17. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes.

  18. Analysis of Cathepsin and Furin Proteolytic Enzymes Involved in Viral Fusion Protein Activation in Cells of the Bat Reservoir Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Najjar, Farah; Lampe, Levi; Baker, Michelle L.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing. PMID:25706132

  19. Analysis of cathepsin and furin proteolytic enzymes involved in viral fusion protein activation in cells of the bat reservoir host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah El Najjar

    Full Text Available Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing.

  20. Neutrophil Cathepsin G, but Not Elastase, Induces Aggregation of MCF-7 Mammary Carcinoma Cells by a Protease Activity-Dependent Cell-Oriented Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that a neutrophil serine protease, cathepsin G, weakens adherence to culture substrates and induces E-cadherin-dependent aggregation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through its protease activity. In this study, we examined whether aggregation is caused by degradation of adhesion molecules on the culture substrates or through an unidentified mechanism. We compared the effect of treatment with cathepsin G and other proteases, including neutrophil elastase against fibronectin- (FN- coated substrates. Cathepsin G and elastase potently degraded FN on the substrates and induced aggregation of MCF-7 cells that had been subsequently seeded onto the substrate. However, substrate-bound cathepsin G and elastase may have caused cell aggregation. After inhibiting the proteases on the culture substrates using the irreversible inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF, we examined whether aggregation of MCF-7 cells was suppressed. PMSF attenuated cell aggregation on cathepsin G-treated substrates, but the effect was weak in cells pretreated with high concentrations of cathepsin G. In contrast, PMSF did not suppress cell aggregation on elastase-treated FN. Moreover, cathepsin G, but not elastase, induced aggregation on poly-L-lysine substrates which are not decomposed by these enzymes, and the action of cathepsin G was nearly completely attenuated by PMSF. These results suggest that cathepsin G induces MCF-7 aggregation through a cell-oriented mechanism.

  1. Lipotoxicity-mediated cell dysfunction and death involve lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguel, Frankis G; Liu, Jo-Wen; Pacheco, Fabio J; De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A; De Leon, Marino

    2010-03-08

    Lipotoxicity, which is triggered when cells are exposed to elevated levels of free fatty acids, involves cell dysfunction and apoptosis and is emerging as an underlying factor contributing to various pathological conditions including disorders of the central nervous system and diabetes. We have shown that palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipotoxicity (PA-LTx) in nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 (NGFDPC12) cells is linked to an augmented state of cellular oxidative stress (ASCOS) and apoptosis and that these events are inhibited by docosahexanoic acid (DHA). The mechanisms of PA-LTx in nerve cells are not well understood, but our previous findings indicate that it involves ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), and caspase activation. The present study used nerve growth factor differentiated PC12 cells (NGFDPC12 cells) and found that lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is an early event during PA-induced lipotoxicity that precedes MMP and apoptosis. Cathepsin L, but not cathepsin B, is an important contributor in this process since its pharmacological inhibition significantly attenuated LMP, MMP, and apoptosis. In addition, co-treatment of NGFDPC12 cells undergoing lipotoxicity with DHA significantly reduced LMP, suggesting that DHA acts by antagonizing upstream signals leading to lysosomal dysfunction. These results suggest that LMP is a key early mediator of lipotoxicity and underscore the value of interventions targeting upstream signals leading to LMP for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with lipotoxicity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipotoxicity Mediated Cell Dysfunction and Death Involves Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization and Cathepsin L Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguel, Frankis G.; Liu, Jo-Wen; Pacheco, Fabio J.; De Leon, Daisy; Casiano, Carlos A.; De Leon, Marino

    2010-01-01

    Lipotoxicity, which is triggered when cells are exposed to elevated levels of free fatty acids, involves cell dysfunction and apoptosis and is emerging as an underlying factor contributing to various pathological conditions including disorders of the central nervous system and diabetes. We have shown that palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipotoxicity (PA-LTx) in nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 (NGFDPC12) cells is linked to an augmented state of cellular oxidative stress (ASCOS) and apoptosis, and that these events are inhibited by docosahexanoic acid (DHA). The mechanisms of PA-LTx in nerve cells are not well understood, but our previous findings indicate that it involves ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), and caspase activation. The present study used nerve growth factor differentiated PC12 cells (NGFDPC12 cells) and found that lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is an early event during PA-induced lipotoxicity that precedes MMP and apoptosis. Cathepsin L, but not cathepsin B, is an important contributor in this process since its pharmacological inhibition significantly attenuated LMP, MMP, and apoptosis. In addition, co-treatment of NGFDPC12 cells undergoing lipotoxicity with DHA significantly reduced LMP, suggesting that DHA acts by antagonizing upstream signals leading to lysosomal dysfunction. These results suggest that LMP is a key early mediator of lipotoxicity, and underscore the value of interventions targeting upstream signals leading to LMP for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with lipotoxicity. PMID:20043885

  3. Localization and cytophotometric analysis of cathepsin B activity in unfixed and undecalcified cryostat sections of whole rat knee joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.; Vogels, I. M.; Smith, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    Cathepsin B activity is demonstrated histochemically with a post-coupling method using Z-Arg-Arg-4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide as substrate and Fast Blue BB as coupling reagent in unfixed and undecalcified cryostat sections of whole rat knee joints. Sections were attached to transparent tape to keep the

  4. Cathepsin activities and membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Rawson, D M; Tosti, L; Carnevali, O

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated enzymatic activity of cathepsins and the membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling. Stage III oocytes (>0.5mm), obtained through dissection of anaesthetised female fish and desegregation of ovarian cumulus, were exposed to 2M methanol or 2M DMSO (both prepared in Hank's medium) for 30min at 22 degrees C before being loaded into 0.5ml plastic straws and placed into a programmable cooler. After controlled slow freezing, samples were plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN) and held for at least 10min, and thawed by immersing straws into a 27 degrees C water bath for 10s. Thawed oocytes were washed twice in Hank's medium. Cathepsin activity and membrane integrity of oocytes were assessed both after cryoprotectant treatment at 22 degrees C and after freezing in LN. Cathepsin B and L colorimetric analyses were performed using substrates Z-Arg-ArgNNap and Z-Phe-Arg-4MbetaNA-HCl, respectively, and 2-naphthylamine and 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine were used as standards. Cathepsin D activity was performed by analysing the level of hydrolytic action on haemoglobin. Oocytes membrane integrity was assessed using 0.2% Trypan blue staining for 5min. Analysis of cathepsin activities showed that whilst the activity of cathepsin B and D was not affected by 2M DMSO treatment, their activity was lowered when treated with 2M methanol. Following freezing to -196 degrees C, the activity of all cathepsins (B, D and L) was significantly decreased in both 2M DMSO and 2M methanol. Trypan blue staining showed that 63.0+/-11.3% and 72.7+/-5.2% oocytes membrane stayed intact after DMSO and methanol treatment for 30min at 22 degrees C, respectively, whilst 14.9+/-2.6% and 1.4+/-0.8% stayed intact after freezing in DMSO and methanol to -196 degrees C. The results indicate that cryoprotectant treatment and freezing modified the activities of lysosomal enzymes involved in oocyte maturation and yolk

  5. Ligand activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta suppresses cathepsin B expression in human endothelial cells in a posttranslational manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Gabi; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Doll, Monika; Hrgovic, Igor; Valesky, Eva Maria; Kippenberger, Stefan; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Meissner, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta agonists are known to have distinct anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects; though, the knowledge regarding their mode of action has thus far been limited. Different cathepsins have been shown to be upregulated in a broad range of pathological events, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, atherosclerosis and diverse tumor entities, for example melanoma. Recent work demonstrated that cathepsin B in particular is an important pro-angiogenic protease in various pathological conditions. We therefore analysed whether cathepsins are a valid target for PPARδ agonists. This study reveals an inhibitory effect of two commonly used PPARδ agonists, GW501516 and L-165,041, on the protein expression and enzyme activity of cathepsin B in human endothelial cells. In contrast, no inhibitory effects were observed on cathepsin L and cathepsin D protein expression after treatment with PPARδ agonists. Furthermore, the results substantiate that PPARδ activators mediate their inhibitory action in a PPARδ-dependent manner and that the underlying regulatory mechanism is not based on a transcriptional but rather on a posttranslational mode of action, via the reduction in the cathepsin B protein half-life. Mechanisms conveying the suppressive effect by 5'-alternative splicing, a 3'-UTR-dependent way or by miRNA could be excluded. The data of this study explore cathepsin B as a new valid target for PPARδ agonists in endothelial cells. The results bolster other studies demonstrating PPARδ agonists as anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic agents and thus might have the potential to help to develop new pharmaceutical drugs. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. [Cathepsin B activity and concentration of elastase and alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor complex in non-small-cell lung cancer: 2 year follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passowicz-Muszyńska, Ewa; Jankowska, Renata; Gołab, Krzysztof; Marciniak, Marek; Warwas, Maria

    2003-05-01

    In 21 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer subjected to radical surgery followed by 3 cycles of chemotherapy, serum cathepsin B activity and plasma E-alpha 1IP concentration in peripheral blood and tumour arterial and venous blood were studied. Cathepsin B activity was determined by a fluorometric assay. E-alpha 1IP concentration was measured with an ELISA kit. The measurements were performed before surgery, before each chemotherapy cycle and every 60 days after chemotherapy completion, for 2 years. All the patients (n = 21) were divided into 2 subgroups: without metastases n = 16 and with metastases n = 5. There was no significant difference between preoperative serum cathepsin B activity and E-alpha 1IP plasma values in peripheral blood and blood coming from tumour artery and vein. The surgery and chemotherapy caused a statistically significant decrease of serum cathepsin B activity and plasma E-alpha 1IP concentration both in the whole group and in the subgroup without metastases. A significant increase of cathepsin B activity in comparison to initial values was observed 2,5-4 months before cerebral metastasis appeared in the subgroup with metastases. The elevation of E-alpha 1IP concentration preceded the increase of cathepsin B activity in this subgroup. It was not statistically significant. A decrease of cathepsin B and E-alpha 1IP values was observed after cerebral metastasis excision.

  7. Cathepsin D inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gacko

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of cathepsin D belong to chemical compounds that estrify carboxyl groups of the Asp33 and Asp231residues of its catalytic site, penta-peptides containing statin, i.e. the amino acid similar in structure to the tetraedric indirectproduct, and polypeptides found in the spare organs of many plants and forming permanent noncovalent complexes withcathepsin. Cathepsin D activity is also inhibited by alpha2-macroglobulin and antibodies directed against this enzyme.Methods used to determine the activity and concentration of these inhibitors and their analytical, preparative and therapeuticapplications are discussed.

  8. Frontline Science: Multiple cathepsins promote inflammasome-independent, particle-induced cell death during NLRP3-dependent IL-1β activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, Gregory M; Sharma, Shruti; Colbert, Jeff D; Bogyo, Matthew; Robertson, Stephanie A; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Chan, Francis K; Rock, Kenneth L

    2017-07-01

    Sterile particles cause several chronic, inflammatory diseases, characterized by repeating cycles of particle phagocytosis and inflammatory cell death. Recent studies have proposed that these processes are driven by the NLRP3 inflammasome, a platform activated by phagocytosed particles, which controls both caspase-1-dependent cell death (pyroptosis) and mature IL-1β secretion. After phagocytosis, particles can disrupt lysosomes, and inhibitor studies have suggested that the resulting release of a lysosomal protease-cathepsin B-into the cytosol somehow activates NLRP3. However, using primary murine macrophages, we found that particle-induced cell death occurs independent of NLRP3/caspase-1 and depends instead on multiple, redundant cathepsins. In contrast, nigericin, a soluble activator of NLRP3 inflammasomes, induced cell death that was dependent on the NLRP3. Interestingly, nigericin-induced cell death depended partly on a single cathepsin, cathepsin X. By inhibiting or silencing multiple cathepsins in macrophages, several key proinflammatory events induced by sterile particles are blocked, including cell death, pro-IL-1β production, and IL-1β secretion. These data suggest that cathepsins might be potential therapeutic targets in particulate-mediated inflammatory disease. In support of this concept, we find that a broad-spectrum cathepsin inhibitor can suppress particle-induced IL-1-dependent peritonitis. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  9. Palladacycle (BPC) antitumour activity against resistant and metastatic cell lines: the relationship with cytosolic calcium mobilisation and cathepsin B activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechara, Alexandre; Barbosa, Christiano M V; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Garcia, Daniel M; Silva, Luís S; Matsuo, Alisson L; Nascimento, Fábio D; Rodrigues, Elaine G; Caires, Antonio C F; Smaili, Soraya S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2014-05-22

    The search for new compounds that induce p53-independent apoptosis is the focus of many studies in cancer biology because these compounds could be more specific and would overcome chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro antitumour activity of a Biphosphinic Palladacycle Complex (BPC) and extended preclinical studies to an in vivo model. Saos-2 cells, a p53-null human osteosarcoma drug-resistant cell line, were treated with BPC in the presence or absence of a cathepsin B inhibitor and a calcium chelator (CA074 and BAPTA-AM, respectively), and several parameters related to apoptosis were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed with mice that were intravenously inoculated with murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 cells and treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with BPC (8 mg/kg/day) for ten consecutive days, when lung metastatic nodules were counted. In vitro data show that BPC induces cell death in Saos-2 cells mainly by apoptosis, which was accompanied by the effector caspase-3 activation. These events are most likely related to Bax translocation and increased cytosolic calcium mobilisation, mainly from intracellular compartments. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilisation (LMP) was also observed after 12 h of BPC exposure. Interestingly, BAPTA-AM and CA074 significantly decreased BPC cytotoxicity, suggesting that both calcium and cathepsin B are required for BPC antitumour activity. In vivo studies demonstrated that BPC protects mice against murine metastatic melanoma. In conclusion, BPC complex is an effective anticancer compound against metastatic murine melanoma. This complex is cytotoxic to the drug-resistant osteosarcoma Saos-2 human tumour cells by inducing apoptosis triggered by calcium signalling and a lysosomal-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. New method to discriminate between cathepsin B and cathepsin L in crude extracts from fish muscle based on a simple acidification procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    2007-01-01

    A new and simple method to distinguish between cathepsin B and cathepsin L in crude extracts of herring (Clupea harengus) muscle has been established. An acid treatment of crude extracts (exposed to pH 3 for 5 min) activated a latent form of cathepsin L and inactivated cathepsin B. Furthermore......, in neutral crude extract, the hydrolysis of benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginyl-4-methylcoumarine (Z-Phe-Arg-MCA) (cathepsin B and cathepsin L substrates) was between 0% and 15% of the hydrolysis of benzyloxycarbonyl-L-arginyl-L-arginyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarine (Z-Arg-Arg-MCA; cathepsin B substrate......). Cathepsin B activity is measured in neutral extract using the specific cathepsin B substrate Z-Arg-Arg-MCA and cathepsin L activity is measured in acid-treated extract with Z-Phe-Arg-MCA as substrate. The specific cathepsin B inhibitor, CA-074, did not inhibit the Z-Arg-Arg-MCA significantly without...

  11. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1α and tumor necrosis factor α promote the expression and secretion of proteolytically active cathepsin S from human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglič, Dejan; Repnik, Urška; Jedeszko, Christopher; Kosec, Gregor; Miniejew, Catherine; Kindermann, Maik; Vasiljeva, Olga; Turk, Vito; Wendt, K Ulrich; Sloane, Bonnie F; Goldring, Mary B; Turk, Boris

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis are destructive joint diseases that involve the loss of articular cartilage. Degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix is believed to occur due to imbalance between the catabolic and anabolic processes of resident chondrocytes. Previous work has suggested that various lysosomal cysteine cathepsins participate in cartilage degeneration; however, their exact roles in disease development and progression have not been elucidated. In order to study degradation processes under conditions resembling the in vivo milieu of the cartilage, we cultivated chondrocytes on a type II collagen-containing matrix. Stimulation of the cultivated chondrocytes with interleukin-1α and/or tumor necrosis factor α resulted in a time-dependent increase in cathepsin S expression and induced its secretion into the conditioned media. Using a novel bioluminescent activity-based probe, we were able to demonstrate a significant increase in proteolytic activity of cathepsin S in the conditioned media of proinflammatory cytokine-stimulated chondrocytes. For the first time, cathepsin S was demonstrated to be secreted from chondrocytes upon stimulation with the proinflammatory cytokines, and displayed proteolytic activity in culture supernatants. Its stability at neutral pH and potent proteolytic activity on extracellular matrix components mean that cathepsin S may contribute significantly to cartilage degradation and may thus be considered a potential drug target in joint diseases.

  12. Cathepsin B Regulates Collagen Expression by Fibroblasts via Prolonging TLR2/NF-?B Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Xue Li; Zhou Wu; Junjun Ni; Yicong Liu; Jie Meng; Weixian Yu; Hiroshi Nakanishi; Yanmin Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts are essential for tissue repair due to producing collagens, and lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B (CatB) is involved in promoting chronic inflammation. We herein report that CatB regulates the expression of collagens III and IV by fibroblasts in response to a TLR2 agonist, lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g. LPS). In cultured human BJ fibroblasts, mRNA expression of CatB was significantly increased, while that of collagens III and IV was significantly decreased a...

  13. Exploration of peptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K protease by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Eighteen tripeptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K were discovered by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation. The 18 tripeptides fit the active site better than the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, and a better inhibitor of cathepsin K could be designed considering these tripeptides. Among the 18 tripeptides, Phe-Arg-Asp and Tyr-Arg-Asp fit the active site the best and their structural similarity should be considered in the design process. Interesting factors emerged from the structure of the decision tree, and its structural information will guide exploration of potential inhibitor molecules for proteases.

  14. ErbB2-Driven Breast Cancer Cell Invasion Depends on a Complex Signaling Network Activating Myeloid Zinc Finger-1-Dependent Cathepsin B Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafn, Bo; Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Andersen, Sofie Hagel

    2012-01-01

    signaling network activates the transcription of cathepsin B gene (CTSB) via myeloid zinc finger-1 transcription factor that binds to an ErbB2-responsive enhancer element in the first intron of CTSB. This work provides a model system for ErbB2-induced breast cancer cell invasiveness, reveals a signaling...... as effectors of ErbB2-induced invasion in vitro. We identify Cdc42-binding protein kinase beta, extracellular regulated kinase 2, p21-activated protein kinase 4, and protein kinase C alpha as essential mediators of ErbB2-induced cysteine cathepsin expression and breast cancer cell invasiveness. The identified...

  15. Cathepsin L silencing increases As2O3 toxicity in malignantly transformed pilocytic astrocytoma MPA58 cells by activating caspases 3/7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primon, Monika; Huszthy, Peter C; Motaln, Helena; Talasila, Krishna M; Miletic, Hrvoje; Atai, Nadia A; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Lah Turnšek, Tamara

    2017-07-01

    Low-grade, pilocytic astrocytomas are treated by resection, but additional therapy is necessary for those tumors with anaplastic features. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is emerging as an effective chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of malignant glioblastoma multiforme, where Cathepsin L silencing enables lower, less harmful As2O3 concentrations to achieve the desired cytotoxic effect. Here, we evaluated the effects of As2O3 combined with stable Cathepsin L shRNA silencing on cell viability/metabolic activity, and apoptosis in primary cultures of recurrent malignantly transformed pilocytic astrocytoma (MPA). These cells expressed high Cathepsin L levels, and when grown as monolayers and spheroids, they were more resistant to As2O3 than the U87MG glioblastoma cell line. Caspases 3/7 activity in MPA58 spheroids was not significantly affected by As2O3, possibly due to higher chemoresistance of primary biopsy tissue of less malignant astrocytoma versus the malignant U87MG cell line. However, As2O3 treatment was cytotoxic to MPA spheroids after silencing of Cathepsin L expression. While Cathepsin L silencing only slightly decreased the live/dead cell ratio in As2O3-treated MPA-si spheroids under our experimental conditions, there was an increase in As2O3-mediated apoptosis in MPA-si spheroids, as indicated by elevated caspases 3/7 activity. Therefore, Cathepsin L silencing by gene manipulation can be applied when a more aggressive approach is needed in treatment of pilocytic astrocytomas with anaplastic features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantifying Cathepsin S Activity in Antigen Presenting Cells Using a Novel Specific Substrate*

    OpenAIRE

    Lützner, Nicolas; Kalbacher, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    Cathepsin S (CatS) is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. Because of the relatively broad substrate specificity of this family, a specific substrate for CatS is not yet known. Based on a detailed study of the CatS endopeptidase specificity, using six series of internally quenched fluorescent peptides, we were able to design a specific substrate for CatS. The peptide series was based on the sequence GRWHTVGLRWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, which sho...

  17. Cysteine cathepsins and extracellular matrix degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonović, Marko; Turk, Boris

    2014-08-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are normally found in the lysosomes where they are involved in intracellular protein turnover. Their ability to degrade the components of the extracellular matrix in vitro was first reported more than 25years ago. However, cathepsins were for a long time not considered to be among the major players in ECM degradation in vivo. During the last decade it has, however, become evident that abundant secretion of cysteine cathepsins into extracellular milieu is accompanying numerous physiological and disease conditions, enabling the cathepsins to degrade extracellular proteins. In this review we will focus on cysteine cathepsins and their extracellular functions linked with ECM degradation, including regulation of their activity, which is often enhanced by acidification of the extracellular microenvironment, such as found in the bone resorption lacunae or tumor microenvironment. We will further discuss the ECM substrates of cathepsins with a focus on collagen and elastin, including the importance of that for pathologies. Finally, we will overview the current status of cathepsin inhibitors in clinical development for treatment of ECM-linked diseases, in particular osteoporosis. Cysteine cathepsins are among the major proteases involved in ECM remodeling, and their role is not limited to degradation only. Deregulation of their activity is linked with numerous ECM-linked diseases and they are now validated targets in a number of them. Cathepsins S and K are the most attractive targets, especially cathepsin K as a major therapeutic target for osteoporosis with drugs targeting it in advanced clinical trials. Due to their major role in ECM remodeling cysteine cathepsins have emerged as an important group of therapeutic targets for a number of ECM-related diseases, including, osteoporosis, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  18. Live Cell Imaging and Profiling of Cysteine Cathepsin Activity Using a Quenched Activity-Based Probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Bogyo, M.; Verdoes, M.

    2017-01-01

    Since protease activity is highly regulated by structural and environmental influences, the abundance of a protease often does not directly correlate with its activity. Because in most of the cases it is the activity of a protease that gives rise to its biological relevance, tools to report on this

  19. Cathepsin L plays a role in quinolinic acid-induced NF-Κb activation and excitotoxicity in rat striatal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ru Wang

    Full Text Available The present study seeks to investigate the role of cathepsin L in glutamate receptor-induced transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation and excitotoxicity in rats striatal neurons. Stereotaxic administration of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor agonist Quinolinic acid (QA into the unilateral striatum was used to produce the in vivo excitotoxic model. Co-administration of QA and the cathepsin L inhibitor Z-FF-FMK or 1-Naphthalenesulfonyl-IW-CHO (NaphthaCHO was used to assess the contribution of cathepsin L to QA-induced striatal neuron death. Western blot analysis and cathepsin L activity assay were used to assess the changes in the levels of cathepsin L after QA treatment. Western blot analysis was used to assess the changes in the protein levels of inhibitor of NF-κB alpha isoform (IκB-α and phospho-IκB alpha (p-IκBα after QA treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect the effects of Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO on QA-induced NF-κB. Western blot analysis was used to detect the effects of Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO on QA-induced IκB-α phosphorylation and degradation, changes in the levels of IKKα, p-IKKα, TP53, caspase-3, beclin1, p62, and LC3II/LC3I. The results show that QA-induced loss of striatal neurons were strongly inhibited by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. QA-induced degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, up-regulation of NF-κB responsive gene TP53, and activation of caspase-3 was strongly inhibited by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. QA-induced increases in beclin 1, LC3II/LC3I, and down-regulation of p62 were reduced by Z-FF-FMK or NaphthaCHO. These results suggest that cathepsin L is involved in glutamate receptor-induced NF-κB activation. Cathepsin L inhibitors have neuroprotective effects by inhibiting glutamate receptor-induced IκB-α degradation and NF-κB activation.

  20. Extraction and Characterization of Cathepsin Inhibitor from Milkfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Nurhayati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzyme is distributed acros all organism including fish. Cysteine proteases are the largest group of proteolytic enzyme. Lysosomal cathepsin, one of cysteine protease enzyme, cause softening and degradation of myofibril protein and it’s activity is regulated by endogenous inhibitors. The purposes of this study were to optimize the extraction cathepsin inhibitors from the skin, muscles, and viscera of fish, to partially purify the cathepsin inhibitors of selected sources, and to study the characteristics of the cathepsin inhibitor. The cathepsin inhibitor could be extracted from muscle fish and partially purified using ammonium sulfate of 70%. The purified cathepsin inhibitor had optimum temperature at 40°C and the optimum at pH 8. Metal ions decreased the activity of the protease inhibitor, except 1 mM of metal ion Mn2+ and Na+. Keywords: Cathepsin, characterization, partial purification, protease inhibitor

  1. Synthetic cyclohexenyl chalcone natural products possess cytotoxic activities against prostate cancer cells and inhibit cysteine cathepsins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb Majumdar, Ishita; Devanabanda, Arvind; Fox, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Jacob; Cong, Huan; Porco, John A; Weber, Horst C

    2011-12-16

    A number of cyclohexenyl chalcone Diels-Alder natural products possess promising biological properties including strong cytotoxicity in various human cancer cells. Herein, we show that natural products in this class including panduratin A and nicolaioidesin C inhibit cysteine cathepsins as indicated by protease profiling assays and cell-free cathepsin L enzyme assays. Owing to the critical roles of cathepsins in the biology of human tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis, these findings should pave the way for development of novel antitumor agents for use in clinical settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Affinity purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop processes for effective isolation and purification of recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) from transgenic rabbit milk. Methods: Immunoaffinity chromatography was selected and improved by a special polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody (PR-mAb). Alteplase was used as immunogen ...

  3. Effect of detergent ''solo'' and crude oil on the activities of cathepsin D and acid phosphatase in hemolymph of Crangon crangon L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drewa, G.; Zbytnieski, Z.; Pautsch, F.

    1977-01-01

    Study was made of the activity of cathepsin D (EC 3.4.23.) and acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2.) in hemolymph of Crangon crangon L. shrimp bred during 72 h in solutions of detergent ''Solo'' and crude oil at concentrations of 10, 50, and 100 mg/l. Both the detergent and crude oil at all concentrations reduced the activity of acid phosphatase after 12 h. On the other hand, the activity of cathepsin D increased after 12 h. After 72 h of the experiment the activities of both enzymes returned to the control levels. It is assumed that the detergent and crude oil cause a change in the permeability of the lysosomal membranes.

  4. Fibrinolytic Activity of Recombinant Mutant Streptokinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Mobarrez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptokinase is a bacterial protein produced by different beta hemolytic streptococci and widely used in thrombolytic treatment. The main disadvantage of using streptokinase is antibody formation which causes allergic reaction to neutralize effects of streptokinase therapy. Aim of this study was investigate of recombinant mutant streptokinase fibrinolytic activity.Materials and Methods: In this study recombinant mutant streptokinase without 42 amino acids from the C terminal region was purified by affinity S-Tag column chromatography and its fibrinolytic activity was studied.Results: The concentration of expressed and purified protein was 10 mg/ml. Its enzyme activity was assayed using zymography, radial caseinolytic activity and fibrin plate test methods and estimated quantitatively by casein digestion method compared to a commercial form.Conclusion: It was found that this product had the more volume and more enzymatic activity.

  5. Hybrid 2D/3D-quantitative structure-activity relationship and modeling studies perspectives of pepstatin A analogs as cathepsin D inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arodola, Olayide A; Soliman, Mahmoud Es

    2018-01-01

    Cathepsin D, one of the attractive targets in the treatment of breast cancer, has been implicated in HIV neuropathogenesis with potential proteolytic effects on chemokines. Methodology/result: Diverse modeling tools were used to reveal the key structural features affecting the inhibitory activities of 78 pepstatin A analogs. Analyses were performed to investigate the stability, rationality and fluctuation of the analogs. Results showed a clear correlation between the experimental and predicted activities of the analogs as well as the variation in their activities relative to structural modifications. The insight gained from this study offers theoretical references for understanding the mechanism of action of cathepsin D and will aid in the design of more potent and clinically-relevant drugs. Graphical abstract [Formula: see text].

  6. Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of a Highly Improved Anticancer Prodrug Activated by Histone Deacetylases and Cathepsin L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Nobuhide; Wang, Wei; Swenson, Cooper; McNaughton, Caroline; Sampson, Nicole S; Hayman, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Lack of absolute selectivity against cancer cells is a major limitation for current cancer therapies. In the previous study, we developed a prodrug strategy for selective cancer therapy using a masked cytotoxic agent puromycin [Boc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin], which can be sequentially activated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) and cathepsin L (CTSL) to kill cancer cells expressing high levels of both enzymes. Despite the promise as a selective cancer therapy, its requirement of relatively high dosage could be a potential issue in the clinical setting. To address this issue, we aimed to further improve the overall efficacy of our prodrug strategy. Since the proteolytic cleavage by CTSL is the rate-limiting step for the drug activation, we sought to improve the substrate structure for CTSL activity by modifying the α-amino protecting group of lysine. Here we show that protection with Fmoc [Fmoc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin] exhibits a marked improvement in overall anticancer efficacy compared to the original Boc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin and this is mainly due to the highly efficient cellular uptake besides its improved substrate structure. Furthermore, to address a concern that the improved drug efficacy might direct high toxicity to the normal cells, we confirmed that Fmoc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin still retains excellent cancer selectivity in vitro and no obvious systemic off-target toxicity in vivo. Thus our preclinical evaluation data presented here demonstrate that the Fmoc-Lys(Ac)-Puromycin exhibits substantially improved anticancer efficacy, further supporting our approach for the selective cancer therapy.

  7. Activated cathepsin L is associated with the switch from autophagy to apoptotic death of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to 6-hydroxydopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lingyun, E-mail: lingyunlee@126.com [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Experimental Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Gao, Luyan [Experimental Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Song, Yunzhen; Qin, Zheng-Hong [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liang, Zhongqin, E-mail: liangzhongqin@suda.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-02-12

    Autophagy and apoptosis are common responses to pathological damage in the process of Parkinson's disease (PD), and lysosome dysfunction may contribute to the etiology of PD's neurodegenerative process. In this study, we demonstrated that the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) increased autophagy in SH-SY5Y cells, as determined by detection of the lysosome marker lysosomal-associated membrane protein1, the autophagy protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II and the autophagy substrate P62 protein. Meanwhile, autophagy repression with 3-methyladenine accelerated the activation of caspase-3 and PARP and aggravated the cell apoptotic death induced by 6-OHDA. Furthermore, we found that 6-OHDA treatment resulted in a transient increase in the intracellular and nuclear expression of cathepsin L (CTSL). The CTSL inhibitor, Z-FY-CHO, could promote autophagy, decrease accumulation of P62, and block activation of caspase-3 and PARP. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of autophagy may primarily be a protective process in SH-SY5Y cell death induced by 6-OHDA, and the nuclear translocation of CTSL could enhance the cell apoptotic cascade via disturbing autophagy-apoptotic systems in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings highlight the potential role of CTSL in the cross talk between autophagy and apoptosis, which might be considered a therapeutic strategy for treatment of pathologic conditions associated with neurodegeneration. - Highlights: • Inhibition of autophagy aggravated the cell apoptotic death in SH-SY5Y cells. • Activation of cathepsin L impaired the autophagy pathway. • Activation of cathepsin L enhanced the cell apoptotic cascade. • Cathepsin L involves in the cross talk between autophagy and apoptosis.

  8. Quantitative Electrochemical Detection of Cathepsin B Activity in Breast Cancer Cell Lysates Using Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrode Arrays toward Identification of Cancer Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Swisher, Luxi Z.; Prior, Allan M.; Gunaratna, Medha J.; Shishido, Stephanie; Madiyar, Foram; Nguyen, Thu A.; Hua, Duy H.; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The proteolytic activity of cathepsin B in complex breast cell lysates have been measured with alternating current voltammetry (ACV) using ferrocene (Fc)-labeled-tetrapeptides immobilized on nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). Four types of breast cells have been tested, including normal breast cells (HMEC), transformed breast cells (MCF-10A), breast cancer cells (T47D), and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). The detected protea...

  9. Cathepsin D inactivates cysteine proteinase inhibitors, cystatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarcic, B; Kos, J; Dolenc, I; Lucovnik, P; Krizaj, I; Turk, V

    1988-07-29

    The formation of inactive complexes in excess molar amounts of human cathepsins H and L with their protein inhibitors human stefin A, human stefin B and chicken cystatin at pH 5.6 has been shown by measurement of enzyme activity coupled with reverse-phase HPLC not to involve covalent cleavage of the inhibitors. Inhibition must be the direct result of binding. On the contrary the interaction of cystatins with aspartic proteinase cathepsin D at pH 3.5 for 60 min followed by HPLC resulted in their inactivation accompanied by peptide bond cleavage at several sites, preferentially those involving hydrophobic amino acid residues. The released peptides do not inhibit papain and cathepsin L. These results explain reported elevated levels of cysteine proteinases and lead to the proposal that cathepsin D exerts an important function, through inactivation of cystatins, in the increased activities of cysteine proteinases in human diseases including muscular distrophy.

  10. Expression of cathepsin K in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, C; Krueger, S; Kuester, D; Ostertag, H; Samii, M; Buehling, F; Broemme, D; Czerniak, B; Roessner, A

    2000-07-01

    Invasive growth of chordoma is accompanied by severe destruction of adjacent bone tissue, a fact that requires high proteolytic activity at the tumor invasion fronts. In this context, cathepsin K is a candidate molecule. It is a protease with high collagenolytic and elastinolytic activity and previously thought to be restricted to osteoclasts and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. In this study, 44 cases of chordoma of sphenooccipital localization, and 10 embryo-fetal specimens including chorda dorsalis were studied immunohistochemically for their expression of cathepsin K. In 4 additional snap-frozen chordoma cases, the enzyme expression was investigated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme histochemistry. Ten chondrosarcomas of the skull base served as controls. Various concentrations of cathepsin K mRNA could be seen in all snap-frozen chordoma specimens. The protease was immunohistochemically expressed by the tumor cells. The immunoreactions were accentuated at the tumor invasion fronts. Enzyme histochemistry indicated a strong tumor cell-associated cathepsin K activity in invasive tumor components. In contrast to chordoma, cathepsin K was not significantly expressed in chorda dorsalis and chondrosarcoma of the skull base. In chondrosarcoma, protease expression was limited to osteoclastic cells localized between infiltrative tumor components and regular bone trabeculae. This study shows the significant expression and activity of cathepsin K in chordoma and implicates an important and direct role of this protease in the infiltrative growth of this tumor. This protease expression occurred during neoplastic transformation and did not appear in chorda dorsalis.

  11. Elastin degradation by cathepsin V requires two exosites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Chen, Nelson L H; Wong, Andre; Craik, Charles S; Brömme, Dieter

    2013-11-29

    Cathepsin V is a highly effective elastase and has been implicated in physiological and pathological extracellular matrix degradation. However, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Whereas human cathepsin V exhibits a potent elastolytic activity, the structurally homologous cathepsin L, which shares a 78% amino acid sequence, has only a minimal proteolytic activity toward insoluble elastin. This suggests that there are distinct structural domains that play an important role in elastinolysis. In this study, a total of 11 chimeras of cathepsins V and L were generated to identify elastin-binding domains in cathepsin V. Evaluation of these chimeras revealed two exosites contributing to the elastolytic activity of cathepsin V that are distant from the active cleft of the protease and are located in surface loop regions. Replacement of exosite 1 or 2 with analogous residues from cathepsin L led to a 75 and 43% loss in the elastolytic activity, respectively. Replacement of both exosites yielded a non-elastase variant similar to that of cathepsin L. Identification of these exosites may contribute to the design of inhibitors that will only affect the elastolytic activity of cysteine cathepsins without interfering with other physiological protease functions.

  12. xtraction and Characterization of Cathepsin Inhibitor from Milkfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Nurhayati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Proteolytic enzyme is distributed acros all organism including fish. Cysteine proteases are the largest group of proteolytic enzyme. Lysosomal cathepsin, one of cysteine protease enzyme, cause softening and degradation of myofibril protein and it’s activity is regulated by endogenous inhibitors. The purposes of this study were to optimize the extraction cathepsin inhibitors from the skin, muscles, and viscera of fish, to partially purify the cathepsin inhibitors of selected sources, and to study the characteristics of the cathepsin inhibitor. The cathepsin inhibitor could be extracted from muscle fish and partially purified using ammonium sulfate of 70%. The purified cathepsin inhibitor had optimum temperature at 40°C and the optimum at pH 8. Metal ions decreased the activity of the protease inhibitor, except 1 mM of metal ion Mn2+ and Na+.

  13. Anti-proliferative activity of recombinant melittin expressed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recombinant melittin was then successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The activity of affinity-purified recombinant melittin was determined in human leukemic U937 cells. Results show that the recombinant melittin had the same anti-proliferative activity in human leukemic U937 cells in vitro as natural one. This shows the ...

  14. Role of cysteine cathepsins in matrix degradation and cell signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermajer, Natasa; Jevnikar, Zala; Doljak, Bojan; Kos, Janko

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins participate in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and remodelling and thus influence important cellular processes such as cell transformation and differentiation, motility, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Also, cathepsins are involved in cell signalling and are capable of activating specific cell receptors and growth factors or liberating them from the ECM. In this review we emphasize recent studies on cathepsins in regard to ECM degradation and cell signalling.

  15. Evaluation of matrix metalloproteinase and cysteine cathepsin activity in dentin hybrid layer by gelatin zymography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekar Mahalaxmi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Etch and rinse adhesive activated MMPs and CCs within the hybrid layer that remained active till 7th day and no gelatinolytic activity was found on 21st day and MMPs are more active compared to CCs and MMP-2.

  16. Cathepsin D, a Marker for the Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer, May Regulate the Mitogenic Activity of Fibroblast Growth Factor 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grieb, Teri

    1998-01-01

    .... Over the years, the data substantiating such a role for cathepsin D has been quite conflicting However, there is strong evidence that cathepsin D plays a role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM...

  17. Dissecting the active site of the collagenolytic cathepsin L3 protease of the invasive stage of Fasciola hepatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Corvo

    Full Text Available A family of secreted cathepsin L proteases with differential activities is essential for host colonization and survival in the parasitic flatworm Fasciola hepatica. While the blood feeding adult secretes predominantly FheCL1, an enzyme with a strong preference for Leu at the S2 pocket of the active site, the infective stage produces FheCL3, a unique enzyme with collagenolytic activity that favours Pro at P2.Using a novel unbiased multiplex substrate profiling and mass spectrometry methodology (MSP-MS, we compared the preferences of FheCL1 and FheCL3 along the complete active site cleft and confirm that while the S2 imposes the greatest influence on substrate selectivity, preferences can be indicated on other active site subsites. Notably, we discovered that the activity of FheCL1 and FheCL3 enzymes is very different, sharing only 50% of the cleavage sites, supporting the idea of functional specialization. We generated variants of FheCL1 and FheCL3 with S2 and S3 residues by mutagenesis and evaluated their substrate specificity using positional scanning synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL. Besides the rare P2 Pro preference, FheCL3 showed a distinctive specificity at the S3 pocket, accommodating preferentially the small Gly residue. Both P2 Pro and P3 Gly preferences were strongly reduced when Trp67 of FheCL3 was replaced by Leu, rendering the enzyme incapable of digesting collagen. In contrast, the inverse Leu67Trp substitution in FheCL1 only slightly reduced its Leu preference and improved Pro acceptance in P2, but greatly increased accommodation of Gly at S3.These data reveal the significance of S2 and S3 interactions in substrate binding emphasizing the role for residue 67 in modulating both sites, providing a plausible explanation for the FheCL3 collagenolytic activity essential to host invasion. The unique specificity of FheCL3 could be exploited in the design of specific inhibitors selectively directed to specific infective stage

  18. Cathepsin E Promotes Pulmonary Emphysema via Mitochondrial Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuchen; Shan, Peiying; Homer, Robert; Zhang, Yi; Petrache, Irina; Mannam, Praveen; Lee, Patty J.

    2015-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung elasticity and irreversible air space enlargement, usually in the later decades of life. The molecular mechanisms of emphysema remain poorly defined. We identified a role for a novel cathepsin, cathepsin E, in promoting emphysema by inducing mitochondrial fission. Unlike previously reported cysteine cathepsins, which have been implicated in cigarette smoke-induced lung disease, cathepsin E is a nonlysosomal intracellular aspartic protease whose function has been described only in antigen processing. We examined lung tissue sections of persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a clinical entity that includes emphysematous change. Human chronic obstructive pulmonary disease lungs had markedly increased cathepsin E protein in the lung epithelium. We generated lung epithelial-targeted transgenic cathepsin E mice and found that they develop emphysema. Overexpression of cathepsin E resulted in increased E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1, caspase activation/apoptosis, and ultimately loss of lung parenchyma resembling emphysema. Inhibiting dynamin-related protein 1, using a small molecule inhibitor in vitro or in vivo, inhibited cathepsin E-induced apoptosis and emphysema. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to identify links between cathepsin E, mitochondrial fission, and caspase activation/apoptosis in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. Our data expand the current understanding of molecular mechanisms of emphysema development and may provide new therapeutic targets. PMID:25239563

  19. Cathepsin E promotes pulmonary emphysema via mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuchen; Shan, Peiying; Homer, Robert; Zhang, Yi; Petrache, Irina; Mannam, Praveen; Lee, Patty J

    2014-10-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung elasticity and irreversible air space enlargement, usually in the later decades of life. The molecular mechanisms of emphysema remain poorly defined. We identified a role for a novel cathepsin, cathepsin E, in promoting emphysema by inducing mitochondrial fission. Unlike previously reported cysteine cathepsins, which have been implicated in cigarette smoke-induced lung disease, cathepsin E is a nonlysosomal intracellular aspartic protease whose function has been described only in antigen processing. We examined lung tissue sections of persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a clinical entity that includes emphysematous change. Human chronic obstructive pulmonary disease lungs had markedly increased cathepsin E protein in the lung epithelium. We generated lung epithelial-targeted transgenic cathepsin E mice and found that they develop emphysema. Overexpression of cathepsin E resulted in increased E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1, caspase activation/apoptosis, and ultimately loss of lung parenchyma resembling emphysema. Inhibiting dynamin-related protein 1, using a small molecule inhibitor in vitro or in vivo, inhibited cathepsin E-induced apoptosis and emphysema. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to identify links between cathepsin E, mitochondrial fission, and caspase activation/apoptosis in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. Our data expand the current understanding of molecular mechanisms of emphysema development and may provide new therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple Cathepsins Promote Pro-IL-1β Synthesis and NLRP3-Mediated IL-1β Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Orlowski, Gregory M.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Sharma, Shruti; Bogyo, Matthew; Robertson, Stephanie A; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    Sterile particles induce robust inflammatory responses that underlie the pathogenesis of diseases like silicosis, gout and atherosclerosis. A key cytokine mediating this response is IL-1β. The generation of bioactive IL-1β by sterile particles is mediated by the NLRP3 inflammasome, although exactly how this occurs is incompletely resolved. Prior studies have found that the cathepsin B inhibitor, Ca074Me, suppresses this response, supporting a model whereby ingested particles disrupt lysosomes...

  1. A recombinant wheat serpin with inhibitory activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren K; Dahl, Søren Weis; Nørgård, Anette

    1996-01-01

    to the subfamily of protein Z-type serpins and the amino acid sequence is 70%, identical with the barley serpins BSZ4 and BSZx and 27-33% identical with human serpins such as alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor, antithrombin III, and plasminogen activator inhibitor. The cDNA was subcloned in the pET3d expression vector......, equipped with a histidine affinity tag at the N-terminus and expressed in Escherichia coli BL(21) DE3 pLysS. Recombinant WSZ1 from the soluble fraction was partially purified on Ni-NTA agarose and MonoQ columns and shown to form SDS-stable complexes with sc-chymotrypsin. Southern blots and amino acid...... sequencing indicated that only few serpins are encoded by wheat, but at least three distinct genes are expressed in the grain. Cleavage experiments on a chymotrypsin column suggested a Gln-Gln reactive site bond not previously observed in inhibitory serpins....

  2. Expression of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Wildtype Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Sabrina P; Wickremesekera, Agadha C; Brasch, Helen D; Marsh, Reginald; Tan, Swee T; Itinteang, Tinte

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the expression of cathepsins B, D, and G, in relation to the cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulations, we have previously characterized within isocitrate dehydogenase (IDH)-wildtype glioblastoma (IDHWGB). 3,3-Diaminobezidine (DAB) immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for cathepsins B, D, and G, was performed on 4μm-thick formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded IDHWGB samples obtained from six patients. Two representative DHWGB samples from the original cohort of patients were selected for immunofluorescent (IF) IHC staining, to identify the localization of the cathepsins in relation to the CSC subpopulations. NanoString gene expression analysis and colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH) were conducted to investigate the transcriptional activation of genes encoding for cathepsins B, D, and G. Data obtained from cell counting of DAB IHC-stained slides and from NanoString analysis were subjected to statistical analyses to determine significance. Cathepsin B and cathepsin D were detected in IDHWGB by DAB IHC staining. IF IHC staining demonstrated the expression of both cathepsin B and cathepsin D by the OCT4 + and SALL4 + CSC subpopulations. NanoString gene analysis and CISH confirmed the abundant transcript expression of these cathepsins. The transcriptional and translational expressions of cathepsin G were minimal and were confined to cells within the microvasculature. This study demonstrated the expression of cathepsin B and cathepsin D but not cathepsin G within the CSC subpopulations of IDHWGB at both the transcriptional and translational level. Cathepsin G was expressed at low levels and was not localized to the CSC population of IDHWGB. The novel finding of cathepsin B and cathepsin D in IDHWGB suggests the presence of bypass loops for the renin-angiotensin system, which may facilitate the production of angiotensin peptides. Elucidating the precise role of these cathepsins may lead to better understanding and more effective treatment of this aggressive

  3. Expression of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Wildtype Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina P. Koh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AimTo investigate the expression of cathepsins B, D, and G, in relation to the cancer stem cell (CSC subpopulations, we have previously characterized within isocitrate dehydogenase (IDH-wildtype glioblastoma (IDHWGB.Methods3,3-Diaminobezidine (DAB immunohistochemical (IHC staining for cathepsins B, D, and G, was performed on 4μm-thick formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded IDHWGB samples obtained from six patients. Two representative DHWGB samples from the original cohort of patients were selected for immunofluorescent (IF IHC staining, to identify the localization of the cathepsins in relation to the CSC subpopulations. NanoString gene expression analysis and colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH were conducted to investigate the transcriptional activation of genes encoding for cathepsins B, D, and G. Data obtained from cell counting of DAB IHC-stained slides and from NanoString analysis were subjected to statistical analyses to determine significance.ResultsCathepsin B and cathepsin D were detected in IDHWGB by DAB IHC staining. IF IHC staining demonstrated the expression of both cathepsin B and cathepsin D by the OCT4+ and SALL4+ CSC subpopulations. NanoString gene analysis and CISH confirmed the abundant transcript expression of these cathepsins. The transcriptional and translational expressions of cathepsin G were minimal and were confined to cells within the microvasculature.ConclusionThis study demonstrated the expression of cathepsin B and cathepsin D but not cathepsin G within the CSC subpopulations of IDHWGB at both the transcriptional and translational level. Cathepsin G was expressed at low levels and was not localized to the CSC population of IDHWGB. The novel finding of cathepsin B and cathepsin D in IDHWGB suggests the presence of bypass loops for the renin-angiotensin system, which may facilitate the production of angiotensin peptides. Elucidating the precise role of these cathepsins may lead to better understanding and more

  4. The Feasibility of Enzyme Targeted Activation for Amino Acid/Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Floxuridine; Cathepsin D as a Potential Targeted Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon L. Amidon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of therapeutic efficacy for cancer agents has been a big challenge which includes the increase of tumor selectivity and the reduction of adverse effects at non-tumor sites. In order to achieve those goals, prodrug approaches have been extensively investigated. In this report, the potential activation enzymes for 5¢-amino acid/dipeptide monoester floxuridine prodrugs in pancreatic cancer cells were selected and the feasibility of enzyme specific activation of prodrugs was evaluated. All prodrugs exhibited the range of 3.0–105.7 min of half life in Capan-2 cell homogenate with the presence and the absence of selective enzyme inhibitors. 5¢-O-L-Phenylalanyl-L-tyrosyl-floxuridine exhibited longer half life only with the presence of pepstatin A. Human cathepsin B and D selectively hydrolized 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine and 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-glycylfloxuridine compared to the other tested prodrugs. The wide range of growth inhibitory effect by floxuridine prodrugs in Capan-2 cells was observed due to the different affinities of prodrug promoieties to enyzmes. In conclusion, it is feasible to design prodrugs which are activated by specific enzymes. Cathepsin D might be a good candidate as a target enzyme for prodrug activation and 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine may be the best candidate among the tested floxuridine prodrugs.

  5. Recombinant ArtinM activates mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria Cintra; Cecilio, Nerry Tatiana; de Almeida Buranello, Patricia Andressa; Pranchevicius, Maria Cristina; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Pereira-da-Silva, Gabriela; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2016-07-04

    Mast cells are hematopoietically derived cells that play a role in inflammatory processes such as allergy, as well as in the immune response against pathogens by the selective and rapid release of preformed and lipid mediators, and the delayed release of cytokines. The native homotetrameric lectin ArtinM, a D-mannose binding lectin purified from Artocarpus heterophyllus seeds, is one of several lectins that are able to activate mast cells. Besides activating mast cells, ArtinM has been shown to affect several biological responses, including immunomodulation and acceleration of wound healing. Because of the potential pharmacological application of ArtinM, a recombinant ArtinM (rArtinM) was produced in Escherichia coli. The current study evaluated the ability of rArtinM to induce mast cell degranulation and activation. The glycan binding specificity of rArtinM was similar to that of jArtinM. rArtinM, via its CRD, was able to degranulate, releasing β-hexosaminidase and TNF-α, and to promote morphological changes on the mast cell surface. Moreover, rArtinM induced the release of the newly-synthesized mediator, IL-4. rArtinM does not have a co-stimulatory effect on the FcεRI degranulation via. The IgE-dependent mast cell activation triggered by rArtinM seems to be dependent on NFkB activation. The lectin rArtinM has the ability to activate and degranulate mast cells via their CRDs. The present study indicates that rArtinM is a suitable substitute for the native form, jArtinM, and that rArtinM may serve as an important and reliable pharmacological agent.

  6. Expression of schistosomal cathepsin l1 in Escherichia coli and evaluation of its protective capacity in an animal challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PA Miyasato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes utilize proteinases to accomplish several activities such as tissue penetration, tissue digestion and evasion of host immune responses. Cathepsin L is a cysteine proteinase of the papain superfamily detected in their gut lumen which indicates that this enzyme contributes to the proteolysis of ingested hemoglobin. Due to the roles played in the schistosome biology, proteolytic enzymes are considered potential targets for developing and guiding antischistosomal therapies. In the present work, the cathepsin L1 cDNA coding of Schistosoma mansoni was cloned into the pAE vector that provides high-level expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was expressed as inclusion bodies, purified under denaturing conditions through nickel-charged chromatography and used for experimental animal vaccination. ELISA was performed with the pooled sera. Although this protein was shown to be immunogenic, mice immunized with three doses of recombinant protein plus aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant were not protected against S. mansoni infection.

  7. Homing of radiolabelled recombinant interleukin-2 activated natural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Homing of radiolabelled recombinant interleukin-2 activated natural killer cells and their efficacy in adoptive immunotherapy against murine fibrosarcoma. Anuradha Rai Ashim K ... Keywords. Adoptive immunotherapy; ascitic fibrosarcoma; natural killer cells; non-recurrence of tumour; recombinant interleukin-2 activation ...

  8. Cathepsin L is required for ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection in NIH3T3 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Hiroaki; Kamiyama, Haruka; Minematsu, Kazuo; Goto, Kensuke; Mizota, Tsutomu; Oishi, Kazunori; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2009-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that a cathepsin B inhibitor, CA-074Me, attenuates ecotropic murine leukemia virus (Eco-MLV) infection in NIH3T3 cells, suggesting that cathepsin B is required for the Eco-MLV infection. However, cathepsin B activity was negative or extremely low in NIH3T3 cells. How did CA-074Me attenuate the Eco-MLV infection? The CA-074Me treatment of NIH3T3 cells inhibited cathepsin L activity, and a cathepsin L specific inhibitor, CLIK148, attenuated the Eco-MLV vector infec...

  9. Control of active B and L cathepsins in tissues of colorectal cancer using cystatins isolated from chicken egg proteins: in vitro studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Rudno-Rudzinska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of cysteine peptidases (cathepsins B and L was estimated in homogenates of tissues sampled during surgery from 60 patients operated due to colorectal tumors. The results were compared to those obtained using tissues in which histopathology disclosed no tumorous cells, obtained from 20 patients of the same group, treated as a control. Activity of the enzymes was inhibited using cysteine peptidase inhibitors isolated from chicken egg proteins. Application of the inhibitors was found to inhibit activity of the enzymes which play a key role in tumor development. It is suggested that in future the inhibitors may provide a component of new generation drugs in the so-called inhibitor therapy. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 4, pp. 670–676

  10. Novel cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like cysteine protease of Naegleria fowleri excretory-secretory proteins and their biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Yang, Hee-Jong; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2014-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes a lethal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals, which leads to death within 7-14 days. Cysteine proteases of parasites play key roles in nutrient uptake, excystment/encystment, host tissue invasion, and immune evasion. In this study, we cloned N. fowleri cathepsin B (nfcpb) and cathepsin B-like (nfcpb-L) genes from our cDNA library of N. fowleri. The full-length sequences of genes were 1,038 and 939 bp (encoded 345 and 313 amino acids), and molecular weights were 38.4 and 34 kDa, respectively. Also, nfcpb and nfcpb-L showed a 56 and 46 % identity to Naegleria gruberi cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like enzyme, respectively. Recombinant NfCPB (rNfCPB) and NfCPB-L (rNfCPB-L) proteins were expressed by the pEX5-NT/TOPO vector that was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21, and they showed 38.4 and 34 kDa bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis using their respective antibodies. Proteolytic activity of refolded rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L was maximum at a pH of 4.5, and the most effective substrate was Z-LR-MCA. rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L showed proteolytic activity for several proteins such as IgA, IgG, IgM, collagen, fibronectin, hemoglobin, and albumin. These results suggested that NfCPB and NfCPB-L cysteine protease are important components of the N. fowleri ESP, and they may play important roles in host tissue invasion and immune evasion as pathogens that cause N. fowleri PAM.

  11. Antiproliferative activity of recombinant human interferon-λ2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... This study aimed at the generation of a stable transformed silkworm BmN cell line which can continuously express human interferon-λ2 (IFN-λ2) gene, and investigated the antiproliferative activity of this recombinant human IFN-λ2. Silkworm BmN cells were transfected with the recombinant vector.

  12. Antiproliferative activity of recombinant human interferon-λ2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at the generation of a stable transformed silkworm BmN cell line which can continuously express human interferon-λ2 (IFN-λ2) gene, and investigated the antiproliferative activity of this recombinant human IFN-λ2. Silkworm BmN cells were transfected with the recombinant vector pIZT/V5-His harboring the ...

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Modulates miR-106b-5p to Control Cathepsin S Expression Resulting in Higher Pathogen Survival and Poor T-Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pires

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The success of tuberculosis (TB bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, relies on the ability to survive in host cells and escape to immune surveillance and activation. We recently demonstrated that Mtb manipulation of host lysosomal cathepsins in macrophages leads to decreased enzymatic activity and pathogen survival. In addition, while searching for microRNAs (miRNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation during mycobacteria infection of human macrophages, we found that selected miRNAs such as miR-106b-5p were specifically upregulated by pathogenic mycobacteria. Here, we show that miR-106b-5p is actively manipulated by Mtb to ensure its survival in macrophages. Using an in silico prediction approach, we identified miR-106b-5p with a potential binding to the 3′-untranslated region of cathepsin S (CtsS mRNA. We demonstrated by luminescence-based methods that miR-106b-5p indeed targets CTSS mRNA resulting in protein translation silencing. Moreover, miR-106b-5p gain-of-function experiments lead to a decreased CtsS expression favoring Mtb intracellular survival. By contrast, miR-106b-5p loss-of-function in infected cells was concomitant with increased CtsS expression, with significant intracellular killing of Mtb and T-cell activation. Modulation of miR-106b-5p did not impact necrosis, apoptosis or autophagy arguing that miR-106b-5p directly targeted CtsS expression as a way for Mtb to avoid exposure to degradative enzymes in the endocytic pathway. Altogether, our data suggest that manipulation of miR-106b-5p as a potential target for host-directed therapy for Mtb infection.

  14. Dysregulation of macrophage-secreted cathepsin B contributes to HIV-1-linked neuronal apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eillen J Rodriguez-Franco

    Full Text Available Chronic HIV infection leads to the development of cognitive impairments, designated as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. The secretion of soluble neurotoxic factors by HIV-infected macrophages plays a central role in the neuronal dysfunction and cell death associated with HAND. One potentially neurotoxic protein secreted by HIV-1 infected macrophages is cathepsin B. To explore the potential role of cathepsin B in neuronal cell death after HIV infection, we cultured HIV-1(ADA infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and assayed them for expression and activity of cathepsin B and its inhibitors, cystatins B and C. The neurotoxic activity of the secreted cathepsin B was determined by incubating cells from the neuronal cell line SK-N-SH with MDM conditioned media (MCM from HIV-1 infected cultures. We found that HIV-1 infected MDM secreted significantly higher levels of cathepsin B than did uninfected cells. Moreover, the activity of secreted cathepsin B was significantly increased in HIV-infected MDM at the peak of viral production. Incubation of neuronal cells with supernatants from HIV-infected MDM resulted in a significant increase in the numbers of apoptotic neurons, and this increase was reversed by the addition of either the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 or a monoclonal antibody to cathepsin B. In situ proximity ligation assays indicated that the increased neurotoxic activity of the cathepsin B secreted by HIV-infected MDM resulted from decreased interactions between the enzyme and its inhibitors, cystatins B and C. Furthermore, preliminary in vivo studies of human post-mortem brain tissue suggested an upregulation of cathepsin B immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and basal ganglia in individuals with HAND. Our results demonstrate that HIV-1 infection upregulates cathepsin B in macrophages, increases cathepsin B activity, and reduces cystatin-cathepsin interactions, contributing to neuronal apoptosis. These findings

  15. Expression of Cathepsins B, D and G in Infantile Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinte eItinteang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS in the biology of infantile hemangioma (IH represents an emerging paradigm, particularly the involvement of renin, angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II. This study investigated the expression of cathepsins B, D and G, enzymes that may modulate the RAS, in IH.Materials and Methods: The expression of cathepsins B, D and G was examined using immunohistochemistry, enzyme activity assays, mass spectrometry and Nanostring gene expression assay in IH samples at different phases of development.Results: Immunohistochemical staining showed the expression of cathepsins B, D and G in proliferating and involuted IH samples. This was confirmed at the transcriptional level using Nanostring gene expression assays. Mass spectrometry confirmed identification of cathepsins D and G in all three phases of IH development, whereas cathepsin B was detected in 2/2 proliferating and 1/2 involuting lesions. Enzyme activity assays demonstrated the activity of cathepsins B and D, but not G, in all phases of IH development.Conclusions: Our data demonstrated the presence of cathepsins B, D and G in IH. Their role in modulating the RAS and the biology of IH offers potential novel targets for the management of this tumor.

  16. Cathepsin G-dependent modulation of platelet thrombus formation in vivo by blood neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauder Faraday

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are consistently associated with arterial thrombotic morbidity in human clinical studies but the causal basis for this association is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophils modulate platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo in a cathepsin G-dependent manner. Neutrophils enhanced aggregation of human platelets in vitro in dose-dependent fashion and this effect was diminished by pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G activity and knockdown of cathepsin G expression. Tail bleeding time in the mouse was prolonged by a cathepsin G inhibitor and in cathepsin G knockout mice, and formation of neutrophil-platelet conjugates in blood that was shed from transected tails was reduced in the absence of cathepsin G. Bleeding time was highly correlated with blood neutrophil count in wildtype but not cathepsin G deficient mice. In the presence of elevated blood neutrophil counts, the anti-thrombotic effect of cathepsin G inhibition was greater than that of aspirin and additive to it when administered in combination. Both pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence prolonged the time for platelet thrombus to form in ferric chloride-injured mouse mesenteric arterioles. In a vaso-occlusive model of ischemic stroke, inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence improved cerebral blood flow, reduced histologic brain injury, and improved neurobehavioral outcome. These experiments demonstrate that neutrophil cathepsin G is a physiologic modulator of platelet thrombus formation in vivo and has potential as a target for novel anti-thrombotic therapies.

  17. Doxorubicin-induced cell death requires cathepsin B in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, S; Rimmbach, C; Neumann, H; Niessen, J; Reimer, E; Ritter, C A; Rosskopf, D; Cinatl, J; Michaelis, M; Schroeder, H W S; Kroemer, H K

    2010-11-15

    The cysteine protease cathepsin B acts as a key player in apoptosis. Cathepsin B-mediated cell death is induced by various stimuli such as ischemia, bile acids or TNFα. Whether cathepsin B can be influenced by anticancer drugs, however, has not been studied in detail. Here, we describe the modulation of doxorubicin-induced cell death by silencing of cathepsin B expression. Previously, it was shown that doxorubicin, in contrast to other drugs, selectively regulates expression and activity of cathepsin B. Selective silencing of cathepsin B by siRNA or the cathepsin B specific inhibitor CA074Me modified doxorubicin-mediated cell death in Hela tumor cells. Both Caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage were significantly reduced in cells lacking cathepsin B. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization as well as the release of cytochrome C and AIF from mitochondria into cytosol induced by doxorubicin were significantly diminished in cathepsin B suppressed cells. In addition, doxorubicin associated down-regulation of XIAP was not observed in cathepsin B silenced cells. Lack of cathepsin B significantly modified cell cycle regulatory proteins such as cdk1, Wee1 and p21 without significant changes in G(1), S or G(2)M cell cycle phases maybe indicating further cell cycle independent actions of these proteins. Consequently, cell viability following doxorubicin was significantly elevated in cells with cathepsin B silencing. In summary, our data strongly suggest a role of cathepsin B in doxorubicin-induced cell death. Therefore, increased expression of cathepsin B in various types of cancer can modify susceptibility towards doxorubicin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human cysteine cathepsins are not reliable markers of infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Naudin

    Full Text Available Cysteine cathepsins have emerged as new players in inflammatory lung disorders. Their activities are dramatically increased in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF patients, suggesting that they are involved in the pathophysiology of CF. We have characterized the cathepsins in CF expectorations and evaluated their use as markers of colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The concentrations of active cathepsins B, H, K, L and S were the same in P. aeruginosa-positive (19 Ps+ and P. aeruginosa-negative (6 Ps- samples, unlike those of human neutrophil elastase. Also the cathepsin inhibitory potential and the cathepsins/cathepsin inhibitors imbalance remained unchanged and similar (∼2-fold in the Ps+ and Ps- groups (p<0.001, which correlated with the breakdown of their circulating cystatin-like inhibitors (kininogens. Procathepsins, which may be activated autocatalytically, are a potential proteolytic reservoir. Immunoblotting and active-site labeling identified the double-chain cathepsin B, the major cathepsin in CF sputum, as the main molecular form in both Ps+ and Ps- samples, despite the possible release of the ∼31 kDa single-chain form from procathepsin B by sputum elastase. Thus, the hydrolytic activity of cysteine cathepsins was not correlated with bacterial colonization, indicating that cathepsins, unlike human neutrophil elastase, are not suitable markers of P. aeruginosa infection.

  19. Human cysteine cathepsins are not reliable markers of infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Clément; Joulin-Giet, Alix; Couetdic, Gérard; Plésiat, Patrick; Szymanska, Aneta; Gorna, Emilia; Gauthier, Francis; Kasprzykowski, Franciszek; Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins have emerged as new players in inflammatory lung disorders. Their activities are dramatically increased in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, suggesting that they are involved in the pathophysiology of CF. We have characterized the cathepsins in CF expectorations and evaluated their use as markers of colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The concentrations of active cathepsins B, H, K, L and S were the same in P. aeruginosa-positive (19 Ps+) and P. aeruginosa-negative (6 Ps-) samples, unlike those of human neutrophil elastase. Also the cathepsin inhibitory potential and the cathepsins/cathepsin inhibitors imbalance remained unchanged and similar (∼2-fold) in the Ps+ and Ps- groups (p<0.001), which correlated with the breakdown of their circulating cystatin-like inhibitors (kininogens). Procathepsins, which may be activated autocatalytically, are a potential proteolytic reservoir. Immunoblotting and active-site labeling identified the double-chain cathepsin B, the major cathepsin in CF sputum, as the main molecular form in both Ps+ and Ps- samples, despite the possible release of the ∼31 kDa single-chain form from procathepsin B by sputum elastase. Thus, the hydrolytic activity of cysteine cathepsins was not correlated with bacterial colonization, indicating that cathepsins, unlike human neutrophil elastase, are not suitable markers of P. aeruginosa infection.

  20. Quantitative Longitudinal Imaging of Vascular Inflammation and Treatment by Ezetimibe in apoE Mice by FMT Using New Optical Imaging Biomarkers of Cathepsin Activity and α(v)β(3) Integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-An; Patel, Manishkumar; Suresch, Donna; Connolly, Brett; Bao, Bagna; Groves, Kevin; Rajopadhye, Milind; Peterson, Jeffrey D; Klimas, Michael; Sur, Cyrille; Bednar, Bohumil

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation as a core pathological event of atherosclerotic lesions is associated with the secretion of cathepsin proteases and the expression of α(v)β(3) integrin. We employed fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) noninvasive imaging of these molecular activities using cathepsin sensing (ProSense, CatB FAST) and α(v)β(3) integrin (IntegriSense) near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) agents. A statistically significant increase in the ProSense and IntegriSense signal was observed within the chest region of apoE(-/-) mice (P < 0.05) versus C57BL/6 mice starting 25 and 22 weeks on high cholesterol diet, respectively. In a treatment study using ezetimibe (7 mg/kg), there was a statistically significant reduction in the ProSense and CatB FAST chest signal of treated (P < 0.05) versus untreated apoE(-/-) mice at 31 and 21 weeks on high cholesterol diet, respectively. The signal of ProSense and CatB FAST correlated with macrophage counts and was found associated with inflammatory cells by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry of cells dissociated from aortas. This report demonstrates that cathepsin and α(v)β(3) integrin NIRF agents can be used as molecular imaging biomarkers for longitudinal detection of atherosclerosis, and cathepsin agents can monitor anti-inflammatory effects of ezetimibe with applications in preclinical testing of therapeutics and potentially for early diagnosis of atherosclerosis in patients.

  1. American lobster Cathepsin D, an aspartic peptidase resistant to proteolysis and active in organic solvents, non-ionic detergents and salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Siordia, Ivan; Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Navarrete Del Toro, María de Los Angeles; García-Carreño, Fernando

    2017-10-05

    Suitable peptidases for biotechnological applications are those active at low temperature, in organic solvents, detergents or proteolytic additives. American lobster cathepsin D1 (CD1) is an enzyme highly efficient at 5-50°C and at pH 2.5-5.5. We assessed the effect of common industrial additives on CD1 activity. CD1 was isolated from lobster gastric fluid by chromatography. The proteolytic activity was measured using a fluorogenic specific substrate and the conformation by intrinsic fluorescence. Non-ionic detergents Tween-20 and Triton X-100 stabilize the peptidase activity. Ethanol, methanol and isopropanol [5-15% (v/v)] increased the enzyme activity up to 80%. The enzyme is active until 2.5M urea and is resistant to proteolysis by papain and renin. In this work, a crustacean peptidase that remains active when exposed to different chemical and proteolytic additives is reported, evincing that crustaceans are a good model for discovery of novel stable peptidases for future pharmaceutical, cosmetic and alimentary applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The 3D structure and function of digestive cathepsin L-like proteinases of Tenebrio molitor larval midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beton, Daniela; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Farah, Chuck S; Terra, Walter R

    2012-09-01

    Cathepsin L-like proteinases (CAL) are major digestive proteinases in the beetle Tenebrio molitor. Procathepsin Ls 2 (pCAL2) and 3 (pCAL3) were expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, purified and activated under acidic conditions. Immunoblot analyses of different T. molitor larval tissues demonstrated that a polyclonal antibody to pCAL3 recognized pCAL3 and cathepsin L 3 (CAL3) only in the anterior two-thirds of midgut tissue and midgut luminal contents of T. molitor larvae. Furthermore, immunocytolocalization data indicated that pCAL3 occurs in secretory vesicles and microvilli in anterior midgut. Therefore CAL3, like cathepsin L 2 (CAL2), is a digestive enzyme secreted by T. molitor anterior midgut. CAL3 hydrolyses Z-FR-MCA and Z-RR-MCA (typical cathepsin substrates), whereas CAL2 hydrolyses only Z-FR-MCA. Active site mutants (pCAL2C25S and pCAL3C26S) were constructed by replacing the catalytic cysteine with serine to prevent autocatalytic processing. Recombinant pCAL2 and pCAL3 mutants (pCAL2C25S and pCAL3C26S) were prepared, crystallized and their 3D structures determined at 1.85 and 2.1 Å, respectively. While the overall structure of these enzymes is similar to other members of the papain superfamily, structural differences in the S2 subsite explain their substrate specificities. The data also supported models for CAL trafficking to lysosomes and to secretory vesicles to be discharged into midgut contents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human Cathepsin V Protease Participates in Production of Enkephalin and NPY Neuropeptide Neurotransmitters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkelstein, Lydiane; Lu, W. Douglas; Koch, Britta; Mosier, Charles; Toneff, Thomas; Taupenot, Laurent; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Proteases are required for processing precursors into active neuropeptides that function as neurotransmitters for cell-cell communication. This study demonstrates the novel function of human cathepsin V protease for producing the neuropeptides enkephalin and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Cathepsin V is a human-specific cysteine protease gene. Findings here show that expression of cathepsin V in neuroendocrine PC12 cells and human neuronal SK-N-MC cells results in production of (Met)enkephalin from proenkephalin. Gene silencing of cathepsin V by siRNA in human SK-N-MC cells results in reduction of (Met)enkephalin by more than 80%, illustrating the prominent role of cathepsin V for neuropeptide production. In vitro processing of proenkephalin by cathepsin V occurs at dibasic residue sites to generate enkephalin-containing peptides and an ∼24-kDa intermediate present in human brain. Cathepsin V is present in human brain cortex and hippocampus where enkephalin and NPY are produced and is present in purified human neuropeptide secretory vesicles. Colocalization of cathepsin V with enkephalin and NPY in secretory vesicles of human neuroblastoma cells was illustrated by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, expression of cathepsin V with proNPY results in NPY production. These findings indicate the unique function of human cathepsin V for producing enkephalin and NPY neuropeptides required for neurotransmission in health and neurological diseases. PMID:22393040

  4. [Expression of the cathepsin L1 gene of Fasciola hepatica eucaryotic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Salih; Kaplan, Mustafa; Kalkan, Ahmet; Ozdarendeli, Aykut

    2006-01-01

    The parasitic trematode Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis that is common in ruminants especially sheep and cattle and is occasionally found in humans. Fasciolosis has a worldwide distribution including Turkey and causes major economic losses in agricultural industry. Cathepsin L1 is one of the major molecules in the excretory-secretory products of F. hepatica and is involved in tissue penetration, immune evasion and feeding and therefore may be used in vaccination and serological diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate cloning and expression of the cathepsin L1 gene of F. hepatica eucaryotic cells. For this purpose, total RNA was extracted from adult F. hepatica. Cathepsin L1 DNA amplicons were obtained with the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The 981 base-coding gene region of cathepsin L1 was amplified using specific primers to the cathepsin L1 gene. Then, the cathepsin L1 gene was cloned into the pCI-neo mammalian expression vector. The presence of the cathepsin L1 gene was confirmed by PCR screening and enzyme digestion assays. So, the resulting recombinant plasmid was named pFhCL1. Afterwards, the pFhCL1 vector was transiently transfected into Vero cells. The presence of the cathepsin L1 proteins was shown by Western immunoblotting.

  5. Autophagic-lysosomal dysregulation downstream of cathepsin B inactivation in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA

    OpenAIRE

    Lamore, Sarah D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, using 2D-DIGE proteomics we have identified cathepsin B as a novel target of UVA in human Hs27 skin fibroblasts. In response to chronic exposure to noncytotoxic doses of UVA (9.9 J/cm2, twice a week, 3 weeks), photooxidative impairment of cathepsin B enzymatic activity occurred with accumulation of autofluorescent aggregates colocalizing with lysosomes, an effect mimicked by pharmacological antagonism of cathepsin B using the selective inhibitor CA074Me. Here, we have further explor...

  6. A systematic analysis of recombination activity and genotype-phenotype correlation in human recombination-activating gene 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu Nee; Frugoni, Francesco; Dobbs, Kerry; Walter, Jolan E; Giliani, Silvia; Gennery, Andrew R; Al-Herz, Waleed; Haddad, Elie; LeDeist, Francoise; Bleesing, Jack H; Henderson, Lauren A; Pai, Sung-Yun; Nelson, Robert P; El-Ghoneimy, Dalia H; El-Feky, Reem A; Reda, Shereen M; Hossny, Elham; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Fuleihan, Ramsay L; Patel, Niraj C; Massaad, Michel J; Geha, Raif S; Puck, Jennifer M; Palma, Paolo; Cancrini, Caterina; Chen, Karin; Vihinen, Mauno; Alt, Frederick W; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2014-04-01

    The recombination-activating gene (RAG) 1/2 proteins play a critical role in the development of T and B cells by initiating the VDJ recombination process that leads to generation of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor repertoire. Pathogenic mutations in the RAG1/2 genes result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from T(-)B(-) severe combined immune deficiency to delayed-onset disease with granuloma formation, autoimmunity, or both. It is not clear what contributes to such heterogeneity of phenotypes. We sought to investigate the molecular basis for phenotypic diversity presented in patients with various RAG1 mutations. We have developed a flow cytometry-based assay that allows analysis of RAG recombination activity based on green fluorescent protein expression and have assessed the induction of the Ighc locus rearrangements in mouse Rag1(-/-) pro-B cells reconstituted with wild-type or mutant human RAG1 (hRAG1) using deep sequencing technology. Here we demonstrate correlation between defective recombination activity of hRAG1 mutant proteins and severity of the clinical and immunologic phenotype and provide insights on the molecular mechanisms accounting for such phenotypic diversity. Using a sensitive assay to measure the RAG1 activity level of 79 mutations in a physiologic setting, we demonstrate correlation between recombination activity of RAG1 mutants and the severity of clinical presentation and show that RAG1 mutants can induce specific abnormalities of the VDJ recombination process. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recombinant-activated factor VII in the paediatric cardiac surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    V Agarwal, KE Okonta, PS Lal. Abstract. Background: The control of excessive bleeding after paediatric cardiac surgery can be challenging. This may make the use of recombinant-activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in preventing this excessive bleeding, after adopted conventional methods have failed, desirable. Our aim is to ...

  8. Anti-proliferative activity of recombinant melittin expressed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kesiena

    2012-02-09

    Feb 9, 2012 ... Recombinant melittin was then successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The activity of .... pre-stained protein ladder; lane 1: GST-melittin fusion proteins in inclusion body; lane 2: GST-melittin fusion proteins in supernatant; lane. 3: Purified ..... hepatocellular carcinoma cells to tumor necrosis factor-related.

  9. l-Homocysteine-induced cathepsin V mediates the vascular endothelial inflammation in hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yi-Ping; Ma, Ye-Shuo; Li, Xiao-Gang; Chen, Rui-Fang; Zeng, Ping-Yu; Li, Xiao-Hui; Qiu, Cheng-Feng; Li, Ya-Pei; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Alex F

    2017-06-20

    Vascular inflammation, including the expression of inflammatory cytokines in endothelial cells, plays a critical role in hyperhomocysteinaemia-associated vascular diseases. Cathepsin V, specifically expressed in humans, is involved in vascular diseases through its elastolytic and collagenolytic activities. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of cathepsin V on l-homocysteine-induced vascular inflammation. A high methionine diet-induced hyperhomocysteinaemic mouse model was used to assess cathepsin V expression and vascular inflammation. Cultures of HUVECs were challenged with l-homocysteine and the cathepsin L/V inhibitor SID to assess the pro-inflammatory effects of cathepsin V. Transfection and antisense techniques were utilized to investigate the effects of cathepsin V on the dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DUSPs) and MAPK pathways. Cathepsin L (human cathepsin V homologous) was increased in the thoracic aorta endothelial cells of hyperhomocysteinaemic mice; l-homocysteine promoted cathepsin V expression in HUVECs. SID suppressed the activity of cathepsin V and reversed the up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α), adhesion and chemotaxis of leukocytes and vascular inflammation induced by l-homocysteine in vivo and in vitro. Increased cathepsin V promoted the degradation of DUSP6 and DUSP7, phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation of ERK1/2, phosphorylation of STAT1 and expression of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. This study has identified a novel mechanism, which shows that l-homocysteine-induced upregulation of cathepsin V mediates vascular endothelial inflammation under high homocysteine condition partly via ERK1/2 /STAT1 pathway. This mechanism could represent a potential therapeutic target in hyperaemia-associated vascular diseases. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Activity of recombinant factor VIIa under different conditions in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Jespersen, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    investigated the in-vitro effects of pH, temperature, and haemodilution on the activity of recombinant activated factor VII. Samples from eight healthy volunteers were spiked with recombinant activated factor VII (final concentration 1.7 microg/ml) and adjusted to pH 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, and 7.4 or analysed at 30...... activity in plasma. Significant effects of pH were observed for clotting time, clot formation time, maximum clot firmness, and factor VII coagulant activity in the direction of longer clot formation times and less firm clots with decreasing pH. Temperature had significant effects on clotting time, clot......, but no effects on clotting time indicating that haemodilution does not affect clot formation, but the clot formed at high haemodilution may not be so firm. In conclusion, the activity of recombinant activated factor VII was affected in vitro by pH, temperature, and haemodilution. Additional studies are necessary...

  11. A Proposal for the Evolution of Cathepsin and Silicatein in Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesgo, Ana; Maldonado, Manuel; López-Legentil, Susanna; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2015-06-01

    Cathepsins are enzymes capable of degrading proteins intracellularly. They occur ubiquitously in opisthokonts, but their potential to provide insight across the evolutionary transition from protists to metazoans remains poorly investigated. Here, we explore the evolution of cathepsins using comparative analyses of transcriptomic datasets, focusing on both, protists (closely related to metazoans), and early divergent animals (i.e., sponges). We retrieved DNA sequences of nine cathepsin types (B, C, D, F, H, L, O, Z, and silicatein) in the surveyed taxa. In choanoflagellates, only five types (B, C, L, O, Z) were identified, all of them being also found in sponges, indicating that while all cathepsins present in protists were conserved across metazoan lineages, cathepsins F and H (and probably D) are metazoan acquisitions. The phylogeny of cysteine protease cathepsins (excluding cathepsin D) revealed two major lineages: lineage B (cathepsins B and C) and lineage L (cathepsins F, H, L, O, Z). In the latter lineage, a mutation at the active site of cathepsin L gave rise to silicatein, an enzyme exclusively known to date from siliceous sponges and involved in the production of their silica spicules. However, we found that several sponges with siliceous spicules did not express silicatein genes and that, in contrast, several aspiculate sponges did contain silicatein genes. Our results suggest that the ability to silicify may have evolved independently within sponges, some of them losing this capacity secondarily. We also show that most phylogenies based on cathepsin and silicatein genes (except for that of cathepsin O) failed to recover the major lineages of sponges.

  12. Recombination in Escherichia coli V. Genetic analysis of recombinants from crosses with recipients deficient in ATP-dependent exonuclease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, P.G. de; Hoekstra, W.P.M.; Verhoef, C.

    A genetic analysis of recombinants from crosses with recombination-deficient recipients, lacking the ATP-dependent exonuclease activity, demonstrated differences in the inheritance pattern of donor markers compared with a Rec+ recipient. In particular the donor markers proximal to the transfer

  13. Effect of Recombinant alpha1-Antitrypsin Fc-Fused (AAT-Fc)Protein on the Inhibition of Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.; Lee, Y.; Hong, K.; Hong, J.; Bae, S.; Choi, J.; Jhun, H.; Kwak, A.; Kim, E.; Jo, S.; Dinarello, C.A.; Kim, S.

    2013-01-01

    alpha1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor family that impedes the enzymatic activity of serine proteinases, including human neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and neutrophil proteinase 3. Here, we expressed recombinant AAT by fusing the intact AAT gene to the constant

  14. Cathepsin K Is Present in Invasive Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Vivo and In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitu, Carolina C.; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Bufalino, Andréia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Teppo, Susanna; Keinänen, Meeri; Vilen, Suvi-Tuuli; Lehenkari, Petri; Nyberg, Pia; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Salo, Tuula

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in the tumor microenvironment (TME) of skin carcinoma, but nothing is known about cathepsin K in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). Our aim was to describe the expression of cathepsin K in invasive OTSCC in vitro and in a series of clinical cancer specimens. Materials and Methods OTSCC invasion in vitro was studied using invasive HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells in 3D organotypic models. In total, 121 mobile tongue OTSCCs and 10 lymph node metastases were analyzed for cathepsin K expression. The association between cathepsin K expression and clinicopathological factors was evaluated. Results Cysteine protease inhibitor E64 and cathepsin K silencing significantly (p<0.0001) reduced HSC-3 cell invasion in the 3D models. Cathepsin K was expressed in a majority of carcinoma and metastatic cells, but the expression pattern in carcinoma cells did not correlate with clinical parameters. Instead, the weak expression of cathepsin K in the invasive TME front correlated with increased overall recurrence (p<0.05), and in early-stage tumors this pattern predicted both cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality (p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively). Conclusions Cathepsin K is expressed in OTSCC tissue in both carcinoma and TME cells. Although the diminished activity and expression in aggressive tongue HSC-3 cells reduced 3D invasion in vitro, the amount of cathepsin K in carcinoma cells was not associated with the outcome of cancer patients. Instead, cathepsin K in the invasive TME front seems to have a protective role in the complex progression of tongue cancer. PMID:23951042

  15. Cathepsin K is present in invasive oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C Bitu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in the tumor microenvironment (TME of skin carcinoma, but nothing is known about cathepsin K in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC. Our aim was to describe the expression of cathepsin K in invasive OTSCC in vitro and in a series of clinical cancer specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: OTSCC invasion in vitro was studied using invasive HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells in 3D organotypic models. In total, 121 mobile tongue OTSCCs and 10 lymph node metastases were analyzed for cathepsin K expression. The association between cathepsin K expression and clinicopathological factors was evaluated. RESULTS: Cysteine protease inhibitor E64 and cathepsin K silencing significantly (p<0.0001 reduced HSC-3 cell invasion in the 3D models. Cathepsin K was expressed in a majority of carcinoma and metastatic cells, but the expression pattern in carcinoma cells did not correlate with clinical parameters. Instead, the weak expression of cathepsin K in the invasive TME front correlated with increased overall recurrence (p<0.05, and in early-stage tumors this pattern predicted both cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality (p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Cathepsin K is expressed in OTSCC tissue in both carcinoma and TME cells. Although the diminished activity and expression in aggressive tongue HSC-3 cells reduced 3D invasion in vitro, the amount of cathepsin K in carcinoma cells was not associated with the outcome of cancer patients. Instead, cathepsin K in the invasive TME front seems to have a protective role in the complex progression of tongue cancer.

  16. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  17. Expression of cathepsin K in the human embryo and fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, C; Krueger, S; Buehling, F; Broemme, D; Franke, K; Schuetze, A; Roese, I; Roessner, A

    1999-10-01

    Cathepsin K is a protease with high collagenolytic and elastinolytic activity. Its cellular expression was previously thought to be restricted to osteoclasts and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. In this study, the expression of cathepsin K in the human embryo and fetus was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and by Northern blotting of fetal tissue extracts. Besides osteoclasts and chondroclasts and their precursors, epithelial cells of various organ systems expressed significant amounts of this enzyme. Respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa, including bile duct epithelia and urothelia, showed high levels of cathepsin K expression. With the exception of the urothelium, showing a more homogenous expression pattern, the protease was usually accentuated in the surface cell layers of pithelia. In summary, these findings in the human embryo and early fetus demonstrated a significant expression of cathepsin K in different epithelial cell types besides osteoclasts. The functional aspects of cathepsin K expression in nonosteoclastic cells and potential conclusions on physiological and pathological conditions in the embryo-fetal or adult organism remain to be investigated. Dev Dyn 1999;216:89-95. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. On the tissue/species dependence of cathepsin B isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, S D; Lamsal, M; Agarwal, S K; Sharma, R; Khan, M Y

    1997-12-01

    Characterization of cathepsin B from buffalo kidney and goat spleen showed the presence of isozymes in case of the goat spleen (GSCB-I and GSCB-II) whereas cathepsin B from buffalo kidney exhibited only one form (BKCB). The molecular weights determined by SDS-PAGE for GSCB-I, GSCB-II, and BKCB were 25.7, 26.6 and 25.5 kDa respectively. The kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of GSCB-I showed close similarities with BKCB against alpha-N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-2-napthylamide whereas GSCB-II was closer to the buffalo enzyme with regards to its activity against Z-Arg-Arg-MCA and Z-Phe-Arg-MCA. All the three enzymes had similar sensitivities towards urea, antipain and leupeptin. However, clear differences were observed in the inhibition patterns of the enzyme with iodoacetic acid and iodoacetamide. Differences in the kinetic, immunogenic and some catalytic properties of GSCB-I and II, which had similarities with regard to most of their physico-chemical properties, were considered to be due to the existence of two isozyme forms in goat spleen cathepsin B preparations. Absence of such a multiplicity in forms of the enzyme from buffalo kidney was accordingly attributed to the absence of cathepsin B isozymes in this species. These observations taken together therefore, indicate a probable species/tissue dependence of cathepsin B.

  19. Cathepsin S Is Involved in Th17 Differentiation Through the Upregulation of IL-6 by Activating PAR-2 after Systemic Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Dekita

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Positive links have been found between periodontitis and numerous diseases in humans via persistent inflammation throughout the body. However, the main factors responsible for maintaining this pro-inflammatory condition are poorly understood. The spleen, the largest secondary immune organ, is a central hub regulating the immune response/inflammation due to the dendritic cell (DC response to CD4+ T cell subtype differentiation, and lysosomal proteinase cathepsin S (CatS is known to be involved in DC functions. In the present study, we found that CatS-induced IL-6 production by splenic DCs subsequently promotes Th17 differentiation, in response to systemic exposure to lipopolysaccharide derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgLPS. The population of CD11c+ DCs was significantly increased in the splenic marginal zone (MZ locally of wild-type (DBA/2 mice with splenomegaly but not in that of CatS deficient (CatS-/- mice after systemic exposure to PgLPS for 7 consecutive days (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal. Similarly, the population of Th17+CD4+ T cells was also significantly increased in the splenic MZ of wild-type mice but not in that of CatS-/- mice after PgLPS exposure. Furthermore, the increase in the Th17+ CD4+ T cell population paralleled increases in the levels of CatS and IL-6 in CD11c+ cells in the splenic MZ. In isolated primary splenic CD11c+ cells, the mRNA expression and the production of IL-6 was dramatically increased in wild-type mice but not in CatS-/- mice after direct stimulation with PgLPS (1 μg/ml, and this PgLPS-induced increase in the IL-6 expression was completely abolished by pre-treatment with Z-Phe-Leu-COCHO (Z-FL, the specific inhibitor of CatS. The PgLPS activated protease-activated receptor (PAR 2 in the isolated splenic CD11c+ cells was also significantly inhibited by CatS deficiently. In addition, the PgLPS-induced increase in the IL-6 production by splenic CD11c+ cells was completely abolished by pre-treatment with

  20. Recombinant Factor VIIa-Mediated Activation of Prothrombin Complex Concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Nasiredin; Iacobelli, Massimo; Vaziri, Behroz; Kahn, Daniel; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Guler, Nil; Fareed, Jawed

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is used in the management of bleeding in patients with hemophilia. A generic biosimilar version of NovoSeven is also developed (AryoSeven). To compare the activation profile of NovoSeven and AryoSeven, 2 commercially available protein complex concentrates (PCCs) were used. Profilnine activated by RecombiPlasTin 2G resulted in conversions of prothrombin to prethrombin and thrombin at 5 to 30 minutes. However, addition of rFVIIa at final concentration range of 0.25 to 0.5 µg/mL to the same mixture resulted in total conversion of prothrombin to thrombin with a doublet at 36 kDa. Recombinant factor VIIa alone did not generate thrombin in native Beriplex, and the addition of rFVIIa to Beriplex failed to generate thrombin. Beriplex activated by RecombiPlasTin 2G resulted in complete conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. Both NovoSeven and AryoSeven exhibited similar activation profiles. These studies indicate that the activation of PCCs by both rFVIIa preparations results in comparable generation of thrombin.

  1. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of cathepsin O in silkworm Bombyx mori related to bacterial response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kui; Su, Jingjing; Chen, Siyuan; Yu, Shuang; Tan, Juan; Xu, Man; Liang, Hanghua; Zhao, Yuzu; Chao, Huijuan; Yang, Liqun; Cui, Hongjuan

    2015-08-01

    Cathepsins are the main members of the cysteine family and play important roles in immune response in vertebrates. The Cathepsin O of Bombyx mori (BmCathepsin O) was cloned from the hemocytes by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The genomic DNA was 6131bp long with a total of six exons and five introns. Its pre-mRNA was spliced to generate two spliceosomes. By comparisons with other reported cathepsins O, it was concluded that the identity between them ranged from 29 to 39%. Expression analysis indicated that BmCathepsin O was specific-expressed in hemocytes, and highly expressed at the 4th molting and metamorphosis stages. Immunofluorescence assay and qRT-PCR showed that BmCathepsin O was expressed in granulocytes and plasmatocytes. Interestingly, BmCathepsin O was significantly up-regulated after stimulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-E) in vivo, which suggested that BmCathepsin O may be regulated by 20E. Moreover, activation of BmCathepsin O was also observed in hemocytes challenged by Escherichia coli, indicating its potential involvement in the innate immune system of silkworm, B. mori. In summary, our studies provide a new insight into the functional features of Cathepsin O. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Localization of nuclear cathepsin L and its association with disease progression and poor outcome in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sullivan, Shane

    2012-02-01

    Previous in vitro studies have identified a nuclear isoform of Cathepsin L. The aim of this study was to examine if nuclear Cathepsin L exists in vivo and examine its association with clinical, pathological and patient outcome data. Cellular localization (nuclear and cytoplasmic) and expression levels v of Cathespin L in 186 colorectal cancer cases using immunohistochemistry. The molecular weight and activity of nuclear and cytoplasmic Cathepsin L in vivo and in vitro were assessed by Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. Epithelial nuclear staining percentage (p = 0.04) and intensity (p = 0.006) increased with advancing tumor stage, whereas stromal cytoplasmic staining decreased (p = 0.02). Using multivariate statistical analysis, survival was inversely associated with staining intensity in the epithelial cytoplasm (p = 0.01) and stromal nuclei (p = 0.007). In different colorectal cell lines and in vivo tumors, pro- and active Cathepsin L isoforms were present in both the cytoplasm and nuclear samples, with pro-Cathepsin L at 50 kDa and active Cathepsin L at 25 kDa. Purified nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions from cell lines and tumors showed active Cathepsin L activity. The identification of nuclear Cathepsin L may play an important prognostic role in colorectal disease progression and patient outcome. Moreover, these findings suggest that altering active nuclear Cathepsin L may significantly influence disease progression.

  3. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  4. Synthesis and biochemical evaluation of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues as potent and selective inhibitors of cathepsin L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Erica N; Song, Jiangli; Kishore Kumar, G D; Odutola, Samuel O; Chavarria, Gustavo E; Charlton-Sevcik, Amanda K; Strecker, Tracy E; Barnes, Ashleigh L; Sudhan, Dhivya R; Wittenborn, Thomas R; Siemann, Dietmar W; Horsman, Michael R; Chaplin, David J; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G

    2015-11-01

    Upregulation of cathepsin L in a variety of tumors and its ability to promote cancer cell invasion and migration through degradation of the extracellular matrix suggest that cathepsin L is a promising biological target for the development of anti-metastatic agents. Based on encouraging results from studies on benzophenone thiosemicarbazone cathepsin inhibitors, a series of fourteen benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against cathepsins L and B. Thiosemicarbazone inhibitors 3-benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1, 1,3-bis(4-fluorobenzoyl)benzene thiosemicarbazone 8, and 1,3-bis(2-fluorobenzoyl)-5-bromobenzene thiosemicarbazone 32 displayed the greatest potency against cathepsin L with low IC50 values of 9.9 nM, 14.4 nM, and 8.1 nM, respectively. The benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues evaluated were selective in their inhibition of cathepsin L compared to cathepsin B. Thiosemicarbazone analogue 32 inhibited invasion through Matrigel of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by 70% at 10 μM. Thiosemicarbazone analogue 8 significantly inhibited the invasive potential of PC-3ML prostate cancer cells by 92% at 5 μM. The most active cathepsin L inhibitors from this benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone series (1, 8, and 32) displayed low cytotoxicity toward normal primary cells [in this case human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs)]. In an initial in vivo study, 3-benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone (1) was well-tolerated in a CDF1 mouse model bearing an implanted C3H mammary carcinoma, and showed efficacy in tumor growth delay. Low cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell invasion, and in vivo tolerability are desirable characteristics for anti-metastatic agents functioning through an inhibition of cathepsin L. Active members of this structurally diverse group of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone cathepsin L inhibitors show promise as potential anti-metastatic, pre

  5. Expression of five cathepsins in murine melanomas of varying metastatic potential and normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, F; Bajkowski, A S; Steiner, D F; Chan, S J; Frankfater, A

    1989-09-01

    The relative levels of mRNAs for cathepsins B, D, H, L, and S in eight normal murine tissues and three murine melanoma variants, B16-F1, B16-F10, and B16a, have been analyzed by RNA dot blot and densitometry. A direct correlation was observed between the levels of cathepsin B mRNA and the metastatic potentials of these three melanoma variants. The relative amount of cathepsin B mRNA in B16a, which is the melanoma variant with the highest metastatic potential, was at least 3 times greater than that found in any of the normal murine tissues surveyed. Similar results were obtained in analyses of either solid tumors or of cultures of tumor cells, confirming that the tumor cells themselves were the source for the elevated expression of cathepsin B mRNA. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of three cathepsin B transcripts of 5.0, 4.0, and 2.2 kilobases in the melanoma variants, while only the 2.2-kilobase transcript was seen in the normal murine tissues. Concurrently with the mRNA analysis, enzyme assays for cathepsin B activity were also performed using synthetic peptide substrates. The assays revealed increased cathepsin B activities in the melanoma variants, corresponding well with the increased cathepsin B mRNA levels, and in addition demonstrated that all three of the melanoma variants secreted a latent form of cathepsin B into conditioned medium, which could be activated by limited proteolysis with pepsin. The levels of the latent enzyme released by the murine melanoma variants correlated well with the levels of cathepsin B mRNA and with the metastatic potentials as determined by spontaneous metastasis form a s.c. site.

  6. Cathepsins B and L differentially regulate amyloid precursor protein processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Donna M; Felsenstein, Kevin M; Brenneman, Douglas E

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that cathepsins control amyloid beta (Abeta) levels in chromaffin cells via a regulated secretory pathway. In the present study, this concept was extended to investigations in primary hippocampal neurons to test whether Abeta release was coregulated by cathepsins and electrical activity, proposed components of a regulated secretory pathway. Inhibition of cathepsin B (catB) activity with CA074Me or attenuation of catB expression through small interfering RNA produced decreases in Abeta release, similar to levels produced with suppression of beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) expression. To test whether the catB-dependent release of Abeta was linked to ongoing electrical activity, neurons were treated with tetrodotoxin (TTX) and CA074Me. These comparisons demonstrated no additivity between decreases in Abeta release produced by TTX and CA074Me. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin L (catL) selectively elevated Abeta42 levels but not Abeta40 or total Abeta. Mechanistic studies measuring C-terminal fragments of amyloid precursor protein (APP) suggested that catL elevated alpha-secretase activity, thereby suppressing Abeta42 levels. The mechanism of catB-mediated regulation of Abeta release remains unclear but may involve elevation of beta-secretase. In summary, these studies provide evidence for a significant alternative pathway for APP processing that involves catB and activity-dependent release of Abeta in a regulated secretory pathway for primary neurons.

  7. An endogenous inhibitor of cysteine cathepsin B from brain tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.L. Lyanna

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomes are the key degradative compartments of the cell in which the processes of protein degradation take place. Lysosomal cathepsins, which are enclosed in the lysosomes, help to maintain the homeostasis of the cell’s metabolism by participating in the degradation of heterophagic and autophagic material. When breaking down the integrity of lysosomal membranes the cathepsins are released into the cytosol and initiate the development of numerous pathological states. Breakdown in the control of protease activity leads to undesired and unregulated proteolysis. This is a cause of many diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, viral infections, cataracts etc. For this reason inhibitors of proteases have the potential to provide successful treatment for a wide range of diseases. Cathepsin B is one of the most abundant and ubiquitously expressed cysteine peptidases of the papain family. It is implicated in a number of pathological states including: inflammatory diseases of the airways, bone and joint disorders, acute pancreatitis, tumour metastasis, Alzheimer’s disease and ischemic neuronal death. The study of specific inhibitors for cathepsin B is considered important for chemotherapy and treatments of other diseases. This article represents part of a complex study of the lysosomal proteolytic-antiproteolytic system and its breakdown in the process of illness. In this article we present a scheme for extraction, purification and characterization of endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin B. The cathepsin inhibitor was purified to homogeneity from the human neocortex. The purification was carried out in several successive stages: ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel-filtration on Sephadex G-150, and ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-Sephadex A-75, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Throughout the purification procedure, cathepsin inhibitory activity was controlled against the substrate p

  8. Carbohydrates and Activity of Natural and Recombinant Tissue Factor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krudysz-Amblo, Jolanta; Jennings, Mark E.; Mann, Kenneth G.; Butenas, Saulius

    2010-01-01

    The effect of glycosylation on tissue factor (TF) activity was evaluated, and site-specific glycosylation of full-length recombinant TF (rTF) and that of natural TF from human placenta (pTF) were studied by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The amidolytic activity of the TF·factor VIIa (FVIIa) complex toward a fluorogenic substrate showed that the catalytic efficiency (Vmax) of the complex increased in the order rTF1–243 (Escherichia coli) carbohydrates significantly influence the activity of TF proteins. Carbohydrate analysis revealed glycosylation on asparagines 11, 124, and 137 in both rTF1–263 and pTF. The carbohydrates of rTF1–263 contain high mannose, hybrid, and fucosylated glycans. Natural pTF contains no high mannose glycans but is modified with hybrid, highly fucosylated, and sialylated sugars. PMID:19955571

  9. Cathepsin G, a Neutrophil Protease, Induces Compact Cell-Cell Adhesion in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Kudo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin G is a serine protease secreted by activated neutrophils that play a role in the inflammatory response. Because neutrophils are known to be invading leukocytes in various tumors, their products may influence the characteristics of tumor cells such as the growth state, motility, and the adhesiveness between cells or the extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that cathepsin G induces cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells resulting from the contact inhibition of cell movement on fibronectin but not on type IV collagen. Cathepsin G subsequently induced cell condensation, a very compact cell colony, resulting due to the increased strength of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cathepsin G action is protease activity-dependent and was inhibited by the presence of serine protease inhibitors. Cathepsin G promotes E-cadherin/catenin complex formation and Rap1 activation in MCF-7 cells, which reportedly regulates E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions. Cathepsin G also promotes E-cadherin/protein kinase D1 (PKD1 complex formation, and Go6976, the selective PKD1 inhibitor, suppressed the cathepsin G-induced cell condensation. Our findings provide the first evidence that cathepsin G regulates E-cadherin function, suggesting that cathepsin G has a novel modulatory role against tumor cell-cell adhesion.

  10. Three-dimensional cultures modeling premalignant progression of human breast epithelial cells: role of cysteine cathepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Stefanie R; Sameni, Mansoureth; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew; Sloane, Bonnie F; Moin, Kamiar

    2012-12-01

    The expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in early stages of human breast cancer.To assess the potential role of cathepsin B in premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells, we employed a 3D reconstituted basement membrane overlay culture model of MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and isogenic variants that replicate the in vivo phenotypes of hyper plasia(MCF10AneoT) and atypical hyperplasia (MCF10AT1). MCF10A cells developed into polarized acinar structures with central lumens. In contrast, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells form larger structures in which the lumens are filled with cells. CA074Me, a cell-permeable inhibitor selective for the cysteine cathepsins B and L,reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of MCF10A, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells in 3D culture. We detected active cysteine cathepsins in the isogenic MCF10 variants in 3D culture with GB111, a cell-permeable activity based probe, and established differential inhibition of cathepsin B in our 3D cultures. We conclude that cathepsin B promotes proliferation and premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells. These findings are consistent with studies by others showing that deletion of cathepsin B in the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice, a murine model that is predisposed to development of mammary cancer, reduces malignant progression.

  11. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ferrer, Jorge M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Kim, Yongbaek [Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. David [The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Bawendi, Moungi G. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  12. Posttranslational Processing and Modification of Cathepsins and Cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiko Katunuma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsins are an essential protease family in all living cells. The cathepsins play an essential roles such as protein catabolism and protein synthesis. To targeting to various organella and to regulate their activity, the post translational-processing and modification play an important role Cathepsins are translated in polysome as the pre-pro-mature forms. The pre-peptide is removed cotranslationally and then translocated to Golgi-apparatus and the pro-part is removed and the mature-part is glycosylated, and the mature-part is targeted into the lysosome mediated by mannose-6-phosphate signal and the mature-part is bound with their coenzymes. The degradation of the mature-part is started by the limited proteolysis of the ordered nicked bonds to make hydrophobic peptides. The peptides are incorporated into phagosome or proteasome after ubiquitinated and are degrade into amino-acids. Cystatins are endogenous inhibitors of cathepsins. Cystatin α which is only located in skin is phosphorylated at the near C-terminus by protein kinase-C, and the phosphorylate-cystatin α is incorporated into cornified envelope and conjugated with filaggrin-fiber by transglutaminase to form the linker-fiber of skin. The cystatin α is modified by glutathione or make their dimmer, and they are inactive. Those modifications are regulated by the redox-potential by the glutathione.

  13. Purification and Characterization of Cathepsin B from the Muscle of Horse Mackerel Trachurus japonicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asami Yoshida

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An endogenous protease in fish muscle, cathepsin B, was partially purified and characterized from horse mackerel meat. On SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme under reducing conditions, main protein bands were detected at 28 and 6 kDa and their respective N-terminal sequences showed high homology to heavy and light chains of cathepsin B from other species. This suggested that horse mackerel cathepsin B formed two-chain forms, similar to mammalian cathepsin Bs. Optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were 5.0 and 50 °C, respectively. A partial cDNA encoding the amino acid sequence of 215 residues for horse mackerel cathepsin B was obtained by RT-PCR and cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a part of light and heavy chains of cathepsin B. The active sites and an N-glycosylation site were conserved across species. We also confirmed that the modori phenomenon was avoided by CA-074, a specific inhibitor for cathepsin B. Therefore, our results suggest that natural cysteine protease inhibitor(s, such as oryzacystatin derived from rice, can apply to thermal-gel processing of horse mackerel to avoid the modori phenomenon. Meanwhile, this endogenous protease may be used for food processing, such as weaning meal and food for the elderly.

  14. C2K77 ELISA detects cleavage of type II collagen by cathepsin K in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, B; Poole, A R; Mort, J S; Richard, H; Beauchamp, G; Laverty, S

    2017-12-01

    Develop a species-specific ELISA for a neo-epitope generated by cathepsin K cleavage of equine type II collagen to: (1) measure cartilage type II collagen degradation by cathepsin K in vitro, (2) identify cytokines that upregulate cathepsin K expression and (3) compare cathepsin K with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) collagenase activity in stimulated cartilage explants and freshly isolated normal and osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilages. A new ELISA (C2K77) was developed and tested by measuring the activity of exogenous cathepsin K on equine articular cartilage explants. The ELISA was then employed to measure endogenous cathepsin K activity in cultured cartilage explants with or without stimulation by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumour necrosis-alpha (TNF-α), oncostatin M (OSM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cathepsin K activity in cartilage explants (control and osteoarthritic-OA) and freshly harvested cartilage (control and OA) was compared to that of MMPs employing C2K77 and C1,2C immunoassays. The addition of Cathepsin K to normal cartilage caused a significant increase (P K77 epitope release. Whereas the content of C1,2C, that reflects MMP collagenase activity, was increased in media by the addition to cartilage explants of TNF-α and OSM (P K77 which also unchanged in OA cartilages compared to normal. The ELISA C2K77 measured the activity of cathepsin K in equine cartilage which was unchanged in OA cartilage. Cytokines that upregulate MMP collagenase activity had no effect on endogenous cathepsin K activity, suggesting a different activation mechanism that requires further study. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The expression of cathepsin B and other lysosomal proteinases in normal tissues and in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, F; Chan, S J; Gong, Q M; Bajkowski, A S; Steiner, D F; Frankfater, A

    1991-01-01

    The mRNA for the lysosomal proteinases cathepsins B, D, H, L, and S are broadly distributed in normal rodent tissues. Although total cathepsin mRNA levels generally parallel the protein catabolic activity of the tissues, the expressions of the individual enzymes do not appear to be linked. Thus, the relative proportions of the individual messages are found to vary from tissue to tissue. Further evidence for the independent regulation of lysosomal proteinase expression is derived from observations of selective increases in mRNA levels for individual proteinases in rodent tumors. Only cathepsin B mRNA is elevated in a highly metastatic murine B16a melanoma and in a Walker-256 rat carcinosarcoma, while Moloney murine sarcoma virus-transformed fibroblasts express increased mRNA for cathepsins B, D, and L and normal levels for H and S. To address the regulation of cathepsin B expression, the mouse cathepsin B gene and its 5'-upstream region were cloned. The gene has 10 exons and 9 introns spanning about 20 kilobases. The 5'-upstream region and exon 1 are GC-rich with several potential Sp1 binding sites. TATA and CAAT motifs adjacent to the transcription start site are not evident. These properties are characteristic of mammalian "housekeeping" genes. B16 melanoma cells contain three cathepsin B transcripts of 2.2, 4.0 and 5.0 kilobases. The two larger messages, which were not found in normal tissues, contain unusually long 3'-untranslated regions resulting from the alternative cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3' end of the cathepsin B pre-mRNA in B16 melanomas. As all three messages encoded normal preprocathepsin B, cathepsin B secretion by melanoma cells is probably due to posttranslational mechanisms and not to alternative splicing or gene mutation.

  16. Biological Activities of Recombinant Liver X Receptor â- Ligand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate tetracycline-inducible expression system for producing clinically usable, highquality liver X receptor ligand-binding domain recombinant protein. Methods: In this study, we have expressed and purified the recombinant liver X receptor β-ligand binding domain proteins in E. coli using a tetracycline ...

  17. Biological Activities of Recombinant Liver X Receptor β- Ligand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate tetracycline-inducible expression system for producing clinically usable, high- quality liver X receptor ligand-binding domain recombinant protein. Methods: In this study, we have expressed and purified the recombinant liver X receptor β-ligand binding domain proteins in E. coli using a tetracycline ...

  18. 76 FR 44339 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Minor Action under the NIH Guidelines. SUMMARY: The Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is updating... Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda, Maryland...

  19. 75 FR 28811 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) by the Institutional Biosafety Committee at Lawrence Livermore... Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health. BILLING CODE 4140-01-P ...

  20. Hypoxia inhibits TRAIL-induced tumor cell apoptosis: involvement of lysosomal cathepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nagathihalli S; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia interferes with the efficacy of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand) is a potent apoptosis inducer that limits tumor growth without damaging normal cells and tissues in vivo. We present evidence for a central role of lysosomal cathepsins in hypoxia and/or TRAIL-induced cell death in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. Hypoxia or TRAIL-induced activation of cathepsins (B, D and L), caspases (-3 and -9), Bid cleavage, release of Bax and cytochrome c, and DNA fragmentation were blocked independently by zVAD-fmk, CA074Me or pepstatin A, consistent with the involvement of lysosomal cathepsin B and D in cell death. Lysosome stability and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced in hypoxia and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. However, TRAIL treatment under hypoxic condition resulted in diminished apoptosis rates compared to treatment under normoxia. This inhibitory effect of hypoxia on TRAIL-induced apoptosis may be based on preventing Bax activation and thus protecting mitochondria stability. Our data show that TRAIL or hypoxia independently triggered activation of cathepsin B and D leading to apoptosis through Bid and Bax, and suggest that hypoxic tissue regions provide a selective environment for highly apoptosis-resistant clonal cells. Molecular therapy approaches based on cathepsin inhibitors need to address this novel tumor-preventing function of cathepsins in OSCC.

  1. Evaluation of cathepsin B levels in fresh thighs selected for cured raw ham production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, V; Ramoni, R; Parolari, G; Virgili, R; Grolli, S; Accornero, P; Fermi, P; Biffi, R; Bignetti, E

    1997-08-01

    Excessive meat tenderization in cured raw Parma ham has recently been correlated with abnormal levels of cathepsin B in freshly slaughtered thigh meat. We have developed a visual assay employing the substrate Z-Arg-Arg-NNapOMe for the quantitative detection of active cathepsin B levels in pork thigh muscle homogenates. The work was based on a kinetic characterization, in steady state condition, of pig muscle cathepsin B with several peptidyl chromophoric substrate analogs. This assay can easily and safely be performed by non-specialized personnel directly in the slaughterhouse or in the factory, for an early quality evaluation of thighs selected for Parma ham production. Our characterization has further indicated that the catalytic properties of porcine muscle cathepsin B and those of isoforms from other animal and plant species are practically identical. This is particularly evident in the commercially available bovine spleen isoform, which was employed as a model enzyme in most of the experiments.

  2. 75 FR 31795 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA...-Curay, Acting Director, Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health. BILLING CODE...

  3. Antibody targeting of Cathepsin S induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Hang Fai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic enzymes have been implicated in driving tumor progression by means of their cancer cell microenvironment activity where they promote proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Therapeutic strategies have focused on attenuating their activity using small molecule inhibitors, but the association of proteases with the cell surface during cancer progression opens up the possibility of targeting these using antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Cathepsin S is a lysosomal cysteine protease that promotes the growth and invasion of tumour and endothelial cells during cancer progression. Our analysis of colorectal cancer patient biopsies shows that cathepsin S associates with the cell membrane indicating a potential for ADCC targeting. Results Here we report the cell surface characterization of cathepsin S and the development of a humanized antibody (Fsn0503h with immune effector function and a stable in vivo half-life of 274 hours. Cathepsin S is expressed on the surface of tumor cells representative of colorectal and pancreatic cancer (23%-79% positive expression. Furthermore the binding of Fsn0503h to surface associated cathepsin S results in natural killer (NK cell targeted tumor killing. In a colorectal cancer model Fsn0503h elicits a 22% cytotoxic effect. Conclusions This data highlights the potential to target cell surface associated enzymes, such as cathepsin S, as therapeutic targets using antibodies capable of elicitingADCC in tumor cells.

  4. Cathepsin X in serum from patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vizin, Tjasa; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Up-regulation of lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin X (Cat X) is associated with disorders of the immune system and neurodegenerative diseases, while its role in the development and progression of cancer is less understood. Enhanced secretion of pro-Cat X was observed in malignant processes......, and therefore, the level of total serum Cat X rather than the active enzyme may better reflect the tumour status....

  5. Proteolytic activity of recombinant DegP from Chromohalobacter salexigens BKL5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Fitriani

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Recombinant DegP from C. salexigens BKL5 showed proteolytic activity when β-casein was used as a substrate. In silico analysis indicated that recombinant DegP had characteristics similar to those of halophilic proteins depending on its amino acid composition.

  6. Quinazoline derivatives as cathepsins B, H and L inhibitors and cell proliferating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Neera; Jangra, Suman; Kumar, Ajay; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine Cathepsins well known to be involved in cancer, inflammation and regulation of degenerative processes like apoptosis have become specific targets in drug designing. The potential of quinazolines and their derivatives in medicinal chemistry led us to synthesise a novel series of seven compounds of quinazolines to evaluate their effect on cathepsins and cellular aspects of HepG2 cells. In the present work we report the solvent free microwave assisted synthesis of (E)-8-benzylidene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2,4-diarylquinazolines as inhibitors of mammalian hepatic cysteine proteases viz. Cathepsins B, H and L. In vitro inhibition of Cathepsins B, H and L is correlated well with in vitro studies when tested using MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay on HepG2 cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. The studies have been extended to evaluate the type of inhibition exhibited by the individual enzyme. Out of the seven compounds 1g i.e. (E)-8-(4-fluorobenzylidene)-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-phenyl-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydroquinazoline has been found to be most inhibitory for Cathepsins B, H and L to a maximum extent with the Ki values of 10(-10)M, 10(-10)M and 10(-9)M order respectively. In silico studies of all compounds have also been done at the active sites of Cathepsin B, H and L. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. (111)Indium Labelling of Recombinant Activated Coagulation Factor VII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Buch, Inge; Sigvardt, Maibritt

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether (111)Indium-labelled recombinant FVIIa (rFVIIa) could be a potential radiopharmaceutical for localization of bleeding sources. DTPA-conjugated rFVIIa was radiolabelled with (111)In chloride. In vitro binding efficiency of (111)In-DTPA-rFVIIa to F1A2...

  8. Activation of XerCD-dif recombination by the FtsK DNA translocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainge, Ian; Lesterlin, Christian; Sherratt, David J

    2011-07-01

    The FtsK translocase pumps dsDNA directionally at ∼5 kb/s and facilitates chromosome unlinking by activating XerCD site-specific recombination at dif, located in the replication terminus of the Escherichia coli chromosome. We show directly that the γ regulatory subdomain of FtsK activates XerD catalytic activity to generate Holliday junction intermediates that can then be resolved by XerC. Furthermore, we demonstrate that γ can activate XerCD-dif recombination in the absence of the translocase domain, when it is fused to XerCD, or added in isolation. In these cases the recombination products are topologically complex and would impair chromosome unlinking. We propose that FtsK translocation and activation of unlinking are normally coupled, with the translocation being essential for ensuring that the products of recombination are topologically unlinked, an essential feature of the role of FtsK in chromosome segregation.

  9. New insights into the evolutionary origins of the recombination-activating gene proteins and V(D)J recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Lina Marcela; Schatz, David G

    2017-06-01

    The adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates relies on V(D)J recombination as one of the main processes to generate the diverse array of receptors necessary for the recognition of a wide range of pathogens. The DNA cleavage reaction necessary for the assembly of the antigen receptor genes from an array of potential gene segments is mediated by the recombination-activating gene proteins RAG1 and RAG2. The RAG proteins have been proposed to originate from a transposable element (TE) as they share mechanistic and structural similarities with several families of transposases and are themselves capable of mediating transposition. A number of RAG-like proteins and TEs with sequence similarity to RAG1 and RAG2 have been identified, but only recently has their function begun to be characterized, revealing mechanistic links to the vertebrate RAGs. Of particular significance is the discovery of ProtoRAG, a transposon superfamily found in the genome of the basal chordate amphioxus. ProtoRAG has many of the sequence and mechanistic features predicted for the ancestral RAG transposon and is likely to be an evolutionary relative of RAG1 and RAG2. In addition, early observations suggesting that RAG1 is able to mediate V(D)J recombination in the absence of RAG2 have been confirmed, implying independent evolutionary origins for the two RAG genes. Here, recent progress in identifying and characterizing RAG-like proteins and the TEs that encode them is summarized and a refined model for the evolution of V(D)J recombination and the RAG proteins is presented. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Use of recombinant activated factor VII in a case of severe postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verre, M; Bossio, F; Mammone, A; Piccirillo, M; Tancioni, F; Varano, M

    2006-02-01

    We describe the case of a 24 year old woman, affected by haemorrhagic shock due to post-partum uterine atony, who underwent an emergency hysterectomy with persistent postoperative bleeding, successfully treated with recombinant activated factor VII (Novoseven).

  11. Chemical constituents of the stem bark of Vochysia thyrsoidea Pohl. (Vochysiaceae) and evaluation of their cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity against cathepsins B and K; Constituintes quimicos das cascas do caule de Vochysia thyrsoidea Pohl. (Vochysiaceae) e avaliacao das atividades citotoxica e inibitoria frente as catepsinas B e K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Lorena Ramos Freitas de; Silva, Jame' s A. da; Vieira, Paulo Cezar [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Costa, Maisa Borges; Santos, Mirley Luciene dos; Menezes, Antonio Carlos Severo, E-mail: amenezes@ueg.br [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Anapolis, GO (Brazil). Unidade Universitaria de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Sbardelotto, Aline Borba; Pessoa, Claudia do O; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Fisiologia e Farmacologia

    2014-04-15

    A new flavonoid, catechin-3-O-(3{sup -}O-trans-cinnamoyl)-α-rhamnopyranoside, along with known compounds, catechin-3-O-α-rhamnopyranoside, 3-oxo-urs-12-en-28-oic acid, 2,4,6-trimethoxybenzoic acid, 2-butyl-D-fructofuranoside and 1-butyl-D-fructofuranoside, has been isolated from the stem bark of V. thyrsoidea. These compounds were assayed for inhibition of protease activity (cathepsins B and K) and against cancer cell lines. Catechin-3-O-(3{sup -}O-trans-cinnamoyl)-α-rhamnopyranoside showed moderate inhibitory activity (IC{sub 50} = 62.02 µM) against cathepsin B while 2-butyl-D-fructofuranoside was the most potent against a strain of CNS (SF-295) and human leukemia (HL-60) with IC{sub 50} = 36.80 μM and IC{sub 50} = 25.37 μM, respectively (author)

  12. Enzymatic vitreolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for vitreomacular traction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raczyńska D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dorota Raczyńska,1 Paweł Lipowski,1 Katarzyna Zorena,2 Andrzej Skorek,3 Paulina Glasner1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Gdańsk, Poland; 2Department of Immunobiology and Environment Microbiology, Medical University of Gdańsk, Poland; 3Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Gdańsk, Poland Aims: The aim of our research was to gain data about the efficacy of intravitreal injections of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA in dissolving vitreoretinal tractions (VRTs.Materials and methods: The study group consisted of patients of our Ophthalmology Clinic who had received an injection of rTPA (TPA Group for an existent vitreomacular traction confirmed by optical coherence tomography and stereoscopic examinations. The control group consisted of patients who had declined treatment despite the existence of a vitreomacular traction confirmed by the same diagnostic methods. Each group consisted of 30 people (30 eyes. The observation period was 6 months.Conclusion: In both groups some of the VRTs had dissolved. In the TPA group the traction dissolved in 10 patients (33.33% and in the control group only in 5 (16.67%. It is also important to point out that the mean baseline membrane thickness was higher in the TPA group than in the control group. Observing patients in both groups we noticed that the dissolution of vitreoretinal membrane occurred most frequently in those cases where the membrane was thin. In the TPA group, the mean membrane thickness after 6 months decreased considerably. At the same time, no significant change in the membrane thickness could be observed in the control group. Observation of the retinal thickness allows us to draw the following conclusion: in the TPA group, the retinal thickness in the macular area (edema had decreased over the study period, whereas in the control group it had increased. In those cases where the traction had dissolved, the edema of the retina decreased by the end

  13. Cathepsin B gene disruption induced Leishmania donovani proteome remodeling implies cathepsin B role in secretome regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teklu Kuru Gerbaba

    Full Text Available Leishmania cysteine proteases are potential vaccine candidates and drug targets. To study the role of cathepsin B cysteine protease, we have generated and characterized cathepsin B null mutant L. donovani parasites. L. donovani cathepsin B null mutants grow normally in culture, but they show significantly attenuated virulence inside macrophages. Quantitative proteome profiling of wild type and null mutant parasites indicates cathepsin B disruption induced remodeling of L. donovani proteome. We identified 83 modulated proteins, of which 65 are decreased and 18 are increased in the null mutant parasites, and 66% (55/83 of the modulated proteins are L. donovani secreted proteins. Proteins involved in oxidation-reduction (trypanothione reductase, peroxidoxins, tryparedoxin, cytochromes and translation (ribosomal proteins are among those decreased in the null mutant parasites, and most of these proteins belong to the same complex network of proteins. Our results imply virulence role of cathepsin B via regulation of Leishmania secreted proteins.

  14. Expression and Localization of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Two Cancer Stem Cell Subpopulations in Moderately Differentiated Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Featherston

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AimWe have previously demonstrated the putative presence of two cancer stem cell (CSC subpopulations within moderately differentiated oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (MDOTSCC, which express components of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS. In this study, we investigated the expression and localization of cathepsins B, D, and G in relation to these CSC subpopulations within MDOTSCC.Methods3,3-Diaminobenzidine (DAB and immunofluorescent (IF immunohistochemical (IHC staining was performed on MDOTSCC samples to determine the expression and localization of cathepsins B, D, and G in relation to the CSC subpopulations. NanoString mRNA analysis and colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH were used to study their transcripts expression. Enzyme activity assays were performed to determine the activity of these cathepsins in MDOTSCC.ResultsIHC staining demonstrated expression of cathepsins B, D, and G in MDOTSCC. Cathepsins B and D were localized to CSCs within the tumor nests, while cathepsin B was localized to the CSCs within the peri-tumoral stroma, and cathepsin G was localized to the tryptase+ phenotypic mast cells within the peri-tumoral stroma. NanoString and CISH mRNA analyses confirmed transcription activation of cathepsins B, D, and G. Enzyme activity assays confirmed active cathepsins B and D, but not cathepsin G.ConclusionThe presence of cathepsins B and D on the CSCs and cathspsin G on the phenotypic mast cells suggest the presence of bypass loops for the RAS which may be a potential novel therapeutic target for MDOTSCC.

  15. Activation of peritoneal cells upon in vivo transfection with a recombinant alphavirus expressing GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimp, A H; van der Vaart, E; Lansink, P O; Withoff, S; de Vries, E G; Scherphof, G L; Wilschut, J; Daemen, T

    2001-02-01

    In this study we determined the in vivo localization of recombinant proteins expressed by intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) particles. Subsequently, we investigated the influence of i.p. administered SFV particles encoding recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) on intraperitoneal recruitment and activation of cells. Finally, the therapeutic effect of SFV-GM-CSF treatment on an i.p. growing ovarian tumor was determined. Intraperitoneal injections of recombinant SFV particles encoding the reporter protein luciferase resulted in a high level of luciferase activity in cells of the peritoneal lining and tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity. Low levels of luciferase activity were found in liver, spleen and lungs. Injection of SFV-GM-CSF particles resulted in a slight increase in the number of peritoneal macrophages and in a significant increase in the number of neutrophils. In contrast to multiple i.p. injections with commercially available recombinant GM-CSF, i.p. injected SFV-GM-CSF particles activated the macrophages to tumor cytotoxicity. Although treatment of tumor-bearing mice with SFV-GM-CSF particles did not result in prolonged survival, tumor growth was inhibited for 2 weeks. Our findings indicate that macrophage-activating cytokines expressed by the efficient and safe recombinant SFV system when administered i.p. may provide an immunotherapeutic treatment modality additional to current chemotherapeutic treatment of intraperitoneally growing cancers.

  16. Characterization of multiple cathepsin B mRNAs in murine B16a melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, F; Frankfater, A; Steiner, D F; Bajkowski, A S; Chan, S J

    1991-01-01

    We have previously shown that the highly metastatic murine B16a melanoma expresses a high level of cathepsin B mRNA which is associated with three transcripts of 2.2, 4.0 and 5.0 kb, while in contrast only a single 2.2 kb cathepsin B RNA was detected in normal murine tissues. Using recombinant DNA techniques, cDNAs corresponding to these three transcripts have been isolated from a B16a melanoma cDNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that all three mRNA transcripts contain identical coding sequences for normal preprocathepsin B. However, the 4.0 and 5.0 kb transcripts contain unusually long extended 3' untranslated regions. These results suggest that the post-transcriptional processing pathway of the cathepsin B gene is modified in B16 melanomas. The results also indicate that the increased extracellular secretion of larger forms of cathepsin B by tumors is most likely due to post-translational mechanisms and does not involve alternative splicing or a coding mutation in the gene.

  17. Effects of elastase and cathepsin G on the levels of membrane and soluble TNFalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezyk-Kopeć, Renata; Bzowska, Małgorzata; Bzowska, Monika; Mickowska, Barbara; Mak, Paweł; Potempa, Jan; Bereta, Joanna

    2005-08-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CG), the proteolytic enzymes localized in azurophil granules of neutrophils (PMN), are involved in PMN responses to various stimuli. When released at sites of inflammation, they participate in the degradation of numerous proteins involved in the regulation of the immune response. In this study, we employed ADAM17(-/-) fibroblasts stably transfected with cDNA of human pro-tumor necrosis factor alpha (proTNFalpha) (ADAM17(-/-)TNF(+)) to investigate the effects of NE and CG on shedding and degradation of TNFalpha. Both NE and CG were found to diminish the level of membrane TNFalpha (mTNFalpha) as measured by flow cytometry. This process was accompanied by the accumulation of biologically active soluble TNFalpha (sTNFalpha) in the culture medium, as determined by an increase in both the cytotoxic activity of TNFalpha and its ability to serve as a co-stimulator in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). However, in contrast to CG, NE at high concentrations was able to degrade sTNFalpha released from the cell surface. Using soluble recombinant human TNFalpha, we identified Val(93)-Ala(94) and Val(117)-Glu(118) as the NE cleavage sites within the sTNFalpha molecule. Taken together, the ability of NE and CG to modulate levels of membrane and soluble forms of TNFalpha may contribute to the proinflammatory activity of neutrophils.

  18. Retrovirus Entry by Endocytosis and Cathepsin Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinao Kubo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses include infectious agents inducing severe diseases in humans and animals. In addition, retroviruses are widely used as tools to transfer genes of interest to target cells. Understanding the entry mechanism of retroviruses contributes to developments of novel therapeutic approaches against retrovirus-induced diseases and efficient exploitation of retroviral vectors. Entry of enveloped viruses into host cell cytoplasm is achieved by fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes at either the cell surface or intracellular vesicles. Many animal retroviruses enter host cells through endosomes and require endosome acidification. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus entry requires cathepsin proteases activated by the endosome acidification. CD4-dependent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is thought to occur via endosomes, but endosome acidification is not necessary for the entry whereas entry of CD4-independent HIVs, which are thought to be prototypes of CD4-dependent viruses, is low pH dependent. There are several controversial results on the retroviral entry pathways. Because endocytosis and endosome acidification are complicatedly controlled by cellular mechanisms, the retrovirus entry pathways may be different in different cell lines.

  19. Differences in targeting and secretion of cathepsins B and L by BALB/3T3 fibroblasts and Moloney murine sarcoma virus-transformed BALB/3T3 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, C; Gong, Q M; Frankfater, A; Bajkowski, A S

    1990-08-15

    BALB/3T3 fibroblasts (3T3) were observed to secrete latent, pepsin-activatable forms of cathepsin B and cathepsin L as well as an active form of beta-glucuronidase when cultured in the absence of serum. The secretion of these proteins was stimulated by the cation ionophore monensin: cathepsin B, 4.3-fold; cathepsin L, 7.2-fold; and beta-glucuronidase, 3.1-fold. These increases were accompanied by a 50% decline in cellular levels of the active forms of these enzymes and by the cellular accumulation of latent forms of cathepsin B and cathepsin L. Latent forms of beta-glucuronidase were not detected. In contrast, Moloney murine sarcoma virus-transformed BALB/3T3 fibroblasts (MMSV) secreted greatly increased amounts of latent cathepsin B (17-fold) and latent cathepsin L (27-fold), and moderately increased amounts of active beta-glucuronidase (2-fold) in a manner which was not further increased by monensin. The increased monensin-insensitive secretion of these lysosomal enzymes by MMSV cells may be due to a transformation-induced decrease in mannose 6-phosphate receptors. Thus, 3T3 cells bound the neoglycoconjugate pentamannosyl 6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin at 4 degrees C in a pentamannosyl 6 phosphate and mannose 6-phosphate-inhibitable manner, whereas MMSV cells showed no measurable cell surface mannose 6-phosphate receptor binding activity.

  20. Characterization of the cathepsin B gene and multiple mRNAs in human tissues: evidence for alternative splicing of cathepsin B pre-mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Q; Chan, S J; Bajkowski, A S; Steiner, D F; Frankfater, A

    1993-05-01

    We have cloned and characterized multiple messages for cathepsin B that differ in their 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) from human kidney and the hepatoma cell line HepG2. A comparison of these messages with the cloned human cathepsin B gene reveals that they arise by alternative splicing of a single gene. Processing at a cryptic intron donor site in exon 11 and splicing to exon 12 produces a 4.0-kb message with an alternate 3' UTR in addition to the 2.3-kb message described previously by Chan et al. (1986). Variable removal of exon 2 produces cathepsin B mRNAs which differ by 88 nucleotides in their 5'-UTRs. The ratio of the 2.3-kb to 4.0-kb transcript is about 2:1 in most of the tissues examined, but the ratio of mRNAs with variant 5' UTRs differs widely. Cathepsin B mRNAs lacking exon 2 are predominant in human tumors. In addition, human breast and colon carcinomas and a human melanoma contain a cathepsin B transcript that is also missing exon 3 encoding the signal peptide and 7 residues of the activation propeptide. An in vitro transcription/translation assay was used to demonstrate that this message could be translated from an internal methionine codon (residue 52), producing a 32-kD product lacking the signal peptide and more than half the propeptide. The transcription/translation assay also demonstrated that the variant messages differ in their rates of translation. The relative rates are about 8:2:1 for mRNA lacking exons 2 and 3 compared to mRNA lacking exon 2 and mRNA containing the full-length 5' end, respectively. These results suggest that the expression of cathepsin B in human tissues may be regulated in part at the level of mRNA processing.

  1. 78 FR 12074 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... recommendations of the RAC, the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) concluded that more specific guidance... address or by fax at 301-496-9839 or by mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  2. 75 FR 21008 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... the NIH Guidelines. SUMMARY: In March 2009, the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) published... e-mail address or by fax to 301-496-9839 or mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  3. 76 FR 62816 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is updating Appendix B of the NIH Guidelines to specify the risk group (RG...: October 3, 2011. Jacqueline Corrigan-Curay, Acting Director, Office of Biotechnology Activities, National...

  4. Selective inhibition of cathepsin B with cell-permeable CA074Me negatively affects L6 rat myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Derek T; Morvay, Leslie C; Allen, Francis; Sloane, Bonnie F; Dufresne, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Active cathepsin B, in concert with other cellular proteases, has been implicated in the catabolic restructuring associated with myotube formation during skeletal myoblast cell differentiation (i.e., myogenesis). We have examined this role in differentiating myoblasts using the cell-permeable, cathepsin B selective inhibitor CA074Me. Cathepsin B activity levels in differentiating L6 rat myoblasts treated with CA074Me were significantly lower than levels in control myoblasts. Inhibition of cathepsin B activity by CA074Me occurred at each stage of differentiation and was dose related. Myotube size and number and induced levels of fusion-related creatine phosphokinase activity and myosin heavy-chain protein were reduced from 30 to 50% in CA074Me-treated myoblasts. These reductions were also dose related. In contrast, CA074Me did not affect levels of myogenin, an early marker of myogenesis, or levels of cathepsin L type and myokinase activities, two nonspecific enzymes. The negative effects associated with CA074Me were reversed when the drug was removed. Collectively, these data suggest that active cathepsin B plays a role in myoblast-myoblast fusion and consequently may be necessary for the complete expression of those genes associated with the fusion process.

  5. Proteomic identification of cathepsin B and nucleophosmin as novel UVA-targets in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamore, Sarah D; Qiao, Shuxi; Horn, David; Wondrak, Georg T

    2010-01-01

    Solar UVA exposure plays a causative role in skin photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Here, we describe the proteomic identification of novel UVA-targets in human dermal fibroblasts following a two-dimensional-difference-gel-electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) approach. Fibroblasts were exposed to noncytotoxic doses of UVA or left untreated, and total protein extracts underwent CyDye-labeling followed by 2D-DIGE/mass-spectrometric identification of differentially expressed proteins, confirmed independently by immunodetection. The protein displaying the most pronounced UVA-induced upregulation was identified as the nucleolar protein nucleophosmin. The protein undergoing the most pronounced UVA-induced downregulation was identified as cathepsin B, a lysosomal cysteine-protease displaying loss of enzymatic activity and altered maturation after cellular UVA exposure. Extensive lysosomal accumulation of lipofuscin-like autofluorescence and osmiophilic material occurred in UVA-exposed fibroblasts as detected by confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Array analysis indicated UVA-induced upregulation of oxidative stress response gene expression, and UVA-induced loss of cathepsin B enzymatic activity in fibroblasts was suppressed by antioxidant intervention. Pharmacological cathepsin B inhibition using CA074Me mimicked UVA-induced accumulation of lysosomal autofluorescence and deficient cathepsin B maturation. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that cathepsin B is a crucial target of UVA-induced photo-oxidative stress causatively involved in dermal photodamage through the impairment of lysosomal removal of lipofuscin. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation. The American Society of Photobiology.

  6. Inhibitory assay for degradation of collagen IV by cathepsin B with a surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Atsushi; Suenaga, Yumiko; Hosaka, Atsushi; Ishida, Yuuki; Yanagida, Akio; Sugawara, Masao

    2017-10-25

    We describe a simple method for evaluating the inhibition of collagen IV degradation by cathepsin B with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. The change in the SPR signal decreased with an increase in the concentration of cathepsin B inhibitors. The order of the inhibitory constant (Ki) obtained by the SPR method was CA074Me≈Z-Phe-Phe-FMK < leupeptin. This order was different from that obtained by benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Phe-Fluoromethylketone (Z-Phe-Phe-FMK) as a peptide substrate. The comparison of Ki suggested that CA074 and Z-Phe-Phe-FMK inhibited exopeptidase activity, and leupeptin inhibited the endopeptidase activity of cathepsin B more strongly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel allosteric mechanism in the cysteine peptidase cathepsin K discovered by computational methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novinec, Marko; Korenč, Matevž; Caflisch, Amedeo; Ranganathan, Rama; Lenarčič, Brigita; Baici, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric modifiers have the potential to fine-tune enzyme activity. Therefore, targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a strategy in drug design. Here we report the use of computational methods for the discovery of the first small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of the collagenolytic cysteine peptidase cathepsin K, a major target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The molecule NSC13345 is identified by high-throughput docking of compound libraries to surface sites on the peptidase that are connected to the active site by an evolutionarily conserved network of residues (protein sector). The crystal structure of the complex shows that NSC13345 binds to a novel allosteric site on cathepsin K. The compound acts as a hyperbolic mixed modifier in the presence of a synthetic substrate, it completely inhibits collagen degradation and has good selectivity for cathepsin K over related enzymes. Altogether, these properties qualify our methodology and NSC13345 as promising candidates for allosteric drug design.

  8. Cathepsin H-Mediated Degradation of HDAC4 for Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in Hepatic Stellate Cells: Implications of Epigenetic Suppression of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Fibrosis through Stabilization of Class IIa Histone Deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zemin; Liu, Yu; Qin, Lan; Wu, Pengfei; Xia, Zanxian; Luo, Mei; Zeng, Yilan; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Ju, Zongyun; Su, Danmei; Kang, Han; Xiao, Zhixiong; Zheng, Sujun; Duan, Zhongping; Hu, Richard; Wang, Qiang; Pandol, Stephen J; Han, Yuan-Ping

    2017-04-01

    In three-dimensional extracellular matrix, mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) gain the ability to express matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) on injury signals. In contrast, in myofibroblastic HSCs in fibrotic liver, many MMP genes are silenced into an epigenetically nonpermissive state. The mechanism by which the three-dimensional extracellular matrix confers the MMP genes into an epigenetically permissive state has not been well characterized. In continuation of previous work, we show here that the up-regulation of MMP genes is mediated through degradation of class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) by certain cysteine cathepsins (Cts). In three-dimensional extracellular matrix culture, CtsH, among other cysteine cathepsins, was up-regulated and localized as puncta in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments in a complex with HDAC4 for its degradation. Conversely, along with HSC trans-differentiation, CtsH and CtsL were progressively down-regulated, whereas HDAC4 was concurrently stabilized. The inhibition of cysteine cathepsins by specific proteinase inhibitors or chloroquine, which raises cellular pH, restored HDAC4. Recombinant CtsH could break down HDAC4 in the transfected cells and in vitro at acidic pH. In human cirrhotic liver, activated HSCs express high levels of class IIa HDACs but little CtsH. We propose that cysteine cathepsin-mediated degradation of class IIa HDACs plays a key role in the modulation of MMP expression/suppression and HSC functions in tissue injury and fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Construction expression and biologic activity of recombinant human sCR1 eucaryotic cell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-lan; Gong, Cui-cui; Wang, Wen-li; Zhang, Chang-yuan; Liu, Ya-li; He, Pei-xia; Zheng, Shu-na; Chen, Xiang-lin

    2008-05-01

    To express human soluble complement receptor type 1(sCR1)protein using ferment cell secreting type carrier and study the extraorgan biologic activity of recombinant human sCR1 fusion protein. Total human RNA was extracted from peripheral blood. The full length cDNA of human sCR1 gene was obtained by RT-PCR and them, cloned into Pichia pastoris eukaryotic expression vector pPIC9k to construct the recombinant plasmid pPIC9k-sCR1 containing human sCR1.After identified by DNA sequencing, the recombinant plasmid pPIC9k-sCR1 was transformed into Pichia pastoris SMD1168. The ferment cell line of the recombinant sCR1 which was chosen by G418 resistance was identified by PCR, After methanol induction, the expressed protein products were verified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot, purified by Ni(2+)-NTA agarose affinity chromatography, and its biologic activity was identified. The obtained Pichia pastoris secretion type yeast carrier pPIC9k-sCR1 was chosen by G418 and identified by PCR to get a highly copied and integral recombinant ferment cell line. The recombinant human sCR1 fusion protein was expressed by yeast cells containing pPIC9k-sCR1 induced by methanol. It was a protein band about M(r) 31 000 in gel, which could be identified by CD35 of anti-sCR1 protein monoclonal antibody with Western blotting technique. The highly purified sCR1 fusion protein and its biologic activity were detected obtained by Ni(2+)-NTA agarose affinity chromatography. The recombinant human sCR1 fusion protein can be highly expressed in the Pichia pastoris expression system, which resembles the human natural protein's antigenicity and biologic activity.

  10. EKSTRAKSI DAN KARAKTERISASI PARSIAL EKSTRAK KASAR ENZIM KATEPSIN DARI IKAN PATIN [Extraction and Partial Characterization of Crude Enzymes Cathepsin from Catfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zakiyul Fikri*

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of protein by enzymatic process will lead to changes in odor, texture, and appearance of fish. The enzymes that play a role in the enzymatic process is primarily proteolytic enzymes. Cathepsin is one of the proteolytic enzymes found in animal tissue that hydrolyzes peptide bonds of proteins. This study aims to extract the cathepsin, characterize the crude extract derived from catfish. The stages of this research consist of the extraction and characterization of the cathepsin from catfish. Result of the extraction was crude extract of cathepsin with activity of 0.278 U/mL. The enzyme had optimum temperature of 50°C, pH 6 and substrate concentration of 2%. The activity of the cathepsin was inhibited by metal ions of Fe3+, Cu2+, Ca2+, but increased by metal ions of Mg2+.

  11. Inhibition of cathepsin B reduces beta-amyloid production in regulated secretory vesicles of neuronal chromaffin cells: evidence for cathepsin B as a candidate beta-secretase of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian; Toneff, Thomas; Bogyo, Matthew; Greenbaum, Doron; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Neveu, John; Lane, William; Hook, Gregory; Reisine, Terry

    2005-09-01

    The regulated secretory pathway of neurons is the major source of extracellular A beta that accumulates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Extracellular A beta secreted from that pathway is generated by beta-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Previously, cysteine protease activity was demonstrated as the major beta-secretase activity in regulated secretory vesicles of neuronal chromaffin cells. In this study, the representative cysteine protease activity in these secretory vesicles was purified and identified as cathepsin B by peptide sequencing. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated colocalization of cathepsin B with A beta in these vesicles. The selective cathepsin B inhibitor, CA074, blocked the conversion of endogenous APP to A beta in isolated regulated secretory vesicles. In chromaffin cells, CA074Me (a cell permeable form of CA074) reduced by about 50% the extracellular A beta released by the regulated secretory pathway, but CA074Me had no effect on A beta released by the constitutive pathway. Furthermore, CA074Me inhibited processing of APP into the COOH-terminal beta-secretase-like cleavage product. These results provide evidence for cathepsin B as a candidate beta-secretase in regulated secretory vesicles of neuronal chromaffin cells. These findings implicate cathepsin B as beta-secretase in the regulated secretory pathway of brain neurons, suggesting that inhibitors of cathepsin B may be considered as therapeutic agents to reduce A beta in AD.

  12. Involvement of cathepsin D during tail regression in tadpoles of the common Indian tree frog, Polypedates maculatus (Anura: Rhacophoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Cuckoo; Mahapatra, Pravati Kumari

    2011-11-01

    Cathepsin D, an aspartyl protease, plays a key role in the metabolic degradation of intracellular proteins in an acidic milieu of lysosomes. Proteolysis plays an essential role in anuran tail regression and a wide variety of thyroid hormone induced proteolytic enzymes have been reported to be involved in the regressing tail. The present study describes the trend of specific activity of cathepsin D in the tail of different developmental stages and immunohistochemical localization of cathepsin D during degradation of various tail tissues in the tadpoles of Polypedates maculatus. Cathepsin D has been found to be involved in the degradation of major tail tissues such as epidermis, muscle, spinal cord, notochord cells and blood cells in the regressing tail. Interestingly, it has also been found to be involved in the pre-regressing tail prior to visible tail regression. In addition, melanocytes have been described to be associated with degradation of different tail tissues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel nonsense mutation in cathepsin C gene in an Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cathepsin C gene (CTSC) (MIM#602365) is a lysosomal cysteine proteinase coding gene which encodes for CTSC protein that plays a major role in the activation of granule serine proteases, particularly leukocyte elastase and granzymes A and B. This activity was proposed to play a role in epithelial ...

  14. Antibacterial Activity of Recombinant Pig Intestinal Parasite Cecropin P4 Peptide Secreted from

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Duk Song

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cecropins (Cec are antibacterial peptides and their expression is induced in a pig intestinal parasite Ascaris suum by bacterial infection. To explore the usefulness of its activity as an antibiotic, CecP4 cDNA was prepared and cloned into the pPICZ B expression vector and followed by the integration into AOX1 locus in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants from cell culture were collected after methanol induction and concentrated for the test of antimicrobial activity. The recombinant P. patoris having CecP4 showed antimicrobial activity when tested against Staphyllococcus aureus in disc diffusion assay. We selected one of the CecP4 clones (CecP4-2 and performed further studies with it. The growth of recombinant P. pastoris was optimized using various concentration of methanol, and it was found that 2% methanol in the culture induced more antibacterial activity, compared to 1% methanol. We extended the test of antimicrobial activity by applying the concentrated supernatant of CecP4 culture to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli respectively. Recombinant CecP4 also showed antimicrobial activity against both Pseudomona and E. coli, suggesting the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity. After improvements for the scale-up, it will be feasible to use recombinant CecP4 for supplementation to the feed to control microbial infections in young animals, such as piglets.

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Recombinant Pig Intestinal Parasite Cecropin P4 Peptide Secreted from Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon-Kyu

    2014-02-01

    Cecropins (Cec) are antibacterial peptides and their expression is induced in a pig intestinal parasite Ascaris suum by bacterial infection. To explore the usefulness of its activity as an antibiotic, CecP4 cDNA was prepared and cloned into the pPICZ B expression vector and followed by the integration into AOX1 locus in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants from cell culture were collected after methanol induction and concentrated for the test of antimicrobial activity. The recombinant P. patoris having CecP4 showed antimicrobial activity when tested against Staphyllococcus aureus in disc diffusion assay. We selected one of the CecP4 clones (CecP4-2) and performed further studies with it. The growth of recombinant P. pastoris was optimized using various concentration of methanol, and it was found that 2% methanol in the culture induced more antibacterial activity, compared to 1% methanol. We extended the test of antimicrobial activity by applying the concentrated supernatant of CecP4 culture to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli respectively. Recombinant CecP4 also showed antimicrobial activity against both Pseudomona and E. coli, suggesting the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity. After improvements for the scale-up, it will be feasible to use recombinant CecP4 for supplementation to the feed to control microbial infections in young animals, such as piglets.

  16. A Broad Survey of Cathepsin K Immunoreactivity in Human Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Martignoni, Guido; Antonescu, Cristina; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Eberhart, Charles; Netto, George; Taube, Janis; Westra, William; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Lotan, Tamara; Maitra, Anirban; Gabrielson, Edward; Torbenson, Michael; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Demarzo, Angelo; Shih, Ie Ming; Illei, Peter; Wu, T.C.; Argani, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Cathepsin K is consistently and diffusely expressed in alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) and a subset of translocation renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). However, cathepsin K expression in human neoplasms has not been systematically analyzed. We constructed tissue microarrays (TMA) from a wide variety of human neoplasms, and performed cathepsin K immunohistochemistry (IHC). Only 2.7% of 1,140 carcinomas from various sites exhibited cathepsin K labeling, thus suggesting that among carcinomas, cathepsin K labeling is highly specific for translocation RCC. In contrast to carcinomas, cathepsin K labeling was relatively common (54.6%) in the 414 mesenchymal lesions studied, including granular cell tumor, melanoma, and histiocytic lesions, but not paraganglioma, all of which are in the morphologic differential diagnosis of ASPS. Cathepsin K IHC can be helpful in distinguishing ASPS and translocation RCC from some but not all of the lesions in their differential diagnosis. PMID:23355199

  17. PPARα agonist Wy14643 suppresses cathepsin B in human endothelial cells via transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Gabi; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Sloane, Bonnie F; Doll, Monika; Kippenberger, Stefan; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Meissner, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin B has been shown to be important in angiogenesis; therefore, understanding its regulation in endothelial cells should provide fundamental information that will aid in the development of new treatment options. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic properties. We explored the influence of a PPARα agonist on cathepsin B expression in human endothelial cells. The PPARα agonist, Wy14643, was found to inhibit cathepsin B protein expression. Further studies demonstrated the Wy14643-dependent but PPARα-independent suppression of cathepsin B. This has been previously described for other PPAR agonists. Wy14643 suppressed the accumulation of cathepsin B mRNA, which was accompanied by the selective suppression of a 5'-alternative splice variant. Consistent with these results, luciferase promoter assays and electrophoretic mobility shift analysis demonstrated that the suppression was facilitated by reduced binding of the transcription factors USF1/2 to an E-box within the cathepsin B promoter. Additionally, Wy14643 treatment resulted in a reduction in cathepsin B half-life, suggesting a posttranslational regulatory mechanism. Overall, our results suggest that the PPARα-dependent anti-angiogenic action of Wy14643 seems to be mediated, in part, by Wy14643-dependent but PPARα-independent regulation of cathepsin B expression.

  18. Purification and characterization of cathepsin D from herring muscle ( Clupea harengus )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L.B.; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    2001-01-01

    Cathepsin D was purified and concentrated 469-fold from a homogenate of Clupea harengus muscle. The purified enzyme is a monomer with a molecular weight of 38 000-39 000. It is inhibited by pepstatin and has optimal activity at pH 2.5 with hemoglobin as the substrate. The isoelectric point is at p......H 6.8. Glycosidase treatment and binding to Concanavalin A indicated that the enzyme contains one N-linked carbohydrate moiety of the high-mannose type per molecule. The first 21 amino acid residues of the N-terminal showed high similarity to cathepsin D from antarctic icefish liver (Chionodraco...

  19. Recombinant amaranth cystatin (AhCPI) inhibits the growth of phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Rodriguez, Silvia; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto; Aguilar-Hernandez, Victor; Cortes-Onofre, Erick; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro; Guerrero-Rangel, Armando

    2010-06-01

    Phytocystatins are cysteine proteinase inhibitors from plants implicated in defense mechanisms against insects and plant pathogens. We have previously characterized an amaranth cystatin cDNA and analyzed its response to different kinds of abiotic stress [37]. In order to characterize amaranth cystatin, the coding sequence was expressed in Escherichia coli using the pQE-2 vector. Recombinant cystatin was predominantly found in the soluble fraction of the cell extract. Large amounts (266 mgL(-1)) of pure recombinant protein were obtained by affinity chromatography in a single step of purification. The amaranth cystatin with a pI 6.8 and an apparent 28 kDa molecular mass inhibited papain (E.C.3.4.22.2) (Ki 115 nM), ficin (E.C.3.4.22.3) (Ki 325 nM) and cathepsin L (E.C.3.4.22.15) (Ki 12.7 nM) but not stem bromelain (E.C.3.4.22.32), and cathepsin B (E.C.3.4.22.1) activities, in colorimetric assays. Furthermore, it was able to arrest the fungal growth of Fusarium oxysporum, Sclerotium cepivorum and Rhyzoctonia solani. It was further demonstrated that recombinant AhCPI is a weak inhibitor of the endogenous cysteine proteinase activities in the fungal mycelium. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the amaranth cystatin activity and encourage further studies of this protein.

  20. Cathepsin-B and cathepsin-L expression levels do not correlate with sensitivity of tumour cells to TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewies, A; Grimm, S

    2003-10-20

    Recently, evidence has been accumulated that besides the caspase proteases, lysosomal cathepsins may play a role in apoptosis induction. This is especially significant as many human tumour cells express high levels of cathepsins, which might sensitise these cells to specific proapoptotic stimuli mediated by cathepsins. We found that TNF-alpha-mediated DNA fragmentation in tumour cells was significantly reduced in the presence of E64d and CA074Me, two inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases. Transient transfection of cathepsin-B (Cath-B) and -L (Cath-L) resulting in expression levels comparable to those found in many tumours did not sensitise tumour cells to TNF-alpha-mediated apoptosis. As lysosomal proteases are thought to be activated by their release from this organelle into the cytosol, we used the lysosomotropic detergent N-dodecyl-imidazole-HCl (NDI-HCl) to disturb lysosomal integrity efficiently and trigger the release of its proteolytic content into the cytosol. Treatment of HeLa cells with NDI-HCl resulted in cell death, which, however, could also not be influenced by augmented Cath-B or -L expression levels. Therefore, our data do not support the hypothesis that the high Cath-B or -L expression levels frequently detected in tumour cells might be exploited to target selectively those tumours for an enhanced cell death effect induced by lysosomotropic agents.

  1. Patterns of recombination activity on mouse chromosome 11 revealed by high resolution mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Billings

    Full Text Available The success of high resolution genetic mapping of disease predisposition and quantitative trait loci in humans and experimental animals depends on the positions of key crossover events around the gene of interest. In mammals, the majority of recombination occurs at highly delimited 1-2 kb long sites known as recombination hotspots, whose locations and activities are distributed unevenly along the chromosomes and are tightly regulated in a sex specific manner. The factors determining the location of hotspots started to emerge with the finding of PRDM9 as a major hotspot regulator in mammals, however, additional factors modulating hotspot activity and sex specificity are yet to be defined. To address this limitation, we have collected and mapped the locations of 4829 crossover events occurring on mouse chromosome 11 in 5858 meioses of male and female reciprocal F1 hybrids of C57BL/6J and CAST/EiJ mice. This chromosome was chosen for its medium size and high gene density and provided a comparison with our previous analysis of recombination on the longest mouse chromosome 1. Crossovers were mapped to an average resolution of 127 kb, and thirteen hotspots were mapped to <8 kb. Most crossovers occurred in a small number of the most active hotspots. Females had higher recombination rate than males as a consequence of differences in crossover interference and regional variation of sex specific rates along the chromosome. Comparison with chromosome 1 showed that recombination events tend to be positioned in similar fashion along the centromere-telomere axis but independently of the local gene density. It appears that mammalian recombination is regulated on at least three levels, chromosome-wide, regional, and at individual hotspots, and these regulation levels are influenced by sex and genetic background but not by gene content.

  2. Top3 processes recombination intermediates and modulates checkpoint activity after DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2006-01-01

    Mutation of TOP3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae causes poor growth, hyperrecombination, and a failure to fully activate DNA damage checkpoints in S phase. Here, we report that overexpression of a dominant-negative allele of TOP3, TOP3(Y356F), which lacks the catalytic (decatenation) activity of Top3......) are downstream of Rad51 function. We propose that Top3 functions in S phase to both process homologous recombination intermediates and modulate checkpoint activity....

  3. Crystal structure of cathepsin A, a novel target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreuder, Herman A., E-mail: herman.schreuder@sanofi.com; Liesum, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.liesum@sanofi.com; Kroll, Katja, E-mail: katja.kroll@sanofi.com; Böhnisch, Britta, E-mail: britta.boehnisch@sanofi.com; Buning, Christian, E-mail: christian.buning@sanofi.com; Ruf, Sven, E-mail: sven.ruf@sanofi.com; Sadowski, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.sadowski@sanofi.com

    2014-03-07

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The structures of active cathepsin A and the inactive precursor are very similar. • The only major difference is the absence of a 40 residue activation domain. • The termini of the active catalytic core are held together by a disulfide bond. • Compound 1 reacts with the catalytic Ser150, building a tetrahedral intermediate. • Compound 2 is cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment remained bound. - Abstract: The lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase cathepsin A is involved in the breakdown of peptide hormones like endothelin and bradykinin. Recent pharmacological studies with cathepsin A inhibitors in rodents showed a remarkable reduction in cardiac hypertrophy and atrial fibrillation, making cathepsin A a promising target for the treatment of heart failure. Here we describe the crystal structures of activated cathepsin A without inhibitor and with two compounds that mimic the tetrahedral intermediate and the reaction product, respectively. The structure of activated cathepsin A turned out to be very similar to the structure of the inactive precursor. The only difference was the removal of a 40 residue activation domain, partially due to proteolytic removal of the activation peptide, and partially by an order–disorder transition of the peptides flanking the removed activation peptide. The termini of the catalytic core are held together by the Cys253–Cys303 disulfide bond, just before and after the activation domain. One of the compounds we soaked in our crystals reacted covalently with the catalytic Ser150 and formed a tetrahedral intermediate. The other compound got cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment, resembling one of the natural reaction products, was found in the active site. These studies establish cathepsin A as a classical serine proteinase with a well-defined oxyanion hole. The carboxylate group of the cleavage product is bound by a hydrogen-bonding network involving one aspartate and two glutamate side chains

  4. Central venous catheter associated thrombosis of major veins: thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenhuis, S.; van't Hek, L. G.; Vlasveld, L. T.; Kröger, R.; Dubbelman, R.; van Tol, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Major thromboses can occur in the venous system in association with central venous catheters. This usually necessitates removal of the catheter. The effectiveness of low dose recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in combination with heparin was assessed in patients with central

  5. Base composition, selection, and phylogenetic significance of indels in the recombination activating gene-1 in vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiari, Y.; Meijden, van der A.; Madsen, O.; Vences, M.; Meyer, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Recombination Activating Proteins, RAG1 and RAG2, play a crucial role in the immune response in vertebrates. Among the nuclear markers currently used for phylogenetic purposes, Rag1 has especially enjoyed enormous popularity, since it successfully contributed to elucidating the

  6. High-Level Expression of Recombinant Bovine Lactoferrin in Pichia pastoris with Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Iglesias-Figueroa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bovine lactoferrin (bLf, an iron-binding glycoprotein considered an important nutraceutical protein because of its several properties, was expressed in Pichia pastoris KM71-H under AOX1 promoter control, using pJ902 as the recombinant plasmid. Dot blotting analysis revealed the expression of recombinant bovine lactoferrin (rbLf in Pichia pastoris. After Bach fermentation and purification by molecular exclusion, we obtained an expression yield of 3.5 g/L of rbLf. rbLf and predominantly pepsin-digested rbLf (rbLfcin demonstrated antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli BL21DE3, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus FRI137, and, in a smaller percentage, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. Aeruginosa ATCC 27833. The successful expression and characterization of functional rbLf expressed in Pichia pastoris opens a prospect for the development of natural antimicrobial agents produced recombinantly.

  7. High-Level Expression of Recombinant Bovine Lactoferrin in Pichia pastoris with Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Figueroa, Blanca; Valdiviezo-Godina, Norberto; Siqueiros-Cendón, Tania; Sinagawa-García, Sugey; Arévalo-Gallegos, Sigifredo; Rascón-Cruz, Quintín

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bovine lactoferrin (bLf), an iron-binding glycoprotein considered an important nutraceutical protein because of its several properties, was expressed in Pichia pastoris KM71-H under AOX1 promoter control, using pJ902 as the recombinant plasmid. Dot blotting analysis revealed the expression of recombinant bovine lactoferrin (rbLf) in Pichia pastoris. After Bach fermentation and purification by molecular exclusion, we obtained an expression yield of 3.5 g/L of rbLf. rbLf and predominantly pepsin-digested rbLf (rbLfcin) demonstrated antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21DE3, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) FRI137, and, in a smaller percentage, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. Aeruginosa) ATCC 27833. The successful expression and characterization of functional rbLf expressed in Pichia pastoris opens a prospect for the development of natural antimicrobial agents produced recombinantly. PMID:27294912

  8. Refolding techniques for recovering biologically active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2014-02-20

    Biologically active proteins are useful for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs and biomaterials in a biotechnology industry. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. As inclusion bodies contain relatively pure and intact proteins, protein refolding is an important process to obtain active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, conventional refolding methods, such as dialysis and dilution, are time consuming and, often, recovered yields of active proteins are low, and a trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. Recently, several approaches have been reported to refold these aggregated proteins into an active form. The strategies largely aim at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This review focuses on protein refolding techniques using chemical additives and laminar flow in microfluidic chips for the efficient recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies.

  9. A novel nonsense mutation in cathepsin C gene in an Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hala Soliman

    2015-04-22

    Apr 22, 2015 ... Periodontitis;. Palmoplantar keratoderma;. Papillon–Lefevre syndrome;. PLS;. Egyptians. Abstract Background: Cathepsin C gene (CTSC) (MIM#602365) is a lysosomal cysteine pro- teinase coding gene which encodes for CTSC protein that plays a major role in the activation of granule serine proteases ...

  10. Coordination of DNA replication and recombination activities in the maintenance of genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Robyn L; Branagan, Amy M; Morrical, Scott W

    2011-10-01

    Across the evolutionary spectrum, living organisms depend on high-fidelity DNA replication and recombination mechanisms to maintain genome stability and thus to avoid mutation and disease. The repair of severe lesions in the DNA such as double-strand breaks or stalled replication forks requires the coordinated activities of both the homologous recombination (HR) and DNA replication machineries. Growing evidence indicates that so-called "accessory proteins" in both systems are essential for the effective coupling of recombination to replication which is necessary to restore genome integrity following severe DNA damage. In this article we review the major processes of homology-directed DNA repair (HDR), including the double Holliday Junction (dHJ), synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA), break-induced replication (BIR), and error-free lesion bypass pathways. Each of these pathways involves the coupling of a HR event to DNA synthesis. We highlight two major classes of accessory proteins in recombination and replication that facilitate HDR: Recombination mediator proteins exemplified by T4 UvsY, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52, and human BRCA2; and DNA helicases/translocases exemplified by T4 Gp41/Gp59, E. coli DnaB and PriA, and eukaryotic Mcm2-7, Rad54, and Mph1. We illustrate how these factors help to direct the flow of DNA and protein-DNA intermediates on the pathway from a double-strand break or stalled replication fork to a high-fidelity recombination-dependent replication apparatus that can accurately repair the damage. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Recombinant expression, characterization and application of a dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with diaphorase activity from Bacillus sphaericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianmehr, Anvarsadat; Mahdizadeh, Rahman; Oladnabi, Morteza; Ansari, Javad

    2017-06-01

    Diaphorases are flavin-containing enzymes with potential applications in biotransfomation reactions, biosensor design and in vitro diagnostic tests. In this communication, we describe recombinant expression, characterization and application of a lipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) with diaphorase activity from a strain of Bacillus sphaericus. The DLD gene consisting of 1413 bp encoding a protein of 470 amino acids was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and the recombinant enzyme was characterized. B. sphaericus DLD catalyzed the reduction of NAD+ by dihydrolipoamide and exhibited NADH-dependent diaphorase activity. The molecular weight of purified enzyme was about 50 kDa, and determined to be a monomeric protein. Diaphorase was active and stable from pH 7.0 to 9.0 with an optimal activity at pH 8.5. It showed its maximal activity at temperature of 30 °C and was almost stable at temperatures between 25 and 30 °C. Different metal ions and inhibitors showed no influence on the activity of target enzyme. The K m and V max values for NADH were estimated to be 0.33 mM and 200.0 U/ml, respectively. Moreover, recombinant B. sphaericus diaphorase exhibited considerable potential to be used as a component of diagnostic tests for the quantification of metabolites. In conclusion, considering the properties of diaphorase from B. sphaericus PAD-91, it can have potential application as a diagnostic enzyme.

  12. Cathepsin B is involved in the heat shock induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis as well as the anti-apoptosis effect of HSP-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Cheng, Bor-Chih; Lin, Cheng-Hsien

    2014-11-01

    Cathepsin B is one of the major lysosomal cysteine proteases that plays an important role in apoptosis. Herein, we investigated whether Cathepsin B is involved in cardiomyocyte apoptosis caused by hyperthermic injury (HI) and heat shock protein (HSP)-70 protects these cells from HI-induced apoptosis mediated by Cathepsin. HI was produced in H9C2 cells by putting them in a circulating 43 °C water bath for 120 min, whereas preinduction of HSP-70 was produced in H9C2 cells by mild heat preconditioning (or putting them in 42 °C water bath for 30 min) 8 h before the start of HI. It was found that HI caused both cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity in H9C2 cells. E-64-c, in addition to reducing Cathepsin B activity, significantly attenuated HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis (evidenced by increased apoptotic cell numbers, increased tuncated Bid (t-Bid), increased cytochrome C, increased caspase-9/-3, and decreased Bcl-2/Bax) in H9C2 cells. In addition, preinduction of HSP-70 by mild heat preconditioning or inhibition of HSP-70 by Tripolide significantly attenuated or exacerbated respectively both the cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity in H9C2 cells. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of pre-induction of HSP-70 by mild heat production in reducing both cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity caused by HI can be significantly reduced by Triptolide preconditioning. These results indicate that Cathepsin B is involved in HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in H9C2 cells and HSP-70 protects these cells from HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis through Cathepsin B pathways.

  13. Antifibrotic effects of curcumin are associated with overexpression of cathepsins K and L in bleomycin treated mice and human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dongwei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung fibrosis is characterized by fibroblast proliferation and the deposition of collagens. Curcumin, a polyphenol antioxidant from the spice tumeric, has been shown to effectively counteract fibroblast proliferation and reducing inflammation and fibrotic progression in animal models of bleomycin-induced lung injury. However, there is little mechanistic insight in the biological activity of curcumin. Here, we study the effects of curcumin on the expression and activity of cathepsins which have been implicated in the development of fibrotic lung diseases. Methods We investigated the effects of curcumin administration to bleomycin stimulated C57BL/6 mice and human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1 on the expression of cathepsins K and L which have been implicated in matrix degradation, TGF-β1 modulation, and apoptosis. Lung tissues were evaluated for their contents of cathepsins K and L, collagen, and TGF-β1. HFL-1 cells were used to investigate the effects of curcumin and cathepsin inhibition on cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and the expression of cathepsins K and L and TGF-β1. Results Collagen deposition in lungs was decreased by 17-28% after curcumin treatment which was accompanied by increased expression levels of cathepsins L (25%-39% and K (41%-76% and a 30% decrease in TGF-β1 expression. Moreover, Tunel staining of lung tissue revealed a 33-41% increase in apoptotic cells after curcumin treatment. These in vivo data correlated well with data obtained from the human fibroblast line, HFL-1. Here, cathepsin K and L expression increased 190% and 240%, respectively, in the presence of curcumin and the expression of TGF-β1 decreased by 34%. Furthermore, curcumin significantly decreased cell proliferation and migration and increased the expression of surrogate markers of apoptosis. In contrast, these curcumin effects were partly reversed by a potent cathepsin inhibitor. Conclusion This study demonstrates that

  14. Cathepsin D SNP associated with increased risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez-Juan Pascual

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD originally resulted from the consumption of foodstuffs contaminated by bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE material, with 163 confirmed cases in the UK to date. Many thousands are likely to have been exposed to dietary infection and so it is important (for surveillance, epidemic modelling, public health and understanding pathogenesis to identify genetic factors that may affect individual susceptibility to infection. This study looked at a polymorphism in the cathepsin D gene (refSNP ID: rs17571 previously examined in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods Blood samples taken from 110 vCJD patients were tested for the C-T base change, and genotype data were compared with published frequencies for a control population using multiple logistic regression. Results There was a significant excess of the cathepsin D polymorphism TT genotype in the vCJD cohort compared to controls. The TT genotype was found to have a 9.75 fold increase in risk of vCJD compared to the CT genotype and a 10.92 fold increase compared to the CC genotype. Conclusion This mutation event has been observed to alter the protease activity of the cathepsin D protein and has been linked to an increase in amyloid beta plaque formation in AD. vCJD neuropathology is characterised by the presence of amyloid plaques, formed from the prion protein, and therefore alterations in the amyloid processing activity of cathepsin D may affect the neuropathogenesis of this disease.

  15. Involvement of cathepsin B in mitochondrial apoptosis by p-phenylenediamine under ambient UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Shruti; Amar, Saroj Kumar [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR-IITR Campus, Lucknow (India); Dubey, Divya; Pal, Manish Kumar [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Singh, Jyoti [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR-IITR Campus, Lucknow (India); Verma, Ankit; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ray, Ratan Singh, E-mail: ratanray.2011@rediffmail.com [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Photodegradation and formation of photoproduct. • Involvement of ROS in PPD phototoxicity. • Role of ROS in DNA damage, CPD and micronuclei formation. • PPD induced lysosomal destabilization and release of cathepsin B. • Cleavage of Bid and activation of mitochondrial apoptosis. - Abstract: Paraphenylenediamine (PPD), a derivative of paranitroaniline has been most commonly used as an ingredient of oxidative hair dye and permanent tattoos. We have studied the phototoxic potential of PPD under ambient ultraviolet radiation. PPD is photodegraded and form a novel photoproduct under UV A exposure. PPD shows a concentration dependent decrease in cell viability of human Keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) through MTT and NRU test. Significant intracellular ROS generation was measured by DCFDA assay. It caused an oxidative DNA damage via single stranded DNA breaks, micronuclei and CPD formation. Both lysosome and mitochondria is main target for PPD induced apoptosis which was proved through lysosomal destabilization and release of cathepsin B by immunofluorescence, real time PCR and western blot analysis. Cathepsin B process BID to active tBID which induces the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. Mitochondrial depolarization was reported through transmission electron microscopy. The cathepsin inhibitor reduced the release of cytochrome C in PPD treated cells. Thus study suggests that PPD leads to apoptosis via the involvement of lysosome and mitochondria both under ambient UV radiation. Therefore, photosensitizing nature of hair dye ingredients should be tested before coming to market as a cosmetic product for the safety of human beings.

  16. Development of a keratinase activity assay using recombinant chicken feather keratin substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Su Jin

    Full Text Available Poultry feathers consist mainly of the protein keratin, which is rich in β-pleated sheets and consequently resistant to proteolysis. Although many keratinases have been identified, the reasons for their substrate specificity towards β-keratin remain unclear due to difficulties in preparing a soluble feather keratin substrate for use in activity assays. In the present study, we overexpressed Gallus gallus chromosomes 2 and 27 β-keratin-encoding genes in Escherichia coli, purified denatured recombinant proteins by Ni2+ affinity chromatography, and refolded by stepwise dialysis to yield soluble keratins. To assess the keratinolytic activity, we compared the proteolytic activity of crude extracts from the feather- degrading bacterium Fervidobacterium islandicum AW-1 with proteinase K, trypsin, and papain using purified recombinant keratin and casein as substrates. All tested proteases showed strong proteolytic activities for casein, whereas only F. islandicum AW-1 crude extracts and proteinase K exhibited pronounced keratinolytic activity for the recombinant keratin. Moreover, LC-MS/MS analysis of keratin hydrolysates allowed us to predict the P1 sites of keratinolytic enzymes in the F. islandicum AW-1 extracts, thereby qualifying and quantifying the extent of keratinolysis. The soluble keratin-based assay has clear therapeutic and industrial potential for the development of a high-throughput screening system for proteases hydrolyzing disease-related protein aggregates, as well as mechanically resilient keratin-based polymers.

  17. [Prokaryotic expression, purification and biological activity analysis of recombinant β-Lactamase protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-liang; Shi, Pei-ji; Wang, Hao

    2011-01-01

    To prepare RGD4CβL fusion protein using prokaryotic expression system and evaluate the biological activity of the RGD4CβL. RGD4CβL gene was cloned into pColdII to contruct β-Lactamase prokaryotic expression vector. After transformation, the recombinant vector was induced to express recombinant protein RGD4CβL by IPTG in E.coli BL(DE3). The recombinant protein was purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing condition and then dialyzed to renature. The tumor cell targeting ability of the recombinant protein was analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. After cleavage and purification, β-Lactamase moiety showed the expected size of 42 000 on Tricine-SDS-PAGE, and was further confirmed by Western blotting. Based on flow cytometric analysis, the purified protein specially targeted breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This research successfully estiblished a method for prokaryotic expression and purification of β-lactamase. These results suggest the potential use of the protein as an agent for ADEPT.

  18. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown.......Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  19. Are Proteinase 3 and Cathepsin C Enzymes Related to Pathogenesis of Periodontitis?

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    Oya Türkoğlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cathepsin C is the activator of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived proteinase 3, which contributes to inflammatory processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate gingival crevicular fluid (GCF proteinase 3 and cathepsin C levels in periodontal diseases. Design. Eighteen patients with chronic periodontitis (CP, 20 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP, 20 patients with gingivitis, and 18 healthy subjects were included in the study. Periodontal parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment level, papilla bleeding index, and plaque index were assessed in all study subjects. GCF proteinase 3 and cathepsin C levels were analyzed by ELISA. Results. GCF proteinase 3 total amount was significantly higher in diseased groups compared to control group, after adjusting age P0.05. Periodontal parameters of sampling sites were positively correlated with GCF proteinase 3 total amounts P0.05. Conclusions. Elevated levels of GCF proteinase 3 in CP, G-AgP, and gingivitis might suggest that proteinase 3 plays a role during inflammatory periodontal events in host response. However, cathepsin C in GCF does not seem to have an effect on the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

  20. Activation of peritoneal cells upon in vivo transfection with a recombinant alphavirus expressing GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimp, AH; Lansink, PO; Withoff, S; de Vries, EGE; Scherphof, GL; Wilschut, J; Daemen, T

    In this study we determined the in vivo localization of recombinant proteins expressed by intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected recombinant Semliki Forest virus (SFV) particles. Subsequently, we investigated the influence of i.p. administered SFV particles encoding recombinant murine

  1. On-line determination of serum bactericidal activity using recombinant luminescent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryabin, D G; Polyakov, E G

    2006-08-01

    Intensity of luminescence quenching in recombinant strains of Escherichia coli with cloned lux-operones by human blood serum is directly proportional to the degree of bactericidal effect assessed by nephelometric and bacteriological methods. This correlation was most characteristic of E. coli with luminescence genes from Photobacterium leiognathi, which substantiates its use in the development of the kinetic bioluminescent method to determine of serum bactericidal activity. The possibility of using this method for evaluation of activity of classic and alternative pathways of compliment activation was demonstrated by using zymosan or EGTA-Mg(2+)-treated sera and C1-C5-deficient sera.

  2. Salivary Tick Cystatin OmC2 Targets Lysosomal Cathepsins S and C in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zavašnik-Bergant

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To ensure successful feeding tick saliva contains a number of inhibitory proteins that interfere with the host immune response and help to create a permissive environment for pathogen transmission. Among the potential targets of the salivary cystatins are two host cysteine proteases, cathepsin S, which is essential for antigen- and invariant chain-processing, and cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase 1, DPP1, which plays a critical role in processing and activation of the granule serine proteases. Here, the effect of salivary cystatin OmC2 from Ornithodoros moubata was studied using differentiated MUTZ-3 cells as a model of immature dendritic cells of the host skin. Following internalization, cystatin OmC2 was initially found to inhibit the activity of several cysteine cathepsins, as indicated by the decreased rates of degradation of fluorogenic peptide substrates. To identify targets, affinity chromatography was used to isolate His-tagged cystatin OmC2 together with the bound proteins from MUTZ-3 cells. Cathepsins S and C were identified in these complexes by mass spectrometry and confirmed by immunoblotting. Furthermore, reduced increase in the surface expression of MHC II and CD86, which are associated with the maturation of dendritic cells, was observed. In contrast, human inhibitor cystatin C, which is normally expressed and secreted by dendritic cells, did not affect the expression of CD86. It is proposed that internalization of salivary cystatin OmC2 by the host dendritic cells targets cathepsins S and C, thereby affecting their maturation.

  3. Autophagic-lysosomal dysregulation downstream of cathepsin B inactivation in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamore, Sarah D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, using 2D-DIGE proteomics we have identified cathepsin B as a novel target of UVA in human Hs27 skin fibroblasts. In response to chronic exposure to noncytotoxic doses of UVA (9.9 J cm(-2), twice a week, 3 weeks), photooxidative impairment of cathepsin B enzymatic activity occurred with accumulation of autofluorescent aggregates colocalizing with lysosomes, an effect mimicked by pharmacological antagonism of cathepsin B using the selective inhibitor CA074Me. Here, we have further explored the mechanistic involvement of cathepsin B inactivation in UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations using autophagy-directed PCR expression array analysis as a discovery tool. Consistent with lysosomal expansion, UVA upregulated cellular protein levels of the lysosomal marker glycoprotein Lamp-1, and increased levels of the lipidated autophagosomal membrane constituent LC3-II were detected. UVA did not alter expression of beclin 1 (BECN1), an essential factor for initiation of autophagy, but upregulation of p62 (sequestosome 1, SQSTM1), a selective autophagy substrate, and α-synuclein (SNCA), an autophagic protein substrate and aggresome component, was observed at the mRNA and protein level. Moreover, UVA downregulated transglutaminase-2 (TGM2), an essential enzyme involved in autophagolysosome maturation. Strikingly, UVA effects on Lamp-1, LC3-II, beclin 1, p62, α-synuclein, and transglutaminase-2 were mimicked by CA074Me treatment. Taken together, our data suggest that UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations occur as a consequence of impaired autophagic flux downstream of cathepsin B inactivation, a novel molecular mechanism potentially involved in UVA-induced skin photodamage. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2012

  4. Cathepsin V is involved in the degradation of invariant chain in human thymus and is overexpressed in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Eva; Li, Weijie; Yasuda, Yoshiyuki; Wienhold, Wolfgang; Denzin, Lisa K; Lautwein, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph; Schnorrer, Petra; Weber, Ekkehard; Stevanovic, Stefan; Kurek, Raffael; Melms, Arthur; Bromme, Dieter

    2003-08-01

    Stepwise degradation of the invariant chain (Ii) is required for the binding of antigenic peptides to MHC class II molecules. Cathepsin (Cat) L in the murine thymus and Cat S in peripheral APCs have both been implicated in the last step of Ii degradation that gives rise to the class II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP). Cat V has been recently described as highly homologous to Cat L and exclusively expressed in human thymus and testis, but with no mouse orthologue. We report that Cat V is the dominant cysteine protease in cortical human thymic epithelial cells, while Cat L and Cat S seem to be restricted to dendritic and macrophage-like cells. Active Cat V in thymic lysosomal preparations was demonstrated by active-site labeling. Recombinant Cat V was capable of converting Ii into CLIP efficiently, suggesting that Cat V is the protease that controls the generation of alphabeta-CLIP complexes in the human thymus, in analogy to Cat L in mouse. Comparison of Cat V expression between thymi from patients with myasthenia gravis and healthy controls revealed a significantly higher expression level in the pathological samples, suggesting a potential involvement of this protease in the immunopathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease almost invariably associated with thymic pathology.

  5. Recombinant human activated protein C in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Cornet (Alexander); A.B.J. Groeneveld (Johan); J.J. Hofstra (Jorrit Jan); A.P.J. Vlaar (Alexander); S. Tuinman (Sietske); A. van Lingen (Arthur); M. Levi (Michael); A.R.J. Girbes (Armand); M.J. Schultz (Marcus); A. Beishuizen (Auke)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRationale: Pulmonary coagulopathy may play a pathogenetic role in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), by contributing to alveolocapillary inflammation and increased permeability. Recombinant human activated protein C (rh-APC) may inhibit this process and thereby improve patient

  6. Onchocerca volvulus: expression and immunolocalization of a nematode cathepsin D-like lysosomal aspartic protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolodar, Abbas; Fischer, Peter; Büttner, Dietrich W; Miller, David J; Schmetz, Christel; Brattig, Norbert W

    2004-01-01

    The N-terminal region of the cathepsin D-like aspartic protease from the human filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus was expressed as His-tag fusion protein. Light and electron microscopic immunohistology using antibodies against the recombinant protein showed labeling of lysosomes in the hypodermis and epithelia of the intestine and the reproductive organs of Onchocerca. While developing oocytes were negative, mature oocytes and early morulae showed strong labeling. In older embryos and mature microfilariae, stained lysosomes were only found in a few cells. Cell death in degenerating microfilariae of patients untreated and treated with microfilaricidal drugs was associated with strong expression of aspartic protease. IgG1, IgG4, and IgE antibodies reactive with the recombinant protein were demonstrated in sera from onchocerciasis patients indicating exposure and recognition of the enzyme by the host's defence system. The aspartic protease of O. volvulus appears to function in intestinal digestion and tissue degradation of the filaria.

  7. A cardinal role for cathepsin d in co-ordinating the host-mediated apoptosis of macrophages and killing of pneumococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A Bewley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The bactericidal function of macrophages against pneumococci is enhanced by their apoptotic demise, which is controlled by the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Here, we show that lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and cytosolic translocation of activated cathepsin D occur prior to activation of a mitochondrial pathway of macrophage apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition or knockout of cathepsin D during pneumococcal infection blocked macrophage apoptosis. As a result of cathepsin D activation, Mcl-1 interacted with its ubiquitin ligase Mule and expression declined. Inhibition of cathepsin D had no effect on early bacterial killing but inhibited the late phase of apoptosis-associated killing of pneumococci in vitro. Mice bearing a cathepsin D(-/- hematopoietic system demonstrated reduced macrophage apoptosis in vivo, with decreased clearance of pneumococci and enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to control pulmonary infection. These findings establish an unexpected role for a cathepsin D-mediated lysosomal pathway of apoptosis in pulmonary host defense and underscore the importance of apoptosis-associated microbial killing to macrophage function.

  8. Active site electrostatics protect genome integrity by blocking abortive hydrolysis during DNA recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chien-Hui; Rowley, Paul A; Macieszak, Anna; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2009-01-01

    Water, acting as a rogue nucleophile, can disrupt transesterification steps of important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA and RNA. We have unveiled this risk, and identified safeguards instituted against it, during strand cleavage and joining by the tyrosine site-specific recombinase Flp. Strand joining is threatened by a latent Flp endonuclease activity (type I) towards the 3′-phosphotyrosyl intermediate resulting from strand cleavage. This risk is not alleviated by phosphate electrostatics; neutralizing the negative charge on the scissile phosphate through methylphosphonate (MeP) substitution does not stimulate type I endonuclease. Rather, protection derives from the architecture of the recombination synapse and conformational dynamics within it. Strand cleavage is protected against water by active site electrostatics. Replacement of the catalytic Arg-308 of Flp by alanine, along with MeP substitution, elicits a second Flp endonuclease activity (type II) that directly targets the scissile phosphodiester bond in DNA. MeP substitution, combined with appropriate active site mutations, will be useful in revealing anti-hydrolytic mechanisms engendered by systems that mediate DNA relaxation, DNA transposition, site-specific recombination, telomere resolution, RNA splicing and retrohoming of mobile introns. PMID:19440204

  9. Optimizing production of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in non-pathogenic Leishmania by two genetic constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemayatkar M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA is one of the most important thrombolytic agents used in patients with vascular occlusions such as acute ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. A variety of recombinant protein expression systems have been developed for heterologous gene expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts. In recent years, Leishmania tarentolae (L. tarentolae, a non-pathogenic trypanosomatid protozoa, has come under consideration because of its safety and immunogenicity as a vaccine vector and special attributes in the expression of complex proteins. This study was done to improve rt-PA expression in this protozoon and create the opportunity for the replacement of rt-PA gene with other genes for the production of other complex proteins."n "n Methods: Two expression cassettes were used for the integration of two copies of t-PA cDNA, one copy in each cassette, into the parasite genome by electroporation. The transformed clones were selected by antibiotic resistancy. The expression of active secreted rt-PA was confirmed by Western blot analysis and Chromolize assay."n "n Results: Appearance of a 64 kD band in nitrocellulose membrane in the Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of full-length rt-PA in the culture media. Chromolize assay showed the expression levels of active recombinant t-PA in single and double transfected L. tarentolae clones- 375 IU/ml and 480 IU/ml of the culture media, respectively."n "n Conclusion: The produced rt-PA in the culture media containing the transfected cells was at least seven times higher than what has been reported in previous studies on L. tarentolae or on some other eukaryotic systems.

  10. Cathepsin S inhibition suppresses systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis because cathepsin S is essential for MHC class II-mediated CD4 T cell and B cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Lichtnekert, Julia; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R; Schott, Brigitte; Gruner, Sabine; Haap, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Guido; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-mediated priming of T and B lymphocytes is a central element of autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis. The cysteine protease cathepsin S degrades the invariant peptide chain during MHC II assembly with antigenic peptide in antigen-presenting cells; therefore, we hypothesised that cathepsin S inhibition would be therapeutic in SLE. We developed a highly specific small molecule, orally available, cathepsin S antagonist, RO5461111, with suitable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties that efficiently suppressed antigen-specific T cell and B cell priming in vitro and in vivo. When given to MRL-Fas(lpr) mice with SLE and lupus nephritis, RO5461111 significantly reduced the activation of spleen dendritic cells and the subsequent expansion and activation of CD4 T cells and CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells. Cathepsin S inhibition impaired the spatial organisation of germinal centres, suppressed follicular B cell maturation to plasma cells and Ig class switch. This reversed hypergammaglobulinemia and significantly suppressed the plasma levels of numerous IgG (but not IgM) autoantibodies below baseline, including anti-dsDNA. This effect was associated with less glomerular IgG deposits, which protected kidneys from lupus nephritis. Together, cathepsin S promotes SLE by driving MHC class II-mediated T and B cell priming, germinal centre formation and B cell maturation towards plasma cells. These afferent immune pathways can be specifically reversed with the cathepsin S antagonist RO5461111, which prevents lupus nephritis progression even when given after disease onset. This novel therapeutic strategy could correct a common pathomechanism of SLE and other immune complex-related autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Role of Cathepsin S in Periodontal Inflammation and Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Memmert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin S is a cysteine protease and regulator of autophagy with possible involvement in periodontitis. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cathepsin S is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. Human periodontal fibroblasts were cultured under inflammatory and infectious conditions elicited by interleukin-1β and Fusobacterium nucleatum, respectively. An array-based approach was used to analyze differential expression of autophagy-associated genes. Cathepsin S was upregulated most strongly and thus further studied in vitro at gene and protein levels. In vivo, gingival tissue biopsies from rats with ligature-induced periodontitis and from periodontitis patients were also analyzed at transcriptional and protein levels. Multiple gene expression changes due to interleukin-1β and F. nucleatum were observed in vitro. Both stimulants caused a significant cathepsin S upregulation. A significantly elevated cathepsin S expression in gingival biopsies from rats with experimental periodontitis was found in vivo, as compared to that from control. Gingival biopsies from periodontitis patients showed a significantly higher cathepsin S expression than those from healthy gingiva. Our findings provide original evidence that cathepsin S is increased in periodontal cells and tissues under inflammatory and infectious conditions, suggesting a critical role of this autophagy-associated molecule in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  12. Expression and serologic activity of a soluble recombinant Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, T; Michon, P; Barnwell, J W; Noe, A R; al-Yaman, F; Kaslow, D.C.; Adams, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (DBP) is a conserved functionally important protein. P. vivax DBP is an asexual blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate because adhesion of P. vivax DBP to its erythrocyte receptor is essential for the parasite to continue development in human blood. We developed a soluble recombinant protein of P. vivax DBP (rDBP) and examined serologic activity to it in residents of a region of high endemicity. This soluble rDBP product contained the cysteine-rich ligand...

  13. A mechanism to activate branch migration between homologous DNA molecules in genetic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, H M

    1975-01-01

    A mechanism to activate branch migration between homologous DNA molecules is described that leads to synapsis in genetic recombination. The model involves a restriction-like endonucleolytic enzyme that first nicks DNA (to produce single-strand breaks) on strands of opposite polarity at symmetrically arranged nucleotide sequences (located at ends of genes or operons). This is followed by local denaturation of the region, promoted by a single-strand-specific DNA binding protein (i.e., an unwinding protein). Hydrogen-bounding between homologous DNA molecules can then be initiated and this allows for subsequent propagation of hybrid DNA in the pathway to formation of the synapton structure. PMID:1054504

  14. Does intravenous administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for ischemic stroke can cause inferior myocardial infarction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Almasi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA is one of the main portions of acute ischemic stroke management, but unfortunately has some complications. Myocardial infarction (MI is a hazardous complication of administration of intravenous rTPA that has been reported recently. A 78-year-old lady was admitted for elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. On the second day of admission, she developed acute left hemiparesis and intravenous rTPA was administered within 120 minutes. Three hours later, she has had chest pain. Rescue percutaneous coronary intervention was performed on right coronary artery due to diagnosis of inferior MI, and the symptoms were resolved.

  15. Conformational transitions during FtsK translocase activation of individual XerCD-dif recombination complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Pawel; May, Peter F J; Baker, Rachel A; Pinkney, Justin N M; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Sherratt, David J; Arciszewska, Lidia K

    2013-10-22

    Three single-molecule techniques have been used simultaneously and in tandem to track the formation in vitro of single XerCD-dif recombination complexes. We observed the arrival of the FtsK translocase at individual preformed synaptic complexes and demonstrated the conformational change that occurs during their activation. We then followed the reaction intermediate transitions as Holliday junctions formed through catalysis by XerD, isomerized, and were converted by XerC to reaction products, which then dissociated. These observations, along with the calculated intermediate lifetimes, inform the reaction mechanism, which plays a key role in chromosome unlinking in most bacteria with circular chromosomes.

  16. Estrogenic and mutagenic activities of Crotalaria pallida measured by recombinant yeast assay and Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Paula; Resende, Flávia; Höhne, Ana; de Camargo, Mariana; Espanha, Lívia; Nogueira, Catarine; Melo, Maria; Vilegas, Wagner; Varanda, Eliana

    2013-09-04

    Crotalaria pallida Ailton is a plant belonging to the Fabaceae family, popularly known as "rattle or rattlesnake" and used in traditional medicine to treat swelling of the joints and as a vermifuge. Previous pharmacological studies have also reported anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antifungal activities. Nevertheless, scientific information regarding this species is scarce, and there are no reports related to its possible estrogenic and mutagenic effects. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the estrogenic potential of C. pallida leaves by means of the Recombinant Yeast Assay (RYA), seeking an alternative for estrogen replacement therapy during menopause; and to reflect on the safe use of natural products to assess the mutagenic activity of the crude extract from C. pallida leaves, the dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol by means of the Ames test. The recombinant yeast assay with the strain BY4741 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was performed with the ethanolic extract, dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol isolated from the leaves of C. pallida. Mutagenic activity was evaluated by the Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test), using the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA100, TA98, TA97 and TA102, with (+S9) and without (-S9) metabolization, by the preincubation method. All samples showed estrogenic activity, mainly stigmasterol. The ethanolic extract from C. pallida leaves showed mutagenic activity in the TA98 strain (-S9), whereas dichloromethane fraction and stigmasterol were found devoid of activity. Considering the excellent estrogenic activity performed by stigmasterol in the RYA associated with the absence of mutagenic activity when evaluated by the Ames test, stigmasterol becomes a strong candidate to be used in hormone replacement therapy during menopause.

  17. A Butter Aroma Recombinate Activates Human Class-I Odorant Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithe, Christiane; Andersen, Gaby; Malki, Agne; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2015-11-04

    With ∼400 olfactory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), humans sensitively perceive ∼230 key aroma compounds as best natural agonists of ∼10000 food volatiles. An understanding of odorant coding, thus, critically depends on the knowledge about interactions of key food aroma chemicals and their mixtures with their cognate receptors. Genetically designed test cell systems enable the screening, deorphaning, and characterization of single odorant receptors (OR). This study shows for the food aroma-specific and quantitative butter aroma recombinate, and its single components, specific in vitro class-I OR activity patterns, as well as the activation of selected OR in a concentration-dependent manner. Recently, chemosensory receptors, especially class-I OR, were demonstrated to be expressed on blood leukocytes, which may encounter foodborne aroma compounds postprandially. This study shows that butter aroma recombinate induced chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils in a defined gradient, and in a concentration-dependent and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner, suggesting at least a GPCR-mediated activation of blood leukocytes by key food odorants.

  18. Epoxysuccinyl peptide-derived cathepsin B inhibitors: modulating membrane permeability by conjugation with the C-terminal heptapeptide segment of penetratin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaschke, Norbert; Deluca, Dominga; Assfalg-Machleidt, Irmgard; Höhneke, Clara; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Machleidt, Werner

    2002-05-01

    Besides its physiological role in lysosomal protein breakdown, extralysosomal cathepsin B has recently been implicated in apoptotic cell death. Highly specific irreversible cathepsin B inhibitors that are readily cell-permeant should be useful tools to elucidate the effects of cathepsin B in the cytosol. We have covalently functionalised the poorly cell-permeant epoxysuccinyl-based cathepsin B inhibitor [R-Gly-Gly-Leu-(2S,3S)-tEps-Leu-Pro-OH; R=OMe] with the C-terminal heptapeptide segment of penetratin (R=epsilonAhx-Arg-Arg-Nle-Lys-Trp-Lys-Lys-NH2). The high inhibitory potency and selectivity for cathepsin B versus cathepsin L of the parent compound was not affected by the conjugation with the penetratin heptapeptide. The conjugate was shown to efficiently penetrate into MCF-7 cells as an active inhibitor, thereby circumventing an intracellular activation step that is required by other inhibitors, such as the prodrug-like epoxysuccinyl peptides E64d and CA074Me.

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a cathepsin B-like protease family unique to Trypanosoma congolense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Palomares, Carlos; Biteau, Nicolas; Giroud, Christiane; Coustou, Virginie; Coetzer, Theresa; Authié, Edith; Boulangé, Alain; Baltz, Théo

    2008-04-01

    Cysteine proteases have been shown to be essential virulence factors and drug targets in trypanosomatids and an attractive antidisease vaccine candidate for Trypanosoma congolense. Here, we describe an important amplification of genes encoding cathepsin B-like proteases unique to T. congolense. More than 13 different genes were identified, whereas only one or two highly homologous genes have been identified in other trypanosomatids. These proteases grouped into three evolutionary clusters: TcoCBc1 to TcoCBc5 and TcoCBc6, which possess the classical catalytic triad (Cys, His, and Asn), and TcoCBs7 to TcoCBs13, which contains an unusual catalytic site (Ser, Xaa, and Asn). Expression profiles showed that members of the TcoCBc1 to TcoCBc5 and the TcoCBs7 to TcoCBs13 groups are expressed mainly in bloodstream forms and localize in the lysosomal compartment. The expression of recombinant representatives of each group (TcoCB1, TcoCB6, and TcoCB12) as proenzymes showed that TcoCBc1 and TcoCBc6 are able to autocatalyze their maturation 21 and 31 residues, respectively, upstream of the predicted start of the catalytic domain. Both displayed a carboxydipeptidase function, while only TcoCBc1 behaved as an endopeptidase. TcoCBc1 exhibited biochemical differences regarding inhibitor sensitivity compared to that of other cathepsin B-like proteases. Recombinant pro-TcoCBs12 did not automature in vitro, and the pepsin-matured enzyme was inactive in tests with cathepsin B fluorogenic substrates. In vivo inhibition studies using CA074Me (a cell-permeable cathepsin B-specific inhibitor) demonstrated that TcoCB are involved in lysosomal protein degradation essential for survival in bloodstream form. Furthermore, TcoCBc1 elicited an important immune response in experimentally infected cattle. We propose this family of proteins as a potential therapeutic target and as a plausible antigen for T. congolense diagnosis.

  20. Albinism-causing mutations in recombinant human tyrosinase alter intrinsic enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinska, Monika B; Kovaleva, Elena; Backlund, Peter; Wingfield, Paul T; Brooks, Brian P; Sergeev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosinase (TYR) catalyzes the rate-limiting, first step in melanin production and its gene (TYR) is mutated in many cases of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1), an autosomal recessive cause of childhood blindness. Patients with reduced TYR activity are classified as OCA1B; some OCA1B mutations are temperature-sensitive. Therapeutic research for OCA1 has been hampered, in part, by the absence of purified, active, recombinant wild-type and mutant human enzymes. The intra-melanosomal domain of human tyrosinase (residues 19-469) and two OCA1B related temperature-sensitive mutants, R422Q and R422W were expressed in insect cells and produced in T. ni larvae. The short trans-membrane fragment was deleted to avoid potential protein insolubility, while preserving all other functional features of the enzymes. Purified tyrosinase was obtained with a yield of >1 mg per 10 g of larval biomass. The protein was a monomeric glycoenzyme with maximum enzyme activity at 37°C and neutral pH. The two purified mutants when compared to the wild-type protein were less active and temperature sensitive. These differences are associated with conformational perturbations in secondary structure. The intramelanosomal domains of recombinant wild-type and mutant human tyrosinases are soluble monomeric glycoproteins with activities which mirror their in vivo function. This advance allows for the structure - function analyses of different mutant TYR proteins and correlation with their corresponding human phenotypes; it also provides an important tool to discover drugs that may improve tyrosinase activity and treat OCA1.

  1. Albinism-causing mutations in recombinant human tyrosinase alter intrinsic enzymatic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika B Dolinska

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase (TYR catalyzes the rate-limiting, first step in melanin production and its gene (TYR is mutated in many cases of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1, an autosomal recessive cause of childhood blindness. Patients with reduced TYR activity are classified as OCA1B; some OCA1B mutations are temperature-sensitive. Therapeutic research for OCA1 has been hampered, in part, by the absence of purified, active, recombinant wild-type and mutant human enzymes.The intra-melanosomal domain of human tyrosinase (residues 19-469 and two OCA1B related temperature-sensitive mutants, R422Q and R422W were expressed in insect cells and produced in T. ni larvae. The short trans-membrane fragment was deleted to avoid potential protein insolubility, while preserving all other functional features of the enzymes. Purified tyrosinase was obtained with a yield of >1 mg per 10 g of larval biomass. The protein was a monomeric glycoenzyme with maximum enzyme activity at 37°C and neutral pH. The two purified mutants when compared to the wild-type protein were less active and temperature sensitive. These differences are associated with conformational perturbations in secondary structure.The intramelanosomal domains of recombinant wild-type and mutant human tyrosinases are soluble monomeric glycoproteins with activities which mirror their in vivo function. This advance allows for the structure - function analyses of different mutant TYR proteins and correlation with their corresponding human phenotypes; it also provides an important tool to discover drugs that may improve tyrosinase activity and treat OCA1.

  2. Escherichia coli Fails to Efficiently Maintain the Activity of an Important Flavin Monooxygenase in Recombinant Overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Milker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the measurement and analysis of in vivo activity and stability of cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB 9871 (CHMO, a model Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase, in the recombinant host Escherichia coli. This enzyme was often described as poorly stable in vitro, and has recently been found to deactivate rapidly in the absence of its essential cofactors and antioxidants. Its stability in vivo was scarcely studied, so far. Under conditions common for the overexpression of CHMO we investigated the ability of the host to support these properties using metabolomics. Our results showed that E. coli failed to provide the intracellular levels of cofactors required to functionally stabilize the enzyme, although the biocatalyst was produced in high concentration, and was invariably detected after protein synthesis had stopped. We thus infer that biotechnological applications of CHMO with this host relied on a residual activity of approximately 5-10%. Other microorganisms might offer a more efficient solution for recombinant production of CHMO and related enzymes.

  3. Cysteine cathepsins are essential in lysosomal degradation of α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinchey, Ryan P; Lee, Jennifer C

    2015-07-28

    A cellular feature of Parkinson's disease is cytosolic accumulation and amyloid formation of α-synuclein (α-syn), implicating a misregulation or impairment of protein degradation pathways involving the proteasome and lysosome. Within lysosomes, cathepsin D (CtsD), an aspartyl protease, is suggested to be the main protease for α-syn clearance; however, the protease alone only generates amyloidogenic C terminal-truncated species (e.g., 1-94, 5-94), implying that other proteases and/or environmental factors are needed to facilitate degradation and to avoid α-syn aggregation in vivo. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, to our knowledge, we report the first peptide cleavage map of the lysosomal degradation process of α-syn. Studies of purified mouse brain and liver lysosomal extracts and individual human cathepsins demonstrate a direct involvement of cysteine cathepsin B (CtsB) and L (CtsL). Both CtsB and CtsL cleave α-syn within its amyloid region and circumvent fibril formation. For CtsD, only in the presence of anionic phospholipids can this protease cleave throughout the α-syn sequence, suggesting that phospholipids are crucial for its activity. Taken together, an interplay exists between α-syn conformation and cathepsin activity with CtsL as the most efficient under the conditions examined. Notably, we discovered that CtsL efficiently degrades α-syn amyloid fibrils, which by definition are resistant to broad spectrum proteases. This work implicates CtsB and CtsL as essential in α-syn lysosomal degradation, establishing groundwork to explore mechanisms to enhance their cellular activity and levels as a potential strategy for clearance of α-syn.

  4. Recombinant-activated factor VII in patients with uncontrolled bleeding: A retrospective observational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said D Abuhasna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Factor VIIa (recombinant has an off-label use to control life-threatening bleeding that is refractory to other measures and was shown to decrease transfusion requirements. Objective: The primary objective of this study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of factor VIIa (recombinant on blood transfusion requirements and coagulation parameters when used in patients whose bleeding was uncorrected by other means. The pharmacoeconomic impact for any discrepancy from our protocol was evaluated. Secondary outcomes included 4-hour and 28-day mortality, as well as safety of this agent in terms of thromboembolic complications. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients who received recombinant-activated factor VII (rFVIIa for uncontrolled bleeding from June 2008 to April 2011. The medical records of 33 patients were evaluated. Coagulation parameters and blood products were determined 24 hours before and 24 hours after administration of rFVIIa, and the results compared. Patients were also screened for any thromboembolic complications. Results: Administration of rFVIIa reduced blood transfusion requirements and improved coagulation parameters significantly (P<0.05. No thromboembolic complications were reported. Most of the dosing was consistent with those recommended in our institutional protocol, with discrepancies resulting in an average cost of $56 058. Moreover, pH was reported in only 67% of patients. All patients treated with rFVIIa survived up to 4 hours after receiving this agent, while the 28-day mortality was 24% (8/33. Conclusion: The use of rFVIIa appears to be safe and effective in promoting hemostasis, as evident from reducing transfusion requirements and improving the coagulation variables.

  5. Oximes: Inhibitors of Human Recombinant Acetylcholinesterase. A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepsova, Vendula; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Korabecny, Jan; Dolezal, Rafael; Zemek, Filip; Bennion, Brian J.; Kuca, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivators were developed for the treatment of organophosphate intoxication. Standard care involves the use of anticonvulsants (e.g., diazepam), parasympatolytics (e.g., atropine) and oximes that restore AChE activity. However, oximes also bind to the active site of AChE, simultaneously acting as reversible inhibitors. The goal of the present study is to determine how oxime structure influences the inhibition of human recombinant AChE (hrAChE). Therefore, 24 structurally different oximes were tested and the results compared to the previous eel AChE (EeAChE) experiments. Structural factors that were tested included the number of pyridinium rings, the length and structural features of the linker, and the number and position of the oxime group on the pyridinium ring. PMID:23959117

  6. Activation of Xer-recombination at dif: structural basis of the FtsKγ-XerD interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Andrew N; Xin, Yue; Boer, Stephanie; Reinhardt, Jonathan; Baker, Rachel; Arciszewska, Lidia K; Lewis, Peter J; Sherratt, David J; Löwe, Jan; Grainge, Ian

    2016-10-06

    Bacterial chromosomes are most often circular DNA molecules. This can produce a topological problem; a genetic crossover from homologous recombination results in dimerization of the chromosome. A chromosome dimer is lethal unless resolved. A site-specific recombination system catalyses this dimer-resolution reaction at the chromosomal site dif. In Escherichia coli, two tyrosine-family recombinases, XerC and XerD, bind to dif and carry out two pairs of sequential strand exchange reactions. However, what makes the reaction unique among site-specific recombination reactions is that the first step, XerD-mediated strand exchange, relies on interaction with the very C-terminus of the FtsK DNA translocase. FtsK is a powerful molecular motor that functions in cell division, co-ordinating division with clearing chromosomal DNA from the site of septation and also acts to position the dif sites for recombination. This is a model system for unlinking, separating and segregating large DNA molecules. Here we describe the molecular detail of the interaction between XerD and FtsK that leads to activation of recombination as deduced from a co-crystal structure, biochemical and in vivo experiments. FtsKγ interacts with the C-terminal domain of XerD, above a cleft where XerC is thought to bind. We present a model for activation of recombination based on structural data.

  7. Correlation between the glycan variations and defibrinogenating activities of acutobin and its recombinant glycoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ming Wang

    Full Text Available Acutobin isolated from Deinagkistrodon acutus venom has been used to prevent or treat stroke in patients. This defibrinogenating serine protease is a 39 kDa glycoprotein containing terminal disialyl-capped N-glycans. After sialidase treatment, the enzyme showed similar catalytic activities toward chromogenic substrate, and cleaved the Aα chain of fibrinogen as efficiently as the native acutobin did. However, the level of fibrinogen degradation products in mice after i.p.-injection of desialylated-acutobin was significantly lower than the level after acutobin injection, suggesting that the disialyl moieties may improve or prolong the half-life of acutobin. Two recombinant enzymes with identical protein structures and similar amidolytic activities to those of native acutobin were expressed from HEK293T and SW1353 cells and designated as HKATB and SWATB, respectively. Mass spectrometric profiling showed that their glycans differed from those of acutobin. In contrast to acutobin, HKATB cleaved not only the Aα chain but also the Bβ and γ chains of human fibrinogens, while SWATB showed a reduced α-fibrinogenase activity. Non-denaturing deglycosylation of these proteases by peptide N-glycosidase F significantly reduced their fibrinogenolytic activities and thermal stabilities. The in vivo defibrinogenating effect of HKATB was inferior to that of acutobin in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the conjugated glycans of acutobin are involved in its interaction with fibrinogen, and that the selection of cells optimally expressing efficient glycoforms and further glycosylation engineering are desirable before a recombinant product can replace the native enzyme for clinical use.

  8. Digestive enzymes activities in Oreochromis niloticus fed diet supplemented with recombinant growth hormone

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    Apriana Vinasyiam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The specific activity of the digestive enzymes, namely: pepsin, amylase, lipase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin were studied in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus fed diet supplemented with recombinant Ephinephelus lanceolatus growth hormone (rElGH. The results showed that fish treated with rE1GH showed lower lipase and chymotrypsin specific activities (P>0.05, while the trypsin/chymotrypsin specific activity (T/C ratio was found higher compared to control fish. Moreover, higher protein digestibility, higher protein retention and a lower ammonia excretion rate were measured for rE1GH treated fish. Oral rElGH administration enhanced Nile tilapia growth up to 20.04%, without affecting survival. This study suggested that rapid growth performance induced by rElGH was linked with T/C ratio rather than the specific activity of other digestive enzymes. Keywords: recombinant growth hormone, digestive enzyme, digestibility, Oreochromis niloticus  ABSTRAK Aktivitas spesifik enzim pencernaan pepsin, amilase, lipase, tripsin, dan kemotripsin diamati pada ikan nila Oreochromis niloticus yang diberi pakan mengandung hormon pertumbuhan rekombinan ikan kerapu kertang Ephinephelus lanceolatus (rElGH. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa ikan uji pada perlakuan rElGH memiliki aktivitas spesifik enzim lipase dan kemotripsin yang lebih rendah, sedangkan rasio tripsin/kemotripsin (rasio T/C yang lebih tinggi dibandingan ikan kontrol. Kecernaan protein dan retensi protein bernilai lebih tinggi sementara laju ekskresi amonia bernilai lebih rendah pada ikan perlakuan. Pemberian rElGH secara oral mampu mempercepat laju pertumbuhan ikan nila hingga 20,04% tanpa memengaruhi kelangsungan hidup. Berdasarkan penelitian ini, dapat disimpulkan bahwa laju pertumbuhan cepat yang diinduksi oleh rElGH berhubungan dengan rasio T/C dibandingkan dengan aktivitas spesifik enzim pencernaan lain. Kata kunci: hormon pertumbuhan rekombinan, enzim pencernaan, kecernaan, Oreochromis niloticus 

  9. Perlecan domain 1 recombinant proteoglycan augments BMP-2 activity and osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarlo, Arthur A; Belousova, Maria; Ellis, April L; Petersen, Donald; Grenett, Hernan; Hardigan, Patrick; O'Grady, Robert; Lord, Megan; Whitelock, John M

    2012-09-11

    Many growth factors, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, have been shown to interact with polymers of sulfated disacharrides known as heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are found on matrix and cell-surface proteoglycans throughout the body. HS GAGs, and some more highly sulfated forms of chondroitin sulfate (CS), regulate cell function by serving as co-factors, or co-receptors, in GF interactions with their receptors, and HS or CS GAGs have been shown to be necessary for inducing signaling and GF activity, even in the osteogenic lineage. Unlike recombinant proteins, however, HS and CS GAGs are quite heterogenous due, in large part, to post-translational addition, then removal, of sulfate groups to various positions along the GAG polymer. We have, therefore, investigated whether it would be feasible to deliver a DNA pro-drug to generate a soluble HS/CS proteoglycan in situ that would augment the activity of growth-factors, including BMP-2, in vivo. Utilizing a purified recombinant human perlecan domain 1 (rhPln.D1) expressed from HEK 293 cells with HS and CS GAGs, tight binding and dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 activity was demonstrated in vitro. In vitro, the expressed rhPln.D1 was characterized by modification with sulfated HS and CS GAGs. Dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 by a pln.D1 expression plasmid delivered together as a lyophilized single-phase on a particulate tricalcium phosphate scaffold for 6 or more weeks generated up to 9 fold more bone volume de novo on the maxillary ridge in a rat model than in control sites without the pln.D1 plasmid. Using a significantly lower BMP-2 dose, this combination provided more than 5 times as much maxillary ridge augmentation and greater density than rhBMP-2 delivered on a collagen sponge (InFuse™). A recombinant HS/CS PG interacted strongly and functionally with BMP-2 in binding and cell-based assays, and, in vivo, the pln.247 expression plasmid significantly improved the dose-effectiveness of BMP-2

  10. Perlecan domain 1 recombinant proteoglycan augments BMP-2 activity and osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeCarlo Arthur A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many growth factors, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2, have been shown to interact with polymers of sulfated disacharrides known as heparan sulfate (HS glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, which are found on matrix and cell-surface proteoglycans throughout the body. HS GAGs, and some more highly sulfated forms of chondroitin sulfate (CS, regulate cell function by serving as co-factors, or co-receptors, in GF interactions with their receptors, and HS or CS GAGs have been shown to be necessary for inducing signaling and GF activity, even in the osteogenic lineage. Unlike recombinant proteins, however, HS and CS GAGs are quite heterogenous due, in large part, to post-translational addition, then removal, of sulfate groups to various positions along the GAG polymer. We have, therefore, investigated whether it would be feasible to deliver a DNA pro-drug to generate a soluble HS/CS proteoglycan in situ that would augment the activity of growth-factors, including BMP-2, in vivo. Results Utilizing a purified recombinant human perlecan domain 1 (rhPln.D1 expressed from HEK 293 cells with HS and CS GAGs, tight binding and dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 activity was demonstrated in vitro. In vitro, the expressed rhPln.D1 was characterized by modification with sulfated HS and CS GAGs. Dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 by a pln.D1 expression plasmid delivered together as a lyophilized single-phase on a particulate tricalcium phosphate scaffold for 6 or more weeks generated up to 9 fold more bone volume de novo on the maxillary ridge in a rat model than in control sites without the pln.D1 plasmid. Using a significantly lower BMP-2 dose, this combination provided more than 5 times as much maxillary ridge augmentation and greater density than rhBMP-2 delivered on a collagen sponge (InFuse™. Conclusions A recombinant HS/CS PG interacted strongly and functionally with BMP-2 in binding and cell-based assays, and, in vivo, the pln.247 expression plasmid

  11. Gene targeting of the cysteine peptidase cathepsin H impairs lung surfactant in mice.

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    Frank Bühling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 11 human cysteine cathepsins are proteases mainly located in the endolysosomal compartment of all cells and within the exocytosis pathways of some secretory cell types. Cathepsin H (Ctsh has amino- and endopeptidase activities. In vitro studies have demonstrated Ctsh involvement in the processing and secretion of the pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B. Furthermore, Ctsh is highly expressed in the secretory organelles of alveolar type II pneumocytes where the surfactant proteins are processed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hence, we generated Ctsh null mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to investigate the role of this protease in surfactant processing in vivo. The targeting construct contains a ß-galactosidase (lacZ reporter enabling the visualisation of Ctsh expression sites. Ctsh-deficiency was verified by northern blot, western blot, and measurement of the Ctsh aminopeptidase activity. Ctsh(-/- mice show no gross phenotype and their development is normal without growth retardation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL from Ctsh(-/- mice contained lower levels of SP-B indicating reduced SP-B secretion. The BAL phospholipid concentration was not different in Ctsh(+/+ and Ctsh(-/- mice, but measurement of surface tension by pulsating bubble surfactometry revealed an impairment of the tension reducing function of lung surfactant of Ctsh(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that cathepsin H is involved in the SP-B production and reduced SP-B levels impair the physical properties of the lung surfactant. However, Ctsh defiency does not reproduce the severe phenotype of SP-B deficient mice. Hence, other proteases of the secretory pathway of type II pneumocytes, i.e. cathepsins C or E, are still able to produce surfactant of sufficient quality in absence of Ctsh.

  12. Gene targeting of the cysteine peptidase cathepsin H impairs lung surfactant in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühling, Frank; Kouadio, Martin; Chwieralski, Caroline E; Kern, Ursula; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Klemm, Nicole; Friedrichs, Nicole; Roth, Wera; Deussing, Jan M; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The 11 human cysteine cathepsins are proteases mainly located in the endolysosomal compartment of all cells and within the exocytosis pathways of some secretory cell types. Cathepsin H (Ctsh) has amino- and endopeptidase activities. In vitro studies have demonstrated Ctsh involvement in the processing and secretion of the pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B). Furthermore, Ctsh is highly expressed in the secretory organelles of alveolar type II pneumocytes where the surfactant proteins are processed. Hence, we generated Ctsh null mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to investigate the role of this protease in surfactant processing in vivo. The targeting construct contains a ß-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter enabling the visualisation of Ctsh expression sites. Ctsh-deficiency was verified by northern blot, western blot, and measurement of the Ctsh aminopeptidase activity. Ctsh(-/-) mice show no gross phenotype and their development is normal without growth retardation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) from Ctsh(-/-) mice contained lower levels of SP-B indicating reduced SP-B secretion. The BAL phospholipid concentration was not different in Ctsh(+/+) and Ctsh(-/-) mice, but measurement of surface tension by pulsating bubble surfactometry revealed an impairment of the tension reducing function of lung surfactant of Ctsh(-/-) mice. We conclude that cathepsin H is involved in the SP-B production and reduced SP-B levels impair the physical properties of the lung surfactant. However, Ctsh defiency does not reproduce the severe phenotype of SP-B deficient mice. Hence, other proteases of the secretory pathway of type II pneumocytes, i.e. cathepsins C or E, are still able to produce surfactant of sufficient quality in absence of Ctsh.

  13. The effect of liposome encapsulation on the pharmacokinetics of recombinant secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (rSLPI) therapy after local delivery to a guinea pig asthma model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, Aileen

    2011-09-01

    Inhaled recombinant Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (rSLPI) has shown potential for treatment of inflammatory lung conditions. Rapid inactivation of rSLPI by cathepsin L (Cat L) and rapid clearance from the lungs have limited clinical efficacy. Encapsulation of rSLPI within 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-L-Serine]:Cholesterol liposomes (DOPS-rSLPI) protects rSLPI against Cat L inactivation in vitro. We aimed to determine the effect of liposomes on rSLPI pharmacokinetics and activity in vitro and after local delivery to the airways in vivo.

  14. Generation of biologically active multi-sialylated recombinant human EPOFc in plants.

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    Alexandra Castilho

    Full Text Available Hyperglycosylated proteins are more stable, show increased serum half-life and less sensitivity to proteolysis compared to non-sialylated forms. This applies particularly to recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO. Recent progress in N-glycoengineering of non-mammalian expression hosts resulted in in vivo protein sialylation at great homogeneity. However the synthesis of multi-sialylated N-glycans is so far restricted to mammalian cells. Here we used a plant based expression system to accomplish multi-antennary protein sialylation. A human erythropoietin fusion protein (EPOFc was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana ΔXTFT, a glycosylation mutant that lacks plant specific N-glycan residues. cDNA of the hormone was co-delivered into plants with the necessary genes for (i branching (ii β1,4-galactosylation as well as for the (iii synthesis, transport and transfer of sialic acid. This resulted in the production of recombinant EPOFc carrying bi- tri- and tetra-sialylated complex N-glycans. The formation of this highly complex oligosaccharide structure required the coordinated expression of 11 human proteins acting in different subcellular compartments at different stages of the glycosylation pathway. In vitro receptor binding assays demonstrate the generation of biologically active molecules. We demonstrate the in planta synthesis of one of the most complex mammalian glycoforms pointing to an outstanding high degree of tolerance to changes in the glycosylation pathway in plants.

  15. Successful Hemostasis with Recombinant Activated Factor VII in a Patient with Massive Hepatic Subcapsular Hematoma

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    Ju-Hee Lee

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa is known to be effective in the management of acquired deficiencies of factor VII and platelet function defects. But recently, rFVIIa has been successfully used to treat ongoing bleeding in disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC condition. The patient reported here was suspected to be suffering from toxic hepatitis on admission. After percutaneous liver biopsy, bleeding occurred and did not stop even after right hepatic artery embolization. The patient developed a severe hemorrhage that resulted in hypovolemic shock, hemoperitoneum, and a massive subcapsular hematoma. The patient then developed DIC due to massive transfusion, as well as acute liver necrosis. The patient was given 400 μg/kg of rFVIIa. Recombinant factor VIIa was administered in an attempt to control the bleeding. This stabilized the hemoglobin levels of the patient. The patient gradually recovered in 4 months. In conclusion, this case suggests that rFVIIa can be successfully used for the hemostasis of uncontrolled bleeding in DIC.

  16. Cathepsin S-cleavable, multi-block HPMA copolymers for improved SPECT/CT imaging of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Shi, Wen; Zhang, Wenting; Jia, Yinnong; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Brusnahan, Susan K; Garrison, Jered C

    2016-10-01

    exploitation of the cathepsin S activity in MPS tissues can be utilized to substantially lower non-target accumulation, suggesting this is a promising approach for the development of diagnostic and radiotherapeutic nanomedicine platforms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cathepsin K modulates invasion, migration and adhesion of oral squamous cell carcinomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, K; Iwatake, M; Okamoto, K; Yamada, S-I; Umeda, M; Tsukuba, T

    2017-05-01

    Cathepsin K was initially discovered as an osteoclast-specific cysteine proteinase, but the enzyme is also expressed in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinomas. This study aimed to clarify the function of cathepsin K in oral squamous cell carcinomas. Expression levels of cathepsin K were examined in six types of cell carcinomas. Carcinomas overexpressing cathepsin K were constructed. Effects of cathepsin K overexpression and treatment with odanacatib, a specific cathepsin K inhibitor, on cell invasion, migration and adhesion were analysed. Different levels of cathepsin K were expressed in carcinomas. Cathepsin K was predominantly localised in lysosomes. Cathepsin K overexpression impaired the proliferation of carcinomas. Invasion analysis showed that cathepsin K overexpression enhanced invasion and migration of carcinomas, whereas inhibition of cathepsin K by odanacatib caused the opposite effects in carcinomas. Cathepsin K overexpression also increased cell adhesion and slightly increased surface expression of the adhesion receptor CD29/integrin β1 . The enhanced invasion of carcinomas resulting from cathepsin K overexpression is probably due to the increased cell migration and adhesion. Thus, cathepsin K is implicated not only in protein degradation but also in invasion, migration and adhesion of oral squamous cell carcinomas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Inhibition of activated protein C by recombinant alpha 1-antitrypsin variants with substitution of arginine or leucine for methionine358

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeb, M.J.; Bischoff, Rainer; Courtney, M.; Griffin, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) was recently identified as a major physiologic plasma inhibitor of activated protein C. The reaction with activated protein C of recombinant alpha 1-AT containing amino acid substitutions at the reactive center was studied. The substitution of Arg358 for Met, as

  19. Molecular cloning, expression, and enzymatic analysis of cathepsin X from starfish (Asterina pectinifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Hye Jin; Kim, Moo-Sang; Kim, Na Young; Go, Hye-Jin; Han, Jin Woo; In Jo, Hyae; Ahn, Sang Jung; Park, Nam Gyu; Chung, Joon Ki; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2013-02-01

    Cathepsin X, also known as cathepsin Z, is referred to as a "lysosomal proteolytic enzyme" and a member of the peptidase C1 family, which is involved in various biological processes such as immune response, cell adhesion, and proliferation. In the present study, the cDNA of starfish (Asterina pectinifera), which is known to cause serious damage to commercial shellfish mariculture, cathepsin X (ApCtX) was isolated through the combination of homology molecular cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) methods for the application to find a way to reduce/control starfish densities. The full-length of ApCtX gene was determined to consist of the 2,240 bp nucleotide sequence, which encoded for a preproprotein of 296 amino acids with a molecular mass of about 32.7 kDa. The tissue type expression of ApCtX was determined in various tissues of A. pectinifera and was shown most abundantly in the liver. The cDNA encoding pro-mature enzyme of ApCtX was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using the pGEX-4T-1 expression vector. Its activity was quantified by cleaving the synthetic peptide Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. The optimal pH for the protease activity was 6.5. The enzymatic activity of proApCtX was reduced by antipain, NEM, EDTA, EGTA, and 1,10-phenanthroline, and the proApCtX enzyme was significantly inhibited by CuSO₄, HgCl₂, CoCl₂, and SDS whereas Triton X-100 and Brij 35 might have potentially acted as an activator. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that the structural features and enzymatic characteristics of Echinoderms cathepsin X are similar to those of the other mammalian and piscine cathepsin X except its pH optimum, and the results of tissue-specific expression might explain their importance in food digestion by hepatic cecain starfish.

  20. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Nagy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR, a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1 is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ and Homologous Recombination (HR repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose Polymerases (PARPs TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation.

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Induced Apoptosis in U937 Cells Promotes Cathepsin D-Independent Stefin B Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidovec, Katja; Božič, Janja; Dolenc, Iztok; Turk, Boris; Turk, Vito; Stoka, Veronika

    2017-12-01

    Lysosomal cathepsins were previously found to be involved in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis. However, there are opposing views regarding their role as either initiators or amplifiers of the signaling cascade as well as the order of molecular events during this process. In this study, we investigated the role of cathepsin D (catD) in TNFα/cycloheximide-induced apoptosis in U937 human monocytic cells. TNFα-induced apoptosis proceeds through caspase-8 activation, processing of the pro-apoptotic molecule Bid, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, and caspase-3 activation. The translocation of lysosomal catD into the cytosol was a late event, suggesting that lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the release of cathepsins are not required for the induction of apoptosis, but rather amplifies the process through the generation of reactive oxygen species. For the first time, we show that apoptosis is accompanied by degradation of the cysteine cathepsin inhibitor stefin B (StfB). CatD did not exhibit a crucial role in this step. However, this degradation was partially prevented through pre-incubation with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, although it did not prevent apoptosis and its progression. These results suggest that the degradation of StfB, as a response to TNFα, could induce a cell death amplification effect as a result of progressive damage to lysosomes during TNFα treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4813-4820, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Long-term stability of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator at -80 C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperling Matthew

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is a thrombolytic widely used clinically in the treatment of acute thrombotic disease such as ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, and deep venous thrombosis. This has led to much interest in tPA based lytic therapies leading to laboratory based in-vitro and in-vivo investigations using this drug. However, tPA reconstituted in solution exhibits full activity for only 6–8 hours, according to the manufacturer. Therefore, methods to store reconstituted tPA for long durations while maintaining activity would be of assistance to laboratories using this enzyme. Findings In this work, the enzymatic activity of tPA stored at -80 C over time was measured, using an ELISA technique that measured the amount of active tPA bound to plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 in a given sample. Sample of tPA solution mixed to a concentration of 1 (mg/ml were stored in cryogenic vials at -80 C for up to 7 years. For a given sample, aliquots were assayed for tPA activity, and compared with a tPA standard to determine relative enzymatic activity. Results are reported as means with standard errors, and 12 measurements were performed for each sample age. Conclusion There was no decrease in tPA activity for samples stored up to 7 years. Such cryogenic storage is a viable method for the preservation of tPA solution for laboratory investigations of tPA-based lytic therapies.

  3. Activation of human natural killer cells by the novel innate immune modulator recombinant Eimeria antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylsworth, Charles F; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Seregin, Sergey S; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The safe and effective activation of the innate and adaptive immune systems are crucial in the implementation of immunotherapeutic modalities for the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Eimeria antigen (EA) and its recombinantly expressed analog (rEA) are extremely effective activators of innate immunity in mice. The effects of rEA in the mouse are primarily mediated through the TLR11/12 MyD88 signaling system. Human cells lack functional TLR11 and TLR12, suggesting that rEA would not be effective in providing beneficial immune activation in humans. In the current report we provide definitive evidence that the treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures with rEA significantly up regulates CD69, CD107, NKG2D levels on NK cells. Furthermore, rEA stimulates human NK cell effector functions including increasing intracellular levels of IFNγ and Granzyme B. These responses are positively correlated with an improved capacity of rEA stimulated human PBMCs to kill NK cell-sensitive human K562 tumor cells. Importantly, rEA-triggered innate immune responses was not associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines production. These data confirm a previously unidentified role for rEA in human immune cell activation, and suggests the utilization of rEA in immunotherapies against a variety of infectious diseases and cancers. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of Cathepsin K in Skull Base Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaibing; Ma, Junpeng; Wang, Liang; Wang, Ke; Li, Da; Hao, Shuyu; Yang, Yang; Du, Jiang; Jia, Guijun; Zhang, Liwei; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between cathepsin K and the clinical characteristics of skull base chordoma (SBC). This study included 58 paraffin-embedded samples and 85 frozen samples of 94 patients. All clinical data corresponding to these patients were available. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were performed. Positive rate of immunohistochemical staining slices and delta cycle threshold value of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction represented the cathepsin K expression level in protein and gene level separately. In protein level, expression level (EL) of invasive tumors was increased compared with noninvasive tumors (P = 0.006), EL of tumors with dura erosion was increased compared with tumors without dura erosion (P = 0.001). Tumors with septa exhibited increased EL compared with tumors without septa (P = 0.001). Tumors with lobulation exhibited increased EL compared with tumors without lobulation (P = 0.000). Higher EL of cathepsin K was associated with reduced progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.015). In gene level, tumors with septa showed higher EL than tumors without septa (P = 0.015), and tumors with lobulation showed higher EL than tumors without lobulation (P = 0.049). Cathepsin K EL was an independent risk factor for reduced PFS, and an increased level of cathepsin K in SBC was associated with reduced PFS (P = 0.042). Increased cathepsin K expression in SBC was associated with tumor invasion and reduced PFS. The cathepsin K level in SBC also was associated with tumor stage, tumor lobulation, and septa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The BCL11A transcription factor directly activates RAG gene expression and V(D)J recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Baeck-seung; Dekker, Joseph D; Lee, Bum-kyu; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Sleckman, Barry P; Shaffer, Arthur L; Ippolito, Gregory C; Tucker, Philip W

    2013-05-01

    Recombination-activating gene 1 protein (RAG1) and RAG2 are critical enzymes for initiating variable-diversity-joining (VDJ) segment recombination, an essential process for antigen receptor expression and lymphocyte development. The transcription factor BCL11A is required for B cell development, but its molecular function(s) in B cell fate specification and commitment is unknown. We show here that the major B cell isoform, BCL11A-XL, binds the RAG1 promoter and Erag enhancer to activate RAG1 and RAG2 transcription in pre-B cells. We employed BCL11A overexpression with recombination substrates in a cultured pre-B cell line as well as Cre recombinase-mediated Bcl11a(lox/lox) deletion in explanted murine pre-B cells to demonstrate direct consequences of BCL11A/RAG modulation on V(D)J recombination. We conclude that BCL11A is a critical component of a transcriptional network that regulates B cell fate by controlling V(D)J recombination.

  6. Mice with Catalytically Inactive Cathepsin A Display Neurobehavioral Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Calhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The lysosomal carboxypeptidase A, Cathepsin A (CathA, is a serine protease with two distinct functions. CathA protects β-galactosidase and sialidase Neu1 against proteolytic degradation by forming a multienzyme complex and activates sialidase Neu1. CathA deficiency causes the lysosomal storage disease, galactosialidosis. These patients present with a broad range of clinical phenotypes, including growth retardation, and neurological deterioration along with the accumulation of the vasoactive peptide, endothelin-1, in the brain. Previous in vitro studies have shown that CathA has specific activity against vasoactive peptides and neuropeptides, including endothelin-1 and oxytocin. A mutant mouse with catalytically inactive CathA enzyme (CathAS190A shows increased levels of endothelin-1. In the present study, we elucidated the involvement of CathA in learning and long-term memory in 3-, 6-, and 12-month-old mice. Hippocampal endothelin-1 and oxytocin accumulated in CathAS190A mice, which showed learning impairments as well as long-term and spatial memory deficits compared with wild-type littermates, suggesting that CathA plays a significant role in learning and in memory consolidation through its regulatory role in vasoactive peptide processing.

  7. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator plus eptifibatide versus recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator alone in acute ischemic stroke: propensity score-matched post hoc analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeoye, Opeolu; Sucharew, Heidi; Khoury, Jane; Tomsick, Thomas; Khatri, Pooja; Palesch, Yuko; Schmit, Pamela A; Pancioli, Arthur M; Broderick, Joseph P

    2015-02-01

    The Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and rt-PA in Acute Ischemic Stroke-Enhanced Regimen (CLEAR-ER) trial demonstrated safety of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) plus eptifibatide in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). CLEAR-ER randomized AIS patients (5:1) to 0.6 mg/kg r-tPA plus eptifibatide versus standard r-tPA (0.9 mg/kg). Interventional Management of Stroke III randomized AIS patients to r-tPA plus endovascular therapy versus standard r-tPA. Albumin in Acute Stroke Part 2 randomized patients to albumin±r-tPA versus saline±r-tPA. Our aim was to compare outcomes in CLEAR-ER combination arm patients to propensity score-matched r-tPA only subjects in Albumin in Acute Stroke Part 2 and Interventional Management of Stroke III. The primary outcome was 90-day severity-adjusted modified Rankin score (mRS) dichotomization based on baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. Secondary outcomes were 90-day mRS dichotomization as excellent (mRS, 0-1); mRS dichotomization as favorable (mRS, 0-2); and nonparametric analysis of the ordinal mRS. Eighty-five combination arm CLEAR-ER subjects were matched with 169 Albumin in Acute Stroke Part 2 and Interventional Management of Stroke III trials' r-tPA only patients (controls). Median age in CLEAR-ER and control subjects was 68years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale in the CLEAR-ER subjects was 11 and in control subjects 12. At 90 days, CLEAR-ER subjects had a nonsignificantly greater proportion of patients with favorable outcomes (45% versus 36%; unadjusted relative risks, 1.24; 95% confidence intervals, 0.91-1.69; P=0.18). Secondary outcomes were 52% versus 34% excellent outcomes (relative risks, 1.51; 95% confidence intervals, 1.13-2.02; P=0.007); 60% versus 53% favorable outcome (relative risks, 1.13; 95% confidence intervals, 0.90-1.41; P=0.31); and ordinal Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel P=0.10. r-tPA plus eptifibatide showed a favorable direction of effect that was

  8. Optimization of the expression, purification and polymerase activity reaction conditions of recombinant human PrimPol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizaveta O Boldinova

    Full Text Available Human PrimPol is a DNA primase/polymerase involved in DNA damage tolerance and prevents nuclear genome instability. PrimPol is also localized to the mitochondria, but its precise function in mitochondrial DNA maintenance has remained elusive. PrimPol works both as a translesion (TLS polymerase and as the primase that restarts DNA replication after a lesion. However, the observed biochemical activities of PrimPol vary considerably between studies as a result of different reaction conditions used. To reveal the effects of reaction composition on PrimPol DNA polymerase activity, we tested the polymerase activity in the presence of various buffer agents, salt concentrations, pH values and metal cofactors. Additionally, the enzyme stability was analyzed under various conditions. We demonstrate that the reaction buffer with pH 6-6.5, low salt concentrations and 3 mM Mg2+ or 0.3-3 mM Mn2+ cofactor ions supports the highest DNA polymerase activity of human PrimPol in vitro. The DNA polymerase activity of PrimPol was found to be stable after multiple freeze-thaw cycles and prolonged protein incubation on ice. However, rapid heat-inactivation of the enzyme was observed at 37ºC. We also for the first time describe the purification of human PrimPol from a human cell line and compare the benefits of this approach to the expression in Escherichia coli and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Our results show that active PrimPol can be purified from E. coli and human suspension cell line in high quantities and that the activity of the purified enzyme is similar in both expression systems. Conversely, the yield of full-length protein expressed in S. cerevisiae was considerably lower and this system is therefore not recommended for expression of full-length recombinant human PrimPol.

  9. A macroporous bioreactor super activated by the recombinant human transforming growth factor-beta 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo eRipamonti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Macroporous single-phase hydroxyapatite (HA and biphasic HA/β-tricalcium phosphate with 33% post-sinter hydroxyapatite (HA/β-TCP were combined with 25 or 125 µg recombinant human transforming growth factor-β3 (hTGF-β3 to engineer a super activated bioreactor implanted in orthotopic calvarial and heterotopic rectus abdominis muscle sites and harvested on day 30 and 90. Coral-derived calcium carbonate fully converted (100% and partially converted to 5% and 13% hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate (HA/CC preloaded with 125 and 250 µg hTGF-β3, and 1:5 and 5:1 binary applications of hTGF-β3: hOP-1 by weight, were implanted in the rectus abdominis and harvested on day 20 and 30, respectively, to monitor spatial/temporal morphogenesis by high doses of hTGF-β3. Bone formation was assessed on decalcified paraffin-embedded sections by measuring the fractional volume of newly-formed bone. On day 30 and 90, single phase HA implants showed greater amounts of bone when compared to biphasic specimens; 5 % and 13 % HA/CC pre-loaded with 125 and 250 µg hTGF-β3 showed substantial induction of bone formation; 250 µg hTGF-β3 induced as yet unreported massive induction of bone formation as early as 20 days prominently outside the profile of the macroporous constructs. The induction of bone formation is controlled by the implanted ratio of the recombinant morphogens, i.e. the 1:5 hTGF-β3:hOP-1 ratio by weight was greater than the inverse ratio. The unprecedented tissue induction by single doses of 250 µg hTGF-β3 resulting in rapid bone morphogenesis of vast mineralized ossicles with multiple trabeculations surfaced by contiguous secreting osteoblasts is the novel molecular and morphological frontier for the induction of bone formation in clinical contexts.

  10. Identification of dipeptidyl nitriles as potent and selective inhibitors of cathepsin B through structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, P D; Clark, K L; Tommasi, R A; Cowen, S D; McQuire, L W; Farley, D L; van Duzer, J H; Goldberg, R L; Zhou, H; Du, Z; Fitt, J J; Coppa, D E; Fang, Z; Macchia, W; Zhu, L; Capparelli, M P; Goldstein, R; Wigg, A M; Doughty, J R; Bohacek, R S; Knap, A K

    2001-12-20

    Cathepsin B is a member of the papain superfamily of cysteine proteases and has been implicated in the pathology of numerous diseases, including arthritis and cancer. As part of an effort to identify potent, reversible inhibitors of this protease, we examined a series of dipeptidyl nitriles, starting with the previously reported Cbz-Phe-NH-CH(2)CN (19, IC(50) = 62 microM). High-resolution X-ray crystallographic data and molecular modeling were used to optimize the P(1), P(2), and P(3) substituents of this template. Cathepsin B is unique in its class in that it contains a carboxylate recognition site in the S(2)' pocket of the active site. Inhibitor potency and selectivity were enhanced by tethering a carboxylate functionality from the carbon alpha to the nitrile to interact with this region of the enzyme. This resulted in the identification of compound 10, a 7 nM inhibitor of cathepsin B, with excellent selectivity over other cysteine cathepsins.

  11. Construction of a plasmid coding for green fluorescent protein tagged cathepsin L and data on expression in colorectal carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Tamhane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The endo-lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L has recently been shown to have moonlighting activities in that its unexpected nuclear localization in colorectal carcinoma cells is involved in cell cycle progression (Tamhane et al., 2015 [1]. Here, we show data on the construction and sequence of a plasmid coding for human cathepsin L tagged with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (phCL-EGFP in which the fluorescent protein is covalently attached to the C-terminus of the protease. The plasmid was used for transfection of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells, while data from non-transfected and pEGFP-N1-transfected cells is also shown. Immunoblotting data of lysates from non-transfected controls and HCT116 cells transfected with pEGFP-N1 and phCL-EGFP, showed stable expression of cathepsin L-enhanced green fluorescent protein chimeras, while endogenous cathepsin L protein amounts exceed those of hCL-EGFP chimeras. An effect of phCL-EGFP expression on proliferation and metabolic states of HCT116 cells at 24 h post-transfection was observed.

  12. ATPase activity tightly regulates RecA nucleofilaments to promote homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bailin; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Chengmin; Yuan, Zheng; Yu, Fangzhi; Zhong, Shangwei; Jiang, Guibin; Yang, Yun-Gui; Le, X Chris; Weinfeld, Michael; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), catalyzed in an evolutionarily conserved manner by active RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments, maintains genomic integrity and promotes biological evolution and diversity. The structures of RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments provide information critical for the entire HR process. By exploiting a unique capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence polarization assay, we have discovered an active form of RecA nucleofilament, stimulated by ATP hydrolysis, that contains mainly unbound nucleotide sites. This finding was confirmed by a nuclease protection assay and electron microscopy (EM) imaging. We further found that these RecA-unsaturated filaments promote strand exchange in vitro and HR in vivo. RecA mutants (P67D and P67E), which only form RecA-unsaturated nucleofilaments, were able to mediate HR in vitro and in vivo, but mutants favoring the formation of the saturated nucleofilaments failed to support HR. We thus present a new model for RecA-mediated HR in which RecA utilizes its intrinsic DNA binding-dependent ATPase activity to remodel the nucleofilaments to a less saturated form and thereby promote HR.

  13. Characterization of the recombination activities of the Entamoeba histolytica Rad51 recombinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Andrew A; Goodson, Steven D; Chavan, Suchitra; Say, Amanda F; Turchick, Audrey; Sharma, Deepti; Ledford, LeAnna L; Ratterman, Erin; Leskoske, Kristin; King, Ada V; Attaway, Christopher C; Bandera, Yura; Foulger, Stephen H; Mazin, Alexander V; Temesvari, Lesly A; Sehorn, Michael G

    The protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis is Entamoeba histolytica. An important facet of the life cycle of E. histolytica involves the conversion of the mature trophozoite to a cyst. This transition is thought to involve homologous recombination (HR), which is dependent upon the Rad51 recombinase. Here, a biochemical characterization of highly purified ehRad51 protein is presented. The ehRad51 protein preferentially binds ssDNA, forms a presynaptic filament and possesses ATP hydrolysis activity that is stimulated by the presence of DNA. Evidence is provided that ehRad51 catalyzes robust DNA strand exchange over at least 5.4 kilobase pairs. Although the homologous DNA pairing activity of ehRad51 is weak, it is strongly enhanced by the presence of two HR accessory cofactors, calcium and Hop2-Mnd1. The biochemical system described herein was used to demonstrate the potential for targeting ehRad51 with two small molecule inhibitors of human RAD51. We show that 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) inhibited ehRad51 by interfering with DNA binding and attenuated encystation in Entamoeba invadens, while B02 had no effect on ehRad51 strand exchange activity. These results provide insight into the underlying mechanism of homology-directed DNA repair in E. histolytica. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Human recombinant anti-thyroperoxidase autoantibodies: in vitro cytotoxic activity on papillary thyroid cancer expressing TPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuffat, S A; Morin, M; Nguyen, B; Castex, F; Robert, B; Péraldi-Roux, S

    2010-03-02

    Thyroid cancers are difficult to treat due to their limited responsiveness to chemo- and radiotherapy. There is thus a great interest in and a need for alternative therapeutic approaches. We studied the cytotoxic activity of anti-thyroperoxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO aAbs, expressed in baculovirus/insect cell (B4) and CHO cells (B4') or purified from patients' sera) against a papillary thyroid cancer (NPA) cell line. Anti-TPO aAbs from patients' sera led to a partial destruction of NPA cell line by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and exhibited an anti-proliferative activity. Comparison of the cytotoxic activity of anti-TPO aAbs shows that B4' induced an anti-proliferative effect and a better ADCC than B4, but a lower one than anti-TPO aAbs from patients' sera. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity was increased when human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used as effector cells, suggesting that FcgammaRs, CD64, CD32 and CD16 are involved. Indeed, anti-TPO aAbs from patients' sera, but not B4 and B4', exhibited CDC activity. These data indicate that anti-TPO aAbs display moderate ADCC and anti-proliferative activities on NPA cells; IgG glycosylation appears to be important for cytotoxic activity and ADCC efficiency depends on FcgammaR-bearing cells. Finally, recombinant human anti-TPO aAbs cannot yet be considered as an optimal tool for the development of a novel therapeutic approach for thyroid cancer.

  15. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ... risk of recombination with endogenous retroviruses which could potentially result in mobilization of the transgene via a replication- competent mouse retrovirus. As the risk of recombination and possible... genetic modifications: (a) More than one-half of the genome of an exogenous virus from a single Family of...

  16. 76 FR 3150 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... repeat (LTR), in order to address the small risk of recombination with endogenous retroviruses which.... As the risk of recombination and possible transmission to humans is more likely with gammaretroviral... containment; and (2) Neither parental transgenic rodent contains the following genetic modifications: (a...

  17. Prolonged binding of radiolabeled recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator after angioplasty and enclosed thrombolysis of the femoropopliteal arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, K H; Vinberg, N; Folkenborg, O

    1992-01-01

    The authors measured the binding of indium-111-labeled recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within the recanalized femoropopliteal segment after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and enclosed thrombolysis. In patients with long occlusions (n = 3), 91 micrograms of rt-PA...

  18. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator as a novel treatment option for infective endocarditis: a retrospective clinical study in 32 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas, Aviva; Krymko, Hanna; Richardson, Justin; Zalzstein, Eli; Ioffe, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is a life-threatening infectious syndrome, with high morbidity and mortality. Current treatments for infective endocarditis include intravenous antibiotics, surgery, and involve a lengthy hospital stay. We hypothesised that adjunctive recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment for infective endocarditis may facilitate faster resolution of vegetations and clearance of positive blood cultures, and therefore decrease morbidity and mortality. This retrospective study included follow-up of patients, from 1997 through 2014, including clinical presentation, causative organism, length of treatment, morbidity, and mortality. We identified 32 patients, all of whom were diagnosed with endocarditis and were treated by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Among all, 27 patients (93%) had positive blood cultures, with the most frequent organisms being Staphylococcus epidermis (nine patients), Staphylococcus aureus (six patients), and Candida (nine patients). Upon treatment, in 31 patients (97%), resolution of vegetations and clearance of blood cultures occurred within hours to few days. Out of 32 patients, one patient (3%) died and three patients (9%) suffered embolic or haemorrhagic events, possibly related to the recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. None of the patients required surgical intervention to assist vegetation resolution. In conclusion, it appears that recombinant tissue plasminogen activator may become an adjunctive treatment for infective endocarditis and may decrease morbidity as compared with current guidelines. Prospective multi-centre studies are required to validate our findings.

  19. The Effect of Recombinant Activated Factor VII on Mortality in Combat-Related Casualties With Severe Trauma and Massive Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    control of bleeding in patients with hemophilia with inhibitors to factor VIII concentrate. Addi- tionally, it is licensed in Europe for patients with...Holcomb JB. Use of recombinant activated factor VII to treat the acquired coagulopathy of trauma. J Trauma. 2005;58:1298–1303. 22. AAAM (2005

  20. GENTAMICIN REDUCES BACTEREMIA AND MORTALITY-RATES ASSOCIATED WITH THE TREATMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL PERITONITIS WITH RECOMBINANT TISSUE-PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; de Graaf, JS; KOOI, K; BLEICHRODT, RP

    BACKGROUND: Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), administered intraperitoneally, reduces intra-abdominal abscess formation in rats with fecal peritonitis at the costs of increased mortality and early Escherichia coli bacteremia. It was determined whether or not mortality and bacteremia

  1. Inhibition of Cathepsin S Induces Mitochondrial ROS That Sensitizes TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis Through p53-Mediated Downregulation of Bcl-2 and c-FLIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Bo Ram; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Woo, Seon Min; Choe, Misun; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Young-Kyung; Yoon, Gyesoon; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2017-08-01

    Cathepsin S is highly expressed in various cancer cells, and it has protumoral effects, including promotion of migration, invasion, and neovascularization. In this study, we show that inhibition of cathepsin S could sensitize cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis. An inhibitor of cathepsin S (Z-FL-COCHO; ZFL) markedly induced apoptosis in human renal cancer cells treated with TRAIL. In contrast, combined treatment with ZFL and TRAIL had no effect on normal cells. ZFL downregulated Bcl-2 expression at the transcriptional level in a p53-dependent manner, and overexpression of Bcl-2 also markedly blocked apoptosis induced by combined treatment with ZFL and TRAIL. In addition, ZFL induced downregulation of c-FLIP, and overexpression of c-FLIP blocked the apoptosis induced by ZFL plus TRAIL. Moreover, ZFL increased the expression of Cbl, an E3 ligase of c-FLIP, in a p53-dependent manner, and knockdown of Cbl markedly prevented c-FLIP downregulation and the apoptosis induced by ZFL plus TRAIL. Interestingly, ZFL induced p53 expression via production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also demonstrated that downregulation of cathepsin S by small interfering RNA sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in Caki cells. These results reveal the importance of cathepsin S on resistance against TRAIL, and inhibition of cathepsin S activity plays a crucial role in TRAIL-mediated cell death of cancer cells. Our results indicated that inhibition of cathepsin S stimulates TRAIL-induced apoptosis through downregulation of Bcl-2 and Cbl-mediated c-FLIP by ROS-mediated p53 expression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 215-233.

  2. Sperm mitochondria diaphorase activity--a gene mapping study of recombinant inbred strains of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golas, Aniela; Malek, Paulina; Piasecka, Malgorzata; Styrna, Jozefa

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the genetic control of semen quality parameters, we derived a set of recombinant inbred (RI) mice from crosses between two inbred strains, KE and CBA/Kw, which differ significantly in gamete quality and fertility parameters. In this work, we used male mice from the two parental strains and from ten RI strains to map genes controlling quantitative traits such as sperm mitochondrial diaphorase activity, and assessed the correlation between this trait, sperm motility and in vivo fertilization efficiency. We analyzed sperm mitochondrial dehydrogenase (diaphorase) activity (NADH-dependent NBT assay) cytochemically by means of computerized image densitometry and obtained values for four parameters: 1) integrated optical density (IOD) for all pixels of the midpiece, 2) mean optical density (MOD) for the midpiece pixels, 3) length of sperm midpiece and 4) area of sperm midpiece. Polymorphic microsatellite marker profiles were prepared for 20 mouse chromosomes in the ten RI strains. We used Map Manager QTX software to correlate the strain distribution patterns (SDPs) of the four measured parameters with the SDPs of the analyzed markers. Hypothetical genes modifying diaphorase activity were mapped to chromosomal region 19q43-19q47, containing, for example, Poll, Sfxn2, Cyp17a1 and Usmg5 genes. Chromosomal regions 18q44 and 18q49-18q80 also showed correlation with the SDPs of diaphorase activity. Katnal2, Me2 and StARD6 candidate genes were proposed from this region. Diaphorase activity in the mouse sperm midpiece did not correlate with in vivo fertilization efficiency, but was negatively correlated with the linearity and straightness of sperm movement.

  3. Design and construction of an in-plant activation cassette for transgene expression and recombinant protein production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2014-05-01

    Virus-based transgene expression systems have become particularly valuable for recombinant protein production in plants. The dual-module in-plant activation (INPACT) expression platform consists of a uniquely designed split-gene cassette incorporating the cis replication elements of Tobacco yellow dwarf geminivirus (TYDV) and an ethanol-inducible activation cassette encoding the TYDV Rep and RepA replication-associated proteins. The INPACT system is essentially tailored for recombinant protein production in stably transformed plants and provides both inducible and high-level transient transgene expression with the potential to be adapted to diverse crop species. The construction of a novel split-gene cassette, the inducible nature of the system and the ability to amplify transgene expression via rolling-circle replication differentiates this system from other DNA- and RNA-based virus vector systems used for stable or transient recombinant protein production in plants. Here we provide a detailed protocol describing the design and construction of a split-gene INPACT cassette, and we highlight factors that may influence optimal activation and amplification of gene expression in transgenic plants. By using Nicotiana tabacum, the protocol takes 6-9 months to complete, and recombinant proteins expressed using INPACT can accumulate to up to 10% of the leaf total soluble protein.

  4. Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cathepsins, are members of the papain superfamily of mammalian lysosomal cysteine proteases. Among others there are two prominent members with broad substrate specificity, these are cathepsin B and cathepsin L that are known to be involved in the process of intra- and extra-cellular protein degradation and turnover.

  5. Cathepsin inhibition-induced lysosomal dysfunction enhances pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis in high glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjeong Jung

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that plays an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. We previously showed that the inhibition of autophagy causes pancreatic β-cell apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a protective mechanism for the survival of pancreatic β-cells. The current study demonstrates that treatment with inhibitors and knockdown of the lysosomal cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B and L impair autophagy, enhancing the caspase-dependent apoptosis of INS-1 cells and islets upon exposure to high concentration of glucose. Interestingly, treatment with cathepsin B and L inhibitors prevented the proteolytic processing of cathepsins B, D and L, as evidenced by gradual accumulation of the respective pro-forms. Of note, inhibition of aspartic cathepsins had no effect on autophagy and cell viability, suggesting the selective role of cathepsins B and L in the regulation of β-cell autophagy and apoptosis. Lysosomal localization of accumulated pro-cathepsins in the presence of cathepsin B and L inhibitors was verified via immunocytochemistry and lysosomal fractionation. Lysotracker staining indicated that cathepsin B and L inhibitors led to the formation of severely enlarged lysosomes in a time-dependent manner. The abnormal accumulation of pro-cathepsins following treatment with inhibitors of cathepsins B and L suppressed normal lysosomal degradation and the processing of lysosomal enzymes, leading to lysosomal dysfunction. Collectively, our findings suggest that cathepsin defects following the inhibition of cathepsin B and L result in lysosomal dysfunction and consequent cell death in pancreatic β-cells.

  6. Prophenoloxidase activation and antimicrobial peptide expression induced by the recombinant microbe binding protein of Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo

    2017-04-01

    Manduca sexta microbe binding protein (MBP) is a member of the β-1,3-glucanase-related protein superfamily that includes Gram-negative bacteria-binding proteins (GNBPs), β-1,3-glucan recognition proteins (βGRPs), and β-1,3-glucanases. Our previous and current studies showed that the purified MBP from baculovirus-infected insect cells had stimulated prophenoloxidase (proPO) activation in the hemolymph of naïve and immune challenged larvae and that supplementation of the exogenous MBP and peptidoglycans (PGs) had caused synergistic increases in PO activity. To explore the underlying mechanism, we separated by SDS-PAGE naïve and induced larval plasma treated with buffer or MBP and detected on immunoblots changes in intensity and/or mobility of hemolymph (serine) proteases [HP14, HP21, HP6, HP8, proPO-activating proteases (PAPs) 1-3] and their homologs (SPH1, SPH2). In a nickel pull-down assay, we observed association of MBP with proHP14 (slightly), βGRP2, PG recognition protein-1 (PGRP1, indirectly), SPH1, SPH2, and proPO2. Further experiments indicated that diaminopimelic acid (DAP) or Lys PG, MBP, PGRP1, and proHP14 together trigger the proPO activation system in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Injection of the recombinant MBP into the 5th instar naïve larvae significantly induced the expression of several antimicrobial peptide genes, revealing a possible link between HP14 and immune signal transduction. Together, these results suggest that the recognition of Gram-negative or -positive bacteria via their PGs induces the melanization and Toll pathways in M. sexta. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of synergism of a recombinant auxiliary activity 9 from Chaetomium globosum with cellulase in cellulose hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Jung; Nam, Ki Hyun; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Sooah; Youn, Hak Jin; Lee, Hee Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-10-01

    Auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9, formerly known as glycoside hydrolase family 61 or polysaccharide monooxygenase) is a group of fungal proteins that were recently found to have a significant synergism with cellulase in cellulose hydrolysis via the oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds of cellulose chains. In this study, we report the active expression of a recombinant fungal AA9 from Chaetomium globosum (CgAA9) in a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, and the optimization of its synergistic activity in cellulose hydrolysis by using cellulase. The recombinant CgAA9 (0.9 mg/g cellulose) exhibited 1.7-fold synergism in the hydrolysis of Avicel when incubated with 0.9 filter paper units of Celluclast 1.5 L/g cellulose. The first study of the active expression of AA9 using a bacterial host and its synergistic optimization could be useful for the industrial application of AA9 for the saccharification of lignocellulose.

  8. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban

    2016-01-01

    stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious....... Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications....

  9. Maturation and degradation of beta-galactosidase in the post-Golgi compartment are regulated by cathepsin B and a non-cysteine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura-Oho, Y; Zhang, S; Callahan, J W; Murata, M; Oshima, A; Suzuki, Y

    1997-12-15

    Lysosomal beta-galactosidase precursor is processed to a mature form and associated with protective protein in lysosomes. In this study we used two cysteine protease proinhibitors, E64-d for cathepsins B, S, H, and L, and CA074Me for cathepsin B. They are converted intracellularly to active forms, E-64c and CA074, respectively. Both active compounds inhibited maturation of the exogenous beta-galactosidase precursor, but E-64c did not inhibit further degradation to an inactive 50-kDa product. We concluded that cathepsin B participated exclusively in maturation of beta-galactosidase, and a non-cysteine protease was involved in further degradation and inactivation of the enzyme molecule.

  10. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison A. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx, and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media, 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media, and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media. Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ, was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM−1 cm−1. No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture.

  11. Overexpression of Soluble Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase by Using Solubility Tags: Effects on Activity and Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Madison A; Gonzalez, Jesica; Hussain, Anjum; Oldfield, Rachel N; Johnston, Kathryn A; Lopez, Karlo M

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase is an important extracellular matrix enzyme that has not been fully characterized due to its low solubility. In order to circumvent the low solubility of this enzyme, three solubility tags (Nus-A, Thioredoxin (Trx), and Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)) were engineered on the N-terminus of mature lysyl oxidase. Total enzyme yields were determined to be 1.5 mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme (0.75 mg/L of media), 7.84 mg for the Trx tagged enzyme (3.92 mg/L of media), and 9.33 mg for the GST tagged enzyme (4.67 mg/L of media). Enzymatic activity was calculated to be 0.11 U/mg for the Nus-A tagged enzyme and 0.032 U/mg for the Trx tagged enzyme, and no enzymatic activity was detected for the GST tagged enzyme. All three solubility-tagged forms of the enzyme incorporated copper; however, the GST tagged enzyme appears to bind adventitious copper with greater affinity than the other two forms. The catalytic cofactor, lysyl tyrosyl quinone (LTQ), was determined to be 92% for the Nus-A and Trx tagged lysyl oxidase using the previously reported extinction coefficient of 15.4 mM(-1 )cm(-1). No LTQ was detected for the GST tagged lysyl oxidase. Given these data, it appears that Nus-A is the most suitable tag for obtaining soluble and active recombinant lysyl oxidase from E. coli culture.

  12. Recombinant human leptin attenuates stress axis activity in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorissen, Marnix; Bernier, Nicholas J; Manuel, Remy; de Gelder, Stefan; Metz, Juriaan R; Huising, Mark O; Flik, Gert

    2012-08-01

    Proper functioning of the endocrine stress axis requires communication between the stress axis and other regulatory mechanisms. We here describe an intimate interplay between the stress axis and recombinant human leptin (rhLeptin) in a teleostean fish, the common carp Cyprinus carpio. Restraint stress (by netting up to 96h) increased plasma cortisol but did not affect hepatic leptin expression. Perifusion of pituitary glands or head kidneys with rhLeptin revealed direct effects of rhLeptin on both tissues. RhLeptin suppresses basal and CRF-induced ACTH-secretion in a rapid and concentration-dependent manner. The rhLeptin effect persisted for over an hour after administration had been terminated. RhLeptin decreases basal interrenal cortisol secretion in vitro, and by doing so attenuates ACTH-stimulated cortisol production; rhLeptin does not affect interrenal ACTH-sensitivity. Our findings show that the endocrine stress axis activity and leptin are inseparably linked in a teleostean fish, a notion relevant to further our insights in the evolution of leptin physiology in vertebrates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Constitutive cellulase production from glucose using the recombinant Trichoderma reesei strain overexpressing an artificial transcription activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyue; Li, Yonghao; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2017-01-01

    The high cost of cellulase production presents biggest challenge in biomass deconstruction. Cellulase production by Trichoderma reesei using low cost carbon source is of great interest. In this study, an artificial transcription activator containing the Cre1 binding domain linked to the Xyr1 effector and binding domains was designed and constitutively overexpressed in T. reesei RUT C30. The recombinant strain T. reesei zxy-2 displayed constitutive cellulase production using glucose as a sole carbon source, and the production titer was 12.75-fold of that observed with T. reesei RUT C30 in shake flask culture. Moreover, FPase and xylanase titers of 2.63 and 108.72IU/mL, respectively, were achieved using glucose as sole carbon source within 48h in a 7-L fermenter by batch fermentation using T. reesei zxy-2. The crude enzyme obtained was used to hydrolyze alkali pretreated corn stover, and a high glucose yield of 99.18% was achieved. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Hemodynamic effects of recombinant human activated protein C in patients with septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Baltasar; Piacentini, Enrique; Pradella, Vittorio; Mignini, Mariano; Nava, Juan

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) on hemodynamic parameters in patients with septic shock. This is a retrospective study of 2 university-hospital critical care units. Patients with septic shock with pulmonary artery catheterization or transthoracic thermodilution monitoring were studied. We matched patients with septic shock with at least 2 organ failures (18 treated with rhAPC and 18 controls) on sex, age, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, and sepsis etiology. We recorded norepinephrine dose and hemodynamic parameters at baseline and 24, 36, and 48 hours after the real or theoretical start of rhAPC treatment. Mean arterial pressure remained stable in both groups. In rhAPC patients, norepinephrine requirements, initially higher than in controls, were significantly lower at 48 hours, and stroke volume at 24 and 48 hours improved (P protein C use correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters and decreased norepinephrine requirements. The retrospective nature of the study limits the strength of these findings. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular activated recombination in divertor simulation plasma on GAMMA 10/PDX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sakamoto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the tandem mirror GAMMA 10/PDX, molecular activated recombination (MAR leading to plasma detachment has been observed by additional hydrogen gas injection to the divertor simulation plasma (i.e. end loss plasma which is exposed to the V-shaped target in the divertor simulation experimental module (D-module. The temperature near the corner of the V-shaped target decreased from ∼23eV to ∼2eV as the neutral pressure in the D-module increased. A clear density rollover was observed at ∼2Pa. A position of the density maximum moves to upstream of the plasma with increase in the neutral pressure and the density near the corner of the target decreases to detach the plasma from the target. After the occurrence of the density rollover, the Balmer β intensity decreases as with the density but the Balmer α intensity continues to increase, indicating the dissociative attachment process in MAR is more dominant than the ion conversion process although the rate coefficient of the former process is lower than that of the latter one, which is calculated by using a collisional radiative model. This would be caused by the MAR process related to triatomic hydrogen molecules which significantly contributed to the detachment process.

  16. Stroke scale items associated with neurologic deterioration within 24 hours after recombinant tissue plasminogen activator therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanri, Yusuke; Yakushiji, Yusuke; Hara, Megumi; Eriguchi, Makoto; Okada, Ryuichirou; Yukitake, Motohiro; Hara, Hideo

    2013-10-01

    It is unclear when and which neurologic deficits should be examined within 24 hours after intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Relationships between serial changes in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) subscores and neurologic deterioration (ND) within the first 24 hours after therapy were investigated in 43 consecutive patients. The NIHSS score was measured by neurologists 28 times within 24 hours after therapy. Assessments of subscores associated with ND, defined as the first change 4 or more points from baseline, were performed at 15 minutes (most frequent time of the first ND), 120 minutes (median time of the first ND), and 24 hours after therapy. Seventeen of 43 patients (age range, 55-94 years) showed ND. Of the NIHSS subscores, increases in scores for loss of consciousness (15 minutes, P = .001; 120 minutes, P = .026; 24 hours, P = .018) and motor limbs total (15 minutes, P = .014; 120 minutes, P = .031) were related to deterioration. Items such as questions, gaze, visual fields, ataxia, language, dysarthria, and extinction/inattention were not related to deterioration at any time. In conclusion, ND of ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous rt-PA therapy was frequently seen within 120 minutes after therapy. Items such as loss of consciousness and motor limbs total may be considered indices for monitoring neurologic deficits after therapy. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic QTL analysis of protein content and glutamine synthetase activity in recombinant inbred wheat lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H M; Liang, H; Li, Z; Tang, Z X; Fu, S L; Geng, Y Y; Yan, B J; Ren, Z L

    2015-07-31

    Protein content (PC) is a crucial factor that determines the end-use and nutritional quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a major participant in nitrogen metabolism, can convert inorganic nitrogen into organic nitrogen. Although many studies have been conducted on PC and GS, a dynamic analysis of all of the filling stages has not been conducted. Therefore, 115 F9-10 recombinant inbred wheat lines of 'R131/R142' were used to analyze PC and GS activity during different developmental stages, using the conditional quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping method. Twenty-two and six conditional QTL were detected for PC and GS activily, respectively. More QTL in leaf PC were detected during the early filling stages than in the later filling stages. Grain PC QTL displayed different dynamic variations to leaf PC QTL during the entire grain-filling stages. All of the QTL were expressed differently over time, and nine conditional QTL were detected across two filling stages. QTL with similar functions may have tended to group in specific locales. This study provides dynamic genetic information on protein accumulation during grain-filling stages.

  18. Preparation of thermosensitive magnetic liposome encapsulated recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for targeted thrombolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hao-Lung; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) was encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML) prepared from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, distearolyphosphatidyl ethanolamine-N-poly(ethylene glycol) 2000, cholesterol and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles by solvent evaporation/sonication and freeze-thaw cycles method. Response surface methodology was proved to be a powerful tool to predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release. Validation experiments verified the accuracy of the model that provides a simple and effective method for fabricating TML with controllable encapsulation efficiency and predictable temperature-sensitive drug release behavior. The prepared samples were characterized for physico-chemical properties by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA could be confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. A thrombolytic drug delivery system using TML could be proposed for magnetic targeted delivery of rtPA to the site of thrombus followed by temperature-triggered controlled drug release in an alternating magnetic field.

  19. Recombinant expression and in vitro characterisation of active Huwentoxin-IV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Sermadiras

    Full Text Available Huwentoxin-IV (HwTx-IV is a 35-residue neurotoxin peptide with potential application as a novel analgesic. It is a member of the inhibitory cystine knot (ICK peptide family, characterised by a compact globular structure maintained by three intramolecular disulfide bonds. Here we describe a novel strategy for producing non-tagged, fully folded ICK-toxin in a bacterial system. HwTx-IV was expressed as a cleavable fusion to small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO in the cytoplasm of the SHuffle T7 Express lysY Escherichia coli strain, which allows cytosolic disulfide bond formation. Purification by IMAC with selective elution of monomeric SUMO fusion followed by proteolytic cleavage and polishing chromatographic steps yielded pure homogeneous toxin. Recombinant HwTx-IV is produced with a C-terminal acid, whereas the native peptide is C-terminally amidated. HwTx-IV(acid inhibited Nav1.7 in a dose dependent manner (IC50 = 463-727 nM. In comparison to HwTx-IV(amide (IC50 = 11 ± 3 nM, the carboxylate was ~50 fold less potent on Nav1.7, which highlights the impact of the C-terminus. As the amide bond of an additional amino acid may mimic the carboxamide, we expressed the glycine-extended analogue HwTx-IV(G36(acid in the SUMO/SHuffle system. The peptide was approximately three fold more potent on Nav1.7 in comparison to HwTx-IV(acid (IC50 = 190 nM. In conclusion, we have established a novel system for expression and purification of fully folded and active HwTx-IV(acid in bacteria, which could be applicable to other structurally complex and cysteine rich peptides. Furthermore, we discovered that glycine extension of HwTx-IV(acid restores some of the potency of the native carboxamide. This finding may also apply to other C-terminally amidated peptides produced recombinantly.

  20. B-cell lymphopoiesis is regulated by cathepsin L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Noel Badano

    Full Text Available Cathepsin L (CTSL is a ubiquitously expressed lysosomal cysteine peptidase with diverse and highly specific functions. The involvement of CTSL in thymic CD4+ T-cell positive selection has been well documented. Using CTSL(nkt/nkt mice that lack CTSL activity, we have previously demonstrated that the absence of CTSL activity affects the homeostasis of the T-cell pool by decreasing CD4+ cell thymic production and increasing CD8+ thymocyte production. Herein we investigated the influence of CTSL activity on the homeostasis of peripheral B-cell populations and bone marrow (BM B-cell maturation. B-cell numbers were increased in lymph nodes (LN, spleen and blood from CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. Increases in splenic B-cell numbers were restricted to transitional T1 and T2 cells and to the marginal zone (MZ cell subpopulation. No alterations in the proliferative or apoptosis levels were detected in peripheral B-cell populations from CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. In the BM, the percentage and the absolute number of pre-pro-B, pro-B, pre-B, immature and mature B cells were not altered. However, in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that BM B-cell production was markedly increased in CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. Besides, BM B-cell emigration to the spleen was increased in CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. Colony-forming unit pre-B (CFU pre-B assays in the presence of BM stromal cells (SC and reciprocal BM chimeras revealed that both BM B-cell precursors and SC would contribute to sustain the increased B-cell hematopoiesis in CTSL (nkt/nkt mice. Overall, our data clearly demonstrate that CTSL negatively regulates BM B-cell production and output therefore influencing the homeostasis of peripheral B cells.

  1. Inhibition of cathepsin B by E-64 induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in filarial parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Wadhawan

    Full Text Available Current available antifilarial drug strategies only eliminate the larval stages of filarial parasites. Therefore, there is an urgent need of drugs which are macrofilaricidals. Identification of molecular targets crucial for survival of parasite is a prerequisite for drug designing. Cathepsin B, a cysteine protease family member is known to play crucial role in the normal growth, digestion of nutrients, exsheathment of the helminth parasites. Therefore, we targeted this enzyme in the filarial parasite using its specific inhibitor, E-64.We have exposed the parasites to E-64 and observed their motility and viability at various time intervals. It caused marked decrease in the motility and viability of the parasites ultimately leading to their death after 8 hours. It is well known that E-64 protects the cell from apoptosis, however, it causes apoptotic effect in carcinoma cell lines. To understand the mechanism of action of E-64 on parasite survival, we have measured levels of different apoptotic markers in the treated parasites. E-64 significantly reduced the level of ced-9 and activity of tyrosine phosphatases, cytochrome c oxidase. It also activated ced-3, homolog of mammalian caspase 3 suggesting initiation of an apoptotic like event in the filarial parasites. Different antioxidant enzymes were also evaluated to further explore the mechanism behind the death of the parasites. There was marked decrease in the level of GSH and activity of Glutathione reductase and glutathione-s-transferase leading to increased generation of reactive oxygen species. This led to the induced oxidation of fatty acids and protein which might alter the mitochondrial membrane permeability.This study suggests that inhibition of cathepsin B by E-64 generates oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial mediated apoptotic like event in filarial parasites leading to their death. Hence, suggesting filarial cathepsin B as a potential chemotherapeutic target for lymphatic

  2. Activation and modulation of recombinantly expressed serotonin receptor type 3A by terpenes and pungent substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Paul M; Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Flegel, Caroline; Herbrechter, Robin; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-11-27

    Serotonin receptor type 3 (5-HT3 receptor) is a ligand-gated ion channel that is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The receptor plays an important role in regulating peristalsis of the gastrointestinal tract and in functions such as emesis, cognition and anxiety. Therefore, a variety of pharmacologically active substances target the 5-HT3 receptor to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The 5-HT3 receptors are activated, antagonized, or modulated by a wide range of chemically different substances, such as 2-methyl-serotonin, phenylbiguanide, setrones, or cannabinoids. Whereas the action of all of these substances is well described, less is known about the effect of terpenoids or fragrances on 5-HT3A receptors. In this study, we screened a large number of natural odorous and pungent substances for their pharmacological action on recombinantly expressed human 5-HT3A receptors. The receptors were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized by electrophysiological recordings using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. A screening of two odorous mixes containing a total of 200 substances revealed that the monoterpenes, thymol and carvacrol, act as both weak partial agonists and positive modulators on the 5-HT3A receptor. In contrast, the most effective blockers were the terpenes, citronellol and geraniol, as well as the pungent substances gingerol, capsaicin and polygodial. In our study, we identified new modulators of 5-HT3A receptors out of the classes of monoterpenes and vanilloid substances that frequently occur in various plants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. INHIBITION OF THE NKG2D ACTIVATING RECEPTOR EXPRESSION ON CYTOTOXIC LYMPHOCYTES BY RECOMBINANT MICA PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Abakushina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome instability of transformed cells, being the most common factor of malignancy, may result into production of abnormal proteins in these cells. Normally, the newly formed proteins are recognized by immune system, thus causing elimination of the transformed cells. Nevertheless, the phenotypic instability promotes formation of specific transformed cells which suppress effector immune reactions and/or are unrecognizable by cytotoxic lymphocytes. NKG2D is one of the most important activating receptors expressed by NK cells. It serves as a major recognition receptor for detection and elimination of tumor and infected cells. The ligands for NKG2D include surface or circulating non-canonical MICA/B molecules from class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I chain–related proteins A and B. MICA and MICB are expressed scarcely, if at all, by the most normal cells, being, however, upregulated in cancer cells and virus-infected cells.NKG2D receptor-ligand interaction is important for regulation of anti-tumor immune reactions. The soluble form of MICA accumulated in blood due to proteolytic shedding from tumor cell membranes is able to inhibit the NKG2D mediated anti-tumor cytotoxicyty and, therefore, promote the immune escape. The aim of our study was to estimate blocking effects of soluble recombinant human MICA protein (rhsMICA upon NKG2D receptor of NK cells.Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood, followed by incubation with of rhsMICA at different concentrations (0, 1, 5, or 10 µg/ml, staining with anti-CD314 (NKG2D mAbs on the CD3- CD56+NK cells, and flow cytometry analysis. A similar treatment protocol was applied for IL2- and IL15-activated mononuclear cells isolated from the melanoma patients.It has been shown that brief incubation of lymphocytes with rhsMICA caused a significantly reduced expression of NKG2D receptor on the surface of cytotoxic lymphocytes, both from healthy donors and melanoma patients. These

  4. Cathepsin B & L are not required for ebola virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marzi

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV, family Filoviridae, emerged in 1976 on the African continent. Since then it caused several outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in humans with case fatality rates up to 90% and remains a serious Public Health concern and biothreat pathogen. The most pathogenic and best-studied species is Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV. EBOV encodes one viral surface glycoprotein (GP, which is essential for replication, a determinant of pathogenicity and an important immunogen. GP mediates viral entry through interaction with cellular surface molecules, which results in the uptake of virus particles via macropinocytosis. Later in this pathway endosomal acidification activates the cysteine proteases Cathepsin B and L (CatB, CatL, which have been shown to cleave ZEBOV-GP leading to subsequent exposure of the putative receptor-binding and fusion domain and productive infection. We studied the effect of CatB and CatL on in vitro and in vivo replication of EBOV. Similar to previous findings, our results show an effect of CatB, but not CatL, on ZEBOV entry into cultured cells. Interestingly, cell entry by other EBOV species (Bundibugyo, Côte d'Ivoire, Reston and Sudan ebolavirus was independent of CatB or CatL as was EBOV replication in general. To investigate whether CatB and CatL have a role in vivo during infection, we utilized the mouse model for ZEBOV. Wild-type (control, catB(-/- and catL(-/- mice were equally susceptible to lethal challenge with mouse-adapted ZEBOV with no difference in virus replication and time to death. In conclusion, our results show that CatB and CatL activity is not required for EBOV replication. Furthermore, EBOV glycoprotein cleavage seems to be mediated by an array of proteases making targeted therapeutic approaches difficult.

  5. Cathepsin G Controls Arterial But Not Venular Myeloid Cell Recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega-Gomez, Almudena; Salvermoser, Melanie; Rossaint, Jan; Pick, Robert; Brauner, Janine; Lemnitzer, Patricia; Tilgner, Jessica; de Jong, Renske J.; Megens, Remco T. A.; Jamasbi, Janina; Döring, Yvonne; Pham, Christine T.; Scheiermann, Christoph; Siess, Wolfgang; Drechsler, Maik; Weber, Christian; Grommes, Jochen; Zarbock, Alexander; Walzog, Barbara; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic targeting of arterial leukocyte recruitment in the context of atherosclerosis has been disappointing in clinical studies. Reasons for such failures include the lack of knowledge of arterial-specific recruitment patterns. Here we establish the importance of the cathepsin G (CatG) in the

  6. Germ-line recombination activity of the widely used hGFAP-Cre and nestin-Cre transgenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiong Zhang

    Full Text Available Herein we demonstrate with PCR, immunodetection and reporter gene approaches that the widely used human Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (hGFAP-Cre transgene exhibits spontaneous germ-line recombination activity in leading to deletion in brain, heart and tail tissue with high frequency. The ectopic activity of hGFAP-Cre requires a rigorous control. We likewise observed that a second widely used nestin-Cre transgene shows germ-line deletion. Here we describe procedures to identify mice with germ-line recombination mediated by the hGFAP-Cre and nestin-Cre transgenes. Such control is essential to avoid pleiotropic effects due to germ-line deletion of loxP-flanked target genes and to maintain the CNS-restricted deletion status in transgenic mouse colonies.

  7. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator enhances microparticle release from mouse brain-derived endothelial cells through plasmin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Marie; Khacef, Kahina; Vion, Anne-Clémence; Leconte, Claire; Yin, Min; Renard, Jean-Marie; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Boulanger, Chantal M; Margaill, Isabelle; Beray-Berthat, Virginie

    2016-11-15

    Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is currently the only approved pharmacological strategy for acute ischemic stroke. However, rt-PA exhibits vascular toxicity mainly due to endothelial damage. To investigate the mechanisms underlying rt-PA-induced endothelial alterations, we assessed the role of rt-PA in the generation of endothelial microparticles (EMPs), emerging biological markers and effectors of endothelial dysfunction. The mouse brain-derived endothelial cell line bEnd.3 was used. Cells were treated with rt-PA at 20, 40 or 80μg/ml for 15 or 24h, and EMPs were quantified in the culture media using Annexin-V staining coupled with flow cytometry. Rt-PA enhanced EMP release from bEnd.3 cells with a maximal increase at the 40μg/ml dose for 24h (+78% compared to controls). Using tranexamic acid and aprotinin we demonstrated that plasmin is responsible for rt-PA-induced EMP release. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitor PJ34 also reduced rt-PA-induced EMP production, suggesting that p38 MAPK and PARP are downstream intracellular effectors of rt-PA/plasmin. Rt-PA also altered through plasmin the morphology and the confluence of bEnd.3 cells. By contrast, these changes did not implicate p38 MAPK and PARP. This study demonstrates that rt-PA induces the production of microparticles by cerebral endothelial cells, through plasmin, p38 MAPK and PARP pathways. Determining the phenotype of these EMPs to clarify their role on the endothelium in ischemic conditions could thus be of particular interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for the management of intracardiac thrombi in newborns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Z, Patricia; Verdugo L, Patricia; Carvajal K, Luis; Múhlhausen M, Germán; Ríos A, Patricia; Rodríguez V, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cardiac thrombi in newborns has increased with the use of central venous catheters. Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) has been used as an alternative to heparin in life threatening giant thrombus and embolization. The aim of this study is to describe the response and complications related to the use of rTPA in the management of life- threatening cardiac thrombi in newborns. The medical records of 8 newborn were reviewed in a retrospective study, of whom 7 were preterm with cardiac thrombi, and rTPA was used in all of them. The patients included 4 males with a mean weight of 1580 gr. The principal pathology was sepsis (7/8), all of them used venous central catheter. The superior vena cava was the most frequent location, with a mean time of installation before the diagnosis of 12 days. RN 7/8 thrombi were located in the right atrium with a size between 7 to 20 mm. Three patients received low molecular weight heparin prior to using rTPA. They received between 1 to 5 cycles with rTPA. In 4 patients complete resolution of the thrombus was achieved in a mean of 3.5 days. Four patients had intracranial haemorrhage grade I, without sequelae at follow-up. There were no deaths or embolism. This study is the first series of infants treated with rTPA in Chile, and where its use has quickly achieved complete resolution of the thrombus in 50% of cases, and partially in the others, thus reducing the secondary life-threatening risk of this disease. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. Plasmid construction using recombination activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Ayako; Watanabe, Kenji; Moriya, Hisao

    2010-03-11

    Construction of plasmids is crucial in modern genetic manipulation. As of now, the common method for constructing plasmids is to digest specific DNA sequences with restriction enzymes and to ligate the resulting DNA fragments with DNA ligase. Another potent method to construct plasmids, known as gap-repair cloning (GRC), is commonly used in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GRC makes use of the homologous recombination activity that occurs within the yeast cells. Due to its flexible design and efficiency, GRC has been frequently used for constructing plasmids with complex structures as well as genome-wide plasmid collections. Although there have been reports indicating GRC feasibility in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, this species is not commonly used for GRC as systematic studies of reporting GRC efficiency in S. pombe have not been performed till date. We investigated GRC efficiency in S. pombe in this study. We first showed that GRC was feasible in S. pombe by constructing a plasmid that contained the LEU2 auxotrophic marker gene in vivo and showed sufficient efficiency with short homology sequences (>25 bp). No preference was shown for the sequence length from the cut site in the vector plasmid. We next showed that plasmids could be constructed in a proper way using 3 DNA fragments with 70% efficiency without any specific selections being made. The GRC efficiency with 3 DNA fragments was dramatically increased >95% in lig4Delta mutant cell, where non-homologous end joining is deficient. Following this approach, we successfully constructed plasmid vectors with leu1+, ade6+, his5+, and lys1+ markers with the low-copy stable plasmid pDblet as a backbone by applying GRC in S. pombe. We concluded that GRC was sufficiently feasible in S. pombe for genome-wide gene functional analysis as well as for regular plasmid construction. Plasmids with different markers constructed in this research are available from NBRP-yeast (http://yeast.lab.nig.ac.jp/).

  10. Novel recombinant human lactoferrin: differential activation of oxidative stress related gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Zimecki, Michał; Wise, Jasen; Płoszaj, Paulina; Mirza, Shaper; Kruzel, Mark; Hwang, Shen-An; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-12-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein found in high concentrations in mammalian exocrine secretions, is an important component of the host defense system. It is also a major protein of the secondary granules of neutrophils from which is released upon activation. Due to its potential clinical utility, recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) has been produced in various eukaryotic expression systems; however, none of these are fully compatible with humans. Most of the biopharmaceuticals approved by the FDA for use in humans are produced in mammalian expression systems. The Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) have become the system of choice for proteins that require post-translational modifications, such as glycoproteins. The aim of this study was to scale-up expression and purification of rhLF in a CHO expression system, verify its glycan primary structure, and assess its biological properties in cell culture models. A stable CHO cell line producing >200mg/L of rhLF was developed and established. rhLF was purified by a single-step cation-exchange chromatography procedure. The highly homogenous rhLF has a molecular weight of approximately 80 kDa. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis revealed N-linked, partially sialylated glycans at two glycosylation sites, typical for human milk LF. This novel rhLF showed a protective effect against oxidative stress in a similar manner to its natural counterpart. In addition, rhLF revealed a modulatory effect on cellular redox via upregulation of key antioxidant enzymes. These data imply that the CHO-derived rhLF is fully compatible with the native molecule, thus it has promise for human therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Preparation of thermosensitive magnetic liposome encapsulated recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for targeted thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hao-Lung [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Health Industry and Technology, Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Tai-Shan, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) was encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML) prepared from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, distearolyphosphatidyl ethanolamine-N-poly(ethylene glycol) 2000, cholesterol and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles by solvent evaporation/sonication and freeze-thaw cycles method. Response surface methodology was proved to be a powerful tool to predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release. Validation experiments verified the accuracy of the model that provides a simple and effective method for fabricating TML with controllable encapsulation efficiency and predictable temperature-sensitive drug release behavior. The prepared samples were characterized for physico-chemical properties by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA could be confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. A thrombolytic drug delivery system using TML could be proposed for magnetic targeted delivery of rtPA to the site of thrombus followed by temperature-triggered controlled drug release in an alternating magnetic field. - Highlights: • rtPA and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNP were encapsulated in thermosensitive magnetic liposome (TML). • RSM could predict the drug encapsulation efficiency and temperature-sensitive drug release from TML. • Temperature-sensitive release of rtPA was confirmed from in vitro thrombolysis experiments. • TML-rtPA will be useful as a magnetic targeted nanodrug to improve clinical thrombolytic therapy.

  12. The crystal structure of human dipeptidyl peptidase I (cathepsin C) in complex with the inhibitor Gly-Phe-CHN2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Anne; Arnau, Jose; Lauritzen, C.

    2007-01-01

    hDDPI (human dipeptidyl peptidase I) is a lysosomal cysteine protease involved in zymogen activation of granule-associated proteases, including granzymes A and B from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells, cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase, and mast cell tryptase and chymase. In the ......hDDPI (human dipeptidyl peptidase I) is a lysosomal cysteine protease involved in zymogen activation of granule-associated proteases, including granzymes A and B from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells, cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase, and mast cell tryptase and chymase...... to 2.05 angstrom resolution to resolve apparent discrepancies between the complex structure and the previously published structure of the native enzyme. The new structure of the native enzyme is, within the experimental error, identical with the structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex presented here...

  13. Active post-marketing surveillance of the intralesional administration of human recombinant epidermal growth factor in diabetic foot ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Yera-Alos, Isis B; Alonso-Carbonell, Liuba; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen M; Tuero-Iglesias, Angela D; Moreira-Mart?nez, Martha; Marrero-Rodr?guez, Ivonne; L?pez-Mola, Ernesto; L?pez-Saura, Pedro A

    2013-01-01

    Background After several exploratory and confirmatory clinical trials, the intralesional administration of human recombinant epidermal growth factor (hrEGF) has been approved for the treatment of advanced diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this procedure in medical practice. Methods A prospective, post-marketing active pharmacosurveillance was conducted in 41 hospitals and 19 primary care polyclinics. Patients with DFU received hrE...

  14. Recombination activating gene-2null severe combined immunodeficient pigs and mice engraft human induced pluripotent stem cells differently

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Kim, Eunsu; Reza, Abu Musa Md Talimur; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Chankyu; Cho, Seong-Keun; Lee, Kiho; Prather, Randall S.; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2017-01-01

    This study comparatively investigated the transcriptional, physiological, and phenotypic differences of the immune disorder between severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse and pig models. We discovered that the recombination activating gene-2 (Rag-2) SCID mice, but not RAG-2 SCID pigs, showed intense, infrequent, and mild cluster of CD3+-, CD4+-, and CD8+ signals respectively, suggesting that distinct species-specific effects exist. Furthermore, the expression of six relevant genes (NFAT...

  15. Scalable Production of Recombinant Membrane Active Peptides and Its Potential as a Complementary Adjunct to Conventional Chemotherapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Rothan, Hussin A.; Jamunaa Ambikabothy; Abdulrahman, Ammar Y.; Hirbod Bahrani; Mojtaba Golpich; Elham Amini; Noorsaadah A. Rahman; Teow Chong Teoh; Zulqarnain Mohamed; Rohana Yusof

    2015-01-01

    The production of short anticancer peptides in recombinant form is an alternative method for costly chemical manufacturing. However, the limitations of host toxicity, bioactivity and column purification have impaired production in mass quantities. In this study, short cationic peptides were produced in aggregated inclusion bodies by double fusion with a central protein that has anti-cancer activity. The anticancer peptides Tachiplicin I (TACH) and Latarcin 1 (LATA) were fused with the N- and ...

  16. Crystallographic, DFT and docking (cathepsin B) studies on an organotellurium(IV) compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caracelli, Ignez; Maganhi, Stella H. [Univ. Federal de Sao Carlos (Brazil). BioMat; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio; Sousa Madureira, Lucas [Univ. Federal de Sao Carlos (Brazil). Lab. de Cristalografia, Estereodinamica e Modelagem Molecular; Stefani, Helio A. [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia; Guadagnin, Rafael C. [Univ. Federal de Sao Paulo, Diadema (Brazil). Inst. e Ciencias Mabientais, Quimicas e Farmaceuticas; Tiekink, Edward R.T. [Sunway Univ., Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia). Centre for Crystalline Materials

    2016-08-01

    Some biologically active organotellurium compounds exhibit inhibitory potency against cathepsin B. In this study, an alkyl derivative, viz. [CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}C(I)=C(H)](nBu)TeI{sub 2}, 1, has been structurally characterised by X-ray crystallography and shown to be coordinated within a C{sub 2}I{sub 2} donor set. When the stereochemically active lone pair of electrons is taken into account, a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry results with the iodide atoms in axial positions. Both intra- and inter-molecular Te..I interactions are also noted. If all interactions are considered, the coordination geometry is based on a Ψ-pentagonal bipyramidal geometry. An unusual feature of the structure is the curving of the functionalised C{sub 5} chain. This feature has been explored by DFT methods and shown to arise as a result of close C-H..I interactions. A docking study (cathepsin B) was performed to understand the inhibition mechanism and to compare the new results with previous observations. Notably, 1 has the same pose exhibited by analogous biologically active compounds with aryl groups. Thus, the present study suggests that (alkyl){sub 2}TeX{sub 2} compounds should also be evaluated for biological activity.

  17. Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of a Cathepsin B-Like Protease Family Unique to Trypanosoma congolense▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Palomares, Carlos; Biteau, Nicolas; Giroud, Christiane; Coustou, Virginie; Coetzer, Theresa; Authié, Edith; Boulangé, Alain; Baltz, Théo

    2008-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been shown to be essential virulence factors and drug targets in trypanosomatids and an attractive antidisease vaccine candidate for Trypanosoma congolense. Here, we describe an important amplification of genes encoding cathepsin B-like proteases unique to T. congolense. More than 13 different genes were identified, whereas only one or two highly homologous genes have been identified in other trypanosomatids. These proteases grouped into three evolutionary clusters: TcoCBc1 to TcoCBc5 and TcoCBc6, which possess the classical catalytic triad (Cys, His, and Asn), and TcoCBs7 to TcoCBs13, which contains an unusual catalytic site (Ser, Xaa, and Asn). Expression profiles showed that members of the TcoCBc1 to TcoCBc5 and the TcoCBs7 to TcoCBs13 groups are expressed mainly in bloodstream forms and localize in the lysosomal compartment. The expression of recombinant representatives of each group (TcoCB1, TcoCB6, and TcoCB12) as proenzymes showed that TcoCBc1 and TcoCBc6 are able to autocatalyze their maturation 21 and 31 residues, respectively, upstream of the predicted start of the catalytic domain. Both displayed a carboxydipeptidase function, while only TcoCBc1 behaved as an endopeptidase. TcoCBc1 exhibited biochemical differences regarding inhibitor sensitivity compared to that of other cathepsin B-like proteases. Recombinant pro-TcoCBs12 did not automature in vitro, and the pepsin-matured enzyme was inactive in tests with cathepsin B fluorogenic substrates. In vivo inhibition studies using CA074Me (a cell-permeable cathepsin B-specific inhibitor) demonstrated that TcoCB are involved in lysosomal protein degradation essential for survival in bloodstream form. Furthermore, TcoCBc1 elicited an important immune response in experimentally infected cattle. We propose this family of proteins as a potential therapeutic target and as a plausible antigen for T. congolense diagnosis. PMID:18281598

  18. A meta-analysis of controlled trials of recombinant human activated protein C therapy in patients with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedermann Christian J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analysis of two randomised controlled trials in severe sepsis performed with recombinant human activated protein C may provide further insight as to the therapeutic utility of targeting the clotting cascade in this syndrome. Methods In search for relevant studies published, two randomized clinical trials were found eligible. Results The studies, PROWESS and ADDRESS, enrolled a total of 4329 patients with risk ratio (RR and 95% confidence interval (CI data for effect on 28-day mortality relative to control treatment of 0.92 (0.83–1.02 suggesting that recombinant human activated protein C is not beneficial in severe sepsis. In PROWESS, 873 of 1690 patients presented with low risk, and 2315 of 2639 patients in ADDRESS as defined by APACHE II score Conclusion This meta-analysis, therefore, raises doubts about the clinical usefulness of recombinant activated protein C in patients with severe sepsis and an APACHE II score ≥ 25 which can only be resolved by another properly designed clinical trial.

  19. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-03

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Delayed activation of Xer recombination at dif by FtsK during septum assembly in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sean P; Chevalier, Fabien; Barre, François-Xavier

    2008-05-01

    The co-ordination and synchronization of DNA replication, chromosome partitioning and cell division in bacteria are critical to survival. In Escherichia coli, the septal protein FtsK links cell division and chromosome segregation through its integral membrane N-terminal and cytoplasmic C-terminal domains. FtsK is responsible for promoting decatenation and dimer resolution in the later stages of chromosome segregation by activating recombination at dif by the site-specific Xer recombinases. Here, we formally demonstrate, using novel assay based on real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, that dif recombination depends not only on proteins upstream of FtsK in the septum assembly pathway, but also on the activity of downstream proteins. Work in synchronized cell cultures further showed that even though FtsK is recruited early to the septum, dif recombination only occurs shortly before cell division and this activity requires a closing septum. We propose a model whereby septum localization and concentration of FtsK co-ordinate its various roles in chromosome segregation and cell division.

  1. [Effect of different molarity cathepsins specific inhibitor E-64 on dentin-resin bonding durability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-xiang; Zhang, Wen-hao; Wu, Shu-yi; Yao, Ke; Liang, Guo-bin; Li, Yan

    2013-06-01

    To investigate, in vitro, the effect of cathepsins specific inhibitor N-(trans-epoxysuccinyl)-L-leucine 4-guanidinobutylamide(E-64) on dental endogenous cathepsins and to find its most effective molarity to elevate dentin-resin bonding durability. Fifty recently extracted human third molars were divided into five groups according to random number table, and treated with different molarity of E-64 as follow: 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 µmol/L. The group 0 µmol/L was control group. Then 20 specimens of dentin-resin composite were fabricated in each group. Half of the specimens were tested after 24 h water storage(37 °C) and the other half were tested after 90 days water storage(37 °C) followed by 3000 cycles'thermocyling(5-55 °C) as aging treatment. Fractured specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy(SEM). After 24 h water storage, no significant differences were found in micro-tensile bond strength(µTBS) of samples between different groups (P > 0.05). However, after ageing treatment, µTBS of the samples in group 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 µmol/L [(18.7 ± 2.7), (20.8 ± 3.4), (18.3 ± 2.8) and (19.1 ± 2.7) MPa] were significantly higher than that in group 0 µmol/L [(15.1 ± 3.0) MPa] (P 0.05), while the µTBS in other groups decreased significantly after aging treatment(P types were almost adhesive and mixed types. Collagens in hybrid layer were less degraded in the groups using E-64 after aging treatment than control group. E-64 was effective on inhibiting cathepsins activity in dentin, and induced less collagens degradation in smear layer for better dentin-resin bond durability.

  2. Evaluation of recombinant activated protein C for severe sepsis at a tertiary academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anger KE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kevin E Anger,1 Jeremy R DeGrado,1 Bonnie C Greenwood,1 Steven A Cohen,2 Paul M Szumita1 1Department of Pharmacy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Division of Epidemiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Purpose: Early clinical trials of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC for severe sepsis excluded patients at high risk of bleeding. Recent literature suggests bleeding rates are higher in clinical practice and may be associated with worsened outcomes. Our objective was to evaluate baseline demographics; incidence, and risk factors for major bleeding; and mortality of patients receiving rhAPC for severe sepsis at our institution. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for all patients receiving rhAPC for treatment of severe sepsis at a tertiary academic medical center from January 2002 to June 2009. Demographic information, clinical variables, intensive care unit, and hospital outcomes were recorded. Results: Of the 156 patients that received rhAPC, 54 (34.6% did not meet institutional criteria for safe use at baseline due to bleeding precaution or contraindication. Twenty-three (14.7% patients experienced a major bleeding event. Multivariate analysis demonstrated baseline International Normalized Ratio ≥2.5 (odds ratio [OR] 3.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28–10.56; P = 0.03 and platelet count ≤100 × 103/mm3 (OR 2.86, 95% CI: 1.07–7.67; P = 0.01 as significant predictors of a major bleed. Overall hospital mortality was 57.7%. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the presence of ≥3 organ dysfunctions (OR 2.46, 95% CI: 1.19–5.09; P < 0.05 and medical intensive care unit admission (OR 1.99, 95% CI: 1.00–3.98; P = 0.05 were independent variables associated with hospital mortality. Conclusion: Patients receiving rhAPC at our institution had higher APACHE II scores, mortality, and major bleeding events than published

  3. Influence of cardiopulmonary bypass on the interaction of recombinant factor VIIa with activated platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjalke, M.; Runge, M.; Rojkjaer, R.

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) interacts preferentially with coated platelets characterized by a high exposure of phosphatidyl serine (PS), FV, FVIII, FIX, and FX binding, and fibrinogen. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is known to impair platelet function. In this study, the influence of CPB...

  4. Cathepsin B is a New Drug Target for Traumatic Brain Injury Therapeutics: Evidence for E64d as a Promising Lead Drug Candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory eHook

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There currently is no therapeutic drug treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI despite decades of experimental clinical trials. This may be because the mechanistic pathways for improving TBI outcomes have yet to be identified and exploited. As such, there remains a need to seek out new molecular targets and their drug candidates to find new treatments for TBI. This review presents supporting evidence for cathepsin B, a cysteine protease, as a potentially important drug target for TBI. Cathepsin B expression is greatly up-regulated in TBI animal models, as well as in trauma patients. Importantly, knockout of the cathepsin B gene in TBI mice results in substantial improvements of TBI-caused deficits in behavior, pathology, and biomarkers, as well as improvements in related injury models. During the process of TBI-induced injury, cathepsin B likely escapes the lysosome, its normal subcellular location, into the cytoplasm or extracellular matrix (ECM where its unleashed proteolytic power causes destruction via necrotic, apoptotic, autophagic, and activated glia-induced cell death, together with ECM breakdown and inflammation. Significantly, chemical inhibitors of cathepsin B are effective for improving deficits in TBI and related injuries including ischemia, cerebral bleeding, cerebral aneurysm, edema, pain, infection, nephritis, epilepsy, rheumatoid arthritis, pancreatitis, Huntington’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. The inhibitor E64d shows prominent efficacy for amelioration of TBI-caused deficits in preclinical models. In clinical trials, E64d has been shown to be safe based on its toxicological profile and, thus, illustrates the compound as an excellent candidate for drug development. These data support the overall conclusion that drug development of cathepsin B inhibitors, with E64d or a novel analog as a lead drug candidate, should be accelerated to improve the outcomes of TBI and related injuries.

  5. Recombinant human erythropoietin pretreatment alleviates renal glomerular injury induced by cardiopulmonary bypass by reducing transient receptor potential channel 6-nuclear factor of activated T-cells pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Tingting; Xia, Weiliang; Wang, Yingwei; Ma, Ke

    2013-09-01

    Acute renal injury after cardiopulmonary bypass is common and associated with high mortality. We aimed to demonstrate the glomerular protective effects of recombinant human erythropoietin using an in vivo rat cardiopulmonary bypass model and to explore the possible mechanism. Dose-related renal protective effects of recombinant human erythropoietin were studied in phase I. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: sham group, cardiopulmonary bypass group, and 3 recombinant human erythropoietin-treated cardiopulmonary bypass groups (bolus doses of 500, 3000, and 5000 U/kg 24 hours before surgery). Blood and urine samples were collected just before surgery and at 2, 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery. In phase II, rats were divided into 3 groups: sham group, cardiopulmonary bypass group, and 5000 U/kg recombinant human erythropoietin group. Kidneys were harvested at 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery. Ultra-organization of glomeruli was observed. Glomerular transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) expression was studied by immunofluorescence and Western blot. Nuclei nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1) activity was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Pretreatment of 5000 U/kg recombinant human erythropoietin decreased the urine protein (72 hours: 7.82 ± 1.13 g/L vs 11.28 ± 1.73 g/L), serum creatinine (72 hours: 35.0 ± 3.5 μmol/L vs 60.7 ± 7.6 μmol/L), and cystatin-C (2 hours: 336.5 ± 28.2 μg/L vs 452.6 ± 63.8 μg/L) compared with the control group (P Cardiopulmonary bypass induced morphologic abnormalities of podocyte foot processes and slit diaphragms, which was improved by recombinant human erythropoietin. Furthermore, recombinant human erythropoietin significantly relieved glomerular TRPC6 increase and NFATc1 activation induced by cardiopulmonary bypass. Pretreatment of 5000 U/kg recombinant human erythropoietin elicited

  6. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing a model cytochrome P450 in the rat digestive environment: viability and bioconversion activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrait, G; Jarrige, J F; Blanquet, S; Beyssac, E; Alric, M

    2007-06-01

    An innovative "biodrug" concept, based on the oral administration of living recombinant microorganisms, has recently emerged for the prevention or treatment of various diseases. An engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing plant P450 73A1 (cinnamate-4-hydroxylase [CA4H] activity) was used, and its survival and ability to convert trans-cinnamic acid (CIN) into p-coumaric acid (COU) were investigated in vivo. In rats, the recombinant yeast was resistant to gastric and small intestinal secretions but was more sensitive to the conditions found in the large intestine. After oral administration of yeast and CIN, the CA4H activity was shown in vivo, with COU being found throughout the rat's digestive tract and in its urine. The bioconversion reaction occurred very fast, with most of the COU being produced within the first 5 min. The gastrointestinal sac technique demonstrated that the recombinant yeast was able to convert CIN into COU (conversion rate ranging from 2 to 5%) in all the organs of the rat's digestive tract: stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon. These results promise new opportunities for the development of drug delivery systems based on engineered yeasts catalyzing a bioconversion reaction directly in the digestive tract.

  7. The occluding loop of cathepsin B prevents its effective inhibition by human kininogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, C; Lecaille, F; Chowdhury, S; Krupa, J C; Purisima, E; Mort, J S; Lalmanach, G

    2010-07-30

    Kininogens, the major plasma cystatin-like inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins, are degraded at sites of inflammation, and cathepsin B has been identified as a prominent mediator of this process. Cathepsin B, in contrast to cathepsins L and S, is poorly inhibited by kininogens. This led us to delineate the molecular interactions between this protease and kininogens (high molecular weight kininogen and low molecular weight kininogen) and to elucidate the dual role of the occluding loop in this weak inhibition. Cathepsin B cleaves high molecular weight kininogen within the N-terminal region of the D2 and D3 cystatin-like domains and close to the consensus QVVAG inhibitory pentapeptide of the D3 domain. The His110Ala mutant, unlike His111Ala cathepsin B, fails to hydrolyze kininogens, but rather forms a tight-binding complex as observed by gel-filtration analysis. K(i) values (picomolar range) as well as association rate constants for the His110Ala cathepsin B variant compare to those reported for cathepsin L for both kininogens. Homology modeling of isolated inhibitory (D2 and D3) domains and molecular dynamics simulations of the D2 domain complexed with wild-type cathepsin B and its mutants indicate that additional weak interactions, due to the lack of the salt bridge (Asp22-His110) and the subsequent open position of the occluding loop, increase the inhibitory potential of kininogens on His110Ala cathepsin B. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Norovirus recombination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bull, Rowena A; Tanaka, Mark M; White, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    ...{at}unsw.edu.au RNA recombination is a significant driving force in viral evolution. Increased awareness of recombination within the genus Norovirus of the family Calicivirus has led to a rise in the identification of norovirus (NoV...

  9. Salvage use of activated recombinant factor VII in the management of refractory bleeding following cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barua A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anupama Barua1, Vinay P Rao1, BC Ramesh2, Biplab Barua3, Hussain El-Shafei21Cardiothoracic Department, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham, UK; 2Cardiothoracic Department, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, UK; 3General Surgery Department, Glenfield Hospital, Glenfield, Leicester, UKBackground: Refractory post cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB bleeding continues to cause concern for cardiac surgeons and intensivists. Massive postoperative hemorrhage following CPB is multifactorial and not fully understood, and it is also associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa has emerged as possible salvage medication in refractory post cardiac surgical bleeding. This observational study sought to identify the pattern of use of rFVIIa in cardiac surgery, its effectiveness, and risk.Methods: This study involved a retrospective case review of medical records of ten patients undergoing a variety of cardiac surgery procedures and who developed life-threatening bleeding during surgery or after surgery despite conventional medical therapy, including transfusion of blood and blood products, and received rFVIIa at a regional center between August 2007 and April 2009.Results: All ten patients received two consecutive doses of rFVIIa (average dose 65 µg/kg at a 2-hour interval. Eight patients were re-explored due to massive postoperative bleeding or cardiac tamponade before receiving rFVIIa. Surgical sources of bleeding were not identified in any cases. A second re-exploration was carried out in two cases. Two patients (20% died in ITU from problems not related to bleeding and thromboembolism. Blood loss was significantly reduced after administration of rFVIIa. Blood loss 6 hours prior to treatment was 1758.5 ± 163.9 mL and blood loss in the 6-hour period post treatment was 405.6 ± 50.5 mL (P < 0.05. Blood and blood products used in the 6-hour period before and after administration of rFVIIa were 19.6 ± 1.5U and 4.4

  10. Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator in the Treatment of Neonates with Intracardiac and Great Vessels Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Segaier, Milad; Khan, Muhammad A; Khan, Zaheer Ullah; Momenah, Tarek; Galal, Mohammed Omar

    2015-12-01

    Life-threatening intracardiac and great vessels thrombi are rare in neonates. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) is used in adults to stimulate fibrinolysis and facilitate thrombus resolution. Its use in neonates, along with heparin, remains controversial because of potential risk of serious bleeding. We aim to present our experience with the use of thrombolytic agents in seven neonates and young infants. In a retrospective study, over a period of 6 years, the medical records of neonates and young infants, who were diagnosed with intracardiac and great vessels thrombi, were reviewed. The following factors were collected: demographic data, primary diagnosis, thrombus site, risk factors, method of diagnosis, thrombolytic and/or anticoagulation agent, route, dose and duration of treatment, complications, and outcome. Six neonates and one 45-day-old infant were analyzed. Age ranged from 5 to 45 days (median age 12 days), and median weight was 2.9 kg (range 0.9-3.8 kg). The thrombi were diagnosed by echocardiography in five and by angiography in two cases. All patients had life-threatening thrombi; four were treated with rTPA (0.5 mg kg(-1) h(-1)) and heparin infusions with complete dissolution of the thrombi, within a median time of 60 h (6-72 h), and without complications. The remaining three patients (two who were premature, at 28 and 34 weeks of gestation, and the third who had a deranged coagulation profile) were treated with unfractionated heparin due to fear of bleeding. The thrombi dissolved in the premature babies (within 2 weeks and 3 months, respectively) but embolized and resulted in the death of the third infant after 2 weeks of treatment. The current case series confirmed the effectiveness and safety of intravenous rTPA infusion, at the dosages used, in neonates and young infants with life-threatening thrombi.

  11. Plasmid construction using recombination activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Chino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Construction of plasmids is crucial in modern genetic manipulation. As of now, the common method for constructing plasmids is to digest specific DNA sequences with restriction enzymes and to ligate the resulting DNA fragments with DNA ligase. Another potent method to construct plasmids, known as gap-repair cloning (GRC, is commonly used in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GRC makes use of the homologous recombination activity that occurs within the yeast cells. Due to its flexible design and efficiency, GRC has been frequently used for constructing plasmids with complex structures as well as genome-wide plasmid collections. Although there have been reports indicating GRC feasibility in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, this species is not commonly used for GRC as systematic studies of reporting GRC efficiency in S. pombe have not been performed till date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated GRC efficiency in S. pombe in this study. We first showed that GRC was feasible in S. pombe by constructing a plasmid that contained the LEU2 auxotrophic marker gene in vivo and showed sufficient efficiency with short homology sequences (>25 bp. No preference was shown for the sequence length from the cut site in the vector plasmid. We next showed that plasmids could be constructed in a proper way using 3 DNA fragments with 70% efficiency without any specific selections being made. The GRC efficiency with 3 DNA fragments was dramatically increased >95% in lig4Delta mutant cell, where non-homologous end joining is deficient. Following this approach, we successfully constructed plasmid vectors with leu1+, ade6+, his5+, and lys1+ markers with the low-copy stable plasmid pDblet as a backbone by applying GRC in S. pombe. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We concluded that GRC was sufficiently feasible in S. pombe for genome-wide gene functional analysis as well as for regular plasmid construction. Plasmids with different

  12. Pharmacokinetics and thrombolytic effects of the recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator in horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background To test the efficacy of the recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) alteplase in horses, the thrombolytic effect was tested in in vitro generated equine thrombi. The extent of lysis was determined by measuring the decrease in thrombi weight over a period of 4 hours. In vivo pharmacokinetics of alteplase were determined in 6 healthy horses. A single dose (1 mg/kg) was applied via intravenous infusion over a period of 30 minutes Coagulation-related variables, blood count and clinical parameters were taken before the treatment and until 48 h after treatment. In addition, plasma rt-PA concentration was measured until 300 min after commencing the infusion. Results In vitro, a dose dependent decrease of thrombus weight ranging from a 56 (± 6.5) % decrease for 0.5 μg/ml to 92 (± 2.1) % decrease for 5 μg/ml rt-PA was noted. The D-dimer concentration in the lysis medium correspondingly increased from 0.10 up to 10.8 mg/l. In vivo, none of the horses showed an adverse reaction to the alteplase infusion. In some horses blood parameters were slightly altered. The 1 mg/kg dose yielded the following pharmacokinetic parameters: Cmax = 1.25 ± 0.27 μg/ml; CL = 21.46 ± 5.67 ml/min/kg; dominant half life (t1/2α) = 6.81 ± 1.48 minutes; median elimination half life (t1/2β) = 171 min (range: 85–1061); AUC = 50.33 ± 17.62 μg · min /ml. Conclusion These findings indicate that a single dose of 1 mg/kg alteplase results in rt-PA plasma concentrations comparable to those in humans and might be sufficient for a thrombolytic therapy in horses. Further studies must be performed to determine the alteplase effectiveness in horses with jugular vein thrombosis. PMID:23938183

  13. High-yield production of biologically active recombinant protein in shake flask culture by combination of enzyme-based glucose delivery and increased oxygen transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukkonen, Kaisa; Vasala, Antti; Ojamo, Heikki; Neubauer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    ...®) and high-aeration shake flask (Ultra Yield Flask™). The benefit of this combination is demonstrated by over 100-fold improvement in the active yield of recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase expressed in E. coli...

  14. Permeable Thrombi Are Associated With Higher Intravenous Recombinant Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Treatment Success in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Emilie M M; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Treurniet, Kilian M; Horsch, Alexander D; Roos, Yvo B; Kappelle, L Jaap; Niessen, Wiro J; Majoie, Charles B; Velthuis, BK; Marquering, Henk A; van der Graaf, Y

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Preclinical studies showed that thrombus permeability improves recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) efficacy. We hypothesize that thrombus permeability estimated from radiological imaging is associated with improved recanalization after treatment with

  15. Permeable Thrombi Are Associated With Higher Intravenous Recombinant Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator Treatment Success in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Dankbaar, J.W.; Treurniet, K.M.; Horsch, A.D.; Roos, Y.B.; Kappelle, L.J.; Niessen, W.J.; Majoie, C.B.; Velthuis, B.; Marquering, H.A.; Meijer, J.F.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Preclinical studies showed that thrombus permeability improves recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) efficacy. We hypothesize that thrombus permeability estimated from radiological imaging is associated with improved recanalization after treatment with

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of latent, active and recombinantly expressed aurone synthase, a polyphenol oxidase, from Coreopsis grandiflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette, E-mail: annette.rompel@univie.ac.at [Universität Wien, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Wien (Austria)

    2015-05-22

    Latent and active aurone synthase purified from petals of C. grandiflora (cgAUS1) were crystallized. The crystal quality of recombinantly expressed latent cgAUS1 was significantly improved by co-crystallization with the polyoxotungstate Na{sub 6}[TeW{sub 6}O{sub 24}] within the liquid–liquid phase-separation zone. Aurone synthase (AUS), a member of a novel group of plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs), catalyzes the oxidative conversion of chalcones to aurones. Two active cgAUS1 (41.6 kDa) forms that differed in the level of phosphorylation or sulfation as well as the latent precursor form (58.9 kDa) were purified from the petals of Coreopsis grandiflora. The differing active cgAUS1 forms and the latent cgAUS1 as well as recombinantly expressed latent cgAUS1 were crystallized, resulting in six different crystal forms. The active forms crystallized in space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and P12{sub 1}1 and diffracted to ∼1.65 Å resolution. Co-crystallization of active cgAUS1 with 1,4-resorcinol led to crystals belonging to space group P3{sub 1}21. The crystals of latent cgAUS1 belonged to space group P12{sub 1}1 and diffracted to 2.50 Å resolution. Co-crystallization of recombinantly expressed pro-AUS with the hexatungstotellurate(VI) salt Na{sub 6}[TeW{sub 6}O{sub 24}] within the liquid–liquid phase separation zone significantly improved the quality of the crystals compared with crystals obtained without hexatungstotellurate(VI)

  17. DISCOVERY OF THE RECOMBINING PLASMA IN THE SOUTH OF THE GALACTIC CENTER: A RELIC OF THE PAST GALACTIC CENTER ACTIVITY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, S.; Nobukawa, M.; Uchida, H.; Tanaka, T.; Tsuru, T. G.; Koyama, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Murakami, H. [Department of Information Science, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Tohoku Gakuin University 2-1-1 Tenjinzawa, Izumi-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 981-3193 (Japan); Uchiyama, H., E-mail: shinya@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Science Education, Faculty of Education, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2013-08-10

    We report Suzaku results for soft X-ray emission to the south of the Galactic center (GC). The emission (hereafter {sup G}C South{sup )} has an angular size of {approx}42' Multiplication-Sign 16' centered at (l, b) {approx} (0. Degree-Sign 0, - 1. Degree-Sign 4) and is located in the largely extended Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). The X-ray spectrum of GC South exhibits emission lines from highly ionized atoms. Although the X-ray spectrum of the GRXE can be well fitted with a plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), that of GC South cannot be fitted with a plasma in CIE, leaving hump-like residuals at {approx}2.5 and 3.5 keV, which are attributable to the radiative recombination continua of the K-shells of Si and S, respectively. In fact, GC South spectrum is well fitted with a recombination-dominant plasma model; the electron temperature is 0.46 keV while atoms are highly ionized (kT = 1.6 keV) in the initial epoch, and the plasma is now in a recombining phase at a relaxation scale (plasma density Multiplication-Sign elapsed time) of 5.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} s cm{sup -3}. The absorption column density of GC South is consistent with that toward the GC region. Thus, GC South is likely to be located in the GC region ({approx}8 kpc distance). The size of the plasma, the mean density, and the thermal energy are estimated to be {approx}97 pc Multiplication-Sign 37 pc, 0.16 cm{sup -3}, and 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg, respectively. We discuss possible origins of the recombination-dominant plasma as a relic of past activity in the GC region.

  18. Prediction of Aggressive Human Prostate Cancer by Cathepsin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    20.0ng/ml. Cathepsin B and stefin A reaction products were found in the cytoplasm of basal and columnar/cuboidal cells of benign prostatic...cancer and invasive cells were acquired at 200X (10X ocular and 20X objective) magnification directly from microscope slides to a computer using a...independent prognostic factor for squamous cell carcinoma patients. Brit. J. Cancer. 81: 510-519, 1999. 17. Chambers AF and Matrisian LM: Changing views of

  19. Host Cell Cathepsins Potentiate Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nachagari, Deepa; Fields, Carolyn; Franks, John; Albritton, Lorraine M.

    2007-01-01

    The roles of cellular proteases in Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection were investigated using MLV particles pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoprotein as a control for effects on core MLV particles versus effects specific to Moloney MLV envelope protein (Env). The broad-spectrum inhibitors cathepsin inhibitor III and E-64d gave comparable dose-dependent inhibition of Moloney MLV Env and VSV G pseudotypes, suggesting that the decrease did not involve the envelo...

  20. Cathepsin E deficiency impairs autophagic proteolysis in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Tsukuba

    Full Text Available Cathepsin E is an endosomal aspartic proteinase that is predominantly expressed in immune-related cells. Recently, we showed that macrophages derived from cathepsin E-deficient (CatE(-/- mice display accumulation of lysosomal membrane proteins and abnormal membrane trafficking. In this study, we demonstrated that CatE(-/- macrophages exhibit abnormalities in autophagy, a bulk degradation system for aggregated proteins and damaged organelles. CatE(-/- macrophages showed increased accumulation of autophagy marker proteins such as LC3 and p62, and polyubiquitinated proteins. Cathepsin E deficiency also altered autophagy-related signaling pathways such as those mediated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, Akt, and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy analyses showed that LC3-positive vesicles were merged with acidic compartments in wild-type macrophages, but not in CatE(-/- macrophages, indicating inhibition of fusion of autophagosome with lysosomes in CatE(-/- cells. Delayed degradation of LC3 protein was also observed under starvation-induced conditions. Since the autophagy system is involved in the degradation of damaged mitochondria, we examined the accumulation of damaged mitochondria in CatE(-/- macrophages. Several mitochondrial abnormalities such as decreased intracellular ATP levels, depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, and decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption were observed. Such mitochondrial dysfunction likely led to the accompanying oxidative stress. In fact, CatE(-/- macrophages showed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production and up-regulation of oxidized peroxiredoxin-6, but decreased antioxidant glutathione. These results indicate that cathepsin E deficiency causes autophagy impairment concomitantly with increased aberrant mitochondria as well as increased oxidative stress.

  1. Structure of a Kunitz-type potato cathepsin D inhibitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guo, J.; Erskine, P. T.; Coker, A. R.; Wood, S. P.; Cooper, J. B.; Mareš, Michael; Baudyš, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 192, č. 3 (2015), s. 554-560 ISSN 1047-8477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18929S; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : potato cathepsin D inhibitor * Kunitz-type protease inhibitor * protein X-ray structure * reactive-site loop * docking Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.570, year: 2015

  2. Defined characteristics of cathepsin B-like proteins from nematodes: inferred functional diversity and phylogenetic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, A; Jasmer, D P

    1999-08-20

    Numerous cathepsin B-like protein sequences (CBLs) have been reported from nematodes. However, the relationships among these proteins remain unclear. Here, expression of several CBL transcripts in the gut of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus was demonstrated. To assess potential functional diversity, multiple nematode CBL sequences were compared with known functional domains of cathepsin B. These domains included the occluding loop, S2' and S2 subsites, and the pro region. Four groups of CBLs were defined based on variable characteristics in the occluding loop region, which incorporates a portion of the S2' subsite. Further diversity was observed in amino acids expected to contribute to the S2 subsite. In addition, short signature sequences near the cysteinyl active site region characterized known CBLs of parasites from the orders Strongylida and Rhabditida. The criteria established were used to identify two predicted CBLs from parasitic (Ascaris suum) and free-living (Caenorhabditis elegans) nematodes as potential orthologues, and provided a basis to evaluate orthologue status of other CBLs. Variability in the domains analyzed suggests substantial functional diversity in enzymatic properties of nematode CBLs. Results suggest that the selective amplification and evolution of distinct CBL lineages has contributed to differences in CBLs among species and groups of nematodes. Nutrient digestion is one potential factor promoting CBL diversification in these organisms.

  3. Cathepsin B-degradable, NIR-responsive nanoparticulate platform for target-specific cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarassoli, Sam P.; Martinez de Pinillos Bayona, Alejandra; Pye, Hayley; Mosse, C. Alexander; Callan, John F.; MacRobert, Alexander; McHale, Anthony P.; Nomikou, Nikolitsa

    2017-02-01

    Stimuli-responsive anticancer formulations can promote drug release and activation within the target tumour, facilitate cellular uptake, as well as improve the therapeutic efficacy of drugs and reduce off-target effects. In the present work, indocyanine green (ICG)-containing polyglutamate (PGA) nanoparticles were developed and characterized. Digestion of nanoparticles with cathepsin B, a matrix metalloproteinase overexpressed in the microenvironment of advanced tumours, decreased particle size and increased ICG cellular uptake. Incorporation of ICG in PGA nanoparticles provided the NIR-absorbing agent with time-dependent altered optical properties in the presence of cathepsin B. Having minimal dark toxicity, the formulation exhibited significant cytotoxicity upon NIR exposure. Combined use of the formulation with saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein, resulted in synergistically enhanced cytotoxicity attributed to the photo-induced release of saporin from endo/lysosomes. The results suggest that this therapeutic approach can offer significant therapeutic benefit in the treatment of superficial malignancies, such as head and neck tumours.

  4. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheem Ullah

    Full Text Available Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of latent, active and recombinantly expressed aurone synthase, a polyphenol oxidase, from Coreopsis grandiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette

    2015-06-01

    Aurone synthase (AUS), a member of a novel group of plant polyphenol oxidases (PPOs), catalyzes the oxidative conversion of chalcones to aurones. Two active cgAUS1 (41.6 kDa) forms that differed in the level of phosphorylation or sulfation as well as the latent precursor form (58.9 kDa) were purified from the petals of Coreopsis grandiflora. The differing active cgAUS1 forms and the latent cgAUS1 as well as recombinantly expressed latent cgAUS1 were crystallized, resulting in six different crystal forms. The active forms crystallized in space groups P2(1)2(1)2(1) and P12(1)1 and diffracted to ∼ 1.65 Å resolution. Co-crystallization of active cgAUS1 with 1,4-resorcinol led to crystals belonging to space group P3(1)21. The crystals of latent cgAUS1 belonged to space group P12(1)1 and diffracted to 2.50 Å resolution. Co-crystallization of recombinantly expressed pro-AUS with the hexatungstotellurate(VI) salt Na6[TeW6O24] within the liquid-liquid phase separation zone significantly improved the quality of the crystals compared with crystals obtained without hexatungstotellurate(VI).

  6. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications.

  7. Synthesis and biochemical evaluation of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues as potent and selective inhibitors of cathepsin L

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Erica N.; Song, Jiangli; Kumar, G. D. Kishore; Odutola, Samuel O.; Chavarria, Gustavo E.; Charlton-Sevcik, Amanda K.; Strecker, Tracy E.; Barnes, Ashleigh L.; Sudhan, Dhivya R.; Wittenborn, Thomas R.; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Horsman, Michael R.; Chaplin, David J.; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of cathepsin L in a variety of tumors and its ability to promote cancer cell invasion and migration through degradation of the extracellular matrix suggest that cathepsin L is a promising biological target for the development of anti-metastatic agents. Based on encouraging results from studies on benzophenone thiosemicarbazone cathepsin inhibitors, a series of fourteen benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibitory a...

  8. Distinct cathepsins control necrotic cell death mediated by pyroptosis inducers and lysosome-destabilizing agents

    OpenAIRE

    Brojatsch, Jürgen; Lima, Heriberto; Palliser, Deborah; Jacobson, Lee S.; Muehlbauer, Stefan M.; Furtado, Raquel; Goldman, David L; Lisanti, Michael P; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Necrotic cell death triggers a range of biological responses including a strong adaptive immune response, yet we know little about the cellular pathways that control necrotic cell death. Inhibitor studies suggest that proteases, and in particular cathepsins, drive necrotic cell death. The cathepsin B-selective inhibitor CA-074-Me blocks all forms of programmed necrosis by an unknown mechanism. We found that cathepsin B deficiency does not prevent induction of pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated ...

  9. Taking out the garbage: cathepsin D and calcineurin in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Aufschnaiter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis requires a tightly controlled balance between protein synthesis, folding and degradation. Especially long-lived, post-mitotic cells such as neurons depend on an efficient proteostasis system to maintain cellular health over decades. Thus, a functional decline of processes contributing to protein degradation such as autophagy and general lysosomal proteolytic capacity is connected to several age-associated neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. These so called proteinopathies are characterized by the accumulation and misfolding of distinct proteins, subsequently driving cellular demise. We recently linked efficient lysosomal protein breakdown via the protease cathepsin D to the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. In a yeast model for Parkinson's disease, functional calcineurin was required for proper trafficking of cathepsin D to the lysosome and for recycling of its endosomal sorting receptor to allow further rounds of shuttling. Here, we discuss these findings in relation to present knowledge about the involvement of cathepsin D in proteinopathies in general and a possible connection between this protease, calcineurin signalling and endosomal sorting in particular. As dysregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis as well as lysosomal impairment is connected to a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders, this novel interplay might very well impact pathologies beyond Parkinson's disease.

  10. Differential subcellular targeting of recombinant human α₁-proteinase inhibitor influences yield, biological activity and in planta stability of the protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shweta; Agarwal, Saurabh; Sanyal, Indraneel; Jain, G K; Amla, D V

    2012-11-01

    The response of protein accumulation site on yield, biological activity and in planta stability of therapeutic recombinant human proteinase inhibitor (α₁-PI) was analyzed via targeting to different subcellular locations, like endoplasmic reticulum (ER), apoplast, vacuole and cytosol in leaves of transgenic tomato plants. In situ localization of the recombinant α₁-PI protein in transgenic plant cells was monitored by immunohistochemical staining. Maximum accumulation of recombinant α₁-PI in T₀ and T₁ transgenic tomato plants was achieved from 1.5 to 3.2% of total soluble protein (TSP) by retention in ER lumen, followed by vacuole and apoplast, whereas cytosolic targeting resulted into degradation of the protein. The plant-derived recombinant α₁-PI showed biological activity for elastase inhibition, as monitored by residual porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) activity assay and band-shift assay. Recombinant α₁-PI was purified from transgenic tomato plants with high yield, homogeneity and biological activity. Purified protein appeared as a single band of ∼48-50 kDa on SDS-PAGE with pI value ranging between 5.1 and 5.3. Results of mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy of purified recombinant α₁-PI revealed the structural integrity of the recombinant protein comparable to native serum α₁-PI. Enzymatic deglycosylation and lectin-binding assays with the purified recombinant α₁-PI showed compartment-specific N-glycosylation of the protein targeted to ER, apoplast and vacuole. Conformational studies based on urea-induced denaturation and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed relatively lower stability of the recombinant α₁-PI protein, compared to its serum counterpart. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of plant derived recombinant and human plasma-purified α₁-PI in rat, by intravenous route, revealed significantly faster plasma clearance and lower area under curve (AUC) of recombinant protein. Our data suggested significance of

  11. Molecular characterization of cathepsin B from Clonorchis sinensis excretory/secretory products and assessment of its potential for serodiagnosis of clonorchiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Chenhui

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cathepsin cysteine proteases play multiple roles in the life cycle of parasites such as food uptake, immune invasion and pathogenesis, making them valuable targets for diagnostic assays, vaccines and drugs. The purpose of this study was to identify a cathepsin B of Clonorchis sinensis (CsCB and to investigate its diagnostic value for human helminthiases. Results The predicted amino acid sequence of the cathepsin B of C. sinensis shared 63%, 52%, 50% identity with that of Schistosoma japonicum, Homo sapiens and Fasciola hepatica, respectively. Sequence encoding proenzyme of CsCB was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Reverse transcription PCR experiments revealed that CsCB transcribed in both adult worm and metacercaria of C. sinensis. CsCB was identified as a C. sinensis excretory/secretory product by immunoblot assay, which was consistent with immunohistochemical localization showing that CsCB was especially expressed in the intestine of C. sinensis adults. Both ELISA and western blotting analysis showed recombinant CsCB could react with human sera from clonorchiasis and other helminthiases. Conclusions Our findings revealed that secreted CsCB may play an important role in the biology of C. sinensis and could be a diagnostic candidate for helminthiases.

  12. Heterologous expression of a truncated form of human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor-A and its biological activity in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Khaki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is one of the most effective proteins in angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation and wound healing. These abilities are therapeutic potential of VEGF in diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and other tissue damage circumstances. In this study, recombinant VEGF was produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli system and then biological activity of this protein was evaluated in animal wound healing. Materials and Methods: E. coli BL21 (DE3 competent cells were transformed with pET32a-VEGF clone and induced by isopropyl-β-D-thio-galactoside (IPTG. The recombinant protein was purified byaffinity chromatography. Recombinant VEGF-A-based ointment (VEGF/Vaseline 0.8 mg/100 w/w was used for external wound (25×15mm thickness healing in animal model. In vivo activity of ointment was evaluated by clinical evidences and cytological microscopic assessment. Results: The recombinant protein with molecular weight of 45 kilodaltons (kDa and concentration of 0.8 mg/ml was produced.Immunoblotting data showed that the antigenic region of VEGF can be expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein has similar epitopes with close antigenic properties to the natural form. Macroscopic findings and microscopic data showed that the recombinant VEGF-A ointment was effective on excisional wound healing. Conclusion: Recombinant VEGF-A produced by pET32a in E. coli, possesses acceptable structure and has wound healing capability.

  13. Transient expression of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) gene in cucurbit plants using viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaran, Vahid Jalali; Shafeinia, Alireza; Javaran, Mokhtar Jalali; Gojani, Esmaeil Ghasemi; Mirzaee, Malihe

    2017-04-01

    To use a transient expression system to express a truncated human tissue plasminogen activator (K2S) gene in cucurbit plants. The recombinant tissue plasminogen activator protein (K2S form) was expressed in active form in cucurbit plants. Its molecular weight was 43 kDa. The plant-derived rt-PA was determined using goat anti-rabbit antibody by western blotting. Among the infected lines, the highest expression of rt-PA was 62 ng/100 mg per leaf tissue as measured by ELISA. The enzymatic activity of the plant-derived rt-PA was 0.8 IU/ml. The K25 form of rt-PA was expressed for the first time using the viral expression system. Plant-derived rt-PA showed similar potency to commercially-available PA.

  14. Mediators of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and the role of recombinant activated protein C in sepsis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kak, Vivek

    2011-12-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome, the host's response to infection involves a series of cascading events that mobilize a series of mediators involving the immune system, complement, and the coagulation cascade. Although the initial focus of mediators is to limit infection, this cascade may run amok and cause the development of hypotension, vascular instability, and disseminated intravascular coagulation, leading to morbidity and mortality in the host. Several therapeutic trials have focused on the modulation of these mediators, but use of recombinant human activated protein C in patients with severe sepsis is the only one that has shown a benefit in clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A recombinant cystatin from Ascaris lumbricoides attenuates inflammation of DSS-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, S; Barrios, L; Zakzuk, J; Regino, R; Ahumada, V; Franco, L; Ocampo, Y; Caraballo, L

    2017-04-01

    Helminthiasis may ameliorate inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. Information about immunomodulators from Ascaris lumbricoides is scarce, but could be important considering the co-evolutionary relationships between helminths and humans. We evaluated the immunomodulatory effects of a recombinant cystatin from A. lumbricoides on an acute model of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. From an A. lumbricoides cDNA library, we obtained a recombinant cystatin (rAl-CPI). Protease activity inhibition was demonstrated on cathepsin B and papain. Immunomodulatory effects were evaluated at two intraperitoneal doses (0.5 and 0.25 μg/G) on mice with DSS-induced colitis. Body weight, colon length, Disease Activity Index (DAI), histological inflammation score, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, gene expression of cytokines and cytokines levels in colon tissue were analysed. Treatment with rAl-CPI significantly reduced DAI, MPO activity and inflammation score without toxic effects. Also, IL-10 and TGF-B gene overexpression was observed in rAl-CPI-treated group compared to DSS-exposed control and healthy mice. Furthermore, a reduction in IL-6 and TNF-A expression was found, and this was confirmed by the levels of these cytokines in colonic tissue. In conclusion, rAl-CPI reduces inflammation in a mouse model of DSS-induced colitis, probably by increasing the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and reducing pro-inflammatory ones. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Development of the production process for a recombinant hormone and evaluation of its biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Font Ingles, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Durant el curs d'aquest treball, es va dur a terme l'expressió de l'hormona Pregnant Mare Serum Gonadotropin (PMSG), també coneguda com equine Chorionic Gonadotropin (eCG) en el llevat metilotròfic Pichia pastoris. La PMSG consta de dues subunitats que varen ser expressades sota control del promotor AOX1. També es va desenvolupar l'upstream i el downstream del procés de producció per la PMSG recombinant (rPMSG). En primer lloc es va desenvolupar un assaig in vitro amb cèl·lules de Leydig (MLT...

  17. Tear Cathepsin S–A Candidate Biomarker for Sjögren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.; Janga, Srikanth R.; Edman, Maria C.; Madrigal, Sara; Shah, Mihir; Frousiakis, Starleen E.; Renduchintala, Kavita; Zhu, Jay; Bricel, Seth; Silka, Kimberly; Bach, Dianne; Heur, Martin; Christianakis, Stratos; Arkfeld, Daniel G.; Irvine, John; Mack, Wendy J.; Stohl, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome (SS) in routine practice is largely a clinical one and requires a high index of suspicion by the treating physician. This great dependence upon clinical judgment frequently leads to delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. Tear protein profiles have been proposed as simple and reliable biomarkers for SS diagnosis. Given that cathepsin S activity is increased in the lacrimal glands and tears of NOD mice (a murine model of SS), we explored the clinical utility of using tear cathepsin S (CTSS) activity as a biomarker for SS. Methods A method to measure CTSS activity in tears eluted from Schirmer's strips was developed and validated. Schirmer's tests and CTSS activity measurements were performed on 278 female subjects, including patients with SS (n=73), rheumatoid arthritis (n=79), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=40), blepharitis (n=10), non-specific dry eye (n=31), or other autoimmune diseases (n=12), along with 33 healthy controls. Results Median tear CTSS activity in SS patients was 4.1-fold higher than in patients with non-SS autoimmune diseases, 2.1-fold higher than in patients with non-specific dry eye, and 41.1-fold higher than in healthy controls. Tear CTSS levels were equally elevated in primary and secondary SS independent of the Schirmer's strip values or of circulating anti-SSA or anti-SSB autoantibodies. Conclusion Markedly high levels of tear CTSS activity are suggestive of SS. CTSS activity in tears can be measured in a simple, quick, economical, and non-invasive fashion and may serve as a novel biomarker and indicator of autoimmune dacryoadenitis during the workup for SS. PMID:24644101

  18. Increased Plasma Cathepsin S at the Time of Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty is Associated with 6-Months’ Restenosis of the Femoropopliteal Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijovski Mojca Bozic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We tested the hypothesis that increased levels of cathepsin S and decreased levels of cystatin C in plasma at the time of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA are associated with the occurrence of 6-months’ restenosis of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA. Methods: 20 patients with restenosis and 24 matched patients with patent FPA after a 6-months follow-up were in - cluded in this study. They all exhibited disabling claudication or critical limb ischemia and had undergone technically successful PTA. They were all receiving statins and ACE in hi - bitors (or angiotensin II receptor antagonist before the PTA and the therapy did not change throughout the observational period. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein were < 10 mg/L and of creatinine within the reference range at the time of the PTA. Plasma concentration and activity of cathepsin S, together with its potent inhibitor cystatin C, were measured the day before and the day after the PTA. Results: The increased plasma concentration and activity of cathepsin S at the time of PTA was associated with the occurrence of 6-months’ restenosis of FPA, independently of established risk factors (lesion complexity, infrapopliteal run-off vessels, type of PTA, age, gender, smoking, diabetes, lipids and of cystatin C. Plasma cystatin C concentration was not associated with restenosis and did not correlate with cathepsin S activity and concentration in the plasma. Conclusion: Increased level of plasma cathepsin S at the time of PTA is associated with 6-months’ restenosis of PTA, independently of established risk factors.

  19. Generation of recombinant single-chain antibodies neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin, the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleckaityte, Milda; Mistiniene, Edita; Lasickiene, Rita; Zvirblis, Gintautas; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2011-11-03

    Gardnerella vaginalis is identified as the predominant colonist of the vaginal tract in women with bacterial vaginosis. Vaginolysin (VLY) is a protein toxin released by G. vaginalis. VLY possesses cytolytic activity and is considered as a main virulence factor of G. vaginalis. Inhibition of VLY-mediated cell lysis by antibodies may have important physiological relevance. Single-chain variable fragments of immunoglobulins (scFvs) were cloned from two hybridoma cell lines producing neutralizing antibodies against VLY and expressed as active proteins in E. coli. For each hybridoma, two variants of anti-VLY scFv consisting of either VL-VH or VH-VL linked with a 20 aa-long linker sequence (G₄S)₄ were constructed. Recovery of scFvs from inclusion bodies with subsequent purification by metal-chelate chromatography resulted in VLY-binding proteins that were predominantly monomeric. The antigen-binding activity of purified scFvs was verified by an indirect ELISA. The neutralizing activity was investigated by in vitro hemolytic assay and cytolytic assay using HeLa cell line. Calculated apparent Kd values and neutralizing potency of scFvs were in agreement with those of parental full-length antibodies. VH-VL and VL-VH variants of scFvs showed similar affinity and neutralizing potency. The anti-VLY scFvs derived from hybridoma clone 9B4 exhibited high VLY-neutralizing activity both on human erythrocytes and cervical epithelial HeLa cells. Hybridoma-derived scFvs with VLY-binding activity were expressed in E. coli. Recombinant anti-VLY scFvs inhibited VLY-mediated cell lysis. The monovalent scFvs showed reduced affinity and neutralizing potency as compared to the respective full-length antibodies. The loss of avidity could be restored by generating scFv constructs with multivalent binding properties. Generated scFvs is the first example of recombinant single-chain antibodies with VLY-neutralizing activity produced in prokaryote expression system. G. vaginalis caused

  20. Generation of recombinant single-chain antibodies neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin, the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleckaityte Milda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gardnerella vaginalis is identified as the predominant colonist of the vaginal tract in women with bacterial vaginosis. Vaginolysin (VLY is a protein toxin released by G. vaginalis. VLY possesses cytolytic activity and is considered as a main virulence factor of G. vaginalis. Inhibition of VLY-mediated cell lysis by antibodies may have important physiological relevance. Results Single-chain variable fragments of immunoglobulins (scFvs were cloned from two hybridoma cell lines producing neutralizing antibodies against VLY and expressed as active proteins in E. coli. For each hybridoma, two variants of anti-VLY scFv consisting of either VL-VH or VH-VL linked with a 20 aa-long linker sequence (G4S4 were constructed. Recovery of scFvs from inclusion bodies with subsequent purification by metal-chelate chromatography resulted in VLY-binding proteins that were predominantly monomeric. The antigen-binding activity of purified scFvs was verified by an indirect ELISA. The neutralizing activity was investigated by in vitro hemolytic assay and cytolytic assay using HeLa cell line. Calculated apparent Kd values and neutralizing potency of scFvs were in agreement with those of parental full-length antibodies. VH-VL and VL-VH variants of scFvs showed similar affinity and neutralizing potency. The anti-VLY scFvs derived from hybridoma clone 9B4 exhibited high VLY-neutralizing activity both on human erythrocytes and cervical epithelial HeLa cells. Conclusions Hybridoma-derived scFvs with VLY-binding activity were expressed in E. coli. Recombinant anti-VLY scFvs inhibited VLY-mediated cell lysis. The monovalent scFvs showed reduced affinity and neutralizing potency as compared to the respective full-length antibodies. The loss of avidity could be restored by generating scFv constructs with multivalent binding properties. Generated scFvs is the first example of recombinant single-chain antibodies with VLY-neutralizing activity produced in

  1. Evolution of grain structure and recombination active dislocations in extraordinary tall conventional and high performance multi-crystalline silicon ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trempa, M.; Kupka, I.; Kranert, C.; Lehmann, T.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.

    2017-02-01

    In this work one high performance multi-crystalline silicon ingot and one conventional multi-crystalline silicon ingot, each with an extraordinary ingot height of 710 mm, were replicated by the successive growth of eight G1 ingots to evaluate the potential advantage of extraordinary tall HPM ingots in industrial production. By analyzing different grain structure parameters like mean grain size, grain orientation and grain boundary type distribution as well as the recombination active dislocation area over the complete ingot height, it was observed that the material properties strongly differ in the initial state of growth for the two material types. However, at ingot heights above 350 mm, the difference has vanished and the grain structure properties for both materials appear similar. It is shown that the evolution of the grain structure in both material types can be explained by the same grain selection and grain boundary generation/annihilation mechanisms whereas the current grain structure determines which mechanisms are the most dominant at a specific ingot height. Since the grain structure directly influences the dislocation content in the silicon material, also the recombination active dislocation area becomes equal in high performance and conventional multi-crystalline silicon material at ingot heights above 350 mm. From these results it is concluded that the advantage of high performance silicon material is limited to the first grown 350 mm of the ingot.

  2. Deacetylase activity of histone deacetylase 3 is required for productive VDJ recombination and B-cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Kristy R.; Barnett, Kelly R.; Wang, Jing; Liu, Qi; Hodges, Emily; Hiebert, Scott W.; Bhaskara, Srividya

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is the catalytic component of NCoR/SMRT corepressor complexes that mediate the actions of transcription factors implicated in the regulation of B-cell development and function. We crossed Hdac3 conditional knockout mice with Mb1-Cre knockin animals to delete Hdac3 in early progenitor B cells. The spleens of Hdac3F/−Mb1-Cre+/− mice were virtually devoid of mature B cells, and B220+CD43+ B-cell progenitors accumulated within the bone marrow. Quantitative deep sequencing of the Ig heavy chain locus from B220+CD43+ populations identified a defect in VHDJH recombination with a severe reduction in productive rearrangements, which directly corresponded to the loss of pre-B cells from Hdac3Δ/− bone marrow. For Hdac3Δ/− B cells that did show productive VDJ rearrangement, there was significant skewing toward the incorporation of proximal VH gene segments and a corresponding reduction in distal VH gene segment use. Although transcriptional effects within these loci were modest, Hdac3Δ/− progenitor cells displayed global changes in chromatin structure that likely hindered effective distal V-DJ recombination. Reintroduction of wild-type Hdac3 restored normal B-cell development, whereas an Hdac3 point mutant lacking deacetylase activity failed to complement this defect. Thus, the deacetylase activity of Hdac3 is required for the generation of mature B cells. PMID:28739911

  3. In vitro reconstitution of antimicrobial pathogen activity by expressed recombinant bovine lactoferrin N-terminal peptide in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hongxia; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Fazheng; Guo, Huiyuan; Lin, Shaohua; Xu, Wentao

    2007-05-01

    Recombinant bovine lactoferrin N-terminal polypeptide (rbLF-N) Escherichia coli expression system was constructed and the rbLF-N antimicrobial activity was displayed by enzymatic proteolysis in this study. A 162 bp 5'-terminal fragment of bovine lactoferrin (bLF) gene from bovine liver gDNA was amplified by PCR. The DNA fragment containing exon-2 of the bLF gene was cloned into the expression vector pGEX-4T1 and the glutathione-S-transferase-rbLF-N (GST-rbLF-N) fusion protein was obtained by over-expression in Esch. coli BL21(DE3). After thrombin/pepsin digestion, the rbLF-N was released from the fusion protein. The recombinant peptide was separated and identified by SDS-PAGE, HPLC and LC-MS/MS analysis. A very strong anti-food-born microbial pathogen activity of the rbLF-N peptides was displayed through bio- and kinetic-assays in vitro. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the rbLF-N peptide for bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Esch. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were 11.7, 11.7, 11.7, 23.4 microg and 23.4, 11.7, 11.7, 46.4 microg, respectively. This study created a new route for exploring lactoferrin peptide application in food science.

  4. PROTECTIVE ACTIVITY STUDY OF A CANDIDATE VACCINE AGAINST ROTAVIRUS INFECTION BASED ON RECOMBINANT PROTEIN FliCVP6VP8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dukhovlinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus infection is among leading causes of severe diarrhea which often leads to severe dehydration, especially, in children under 5 years old. In Russia, the incidence of rotavirus infection is constantly increased, due to higher rates of actual rotavirus infection cases and improved diagnostics of the disease. Immunity to rotavirus is unstable, thus causing repeated infections intra vitam. Anti-infectious resistance in reconvalescents is explained by induction of specific IgM, IgG, and, notably, IgA antibodies. Due to absence of market drugs with direct action against rotavirus, a rational vaccination is considered the most effective way to control the disease. Currently available vaccines for prevention of rotavirus infection are based on live attenuated rotavirus strains, human and/or animal origin, which replicate in human gut. Their implementation may result into different complications. Meanwhile, usage of vaccines based on recombinant proteins is aimed to avoid risks associated with introduction of a complete virus into humans. In this paper, we studied protective activity of candidate vaccines against rotavirus.In this work we studied protective activity of a candidate vaccine against rotavirus infection based on recombinant FliCVP6VP8 protein which includes VP6 and VP8, as well as components of Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (FliC as an adjuvant. Different components are joined by flexible bridges. Efficiency of the candidate vaccine was studied in animal model using Balb/c mice. We have shown high level of protection which occurs when the candidate vaccine is administered twice intramuscularly. Complete protection of animals against mouse rotavirus EDC after intramuscular immunization with a candidate vaccine was associated with arising rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibodies in serum and intestine of immunized animals. The efficacy of candidate vaccine based on recombinant protein FliCVP6VP8 against rotavirus infection was

  5. Functional divergence among silkworm antimicrobial peptide paralogs by the activities of recombinant proteins and the induced expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanying Yang

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are small-molecule proteins that are usually encoded by multiple-gene families. They play crucial roles in the innate immune response, but reports on the functional divergence of antimicrobial peptide gene families are rare. In this study, 14 paralogs of antimicrobial peptides belonging to cecropin, moricin and gloverin families were recombinantly expressed in pET expression systems. By antimicrobial activity tests, peptides representing paralogs in the same family of cecropin and moricin families, displayed remarkable differences against 10 tested bacteria. The evolutionary rates were relatively fast in the two families, which presented obvious functional divergence among paralogs of each family. Four peptides of gloverin family had similar antimicrobial spectrum and activity against tested bacteria. The gloverin family showed similar antimicrobial function and slow evolutionary rates. By induced transcriptional activity, genes encoding active antimicrobial peptides were upregulated at obviously different levels when silkworm pupae were infected by three types of microbes. Association analysis of antimicrobial activities and induced transcriptional activities indicated that the antimicrobial activities might be positively correlated with induced transcriptional activities in the cecropin and moricin families. These results suggest that representative BmcecB6, BmcecD and Bmmor as the major effector genes have broad antimicrobial spectrum, strong antimicrobial activity and high microbe-induced expression among each family and maybe play crucial roles in eliminating microbial infection.

  6. Genetic Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, H. L. K.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the mechanisms of genetic recombination with particular emphasis on the study of the fungus Sordaria brevicollis. The study of recombination is facilitated by the use of mutants of this fungus in which the color of the ascospores is affected. (JR)

  7. Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined by immunofluorescence studies the distribution pattern of cathepsin L protein and determine the specific cell types synthesizing the enzyme in the brain of African giant rats (Cricetomysgambianus).Results showed that Cathepsin L protein was localized in various brain regions of the giant rats. In the ...

  8. Serum cathepsin H as a potential prognostic marker in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, A; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Cathepsin H is a lysosomal cysteine protease that may participate in tumor progression. In order to evaluate its potential as a prognostic marker, its protein levels were measured by ELISA in preoperative sera from 324 patients with colorectal cancer. The level of cathepsin H was significantly...

  9. Cathepsins B, L and cystatin C in cyst fluid of ovarian tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolwijck, E.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Thomas, C.M.G.; Span, P.N.; Krasovec, M.; Kos, J.; Sweep, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In cancer, an extracellular and membrane bound localization of cathepsins contribute to the invasion of tumor cells at the basement membrane. METHODS: This is the first study that explored levels of cathepsins B (CatB), L (CatL) and their inhibitor cystatin C (CysC) in the cystic fluid

  10. Synthesis and biochemical evaluation of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues as potent and selective inhibitors of cathepsin L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Erica N; Song, Jiangli; Kishore Kumar, G D

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of cathepsin L in a variety of tumors and its ability to promote cancer cell invasion and migration through degradation of the extracellular matrix suggest that cathepsin L is a promising biological target for the development of anti-metastatic agents. Based on encouraging results fr...

  11. Identification of Chalcones as Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L Inhibitors Using a Comprehensive Experimental and Computational Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Ferraro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased reports of human infections have led fasciolosis, a widespread disease of cattle and sheep caused by the liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, to be considered an emerging zoonotic disease. Chemotherapy is the main control measure available, and triclabendazole is the preferred drug since is effective against both juvenile and mature parasites. However, resistance to triclabendazole has been reported in several countries urging the search of new chemical entities and target molecules to control fluke infections.We searched a library of forty flavonoid derivatives for inhibitors of key stage specific Fasciola hepatica cysteine proteases (FhCL3 and FhCL1. Chalcones substituted with phenyl and naphtyl groups emerged as good cathepsin L inhibitors, interacting more frequently with two putative binding sites within the active site cleft of the enzymes. One of the compounds, C34, tightly bounds to juvenile specific FhCL3 with an IC50 of 5.6 μM. We demonstrated that C34 is a slow-reversible inhibitor that interacts with the Cys-His catalytic dyad and key S2 and S3 pocket residues, determinants of the substrate specificity of this family of cysteine proteases. Interestingly, C34 induces a reduction in NEJ ability to migrate through the gut wall and a loss of motility phenotype that leads to NEJ death within a week in vitro, while it is not cytotoxic to bovine cells.Up to date there are no reports of in vitro screening for non-peptidic inhibitors of Fasciola hepatica cathepsins, while in general these are considered as the best strategy for in vivo inhibition. We have identified chalcones as novel inhibitors of the two main Cathepsins secreted by juvenile and adult liver flukes. Interestingly, one compound (C34 is highly active towards the juvenile enzyme reducing larval ability to penetrate the gut wall and decreasing NEJ´s viability in vitro. These findings open new avenues for the development of novel agents to control

  12. Dissolution of emboli in rats with experimental cerebral thromboembolism by recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (TD-2061)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Ogawa, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Tomikawa, M. (Research Institute, Daiichi Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, (Japan))

    1990-08-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) is frequently administered clinically as thrombolytic therapy. We injected recombinant t-PA into rats with cerebral {sup 125}I-labeled blood clot emboli to evaluate the dissolutive effect of recombinant human single-chain t-PA (rt-PA; TD-2061) on such emboli and to examine the possibility of improving neurological damage in patients with cerebral thrombosis. When rt-PA was given intravenously at a dose of 350,000 IU/kg 2 minutes before embolization, radioactivity in the affected cerebral hemisphere decreased to 20% of that in the vehicle control 2 hours after embolization. A significant decrease in radioactivity in the cerebral hemisphere was also found on the administration of 700,000 IU/kg of rt-PA 30 or 60 minutes after embolization, but not when rt-PA was administered 2 minutes after embolization. Marked inhibition of abnormal behavior such as hemiplegia was seen on treatment with rt-PA 2 minutes before embolization, but not at all when rt-PA treatment was given 30 or 60 minutes after embolization. The findings suggest that rt-PA can dissolve blood clot emboli in cerebral vessels and that prompt thrombolytic therapy is important to minimize neurological dysfunction in cases of cerebral thromboembolism.

  13. The effect of cathepsin K deficiency on airway development and TGF-β1 degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saftig Paul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Cathepsin K, a cysteine protease predominantly expressed in osteoclasts, is a major drug target for the treatment of osteoporosis. Recent findings, however, indicate that cathepsin K is also involved in non-skeletal metabolism. The development of fibrotic phenotypes in lung and skin is a concern for cathepsin K inhibitors presently evaluated in clinical trials. Cathepsin K is expressed in lung tissue and has been implicated in lung fibrosis. However, little is known about the role of cathepsin K in airway development and its effect on TGF-β1 degradation. Methods We investigated the effects of cathepsin K-deficiency on alterations in airway integrity, extracellular matrix composition, and TGF-β1 expression and degradation. Lung homogenates of wild-type and cathepsin K-deficient mice were used to evaluate their contents of collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and TGF-β1. The accessibility of TGF-β1 to cathepsin K-mediated degradation was determined in vitro and lung fibroblast proliferations in wild-type and cathepsin K-deficient cells were evaluated. Results Lung airway cathepsin K expression in wild-type mice remained constant between 1 and 6 months of age and the airway integrity was maintained. In contrast, after 2 months of age, all Ctsk-/- mice demonstrated increased airway epithelium thickness by 16-28%, a lower structural airway integrity (1-2 score units lower, elevated cytokeratin expression of 12%, increased α-actin and vimentin expression by 50% and 70%, increased area of smooth muscle cells by 15%, elevated hydroxyproline and GAGs content by 20% and 25%, and increased TGF-β1 expression by 25%. TGF-β1 proved an efficient substrate of cathepsin K and TGF-β1 protein content in lung was increased by a potent cathepsin inhibitor. Lung fibroblasts from Ctsk-/- mice after TGF-β1 treatment showed increased proliferation rates, increased levels of TGF-β1 by 30%, and increased ECM secretion. Conclusion This study suggests that

  14. Study of the expression of cathepsins in histological material from pancreatic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Martínez

    Full Text Available Background and aims: To assess the expression levels of cathepsins in malignant and premalignant lesions. Methods: We retrospectively included patients who underwent pancreatic surgery on pancreatic solid or cystic masses. The expression of cathepsin H, L, B and S was determined in both types of samples. Lesions were divided into three categories: malignant (pancreatic adenocarcinoma and malignant mucinous neoplasms, premalignant (mucinous neoplasms and benign (other lesions. Results: Thirty-one surgical resection samples were studied. The expression of cathepsins was significantly higher in malignant lesions than in premalignant and benign lesions (H 75%, 27%, 37% p = 0.05; L 92%, 36%, 37% p = 0.011; B 83%, 36%, 62% p = 0.069; S 92%, 36%, 25% p = 0.004, respectively. Conclusions: Cathepsins are overexpressed in histological samples of malignant lesions compared to premalignant and benign lesions. However, the expression of cathepsins is similar in both premalignant and benign lesions.

  15. Microbial factories for recombinant pharmaceuticals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Domingo-Espín, Joan; Corchero, José Luis; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    ...-translational modifications, proteolytic instability, poor solubility and activation of cell stress responses, among others, they represent convenient and powerful tools for recombinant protein production...

  16. Expression of recombinant staphylokinase, a fibrin-specific plasminogen activator of bacterial origin, in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszberg, Aneta; Wiktorek-Smagur, Aneta; Hnatuszko-Konka, Katarzyna; Łuchniak, Piotr; Kononowicz, Andrzej K

    2012-03-01

    One of the most dynamically developing sectors of green biotechnology is molecular farming using transgenic plants as natural bioreactors for the large scale production of recombinant proteins with biopharmaceutical and therapeutic values. Such properties are characteristic of certain proteins of bacterial origin, including staphylokinase. For many years, work has been carried out on the use of this protein in thrombolytic therapy. In this study, transgenic Solanum tuberosum plants expressing a CaMV::sak-mgpf-gusA gene fusion, were obtained. AGL1 A. tumefaciens strain was used in the process of transformation. The presence of the staphylokinase gene was confirmed by PCR in 22.5% of the investigated plants. The expression of the fusion transgene was detected using the β-glucuronidase activity assay in 32 putative transgenic plants. Furthermore, on the basis of the GUS histochemical reaction, the transgene expression pattern had a strong, constitutive character in seven of the transformants. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a protein extract from the SAK/PCR-positive plants, revealed the presence of a119 kDa protein that corresponds to that of the fusion protein SAK-mGFP-GUSA. Western blot analysis, using an antibody against staphylokinase, showed the presence of the staphylokinase domain in the 119 kDa protein in six analyzed transformants. However, the enzymatic test revealed amidolytic activity characteristic of staphylokinase in the protein extract of only one plant. This is the first report on a Solanum tuberosum plant producing a recombinant staphylokinase protein, a plasminogen activator of bacterial origin.

  17. Recombinant Nox4 cytosolic domain produced by a cell or cell-free base systems exhibits constitutive diaphorase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong, E-mail: mvchuong@yahoo.fr [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Zhang, Leilei [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Lhomme, Stanislas; Mouz, Nicolas [PX' Therapeutics, MINATEC/Batiment de Haute Technologie, Grenoble (France); Lenormand, Jean-Luc [HumProTher Laboratory, TheReX/TIMC-IMAG UMR 5525 CNRS UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, UFR de Medecine, Domaine de la Merci, 38706 La Tronche (France); Lardy, Bernard; Morel, Francoise [GREPI AGIM FRE 3405 CNRS-UJF, Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A comparison of two bacterial cell and cell-free protein expression systems is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins are produced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nox4 has a constitutive diaphorase activity which is independent of cytosolic factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isoform Nox4B is unable to initiate the first electronic transfer step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of Nox4 oxidase activity. -- Abstract: The membrane protein NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase Nox4 constitutively generates reactive oxygen species differing from other NADPH oxidases activity, particularly in Nox2 which needs a stimulus to be active. Although the precise mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species by Nox2 is well characterized, the electronic transfer throughout Nox4 remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the initial electronic transfer step (diaphorase activity) of the cytosolic tail of Nox4. For this purpose, we developed two different approaches to produce soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins. We synthesized soluble recombinant proteins either by in vitro translation or by bacteria induction. While proteins obtained by bacteria induction demonstrate an activity of 4.4 {+-} 1.7 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 20.5 {+-} 2.8 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c, the soluble proteins produced by cell-free expression system exhibit a diaphorase activity with a turn-over of 26 {+-} 2.6 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 48 {+-} 20.2 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c. Furthermore, the activity of the soluble proteins is constitutive and does not need any stimulus. We also show that the cytosolic tail of the isoform Nox4B lacking the first NADPH binding site is unable to demonstrate any diaphorase activity pointing out the

  18. A modeling study of aldehyde inhibitors of human cathepsin K using partial least squares method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaei, M; Fassihi, A; Saghaie, L; Arkan, E; Pourhossein, A

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative relationships between molecular structure of forty eight aldehyde compounds with their known Cathepsin K inhibitory effects were discovered by partial least squares (PLS) method. Evaluation of a test set of 10 compounds with the developed PLS model revealed that this model is reliable with a good predictability. Since the QSAR study was performed on the basis of theoretical descriptors calculated completely from the molecular structures, the proposed model could potentially provide useful information about the activity of the studied compounds. Various tests and criteria such as leave-one-out cross validation, leave-many-out cross validation, and also criteria suggested by Tropsha were employed to examine the predictability and robustness of the developed model.

  19. A modeling study of aldehyde inhibitors of human cathepsin K using partial least squares method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaei, M.; Fassihi, A.; Saghaie, L.; Arkan, E.; Pourhossein, A.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative relationships between molecular structure of forty eight aldehyde compounds with their known Cathepsin K inhibitory effects were discovered by partial least squares (PLS) method. Evaluation of a test set of 10 compounds with the developed PLS model revealed that this model is reliable with a good predictability. Since the QSAR study was performed on the basis of theoretical descriptors calculated completely from the molecular structures, the proposed model could potentially provide useful information about the activity of the studied compounds. Various tests and criteria such as leave-one-out cross validation, leave-many-out cross validation, and also criteria suggested by Tropsha were employed to examine the predictability and robustness of the developed model. PMID:22224089

  20. Purification of active human plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 from Escherichia coli. Comparison with natural and recombinant forms purified from eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, D; Strandberg, L; Grundström, T; Ny, T

    1989-12-22

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) inhibits both tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and, therefore, is an important regulator of plasminogen activation. We have developed eucaryotic and procaryotic expression systems for PAI-1 and characterized the recombinant glycosylated and non-glycosylated products, together with a non-recombinant natural control, produced in the histosarcoma cell line HT 1080. For eucaryotic expression, the PAI-1 cDNA was stably transfected into chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO cells), while procaryotic expression in Escherichia coli was examined after inserting the DNA sequence encoding the mature PAI-1 protein into an inducible expression vector. Recombinant PAI-1 from CHO cells was purified approximately 50-fold in two steps and was indistinguishable from natural PAI-1. Between 3% and 4% of total cellular protein in the procaryotic expression system consisted of PAI-1, from which it was purified approximately 30-fold, with yields of between 15% and 20%. This PAI-1 formed 1:1 complexes with uPA and also with the single- and two-chain forms of tPA. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the procaryote-produced PAI-1 had an inhibitory activity towards all three forms of PA that resembled that of natural PAI-1 with association rate constants of approximately 10(7) M-1 s-1. In contrast to PAI-1 from eucaryotic cells, the PAI-1 from E. coli had an inherent activity equal to that of guanidine/HCl-activated natural PAI-1. The activity could not be increased by treatment with denaturants suggesting that the latent form of PAI-1 was absent. However, at 37 degrees C the procaryote-produced PAI-1 lost activity at the same rate as natural PAI-1, with approximately 50% of the activity remaining after 3 h. This activity could be partially restored by treatment with 4 M guanidine/HCl. E. coli-derived PAI-1, added to human plasma and fractionated by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography, eluted in two peaks

  1. Application of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray microprobe techniques for the analysis of recombination activity of metals precipitated at Si/SiGe misfit dislocations

    CERN Document Server

    Vyvenko, O F; Istratov, A A; Weber, E R; Kittler, M; Seifert, W

    2002-01-01

    In this study we report application of synchrotron-radiation-based x-ray microprobe techniques (the x-ray-beam-induced current (XBIC) and x-ray fluorescence (mu-XRF) methods) to the analysis of the recombination activity and space distribution of copper and iron in the vicinity of dislocations in silicon/silicon-germanium structures. A combination of these two techniques enables one to study the chemical nature of the defects and impurities and their recombination activity in situ and to map metal clusters with a micron-scale resolution. XRF analysis revealed that copper formed clearly distinguishable precipitates along the misfit dislocations. A proportional dependence between the XBIC contrast and the number of copper atoms in the precipitates was established. In hydrogen-passivated iron-contaminated samples we observed clusters of iron precipitates which had no recombination activity detectable by the XBIC technique as well as iron clusters which were not completely passivated.

  2. Recombinant jacalin-like plant lectins are produced at high levels in Nicotiana benthamiana and retain agglutination activity and sugar specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-del-Carmen, Asun; Juárez, Paloma; Presa, Silvia; Granell, Antonio; Orzáez, Diego

    2013-02-20

    The plant kingdom is an underexplored source of valuable proteins which, like plant lectins, display unique interacting specificities. Furthermore, plant protein diversity remains under-exploited due to the low availability and heterogeneity of native sources. All these hurdles could be overcome with recombinant production. A narrow phylogenetic gap between the native source and the recombinant platform is likely to facilitate proper protein processing and stability; therefore, the plant cell chassis should be specially suited for the recombinant production of many plant native proteins. This is illustrated herein with the recombinant production of two representatives of the plant jacalin-related lectin (JRLs) protein family in Nicotiana benthamiana using state-of-the-art magnICON technology. Mannose-specific Banlec JRL was produced at very high levels in leaves, reaching 1.0mg of purified protein per gram of fresh weight and showing strong agglutination activity. Galactose-specific jacalin JRL, with its complicated processing requirements, was also successfully produced in N. benthamiana at levels of 0.25 mg of purified protein per gram of fresh weight. Recombinant Jacalin (rJacalin) proved efficient in the purification of human IgA1, and was able to discriminate between plant-made and native IgA1 due to their differential glycosylation status. Together, these results show that the plant cell factory should be considered a primary option in the recombinant production of valuable plant proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) activity upon recombinant expression and purification of human telomerase in a bacterial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Debra T; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Larson, Amy C; Hansen, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase biogenesis is a highly regulated process that solves the DNA end-replication problem. Recombinant expression has so far been accomplished only within a eukaryotic background. Towards structural and functional analyses, we developed bacterial expression of human telomerase. Positive activity by the telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) was identified in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a sequence-optimized hTERT gene, the full-length hTR RNA with a self-splicing hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, and the human heat shock complex of Hsp90, Hsp70, p60/Hop, Hsp40, and p23. The Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin did not affect post-assembly TRAP activity. By various purification methods, TRAP activity was also obtained upon expression of only hTERT and hTR. hTERT was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry in a ∼120 kDa SDS-PAGE fragment from a TRAP-positive purification fraction. TRAP activity was also supported by hTR constructs lacking the box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA domain. End-point TRAP indicated expression levels within 3-fold of that from HeLa carcinoma cells, which is several orders of magnitude below detection by the direct assay. These results represent the first report of TRAP activity from a bacterium and provide a facile system for the investigation of assembly factors and anti-cancer therapeutics independently of a eukaryotic setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping and Quantitation of the Interaction between the Recombination Activating Gene Proteins RAG1 and RAG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Hang; Shetty, Keerthi; Surleac, Marius D; Petrescu, Andrei J; Schatz, David G

    2015-05-08

    The RAG endonuclease consists of RAG1, which contains the active site for DNA cleavage, and RAG2, an accessory factor whose interaction with RAG1 is critical for catalytic function. How RAG2 activates RAG1 is not understood. Here, we used biolayer interferometry and pulldown assays to identify regions of RAG1 necessary for interaction with RAG2 and to measure the RAG1-RAG2 binding affinity (KD ∼0.4 μM) (where RAG1 and RAG2 are recombination activating genes 1 or 2). Using the Hermes transposase as a guide, we constructed a 36-kDa "mini" RAG1 capable of interacting robustly with RAG2. Mini-RAG1 consists primarily of the catalytic center and the residues N-terminal to it, but it lacks a zinc finger region in RAG1 previously implicated in binding RAG2. The ability of Mini-RAG1 to interact with RAG2 depends on a predicted α-helix (amino acids 997-1008) near the RAG1 C terminus and a region of RAG1 from amino acids 479 to 559. Two adjacent acidic amino acids in this region (Asp-546 and Glu-547) are important for both the RAG1-RAG2 interaction and recombination activity, with Asp-546 of particular importance. Structural modeling of Mini-RAG1 suggests that Asp-546/Glu-547 lie near the predicted 997-1008 α-helix and components of the active site, raising the possibility that RAG2 binding alters the structure of the RAG1 active site. Quantitative Western blotting allowed us to estimate that mouse thymocytes contain on average ∼1,800 monomers of RAG1 and ∼15,000 molecules of RAG2, implying that nuclear concentrations of RAG1 and RAG2 are below the KD value for their interaction, which could help limit off-target RAG activity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. EFFECT OF RECOMBINANT TISSUE-PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR ON INTRAABDOMINAL ABSCESS FORMATION IN RATS WITH GENERALIZED PERITONITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; de Graaf, JS; Kooi, K; Sluiter, WJ; Bom, VJJ; van der Meer, J; Bleichrodt, RP

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During generalized peritonitis, intraabdominal fibrin deposition is stimulated whereas fibrinolytic activity is reduced, which predisposes intra-abdominal abscess formation. We investigated the effects of increasing the intra-abdominal fibrinolytic activity on abscess formation by

  6. Highly Attenuated Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus VSV-12′GFP Displays Immunogenic and Oncolytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John N.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown considerable promise both as an immunization vector and as an oncolytic virus. In both applications, an important concern is the safety profile of the virus. To generate a highly attenuated virus, we added two reporter genes to the 3′ end of the VSV genome, thereby shifting the NPMGL genes from positions 1 to 5 to positions 3 to 7. The resulting virus (VSV-12′GFP) was highly attenuated, generating smaller plaques than four other attenuated VSVs. In one-step growth curves, VSV-12′GFP displayed the slowest growth kinetics. The mechanism of attenuation appears to be due to reduced expression of VSV genes downstream of the reporter genes, as suggested by a 10.4-fold reduction in L-protein RNA transcript. Although attenuated, VSV-12′GFP was highly effective at generating an immune response, indicated by a high-titer antibody response against the green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed by the virus. Although VSV-12′GFP was more attenuated than other VSVs on both normal and cancer cells, it nonetheless showed a greater level of infection of human cancer cells (glioma and melanoma) than of normal cells, and this effect was magnified in glioma by interferon application, indicating selective oncolysis. Intravenous VSV-12′GFP selectively infected human gliomas implanted into SCID mice subcutaneously or intracranially. All postnatal day 16 mice given intranasal VSV-12′GFP survived, whereas only 10% of those given VSV-G/GFP survived, indicating reduced neurotoxicity. Intratumoral injection of tumors with VSV-12′GFP dramatically suppressed tumor growth and enhanced survival. Together these data suggest this recombinant virus merits further study for its oncolytic and vaccine potential. PMID:23135719

  7. Highly attenuated recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus VSV-12'GFP displays immunogenic and oncolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, Anthony N; Davis, John N

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown considerable promise both as an immunization vector and as an oncolytic virus. In both applications, an important concern is the safety profile of the virus. To generate a highly attenuated virus, we added two reporter genes to the 3' end of the VSV genome, thereby shifting the NPMGL genes from positions 1 to 5 to positions 3 to 7. The resulting virus (VSV-12'GFP) was highly attenuated, generating smaller plaques than four other attenuated VSVs. In one-step growth curves, VSV-12'GFP displayed the slowest growth kinetics. The mechanism of attenuation appears to be due to reduced expression of VSV genes downstream of the reporter genes, as suggested by a 10.4-fold reduction in L-protein RNA transcript. Although attenuated, VSV-12'GFP was highly effective at generating an immune response, indicated by a high-titer antibody response against the green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed by the virus. Although VSV-12'GFP was more attenuated than other VSVs on both normal and cancer cells, it nonetheless showed a greater level of infection of human cancer cells (glioma and melanoma) than of normal cells, and this effect was magnified in glioma by interferon application, indicating selective oncolysis. Intravenous VSV-12'GFP selectively infected human gliomas implanted into SCID mice subcutaneously or intracranially. All postnatal day 16 mice given intranasal VSV-12'GFP survived, whereas only 10% of those given VSV-G/GFP survived, indicating reduced neurotoxicity. Intratumoral injection of tumors with VSV-12'GFP dramatically suppressed tumor growth and enhanced survival. Together these data suggest this recombinant virus merits further study for its oncolytic and vaccine potential.

  8. DNA glycosylase activity and cell proliferation are key factors in modulating homologous recombination in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Roytman, Megan D; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Samson, Leona D; Engelward, Bevin P

    2014-11-01

    Cancer susceptibility varies between people, affected by genotoxic exposures, genetic makeup and physiological state. Yet, how these factors interact among each other to define cancer risk is largely unknown. Here, we uncover the interactive effects of genetical, environmental and physiological factors on genome rearrangements driven by homologous recombination (HR). Using FYDR mice to quantify HR-driven rearrangements in pancreas tissue, we show that DNA methylation damage (induced by methylnitrosourea) and cell proliferation (induced by thyroid hormone) each induce HR and together act synergistically to induce HR-driven rearrangements in vivo. These results imply that developmental or regenerative proliferation as well as mitogenic exposures may sensitize tissues to DNA damaging exposures. We exploited mice genetically deficient in alkyl-adenine DNA glycosylase (Aag) to analyse the relative contributions of unrepaired DNA base lesions versus intermediates formed during base excision repair (BER). Remarkably, results show that, in the pancreas, Aag is a major driver of spontaneous HR, indicating that BER intermediates (including abasic sites and single strand breaks) are more recombinogenic than the spontaneous base lesions removed by Aag. Given that mammals have about a dozen DNA glycosylases, these results point to BER as a major source of pressure on the HR pathway in vivo. Taken together, methylation damage, cell proliferation and Aag interact to define the risk of HR-driven sequence rearrangements in vivo. These data identify important sources of sequence changes in a cancer-relevant organ, and advance the effort to identify populations at high-risk for cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Recombination monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-03

    This is a brief report on LEReC recombination monitor design considerations. The recombination produced Au78+ ion rate is reviewed. Based on this two designs are discussed. One is to use the large dispersion lattice. It is shown that even with the large separation of the Au78+ beam from the Au79+ beam, the continued monitoring of the recombination is not possible. Accumulation of Au78+ ions is needed, plus collimation of the Au79+ beam. In another design, it is shown that the recombination monitor can be built based on the proposed scheme with the nominal lattice. From machine operation point of view, this design is preferable. Finally, possible studies and the alternative strategies with the basic goal of the monitor are discussed.

  10. Scalable Production of Recombinant Membrane Active Peptides and Its Potential as a Complementary Adjunct to Conventional Chemotherapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussin A Rothan

    Full Text Available The production of short anticancer peptides in recombinant form is an alternative method for costly chemical manufacturing. However, the limitations of host toxicity, bioactivity and column purification have impaired production in mass quantities. In this study, short cationic peptides were produced in aggregated inclusion bodies by double fusion with a central protein that has anti-cancer activity. The anticancer peptides Tachiplicin I (TACH and Latarcin 1 (LATA were fused with the N- and C-terminus of the MAP30 protein, respectively. We successfully produced the recombinant TACH-MAP30-LATA protein and MAP30 alone in E. coli that represented 59% and 68% of the inclusion bodies. The purified form of the inclusion bodies was prepared by eliminating host cell proteins through multiple washing steps and semi-solubilization in alkaline buffer. The purified active protein was recovered by inclusive solubilization at pH 12.5 in the presence of 2 M urea and refolded in alkaline buffer containing oxides and reduced glutathione. The peptide-fusion protein showed lower CC50 values against cancer cells (HepG2, 0.35±0.1 μM and MCF-7, 0.58±0.1 μM compared with normal cells (WRL68, 1.83±0.2 μM and ARPE19, 2.5±0.1 μM with outstanding activity compared with its individual components. The presence of the short peptides facilitated the entry of the peptide fusion protein into cancer cells (1.8 to 2.2-fold compared with MAP30 alone through direct interaction with the cell membrane. The cancer chemotherapy agent doxorubicin showed higher efficiency and selectivity against cancer cells in combination with the peptide- fusion protein. This study provides new data on the mass production of short anticancer peptides as inclusion bodies in E. coli by fusion with a central protein that has similar activity. The product was biologically active against cancer cells compared with normal cells and enhanced the activity and selective delivery of an anticancer

  11. Scalable Production of Recombinant Membrane Active Peptides and Its Potential as a Complementary Adjunct to Conventional Chemotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothan, Hussin A; Ambikabothy, Jamunaa; Abdulrahman, Ammar Y; Bahrani, Hirbod; Golpich, Mojtaba; Amini, Elham; A Rahman, Noorsaadah; Teoh, Teow Chong; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Yusof, Rohana

    2015-01-01

    The production of short anticancer peptides in recombinant form is an alternative method for costly chemical manufacturing. However, the limitations of host toxicity, bioactivity and column purification have impaired production in mass quantities. In this study, short cationic peptides were produced in aggregated inclusion bodies by double fusion with a central protein that has anti-cancer activity. The anticancer peptides Tachiplicin I (TACH) and Latarcin 1 (LATA) were fused with the N- and C-terminus of the MAP30 protein, respectively. We successfully produced the recombinant TACH-MAP30-LATA protein and MAP30 alone in E. coli that represented 59% and 68% of the inclusion bodies. The purified form of the inclusion bodies was prepared by eliminating host cell proteins through multiple washing steps and semi-solubilization in alkaline buffer. The purified active protein was recovered by inclusive solubilization at pH 12.5 in the presence of 2 M urea and refolded in alkaline buffer containing oxides and reduced glutathione. The peptide-fusion protein showed lower CC50 values against cancer cells (HepG2, 0.35±0.1 μM and MCF-7, 0.58±0.1 μM) compared with normal cells (WRL68, 1.83±0.2 μM and ARPE19, 2.5±0.1 μM) with outstanding activity compared with its individual components. The presence of the short peptides facilitated the entry of the peptide fusion protein into cancer cells (1.8 to 2.2-fold) compared with MAP30 alone through direct interaction with the cell membrane. The cancer chemotherapy agent doxorubicin showed higher efficiency and selectivity against cancer cells in combination with the peptide- fusion protein. This study provides new data on the mass production of short anticancer peptides as inclusion bodies in E. coli by fusion with a central protein that has similar activity. The product was biologically active against cancer cells compared with normal cells and enhanced the activity and selective delivery of an anticancer chemotherapy agent.

  12. Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxian; Wu, Wenzhong; Henkelmann, Bernhard; You, Li; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, PAHs and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

  13. Continuous treatment with recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis CFP-10-ESAT-6 protein activated human monocyte while deactivated LPS-stimulated macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yonghong; Yang, Xin; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yaoting; Su, Bo; Ding, Yuansheng; Qin, Lianhua; Yang, Hua; Zheng, Ruijuan; Hu, Zhongyi

    2008-01-18

    Influence of the recombinant culture filtered protein 10 (CFP-10) and early-secreted antigenic target 6kDa protein (ESAT-6) (r-CFP-10-ESAT-6, rCE) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) on human monocyte and macrophage activation was investigated using human monocyte, monocyte like THP-1 cell line and monocyte derived macrophage (MDM). rCE solely enhanced TNF-alpha release from human monocytes and THP-1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. rCE enhanced expression of CD80 and CD40, it also synergized with IFN-gamma in induction of TNF-alpha production and HLA-DR expression. Pharmacological agents that selectively inhibit mitogen activated protein kinase activation markedly suppressed rCE-induced TNF- alpha release. However, continuous presence of rCE (>72h) during monocyte to macrophage differentiation inhibited macrophage response to LPS stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that rCE might have differential influence on monocyte and macrophage activation, which might be correlated with Mtb immune evasion.

  14. Overexpression of cathepsin K during silica-induced lung fibrosis and control by TGF-β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lison Dominique

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung fibrosis is characterized by tissue remodeling resulting from an imbalance between synthesis and degradation of extracellular organic matrices. To examine whether cathepsin(s (Cat are important in the development of pulmonary fibrosis, we assessed the expression of four Cat known for their collagenolytic activity in a model of silica-induced lung fibrosis. Methods Different strains of mice were transorally instilled with 2.5 mg crystalline silica or other particles. Cat expression (Cat K, S, L and B was quantified in lung tissue and isolated pulmonary cells by quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro, we assessed the effect of different cytokines, involved in lung inflammatory and fibrotic responses, on the expression of Cat K by alveolar macrophages and fibroblasts. Results In lung tissue, Cat K transcript was the most strongly upregulated in response to silica, and this upregulation was intimately related to the fibrotic process. In mouse strains known for their differential response to silica, we showed that the level of Cat K expression following silica treatment was inversely related to the level of TGF-β expression and the susceptibility of these strains to develop fibrosis. Pulmonary macrophages and fibroblasts were identified as Cat K overproducing cells in the lung of silicotic mice. In vitro, Cat K was downregulated in mouse and human lung fibroblasts by the profibrotic growth factor TGF-β1. Conclusion Altogether, these data suggest that while Cat K may contribute to control lung fibrosis, TGF-β appears to limit its overexpression in response to silica particles.

  15. Corrected and Republished from: BCL11A is a critical component of a transcriptional network that activates RAG expression and VDJ recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Baeck-Seung; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Sleckman, Barry P; Shaffer, Arthur L; Ippolito, Gregory C; Tucker, Haley O; Dekker, Joseph D

    2017-10-16

    Recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 are critical enzymes for initiating variable-diversity-joining (VDJ) segment recombination, an essential process for antigen receptor expression and lymphocyte development. The BCL11A transcription factor is required for B cell and Plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) development, but its molecular function(s) in early B cell fate specification and commitment are unknown. We show here that the major B cell isoform, BCL11A-XL, binds directly to the RAG1 promoter as well as directly to regulatory regions of transcription factors previously implicated in both B cell and pDC development to activate RAG1 and RAG2 transcription in pro- and pre-B cells. We employ BCL11A over-expression with recombination substrates to demonstrate direct consequences of BCL11A/RAG modulation on V(D)J recombination. We conclude that BCL11A is a critical component of a transcriptional network that regulates B cell fate by controlling V(D)J recombination. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Antiviral cationic peptides as a strategy for innovation in global health therapeutics for dengue virus: high yield production of the biologically active recombinant plectasin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothan, Hussin A; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Suhaeb, Abdulrazzaq M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2013-11-01

    Dengue virus infects millions of people worldwide, and there is no vaccine or anti-dengue therapeutic available. Antimicrobial peptides have been shown to possess effective antiviral activity against various viruses. One of the main limitations of developing these peptides as potent antiviral drugs is the high cost of production. In this study, high yield production of biologically active plectasin peptide was inexpensively achieved by producing tandem plectasin peptides as inclusion bodies in E. coli. Antiviral activity of the recombinant peptide towards dengue serotype-2 NS2B-NS3 protease (DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro) was assessed as a target to inhibit dengue virus replication in Vero cells. Single units of recombinant plectasin were collected after applying consecutive steps of refolding, cleaving by Factor Xa, and nickel column purification to obtain recombinant proteins of high purity. The maximal nontoxic dose (MNTD) of the recombinant peptide against Vero cells was 20 μM (100 μg/mL). The reaction velocity of DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro decreased significantly after increasing concentrations of recombinant plectasin were applied to the reaction mixture. Plectasin peptide noncompetitively inhibited DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro at Ki value of 5.03 ± 0.98 μM. The percentage of viral inhibition was more than 80% at the MNTD value of plectasin. In this study, biologically active recombinant plectasin which was able to inhibit dengue protease and viral replication in Vero cells was successfully produced in E. coli in a time- and cost- effective method. These findings are potentially important in the development of potent therapeutics against dengue infection.

  17. Biologically active recombinant human erythropoietin expressed in hairy root cultures and regenerated plantlets of Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Poornima Devi; Schäfer, Holger; Ramamoorthy, Siva; Wink, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Hairy root culture is a potential alternative to conventional mammalian cell culture to produce recombinant proteins due to its ease in protein recovery, low costs and absence of potentially human pathogenic contaminants. The current study focussed to develop a new platform of a hairy root culture system from Nicotiana tabacum for the production of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO), which is regularly produced in mammalian cells. The human EPO construct was amplified with C-terminal hexahistidine tag from a cDNA of Caco-2 cells. Two versions of rhEPO clones, with or without the N-terminal calreticulin (cal) fusion sequence, were produced by cloning the amplified construct into gateway binary vector pK7WG2D. Following Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation of tobacco explants; integration and expression of constructs in hairy roots were confirmed by several tests at DNA, RNA and protein levels. The amount of intracellular rhEPO from hairy root cultures with cal signal peptide was measured up to 66.75 ng g-1 of total soluble protein. The presence of the ER signal peptide (cal) was essential for the secretion of rhEPO into the spent medium; no protein was detected from hairy root cultures without ER signal peptide. The addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone enhanced the stabilization of secreted rhEPO leading to a 5.6 fold increase to a maximum concentration of 185.48 pg rhEPOHR g-1 FW hairy root cultures. The rhizo-secreted rhEPO was separated by HPLC and its biological activity was confirmed by testing distinct parameters for proliferation and survival in retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE). In addition, the rhEPO was detected to an amount 14.8 ng g-1 of total soluble leaf protein in transgenic T0 generation plantlets regenerated from hairy root cultures with cal signal peptide.

  18. Biologically active recombinant human erythropoietin expressed in hairy root cultures and regenerated plantlets of Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima Devi Gurusamy

    Full Text Available Hairy root culture is a potential alternative to conventional mammalian cell culture to produce recombinant proteins due to its ease in protein recovery, low costs and absence of potentially human pathogenic contaminants. The current study focussed to develop a new platform of a hairy root culture system from Nicotiana tabacum for the production of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO, which is regularly produced in mammalian cells. The human EPO construct was amplified with C-terminal hexahistidine tag from a cDNA of Caco-2 cells. Two versions of rhEPO clones, with or without the N-terminal calreticulin (cal fusion sequence, were produced by cloning the amplified construct into gateway binary vector pK7WG2D. Following Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation of tobacco explants; integration and expression of constructs in hairy roots were confirmed by several tests at DNA, RNA and protein levels. The amount of intracellular rhEPO from hairy root cultures with cal signal peptide was measured up to 66.75 ng g-1 of total soluble protein. The presence of the ER signal peptide (cal was essential for the secretion of rhEPO into the spent medium; no protein was detected from hairy root cultures without ER signal peptide. The addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone enhanced the stabilization of secreted rhEPO leading to a 5.6 fold increase to a maximum concentration of 185.48 pg rhEPOHR g-1 FW hairy root cultures. The rhizo-secreted rhEPO was separated by HPLC and its biological activity was confirmed by testing distinct parameters for proliferation and survival in retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE. In addition, the rhEPO was detected to an amount 14.8 ng g-1 of total soluble leaf protein in transgenic T0 generation plantlets regenerated from hairy root cultures with cal signal peptide.

  19. Recombinant ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73 has long lasting antinociceptive effects that are dependent on adenosine A1 receptor activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zylka Mark J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, also known as CD73 hydrolyzes extracellular adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP to adenosine in nociceptive circuits. Since adenosine has antinociceptive effects in rodents and humans, we hypothesized that NT5E, an enzyme that generates adenosine, might also have antinociceptive effects in vivo. Results To test this hypothesis, we purified a soluble version of mouse NT5E (mNT5E using the baculovirus expression system. Recombinant mNT5E hydrolyzed AMP in biochemical assays and was inhibited by α,β-methylene-adenosine 5'-diphosphate (α,β-me-ADP; IC50 = 0.43 μM, a selective inhibitor of NT5E. mNT5E exhibited a dose-dependent thermal antinociceptive effect that lasted for two days when injected intrathecally in wild-type mice. In addition, mNT5E had thermal antihyperalgesic and mechanical antiallodynic effects that lasted for two days in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA model of inflammatory pain and the spared nerve injury (SNI model of neuropathic pain. In contrast, mNT5E had no antinociceptive effects when injected intrathecally into adenosine A1 receptor (A1R, Adora1 knockout mice. Conclusion Our data indicate that the long lasting antinociceptive effects of mNT5E are due to hydrolysis of AMP followed by activation of A1R. Moreover, our data suggest recombinant NT5E could be used to treat chronic pain and to study many other physiological processes that are regulated by NT5E.

  20. The Ketogenic Diet Suppresses the Cathepsin E Expression Induced by Kainic Acid in the Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Hojeong; Kim, Yoon-Kyoung; Park, Sang-Kyu; Kang, Dong-Won

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The ketogenic diet has long been used to treat epilepsy, but its mechanism is not yet clearly understood. To explore the potential mechanism, we analyzed the changes in gene expression induced by the ketogenic diet in the rat kainic acid (KA) epilepsy model. Materials and Methods KA-administered rats were fed the ketogenic diet or a normal diet for 4 weeks, and microarray analysis was performed with their brain tissues. The effects of the ketogenic diet on cathepsin E messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression were analyzed in KA-administered and normal saline-administered groups with semi-quantitative and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Brain tissues were dissected into 8 regions to compare differential effects of the ketogenic diet on cathepsin E mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry with an anti-cathepsin E antibody was performed on slides of hippocampus obtained from whole brain paraffin blocks. Results The microarray data and subsequent RT-PCR experiments showed that KA increased the mRNA expression of cathepsin E, known to be related to neuronal cell death, in most brain areas except the brain stem, and these increases of cathepsin E mRNA expression were suppressed by the ketogenic diet. The expression of cathepsin E mRNA in the control group, however, was not significantly affected by the ketogenic diet. The change in cathepsin E mRNA expression was greatest in the hippocampus. The protein level of cathepsin E in the hippocampus of KA-administered rat was elevated in immunohistochemistry and the ketogenic diet suppressed this increase. Conclusion Our results showed that KA administration increased cathepsin E expression in the rat brain and its increase was suppressed by the ketogenic diet. PMID:20635438

  1. Involvement of a cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinase in platelet aggregation induced by tumor cells and their shed membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, P G; Sloane, B F; Bajkowski, A S; Gasic, G J; Gasic, T B; Honn, K V

    1983-01-01

    Murine 15091A mammary adenocarcinoma cells and membrane vesicles spontaneously shed from these tumor cells in culture can induce aggregation of washed human platelets. A spectrum of proteinase inhibitors was tested for their ability to inhibit 15091A induced platelet aggregation. Of the inhibitors tested the most effective were those selective for cysteine proteinases. The effect of the spectrum of proteinase inhibitors on 15091A induced platelet aggregation was compared to the effect on cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinase activity in homogenates of 15091A tumor cells and their spontaneously shed vesicles. The results suggest that there is a correlation between activity of a cathepsin B-like proteinase in 15091A cells and vesicles and the ability of these cells and vesicles to induce aggregation of washed human platelets.

  2. [Antiviral activity of recombinant interferon-alpha-2b in combination with certain antioxidant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, A N; Deriabin, P G; Galegov, G A

    2011-01-01

    In vitro activity of interferon-alpha-2b in combination with various antioxidants against the influenza virus and Herpes simplex was studied. The standard strains and a clinical strain of Herpes simplex isolated from a patient with resistance to acyclovir were used. The in vitro studie showed that antioxidants, such as alpho-tocoferol acetate (vitamin E), Unithiol and ascorbic acid had a significant antiinfluenzae and antiherpetic action on the influenza virus A/H5N1 and Herpes simplex variants. They protected up to 100% of the cell monolayer from the virus cytopathic effect. The taurin solutions had no antiviral activity irrespective of the infection dose. Combinations of interferon-alpha-2b with alpha-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E), Unithiol or ascorbic acid showed a significant synergistic effect: the antiviral activity of interferon increased several times. The antiinfluenza activity of interferon-a-2b in the presence of various concentrations of taurin did not change.

  3. Endogenous and recombinant type I interferons and disease activity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Krakauer, Martin; Limborg, Signe

    2012-01-01

    Although treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) with the type I interferon (IFN) IFN-ß lowers disease activity, the role of endogenous type I IFN in MS remains controversial. We studied CD4+ T cells and CD4+ T cell subsets, monocytes and dendritic cells by flow cytometry and analysed the relationship......, the effects of IFN-ß treatment and endogenous type I IFN activity on VLA-4 expression are similar and associated with control of disease activity. However, immune-activating effects of treatment with IFN-ß may counteract the beneficial effects of treatment and cause an insufficient response to therapy.......), and this effect was associated with less MRI disease activity. IFN-ß therapy reduced CD49d expression on CD4+CD26(high) T cells, and the percentage of CD4+CD26(high) T cells that were CD49d(high) correlated with clinical and MRI disease activity in patients treated with IFN-ß. Treatment with IFN-ß also increased...

  4. Casein kinase 1delta activates human recombinant deoxycytidine kinase by Ser-74 phosphorylation, but is not involved in the in vivo regulation of its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smal, Caroline; Vertommen, Didier; Amsailale, Rachid; Arts, Angélique; Degand, Hervé; Morsomme, Pierre; Rider, Mark H; Neste, Eric Van Den; Bontemps, Françoise

    2010-10-01

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a key enzyme in the salvage of deoxynucleosides and in the activation of several anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. We recently showed that dCK was activated in vivo by phosphorylation of Ser-74. However, the protein kinase responsible was not identified. Ser-74 is located downstream a Glu-rich region, presenting similarity with the consensus phosphorylation motif of casein kinase 1 (CKI), and particularly of CKI delta. We showed that recombinant CKI delta phosphorylated several residues of bacterially overexpressed dCK: Ser-74, but also Ser-11, Ser-15, and Thr-72. Phosphorylation of dCK by CKI delta correlated with increased activity reaching at least 4-fold. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that only Ser-74 phosphorylation was involved in dCK activation by CKI delta, strengthening the key role of this residue in the control of dCK activity. However, neither CKI delta inhibitors nor CKI delta siRNA-mediated knock-down modified Ser-74 phosphorylation or dCK activity in cultured cells. Moreover, these approaches did not prevent dCK activation induced by treatments enhancing Ser-74 phosphorylation. Taken together, the data preclude a role of CKI delta in the regulation of dCK activity in vivo. Nevertheless, phosphorylation of dCK by CKI delta could be a useful tool for elucidating the influence of Ser-74 phosphorylation on the structure-activity relationships in the enzyme. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator and immediate angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction. : One-year follow up. The European Cooperative Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.R. Arnold (Alfred); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); D.P. de Bono (David); J.G.P. Tijssen (Jan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M. Verstraete (Marc); J. Lubsen (Jacob); F.J.J. van de Werf (Frans)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. The European Cooperative Study Group conducted two randomized trials in patients with suspected myocardial infarction to assess the effect of 100 mg single-chain recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA, alteplase) on enzymatic infarct size, left ventricular

  6. Reasons for the lack of benefit of immediate angioplasty during recombinant tissue plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction: a regional wall motion analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); W.R. Rutsch (Wolfgang); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); D.P. de Bono (David); J.G.P. Tijssen (Jan); J. Lubsen (Jacob); M. Verstraete (Marc); A.E.R. Arnold (Alfred)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractRegional ventricular wall motion analysis utilizing three different methods was performed on predischarge left ventriculograms from 291 of 367 patients enrolled in a randomized trial of single chain recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA), aspirin and heparin with and

  7. The biological activity of a recombinantly expressed (His)(6)-tagged peanut allergen (rAra h 1) is unaffected by endotoxin removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Bjerremann; Torp, Anna Maria; Andersen, Sven Bode

    2008-01-01

    The application of recombinant (His)(6)-tagged proteins in cell culture assays is associated with problems due to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination. LPS stimulates cells of the immune system, thereby masking antigen-specific activation of T cells. Due to the affinity of LPS for histidine...

  8. Newly diagnosed congenital factor VII deficiency and utilization of recombinant activated factor VII (NovoSeven®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosh NS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nicole S Bartosh, Tara Tomlin, Christian Cable, Kathleen HalkaDepartment of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Scott and White Healthcare and Texas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, TX, USAAbstract: This case report presents a newly diagnosed congenital factor VII deficiency treated with recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa. Congenital factor VII deficiency is a rare autosomal-recessive bleeding disorder that occurs in fewer than 1/500,000 persons. Its presentation can vary from epistaxis to hemarthroses and severe central nervous system bleeding, and correlates poorly with factor VII levels. Our patient had not had a significant hemostatic challenge prior to his presentation and therefore never had any symptomatology suggestive of this disease. He was treated with rFVIIa, and was able to undergo repair of his fractures without bleeding.Case report: A 19-year-old African-American male presented to the emergency room after an altercation that resulted in significant trauma. He sustained bilateral mandibular angle fractures and orbital floor fractures, requiring urgent surgical correction. On initial evaluation, he was noted to have a prolonged prothrombin time of 40.1 seconds, with an International Normalized Ratio of 4.0, a normal activated partial thromboplastin time of 29.9 seconds, and a platelet count of 241. After receiving vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma, he was taken to the operating room for a temporary rigid maxillomandibular fixation. A 1:1 mixing study with normal plasma corrected the prothrombin time (decreasing from 40.7 to 14.7 seconds and a factor VII assay revealed 5% of the normal factor VII level. The patient was diagnosed with congenital factor VII deficiency. Due to his coagulopathy and the extensive surgical correction needed, rFVIIa was administered and surgery was accomplished without hemorrhagic sequelae.Conclusion: This case report and review describes a rare congenital

  9. Hetero- and auto-activation of recombinant glutamyl endopeptidase from Bacillus intermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, E V; Demidyuk, I V; Shubin, A V; Kozlovskiy, V I; Leonova, O G; Kostrov, S V

    2008-11-01

    Glutamyl endopeptidase from Bacillus intermedius (BIGEP) is a secretory serine proteinase specifically hydrolyzing peptide bonds involving alpha-carboxyl groups of glutamic and aspartic acids. In this work, different BIGEP forms (full-length precursor, precursor without signal peptide and mature part) were expressed in Escherichia coli and the process of enzyme maturation was studied in vitro. BIGEP precursor renaturation leads to autocatalytic hydrolysis of the propeptide at Glu(-16). At the same time, the enzyme activation requires the complete removal of the prosequence by other proteinases. The mature part of BIGEP cannot be activated, which indicates that the propeptide is required for the active protein formation. The data obtained allowed us to apply directed mutagenesis of the processing site to obtain a BIGEP form that matured autocatalytically. This approach makes it possible to produce the enzyme without extrinsic proteinases, which is a prerequisite for using it in limited hydrolysis of proteins and peptides.

  10. Engineering the cellular protein secretory pathway for enhancement of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells: effects of CERT and XBP1s genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Azam; Vaziri, Behrouz; Moazzami, Reza; Nematollahi, Leila; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Kokabee, Leila; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2013-08-01

    Cell line development is the most critical and also the most time-consuming step in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this regard, a variety of vector and cell engineering strategies have been developed for generating high-producing mammalian cells; however, the cell line engineering approach seems to show various results on different recombinant protein producer cells. In order to improve the secretory capacity of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, we developed cell line engineering approaches based on the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) genes. For this purpose, CERT S132A, a mutant form of CERT that is resistant to phosphorylation, and XBP1s were overexpressed in a recombinant t-PA-producing CHO cell line. Overexpression of CERT S132A increased the specific productivity of t-PA-producing CHO cells up to 35%. In contrast, the heterologous expression of XBP1s did not affect the t-PA expression rate. Our results suggest that CERTS132A- based secretion engineering could be an effective strategy for enhancing recombinant t- PA production in CHO cells.

  11. 78 FR 66751 - Office of Science Policy, Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is updating Appendix B (Classification of Human Etiologic Agents on the Basis of Hazard) of the NIH Guidelines by specifying the risk group (RG) classification for two organisms: Middle... that will be manipulated (see Appendix B, Classification of Human Etiologic Agents on the Basis of...

  12. Activation parameters for the recombination reaction of intramolecular radical pairs generated from the radical diffusion-inhibited HABI derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Sayaka; Abe, Jiro

    2008-07-10

    Activation parameters were determined for the recombination of radical pairs arising from newly designed, photochromic, radical diffusion-restricted hexaarylbiimidazole (HABI) derivative. We have developed a new type of radical diffusion-inhibited HABI derivative, which contains two equivalent HABI units and yields a tetraradical with four equivalent 2,4,5-triphenylimidazolyl radical (TPIR) units by photoirradiation. This radical dimerization proceeds by a successive first-order reaction from the tetraradical to the parent molecule via a diradical. The rate constants of each reaction were determined from the decay profile of EPR signal intensities. The entropies of activation (DeltaS(double dagger)) for the first and the successive dimerization steps were estimated to be -178.5 and -205.5 J K(-1) mol(-1), respectively. Within the experimental temperature range, the radical dimerizations are entropy-controlled (-TDeltaS(double dagger) > DeltaH(double dagger)). The large negative DeltaS(double dagger) values imply a highly ordered transition state, indicating that the radical dimerizations occur when the TPIR units interact at a specific orientation. The present study demonstrates the availability of radical diffusion-inhibited HABI for the kinetic study of radical-radical reaction.

  13. A high affinity recombinant antibody to the human EphA3 receptor with enhanced ADCC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasevic, Nenad; Luehrsen, Kenneth; Baer, Mark; Palath, Varghese; Martinez, David; Williams, Jason; Yi, Christina; Sujatha-Bhaskar, Swathi; Lanke, Rohini; Leung, John; Ching, Wendy; Lee, Andreia; Bai, Lu; Yarranton, Geoffrey; Bebbington, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    EphA3 is expressed in solid tumors and leukemias and is an attractive target for the therapy. We have generated a panel of Humaneered® antibodies to the ligand-binding domain using a Fab epitope-focused library that has the same specificity as monoclonal antibody mIIIA4. A high-affinity antibody was selected that competes with the mIIIA4 antibody for binding to EphA3 and has an improved affinity of ∼1 nM. In order to generate an antibody with potent cell-killing activity the variable regions were assembled with human IgG1k constant regions and expressed in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line deficient in fucosyl transferase. Non-fucosylated antibodies have been reported to have enhanced binding affinity for the IgG receptor CD16a (FcγRIIIa). The affinity of the antibody for recombinant CD16a was enhanced approximately 10-fold. This resulted in enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity against EphA3-expressing leukemic cells, providing a potent antibody for the evaluation as a therapeutic agent.

  14. Mediator facilitates transcriptional activation and dynamic long-range contacts at the IgH locus during class switch recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Claudepierre, Anne-Sophie; Robert, Isabelle; Rocha, Pedro P.; Raviram, Ramya; Schiavo, Ebe; Heyer, Vincent; Bonneau, Richard; Luo, Vincent M.; Reddy, Janardan K.; Borggrefe, Tilman; Skok, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) is initiated by the transcription-coupled recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to Ig switch regions (S regions). During CSR, the IgH locus undergoes dynamic three-dimensional structural changes in which promoters, enhancers, and S regions are brought to close proximity. Nevertheless, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we show that Med1 and Med12, two subunits of the mediator complex implicated in transcription initiation and long-range enhancer/promoter loop formation, are dynamically recruited to the IgH locus enhancers and the acceptor regions during CSR and that their knockdown in CH12 cells results in impaired CSR. Furthermore, we show that conditional inactivation of Med1 in B cells results in defective CSR and reduced acceptor S region transcription. Finally, we show that in B cells undergoing CSR, the dynamic long-range contacts between the IgH enhancers and the acceptor regions correlate with Med1 and Med12 binding and that they happen at a reduced frequency in Med1-deficient B cells. Our results implicate the mediator complex in the mechanism of CSR and are consistent with a model in which mediator facilitates the long-range contacts between S regions and the IgH locus enhancers during CSR and their transcriptional activation. PMID:26903242

  15. Expression of recombinant human interferon-γ with antiviral activity in the bi-cistronic baculovirus-insect/larval system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Shuo; Villaflores, Oliver B; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Chan, Ming-Tsair; Chang, Yen-Chung; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    A bi-cistronic baculovirus-insect/larval system containing a polyhedron promoter, an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), and an egfp gene was developed as a cost-effective platform for the production of recombinant human interferon gamma (rhIFN-γ). There was no significant difference between the amounts of rhIFN-γ produced in the baculovirus-infected Spodoptera frugiferda 21 cells grown in serum-free medium and the serum-supplemented medium, while the Trichoplusia ni (T. ni) and Spodoptera exigua (S. exigua) larvae afforded rhIFN-γ amounting to 1.08±0.04 and 9.74±0.35 µg/mg protein respectively. The presence of non-glycosylated and glycosylated rhIFN-γ was confirmed by immunoblot and lectin blot. The immunological activity of purified rhIFN-γ, with 96% purity by Nickel (II)-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) affinity chromatography, was similar to that commercially available. Moreover, the rhIFN-γ protein from T. ni had more potent antiviral activity. These findings suggest that this IRES-based expression system is a simple and inexpensive alternative for large-scale protein production in anti-viral research.

  16. Hyperacute Carotid Stent Thrombosis During Emergent Revascularization Treated with Intraarterial Eptifibatide After Systemic Administration of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Grant C; Dumont, Travis M; Mokin, Maxim; Eller, Jorge L; Natarajan, Sabareesh K; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2015-07-01

    A 57-year-old woman with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 26 was found to have an acute left carotid occlusion with tandem left M1 thrombus within 1.5 hours of symptom onset. After no neurologic improvement following standard-dose intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), emergent neuroendovascular revascularization with carotid stenting and intracranial thrombectomy were performed under conscious sedation. Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI)-3 flow restoration and symptom resolution were achieved postprocedure; however, complete carotid stent thrombosis was noted on final angiographic runs (25 minutes later), correlating with neurologic decline. Rapid administration of an intraarterial (IA) bolus dose of eptifibatide resulted in TIMI-3 flow restoration, with neurologic improvement. The patient was discharged three days postrevascularization on dual antiplatelet therapy with an NIHSS score of 1. Intraarterial (IA) eptifibatide can be an effective option for acute stent occlusion during emergent neuroendovascular revascularization after IV rtPA administration. CLEARCombined approach to lysis utilizing eptifibatide and RtPACTcomputed tomographicFrFrenchGPglycoproteinIAintraarterialICAinternal carotid arteryIVintravenousMCAmiddle cerebral arteryNIHSSNational Institutes of Health Stroke ScalertPArecombinant tissue plasminogen activatorTIMIthrombolysis in myocardial infarction.

  17. Reduced cathepsins B and D cause impaired autophagic degradation that can be almost completely restored by overexpression of these two proteases in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatti, Massimo; Motta, Marialetizia; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina; Scarpa, Susanna; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Cecconi, Francesco; Salvioli, Rosa

    2012-12-01

    Saposin (Sap) C deficiency, a rare variant form of Gaucher disease, is due to mutations in the Sap C coding region of the prosaposin (PSAP) gene. Sap C is required as an activator of the lysosomal enzyme glucosylceramidase (GCase), which catalyzes glucosylceramide (GC) degradation. Deficit of either GCase or Sap C leads to the accumulation of undegraded GC and other lipids in lysosomes of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Recently, we reported that Sap C mutations affecting a cysteine residue result in increased autophagy. Here, we characterized the basis for the autophagic dysfunction. We analyzed Sap C-deficient and GCase-deficient fibroblasts and observed that autophagic disturbance was only associated with lack of Sap C. By a combined fluorescence microscopy and biochemical studies, we demonstrated that the accumulation of autophagosomes in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts is not due to enhanced autophagosome formation but to delayed degradation of autolysosomes caused, in part, to decreased amount and reduced enzymatic activity of cathepsins B and D. On the contrary, in GCase-deficient fibroblasts, the protein level and enzymatic activity of cathepsin D were comparable with control fibroblasts, whereas those of cathepsin B were almost doubled. Moreover, the enhanced expression of both these lysosomal proteases in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts resulted in close to functional autophagic degradation. Our data provide a novel example of altered autophagy as secondary event resulting from insufficient lysosomal function.

  18. Sorafenib induces cathepsin B-mediated apoptosis of bladder cancer cells by regulating the Akt/PTEN pathway. The Akt inhibitor, perifosine, enhances the sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity against bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amantini, Consuelo; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Santoni, Matteo; Soriani, Alessandra; Cardinali, Claudio; Farfariello, Valerio; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Bonfili, Laura; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Nabissi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated to exert anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on bladder cancer remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanisms responsible for the sorafenib-induced anti-tumor effects on 5637 and T24 bladder cancer cells. We demonstrated that sorafenib reduces cell viability, stimulates lysosome permeabilization and induces apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. These effects are dependent by the activation of cathepsin B released from lysosomes. The sorafenib-increased cathepsin B activity induced the proteolysis of Bid into tBid that stimulates the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis characterized by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxygen radical generation and cytochrome c release. Moreover, we found that cathepsin B enzymatic activity, induced by sorafenib, is dependent on its dephosphorylation via PTEN activation and Akt inactivation. Pretreatment with orthovanadate rescued bladder cancer cells from apoptosis. In addition, the Akt inhibitor perifosine increased the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity. Overall, our results show that apoptotic cell death induced by sorafenib in bladder cancer cells is dependent on cathepsin B activity and involved PTEN and Akt signaling pathways. The Akt inhibitor perifosine increased the cytotoxic effects of sorafenib in bladder cancer cells. PMID:26097873

  19. INHIBITION OF THE NKG2D ACTIVATING RECEPTOR EXPRESSION ON CYTOTOXIC LYMPHOCYTES BY RECOMBINANT MICA PROTEIN

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Abakushina; E. Yu. Lyssuk; A. V. Posvyatenko; A. V. Kibardin

    2017-01-01

    Genome instability of transformed cells, being the most common factor of malignancy, may result into production of abnormal proteins in these cells. Normally, the newly formed proteins are recognized by immune system, thus causing elimination of the transformed cells. Nevertheless, the phenotypic instability promotes formation of specific transformed cells which suppress effector immune reactions and/or are unrecognizable by cytotoxic lymphocytes. NKG2D is one of the most important activating...

  20. RECOMBINANT HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE FOR ANALYTICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.M. Egorov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with prospects of using recombinant horseradish peroxidase in analytical biochemistry and biotechnology. Problems of recombinant horseradish peroxidase cloning in different expression systems, possible approaches to their solution, advantages of recombinant recombinant horseradish peroxidase and recombinant horseradish peroxidase-fusion proteins for immunoassays are considered. Possibility for development of mediatorless bienzyme biosensor for peroxide and metabolites, yielding hydrogen peroxide during their transformations, based on co-adsorption of recombinant horseradish peroxidase and the appropriate oxidase was demonstrated. The possibility to produce a fully active recombinant conjugate of recombinant horseradish peroxidase with human heart-type fatty acid binding protein, which may be used in competitive immunoassay for clinical diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, and recombinant conjugates (N- and C-terminus of recombinant horseradish peroxidase with Fab-fragments of the antibody against atrazine, which may be applied for atrazine pesticides detection, are demonstra ted for the first time.

  1. Biotechnological production of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator protein (reteplase) from transplastomic tobacco cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Diego; Abdoli-Nasab, Maryam; Jalali-Javaran, Mokhtar; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Cusidó, Rosa M; Corchete, Purificación; Palazon, Javier

    2017-09-01

    Transplastomic plants are a system of choice for the mass production of biopharmaceuticals due to the polyploidy of the plastid genome and the low risk of pollen-mediated outcrossing because of maternal inheritance. However, as field-grown plants, they can suffer contamination by agrochemicals and fertilizers, as well as fluctuations in yield due to climatic changes and infections. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), a protein used to treat heart attacks, converts plasminogen into plasmine, which digests fibrin and induces the dissolution of fibrin clots. Recently, we obtained transplastomic tobacco plants carrying the K2S gene encoding truncated human tPA (reteplase) with improved biological activity, and confirmed the presence of the target protein in the transgenic plant leaves. Considering the advantages of plant cell cultures for biopharmaceutical production, we established a cell line derived from the K2S tobacco plants. The active form of reteplase was quantified in cultures grown in light or darkness, with production 3-fold higher in light. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. TPM analyses reveal that FtsK contributes both to the assembly and the activation of the XerCD-dif recombination synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagne, Cheikh Tidiane; Salhi, Maya; Crozat, Estelle; Salomé, Laurence; Cornet, Francois; Rousseau, Philippe; Tardin, Catherine

    2014-02-01

    Circular chromosomes can form dimers during replication and failure to resolve those into monomers prevents chromosome segregation, which leads to cell death. Dimer resolution is catalysed by a highly conserved site-specific recombination system, called XerCD-dif in Escherichia coli. Recombination is activated by the DNA translocase FtsK, which is associated with the division septum, and is thought to contribute to the assembly of the XerCD-dif synapse. In our study, direct observation of the assembly of the XerCD-dif synapse, which had previously eluded other methods, was made possible by the use of Tethered Particle Motion, a single molecule approach. We show that XerC, XerD and two dif sites suffice for the assembly of XerCD-dif synapses in absence of FtsK, but lead to inactive XerCD-dif synapses. We also show that the presence of the γ domain of FtsK increases the rate of synapse formation and convert them into active synapses where recombination occurs. Our results represent the first direct observation of the formation of the XerCD-dif recombination synapse and its activation by FtsK.

  3. Expression and biological activity of two recombinant polypeptides related to subunit 1 of the interferon-a receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yoon

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal production of interferon alpha (IFN-a has been found in certain autoimmune diseases and can be also observed after prolonged therapy with IFN-a. IFN-a can contribute to the pathogenesis of allograft rejection in bone marrow transplants. Therefore, the development of IFN-a inhibitors as a soluble receptor protein may be valuable for the therapeutic control of these diseases. We have expressed two polypeptides encoding amino acids 93-260 (P1 and 261-410 (P2 of the extracellular domain of subunit 1 of the interferon-a receptor (IFNAR 1-EC in E. coli. The activities of the recombinant polypeptides and of their respective antibodies were evaluated using antiproliferative and antiviral assays. Expression of P1 and P2 polypeptides was achieved by transformation of cloned plasmid pRSET A into E. coli BL21(DE3pLysS and by IPTG induction. P1 and P2 were purified by serial sonication steps and by gel filtration chromatography with 8 M urea and refolded by dialysis. Under reducing SDS-PAGE conditions, the molecular weight of P1 and P2 was 22 and 17 kDa, respectively. Polyclonal anti-P1 and anti-P2 antibodies were produced in mice. P1 and P2 and their respective polyclonal antibodies were able to block the antiproliferative activity of 6.25 nM IFN-aB on Daudi cells, but did not block IFN-aB activity at higher concentrations (>6.25 nM. On the other hand, the polypeptides and their respective antibodies did not inhibit the antiviral activity of IFN-aB on Hep 2/c cells challenged with encephalomyocarditis virus.

  4. Peptidoglycan degrading activity of the broad-range Salmonella bacteriophage S-394 recombinant endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legotsky, Sergey A; Vlasova, Ksenia Yu; Priyma, Anastasia D; Shneider, Mikhail M; Pugachev, Vladimir G; Totmenina, Olga D; Kabanov, Alexander V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Klyachko, Natalia L

    2014-12-01

    The use of bacteriophage endolysins as specific antibacterial agents is a prospective strategy to treat bacterial infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In case of Gram-negative species this strategy has limited applications since outer membrane shields the enzyme target and prevents bacteria lysis. We aimed to obtain and characterize the endolysin of the newly discovered anti-Salmonella bacteriophage S-394 (Lys394) and to choose an appropriate permeabilizing agent to disrupt Escherichia coli cells suspended in buffer solution and grown on agar surface. Lys394 synthesized in E. coli C41(DE3) was obtained as an electrophoretically homogenous protein. The protein of 18 kDa molecular weight shows high muralytic activity against various genera of chloroform treated Gram-negatives. Maximum of enzyme activity was observed at pH 8.5 and low ionic strength. In silico analysis of amino acid sequence identified Lys394 as an endopeptidase. Various outer membrane permeabilizers were analyzed in combination with Lys394 to degrade laboratory strain of E. coli CR63. Permeabilizing activity was evaluated using a periplasmic β-lactamase leakage test with untreated E. coli cells as a substrate. The highest rate of planktonic E. coli lysis was reached for Lys394 applied together with 25 μg/ml of poly-l-arginine with molecular weight distribution from 5 to 15 kDa or 20 μg/ml PGLa peptide. Lawn E. coli colony forming ability was decreased by 4 orders of magnitude after 30 min treatment with 25 μg of Lys394, 1 mM EDTA and 50 μg/ml of PGLa peptide at a room temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. Is intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) safe in patients on Dabigatran?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Raghav; Galvez, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dabigatran etexilate is a newly approved oral anticoagulant indicated for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. There are no reliable, rapidly available laboratory markers to assess its anticoagulant activity. There is no data on the safety of r-tPA on patients who are on dabigatran and it is not known whether r-tPA is safe in patients who are on dabigatran with a normal activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Case report We report the case of a 59-year-old male who is reported with right hemiparesis and global aphasia. Two days prior to admission he underwent elective cardioversion for atrial fibrillation. He had begun dabigatran at 150 mg BID 3 days before cardioversion. Five days after commencing dabigatran, and 10 h after the last oral dose he presented with these symptoms. Patient fulfilled the criteria for r-tPA including a normal aPTT (30 s), normal prothrombin time (INR = 1.0) and a normal creatinine clearance (glomerular filtration rate >60 mL/min/1.73 m2). A brain CT without contrast was normal. After extensive discussion with the family, with clear understanding of the risks and benefits of such an approach in a patient who has been on dabigatran, consent was obtained, and r-tPA (0.9 mg/kg alteplase) was given. Patient’s hospital course remained uncomplicated and he was discharged 4 days after the initial symptoms to an acute rehabilitation facility and is currently on coumadin with INR therapeutic goal between 2 and 3. Conclusion More studies are needed to asses whether r-tPA might be safe in patients who are on dabigatran with a normal activated partial thromboplastin time and more than 10 h after the last dose. PMID:24920984

  6. Activation of the cellular unfolded protein response by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is a stress-induced cyto-protective mechanism elicited towards an influx of large amount of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the present study, we evaluated if AAV manipulates the UPR pathways during its infection. We first examined the role of the three major UPR axes, namely, endoribonuclease inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1α, activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6 and PKR-like ER kinase (PERK in AAV infected cells. Total RNA from mock or AAV infected HeLa cells were used to determine the levels of 8 different ER-stress responsive transcripts from these pathways. We observed a significant up-regulation of IRE1α (up to 11 fold and PERK (up to 8 fold genes 12-48 hours after infection with self-complementary (scAAV2 but less prominent with single-stranded (ssAAV2 vectors. Further studies demonstrated that scAAV1 and scAAV6 also induce cellular UPR in vitro, with AAV1 vectors activating the PERK pathway (3 fold while AAV6 vectors induced a significant increase on all the three major UPR pathways [6-16 fold]. These data suggest that the type and strength of UPR activation is dependent on the viral capsid. We then examined if transient inhibition of UPR pathways by RNA interference has an effect on AAV transduction. siRNA mediated silencing of PERK and IRE1α had a modest effect on AAV2 and AAV6 mediated gene expression (∼1.5-2 fold in vitro. Furthermore, hepatic gene transfer of scAAV2 vectors in vivo, strongly elevated IRE1α and PERK pathways (2 and 3.5 fold, respectively. However, when animals were pre-treated with a pharmacological UPR inhibitor (metformin during scAAV2 gene transfer, the UPR signalling and its subsequent inflammatory response was attenuated concomitant to a modest 2.8 fold increase in transgene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that AAV vectors activate the cellular UPR pathways and their selective inhibition may be beneficial during AAV mediated gene transfer.

  7. Activation of the cellular unfolded protein response by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Balaji; Sen, Dwaipayan; Hareendran, Sangeetha; Roshini, Vaani; David, Sachin; Srivastava, Alok; Jayandharan, Giridhara R

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress-induced cyto-protective mechanism elicited towards an influx of large amount of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In the present study, we evaluated if AAV manipulates the UPR pathways during its infection. We first examined the role of the three major UPR axes, namely, endoribonuclease inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1α), activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) in AAV infected cells. Total RNA from mock or AAV infected HeLa cells were used to determine the levels of 8 different ER-stress responsive transcripts from these pathways. We observed a significant up-regulation of IRE1α (up to 11 fold) and PERK (up to 8 fold) genes 12-48 hours after infection with self-complementary (sc)AAV2 but less prominent with single-stranded (ss)AAV2 vectors. Further studies demonstrated that scAAV1 and scAAV6 also induce cellular UPR in vitro, with AAV1 vectors activating the PERK pathway (3 fold) while AAV6 vectors induced a significant increase on all the three major UPR pathways [6-16 fold]. These data suggest that the type and strength of UPR activation is dependent on the viral capsid. We then examined if transient inhibition of UPR pathways by RNA interference has an effect on AAV transduction. siRNA mediated silencing of PERK and IRE1α had a modest effect on AAV2 and AAV6 mediated gene expression (∼1.5-2 fold) in vitro. Furthermore, hepatic gene transfer of scAAV2 vectors in vivo, strongly elevated IRE1α and PERK pathways (2 and 3.5 fold, respectively). However, when animals were pre-treated with a pharmacological UPR inhibitor (metformin) during scAAV2 gene transfer, the UPR signalling and its subsequent inflammatory response was attenuated concomitant to a modest 2.8 fold increase in transgene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that AAV vectors activate the cellular UPR pathways and their selective inhibition may be beneficial during AAV mediated gene transfer.

  8. In Plant Activation: An Inducible, Hyperexpression Platform for Recombinant Protein Production in Plants[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L.; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A.; Harding, Robert M.; Dale, James L.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we describe a novel protein production platform that provides both activation and amplification of transgene expression in planta. The In Plant Activation (INPACT) system is based on the replication machinery of tobacco yellow dwarf mastrevirus (TYDV) and is essentially transient gene expression from a stably transformed plant, thus combining the advantages of both means of expression. The INPACT cassette is uniquely arranged such that the gene of interest is split and only reconstituted in the presence of the TYDV-encoded Rep/RepA proteins. Rep/RepA expression is placed under the control of the AlcA:AlcR gene switch, which is responsive to trace levels of ethanol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun) plants containing an INPACT cassette encoding the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter had negligible background expression but accumulated very high GUS levels (up to 10% total soluble protein) throughout the plant, within 3 d of a 1% ethanol application. The GUS reporter was replaced with a gene encoding a lethal ribonuclease, barnase, demonstrating that the INPACT system provides exquisite control of transgene expression and can be adapted to potentially toxic or inhibitory compounds. The INPACT gene expression platform is scalable, not host-limited, and has been used to express both a therapeutic and an industrial protein. PMID:23839786

  9. In plant activation: an inducible, hyperexpression platform for recombinant protein production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we describe a novel protein production platform that provides both activation and amplification of transgene expression in planta. The In Plant Activation (INPACT) system is based on the replication machinery of tobacco yellow dwarf mastrevirus (TYDV) and is essentially transient gene expression from a stably transformed plant, thus combining the advantages of both means of expression. The INPACT cassette is uniquely arranged such that the gene of interest is split and only reconstituted in the presence of the TYDV-encoded Rep/RepA proteins. Rep/RepA expression is placed under the control of the AlcA:AlcR gene switch, which is responsive to trace levels of ethanol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Samsun) plants containing an INPACT cassette encoding the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter had negligible background expression but accumulated very high GUS levels (up to 10% total soluble protein) throughout the plant, within 3 d of a 1% ethanol application. The GUS reporter was replaced with a gene encoding a lethal ribonuclease, barnase, demonstrating that the INPACT system provides exquisite control of transgene expression and can be adapted to potentially toxic or inhibitory compounds. The INPACT gene expression platform is scalable, not host-limited, and has been used to express both a therapeutic and an industrial protein.

  10. Schistosoma mekongi cathepsin B and its use in the development of an immunodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangfuang, Manaw; Chusongsang, Yupa; Limpanont, Yanin; Vanichviriyakit, Rapeepun; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Sobhon, Prasert; Preyavichyapugdee, Narin

    2016-03-01

    Schistosomiasis mekongi is one of the most important human parasitic diseases caused by Schistosoma mekongi in South-east Asia. The endemic area is the Mekong River sub-region from Laos to Cambodia. This parasite also infects dogs and pigs which are its alternative host species. Currently, the lack of reliable rapid diagnosis makes it difficult to monitor the infection and spreading of the disease. In this study, we screened the antigens of the parasite with sera of infected mice using Western blotting and identified proteins of interest with LC-MS/MS to obtain potential candidate proteins for diagnostic development. This assay yielded 2 immunoreactive bands at molecular masses of 31 and 22kDa. The 31kDa protein was the major band identified as cathepsin B, and its gene was cloned to obtain a full cDNA sequence (SmekCatB). The cDNA consisted of 1123bp and its longest reading frame encoded for 342 amino acids with some putative post translation modifications. The recombinant SmekCatB (rSmekCatB) with hexahistidine tag at the C-terminus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions. The rSmekCatB reacted with sera of S. mekongi-infected mice. Indirect ELISA using rSmekCatB as the antigen to detect mouse antibodies, revealed a sensitivity of 91.67% for schistosomiasis mekongi and the specificity of 100%. Our data suggested that SmekCatB is one of the most promising parasitic antigens that could be used for the diagnosis of S. mekongi infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Dynamics Investigation of Human Family 1 & 2 Cystatin-Cathepsin L1 Interaction: A Comparison of Binding Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Suman Kumar; Seal, Alpana

    2016-01-01

    Cystatin superfamily is a large group of evolutionarily related proteins involved in numerous physiological activities through their inhibitory activity towards cysteine proteases. Despite sharing the same cystatin fold, and inhibiting cysteine proteases through the same tripartite edge involving highly conserved N-terminal region, L1 and L2 loop; cystatins differ widely in their inhibitory affinity towards C1 family of cysteine proteases and molecular details of these interactions are still elusive. In this study, inhibitory interactions of human family 1 & 2 cystatins with cathepsin L1 are predicted and their stability and viability are verified through protein docking & comparative molecular dynamics. An overall stabilization effect is observed in all cystatins on complex formation. Complexes are mostly dominated by van der Waals interaction but the relative participation of the conserved regions varied extensively. While van der Waals contacts prevail in L1 and L2 loop, N-terminal segment chiefly acts as electrostatic interaction site. In fact the comparative dynamics study points towards the instrumental role of L1 loop in directing the total interaction profile of the complex either towards electrostatic or van der Waals contacts. The key amino acid residues surfaced via interaction energy, hydrogen bonding and solvent accessible surface area analysis for each cystatin-cathepsin L1 complex influence the mode of binding and thus control the diverse inhibitory affinity of cystatins towards cysteine proteases.

  12. Structural Dynamics Investigation of Human Family 1 & 2 Cystatin-Cathepsin L1 Interaction: A Comparison of Binding Modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kumar Nandy

    Full Text Available Cystatin superfamily is a large group of evolutionarily related proteins involved in numerous physiological activities through their inhibitory activity towards cysteine proteases. Despite sharing the same cystatin fold, and inhibiting cysteine proteases through the same tripartite edge involving highly conserved N-terminal region, L1 and L2 loop; cystatins differ widely in their inhibitory affinity towards C1 family of cysteine proteases and molecular details of these interactions are still elusive. In this study, inhibitory interactions of human family 1 & 2 cystatins with cathepsin L1 are predicted and their stability and viability are verified through protein docking & comparative molecular dynamics. An overall stabilization effect is observed in all cystatins on complex formation. Complexes are mostly dominated by van der Waals interaction but the relative participation of the conserved regions varied extensively. While van der Waals contacts prevail in L1 and L2 loop, N-terminal segment chiefly acts as electrostatic interaction site. In fact the comparative dynamics study points towards the instrumental role of L1 loop in directing the total interaction profile of the complex either towards electrostatic or van der Waals contacts. The key amino acid residues surfaced via interaction energy, hydrogen bonding and solvent accessible surface area analysis for each cystatin-cathepsin L1 complex influence the mode of binding and thus control the diverse inhibitory affinity of cystatins towards cysteine proteases.

  13. Differential expression of Cathepsin S and X in the spinal cord of a rat neuropathic pain model

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    Schmitz Beate

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ample evidence suggests a substantial contribution of cellular and molecular changes in the spinal cord to the induction and persistence of chronic neuropathic pain conditions. While for a long time, proteases were mainly considered as protein degrading enzymes, they are now receiving growing interest as signalling molecules in the pain pathology. In the present study we focused on two cathepsins, CATS and CATX, and studied their spatiotemporal expression and activity during the development and progression of neuropathic pain in the CNS of the rat 5th lumbar spinal nerve transection model (L5T. Results Immediately after the lesion, both cathepsins, CATS and CATX, were upregulated in the spinal cord. Moreover, we succeeded in measuring the activity of CATX, which was substantially increased after L5T. The differential expression of these proteins exhibited the same spatial distribution and temporal progression in the spinal cord, progressing up to the medulla oblongata in the late phase of chronic pain. The cellular distribution of CATS and CATX was, however, considerably different. Conclusion The cellular distribution and the spatio-temporal development of the altered expression of CATS and CATX suggest that these proteins are important players in the spinal mechanisms involved in chronic pain induction and maintenance.

  14. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  15. The protease degrading sperm histones post-fertilization in sea urchin eggs is a nuclear cathepsin L that is further required for embryo development.

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    Violeta Morin

    Full Text Available Proteolysis of sperm histones in the sea urchin male pronucleus is the consequence of the activation at fertilization of a maternal cysteine protease. We previously showed that this protein is required for male chromatin remodelling and for cell-cycle progression in the newly formed embryos. This enzyme is present in the nucleus of unfertilized eggs and is rapidly recruited to the male pronucleus after insemination. Interestingly, this cysteine-protease remains co-localized with chromatin during S phase of the first cell cycle, migrates to the mitotic spindle in M-phase and is re-located to the nuclei of daughter cells after cytokinesis. Here we identified the protease encoding cDNA and found a high sequence identity to cathepsin proteases of various organisms. A phylogenetical analysis clearly demonstrates that this sperm histone protease (SpHp belongs to the cathepsin L sub-type. After an initial phase of ubiquitous expression throughout cleavage stages, SpHp gene transcripts become restricted to endomesodermic territories during the blastula stage. The transcripts are localized in the invaginating endoderm during gastrulation and a gut specific pattern continues through the prism and early pluteus stages. In addition, a concomitant expression of SpHp transcripts is detected in cells of the skeletogenic lineage and in accordance a pharmacological disruption of SpHp activity prevents growth of skeletal rods. These results further document the role of this nuclear cathepsin L during development.

  16. Addition of thiols to the double bond of dipeptide C-terminal dehydroalanine as a source of new inhibitors of cathepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenartowicz, Paweł; Makowski, Maciej; Oszywa, Bartosz; Haremza, Kinga; Latajka, Rafał; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Kafarski, Paweł

    2017-08-01

    Addition of thiols to double bond of glycyl-dehydroalanine and phenyl-dehydroalanine esters provided micromolar inhibitors of cathepsin C. The structure-activity studies indicated that dipeptides containing N-terminal phenylalanine exhibit higher affinity towards the enzyme. A series of C-terminal S-substituted cysteines are responsible for varying interaction with S1 binding pocket of cathepsin C. Depending on diastereomer these compounds most likely act as slowly reacting substrates or competitive inhibitors. This was proved by TLC analysis of the medium in which interaction of methyl (S)-phenylalanyl-(R,S)-(S-adamantyl)cysteinate (7i) with the enzyme was studied. Molecular modeling enabled to establish their mode of binding showed that S2 pocket is long and narrow and accommodates phenyl group of phenylalanine while significantly spacious sites located at the surface of the enzyme (one of them being S1 pocket) bind the adamantyl moiety oriented in different direction for each stereoisomer. Finally replacement of carboxymethyl moiety of methyl (S)-phenylalanyl-(R,S)-(S-phenyl)cysteinate (7c) with nitrile group provided about 650-times more potent inhibitor of cathepsin C indicating that the studied C-terminal S-substituted cysteines are good activity probes for S1 binding pocket of this enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. Azilsartan increases levels of IL-10, down-regulates MMP-2, MMP-9, RANKL/RANK, Cathepsin K and up-regulates OPG in an experimental periodontitis model.

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    Aurigena Antunes de Araújo

    Full Text Available AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of azilsartan (AZT on bone loss, inflammation, and the expression of matrix metallo proteinases (MMPs, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK, osteoprotegerin (OPG, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and cathepsin K in periodontal tissue in a rat model of ligature-induced periodontitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 5 groups of 10 rats each: (1 nonligated, water; (2 ligated, water; (3 ligated, 1 mg/kg AZT; (4 ligated, 5 mg/kg AZT; and (5 ligated, 10 mg/kg AZT. All groups were treated with saline or AZT for 10 days. Periodontal tissues were analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical detection of MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, RANKL, RANK, OPG, and cathepsin K. Levels of IL-1β, IL-10, TNF-α, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and glutathione (GSH were determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Treatment with 5 mg/kg AZT resulted in reduced MPO (p<0.05 and IL-1β (p<0.05, increased levels of IL-10 (p<0.05, and reduced expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, RANK, RANKL, cathepsin K, and increased expression of OPG. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reveal that AZT increases anti-inflammatory cytokines and GSH and decreases bone loss in ligature-induced periodontitis in rats.

  18. Plasma cathepsin S and cystatin C levels and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Cheng, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown.......Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown....

  19. A SEP tag enhances the expression, solubility and yield of recombinant TEV protease without altering its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Kalpana; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2018-02-12

    Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease is used in the purification of recombinant proteins, but its usage is often hampered by solubility issues. Here, we report a short, 12-residue solubility enhancing peptide (SEP) tag attached at the C-terminus of TEV (TEV-C9R). We assessed the effects of the C9R tag on the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of TEV. The yield of HPLC purified TEV-C9R expressed in E. coli grown in 200 mL LB or TB media was between 10 and 13 mg, which was up to 6.5 times higher than the yield of the untagged TEV (untagged-TEV). TEV-C9R was active over a pH range of 5-8, which was wider than that of the commonly used thrombin, and it remained active upon incubation at 60 °C much longer than the untagged-TEV, which aggregated at this temperature. Static and dynamic light scattering demonstrated the higher solubility of purified TEV-C9R. Furthermore, the thermal unfolding of TEV-C9R, as assessed by circular dichroism at pH 4.7, was almost perfectly reversible, in contrast to that of untagged-TEV, which aggregated at high temperature. These results demonstrate the improved biophysical and biochemical characteristics of TEV-C9R originating from higher solubility and provide another example of how SEP tags can enhance enzyme solubility without altering its activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recombinant rabies virus expressing IL-21 enhances immunogenicity through activation of T follicular helper cells and germinal centre B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajing; Zhou, Ming; Wang, Zhao; Yang, Jie; Li, Mingming; Wang, Kunlun; Cui, Min; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Zhao, Ling

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the lack of interleukin-21 (IL-21) signalling could affect specific antibody induction after rabies vaccination. Here, to further investigate the over-expression of IL-21 on the immunogenicity of rabies virus (RABV), a recombinant RABV expressing murine IL-21, designated LBNSE-IL21, was constructed and evaluated in a mouse model. It was found that in mice immunized with LBNSE-IL21, there was a substantial increase in the number of T follicular helper cells and germinal centre B cells but no enhancement of dendritic cell activation. Furthermore, significantly higher rabies virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titres were produced in mice immunized with LBNSE-IL21 than in mice immunized with the parent virus LBNSE in the first six weeks, resulting in higher protection. Together, these results suggest that LBNSE-IL21 can induce a rapid and robust VNA titre, and it has the potential to be developed as a promising rabies vaccine.

  1. Characterization of the highly active fragment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter for recombinant protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Zhu, Jihong; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    Developing efficient native promoters is important for improving recombinant protein expression by fungal genetic engineering. The promoter region of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Pleurotus ostreatus (Pogpd) was isolated and optimized by upstream truncation. The activities of these promoters with different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. A truncated Pogpd-P2 fragment (795 bp) drove enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene expression in P. ostreatus much more efficiently than full-length Pogpd-P1. Further truncating Pogpd-P2 to 603, 403 and 231 bp reduced the eGFP expression significantly. However, the 403-bp fragment between -356 bp and the start codon was the minimal but sufficient promoter element for eGFP expression. Compact native promoters for genetic engineering of P. ostreatus were successfully developed and validated in this study. This will broaden the preexisting repertoire of fungal promoters for biotechnology application. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Recombination activating gene-2null severe combined immunodeficient pigs and mice engraft human induced pluripotent stem cells differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Kim, EunSu; Reza, Abu Musa Md Talimur; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Chankyu; Cho, Seong-Keun; Lee, Kiho; Prather, Randall S.; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2017-01-01

    This study comparatively investigated the transcriptional, physiological, and phenotypic differences of the immune disorder between severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse and pig models. We discovered that the recombination activating gene-2 (Rag-2) SCID mice, but not RAG-2 SCID pigs, showed intense, infrequent, and mild cluster of CD3+-, CD4+-, and CD8+ signals respectively, suggesting that distinct species-specific effects exist. Furthermore, the expression of six relevant genes (NFATC1, CD79B, CD2, BLNK, FOXO1, and CD40) was more downregulated than that in the Rag-2 SCID mice, which provides a partial rationale for the death of T/B cells in the lymphoid organs of RAG-2 SCID pigs but not in Rag-2 SCID mice. Further, NK cell maturation-related gene expression was significantly lower in RAG-2 SCID pigs than in Rag-2 SCID mice. Consistently, the RAG-2 SCID pigs, but not Rag-2 SCID mice, developed human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived teratomas that were the same as those of perforin/Rag-2 SCID mice. Therefore, these unexpected findings indicate the superiority of RAG-2 SCID pigs over Rag-2 SCID mice as a suitable model for investigating human diseases. PMID:29050212

  3. Effect of haemodilution, acidosis, and hypothermia on the activity of recombinant factor VIIa (NovoSeven®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viuff, D.; Lauritzen, B.; Pusateri, A. E.; Andersen, S.; Rojkjaer, R.; Johansson, P. I.

    2008-01-01

    Background A range of plasma volume expanders is used clinically, often in settings where haemostasis may already be impaired. The haemostatic agent, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven®), may be used to improve haemostasis but potential interactions with different volume expanders are poorly understood. Methods Clot formation was measured by thromboelastography (TEG) using blood from healthy volunteers. In vitro effects of rFVIIa with haemodilution, acidosis, and hypothermia were examined. Conditions were induced by dilution with NaCl (0.9%), lactated Ringer's solution, albumin 5%, or hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions [MW (molecular weight) 130–670 kDa]; by adjusting pH to 6.8 with 1 M HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N′-2-ethanesulphonic acid) buffer; or by reducing temperature to 32°C. We also studied the effect of low vs high MW HES (MW 200 vs 600 kDa) and rFVIIa on in vivo bleeding time (BT) in rabbits. Results Haemodilution progressively altered TEG parameters. rFVIIa improved TEG parameters in the presence of acidosis, hypothermia or 20% haemodilution (P<0.05). At 40% haemodilution, the rFVIIa effect was diminished particularly with high MW HES. In vivo, rFVIIa shortened the BT (P<0.05) with low but not high MW HES. Conclusions Efficacy of rFVIIa was affected by the degree of haemodilution and type of volume expander, but not by acidosis or hypothermia. PMID:18565966

  4. Prolonged activity of a recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein in hemophilia A mice and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Jennifer A.; Liu, Tongyao; Low, Susan C.; Zhang, Xin; Kamphaus, George; Sakorafas, Paul; Fraley, Cara; Drager, Douglas; Reidy, Thomas; McCue, Justin; Franck, Helen W. G.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Bitonti, Alan J.; Pierce, Glenn F.

    2012-01-01

    Despite proven benefits, prophylactic treatment for hemophilia A is hampered by the short half-life of factor VIII. A recombinant factor VIII-Fc fusion protein (rFVIIIFc) was constructed to determine the potential for reduced frequency of dosing. rFVIIIFc has an ∼ 2-fold longer half-life than rFVIII in hemophilia A (HemA) mice and dogs. The extension of rFVIIIFc half-life requires interaction of Fc with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). In FcRn knockout mice, the extension of rFVIIIFc half-life is abrogated, and is restored in human FcRn transgenic mice. The Fc fusion has no impact on FVIII-specific activity. rFVIIIFc has comparable acute efficacy as rFVIII in treating tail clip injury in HemA mice, and fully corrects whole blood clotting time (WBCT) in HemA dogs immediately after dosing. Furthermore, consistent with prolonged half-life, rFVIIIFc shows 2-fold longer prophylactic efficacy in protecting HemA mice from tail vein transection bleeding induced 24-48 hours after dosing. In HemA dogs, rFVIIIFc also sustains partial correction of WBCT 1.5- to 2-fold longer than rFVIII. rFVIIIFc was well tolerated in both species. Thus, the rescue of FVIII by Fc fusion to provide prolonged protection presents a novel pathway for FVIII catabolism, and warrants further investigation. PMID:22246033

  5. Solubilization and folding of a fully active recombinant Gaussia luciferase with native disulfide bonds by using a SEP-Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnayaka, Tharangani; Tawa, Minako; Nakamura, Takashi; Sohya, Shihori; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Yohda, Masafumi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    Gaussia luciferase (GLuc) is the smallest known bioluminescent protein and is attracting much attention as a potential reporter protein. However, its 10 disulfide bond forming cysteines have hampered the efficient production of recombinant GLuc and thus limited its use in bio-imaging application. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of a short solubility enhancement peptide tag (SEP-Tag) to the C-terminus of GLuc (GLuc-C9D) significantly increased the fraction of soluble protein at a standard expression temperature. The expression time was much shorter, and the final yield of GLuc-C9D was significantly higher than with our previous pCold expression system. Reversed phase HPLC indicated that the GLuc-C9D variant folded with a single disulfide bond pattern after proper oxidization. Further, the thermal denaturation of GLuc-C9D was completely reversible, and its secondary structure content remained unchanged until 40°C as assessed by CD spectroscopy. The (1)H-NMR spectrum of GLuc indicated sharp well dispersed peaks typical for natively folded proteins. GLuc-C9D bioluminescence activity was strong and fully retained even after incubation at high temperatures. These results suggest that solubilization using SEP-Tags can be useful for producing large quantities of proteins containing multiple disulfide bonds. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Recombinant mumps viruses expressing the batMuV fusion glycoprotein are highly fusion active and neurovirulent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Nadine; Sauder, Christian; Hoffmann, Markus; Örvell, Claes; Drexler, Jan Felix; Rubin, Steven; Herrler, Georg

    2016-11-01

    A recent study reported the detection of a bat-derived virus (BatPV/Epo_spe/AR1/DCR/2009, batMuV) with phylogenetic relatedness to human mumps virus (hMuV). Since all efforts to isolate infectious batMuV have reportedly failed, we generated recombinant mumps viruses (rMuVs) in which the open reading frames (ORFs) of the fusion (F) and haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoproteins of an hMuV strain were replaced by the corresponding ORFs of batMuV. The batMuV F and HN proteins were successfully incorporated into viral particles and the resultant chimeric virus was able to mediate infection of Vero cells. Distinct differences were observed between the fusogenicity of rMuVs expressing one or both batMuV glycoproteins: viruses expressing batMuV F were highly fusogenic, regardless of the origin of HN. In contrast, rMuVs expressing human F and bat-derived HN proteins were less fusogenic compared to hMuV. The growth kinetics of chimeric MuVs expressing batMuV HN in combination with either hMuV or batMuV F were similar to that of the backbone virus, whereas a delay in virus replication was obtained for rMuVs harbouring batMuV F and hMuV HN. Replacement of the hMuV F and HN genes or the HN gene alone by the corresponding batMuV genes led to a slight reduction in neurovirulence of the highly neurovirulent backbone strain. Neutralizing antibodies inhibited infection mediated by all recombinant viruses generated. Furthermore, group IV anti-MuV antibodies inhibited the neuraminidase activity of bat-derived HN. Our study reports the successful generation of chimeric MuVs expressing the F and HN proteins of batMuV, providing a means for further examination of this novel batMuV.

  7. Recombinant hamster oviductin is biologically active and exerts positive effects on sperm functions and sperm-oocyte binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Yang

    Full Text Available Studies carried out in several mammalian species suggest that oviductin, also known as oviduct-specific glycoprotein or OVGP1, plays a key role in sperm capacitation, fertilization, and development of early embryos. In the present study, we used recombinant DNA technology to produce, for the first time, recombinant hamster OVGP1 (rHamOVGP1 in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells. rHamOVGP1 secreted in the culture medium was purified by affinity chromatography. The resulting protein migrated as a poly-dispersed band of 160-350 kDa on SDS-PAGE corresponding to the molecular mass of the native HamOVGP1. Subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of the purified rHamOVGP1 confirmed its identity as HamOVGP1. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated binding of rHamOVGP1 to the mid-piece and head of hamster sperm and to the zona pellucida (ZP of ovarian oocytes. In vitro functional experiments showed that addition of rHamOVGP1 in the capacitation medium further enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of two sperm proteins of approximately 75 kDa and 83 kDa in a time-dependent manner. After 3 hours of incubation in the presence of rHamOVGP1, a significant increase in acrosome reaction was measured. Pretreatment of either sperm or oocyte with 20 μg/ml of rHamOVGP1 prior to sperm-egg binding assay significantly increased the number of sperm bound to the ZP. Addition of rHamOVGP1 in the medium during sperm-egg binding with either oocyte or sperm pretreated with rHamOVGP1 also saw an increase in the number of sperm bound to ZP. In all experimental conditions, the effect of rHamOVGP1 on sperm-oocyte binding was negated by the addition of monoclonal anti-HamOVGP1 antibody. The successful production and purification of a biologically active rHamOVGP1 will allow further exploration of the function of this glycoprotein in reproductive function.

  8. Colorimetric activity measurement of a recombinant putrescine N-methyltransferase from Datura stramonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biastoff, Stefan; Teuber, Michael; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny; Dräger, Birgit

    2006-10-01

    Putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT, EC 2.1.1.53) catalyses the S-adenosyl- L-methionine (SAM or AdoMet)-dependent methylation of putrescine to N-methylputrescine within the biosynthetic pathways of calystegines, nicotine, and tropane alkaloids in medicinal plants and produces S-adenosyl- L-homocysteine (SAH or AdoHcy). Determination of PMT activity was time-consuming and hardly reproducible in the past because it required tedious separation steps after chemical derivatisation or radioactive labelling of N-methylputrescine. A convenient and accurate enzyme-coupled colorimetric assay is based on the conversion of SAH to homocysteine by 5'-methylthioadenosine/ S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN/SAHN, EC 3.2.2.9) and S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase (LuxS, EC 4.4.1.21). Homocysteine is quantified by 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid. Putrescine was shown not to interfere with MTAN or LuxS. The colorimetric assay was validated by HPLC analysis. K(m) values determined by the assay, 108 microM for putrescine and 42 microM for SAM, are lower than the previously reported values, due to alleviation of PMT inhibition by SAH. DTNB:5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid LuxS: S-ribosylhomocysteine lyase MTAN:5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase PMT:putrescine N-methyltransferase SAH: S-adenosyl- L-homocysteine SAM: S-adenosyl- L-methionine TNB:2-nitro-5-thiobenzoic acid.

  9. Recombinant human lactoferrin as a biomaterial for bone tissue engineering: mechanism of antiapoptotic and osteogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Ashley A; Nair, Lakshmi S

    2014-06-01

    Lactoferrin is a bioactive globular protein with unique properties towards musculo-skeletal cells and anabolic to bone in vivo. Even though the potent anti-apoptotic and osteogenic activity of lactoferrin has been reported, the mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. The study demonstrates that the anti-apoptotic effect of rhLF towards MC3T3 pre-osteoblast cells is mediated by Wnt5a/PKA pathway and the stabilization of β-catenin by rhLF is dependent on PKA/LRP6 signaling pathway. The study also investigates the feasibility of developing rhLF as a biomaterial for cell delivery. The injectable rhLF cell delivery vehicles are prepared by enzymatic crosslinking of tyramine-modified rhLF in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and horseradish peroxidase. The modified rhLF shows bioactivity similar to unmodified rhLF. The rhLF gels support encapsulated MC3T3 cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation, as well as phosphorylation of signaling proteins. In conclusion, the study demonstrates the involvement of Wnt5a, LRP6, and PKA signaling in rhLF-mediated bioactivity towards MC3T3 cells and the feasibility of developing an injectable cell delivery vehicle from rhLF. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Recombinant human erythropoietin reduces plasminogen activator inhibitor and ameliorates pro-inflammatory responses following trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mojtahedzadeh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n  "n Background and the purpose of the study: Besides its hematopoietic effects, erythropoietin (EPO by mobilization of iron and modulation of some inflammatory cytokines has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these effects of erythropoietin and its impact on organ function in traumatized patients. "n Methods: Twenty-six ICU-admitted traumatized patients within 24 hrs after trauma were randomly assigned to the EPO (received EPO, 300 units/Kg/day and Control (not received EPO groups. The inflammatory biomarkers including Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α, Interleukin 1 (IL-1, Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1 and Nitrotyrosine were recorded at the admission, 3, 6 and 9 days thereafter. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA scores were also recorded. "n Results: Among 12 patients (EPO group TNF-α level at the day of 9 (P=0.046, and within EPO group at the days of 3 (P=0.026 ameliorate, 6 (P=0.016, and 9 (P=0.052 were significantly lowered. Level of IL-1 and PAI-1 decreased significantly at days of 3, 6 and 9 post intervention. Also there were significant differences between two groups in the SOFA score during three measured time intervals (the first, third and seventh days. "n Conclusion: From the results of this study it seems that injection of erythrocyte stimulating agent is well tolerated and inhibits the inflammatory response and oxidative stress following trauma.

  11. Efficacy and effectiveness of recombinant human activated protein C in severe sepsis of adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sepsis is defined as an invasion of microorganisms and/or their toxins into the blood associated the reaction of the organism to this invasion. Severe sepsis is a major cost driver in intensive care medicine. In Germany, prevalence data was assessed in the context of the German Prevalence Study. Severe sepsis has a prevalence of 35% in German intensive care units. Research questions: The following questions were analysed: is Drotrecogin alfa (activated (DAA effective in the treatment of patients with severe sepsis and a mixed risk of death, both in all patients and in different subgroups? Is DAA effective in the treatment of patients with severe sepsis and low risk of death? Is DAA cost effective in the treatment of patients with severe sepsis compared to placebo? Methods: Only studies with adult patients are included. There are no other exclusion criteria. A systematic literature search is performed by the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI. The literature search yielded as a total of 847 hits. After screening of the abstracts, 165 medical and 101 economic publications were chosen for full text appraisal. Results: Therapy with DAA appears to be cost effective in reducing 28-day-mortality in patients with severe sepsis and a high risk of death. A high risk of death is indicated by the presence of multiorgan failure (≥2 and/or an APACHE-II-Score ≥25. Therapy with DAA is not associated with a long-term reduction of mortality at later follow-up assessments. Therapy with DAA is not associated with a long-term reduction of mortality at later follow-up assessments. Therapy with DAA is cost-effective in patients with multiorgan failure and/or an APACHE II Score (≥25. In patients with a lower risk of death, DAA is not cost-effective. Costs associated with bleeding events have been rarely included in cost calculations. Discussion: DAA appears to reduce mortality in patients with severe sepsis and a high

  12. Recombinant human activated protein C improves endotoxemia-induced endothelial dysfunction: a blood-free model in isolated mouse arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennoun, Nacira; Baron-Menguy, Celine; Burban, Mélanie; Lecompte, Thomas; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Henrion, Daniel; Mercat, Alain; Asfar, Pierre; Levy, Bruno; Meziani, Ferhat

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) is one of the treatment panels for improving vascular dysfunction in septic patients. In a previous study, we reported that rhAPC treatment in rat endotoxemia improved vascular reactivity, although the mechanisms involved are still under debate. In the present study, we hypothesized that rhAPC may improve arterial dysfunction through its nonanticoagulant properties. Ten hours after injection of LPS in mice (50 mg/kg ip), aortic rings and mesenteric arteries were isolated and incubated with or without rhAPC for 12 h. Aortic rings were mounted in a myograph, after which arterial contractility and endothelium-dependent relaxation were measured in the presence or absence of nitric oxide synthase or cyclooxygenase inhibitors. Flow (shear stress)-mediated dilation with or without the above inhibitors was also measured in mesenteric resistance arteries. Protein expression was assessed by Western blotting. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduced aortic contractility to KCl and phenylephrine as well as dilation to acetylcholine. LPS also reduced flow-mediated dilation in mesenteric arteries. In rhAPC-treated aorta and mesenteric arteries, contractility and endothelial responsiveness to vasodilator drug and shear stress were improved. rhAPC treatment also improved LPS-induced endothelial dysfunction; this effect was associated with an increase in the phosphorylated form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and protein kinase B as well as cyclooxygenase vasodilatory pathways, thus suggesting that these pathways, together with the decrease in nuclear factor-kappaB activation and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in the vascular wall, are implicated in the endothelial effect of rhAPC. In conclusion, ex vivo application of rhAPC improves arterial contractility and endothelial dysfunction resulting from endotoxemia in mice. This finding provides important insights into the mechanism underlying rhAPC-induced improvements on arterial

  13. Chitinase Genes LbCHI31 and LbCHI32 from Limonium bicolor Were Successfully Expressed in Escherichia coli and Exhibit Recombinant Chitinase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Rongshu; Diao, Guiping; Fan, Haijuan; Wang, Zhiying

    2013-01-01

    The two chitinase genes, LbCHI31 and LbCHI32 from Limonium bicolor, were, respectively, expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 strain. The intracellular recombinant chitinases, inrCHI31 and inrCHI32, and the extracellular exrCHI31 and exrCHI32 could be produced into E. coli. The exrCHI31 and exrCHI32 can be secreted into extracellular medium. The optimal reaction condition for inrCHI31 was 5 mmol/L of Mn2+ at 40°C and pH 5.0 with an activity of 0.772 U using Alternaria alternata cell wall as substrate. The optimal condition of inrCHI32 was 5 mmol/L of Ba2+ at 45°C and pH 5.0 with an activity of 0.792 U using Valsa sordida cell wall as substrate. The optimal reaction condition of exrCHI31 was 5 mmol/L of Zn2+ at 40°C and pH 5.0, and the activity was 0.921 U using the A. alternata cell wall as substrate. Simultaneously, the optimal condition of exrCHI32 was 5 mmol/L of K+ at 45°C and pH 5.0, with V. sordida cell wall as the substrate, and the activity was 0.897 U. Furthermore, the activities of extracellular recombinant enzymes on fungal cell walls and compounds were generally higher than those of the intracellular recombinant enzymes. Recombinant exrCHI31 and exrCHI32 have better hydrolytic ability on cell walls of different fungi than synthetic chitins and obviously showed activity against A. alternata. PMID:24385885

  14. Effect of factor V Leiden polymorphism in severe sepsis and on treatment with recombinant human activated protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, S Betty; Nelson, David R

    2004-05-01

    Coagulation activation is part of the acute innate host response to infection that, when uncontrolled, may contribute to organ dysfunction and death. Activated protein C limits excessive coagulation activation by inactivating factors Va and VIIIa. The factor V Leiden mutation (R506Q), a prothrombotic gene polymorphism, disrupts the activity of this natural anticoagulant by rendering factor Va partially resistant to inactivation by activated protein C. Previous findings in the mouse factor V Leiden endotoxemia model and in patients with severe sepsis suggest that factor V Leiden constitutes a rare example of a balanced gene polymorphism that may provide a survival advantage for heterozygous carriers with severe sepsis. We sought to confirm that carriers of this prothrombotic factor V Leiden mutation do not have an increased risk of developing severe sepsis and that carriers with severe sepsis derive similar treatment benefit from recombinant human activated protein C (drotrecogin alfa [activated]) as non-factor V Leiden carriers. Prospective collection of factor V Leiden status from two clinical studies of severe sepsis (PROWESS and ENHANCE). : A total of 447 clinical sites across 25 countries. A total of 3894 adult patients with severe sepsis. Either 24 microg x kg x hr drotrecogin alfa (activated) (n = 3063) or placebo (n = 800) for 96 hrs or no exposure to the study drug (n = 31). The effect of the factor V Leiden carrier status in severe sepsis in the PROWESS study has been previously reported. The combined data on factor V Leiden status from 3894 adult patients with severe sepsis from the PROWESS and ENHANCE (a single-arm, open-label study of drotrecogin alfa [activated]) studies are reported here. At study entry, 3.9% of patients (150/3894) presenting with severe sepsis were heterozygous carriers. No homozygous factor V Leiden carriers were identified. The proportion of factor V Leiden carriers in patients with severe sepsis differs slightly from that

  15. Anthrax lethal toxin induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cytosolic cathepsin release is Nlrp1b/Nalp1b-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Averette

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available NOD-like receptors (NLRs are a group of cytoplasmic molecules that recognize microbial invasion or 'danger signals'. Activation of NLRs can induce rapid caspase-1 dependent cell death termed pyroptosis, or a caspase-1 independent cell death termed pyronecrosis. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT, is recognized by a subset of alleles of the NLR protein Nlrp1b, resulting in pyroptotic cell death of macrophages and dendritic cells. Here we show that LT induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP. The presentation of LMP requires expression of an LT-responsive allele of Nlrp1b, and is blocked by proteasome inhibitors and heat shock, both of which prevent LT-mediated pyroptosis. Further the lysosomal protease cathepsin B is released into the cell cytosol and cathepsin inhibitors block LT-mediated cell death. These data reveal a role for lysosomal membrane permeabilization in the cellular response to bacterial pathogens and demonstrate a shared requirement for cytosolic relocalization of cathepsins in pyroptosis and pyronecrosis.

  16. Cathepsin B mediates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Nagathihalli S; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Zacharias, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    The death ligand TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand) triggers apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells, which implies the potential for therapeutic applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B (CB) in mediating TRAIL-induced cell death in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. OSCC cell lines from primary tumor and lymph node metastasis were examined for expression of apoptosis markers by Western blots, enzyme activity assays, nuclear fragmentation assays, and FACS analysis. Gene-specific ribozymes or chemical inhibitors were used to inhibit CB or caspases in target cells. TRAIL-induced activation of caspase-3, cleavage of Bid and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, release of cytochrome c, and DNA fragmentation were blocked either by a pan-caspase inhibitor (zVAD-fmk) or a CB inhibitor (CA074Me), consistent with the involvement of TRAIL as well as CB in cell death. The primary tumor cells were more susceptible to apoptosis than their corresponding lymph node metastatic cells. Stable transfection of a ribozyme which inhibited CB expression also decreased the apoptotic process. We conclude that TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death in OSCC cells is mediated through CB or through caspase activation. Our data point to a new tumor-suppressive role for CB in OSCC which is opposed to the invasion- and metastasis-promoting functions of lysosomal proteases.

  17. Protective Protein/Cathepsin A Rescues N-glycosylation defects in Neuraminidase-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongning; Zaitsev, Slava; Taylor, Garry; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Bonten, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background Neuraminidase-1 (NEU1) catabolizes the hydrolysis of sialic acids from sialo-glycoconjugates. NEU1 depends on its interaction with the protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA) for lysosomal compartmentalization and catalytic activation. Murine NEU1 contains 4 N-glycosylation sites, 3 of which are conserved in the human enzyme. The expression of NEU1 gives rise to differentially glycosylated proteins. Methods We generated single-point mutations in mouse NEU1 at each of the 4 N-glycosylation sites. Mutant enzymes were expressed in NEU1-deficient cells in the presence and absence of PPCA. Results All 4 N-glycosylation variants were targeted to the lysosomal/endosomal compartment. All N-glycans, with the exception of the most C-terminal glycan, were important for maintaining stability or catalytic activity. The loss of catalytic activity caused by the deletion of the second N-glycan was rescued by increasing PPCA expression. Similar results were obtained with a human NEU1 N-glycosylation mutant identified in a sialidosis patient. Conclusions The N-terminal N-glycan of NEU1 is indispensable for its function, whereas the C-terminal N-glycan appears to be non-essential. The omission of the second N-glycan can be compensated for by upregulating the expression of PPCA. General Significance These findings could be relevant for the design of target therapies for patients carrying specific NEU1 mutations. PMID:19714866

  18. NSP4 Is Stored in Azurophil Granules and Released by Activated Neutrophils as Active Endoprotease with Restricted Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perera, Natascha C; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Larsen, Maria Torp

    2013-01-01

    and stored as an already activated enzyme in azurophil granules. Moreover, cathepsin C was identified as the activator of NSP4 in vivo, as cathepsin C deficiency resulted in a complete absence of NSP4 in a Papillon-Lefèvre patient. Our in-depth analysis of NSP4 establishes this arginine-specific protease...

  19. Rheumatoid Factor Positivity Is Associated with Increased Joint Destruction and Upregulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 and Cathepsin K Gene Expression in the Peripheral Blood in Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients Treated with Methotrexate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchetina, Elena V.; Demidova, Natalia V.; Karateev, Dmitry E.; Nasonov, Eugeny L.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated changes in gene expression of mTOR, p21, caspase-3, ULK1, TNFα, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and cathepsin K in the whole blood of rheumatoid arthritic (RA) patients treated with methotrexate (MTX) in relation to their rheumatoid factor status, clinical, immunological, and radiological parameters, and therapeutic response after a 24-month follow-up. The study group consisted of 35 control subjects and 33 RA patients without previous history of MTX treatment. Gene expression was measured using real-time RT-PCR. Decreased disease activity in patients at the end of the study was associated with significant downregulation of TNFα expression. Downregulation of mTOR was observed in seronegative patients, while no significant changes in the expression of p21, ULK1, or caspase-3 were noted in any RA patients at the end of the study. The increase in erosion numbers observed in the seropositive patients at the end of the follow-up was accompanied by upregulation of MMP-9 and cathepsin K, while seronegative patients demonstrated an absence of significant changes in MMP-9 and cathepsin K expression and no increase in the erosion score. Our results suggest that increased expression of MMP-9 and cathepsin K genes in the peripheral blood might indicate higher bone tissue destruction activity in RA patients treated with methotrexate. The clinical study registration number is 0120.0810610. PMID:24348567

  20. Native signal peptide of human ERp57 disulfide isomerase mediates secretion of active native recombinant ERp57 protein in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čiplys, Evaldas; Žitkus, Eimantas; Slibinskas, Rimantas

    2013-06-01

    Human ERp57 protein is disulfide isomerase, facilitating proper folding of glycoprotein precursors in the concert with ER lectin chaperones calreticulin and calnexin. Growing amount of data also associates ERp57 with many different functions in subcellular locations outside the ER. Analysis of protein functions requires substantial amounts of correctly folded, biologically active protein, and in this study we introduce yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a perfect host for production of human ERp57. Our data suggest that native signal peptide of human ERp57 protein is recognized and correctly processed in the yeast cells, which leads to protein secretion. Secreted recombinant ERp57 protein possesses native amino acid sequence and is biologically active. Moreover, secretion allows simple one-step purification of recombinant ERp57 protein with the yields reaching up to 10mg/L. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cultured mast cells from asthmatic patients and controls respond with similar sensitivity to recombinant Der P2 induced, IgE-mediated activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Inge Jacoba Maria Kortekaas; Sverrild, Asger; Lund, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    The function of cultured mast cells may depend on genetic or environmental influence on the stem cell donor. This study investigates whether asthma or atopy in the donor influenced the growth and sensitivity of mast cells cultured from patients with asthma and healthy controls under identical...... conditions. Mast cells were cultured from peripheral blood from twelve patients with an objectively confirmed asthma diagnosis and eight healthy subjects. During the last 2 weeks of culture, mast cells were incubated with IL-4 and 80 kU/l recombinant human IgE containing two clones (7% + 7%) specific...... for mite allergen Der p2. The sensitivity of IgE-mediated activation of mast cells was investigated as FcεRI-mediated upregulation of CD63. Ten subjects were atopic, defined as a positive skin prick test (>3 mm) to at least one of ten common allergens. After activation with recombinant Der p2, the maximum...

  2. Recombinant human activated protein C in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome: a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Cornet

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Pulmonary coagulopathy may play a pathogenetic role in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, by contributing to alveolocapillary inflammation and increased permeability. Recombinant human activated protein C (rh-APC may inhibit this process and thereby improve patient outcome. METHODS: A prospective randomized, saline-controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was performed in the intensive care units of two university hospitals, and patients with ARDS were included within 24 h after meeting inclusion criteria. INTERVENTION: A 4-day course of intravenous rh-APC (24 mcg/kg/h (n = 33 versus saline (n = 38. OUTCOMES: The primary outcome parameter was the pulmonary leak index (PLI of 67Gallium-transferrin as a measure of alveolocapillary permeability and secondary outcomes were disease severity scores and ventilator-free days, among others. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were similar; in 87% of patients the PLI was above normal and in 90% mechanical or non-invasive ventilation was instituted at a median lung injury score of 2.5. There was no evidence that Rh-APC treatment affected the PLI or attenuated lung injury and sequential organ failure assessment scores. Mean ventilator-free days amounted to 14 (rh-APC and 12 days (saline, P = 0.35. 28-day mortality was 6% in rh-APC- and 18% in saline-treated patients (P = 0.12. There was no difference in bleeding events. The study was prematurely discontinued because rh-APC was withdrawn from the market. CONCLUSION: There is no evidence that treatment with intravenous rh-APC during 4 days for infectious or inflammatory ARDS ameliorates increased alveolocapillary permeability or the clinical course of ARDS patients. We cannot exclude underpowering. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Nederlands Trial Register ISRCTN 52566874.

  3. Embryonic stem cells deficient for Brca2 or Blm exhibit divergent genotoxic profiles that support opposing activities during homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marple, Teresa [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Kim, Tae Moon [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States)]. E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu

    2006-12-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2 and the RecQ helicase, Blm (Bloom syndrome mutated) are tumor suppressors that maintain genome integrity, at least in part, through homologous recombination (HR). Brca2 facilitates HR by interacting with Rad51 in multiple regions, the BRC motifs encoded by exon 11 and a single domain encoded by exon 27; however, the exact importance of these regions is not fully understood. Blm also interacts with Rad51 and appears to suppress HR in most circumstances; however, its yeast homologue Sgs1 facilitates HR in response to some genotoxins. To better understand the biological importance of these two proteins, we performed a genotoxic screen on mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells impaired for either Brca2 or Blm to establish their genotoxic profiles (a cellular dose-response to a wide range of agents). This is the first side-by-side comparison of these two proteins in an identical genetic background. We compared cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 to cells reduced for Blm expression and find that the Brca2- and Blm-impaired cells exhibit genotoxic profiles that reflect opposing activities during HR. Cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 are hypersensitive to {gamma}-radiation, streptonigrin, mitomycin C and camptothecin and mildly resistant to ICRF-193 which is similar to HR defective cells null for Rad54. By contrast, Blm-impaired cells are hypersensitive to ICRF-193, mildly resistant to camptothecin and mitomycin C and more strongly resistant to hydroxyurea. These divergent profiles support the notion that Brca2 and Blm perform opposing functions during HR in mouse ES cells.

  4. Characterization of oligosaccharides in recombinant tissue plasminogen activator produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells: two decades of analytical technology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Oleg V; Field, Matthew; Ling, Victor T; Harris, Reed J

    2009-12-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is a well-characterized glycoprotein with a great deal of published information on its structure, post-translational modifications, and O- and N-glycosylation. Most of the characterization was accomplished in the late 1980s. During the past 2 decades, however, mass spectrometry has made a quantum leap forward offering new capabilities in soft electrospray ionization, speed, resolution, and accuracy of mass measurements. From this point of view, it is worthwhile to revisit the characterization of familiar proteins, such as rt-PA, using the new capabilities of modern analytical technology. In this work, we applied LC-MS with state-of-the-art instrumentation to the characterization of glycoforms of rt-PA. This method takes advantage of accurate mass measurements along with a fast "in-source" voltage switching for the detection of characteristic oxonium ions of saccharides. This method confirmed previously identified glycan structures based on existing knowledge of rt-PA glycans. In addition, we identified two novel glycan structures in rt-PA. A low level of Asn142 N-glycosylation was detected at an atypical Asn-Xaa-Cys consensus motif. It was found to be modified predominantly by biantennary hybrid structures. This N-glycosylation site was confirmed using a recently developed electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) technique. Also using this method, we detected low levels of elongation of fucose-O-Thr61 to di-, tri-, and tetrasaccharides, not previously observed in rt-PA. The results demonstrate that use of state-of-the-art analytical methods can reveal low-level, previously undetected modifications of well-characterized biopharmaceuticals.

  5. Response to treatment and adverse events associated with use of recombinant activated factor VII in children: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, James D; Ritchey, Arthur K

    2017-02-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for patients with hemophilia with inhibitors or congenital factor VII deficiency. Initial reports of off-label use highlighted its efficacy, though newer reports have not repeated these findings. In both types of publication, though, secondary thromboses have been seen in adult patients. The data in children are less clear. This study analyzed all rFVIIa use at a large children's hospital for characteristics and outcomes. Recipients of rFVIIa were identified retrospectively via the electronic medical record. Data on patient diagnosis, lab data, other treatments, adverse events, and outcomes were collected. Over 33 months, 66 patient episodes were treated with a total of 606 doses (median = 2). The most common indication (36.4%) was gastrointestinal bleeding (24/66 patients). Only one patient received a dose for an approved labeled indication. For control of bleeding, 33.3% of courses were unsuccessful (19/57). Bleeding from multiple sites was associated with treatment failure. In 16.7% of patients (11/66), unexpected adverse thromboses developed within 1 week of completing a course of rFVIIa. Thromboses in both intra- and extra-corporeal sites were included if they compromised patient care. In the majority of cases reviewed, rFVIIa was successful in stopping or slowing serious bleeding episodes. It was least effective when a patient had diffuse bleeding at the time of administration. The thrombosis rate of 16.7% was higher than expected, though causality cannot be declared. Further investigation is needed to determine the risk-benefit ratio in children.

  6. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against cathepsin B and cathepsin B-Like proteins of Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Gi-Sang; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kang, Heekyoung; Seo, Ga-Eun; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2017-12-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals. In previous studies, cathepsin B (nfcpb) and cathepsin B-like (nfcpb-L) genes of N. fowleri were cloned, and it was suggested that refolding rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L proteins could play important roles in host tissue invasion, immune response evasion and nutrient uptake. In this study, we produced anti-NfCPB and anti-NfCPB-L monoclonal antibodies (McAb) using a cell fusion technique, and observed their immunological characteristics. Seven hybridoma cells secreting rNfCPB McAbs and three hybridoma cells secreting rNfCPB-L McAbs were produced. Among these, 2C9 (monoclone for rNfCPB) and 1C8 (monoclone for rNfCPB-L) McAb showed high antibody titres and were finally selected for use. As determined by western blotting, 2C9 McAb bound to N. fowleri lysates, specifically the rNfCPB protein, which had bands of 28 kDa and 38.4 kDa. 1C8 McAb reacted with N. fowleri lysates, specifically the rNfCPB-L protein, which had bands of 24 kDa and 34 kDa. 2C9 and 1C8 monoclonal antibodies did not bind to lysates of other amoebae, such as N. gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii and A. polyphaga in western blot analyses. Immuno-cytochemistry analysis detected NfCPB and NfCPB-L proteins in the cytoplasm of N. fowleri trophozoites, particularly in the pseudopodia and food-cup. These results suggest that monoclonal antibodies produced against rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L proteins may be useful for further immunological study of PAM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. First-principles study of Frenkel pair recombination in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Shi-Yao; Jin, Shuo, E-mail: jinshuo@buaa.edu.cn; Li, Yu-Hao; Zhou, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-15

    The recombination of one Frenkel pair in tungsten has been investigated through first-principles simulation. Two different recombination types have been identified: instantaneous and thermally activated. The small recombination barriers for thermally activated recombination cases indicate that recombination can occur easily with a slightly increased temperature. For both of the two recombination types, recombination occurs through the self-interstitial atom moving towards the vacancy. The recombination process can be direct or through replacement sequences, depending on the vertical distance between the vacancy and the 〈1 1 1〉 line of self-interstitial atom pair.

  8. First-principles study of Frenkel pair recombination in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shi-Yao; Jin, Shuo; Li, Yu-Hao; Zhou, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-01

    The recombination of one Frenkel pair in tungsten has been investigated through first-principles simulation. Two different recombination types have been identified: instantaneous and thermally activated. The small recombination barriers for thermally activated recombination cases indicate that recombination can occur easily with a slightly increased temperature. For both of the two recombination types, recombination occurs through the self-interstitial atom moving towards the vacancy. The recombination process can be direct or through replacement sequences, depending on the vertical distance between the vacancy and the line of self-interstitial atom pair.

  9. XRCC3 ATPase activity is required for normal XRCC3-Rad51C complex dynamics and homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, N; Hinz, J; Kopf, V L; Segalle, K; Thompson, L

    2004-02-25

    Homologous recombinational repair is a major DNA repair pathway that preserves chromosomal integrity by removing double-strand breaks, crosslinks, and other DNA damage. In eukaryotic cells, the Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D) are involved in this process, although their exact functions are largely undetermined. All five paralogs contain ATPase motifs, and XRCC3 appears to exist in a single complex with Rad51C. To begin to examine the function of this Rad51C-XRCC3 complex, we generated mammalian expression vectors that produce human wild-type XRCC3 or mutant XRCC3 with either a non-conservative mutation (K113A) or a conservative mutation (K113R) in the GKT Walker A box of the ATPase motif. The three vectors were independently transfected into Xrcc3-deficient irs1SF CHO cells. Wild-type XRCC3 complemented irs1SF cells, albeit to varying degrees, while ATPase mutants had no complementing activity, even when the mutant protein was expressed at comparable levels to that in wild-type-complemented clones. Because of the mutants' dysfunction, we propose that ATP binding and hydrolyzing activities of XRCC3 are essential. We tested in vitro complex formation by wild-type and mutant XRCC3 with His6-tagged Rad51C upon coexpression in bacteria, nickel affinity purification, and western blotting. Wild-type and K113A mutant XRCC3 formed stable complexes with Rad51C and co-purified with Rad51C, while the K113R mutant did not and was predominantly insoluble. Addition of 5 mM ATP, but not ADP, also abolished complex formation by the wild-type proteins. These results suggest that XRCC3 is likely to regulate the dissociation and formation of Rad51C-XRCC3 complex through ATP binding and hydrolysis, with both processes being essential for the complex's ability to participate in HRR.

  10. Molecular chaperone assisted expression systems: obtaining pure soluble and active recombinant proteins for structural and therapeutic purposes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makhoba, XH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available during recombinant proteins production in E. coli. Molecular chaperones are proteins that are known to assist the newly synthesized proteins to complete their folding stages. This system has improved various proteins that are difficult to produce in E...

  11. Recombinant interferon-beta blocks proliferation but enhances interleukin-10 secretion by activated human T-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, M. H.; Hintzen, R. Q.; Polman, C. H.; van Lier, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Results from recent clinical trials have indicated that recombinant interferon-beta (rIFN-beta) is a promising drug for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS), a disease of supposed autoimmune etiology. To gain insight into the immunoregulatory properties of this cytokine, we analyzed effects of

  12. Glycosylation profile of a recombinant urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, M; Rahbek-Nielsen, H; Nielsen, P F

    1998-01-01

    migration and tissue remodeling. The uPA receptor is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein belonging to the Ly-6/uPAR superfamily and is the only multidomain member identified so far. We have now purified the three individual domains of a recombinant soluble uPAR variant, expressed in Chinese hamster ovary...

  13. Prolonged Prothrombin Time After Recombinant Activated Factor VII Therapy in Critically Bleeding Trauma Patients Is Associated With Adverse Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    based on levels effective for hemophilia patients with inhibitors; therefore, it was unlikely that underdosing of rFVIIa contributed to the compromised...NR, Kauvar DS, Currier HM, et al. The clinical and labora- tory response to recombinant factor VIIA in trauma and surgical patients with acquired

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Juices Prepared from Individual Vegetables on CYP3A4 Activity in Recombinant CYP3A4 and LS180 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Agawa, Chie; Ueda, Shinya; Yamane, Takayoshi; Kitayama, Haruna; Terao, Aya; Fukuda, Tomoya; Minegaki, Tetsuya; Nishiguchi, Kohshi

    2017-01-01

    Human intestinal absorption and drug metabolism vary to a large extent among individuals. For example, CYP3A4 activity has large individual variation that cannot be attributed to only genetic differences. Various flavonoids in vegetables, such as kaempferol and quercetin, possess inhibitory effects, and some vegetable and fruit juices have also been found to inhibit CYP3A4 activity. Therefore, differences in daily intake of flavonoid-containing vegetables may induce individual variation in intestinal bioavailability. To identify a vegetable that strongly inhibits CYP3A4, we investigated the effects of juices, prepared from individual vegetables, on CYP3A4 activity using recombinant CYP3A4 and LS180 cells in this study. Nine vegetable juices (cabbage, Japanese radish, onion, tomato, eggplant, carrot, Chinese cabbage, green pepper, and lettuce), were prepared and recombinant CYP3A4 and LS180 cells were used for evaluation of CYP3A4 activity. Metabolism to 6β-hydroxytestosterone by recombinant CYP3A4 was strongly inhibited by cabbage, onion, and green pepper juices, and cabbage and green pepper juices significantly inhibited CYP3A4 activity in a preincubation time-dependent manner. In addition, CYP3A4 activity in LS180 cells was significantly inhibited by cabbage and onion juices. In conclusion, this study showed that juices prepared from some individual vegetables could significantly inhibit CYP3A4 activity. Therefore, variation in the daily intake of vegetables such as cabbage and onion may be one of the factors responsible for individual differences in intestinal bioavailability.

  15. Identification and Characterization of the V(DJ Recombination Activating Gene 1 in Long-Term Memory of Context Fear Conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Castro-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence suggests that mechanisms related to the introduction and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs may be associated with long-term memory (LTM processes. Previous studies from our group suggested that factors known to function in DNA recombination/repair machineries, such as DNA ligases, polymerases, and DNA endonucleases, play a role in LTM. Here we report data using C57BL/6 mice showing that the V(DJ recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1, which encodes a factor that introduces DSBs in immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor genes, is induced in the amygdala, but not in the hippocampus, after context fear conditioning. Amygdalar induction of RAG1 mRNA, measured by real-time PCR, was not observed in context-only or shock-only controls, suggesting that the context fear conditioning response is related to associative learning processes. Furthermore, double immunofluorescence studies demonstrated the neuronal localization of RAG1 protein in amygdalar sections prepared after perfusion and fixation. In functional studies, intra-amygdalar injections of RAG1 gapmer antisense oligonucleotides, given 1 h prior to conditioning, resulted in amygdalar knockdown of RAG1 mRNA and a significant impairment in LTM, tested 24 h after training. Overall, these findings suggest that the V(DJ recombination-activating gene 1, RAG1, may play a role in LTM consolidation.

  16. Identification of a recombinant inulin fructotransferase (difructose dianhydride III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 with high specific activity and remarkable thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-04-08

    Difructose dianhydride III (DFA III) is a functional carbohydrate produced from inulin by inulin fructotransferase (IFTase, EC 4.2.2.18). In this work, an IFTase gene from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 was cloned and expressed in Escherachia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified by metal affinity chromatography. It showed significant inulin hydrolysis activity, and the produced main product from inulin was determined as DFA III by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The molecular mass of the purified protein was calculated to be 43 and 125 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, respectively, suggesting the native enzyme might be a homotrimer. The recombinant enzyme showed maximal activity as 2391 units/mg at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. It displayed the highest thermostability among previously reported IFTases (DFA III forming) and was stable up to 80 °C for 4 h of incubation. The smallest substrate was determined as nystose. The conversion ratio of inulin to DFA III reached 81% when 100 g/L inulin was catalyzed by 80 nM recombinant enzyme for 20 min at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. All of these data indicated that the IFTase (DFA III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 had great potential for industrial DFA III production.

  17. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  18. Prediction of human pharmacokinetics of activated recombinant factor VII and B-domain truncated factor VIII from animal population pharmacokinetic models of haemophilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malte Selch; Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Groth, Andreas Velsing

    2018-01-01

    Various experimental animal models are used in haemophilia research, however, little is known about how well the different species predict pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles in haemophilia patients. The aim of the current study was to describe the plasma concentration-time profile of recombinant...... activated factor VII (rFVIIa) and recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) in several experimental animal models using population PK modelling, and apply a simulation-based approach to evaluate how well the developed animal population PK models predict human PK. PK models were developed for rFVIIa and r...... for nonlinear kinetics and gender-specific difference in clearance for rFVIII. The predictive performance of the animal population PK models of rFVIIa and rFVIII revealed significant species-variation. The developed PK models of rFVIIa and rFVIII in monkeys and dogs along with allometric interspecies scaling...

  19. Lysosomal Cathepsin A Plays Significant Role In The Processing Of Endogenous Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Timur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase Cathepsin A (CTSA is a multifunctional enzyme with distinct protective and catalytic function. CTSA that is present in the lysosomal multienzyme complex facilitates correct lysosomal routing, stability and activation of betagalactosidase and alpha-neuraminidase. In addition, CTSA plays a role in the inactivation of bioactive peptides including bradykinin, substances P, oxytocin, angiotensin I and endothelin-I by cleavage of one or two amino acid(s from the C-terminal ends. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the regulatory role of CTSA on bioactive peptides in a knock-in mouse model of CTSAS190A. We evaluated the levels of bradykinin, substances P, oxytocin, angiotensin I and endothelin-I in the kidney, liver, lung, brain and serum of the CTSAS190A mouse model at three- and six-months of age. Our results suggest that CTSA selectively contributes to the processing of bioactive peptides in different tissues of CTSAS190A mice compared to those of age-matched wild-type mice.

  20. Cyanobacterial peptides as a prototype for the design of cathepsin D inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Bao, Keting; Tang, Shuai; Ai, Jing; Hu, Haiyan; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Cathepsin D (Cath D) is overexpressed and secreted in a number of solid tumors and involved in the progress of tumor invasion, proliferation, metastasis, and apoptosis. Inhibition of Cath D is regarded as an attractive pathway for the development of novel anticancer drugs. Our previous studies revealed that tasiamide B, a cyanobacterial peptide that contained a statine-like unit, exhibited good inhibition against Cath D and other aspartic proteases. Using this natural product as prototype, we designed and synthesized three new analogs, which bear isophthalic acid fragment at the N-terminus and isobutyl amine (1), cyclopropyl amine (2), or 3-methoxybenzyl amine (3) moiety at the C-terminus. Enzymatic assays revealed that all these three compounds showed moderate-to-good inhibition against Cath D, with IC50 s of 15, 884, and 353 nM, respectively. Notably, compound 1 showed extreme selectivity for Cath D with 576-fold over Cath E and 554-fold over BACE1, which could be a valuable template for the design of highly potent and selective Cath D inhibitors. Additionally, compound 1 showed moderated activity against HeLa cell lines with IC50 of 41.8 μM. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Cathepsin L is required for endothelial progenitor cell-induced neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbich, Carmen; Heeschen, Christopher; Aicher, Alexandra; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Bruhl, Thomas; Hofmann, Wolf K.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Pennacchio, Len A.; Abolmaali, Nasreddin D.; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2004-01-15

    Infusion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but not of mature endothelial cells (ECs), promotes neovascularization after ischemia. We performed a gene expression profiling of EPCs and ECs to identify genes, which might be important for the neovascularization capacity of EPCs. Intriguingly, the protease cathepsin L (CathL) was highly expressed in EPCs as opposed to ECs and is essential for matrix degradation and invasion by EPCs in vitro. CathL deficient mice showed impaired functional recovery after hind limb ischemia supporting the concept for an important role of CathL in postnatal neovascularization. Infused CathL deficient progenitor cells failed to home to sites of ischemia and to augment neovascularization. In contrast, over expression of CathL in mature ECs significantly enhanced their invasive activity and induced their neovascularization capacity in vivo. Taken together, CathL plays a crucial role for the integration of circulating EPCs into the ischemic tissue and is required for neovascularization mediated by EPCs.

  2. Cathepsin L Helps to Defend Mice from Infection with Influenza A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xu

    Full Text Available Host-derived proteases can augment or help to clear infections. This dichotomy is exemplified by cathepsin L (CTSL, which helps Hendra virus and SARS coronavirus to invade cells, but is essential for survival in mice with mycoplasma pneumonia. The present study tested the hypothesis that CTSL protects mice from serious consequences of infection by the orthomyxovirus influenza A, which is thought to be activated by host-supplied proteases other than CTSL. Ctsl-/- mice infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1 had larger lung viral loads and higher mortality than infected Ctsl+/+ mice. Lung inflammation in surviving infected mice peaked 14 days after initial infection, accompanied marked focal distal airway bronchiolization and epithelial metaplasia followed by desquamation and fibrotic interstitial remodeling, and persisted for at least 6 weeks. Most deaths occurred during the second week of infection in both groups of mice. In contrast to mycoplasma pneumonia, infiltrating cells were predominantly mononuclear rather than polymorphonuclear. The histopathology of lung inflammation and remodeling in survivors was similar in Ctsl-/- and Ctsl+/+ mice, although Ctsl+/+ mice cleared immunoreactive virus sooner. Furthermore, Ctsl-/- mice had profound deficits in CD4+ lymphocytes before and after infection and weaker production of pathogen-specific IgG. Thus, CTSL appears to support innate as well as adaptive responses, which confer a survival advantage on mice infected with the orthomyxovirus influenza A.

  3. Safety of full-dose intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator followed by multimodal endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Raul G; Yoo, Albert J; Masrur, Shihab; Batista, Leonardo M; Hakimelahi, Reza; Hirsch, Joshua A; Schwamm, Lee H

    2013-07-01

    The optimal management of stroke patients who fail treatment with intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) remains unknown. A study was undertaken to establish whether treatment with a standard intravenous t-PA dose (0.9 mg/kg) followed by multimodal endovascular therapy would have a similar safety profile to reduced dose (0.6 mg/kg) bridging therapy. A retrospective analysis was performed of a prospectively collected database. All patients treated with full-dose t-PA and endovascular therapy were included. The primary safety endpoints included ECASS-III symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) and ECASS parenchymal hematomas (PH). Secondary safety endpoints included severe systemic bleeding and 90-day mortality. Clinical efficacy endpoints included rates of recanalization (TICI 2-3), ambulation at hospital discharge and 90-day independent outcomes (mRS 0-2). 106 consecutive patients (mean age 69 ± 17 years; mean baseline NIH Stroke Scale 17.8 ± 4.8; 55% women; occlusion sites: MCA-M1 60.4%; MCA-M2 6.6%; ICA-T 19.8%; tandem cervical ICA+MCA-M1 7.5%; basilar artery 5.7%) were identified over a 10-year period. The sICH rate was 8.5% and the PH-1, PH-2 and subarachnoid hemorrhage rates were 2.8%, 8.5% and 2.8%, respectively. There were two (1.9%) severe groin hematomas. The recanalization rate was 66%. At hospital discharge, 41.4% of the patients were ambulatory. The rate of independent functional outcomes at 90 days was 24%; however, this sample is biased since nearly all deaths were captured but detailed 90-day functional outcomes were missing in 27 patients. The 90-day death rate was 32.4%. Combined treatment with full-dose intravenous rt-PA followed by multimodal endovascular therapy seems to be associated with similar rates of sICH to that of bridging therapy with reduced rt-PA dosage.

  4. Molecular Cloning, Recombinant Expression and Antifungal Activity of BnCPI, a Cystatin in Ramie (Boehmeria nivea L.

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    Yongting Yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytocystatins play multiple roles in plant growth, development and resistance to pests and other environmental stresses. A ramie (Boehmeria nivea L. phytocystatin gene, designated as BnCPI, was isolated from a ramie cDNA library and its full-length cDNA was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE. The full-length cDNA sequence (691 bp consisted of a 303 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a protein of 100 amino acids with deduced molecular mass of 11.06 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point (pI of 6.0. The alignment of genome DNA (accession no. MF153097 and cDNA sequences of BnCPI showed that an intron (~104 bp exists in the coding region. The BnCPI protein contains most of the highly conserved blocks including Gly5-Gly6 at the N-terminal, the reactive site motif QxVxG (Q49V50V51S52G53, the L79-W80 block and the [LVI]-[AGT]-[RKE]-[FY]-[AS]-[VI]-x-[EDQV]-[HYFQ]-N (L22G23R24 F25A26V27 D28D29H30 N31 block that is common among plant cystatins. BLAST analysis indicated that BnCPI is similar to cystatins from Glycine max (77%, Glycine soja (76%, Hevea brasiliensis (75% and Ricinus communis (75%. The BnCPI was subcloned into expression vector pSmart-I and then overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 as a His-tagged recombinant protein. The purified reBnCPI has a molecular mass of 11.4 kDa determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE. Purified reBnCPI can efficiently inhibit the protease activity of papain and ficin toward BANA (Nα-benzoyl-L-arginine-2-naphthyamide, as well as the mycelium growth of some important plant pathogenic fungi. The data further contribute to our understanding of the molecular functions of BnCPI.

  5. Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator in Acute Ischemic Stroke–Enhanced Regimen Stroke Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancioli, Arthur M.; Adeoye, Opeolu; Schmit, Pamela A.; Khoury, Jane; Levine, Steven R.; Tomsick, Thomas A.; Sucharew, Heidi; Brooks, Claudette E.; Crocco, Todd J.; Gutmann, Laurie; Hemmen, Thomas M.; Kasner, Scott E.; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Knight, William A.; Martini, Sharyl; McKinney, James S.; Meurer, William J.; Meyer, Brett C.; Schneider, Alexander; Scott, Phillip A.; Starkman, Sidney; Warach, Steven; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose In a previous study, 0.3 and 0.45 mg/kg of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) were safe when combined with eptifibatide 75 mcg/kg bolus and a 2-hour infusion (0.75 mcg/kg per minute). The Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and rt-PA in Acute Ischemic Stroke–Enhanced Regimen (CLEAR-ER) trial sought to determine the safety of a higher-dose regimen and to establish evidence for a phase III trial. Methods CLEAR-ER was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized safety study. Ischemic stroke patients were randomized to 0.6 mg/kg rt-PA plus eptifibatide (135 mcg/kg bolus and a 2-hour infusion at 0.75 mcg/kg per minute) versus standard rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg). The primary safety end point was the incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage within 36 hours. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≤1 or return to baseline mRS at 90 days. Analysis of the safety and efficacy outcomes was done with multiple logistic regression. Results Of 126 subjects, 101 received combination therapy, and 25 received standard rt-PA. Two (2%) patients in the combination group and 3 (12%) in the standard group had symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (odds ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–1.40; P=0.053). At 90 days, 49.5% of the combination group had mRS ≤1 or return to baseline mRS versus 36.0% in the standard group (odds ratio, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.70–4.31; P=0.23). After adjusting for age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, time to intravenous rt-PA, and baseline mRS, the odds ratio was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 0.51–3.76; P=0.52). Conclusions The combined regimen of intravenous rt-PA and eptifibatide studied in this trial was safe and provides evidence that a phase III trial is warranted to determine efficacy of the regimen. PMID:23887841

  6. Combined approach to lysis utilizing eptifibatide and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke-enhanced regimen stroke trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancioli, Arthur M; Adeoye, Opeolu; Schmit, Pamela A; Khoury, Jane; Levine, Steven R; Tomsick, Thomas A; Sucharew, Heidi; Brooks, Claudette E; Crocco, Todd J; Gutmann, Laurie; Hemmen, Thomas M; Kasner, Scott E; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Knight, William A; Martini, Sharyl; McKinney, James S; Meurer, William J; Meyer, Brett C; Schneider, Alexander; Scott, Phillip A; Starkman, Sidney; Warach, Steven; Broderick, Joseph P

    2013-09-01

    In a previous study, 0.3 and 0.45 mg/kg of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) were safe when combined with eptifibatide 75 mcg/kg bolus and a 2-hour infusion (0.75 mcg/kg per minute). The Combined Approach to Lysis Utilizing Eptifibatide and rt-PA in Acute Ischemic Stroke-Enhanced Regimen (CLEAR-ER) trial sought to determine the safety of a higher-dose regimen and to establish evidence for a phase III trial. CLEAR-ER was a multicenter, double-blind, randomized safety study. Ischemic stroke patients were randomized to 0.6 mg/kg rt-PA plus eptifibatide (135 mcg/kg bolus and a 2-hour infusion at 0.75 mcg/kg per minute) versus standard rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg). The primary safety end point was the incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage within 36 hours. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≤1 or return to baseline mRS at 90 days. Analysis of the safety and efficacy outcomes was done with multiple logistic regression. Of 126 subjects, 101 received combination therapy, and 25 received standard rt-PA. Two (2%) patients in the combination group and 3 (12%) in the standard group had symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (odds ratio, 0.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-1.40; P=0.053). At 90 days, 49.5% of the combination group had mRS ≤1 or return to baseline mRS versus 36.0% in the standard group (odds ratio, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-4.31; P=0.23). After adjusting for age, baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, time to intravenous rt-PA, and baseline mRS, the odds ratio was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 0.51-3.76; P=0.52). The combined regimen of intravenous rt-PA and eptifibatide studied in this trial was safe and provides evidence that a phase III trial is warranted to determine efficacy of the regimen. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00894803.

  7. Use of activated recombinant factor VII for severe coagulopathy post ventricular assist device or orthotopic heart transplant

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    Despotis George J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ventricular assist devices(VAD implantation/removal is a complex surgical procedure with perioperative bleeding complications occurring in nearly half of the cases. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa has been used off-label to control severe hemorrhage in surgery and trauma. We report here our experience with rFVIIa as a rescue therapy to achieve hemostasis in patients undergoing orthotopic heart transplant (OHT and/or VAD implantation. Methods A retrospective review was conducted from Jan 03 to Aug 05 for patients who received rFVIIa for the management of intractable bleeding unresponsive to standard hemostatic blood component therapy. Blood loss and the quantity of blood products, prior to, and for at least 12 hours after, administration of rFVIIa were recorded. Results Mean patient age was 53, (38–64 yrs, mean dose of rFVIIa administered was 78.3 μg/kg (24–189 μg/kg in 1–3 doses. All patients received the drug either intraoperatively or within 6 hours of arrival in ICU. Mean transfusion requirements and blood loss were significantly reduced after rFVIIa administration (PRBC's; 16.9 ± 13.3 to 7.1 ± 6.9 units, FFP; 13.1 ± 8.2 to 4.1 ± 4.9 units, platelets; 4.0 ± 2.8 to 2.1 ± 2.2 units, p Conclusion In this review, there was a significant decrease in transfusion requirement and blood loss after rFVIIa administration. Although, 5/17 developed thromboembolic complications, these patients may have been at higher risk based on the multiple modality therapy used to manage intractable bleeding. Nevertheless, the exact role of rFVIIa with respect to development of thromboembolic complications cannot be clearly determined. Further investigation is needed to determine rFVIIa's safety and its effectiveness in improving postoperative morbidity and mortality.

  8. Treatment of acute ischemic brain infarction with the assistance of local intraarterial thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncyljusz, W; Falkowski, A; Kojder, I; Cebula, E; Sagan, L; Czechowski, J; Walecka, A

    2007-09-01

    Cerebral infarction is usually due to arterial occlusion. Prompt treatment with thrombolytic drugs can restore blood flow and improve recovery from an infarct. To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of local intraarterial thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rtPA) in patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarctions within 6 hours of the onset of symptoms. Sixteen patients (10 females and six males) aged from 42 to 61 years, with acute MCA territory infarcts were selected for treatment with local i.a. rtPA up to 6 hours after the onset of symptoms. Patient selection was based on clinical examination, computed tomography (CT), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A clinical evaluation was performed before treatment, at the time of discharge, and 90 days post-procedure on the basis of modified Rankin and NIHSS scores. Controls (n = 16, nine females and seven males) aged from 51 to 70 years were treated only with intravenous anticoagulation using i.v. heparin infusion. The control group was evaluated with multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography performed on entry to the study and at 2-4 hours afterwards. Eight patients (50%) achieved a modified Rankin score of 2 or less as the primary outcome after 90 days follow-up. The secondary clinical outcome at 90-day follow-up was as follows: NIHSS score or =50% decrease, nine (56%) of the patients. A recanalization rate of 75% was achieved in 12 of the 16 treated patients, but only 12.5% in two of the 16 patients in the control group. Intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in two (12.5%) of the patients in the treatment group, but in only one patient (6%) in the control group. There were no deaths in the treated group after thrombolysis up to the time of discharge; however, during the 90-day follow-up, two patients died compared to three patients in the control group (19% vs. 12.5% mortality rate). Patients with cerebral infarction who were treated within 6 hours of onset using

  9. Mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting of cathepsin D to lysosomes in HepG2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnboutt, S.; Kal, A. J.; Geuze, H. J.; Aerts, H.; Strous, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the role of N-linked oligosaccharides and proteolytic processing on the targeting of cathepsin D to the lysosomes in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. In the presence of tunicamycin cathepsin D was synthesized as an unglycosylated 43-kDa proenzyme which was proteolytically

  10. TAILS N-Terminomics and Proteomics Show Protein Degradation Dominates over Proteolytic Processing by Cathepsins in Pancreatic Tumors

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    Anna Prudova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deregulated cathepsin proteolysis occurs across numerous cancers, but in vivo substrates mediating tumorigenesis remain