WorldWideScience

Sample records for active nitrogen species

  1. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Defense/Stress Responses Activated by Chitosan in Sycamore Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Malerba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan (CHT is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L. cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO. We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation.

  2. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-29

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation.

  3. The nature of paramagnetic species in nitrogen doped TiO2 active in visible light photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livraghi, Stefano; Votta, Annamaria; Paganini, Maria Cristina; Giamello, Elio

    2005-01-28

    Nitrogen doped TiO2, a novel photocatalyst active in the decomposition of organic pollutants using visible light, contains two different types of paramagnetic centres (neutral NO radicals and NO2(2-) type radical ions respectively) which are likely related to specific properties of the solid.

  4. Construction of Z-scheme Ag2CO3/N-doped graphene photocatalysts with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity by tuning the nitrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaoqing; Meng, Aiyun; Jiang, Shujuan; Cheng, Bei; Jiang, Chuanjia

    2017-02-01

    Semiconductor-based photocatalysis has great potential in various environmental and energy applications, and Z-scheme photocatalysts have many advantages over single-component photocatalysts. The construction of a highly efficient Z-scheme photocatalytic system depends on the geometric structure arrangement, microscopic and crystalline form of the stoichiometric species, and it has not been elucidated whether the Z-scheme photocatalysts can be designed by tuning the electronic structures of cocatalysts alone. Here, using N-doped graphene (NG) as cocatalyst, we successfully constructed Z-scheme Ag2CO3-NG photocatalysts with enhanced activity for the photooxidative degradation of phenol pollutant. It was found that the pyridinic nitrogen species (Np) of NG could spontaneously reduce Ag+ to produce plasmonic Ag nanoparticles on Ag2CO3-NG, while the efficiency of the photogenerated charge separation, Z-scheme transfer option, and O2 adsorption were promoted by the graphitic nitrogen species (Ng). Therefore, the as-designed Z-scheme Ag2CO3-NG photocatalysts showed much higher activity than Ag2CO3 and its composites with graphene oxide (GO) or reduced GO as cocatalysts in the photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Hence, our results provide a new strategy for exploring advanced Z-scheme photocatalysts with NG as cocatalyst by rationally tuning the Np and Ng species.

  5. Buffer nitrogen solubility, in vitro ruminal partitioning of nitrogen and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in leaves of four fodder tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudjoe, N; Mlambo, V

    2014-08-01

    This study explores the chemical composition, buffer N solubility, in vitro ruminal N degradability and in vitro ruminal biological activity of tannins in leaves from Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala, Morus alba and Trichanthera gigantea trees. These tree leaves are a potential protein source for ruminants, but their site-influenced nutritive value is largely unknown. Leucaena leucocephala leaves had the highest N content (42.1 g/kg DM), while T. gigantea leaves had the least (26.1 g/kg DM). Leucaena leucocephala had the highest buffer solubility index (20%), while 10% of the total N in leaves of the other three species was soluble. The rapidly fermentable N fraction 'a' was highest in M. alba leaves (734.9 g/kg DM) and least in T. gigantea leaves (139.5 g/kg DM). The rate of fermentation (c) was highest for M. alba (7%/hours) leaves. No significant correlations were recorded between buffer solubility index of N and in vitro ruminal N degradability parameters: a, b, and c. The highest response to tannin inactivation using polyethylene glycol, in terms of percentage increase in 36-hours cumulative gas production, was recorded in M. alba (39%) and T. gigantea (38%) leaves. It was concluded that buffer solubility of N is not a good indicator of ruminal N degradation in the leaves of these tree species. Leaves of M. alba could be more valuable as a source of rapidly fermentable N when animals are offered low-protein, high-fibre diets compared with other tree species evaluated in the current study. However, when feeding M. alba leaves, the role of tannins must be considered because these secondary plant compounds showed significant in vitro ruminal biological activity.

  6. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 3. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS/RNS) Scavenging Assays, Oxidative Stress Biomarkers, and Chromatographic/Chemometric Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    There are many studies in which the antioxidant potential of different foods have been analyzed. However, there are still conflicting results and lack of information as a result of unstandardized assay techniques and differences between the principles of the methods applied. The measurement of antioxidant activity, especially in the case of mixtures, multifunctional or complex multiphase systems, cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using a simple antioxidant test due to the many variables influencing the results. In the literature, there are many antioxidant assays that are used to measure the total antioxidant activity/capacity of food materials. In this review, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) scavenging assays are evaluated with respect to their mechanism, advantages, disadvantages, and potential use in food systems. On the other hand, in vivo antioxidant activity (AOA) assays including oxidative stress biomarkers and cellular-based assays are covered within the scope of this review. Finally, chromatographic and chemometric assays are reviewed, focusing on their benefits especially with respect to their time saving, cost-effective, and sensitive nature.

  7. Structure of dihydrochalcones and related derivatives and their scavenging and antioxidant activity against oxygen and nitrogen radical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentes, Alexandre L A; Borges, Rosivaldo S; Monteiro, Waldinei R; de Macedo, Luiz G M; Alves, Cláudio N

    2011-02-21

    Quantum mechanical calculations at B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory were employed to obtain energy (E), ionization potential (IP), bond dissociation enthalpy (O-H BDE) and stabilization energies (DE(iso)) in order to infer the scavenging activity of dihydrochalcones (DHC) and structurally related compounds. Spin density calculations were also performed for the proposed antioxidant activity mechanism of 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (2,4,6-THA). The unpaired electron formed by the hydrogen abstraction from the phenolic hydroxyl group of 2,4,6-THA is localized on the phenolic oxygen at 2, 6, and 4 positions, the C₃ and C₆ carbon atoms at ortho positions, and the C₅ carbon atom at para position. The lowest phenolic oxygen contribution corresponded to the highest scavenging activity value. It was found that antioxidant activity depends on the presence of a hydroxyl at the C2 and C4 positions and that there is a correlation between IP and O-H BDE and peroxynitrite scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation. These results identified the pharmacophore group for DHC.

  8. Structure of Dihydrochalcones and Related Derivatives and Their Scavenging and Antioxidant Activity against Oxygen and Nitrogen Radical Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre L. A. Bentes

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanical calculations at B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory were employed to obtain energy (E, ionization potential (IP, bond dissociation enthalpy (O-H BDE and stabilization energies (DEiso in order to infer the scavenging activity of dihydrochalcones (DHC and structurally related compounds. Spin density calculations were also performed for the proposed antioxidant activity mechanism of 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (2,4,6-THA. The unpaired electron formed by the hydrogen abstraction from the phenolic hydroxyl group of 2,4,6-THA is localized on the phenolic oxygen at 2, 6, and 4 positions, the C3 and C6 carbon atoms at ortho positions, and the C5 carbon atom at para position. The lowest phenolic oxygen contribution corresponded to the  highest scavenging activity value. It was found that antioxidant activity depends on the presence of a hydroxyl at the C2 and C4 positions and that there is a correlation between IP and O-H BDE and peroxynitrite scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation. These results identified the pharmacophore group for DHC.

  9. Relationship of peroxyacetyl nitrate to active and total odd nitrogen at northern high latitudes - Influence of reservoir species on NO(x) and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.; Herlth, D.; O'Hara, D.; Zahnle, K.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Talbot, R.; Crutzen, P. J.; Kanakidou, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The partitioning of relative nitrogen in the Arctic and the sub-Arctic troposphere based on measurements conducted during the 1988 Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) is described. The first set of comprehensive odd nitrogen and O3 measurements from the Arctic/sub-Arctic free troposphere shows that a highly aged air mass that has persisted under very cold conditions is present. A large fraction of the odd nitrogen appears to be present in the form of reservoir species such as PAN. Significant quantities of as yet unknown reactive nitrogen species, such as complex alkyl nitrates and pernitrates, are expected to be present. Together with PAN, these nitrate and pernitrate reservoir species could control the entire NO(x) availability of the high-latitude troposphere and in turn influence the O3 photochemistry of the region. The role of PAN in influencing the O3 reservoir is shown to be important and may be responsible for the increasing O3 temporal trend observed at high latitudes.

  10. Anti-apoptotic mechanism of Bacoside rich extract against reactive nitrogen species induced activation of iNOS/Bax/caspase 3 mediated apoptosis in L132 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, T; Pandareesh, M D; Bhat, Pratiksha V; Venkataramana, M

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a highly reactive free radical gas that reacts with a wide range of bio-molecules to produce reactive nitrogen species and exerts nitrative stress. Bacopa monniera is a traditional folk and ayurvedic medicine known to alleviate a variety of disorders. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the protective propensity of Bacopa monniera extract (BME) through its oxido-nitrosative and anti-apoptotic mechanism to attenuate sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced apoptosis in a human embryonic lung epithelial cell line (L132). Our results elucidate that pre-treatment of L132 cells with BME ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by SNP as evidenced by MTT and LDH leakage assays. BME pre-treatment inhibited NO generation by down-regulating inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. BME exhibited potent antioxidant activity by up-regulating the antioxidant enzymes. SNP-induced damage to cellular, nuclear and mitochondrial integrity was also restored by BME, which was confirmed by ROS estimation, comet assay and mitochondrial membrane potential assays respectively. BME pre-treatment efficiently attenuated the SNP-induced apoptotic biomarkers such as Bax, cytochrome-c and caspase-3, which orchestrate the proteolytic damage of the cell. By considering all these findings, we report that BME protects L132 cells against SNP-induced toxicity via its free radical scavenging and anti-apoptotic mechanism.

  11. Nitrogen deposition threatens species richness of grasslands across Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C.J. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Gowing, D.J.G. [Department of Life Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Dupre, C.; Diekmann, M. [Institute of Ecology, FB 2, University of Bremen, Leobener Str., DE-28359 Bremen (Germany); Dorland, E. [Section of Landscape Ecology, Department of Geobiology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80084, 3508 TB Utrecht (Netherlands); Gaudnik, C.; Alard, D.; Corcket, E. [University of Bordeaux 1. UMR INRA 1202 Biodiversity, Genes and Communities, Equipe Ecologie des Communautes, Batiment B8 - Avenue des Facultes, F-33405 Talence (France); Bleeker, A. [Department of Air Quality and Climate Change, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bobbink, R. [B-WARE Research Centre, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9010, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Fowler, D. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Mountford, J.O. [NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, MacLean Building, Benson Lane, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Vandvik, V. [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Box 7800, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Aarrestad, P.A. [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, NO-7485 Trondheim (Norway); Muller, S. [Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite et Ecosystemes LIEBE, UMR CNRS 7146, U.F.R. Sci. F.A., Campus Bridoux, Universite Paul Verlaine, Avenue du General Delestraint, F-57070 Metz (France); Dise, N.B. [Department of Environmental and Geographical Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Evidence from an international survey in the Atlantic biogeographic region of Europe indicates that chronic nitrogen deposition is reducing plant species richness in acid grasslands. Across the deposition gradient in this region (2-44 kg N ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) species richness showed a curvilinear response, with greatest reductions in species richness when deposition increased from low levels. This has important implications for conservation policies, suggesting that to protect the most sensitive grasslands resources should be focussed where deposition is currently low. Soil pH is also an important driver of species richness indicating that the acidifying effect of nitrogen deposition may be contributing to species richness reductions. The results of this survey suggest that the impacts of nitrogen deposition can be observed over a large geographical range. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is reducing biodiversity in grasslands across Europe.

  12. Role of reactive nitrogen species in blood platelet functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2007-12-01

    Blood platelets, in analogy to other circulating blood cells, can generate reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that may behave as second messengers and may regulate platelet functions. Accumulating evidence suggest a role of ROS/RNS in platelet activation. On the other hand, an increased production of ROS/RNS causes oxidative stress, and thus, may contribute to the development of different diseases, including vascular complications, inflammatory and psychiatric illnesses. Oxidative stress in platelets leads to chemical changes in a wide range of their components, and platelet proteins may be initial targets of ROS/RNS action. It has been demonstrated that reaction of proteins with ROS/RNS results in the oxidation and nitration of some amino acid residues, formation of aggregates or fragmentation of proteins. In oxidized proteins new carbonyl groups and protein hydroperoxides are also formed. In platelets, low molecular weight thiols such as glutathione (GSH), cysteine and cysteinylglycine and protein thiols may be also target for ROS/RNS action. This review describes the chemical structure and biological activities of reactive nitrogen species, mainly nitric oxide ((*)NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and their effects on blood platelet functions, and the mechanisms involved in their action on platelets.

  13. Nitrogen deposition threatens species richness of grasslands across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Carly J; Duprè, Cecilia; Dorland, Edu; Gaudnik, Cassandre; Gowing, David J G; Bleeker, Albert; Diekmann, Martin; Alard, Didier; Bobbink, Roland; Fowler, David; Corcket, Emmanuel; Mountford, J Owen; Vandvik, Vigdis; Aarrestad, Per Arild; Muller, Serge; Dise, Nancy B

    2010-09-01

    Evidence from an international survey in the Atlantic biogeographic region of Europe indicates that chronic nitrogen deposition is reducing plant species richness in acid grasslands. Across the deposition gradient in this region (2-44 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) species richness showed a curvilinear response, with greatest reductions in species richness when deposition increased from low levels. This has important implications for conservation policies, suggesting that to protect the most sensitive grasslands resources should be focussed where deposition is currently low. Soil pH is also an important driver of species richness indicating that the acidifying effect of nitrogen deposition may be contributing to species richness reductions. The results of this survey suggest that the impacts of nitrogen deposition can be observed over a large geographical range.

  14. Impact of lime, nitrogen and plant species on bacterial community structure in grassland microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Nabla; Brodie, Eoin; Connolly, John; Clipson, Nicholas

    2004-10-01

    A microcosm-based approach was used to study impacts of plant and chemical factors on the bacterial community structure of an upland acidic grassland soil. Seven perennial plant species typical of both natural, unimproved (Nardus stricta, Agrostis capillaris, Festuca ovina and F. rubra) and fertilized, improved (Holcus lanatus, Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens) grasslands were either left unamended or treated with lime, nitrogen, or lime plus nitrogen in a 75-day glasshouse experiment. Lime and nitrogen amendment were shown to have a greater effect on microbial activity, biomass and bacterial ribotype number than plant species. Liming increased soil pH, microbial activity and biomass, while decreasing ribotype number. Nitrogen addition decreased soil pH, microbial activity and ribotype number. Addition of lime plus nitrogen had intermediate effects, which appeared to be driven more by lime than nitrogen. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis revealed that lime and nitrogen addition altered soil bacterial community structure, while plant species had little effect. These results were further confirmed by multivariate redundancy analysis, and suggest that soil lime and nitrogen status are more important controllers of bacterial community structure than plant rhizosphere effects.

  15. Oxidative and nitrative modifications of enkephalins by reactive nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Mario; Pecci, Laura; Schininá, Maria Eugenia; Montefoschi, Gabriella; Rosei, Maria Anna

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of Leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enkephalin) with reactive nitrogen species has been investigated. Reactive nitrogen species are capable of nitrating and oxidizing Leu-enkephalin. HPLC analysis shows the formation of two major enkephalin derivatives by peroxynitrite. The tyrosine amino-terminal residue of Leu-enkephalin is converted either to 3-nitrotyrosine thus producing nitroenkephalin and to dityrosine by dimerization with the production of an enkephalin dimer. The evidence of the formation of the nitroenkephalin and of the enkephalin dimer--dienkephalin--was achieved by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. In addition to peroxynitrite, the methylene blue photosensitized oxidation of enkephalin in the presence of nitrite leads to the formation of the nitrated peptide. Moreover, the nitropeptide can be also obtained by peroxidase-generated nitrogen reactive species.

  16. Emissions of gaseous nitrogen species from manure management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Hutchings, Nick

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for the assessment of emissions of nitrogen (N) species (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, di-nitrogen) from the manure management system is developed, which treats N pools and flows including emissions strictly according to conservation of mass criteria. As all relevant flows...... in the husbandry of mammals are depicted, the methodology is considered a Tier 3 approach in IPCC terminology or a detailed methodology in UN ECE terminology. The importance of accounting for all N species is illustrated by comparing emission estimates obtained using this approach with those obtained from...

  17. Impact of nitrogen deposition at the species level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Richard J; Dise, Nancy B; Stevens, Carly J; Gowing, David J

    2013-01-15

    In Europe and, increasingly, the rest of the world, the key policy tool for the control of air pollution is the critical load, a level of pollution below which there are no known significant harmful effects on the environment. Critical loads are used to map sensitive regions and habitats, permit individual polluting activities, and frame international negotiations on transboundary air pollution. Despite their fundamental importance in environmental science and policy, there has been no systematic attempt to verify a critical load with field survey data. Here, we use a large dataset of European grasslands along a gradient of nitrogen (N) deposition to show statistically significant declines in the abundance of species from the lowest level of N deposition at which it is possible to identify a change. Approximately 60% of species change points occur at or below the range of the currently established critical load. If this result is found more widely, the underlying principle of no harm in pollution policy may need to be modified to one of informed decisions on how much harm is acceptable. Our results highlight the importance of protecting currently unpolluted areas from new pollution sources, because we cannot rule out ecological impacts from even relatively small increases in reactive N deposition.

  18. Nitrogen transfer between herbivores and their forage species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Kuijper, Dries P. J.; van der Wal, Rene; Loonen, Maarten J. J. E.; Huiskes, Ad H. L.; Woodin, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    Herbivores may increase the productivity of forage plants; however, this depends on the return of nutrients from faeces to the forage plants. The aim of this study was to test if nitrogen (N) from faeces is available to forage plants and whether the return of nutrients differs between plant species

  19. The effect of plant species on soil nitrogen mineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krift, van der A.J.; Berendse, F.

    2001-01-01

    1. To ascertain the influence of different plant species on nitrogen (N) cycling, we performed a long-term garden experiment with six grasses and five dicots with different potential growth rates, that are adapted to habitats with different nutrient supplies. We measured in situ N mineralization and

  20. Characterization of nitrogen species incorporated into graphite using low energy nitrogen ion sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Hisao; Kondo, Takahiro; Sakurai, Masataka; Guo, Donghui; Nakamura, Junji; Niwa, Hideharu; Miyawaki, Jun; Kawai, Maki; Oshima, Masaharu; Harada, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structures of nitrogen species incorporated into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), prepared by low energy (200 eV) nitrogen ion sputtering and subsequent annealing at 1000 K, were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), angle-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and Raman spectroscopy. An additional peak was observed at higher binding energy of 401.9 eV than 400.9 eV for graphitic1 N (graphitic N in the basal plane) in N 1s XPS, where graphitic2 N (graphitic N in the zigzag edge and/or vacancy sites) has been theoretically expected to appear. N 1s XPS showed that graphitic1 N and graphitic2 N were preferably incorporated under low nitrogen content doping conditions (8 × 10(13) ions cm(-2)), while pyridinic N and graphitic1 N were dominantly observed under high nitrogen content doping conditions. In addition, angle-dependent N 1s XAS showed that the graphitic N and pyridinic N atoms were incorporated into the basal plane of HOPG and thus were highly oriented. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy revealed that low energy sputtering resulted in almost no fraction of the disturbed graphite surface layers under the lowest nitrogen doping condition. The suitable nitrogen doping condition was discovered for realizing the well-controlled nitrogen doped HOPG. The electrochemical properties for the oxygen reduction reaction of these samples in acidic solution were examined and discussed.

  1. Liquid Nitrogen (-196°C effect under pollen of some cultured or ornamental species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina GLIGOR

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The criopreservation involve the stock of the vegetal material at low temperatures (-196°C in liquid nitrogen, in thermal conditions in which the division of cells and metabolic processes slow down, thus that the samplings may be conserved for long periods without suffering any genetic modifications. This stock technique is applied till present only on 80 vegetal species, keeping their seeds and vitrocultures preponderantly; researches were made regarding the maintenance of pollen in liquid nitrogen.The mature pollen, able to resist a higher degree of desiccation, may be conserved at low temperatures, without criopreservation. It was made researches on criopreservation of rise, maize, wheat, roses, sun flower and soy pollen. Our study purpose was to follow the impact of liquid nitrogen (-196°C about on viability of some cultured and ornamental species. The designed time of criopreservation it was 30 minutes and 7 days, using the TTC (tripheniltetrazole chloride method which allows testing the viability of vegetal material based on dehydrogenase activity.It was observed at Petunia hybrida species, that the pollen viability was low - in relevance with the witness represented from the pollen which was not resigned to the nitrogen liquid treatment - between percentage limits of 3.5-8%, in the case when the vegetal material was submersed 30 minutes in liquid nitrogen and 7.5-14.5% 7 days at (-196°C. The submersing of Nicotiana alata var. grandiflora species at 7 days, determined a low viability with 11.53%. The following two studied species Cucurbita and Hosta were proved to be the most resistant at submersing and maintenance in liquid nitrogen. The most affected pollen was Campsis radicans species. At Datura stramonium species was observed 2.59% a low viability of pollen, after 30 minutes of liquid nitrogen treatment, was 19.56%, after 7 days of submersing, the most pollen granules losing completely their viability.

  2. Enhanced concentrations of reactive nitrogen species in wildfire smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Katherine B.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Carrico, Christian M.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2017-01-01

    During the summer of 2012 the Hewlett Gulch and High Park wildfires burned an area of 400 km2 northwest of Fort Collins, Colorado. These fires both came within 20 km of the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University, allowing for extensive measurements of smoke-impacted air masses over the course of several weeks. In total, smoke plumes were observed at the measurement site for approximately 125 h. During this time, measurements were made of multiple reactive nitrogen compounds, including gas phase species NH3, NOx, and HNO3, and particle phase species NO3- and NH4+, plus an additional, unspeciated reactive nitrogen component that is measured by high temperature conversion over a catalyst to NO. Concurrent measurements of CO, levoglucosan and PM2.5 served to confirm the presence of smoke at the monitoring site. Significant enhancements were observed for all of the reactive nitrogen species measured in the plumes, except for NH4+ which did not show enhancements, likely due to the fresh nature of the plume, the presence of sufficient regional ammonia to have already neutralized upwind sulfate, and the warm conditions of the summer measurement period which tend to limit ammonium nitrate formation. Excess mixing ratios for NH3 and NOx relative to excess mixing ratios of CO in the smoke plumes, ΔNH3/ΔCO (ppb/ppb) and ΔNOx/ΔCO (ppb/ppb), were determined to be 0.027 ± 0.002 and 0.0057 ± 0.0007, respectively. These ratios suggest that smoldering combustion was the dominant source of smoke during our plume interceptions. Observations from prior relevant laboratory and field measurements of reactive nitrogen species are also briefly summarized to help create a more comprehensive picture of reactive nitrogen and fire.

  3. Evaluation of Nitrogen Species Using MOZART During the TOPSE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, X.; Emmons, L.; Horowitz, L.; Brasseur, G.; Ridley, B.; Atlas, E.; Kinnison, D.

    2001-12-01

    In the troposphere, Nitrogen oxides (NOx) is closely related to ozone chemistry. Nitrogen oxides is also intricately linked to the hydroxyl radical OH, another key atmospheric oxidizing species. The reaction between NO2 and OH leads to the formation of relatively stable nitric acid (HNO3), which can be removed from the atmosphere by precipitation and hence provides an important source of nitrogen for the biosphere. The distributions of nitrogen species are analyzed during the TOPSE (Tropospheric O3 Production about the Spring Equinox) experiment. The experiment took place from February to May, 2000 in a series of 7 round trip missions from Colorado to northern latitudes. Using the NCAR C-130 flying laboratory, the TOPSE experiment covered a latitude range from 40N to near the North Pole, and from 100 ft. to 25,000 ft. in altitude. The experiment measured O3, NOx, sulfate aerosol and other concentrations which provides a unique characterization of the temporal and spatial distribution of these species to evaluate the effect of several physical and chemical processes on nitrogen species in this region. These data are compared with the calculations of a global chemical/transport model (Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART). The model is a comprehensive tropospheric chemical/transport model, calculating the global distribution of 56 gas-phase chemical species. The nitrogen species in the model include NOx, HNO3, N2O5, HNO4, NO3, and PAN. In this study a series of model runs is performed to study the sensitivity of some major factors (including heterogeneous reaction on sulfate aerosols, washout of nitrate in rain drops, stratospheric intrusion, lightning production of NO, and gas to aqueous phase conversion in cloud drops) to the NOx and HNO3 concentrations at high latitudes in North America during winter and early spring. The results show that the heterogeneous reaction on sulfate aerosols and wet deposition of HNO3 have significant effects on NOx and

  4. Plant species richness enhances nitrogen retention in green roof plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine; Schweinhart, Shelbye; Buffam, Ishi

    2016-10-01

    Vegetated (green) roofs have become common in many cities and are projected to continue to increase in coverage, but little is known about the ecological properties of these engineered ecosystems. In this study, we tested the biodiversity-ecosystem function hypothesis using commercially available green roof trays as replicated plots with varying levels of plant species richness (0, 1, 3, or 6 common green roof species per plot, using plants with different functional characteristics). We estimated accumulated plant biomass near the peak of the first full growing season (July 2013) and measured runoff volume after nearly every rain event from September 2012 to September 2013 (33 events) and runoff fluxes of inorganic nutrients ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate from a subset of 10 events. We found that (1) total plant biomass increased with increasing species richness, (2) green roof plots were effective at reducing storm runoff, with vegetation increasing water retention more than soil-like substrate alone, but there was no significant effect of plant species identity or richness on runoff volume, (3) green roof substrate was a significant source of phosphate, regardless of presence/absence of plants, and (4) dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = nitrate + ammonium) runoff fluxes were different among plant species and decreased significantly with increasing plant species richness. The variation in N retention was positively related to variation in plant biomass. Notably, the increased biomass and N retention with species richness in this engineered ecosystem are similar to patterns observed in published studies from grasslands and other well-studied ecosystems. We suggest that more diverse plantings on vegetated roofs may enhance the retention capacity for reactive nitrogen. This is of importance for the sustained health of vegetated roof ecosystems, which over time often experience nitrogen limitation, and is also relevant for water quality in receiving waters

  5. Effect of plant species on nitrogen recovery in aquaponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Brotto, Ariane Coelho; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen transformations in aquaponics with different edible plant species, i.e., tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and pak choi (Brassica campestris L. subsp. chinensis) were systematically examined and compared. Results showed that nitrogen utilization efficiencies (NUE) of tomato- and pak choi-based aquaponic systems were 41.3% and 34.4%, respectively. The abundance of nitrifying bacteria in tomato-based aquaponics was 4.2-folds higher than that in pak choi-based aquaponics, primarily due to its higher root surface area. In addition, tomato-based aquaponics had better water quality than that of pak choi-based aquaponics. About 1.5-1.9% of nitrogen input were emitted to atmosphere as nitrous oxide (N2O) in tomato- and pak choi-based aquaponic systems, respectively, suggesting that aquaponics is a potential anthropogenic source of N2O emission. Overall, this is the first intensive study that examined the role plant species played in aquaponics, which could provide new strategy in designing and operating an aquaponic system.

  6. Temporal variation of the total nitrogen concentration in aereal organs of nitrogen fixing and non fixing riparian species

    OpenAIRE

    Llinares, F.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in nitrogen concentration was determinated in samples of Alnus glutinosa, Elaeagnus angustifolia, Populus x canadiensis and Ailanthus altissima leaves, petioles and branches periodically during a year. Maximum nitrogen percentage was found in diazotrophic species (Alnus and Elaeagnus) and the nitrogen retranslocation form branches was higher (2.5 times) in no fixing species. Se estudian 10s cambios en la concentración de nitrógeno en Alnus glutinosa, Elaeagnus angustifolia, Populus...

  7. Post-translational modifications mediated by reactive nitrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, Luis A; Barroso, Juan B

    2008-01-01

    In animal cells, nitric oxide and NO-derived molecules have been shown to mediate post-translational modifications such as S-nitrosylation and protein tyrosine nitration which are associated with cell signalling and pathological processes, respectively. In plant cells, knowledge of the function of these post-translational modifications under physiological and stress conditions is still very rudimentary. In this addendum, we briefly examine how reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can exert important effects on proteins that could mediate signalling processes in plants. PMID:19841652

  8. The interdependence of the reactive species of oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bild, Walther; Ciobica, Alin; Padurariu, Manuela; Bild, Veronica

    2013-03-01

    This mini-review tries to summarize the main interdependences between the free radicals of oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon. Also, the main metabolic pathways for these radical species are described, as well as how these affect their interaction and functional implications. Emphasis is made on the metabolic disturbances induced by stressing aggressions that produce radical species. In this way, cellular oxidative imbalances created by the superiority of reactive oxygen species over the antioxidant systems produce both activation of nitroxide synthases and the oxidation of terminal nitrogen from L-arginine, as well as the metabolization of heme until carbon monoxide by nitric oxide-activated hemoxygenase. Also, multiple cellular protein and nucleoprotein alterations determined by these three kinds of radical species are completed by the involvement of hydrogen sulfide, which results from the degradation of L-cysteine by cistationine-γ-lyase. In this way, sufficient experimental data tend to demonstrate the involvement of hydrogen sulfide and other thiol derivatives in the interrelations between oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon, which results in a true radical cascade. Thus, oxidative stress, together with nitrosative and carbonilic stress, may constitute a central point where other factors of vulnerability meet, and their interactions could have an important impact in many modern diseases. Considering that the actions of reactive species can be most of the time corrected, future studies need to establish the therapeutical importance of various agents which modulate oxidative, nitrosative, or carbonilic stress.

  9. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  10. Antioxidant activity of Cat's whiskers flavonoid on some reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generating inflammatory cells is mediated by scavenging of free radicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asis Bala; Biswakanth Kar; Indrajit Karmakar; R.B.Suresh Kumar; Pallab Kanti Haldar

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To find out the effect of Cat's whiskers (Cleome gynandra L.,Capparidaceae) flavonoid (CWF) for the scavenging of free radicals in some inflammatory cells.METHODS:Mouse erythrocyte's hemoglobin,peritoneal macrophage,and peripheral blood lymphocytes were oxidized either by some of toxic chemicals (nitrite,carbon tetrachloride) or by enzymatic stimulation (glucoseoxidase) to produce oxidative damage to cells.The protective effect of the CWF was examined,and the biochemical mechanism of action was also investigated in terms of the scavenging of free radicals.RESULTS:CWF (1-20 μg·mL-1) decreased glucoseoxidase and nitrite induce oxidative damage in a concentration dependent manner in an in vitro model and inhibited the lysis of RBC [(28.64 ±13.03)% and (70.31 ± 1.80)%] when mice were treated with CWF (25 and 50 mg·kg-1).To assess the antioxidant potential of CWF in the lymphocytes and macrophages in living animals,the effect of CWF was measured on the elevated level of superoxide anions production in the cells.CWF scavenged the superoxide anion (O2-) production and inhibited the O2-induced destruction of protein and lipid biomolecules.CONCLUSION:The study has established that the CWF mediates its antioxidant activity in some chronic inflammatory cells via its free radical scavenging activity.

  11. Science Letters: Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 and activity in carbon-nitric oxide reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Xian-kai; ZOU Xue-quan; SHI Hui-xiang; WANG Da-hui

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon loading Fe2O3 was performed by annealing in ammonia, and the activity of the modified carbon for NO reduction was studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that Fe2O3 enhances the amount of surface oxygen complexes and facilitates nitrogen incorporation in the carbon, especially in the form of pyridinic nitrogen. The modified carbon shows excellent activity for NO reduction in the low temperature regime (<500 ℃) because of the cooperative effect of Fe2O3 and the surface nitrogen species.

  12. Ecological effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cong-yan; Lv Yan-na; LIU Xue-yan Liu; WANG Lei

    2013-01-01

    The continuing increase in human activities is causing global changes such as increased deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.There is considerable interest in understanding the effects of increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities,specifically in terms of global nitrogen cycling and its potential future contribution to global climate change.This paper summarizes the ecological effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities,including size-effects,stage-effects,site-effects,and the effects of different levels and forms of atmospheric nitrogen deposition.We discuss needs for further research on the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen deposition and soil enzymes.

  13. Integrating species composition and leaf nitrogen content to indicate effects of nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Enzai

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has been increasing globally and has arisen concerns of its impacts on terrestrial ecosystems. Ecological indicators play an important role in ecosystem monitoring, assessment and management in the context of an anthropogenic transformation of the global N cycle. By integrating species composition and leaf N stoichiometry, a new community N indicator was defined and validated in the understory plots of an N enrichment (as NH4NO3) experiment in an old-growth boreal forest in Northeast China. Three-year N additions showed no significant effect on the understory species richness, but an obvious shift in species composition occurred. The response of leaf N content to N additions was generally positive but varied by species. Overall, the community N indicator increased significantly with higher N addition level and soil available N content, being in the shape of a non-linear saturation response curve. The results suggest that the community N indicator could be an effective tool to indicate changes in ecosystem N availability. Critical values of the community N indicator for specific vegetation type could potentially provide useful information for nature conservation managers and policy makers.

  14. Nitrogen addition enhances drought sensitivity of young deciduous tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Dziedek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N and drought (D effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a four-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e. combined treatment effects were non-additive, while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e. trait combination, but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role (‘trait portfolio’ that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they

  15. Nitrogen and protein contents in some aquatic plant species

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Bytniewska

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen and protein contents in higher aquatic plants deriving from a natural habitat were determined. The following plants were examined: Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid., Elodea canadensis Rich., Riccia fluitans L. Total nitrogen and nitrogen of respective fractions were determined by the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen compounds were fractionated according to Thimann et al. Protein was extracted after Fletcher and Osborne and fractionated after Osborne. It was found, that total protein conten...

  16. Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell`Orco, P.C. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

  17. Effect of nitrogen content on methane production by the marine algae gracilaria tikvahiae and ulva species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habig, C.; De Busk, T.A.; Ryther, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The rhodophyte Gracilaria tikvahiae and the chlorophyte Ulva species were grown under three different nitrogen enrichment regimes producing plants of each species with three different concentrations of tissue nitrogen. Each was then digested in batch-mode fermentation experiments. Both biogas and methane production were initially greater in Ulva but persisted longer in Gracilaria, resulting in similar performances for the two species over the entire time course of the experiment. Low-nitrogen Gracilaria contained more volatile solids and produced more biogas and methane per unit dry weight than did higher nitrogen plants, but about the same gas production per unit volatile solids. However, low nitrogen Ulva consistently out-performed the high nitrogen plants in gas production per unit volatile solids, total volatile solids reduction, and bioconversion efficiency. These results, in contrast with those found in higher plants, probably reflect the low fiber, high soluble carbohydrate levels of nitrogen-deficient seaweeds in general and of Ulva in particular.

  18. Competition and facilitation between unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and non-nitrogen-fixing phytoplankton species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agawin, N.S.; Rabouille, S.; Veldhuis, M.; Servatius, L.; Hol, S.; van Overzee, H.M.J.; Huisman, J.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Recent discoveries show that small unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are more widespread than previously thought and can make major contributions to the nitrogen budget of the oceans. We combined theory and experiments to investigate competition for nitrogen and light between these

  19. Nitrogen and protein contents in some aquatic plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Bytniewska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen and protein contents in higher aquatic plants deriving from a natural habitat were determined. The following plants were examined: Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleid., Elodea canadensis Rich., Riccia fluitans L. Total nitrogen and nitrogen of respective fractions were determined by the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen compounds were fractionated according to Thimann et al. Protein was extracted after Fletcher and Osborne and fractionated after Osborne. It was found, that total protein content in the plants under examination constitutes 18 to 25%o of dry matter. Albumins and glutelins are the most abundant protein fractions.

  20. Nitrogen-dependent calcineurin activation in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Celia; Galindo, Luis R; Siverio, José M

    2013-04-01

    Non-preferred nitrogen sources, unlike preferred ones, raised total cell Ca(2+) content and expression of ENA1, a very well-known calcineurin-regulated gene. This indicates calcineurin activation is regulated by nitrogen source. Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) and nitrate induction mechanisms, both regulating nitrate assimilation in Hansenula polymorpha, are controlled by calcineurin. Concerning NCR, lack of calcineurin (cnb1 mutant) decreased nitrate-assimilation gene expression, levels of the transcription factor Gat1 and growth in several nitrogen sources. We found that the role of calcineurin in NCR was mediated by Crz1 via Gat1. Regarding nitrate induction, calcineurin also affects the levels of transcription factors Gat2 and Yna2 involved in this process. We conclude that Ca(2+) and calcineurin play a central role in nitrogen signalling and assimilation. Thus, the nitrogen source modulates Ca(2+) content and calcineurin activation. Calcineurin in turn regulates nitrogen assimilation genes.

  1. Effects of tree species, water and nitrogen on mycorrhizal C flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyailo, O.; Matvienko, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mycorrhiza plays an important role in global carbon cycle, especially, in forest soils, yet the effect of tree species on the amount and timing of C transfer through roots to myccorhiza is largely unknown. We studied the C transport to mycorrhiza under 6 most commonly dominant in boreal forests tree species using the mesh collars installed at the Siberian afforestation experiment. The CO2 flux from mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal mesh collars indicated the mycorrhizal C flux. Tree species strongly differed in C flux to mycorrhiza: more C was transferred by deciduous species than by conifers. The mycorrhizal CO2 flux was not linked to soil temperature but rather to trees phenology and to photosynthetic activity. All tree species transfered more carbon to mycorrhiza during the second half of summer and in September, this is because all the carbon photosynthesized earlier is used for building the tree biomass. Seasonal variation in C transfer to mycorrhiza was much larger than hourly variation (within a day). Nitrogen application (50 kg/ha) increased mycorrhizal C flux only under Scots pine, but not under larch, thus the effect of N application is tree species dependent. We found under most tree species that more C was transferred by trees to mycorrhiza in root-free collars, where the soil moisture was higher than in collars with roots. This suggests that trees preferentially support those parts of mycorrhiza, which can gain extra-resources.

  2. Plasticity of nitrogen allocation in the leaves of the invasive wetland grass, Phalaris arundinacea and co-occurring Carex species determines the photosynthetic sensitivity to nitrogen availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holaday, A Scott; Schwilk, Dylan W; Waring, Elizabeth F; Guvvala, Hasitha; Griffin, Chelsea M; Lewis, O Milo

    2015-04-01

    Phalaris arundinacea displaces the slower-growing, native sedge, Carex stricta, where nitrogen availability is high. Our aim was to address whether morphological and physiological traits associated with carbon gain for P. arundinacea and C. stricta responded to nitrogen supply differently and if the species exhibited different degrees of plasticity in these traits. The plants were grown in gravel and provided modified Hoagland's solution containing four nitrogen concentrations from 0.15 to 15 mM for 6 to 7 weeks. Supplied nitrogen affected the leaf nitrogen content to the same degree for both species. Increasing supplied nitrogen strongly increased CO2 assimilation (A), photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE), and respiration for P. arundinacea but had only a small effect on these parameters for C. stricta. Relative to growth at 15 mM nitrogen, growth at 0.15 mM for young leaves decreased carboxylation capacity and efficiency and the capacity for electron transport for P. arundinacea and a larger, stouter Carex species, Carex lacustris, by 53 to 70% but only 20 to 24% for C. stricta. Leaf nitrogen decreased approximately 50% for all species, but vacuolar nitrate did not decrease for P. arundinacea and C. stricta, suggesting that it does not serve as a nitrogen reserve for use during nitrogen deprivation in these species. After 4 months of nitrogen deprivation, P. arundinacea doubled A in 12 days after being supplied 15 mM nitrogen, whereas A for C. stricta increased only 22%. We propose that one factor linking P. arundinacea abundance to nitrogen availability involves this species' plastic response of carbon gain to nitrogen supply. C. stricta appears to be adapted to tolerate low nitrogen availability but cannot respond as rapidly and extensively as P. arundinacea when nitrogen supply is high.

  3. A nitrogen index to track changes in butterfly species assemblages under nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallis de Vries, Michiel; Swaay, van Chris A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The impacts of nitrogen deposition (N) on animal communities are still poorly understood in comparison to plant communities. Long-term monitoring of community changes may contribute to this understanding, complementing experimental studies on underlying mechanisms. Butterflies are particularly

  4. Plant Species Richness and Nitrogen Deposition can Alter Microbial Assimilation of New Photosynthate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H.; Zak, D.; Reich, P.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial assimilation of recent photosynthate was analyzed in a 6-year-long field experiment to determine how plant species richness impacts microbial metabolism of new photosynthate, and how this may be modified by atmospheric N deposition. Our study was conducted at the BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) FACE (Free-Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment) experiment located at the Cedar Creek Natural History area in Minnesota, USA. In this experiment, plant species richness, atmospheric N deposition, and atmospheric CO2 concentration were manipulated in concert. The depleted δ13C of fumigation CO2 enabled us to investigate the effect of plant species richness and atmospheric N deposition on the metabolism of soil microbial communities in the elevated CO2 treatment. We determined the δ13C of bacterial, actinobacterial, and fungal phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). In the elevated CO2 conditions of this study, the δ13C of bacterial PLFAs (i15:0, i16:0, 16:1ω7c, 16:1ω9c, 10Me16:0, and 10Me18:0) and the fungal PLFA 18:1ω9c was significantly lower in species-rich plant communities than in species-poor plant communities, indicating that microbial incorporation of new C increased with plant species richness. Despite an increase in plant production, total PLFA decreased under N deposition by 27%. Moreover, N deposition also decreased fungal relative abundance in species-rich plant communities. In our study, plant species richness directly increased microbial incorporation of new photosynthate, providing a mechanistic link between greater plant detritus production in species-rich plant communities and larger and more active soil microbial community.

  5. Accumulation of non-superoxide anion reactive oxygen species mediates nitrogen-limited alcoholic fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Ferreira, Ana; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Barbosa, Catarina; Rodrigues, Fernando; Costa, Vítor; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Ludovico, Paula; Leão, Cecília

    2010-12-01

    Throughout alcoholic fermentation, nitrogen depletion is one of the most important environmental stresses that can negatively affect the yeast metabolic activity and ultimately leads to fermentation arrest. Thus, the identification of the underlying effects and biomarkers of nitrogen limitation is valuable for controlling, and therefore optimizing, alcoholic fermentation. In this study, reactive oxygen species (ROS), plasma membrane integrity, and cell cycle were evaluated in a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation in nitrogen-limiting medium under anaerobic conditions. The results indicated that nitrogen limitation leads to an increase in ROS and that the superoxide anion is a minor component of the ROS, but there is increased activity of both Sod2p and Cta1p. Associated with these effects was a decrease in plasma membrane integrity and a persistent cell cycle arrest at G(0)/G(1) phases. Moreover, under these conditions it appears that autophagy, evaluated by ATG8 expression, is induced, suggesting that this mechanism is essential for cell survival but does not prevent the cell cycle arrest observed in slow fermentation. Conversely, nitrogen refeeding allowed cells to reenter cell cycle by decreasing ROS generation and autophagy. Altogether, the results provide new insights on the understanding of wine fermentations under nitrogen-limiting conditions and further indicate that ROS accumulation, evaluated by the MitoTracker Red dye CM-H(2)XRos, and plasma membrane integrity could be useful as predictive markers of fermentation problems.

  6. Comparison of Nitrogen Depletion and Repletion on Lipid Production in Yeast and Fungal Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihui Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well known that low nitrogen stimulates lipid accumulation, especially for algae and some oleaginous yeast, few studies have been conducted in fungal species, especially on the impact of different nitrogen deficiency strategies. In this study, we use two promising consolidated bioprocessing (CBP candidates to examine the impact of two nitrogen deficiency strategies on lipid production, which are the extensively investigated oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, and the commercial cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. We first utilized bioinformatics approaches to reconstruct the fatty acid metabolic pathway and demonstrated the presence of a triacylglycerol (TAG biosynthesis pathway in Trichoderma reesei. We then examined the lipid production of Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces in different media using two nitrogen deficiency strategies of nitrogen natural repletion and nitrogen depletion through centrifugation. Our results demonstrated that nitrogen depletion was better than nitrogen repletion with about 30% lipid increase for Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipomyces, and could be an option to improve lipid production in both oleaginous yeast and filamentous fungal species. The resulting distinctive lipid composition profiles indicated that the impacts of nitrogen depletion on yeast were different from those for fungal species. Under three types of C/N ratio conditions, C16 and C18 fatty acids were the predominant forms of lipids for both Trichoderma reesei and Y. lipolytica. While the overall fatty acid methyl ester (FAME profiles of Trichoderma reesei were similar, the overall FAME profiles of Y. lipolytica observed a shift. The fatty acid metabolic pathway reconstructed in this work supports previous reports of lipid production in T. reesei, and provides a pathway for future omics studies and metabolic engineering efforts. Further investigation to identify the genetic targets responsible for the effect of nitrogen depletion on

  7. Chemically Reactive Nitrogen Trace Species in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    solution, containing equal parts of urea , ammonia, and nitrate, that was broadcast across the field after planting. The final addition of fertilizer...102 kg N per hectare, was applied on May 20, 1995, also as a 30% N solution 5 of equal parts urea , ammonia, and nitrate. This final sidedressing was...Lobroue L. and Chassin P., Nitrogen compound emissions from fertilized soils in a maize field pine tree forest agrosystem in the southwest of France

  8. Spatial pattern of nitrogen deposition flux over Czech forests: a novel approach accounting for unmeasured nitrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hůnová, Iva; Stoklasová, Petra; Kurfürst, Pavel; Vlček, Ondřej; Schovánková, Jana; Stráník, Vojtěch

    2015-04-01

    atmospheric nitrogen deposition flux over the Czech forests collating all available data and model results. The aim of the presented study is to provide an improved, more reliable and more realistic estimate of spatial pattern of nitrogen deposition flux over one country. This has so far been based standardly on measurements of ambient N/NOx concentrations as dry deposition proxy, and N/NH4+ and N/NO3- as wet deposition proxy. For estimate of unmeasured species contributing to dry deposition, we used an Eulerian photochemical dispersion model CAMx, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (ESSS, 2011), coupled with a high resolution regional numeric weather prediction model Aladin (Vlček, Corbet, 2011). Contribution of fog was estimated using a geostatistical data driven model. Final maps accounting for unmeasured species clearly indicate, that so far used approach results in substantial underestimation of nitrogen deposition flux. Substitution of unmeasured nitrogen species by modeled values seems to be a plausible way for approximation of total nitrogen deposition, and getting more realistic spatial pattern as input for further studies of likely nitrogen impacts on ecosystems. Acknowledgements: We would like to acknowledge the grants GA14-12262S - Effects of changing growth conditions on tree increment, stand production and vitality - danger or opportunity for the Central-European forestry?, and NAZV QI112A168 (ForSoil) of the Czech Ministry for Agriculture for support of this contribution. The input data used for the analysis were provided by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute. References: Bobbink, R., Hicks, K., Galloway, J., Spranger, T., Alkemade, R. et al. (2010): Global Assessment of Nitrogen Deposition Effects on Terrestrial Plant Diversity: a Synthesis. Ecological Applications 20 (1), 30-59. Fowler D., O'Donoghue M., Muller J.B.A, et al. (2005): A chronology of nitrogen deposition in the UK between 1900 and 2000. Watter, Air & Soil Pollution: Focus

  9. Challenges in quantifying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, M.A.; Nemitz, E.; Erisman, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent research in nitrogen exchange with the atmosphere has separated research communities according to N form. The integrated perspective needed to quantify the net effect of N on greenhouse-gas balance is being addressed by the NitroEurope Integrated Project (NEU). Recent advances have depended...... progress has been made in modelling N fluxes, especially for N2O, NO and bi-directional NH3 exchange. Landscape analysis represents an emerging challenge to address the spatial interactions between farms, fields, ecosystems, catchments and air dispersion/deposition. European up-scaling of N fluxes...

  10. Oxygen and nitrogen reactive species are effectively scavenged by Eucalyptus globulus leaf water extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Isabel F; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lima, José L F C; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Seabra, Rosa M; Costa, P C; Bahia, M F

    2009-02-01

    Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (Family Myrtaceae) is a plant of Australian origin, with a reported therapeutic use in airway inflammatory diseases. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, an effective scavenging activity against these reactive species may contribute for the therapeutic effect of this plant. In the present study, a water extract of E. globulus leaves was evaluated for its putative in vitro scavenging effects on ROS (HO(*), O(2)(*-), ROO(*), and H(2)O(2)) and RNS ((*)NO and ONOO(-)) and on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH). Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the extract's phenolic composition were also performed. The Eucalyptus leaf water extract presented a remarkable capacity to scavenge all the reactive species tested, with all the 50% inhibitory concentrations being found at the mug/mL level. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of polyphenols such as flavonoids (rutin and quercitrin) and phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid and ellagic acid), which may be partially responsible for the observed antioxidant activity. These observations provide further support, beyond the well-known antibacterial and antiviral activities of the Eucalyptus plant, for its reported use in traditional medicine such as in the treatment of airway inflammatory diseases, considering the important role of ROS and RNS in the inflammatory process, although further studies are needed to prove the bioavailability of the antioxidants/antibacterial compounds of the extract as well as the ability of the active compounds to reach specific tissues and to act in them.

  11. Preferential uptake of soil nitrogen forms by grassland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Alexandra; Bol, Roland; Bardgett, Richard D

    2005-02-01

    In this study, we assessed whether a range of temperate grassland species showed preferential uptake for different chemical forms of N, including inorganic N and a range of amino acids that commonly occur in temperate grassland soil. Preferential uptake of dual-labelled (13C and 15N) glycine, serine, arginine and phenylalanine, as compared to inorganic N, was tested using plants growing in pots with natural field soil. We selected five grass species representing a gradient from fertilised, productive pastures to extensive, low productivity pastures (Lolium perenne, Holcus lanatus, Anthoxanthum odoratum, Deschampsia flexuosa, and Nardus stricta). Our data show that all grass species were able to take up directly a diversity of soil amino acids of varying complexity. Moreover, we present evidence of marked inter-species differences in preferential use of chemical forms of N of varying complexity. L. perenne was relatively more effective at using inorganic N and glycine compared to the most complex amino acid phenylalanine, whereas N. stricta showed a significant preference for serine over inorganic N. Total plant N acquisition, measured as root and shoot concentration of labelled compounds, also revealed pronounced inter-species differences which were related to plant growth rate: plants with higher biomass production were found to take up more inorganic N. Our findings indicate that species-specific differences in direct uptake of different N forms combined with total N acquisition could explain changes in competitive dominance of grass species in grasslands of differing fertility.

  12. Challenges in quantifying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, M A; Nemitz, E; Erisman, J W; Beier, C; Bahl, K Butterbach; Cellier, P; de Vries, W; Cotrufo, F; Skiba, U; Di Marco, C; Jones, S; Laville, P; Soussana, J F; Loubet, B; Twigg, M; Famulari, D; Whitehead, J; Gallagher, M W; Neftel, A; Flechard, C R; Herrmann, B; Calanca, P L; Schjoerring, J K; Daemmgen, U; Horvath, L; Tang, Y S; Emmett, B A; Tietema, A; Peñuelas, J; Kesik, M; Brueggemann, N; Pilegaard, K; Vesala, T; Campbell, C L; Olesen, J E; Dragosits, U; Theobald, M R; Levy, P; Mobbs, D C; Milne, R; Viovy, N; Vuichard, N; Smith, J U; Smith, P; Bergamaschi, P; Fowler, D; Reis, S

    2007-11-01

    Recent research in nitrogen exchange with the atmosphere has separated research communities according to N form. The integrated perspective needed to quantify the net effect of N on greenhouse-gas balance is being addressed by the NitroEurope Integrated Project (NEU). Recent advances have depended on improved methodologies, while ongoing challenges include gas-aerosol interactions, organic nitrogen and N(2) fluxes. The NEU strategy applies a 3-tier Flux Network together with a Manipulation Network of global-change experiments, linked by common protocols to facilitate model application. Substantial progress has been made in modelling N fluxes, especially for N(2)O, NO and bi-directional NH(3) exchange. Landscape analysis represents an emerging challenge to address the spatial interactions between farms, fields, ecosystems, catchments and air dispersion/deposition. European up-scaling of N fluxes is highly uncertain and a key priority is for better data on agricultural practices. Finally, attention is needed to develop N flux verification procedures to assess compliance with international protocols.

  13. Challenges in quantifying biosphere-atmosphere exchange of nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ms@ceh.ac.uk; Nemitz, E. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Erisman, J.W. [ECN, Clean Fossil Fuels, PO Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Beier, C. [Riso National Laboratory, PO Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bahl, K. Butterbach [Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research, Atmos. Environ. Research (IMK-IFU), Research Centre Karlsruhe GmbH, Kreuzeckbahnstr. 19, 82467 Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany); Cellier, P. [INRA Unite Mixte de Recherche, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Vries, W. de [Alterra, Green World Research, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Cotrufo, F. [Dip. Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, via Vivaldi 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); Skiba, U.; Di Marco, C.; Jones, S. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Laville, P.; Soussana, J.F.; Loubet, B. [INRA Unite Mixte de Recherche, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Twigg, M.; Famulari, D. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh Research Station, Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom); Whitehead, J.; Gallagher, M.W. [School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Williamson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Neftel, A.; Flechard, C.R. [Agroscope FAL Reckenholz, Federal Research Station for Agroecology and Agriculture, PO Box, CH 8046 Zurich (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2007-11-15

    Recent research in nitrogen exchange with the atmosphere has separated research communities according to N form. The integrated perspective needed to quantify the net effect of N on greenhouse-gas balance is being addressed by the NitroEurope Integrated Project (NEU). Recent advances have depended on improved methodologies, while ongoing challenges include gas-aerosol interactions, organic nitrogen and N{sub 2} fluxes. The NEU strategy applies a 3-tier Flux Network together with a Manipulation Network of global-change experiments, linked by common protocols to facilitate model application. Substantial progress has been made in modelling N fluxes, especially for N{sub 2}O, NO and bi-directional NH{sub 3} exchange. Landscape analysis represents an emerging challenge to address the spatial interactions between farms, fields, ecosystems, catchments and air dispersion/deposition. European up-scaling of N fluxes is highly uncertain and a key priority is for better data on agricultural practices. Finally, attention is needed to develop N flux verification procedures to assess compliance with international protocols. - Current N research is separated by form; the challenge is to link N components, scales and issues.

  14. Nitrotyrosine-modified SERCA2: a cellular sensor of reactive nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.

    2009-01-19

    The SERCA2 isoform of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase is sensitive to cellular conditions of inflammation and oxidative stress as evidenced by the common appearance of 3-nitrotyrosine modified forms of SERCA2 in aging and disease in both striated and smooth muscle of humans and several rodent models. Structural-functional studies of nitrated SERCA2 in aging heart and skeletal muscle demonstrate stoichiometric nitration of vicinal tyrosines, Tyr-294 and Tyr-295, on the lumenal side of the membrane-spanning helix, M4 that correlates with partial inhibition of its Ca2+-ATPase activity suggesting a possible regulatory function in down-regulating mitochondrial energy production and the associated generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. This review discusses recent work regarding the nitrative and redox sensitivity of SERCA2 in muscle with respect to general cellular mechanisms of turnover and repair of modified proteins.

  15. The emerging immunological role of post-translational modifications by reactive nitrogen species in cancer microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eDe Sanctis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Under many inflammatory contexts, such as tumor progression, systemic and peripheral immune response is tailored by reactive nitrogen species (RNS-dependent post-translational modifications, suggesting a biological function for these chemical alterations. RNS modify both soluble factors and receptors essential to induce and maintain a tumor-specific immune response, creating a chemical barrier that impairs effector T cell infiltration and functionality in tumor microenvironment and supports the escape phase of cancer. RNS generation during tumor growth mainly depends on nitric oxide production by both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that constitutively activate essential metabolic pathways of L-arginine catabolism. This review provides an overview of the potential immunological and biological role of RNS-induced modifications and addresses new approaches targeting RNS either in search of novel biomarkers or to improve anti-cancer treatment.

  16. The emerging immunological role of post-translational modifications by reactive nitrogen species in cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Sandri, Sara; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Pagliarello, Irene; Sartoris, Silvia; Ugel, Stefano; Marigo, Ilaria; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Under many inflammatory contexts, such as tumor progression, systemic and peripheral immune response is tailored by reactive nitrogen species (RNS)-dependent post-translational modifications, suggesting a biological function for these chemical alterations. RNS modify both soluble factors and receptors essential to induce and maintain a tumor-specific immune response, creating a "chemical barrier" that impairs effector T cell infiltration and functionality in tumor microenvironment and supports the escape phase of cancer. RNS generation during tumor growth mainly depends on nitric oxide production by both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that constitutively activate essential metabolic pathways of l-arginine catabolism. This review provides an overview of the potential immunological and biological role of RNS-induced modifications and addresses new approaches targeting RNS either in search of novel biomarkers or to improve anti-cancer treatment.

  17. Preparation of nitrogen-doped titania and its photocatalytic activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Haoli; GU Guobang; LIU Song

    2007-01-01

    Yellowish nitrogen-doped titania was produced through sol-gel method in mild condition, with the elemental nitrogen derived from aqua ammonia. The titania catalysts were characterized using XRD, BET, TEM, XPS, and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer, and their photocatalytic activities were evaluated under UV and visible light, respectively. The XRD results showed that all titania catalysts were anatase. More significantly, the crystallite size of nitrogen-doped titania increased with an increase in N/Ti proportion, and the doping of nitrogen could extend the absorption shoulder into the visible-light region, thus it possessed a higher visible-light activity illustrated by decolorization of methyl orange (65.3%) under the irradiation of visible light, whereas pure titania showed little of such kind of visible light activity.The UV-light activity of nitrogen-doped titania catalysts was worse than that of pure titania and Degussa P25. In the range of N/Ti proportion of 4-10 mol%, the activity of nitrogen-doped titania weakened appreciably in the visible-light region as the N/Ti proportion increased, whereas a reverse relationship existed under the irradiation of UV light.

  18. Temperature, plant species and residence time effects on nitrogen removal in model treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C R; Stein, O R; Hook, P B; Burr, M D; Parker, A E; Hafla, E C

    2013-01-01

    Total nitrogen (TN) removal in treatment wetlands (TWs) is challenging due to nitrogen cycle complexity and the variation of influent nitrogen species. Plant species, season, temperature and hydraulic loading most likely influence root zone oxygenation and appurtenant nitrogen removal, especially for ammonium-rich wastewater. Nitrogen data were collected from two experiments utilizing batch-loaded (3-, 6-, 9- and 20-day residence times), sub-surface TWs monitored for at least one year during which temperature was varied between 4 and 24 °C. Synthetic wastewater containing 17 mg/l N as NH4 and 27 mg/l amino-N, 450 mg/l chemical oxygen demand (COD), and 13 mg/l SO4-S was applied to four replicates of Carex utriculata, Schoenoplectus acutus and Typha latifolia and unplanted controls. Plant presence and species had a greater effect on TN removal than temperature or residence time. Planted columns achieved approximately twice the nitrogen removal of unplanted controls (40-95% versus 20-50% removal) regardless of season and temperature. TWs planted with Carex outperformed both Typha and Schoenoplectus and demonstrated less temperature dependency. TN removal with Carex was excellent at all temperatures and residence times; Schoenoplectus and Typha TN removal improved at longer residence times. Reductions in TN were not accompanied by increases in NO3, which was consistently below 1 mg/l N.

  19. Traits affecting early season nitrogen uptake in nine legume species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elana Dayoub

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Legume crops are known to have low soil N uptake early in their life cycle, which can weaken their ability to compete with other species, such as weeds or other crops in intercropping systems. However, there is limited knowledge on the main traits involved in soil N uptake during early growth and for a range of species. The objective of this research was to identify the main traits explaining the variability among legume species in soil N uptake and to study the effect of the soil mineral N supply on the legume strategy for the use of available N sources during early growth. Nine legume species were grown in rhizotrons with or without N supply. Root expansion, shoot and root biomass, nodule establishment, N2 fixation and mineral soil N uptake were measured. A large interspecific variability was observed for all traits affecting soil N uptake. Root lateral expansion and early biomass in relation to seed mass were the major traits influencing soil N uptake regardless of the level of soil N availability. Fenugreek, lentil, alfalfa, and common vetch could be considered weak competitors for soil N due to their low plant biomass and low lateral root expansion. Conversely, peanut, pea, chickpea and soybean had a greater soil N uptake. Faba bean was separated from other species having a higher nodule biomass, a higher N2 fixation and a lower seed reserve depletion. Faba bean was able to simultaneously fix N2 and take up soil N. This work has identified traits of seed mass, shoot and root biomass, root lateral expansion, N2 fixation and seed reserve depletion that allowing classification of legume species regarding their soil N uptake ability during early growth.

  20. Electrochemical behavior of nitrogen gas species adsorbed onto boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo-Robledo, A; Lévy-Clément, C; Alonso-Vante, N

    2007-11-06

    The adsorption of nitrogen species, in neutral electrolyte solutions, onto boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode surfaces from dissolved NO2, NO, and N2O gases was induced at 0 V/SCE. Modified BDD electrode surfaces showed a different electrochemical response toward the hydrogen evolution reaction than did a nonmodified electrode surface in electrolyte base solution. The formation of molecular hydrogen and nitrogen gaseous species was confirmed by the online differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) technique. Among the three nitrogen oxides gases, NO2 substantially modifies the electrolyte via hydrolysis leading to the formation of NO3- and its adsorption on the BDD electrode surface. The BDD/(NO3-) interface was the only N2O and N2 species generating system.

  1. Attenuation of reactive nitrogen species by different flavonoids enriched fractions of Schima Wallichii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanchita Das; Asis Bala; Manas Bhowmik; Lakshmi Kanta Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate Schima wallichii (S. wallichii) Choisy (Ternstroemiaceae) which is a well known plant of Sikkim in the Himalayan region, India. Methods: Therefore three major flavonoid enriched fractions (FPet.Ether, FChloroform and FEthylacetate) were isolated by petroleum ether chloroform and ethyl acetate successively. The reactive nitrogen species scavenging activity of the flavonoid fractions was established using biochemical assay to measure scavenging of 2, 2 diphenyl picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) and peroxinitrite. Results: FEthylacetate showed maximum scavenging activity: their IC50 being (7.33 ± 3.32), (7.11 ± 2.21), and (6.67 ± 2.23)μg/mL in DPPH, NO, peroxinitrite radical respectively. Presence of (57.32 ± 2.31) and (163.4 ±2.22) μg of flavonoids and phenolic compound in 1 mg of extract is assumed to be responsible for free radical scavenging activity. Conclusion: Taken together S. wallichii has potent free radical scavenging property indicating its importance in food supplement as a rich source of active flavonoid and phenolic compounds in ethyl acetate fraction which is responsible for its free radical scavenging as well as antioxidant activity.

  2. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen over Czech forests: refinement of estimation of dry deposition for unmeasured nitrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunova, Iva; Stoklasova, Petra; Kurfurst, Pavel; Vlcek, Ondrej; Schovankova, Jana

    2014-05-01

    The accurate quantification of atmospheric deposition is very important for assessment of ambient air pollution impacts on ecosystems. Our contribution presents an advanced approach to improved quantification of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen over Czech forests, merging available measured data and model results. The ambient air quality monitoring in the Czech Republic is paid an appreciable attention (Hůnová, 2001) due to the fact, that in the recent past its territory belonged to the most polluted parts of Europe (Moldan and Schnoor, 1992). The time trends and spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition were published (Hůnová et al. 2004, Hůnová et al. 2014). Nevertheless, it appears that the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, particularly the dry deposition, is likely to be underestimated due to unavailability of data of certain nitrogen species as HNO3(g) and NH3. It is known that HNO3(g) may contribute significantly to the dry deposition of nitrogen even in regions with relatively low concentrations (Flechard et al., 2011). We attempted to substitute unmeasured nitrogen species using an Eulerian photochemical dispersion model CAMx, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (ESSS, 2011), coupled with a high resolution regional numeric weather prediction model Aladin (Vlček, Corbet, 2011). Preliminary results for 2008 indicate that dry deposition of nitrogen, so far based on detailed monitoring of ambient NOx levels, is underestimated substantially. The dry deposition of N/NOx in 2008 reported by Ostatnická (2009) was about 0.5 g.m-2.year-1 over 99.5 % of the nation-wide area, while the contribution of unmeasured nitrogen species estimated by CAMx model were much higher. To be specific, the dry deposition of N/HNO3(g) accounted for 1.0 g.m-2.year-1, and N/NH3 for 1.6 g.m-2.year-1. In contrast, the deposition of N/HONO (g) with 0.001 g.m-2.year-1, N/PAN with 0.007 g.m-2.year-1, particulate N/NO3- with 0.002 g.m-2.year-1, and particulate N/NH4

  3. Biochemical characterization of reactive nitrogen species by eosinophil peroxidase in tyrosine nitration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi,Yoshiaki

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that eosinophils are involved in tyrosine nitration. In this study, we evaluated tyrosine nitration by rat eosinophils isolated from peritoneal fl uid and constituent eosinophils in the stomach. Rat peritoneal eosinophils activated with 1 μM phorbol myristate acetate (PMA and 50 μM NO2 ン showed immunostaining for nitrotyrosine only in smaller cells, despite the fact that eosinophils are capable of producing superoxide (O2·ン. Free tyrosine nitrating capacity after incubation with PMA and NO2 ン was 4-fold higher in eosinophils than in neutrophils. Catalase and ク- and コ -tocopherol inhibited free tyrosine nitration by reactive nitrogen species from eosinophils but not that by peroxynitrite. Superoxide dismutase augmented free tyrosine nitration by activated eosinophils and peroxynitrite. The concentration of nitric oxide released from eosinophils was relatively low (0.32 μM/106 cells/h and did not contribute to the formation of nitrotyrosine. On the other hand, most constituent eosinophils constituent in the rat stomach stimulated by PMA and NO2 ン showed tyrosine nitration capacity. These results suggest that intact cells other than apoptotic-like eosinophils eluted in the intraperitoneal cavity could not generate reactive species responsible for nitration by a peroxidase-dependent mechanism. In contrast, normal eosinophils in the stomach were capable of nitration, suggesting that the characteristics of eosinophils in gastric mucosa are diff erent from those eluted in the peritoneal cavity.

  4. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  5. Water-use efficiency and nitrogen-use efficiency of C(3) -C(4) intermediate species of Flaveria Juss. (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogan, Patrick J; Sage, Rowan F

    2011-09-01

    Plants using the C(4) pathway of carbon metabolism are marked by greater photosynthetic water and nitrogen-use efficiencies (PWUE and PNUE, respectively) than C(3) species, but it is unclear to what extent this is the case in C(3) -C(4) intermediate species. In this study, we examined the PWUE and PNUE of 14 species of Flaveria Juss. (Asteraceae), including two C(3) , three C(4) and nine C(3) -C(4) species, the latter containing a gradient of C(4) -cycle activities (as determined by initial fixation of (14) C into C-4 acids). We found that PWUE, PNUE, leaf ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) content and intercellular CO(2) concentration in air (C(i) ) do not change gradually with C(4) -cycle activity. These traits were not significantly different between C(3) species and C(3) -C(4) species with less than 50% C(4) -cycle activity. C(4) -like intermediates with greater than 65% C(4) -cycle activity were not significantly different from plants with fully expressed C(4) photosynthesis. These results indicate that a gradual increase in C(4) -cycle activity has not resulted in a gradual change in PWUE, PNUE, intercellular CO(2) concentration and leaf Rubisco content towards C(4) levels in the intermediate species. Rather, these traits arose in a stepwise manner during the evolutionary transition to the C(4) -like intermediates, which are contained in two different clades within Flaveria.

  6. Antarctic bacterial haemoglobin and its role in the protection against nitrogen reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Daniela; Giordano, Daniela; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; di Prisco, Guido; Ascenzi, Paolo; Poole, Robert K; Verde, Cinzia

    2013-09-01

    In a cold and oxygen-rich environment such as Antarctica, mechanisms for the defence against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are needed and represent important components in the evolutionary adaptations. In the Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125, the presence of multiple genes encoding 2/2 haemoglobins and a flavohaemoglobin strongly suggests that these proteins fulfil important physiological roles, perhaps associated to the peculiar features of the Antarctic habitat. In this work, the putative role of Ph-2/2HbO, encoded by the PSHAa0030 gene, was investigated by in vivo and in vitro experiments in order to highlight its involvement in NO detoxification mechanisms. The PSHAa0030 gene was cloned and then over-expressed in a flavohaemoglobin-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, unable to metabolise NO, and the resulting strain was studied analysing its growth properties and oxygen uptake in the presence of NO. We here demonstrate that Ph-2/2HbO protects growth and cellular respiration of the heterologous host from the toxic effect of NO-donors. Unlike in Mycobacterium tuberculosis 2/2 HbN, the deletion of the N-terminal extension of Ph-2/2HbO does not seem to reduce the NO scavenging activity, showing that the N-terminal extension is not a requirement for efficient NO detoxification. Moreover, the ferric form of Ph-2/2HbO was shown to catalyse peroxynitrite isomerisation in vitro, confirming its potential role in the scavenging of reactive nitrogen species. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

  7. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  8. Treatment of methyl orange by nitrogen non-thermal plasma in a corona reactor: The role of reactive nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadorin, Bruno Mena, E-mail: brunomenacadorin@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Tralli, Vitor Douglas [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Ceriani, Elisa [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy); Benetoli, Luís Otávio de Brito [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Marotta, Ester, E-mail: ester.marotta@unipd.it [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy); Ceretta, Claudio [Department of Industrial Engineering, Università di Padova (Italy); Debacher, Nito Angelo [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Paradisi, Cristina [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Nitration of methyl orange is one of the main processes in treatment with N{sub 2}-plasma. • MS/MS analysis shows preferred nitration of methyl orange in ortho position. • N{sub 2} plasma, N{sub 2}-PAW, reaction with NO{sub 2}{sup −} or NO{sub 2}{sup −}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at pH 2 give the same products. - Abstract: Methyl orange (MO) azo dye served as model organic pollutant to investigate the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in non-thermal plasma (NTP) induced water treatments. The results of experiments in which MO aqueous solutions were directly exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP are compared with those of control experiments in which MO was allowed to react with nitrite, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide, which are species formed in water exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP. Treatment of MO was also performed in PAW, Plasma Activated Water, that is water previously exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP. Both direct N{sub 2}-NTP and N{sub 2}-PAW treatments induced the rapid decay of MO. No appreciable reaction was instead observed when MO was treated with NO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} either under acidic or neutral pH. In contrast, in acidic solutions MO decayed rapidly when treated with NO{sub 2}{sup −} and with a combination of NO{sub 2}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thorough product analysis was carried out by HPLC coupled with UV–vis and ESI–MS/MS detectors. In all experiments in which MO reaction was observed, the major primary product was a derivative nitro-substituted at the ortho position with respect to the N,N-dimethylamino group of MO. The reactions of RNS are discussed and a mechanism for the observed nitration products is proposed.

  9. Growth responses of low-alpine dwarf-shrub heath species to nitrogen deposition and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Andrea J. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.britton@macaulay.ac.uk; Fisher, Julia M. [Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Nitrogen deposition is a continuing problem in European alpine regions. We hypothesised that, despite climatic limitations, low-alpine Calluna heathland would respond to nitrogen addition with increased shoot growth and flowering and that fire and grazing would modify responses. In a five-year study, 0-50 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} were added, combined with burning (+/-) and clipping (+/-). Calluna vulgaris responded with increased shoot extension, but effects on flowering were variable. Burning enhanced the positive effect of nitrogen addition and negative effects of clipping. Sub-dominant shrubs generally did not respond to nitrogen. C. vulgaris shoot extension was stimulated by nitrogen addition of 10 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} (above background) supporting suggestions that alpine heathlands are sensitive to low levels of nitrogen deposition. Increased C. vulgaris growth could negatively impact on important lichen components of this vegetation through increased shading and competition. Climatic factors constrain productivity in this community, but do not prevent rapid responses to nitrogen deposition by some species. - Low levels of N deposition increase productivity in alpine dwarf-shrub heath despite strong climatic constraints.

  10. Growth responses of low-alpine dwarf-shrub heath species to nitrogen deposition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Andrea J; Fisher, Julia M

    2008-06-01

    Nitrogen deposition is a continuing problem in European alpine regions. We hypothesised that, despite climatic limitations, low-alpine Calluna heathland would respond to nitrogen addition with increased shoot growth and flowering and that fire and grazing would modify responses. In a five-year study, 0-50kgNha(-1)y(-1) were added, combined with burning (+/-) and clipping (+/-). Calluna vulgaris responded with increased shoot extension, but effects on flowering were variable. Burning enhanced the positive effect of nitrogen addition and negative effects of clipping. Sub-dominant shrubs generally did not respond to nitrogen. C. vulgaris shoot extension was stimulated by nitrogen addition of 10kgNha(-1)y(-1) (above background) supporting suggestions that alpine heathlands are sensitive to low levels of nitrogen deposition. Increased C. vulgaris growth could negatively impact on important lichen components of this vegetation through increased shading and competition. Climatic factors constrain productivity in this community, but do not prevent rapid responses to nitrogen deposition by some species.

  11. Investigation of nitrogen-bearing species in catalytic steam gasification of poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Atul C; Bagchi, Bratendu

    2005-05-01

    The production of broiler chickens has become one of the largest sectors in U.S. agriculture, and the growing demand for poultry has led to an annual production growth rate of 5%. With increased demand for poultry, litter management has become a major challenge in the agriculture industry. Although the catalytic steam gasification has been accepted as a possible and feasible method for litter management, concern has been expressed about the presence of nitrogen and phosphorus containing species in the fuel gas and/or in the final solid residue. The possible release of phosphorus as phosphine gas in the fuel gas can have an adverse impact on the environment. Similarly, possible release of ammonia from the nitrogen containing species is also not acceptable. Hence, under partial U.S. Department of Agriculture support, a study was conducted to examine the fate and the environmental impact of the nitrogen- and phosphorus-containing species released during catalytic steam gasification of poultry litter. From various preliminary tests, it was concluded that most (approximately 100%) of the phosphorus would remain in the residue, and some (20-70%) of the nitrogen would end up as ammonia in the fuel gas. The effects of temperature, catalyst loading, and type of catalyst on ammonia liberation were studied in a muffled furnace setup at atmospheric pressure. The fraction of nitrogen released as ammonia was found to decrease with an increase in temperature during pyrolysis and steam gasification. It also decreased with an increase in catalyst loading.

  12. Nitrogen and phosphorus additions negatively affect tree species diversity in tropical forest regrowth trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Ilyas; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães; Schmidt, Susanne; Lamb, David; Carvalho, Cláudio José Reis; Figueiredo, Ricardo de Oliveira; Blomberg, Simon; Davidson, Eric A

    2010-07-01

    Nutrient enrichment is increasingly affecting many tropical ecosystems, but there is no information on how this affects tree biodiversity. To examine dynamics in vegetation structure and tree species biomass and diversity, we annually remeasured tree species before and for six years after repeated additions of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in permanent plots of abandoned pasture in Amazonia. Nitrogen and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus addition shifted growth among woody species. Nitrogen stimulated growth of two common pioneer tree species and one common tree species adaptable to both high- and low-light environments, while P stimulated growth only of the dominant pioneer tree Rollinia exsucca (Annonaceae). Overall, N or P addition reduced tree assemblage evenness and delayed tree species accrual over time, likely due to competitive monopolization of other resources by the few tree species responding to nutrient enrichment with enhanced establishment and/or growth rates. Absolute tree growth rates were elevated for two years after nutrient addition. However, nutrient-induced shifts in relative tree species growth and reduced assemblage evenness persisted for more than three years after nutrient addition, favoring two nutrient-responsive pioneers and one early-secondary tree species. Surprisingly, N + P effects on tree biomass and species diversity were consistently weaker than N-only and P-only effects, because grass biomass increased dramatically in response to N + P addition. The resulting intensified competition probably prevented an expected positive N + P synergy in the tree assemblage. Thus, N or P enrichment may favor unknown tree functional response types, reduce the diversity of coexisting species, and delay species accrual during structurally and functionally complex tropical rainforest secondary succession.

  13. Aggregate-associated carbon and nitrogen affected by residue placement, crop species, and nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    High variability in soil and climatic conditions results in limited changes in soil aggregate-21 associated C and N levels as affected by management practices during a crop growing season in 22 the field. We evaluated the effects of crop species (spring wheat [Triticum aestivum L.], pea 23 [Pisum sa...

  14. Identification of nitrogenous organic species in Titan aerosols analogs: Nitrogen fixation routes in early atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2013-09-01

    Titan, an icy world surrounded by auburn organic haze, is considered as one of the best targets for studying abiotic planetary organic chemistry. In spite of a great many efforts being made, the chemistry in Titan’s atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of Titan aerosols analogs (tholin) by NMR and identified hexamethylenetetramine as a dominant small molecule in Titan tholin. Here we report a more complete and definitive structural investigation of the small molecule inventory in Titan tholin. We identified several nitrogenous organic molecules including cyanamide, guanidine, 2-cyanoguanidine, melamine, N‧-cyanoformamidine and 1,2,4-triazole in Titan tholin by using NMR and GC-MS and standard sample comparison. The structural characteristics of these molecules suggest a possible formation pathway from the reaction of HCN and NH3, both of which are known to exist in appreciable density in the atmosphere and were tentatively detected by the Huygens probe.

  15. Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Pathogenesis of Vascular Complications of Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Man Son

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrovascular and microvascular diseases are currently the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in subjects with diabetes. Disorders of the physiological signaling functions of reactive oxygen species (superoxide and hydrogen peroxide and reactive nitrogen species (nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are important features of diabetes. In the absence of an appropriate compensation by the endogenous antioxidant defense network, increased oxidative stress leads to the activation of stress-sensitive intracellular signaling pathways and the formation of gene products that cause cellular damage and contribute to the vascular complications of diabetes. It has recently been suggested that diabetic subjects with vascular complications may have a defective cellular antioxidant response against the oxidative stress generated by hyperglycemia. This raises the concept that antioxidant therapy may be of great benefit to these subjects. Although our understanding of how hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress ultimately leads to tissue damage has advanced considerably in recent years, effective therapeutic strategies to prevent or delay the development of this damage remain limited. Thus, further investigation of therapeutic interventions to prevent or delay the progression of diabetic vascular complications is needed.

  16. Performance of low-input turfgrass species as affected by mowing and nitrogen fertilization in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Minnesota, most lawns and higher cut turfgrass areas consist primarily of species such as Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) that require significant management inputs such as frequent mowing and nitrogen fertility. Several studies have shown that oth...

  17. Regulation of MAP kinase-dependent apoptotic pathway: implication of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbayev, Vadim V; Yasinska, Inna M

    2005-04-15

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades are multi-functional signaling networks that influence cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and cellular responses to stress. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is a MAP kinase kinase kinase that triggers apoptogenic kinase cascade leading to the phosphorylation/activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases and p38-MAP kinase, which are responsible for inducing apoptotic cell death. This pathway plays a pivotal role in transduction of signals from different apoptotic stimuli. In the present review, we summarized the recent evidence concerning MAP kinase-dependent apoptotic pathway and its regulation in the mammalian cells and organism in vivo. We have shown that the key messengers of regulation of this pathway are the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The role of protein oxidation and S-nitrosation in induction of apoptotic cell death via ASK1 is discussed. Also we have outlined other recently discovered signal transduction processes involved in the regulation of ASK1 activity and downstream pathway.

  18. The reactivity of lattice carbon and nitrogen species in molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides prepared by single-source routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlShalwi, M. [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Hargreaves, J.S.J., E-mail: Justin.Hargreaves@glasgow.ac.uk [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Liggat, J.J.; Todd, D. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, 295 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G1 1XL (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides have been prepared from single source routes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen species are more reactive than carbon species within the carbonitrides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reactivity of nitrogen species is a function of carbonitride composition. -- Abstract: Molybdenum (oxy)carbonitrides of different compositions have been prepared from hexamethylenetetramine molybdate and ethylenediamine molybdate precursors and the reactivity of the lattice carbon and nitrogen species within them has been determined by temperature programmed reduction and thermal volatilisation studies. Nitrogen is found to be much more reactive than carbon and the nature of its reactivity is influenced by composition with the presence of carbon enhancing the reactivity of nitrogen. The difference in reactivity observed indicates that molybdenum carbonitrides are not suitable candidates as reagents for which the simultaneous loss of nitrogen and carbon from the lattice would be desirable.

  19. Mitochondrial Signaling in Plants Under Hypoxia: Use of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim; Møller, Ian Max

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia commonly occurs in roots in water-saturated soil and in maturing and germinating seeds. We here review the role of the mitochondria in the cellular response to hypoxia with an emphasis on the turnover of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) and their potential...... removed, these compounds can react with proteins either reversibly—one-step oxidation or nitrosylation of cysteine—or irreversibly by carbonylation and this affects the properties of the oxidized proteins in, as yet, mostly unknown ways. ROS, probably hydrogen peroxide, and/or oxidized peptides...

  20. Plant water use affects competition for nitrogen: why drought favors invasive species in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Katherine; Seabloom, Eric W; Harpole, W Stanley; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Classic resource competition theory typically treats resource supply rates as independent; however, nutrient supplies can be affected by plants indirectly, with important consequences for model predictions. We demonstrate this general phenomenon by using a model in which competition for nitrogen is mediated by soil moisture, with competitive outcomes including coexistence and multiple stable states as well as competitive exclusion. In the model, soil moisture regulates nitrogen availability through soil moisture dependence of microbial processes, leaching, and plant uptake. By affecting water availability, plants also indirectly affect nitrogen availability and may therefore alter the competitive outcome. Exotic annual species from the Mediterranean have displaced much of the native perennial grasses in California. Nitrogen and water have been shown to be potentially limiting in this system. We parameterize the model for a Californian grassland and show that soil moisture-mediated competition for nitrogen can explain the annual species' dominance in drier areas, with coexistence expected in wetter regions. These results are concordant with larger biogeographic patterns of grassland invasion in the Pacific states of the United States, in which annual grasses have invaded most of the hot, dry grasslands in California but perennial grasses dominate the moister prairies of northern California, Oregon, and Washington.

  1. Invasive Buddleja davidii allocates more nitrogen to its photosynthetic machinery than five native woody species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu-Long; Auge, Harald; Ebeling, Susan K

    2007-09-01

    The general-purpose genotype hypothesis and the hypothesis of the evolution of invasiveness predict that invasive species are characterized by particular traits that confer invasiveness. However, these traits are still not well-defined. In this study, ecophysiological traits of eight populations of the invasive shrub Buddleja davidii from a wide range of European locations and five co-occurring native woody species in Germany were compared in a common garden experiment. We hypothesized that the invader has higher resource capture ability and utilization efficiency than the natives. No differences were detected among the eight populations of B. davidii in any of the traits evaluated, indicating that the invader did not evolve during range expansion, thus providing support to the general-purpose genotype hypothesis. The invader showed significantly higher maximum electron transport rate, maximum carboxylation rate, carboxylation efficiency, light-saturated photosynthetic rate (P(max)) and photosynthetic nitrogen utilization efficiency (PNUE) than the five natives. Leaf nitrogen content was not significantly different between the invader and the natives, but the invader allocated more nitrogen to the photosynthetic machinery than the natives. The increased nitrogen content in the photosynthetic machinery resulted in a higher resource capture ability and utilization efficiency in the invader. At the same intercellular CO(2) concentration, P (max) was significantly higher in the invader than in the natives, again confirming the importance of the higher nitrogen allocation to photosynthesis. The invader reduced metabolic cost by increasing the ratio of P (max) to dark respiration rate (R (d)), but it did not reduce carbon cost by increasing the specific leaf area and decreasing leaf construction cost. The higher nitrogen allocation to the photosynthetic machinery, P(max), PNUE and P(max)/R(d) may facilitate B. davidii invasion, although studies involving a wide range of

  2. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Jun Ahn

    Full Text Available The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  3. Genetic Diversity of Nitrogen-Fixing and Plant Growth Promoting Pseudomonas Species Isolated from Sugarcane Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Bi Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to isolate and characterize Pseudomonas spp. from sugarcane rhizosphere, and to evaluate their plant- growth- promoting (PGP traits and nitrogenase activity. A biological nitrogen-fixing microbe has great potential to replace chemical fertilizers and be used as a targeted biofertilizer in a plant. A total of 100 isolates from sugarcane rhizosphere, belonging to different species, were isolated; from these, 30 isolates were selected on the basis of preliminary screening, for in vitro antagonistic activities against sugarcane pathogens and for various PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. The production of IAA varied from 312.07 to 13.12 μg mL−1 in tryptophan supplemented medium, with higher production in AN15 and lower in CN20 strain. The estimation of ACC deaminase activity, strains CY4 and BA2 produced maximum and minimum activity of 77.0 and 15.13 μmoL mg−1 h−1. For nitrogenase activity among the studied strains, CoA6 fixed higher and AY1 fixed lower in amounts (108.30 and 6.16 μmoL C2H2 h−1 mL−1. All the strains were identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the phylogenetic diversity of the strains was analyzed. The results identified all strains as being similar to Pseudomonas spp. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of nifH and antibiotic genes was suggestive that the amplified strains had the capability to fix nitrogen and possessed biocontrol activities. Genotypic comparisons of the strains were determined by BOX, ERIC, and REP PCR profile analysis. Out of all the screened isolates, CY4 (Pseudomonas koreensis and CN11 (Pseudomonas entomophila showed the most prominent PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. Therefore, only these two strains were selected for further studies; Biolog profiling; colonization through green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged bacteria; and nifH gene expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis. The

  4. Genetic Diversity of Nitrogen-Fixing and Plant Growth Promoting Pseudomonas Species Isolated from Sugarcane Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Bi; Singh, Rajesh K; Singh, Pratiksha; Song, Qi-Qi; Xing, Yong-Xiu; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yang-Rui

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to isolate and characterize Pseudomonas spp. from sugarcane rhizosphere, and to evaluate their plant- growth- promoting (PGP) traits and nitrogenase activity. A biological nitrogen-fixing microbe has great potential to replace chemical fertilizers and be used as a targeted biofertilizer in a plant. A total of 100 isolates from sugarcane rhizosphere, belonging to different species, were isolated; from these, 30 isolates were selected on the basis of preliminary screening, for in vitro antagonistic activities against sugarcane pathogens and for various PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. The production of IAA varied from 312.07 to 13.12 μg mL(-1) in tryptophan supplemented medium, with higher production in AN15 and lower in CN20 strain. The estimation of ACC deaminase activity, strains CY4 and BA2 produced maximum and minimum activity of 77.0 and 15.13 μmoL mg(-1) h(-1). For nitrogenase activity among the studied strains, CoA6 fixed higher and AY1 fixed lower in amounts (108.30 and 6.16 μmoL C2H2 h(-1) mL(-1)). All the strains were identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the phylogenetic diversity of the strains was analyzed. The results identified all strains as being similar to Pseudomonas spp. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of nifH and antibiotic genes was suggestive that the amplified strains had the capability to fix nitrogen and possessed biocontrol activities. Genotypic comparisons of the strains were determined by BOX, ERIC, and REP PCR profile analysis. Out of all the screened isolates, CY4 (Pseudomonas koreensis) and CN11 (Pseudomonas entomophila) showed the most prominent PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. Therefore, only these two strains were selected for further studies; Biolog profiling; colonization through green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacteria; and nifH gene expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. The Biolog phenotypic

  5. Carbon and nitrogen in forest floor and mineral soil under six common European tree species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterdal, Lars; Schmidt, Inger K.; Callesen, Ingeborg;

    2007-01-01

    The knowledge of tree species effects on soil C and N pools is scarce, particularly for European deciduous tree species. We studied forest floor and mineral soil carbon and nitrogen under six common European tree species in a common garden design replicated at six sites in Denmark. Three decades...... after planting the six tree species had different profiles in terms of litterfall, forest floor and mineral soil C and N attributes. Three groups were identified: (1) ash, maple and lime, (2) beech and oak, and (3) spruce. There were significant differences in forest floor and soil C and N contents...... and C/N ratios, also among the five deciduous tree species. The influence of tree species was most pronounced in the forest floor, where C and N contents increased in the order ash = lime = maple

  6. Soil carbon accumulation and nitrogen retention traits of four tree species grown in common gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurmesa, Geshere Abdisa; Schmidt, Inger Kappel; Gundersen, Per

    2013-01-01

    Tree species effects on soil carbon (C) accumulation are uncertain, especially with respect to the mineral soil C, and the consistency of such effects across soil types is not known. The interaction between C accumulation and nitrogen (N) retention among common tree species has also been little...... differed significantly between conifers and broadleaves. The observed differences in forest floor C and N stocks were attributed to differences in litter turnover rates among the tree species. Mineral soil C stocks were significantly higher in stands of Norway spruce than in stands of oak and beech while...

  7. XPS of nitrogen-containing functional groups on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.J.J.; Bekkum, van H.

    1995-01-01

    XPS is used to study the binding energy of the Cls, Nls and Ols photoelectrons of surface groups on several nitrogen-containing activated carbons. Specific binding energies are assigned to amide (399.9 eV). lactam and imidc (399.7 eV). pyridine (398.7 eV), pyrrole (400.7 eV), alkylamine. secondary a

  8. Nitrogen fixation and nitrogenase activity of Azotobacter chroococcum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brotonegoro, S.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the effect of some chemical, physical and biological factors on growth, efficiency of nitrogen fixation and nitrogenase activity of Azotobacter chroococcum.From biochemical studies with cell-free preparations of various nitrogenfixing microorgani

  9. Science Letters:Effect of nitrogen doping on the reduction of nitric oxide with activated carbon in the presence of oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon (AC) was performed by annealing both in ammonia and nitric oxide, and the activities of the modified carbons for NO reduction were studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that nitrogen atoms were incorporated into the carbons, mostly in the form of pyridinic nitrogen or pyridonic nitrogen. The effect of nitrogen doping on the activities of the carbons can be ignored when oxygen is absent, but the doped carbons show desirable activities in the low temperature regime (≤500 ℃) when oxygen is present. The role of the surface nitrogen species is suggested to promote the formation of NO2 in the presence of oxygen, and NO2 can facilitate decomposition of the surface oxygen species in the low temperature regime.

  10. Nitrogen removal from coal gasification wastewater by activated carbon technologies combined with short-cut nitrogen removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Zhuang, Haifeng; Jia, Shengyong; Fang, Fang

    2014-11-01

    A system combining granular activated carbon and powdered activated carbon technologies along with shortcut biological nitrogen removal (GAC-PACT-SBNR) was developed to enhance total nitrogen (TN) removal for anaerobically treated coal gasification wastewater with less need for external carbon resources. The TN removal efficiency in SBNR was significantly improved by introducing the effluent from the GAC process into SBNR during the anoxic stage, with removal percentage increasing from 43.8%-49.6% to 68.8%-75.8%. However, the TN removal rate decreased with the progressive deterioration of GAC adsorption. After adding activated sludge to the GAC compartment, the granular carbon had a longer service-life and the demand for external carbon resources became lower. Eventually, the TN removal rate in SBNR was almost constant at approx. 43.3%, as compared to approx. 20.0% before seeding with sludge. In addition, the production of some alkalinity during the denitrification resulted in a net savings in alkalinity requirements for the nitrification reaction and refractory chemical oxygen demand (COD) degradation by autotrophic bacteria in SBNR under oxic conditions. PACT showed excellent resilience to increasing organic loadings. The microbial community analysis revealed that the PACT had a greater variety of bacterial taxons and the dominant species associated with the three compartments were in good agreement with the removal of typical pollutants. The study demonstrated that pre-adsorption by the GAC-sludge process could be a technically and economically feasible method to enhance TN removal in coal gasification wastewater (CGW).

  11. QQS orphan gene regulates carbon and nitrogen partitioning across species via NF-YC interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Zheng, Wenguang; Zhu, Yanbing; Ye, Huaxun; Tang, Buyun; Arendsee, Zebulun W; Jones, Dallas; Li, Ruoran; Ortiz, Diego; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Chuanlong; Nettleton, Dan; Scott, M Paul; Salas-Fernandez, Maria G; Yin, Yanhai; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2015-11-24

    The allocation of carbon and nitrogen resources to the synthesis of plant proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids is complex and under the control of many genes; much remains to be understood about this process. QQS (Qua-Quine Starch; At3g30720), an orphan gene unique to Arabidopsis thaliana, regulates metabolic processes affecting carbon and nitrogen partitioning among proteins and carbohydrates, modulating leaf and seed composition in Arabidopsis and soybean. Here the universality of QQS function in modulating carbon and nitrogen allocation is exemplified by a series of transgenic experiments. We show that ectopic expression of QQS increases soybean protein independent of the genetic background and original protein content of the cultivar. Furthermore, transgenic QQS expression increases the protein content of maize, a C4 species (a species that uses 4-carbon photosynthesis), and rice, a protein-poor agronomic crop, both highly divergent from Arabidopsis. We determine that QQS protein binds to the transcriptional regulator AtNF-YC4 (Arabidopsis nuclear factor Y, subunit C4). Overexpression of AtNF-YC4 in Arabidopsis mimics the QQS-overexpression phenotype, increasing protein and decreasing starch levels. NF-YC, a component of the NF-Y complex, is conserved across eukaryotes. The NF-YC4 homologs of soybean, rice, and maize also bind to QQS, which provides an explanation of how QQS can act in species where it does not occur endogenously. These findings are, to our knowledge, the first insight into the mechanism of action of QQS in modulating carbon and nitrogen allocation across species. They have major implications for the emergence and function of orphan genes, and identify a nontransgenic strategy for modulating protein levels in crop species, a trait of great agronomic significance.

  12. Catalytic Activation of Nitrogen Dioxide for Selective Synthesis of Nitroorganics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-15

    attack of NO2– at a methyl group in the FA9550-11-1-0253: Catalytic Activation of Nitrogen Dioxide for Selective Synthesis of Nitroorganics PI: Seth...They can be installed (generally as their pinacol esters) by efficient iridium -catalyzed undirected aryl C-H activation. They can then be used to...of ipso nitro-deboronation, in reasonable yields. Trichlorotris(pyridine) iridium (III) is the most selective catalyst for this reaction. The reaction

  13. Effects of water and nitrogen addition on species turnover in temperate grasslands in northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuwen Xu

    Full Text Available Global nitrogen (N deposition and climate change have been identified as two of the most important causes of current plant diversity loss. However, temporal patterns of species turnover underlying diversity changes in response to changing precipitation regimes and atmospheric N deposition have received inadequate attention. We carried out a manipulation experiment in a steppe and an old-field in North China from 2005 to 2009, to test the hypothesis that water addition enhances plant species richness through increase in the rate of species gain and decrease in the rate of species loss, while N addition has opposite effects on species changes. Our results showed that water addition increased the rate of species gain in both the steppe and the old field but decreased the rates of species loss and turnover in the old field. In contrast, N addition increased the rates of species loss and turnover in the steppe but decreased the rate of species gain in the old field. The rate of species change was greater in the old field than in the steppe. Water interacted with N to affect species richness and species turnover, indicating that the impacts of N on semi-arid grasslands were largely mediated by water availability. The temporal stability of communities was negatively correlated with rates of species loss and turnover, suggesting that water addition might enhance, but N addition would reduce the compositional stability of grasslands. Experimental results support our initial hypothesis and demonstrate that water and N availabilities differed in the effects on rate of species change in the temperate grasslands, and these effects also depend on grassland types and/or land-use history. Species gain and loss together contribute to the dynamic change of species richness in semi-arid grasslands under future climate change.

  14. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on cotton biomass, nitrogen utilization and soil urease activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Ning; Yin, Fei-hu; Chen, Yun; Gao, Zhi-jian; Liu, Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a semi-open-top artificial climate chamber was used to study the effect of CO2 enrichment (360 and 540 µmol · mol(-1)) and nitrogen addition (0, 150, 300 and 450 kg · hm(-2)) on cotton dry matter accumulation and distribution, nitrogen absorption and soil urease activity. The results showed that the dry matter accumulation of bud, stem, leaf and the whole plant increased significantly in the higher CO2 concentration treatment irrespective of nitrogen level. The dry matter of all the detected parts of plant with 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen addition was significantly higher than those with the other nitrogen levels irrespective of CO2 concentration, indicating reasonable nitrogen fertilization could significantly improve cotton dry matter accumulation. Elevated CO2 concentration had significant impact on the nitrogen absorption contents of cotton bud and stem. Compared to those under CO2 concentration of 360 µmol · mol(-1), the nitrogen contents of bud and stem both increased significantly under CO2 concentration of 540 µmol · mol(-1). The nitrogen content of cotton bud in the treatment of 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen was the highest among the four nitrogen fertilizer treatments. While the nitrogen contents of cotton stem in the treatments of 150 kg · hm(-2) and 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels were higher than those in the treatment of 0 kg · hm(-2) and 450 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels. The nitrogen content of cotton leaf was significantly influenced by the in- teraction of CO2 elevation and N addition as the nitrogen content of leaf increased in the treatments of 0, 150 and 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels under the CO2 concentration of 540 µmol · mol(-1). The nitrogen content in cotton root was significantly increased with the increase of nitrogen fertilizer level under elevated CO2 (540 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment. Overall, the cotton nitrogen absorption content under the elevated CO2 (540 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment was higher than that

  15. A marine eutrophication impacts assessment method in LCIA coupling coastal ecosystems exposure to nitrogen and species sensitivity to hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Koski, Marja; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    Characterisation modelling in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) aims at quantifying potential impacts of anthropogenic emissions. It delivers substance-specific Characterisation Factors (CF) expressing ecosystem responses to marginal increments in emitted quantities. Nitrogen (N) emissions from e...... biological processes of ecosystem’s N exposure (Exposure Factor, XF) with the sensitivity of select species to hypoxia (Effect Factor, EF). The XF converts N-inputs into a sinking carbon flux from planktonic primary production and DO consumed by bacterial respiration in bottom waters, whereas EF builds...... producing comparative environmental sustainability indicators of human activities as applied in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of product systems....

  16. Emissions of gaseous nitrogen species from manure management: A new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemmgen, Ulrich [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Institute of Agroecology, Bundesallee 50, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.daemmgen@fal.de; Hutchings, Nicholas J. [Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agroecology, Tjele (Denmark)], E-mail: nick.hutchings@agrsci.dk

    2008-08-15

    A procedure for the assessment of emissions of nitrogen (N) species (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide, di-nitrogen) from the manure management system is developed, which treats N pools and flows including emissions strictly according to conservation of mass criteria. As all relevant flows in the husbandry of mammals are depicted, the methodology is considered a Tier 3 approach in IPCC terminology or a detailed methodology in UN ECE terminology. The importance of accounting for all N species is illustrated by comparing emission estimates obtained using this approach with those obtained from the application the present detailed/Tier 2 methodology. - A cow is a cow. There is no distinction between an IPCC and a UN ECE cow{exclamation_point}.

  17. Protective effect of Castanea sativa and Quercus robur leaf extracts against oxygen and nitrogen reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Isabel F; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lima, José L F C; Costa, P C; Bahia, M F

    2008-05-29

    Topical natural antioxidants are a useful strategy for the prevention of photoaging and oxidative stress mediated skin diseases. In view of this underlying principle, the screening of natural plant extracts with scavenging activity for pro-oxidant reactive species is a primary requirement for the development of new topical antioxidant formulations. In the present study, an ethanol:water (7:3) extract from Castanea sativa leaves and a ethanol:water (2:3) extract from Quercus robur leaves were evaluated for their putative in vitro scavenging effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) namely superoxide radical (O(2)(-)), hydroxyl radical (HO()), peroxyl radical (ROO()), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) as well as on reactive nitrogen species (RNS) namely nitric oxide (()NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). The extracts presented a high potency to scavenge the tested reactive species, all the IC(50)s being found at the microg/mL level. IC(50)s (mean+/-SE) for the ROS O(2)(-),HO(),H(2)O(2) and (1)O(2) were 13.6+/-1.8; 216+/-4; 410+/-8; 12.3+/-0.7 microug/mL, respectively, for C. sativa, and 11.0+/-0.5; 285+/-22; 251+/-32; 7.90+/-0.56 microg/mL, respectively, for Q. robur. The ORAC values obtained for ROO() were 1.24+/-0.13 for C. sativa and 1.09+/-0.06 for Q. robur. The IC(50)s (mean+/-SE) for ()NO and ONOO(-) were 3.10+/-0.14 and 1.49+/-0.10 microg/mL, respectively, for C. sativa and 3.13+/-0.11 and 0.95+/-0.02 microg/mL, respectively, for Q. robur. The content of total phenolics for C. sativa and Q. robur were 284+/-9 and 346+/-4 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g of lyophilized extract respectively. The observed effects might be of relevance considering the putative interest of these extracts as topical antioxidants.

  18. In vitro protective effect of Hypericum androsaemum extract against oxygen and nitrogen reactive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Isabel F; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lima, José L F C; Costa, Paulo Cardoso; Bahia, Maria Fernanda

    2009-10-01

    Hypericum androsaemum L. (Gutiferae) is a medicinal plant growing in Western Europe that has been used in traditional medicine in the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. Oxidative stress and nitrosative stress are common pathogenetic mechanisms contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage in several liver disorders. In the present study, an ethanol:water (4:6) extract from H. androsaemum branches and leaves were evaluated for its putative in vitro scavenging effects on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil radical, on reactive oxygen species, namely HO•, O₂•-, ROO•, ¹O₂ and H₂O₂ and on reactive nitrogen species, namely •NO and ONOO⁻. The hypericum extract presented a remarkable capacity to scavenge all the tested reactive species, all the IC₅₀ values being found at the μg/ml level. IC₅₀ values for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil, and for the reactive oxygen species O₂•-, H₂O₂, HO• and ¹O₂ were 11.3 ± 0.7, 32.7 ± 3.4, 944 ± 47, 595 ± 82, 28.3 ± 1.2 μg/ml respectively. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity value obtained for ROO• was 1.5 ± 0.1 μmol Trolox equivalents/mg extract. The IC₅₀ values for •NO and ONOO⁻ were 2.2 ± 0.2 and 1.2 ± 0.1 μg/ml respectively. The content of total phenolics was 281 ± 2 mg of gallic acid equivalents/g of lyophilized extract. The observed antioxidant activity provides scientific support for the reported therapeutic use of H. androsaemum, though further in vitro and in vivo studies are required to ascertain the risk/benefit score at therapeutic concentrations.

  19. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  20. Ecosystem responses to warming-induced plant species loss and increased nitrogen availability in a Rocky Mountain subalpine meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Molly Elizabeth

    Climate change is predicted to be an important driver of future biodiversity changes, especially in mountainous environments. Climate warming-induced plant species loss is likely to be non-random and based on species-specific susceptibility to rising temperatures. Experimental warming results from a subalpine meadow in Colorado suggest that warming adversely affects shallow-rooted forb species in this ecosystem. To examine the ecological consequences of losing this warming-sensitive species group, I experimentally removed all shallow-rooted forb species from otherwise intact subalpine meadow plots. Since experimental warming also resulted in increased soil nitrogen availability, I crossed the removal treatment with a nitrogen addition treatment to determine whether the loss of shallow-rooted forbs altered the community's response to a perturbation in nitrogen availability. After three years of experimental species removal, tap-rooted forbs and grasses were able to fully compensate for the loss of shallow-rooted forbs with increased biomass production. Moreover, the remaining plant community yielded a larger biomass response to nitrogen addition when shallow-rooted forbs were removed, possibly because removal led to increased soil moisture. The loss of shallow-rooted forbs and addition of nitrogen did not have strong effects on nitrogen cycling beyond increases in the amount of nitrate moving down through the soil profile. Uptake of nitrogen into plant tissue was also not affected by either the shallow-rooted forb removal or nitrogen addition treatments, suggesting that nitrogen may not have been the most limiting resource during the experiment. I found that spatial heterogeneity generally had a greater influence on soil microbial community composition than any of the experimental treatments. I conclude that the warming-induced loss of shallow-rooted forbs did not affect biomass production, nitrogen cycling, or soil microbial community composition, but did increase

  1. Differential allocation to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic nitrogen fractions among native and invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Jennifer L; Glenwinkel, Lori A; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the "high-return" end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids.

  2. Differential allocation to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic nitrogen fractions among native and invasive species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Funk

    Full Text Available Invasive species are expected to cluster on the "high-return" end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids.

  3. The effect of hydraulic lift on organic matter decomposition, soil nitrogen cycling, and nitrogen acquisition by a grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Cristina; Kim, John H; Bleby, Timothy M; Jackson, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic lift (HL) is the passive movement of water through plant roots, driven by gradients in water potential. The greater soil-water availability resulting from HL may in principle lead to higher plant nutrient uptake, but the evidence for this hypothesis is not universally supported by current experiments. We grew a grass species common in North America in two-layer pots with three treatments: (1) the lower layer watered, the upper one unwatered (HL), (2) both layers watered (W), and (3) the lower layer watered, the upper one unwatered, but with continuous light 24 h a day to limit HL (no-HL). We inserted ingrowth cores filled with enriched-nitrogen organic matter ((15)N-OM) in the upper layer and tested whether decomposition, mineralization and uptake of (15)N were higher in plants performing HL than in plants without HL. Soils in the upper layer were significantly wetter in the HL treatment than in the no-HL treatment. Decomposition rates were similar in the W and HL treatments and lower in no-HL. On average, the concentration of NH(4)(+)-N in ingrowth cores was highest in the W treatment, and NO(3)(-)-N concentrations were highest in the no-HL treatment, with HL having intermediate values for both, suggesting differential mineralization of organic N among treatments. Aboveground biomass, leaf (15)N contents and the (15)N uptake in aboveground tissues were higher in W and HL than in no-HL, indicating higher nutrient uptake and improved N status of plants performing HL. However, there were no differences in total root nitrogen content or (15)N uptake by roots, indicating that HL affected plant allocation of acquired N to photosynthetic tissues. Our evidence for the role of HL in organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling suggests that HL could have positive effects on plant nutrient dynamics and nutrient turnover.

  4. Shifts in species composition constrain restoration of overgrazed grassland using nitrogen fertilization in Inner Mongolian steppe, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    Full Text Available Long-term livestock over-grazing causes nitrogen outputs to exceed inputs in Inner Mongolia, suggesting that low levels of nitrogen fertilization could help restore grasslands degraded by overgrazing. However, the effectiveness of such an approach depends on the response of production and species composition to the interactive drivers of nitrogen and water availability. We conducted a five-year experiment manipulating precipitation (NP: natural precipitation and SWP: simulated wet year precipitation and nitrogen (0, 25 and 50 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1 addition in Inner Mongolia. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would increase forage production when water availability was relatively high. However, the extent to which nitrogen would co-limit production under average or below average rainfall in these grasslands was unknown.Aboveground net primary production (ANPP increased in response to nitrogen when precipitation was similar to or higher than the long-term average, but not when precipitation was below average. This shift in limitation was also reflected by water and nitrogen use efficiency. Belowground live biomass significantly increased with increasing water availability, but was not affected by nitrogen addition. Under natural precipitation (NP treatment, the inter-annual variation of ANPP was 3-fold greater than with stable water availability (CV(ANPP = 61±6% and 17±3% for NP and SWP treatment, respectively and nitrogen addition increased CV(ANPP even more (89±14%. This occurred in part because fertilizer nitrogen left in the soil in dry years remained available for uptake during wet years and because of high production by unpalatable annual species in wet years in the NP treatment. In summary, plant growth by residual fertilizer nitrogen could lead to sufficient yields to offset lack of additional production in dry years. However, the utility of fertilization for restoration may be constrained by shifts in species composition and

  5. Shifts in species composition constrain restoration of overgrazed grassland using nitrogen fertilization in Inner Mongolian steppe, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Hooper, David U; Lin, Shan

    2011-03-01

    Long-term livestock over-grazing causes nitrogen outputs to exceed inputs in Inner Mongolia, suggesting that low levels of nitrogen fertilization could help restore grasslands degraded by overgrazing. However, the effectiveness of such an approach depends on the response of production and species composition to the interactive drivers of nitrogen and water availability. We conducted a five-year experiment manipulating precipitation (NP: natural precipitation and SWP: simulated wet year precipitation) and nitrogen (0, 25 and 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) addition in Inner Mongolia. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would increase forage production when water availability was relatively high. However, the extent to which nitrogen would co-limit production under average or below average rainfall in these grasslands was unknown.Aboveground net primary production (ANPP) increased in response to nitrogen when precipitation was similar to or higher than the long-term average, but not when precipitation was below average. This shift in limitation was also reflected by water and nitrogen use efficiency. Belowground live biomass significantly increased with increasing water availability, but was not affected by nitrogen addition. Under natural precipitation (NP treatment), the inter-annual variation of ANPP was 3-fold greater than with stable water availability (CV(ANPP) = 61±6% and 17±3% for NP and SWP treatment, respectively) and nitrogen addition increased CV(ANPP) even more (89±14%). This occurred in part because fertilizer nitrogen left in the soil in dry years remained available for uptake during wet years and because of high production by unpalatable annual species in wet years in the NP treatment. In summary, plant growth by residual fertilizer nitrogen could lead to sufficient yields to offset lack of additional production in dry years. However, the utility of fertilization for restoration may be constrained by shifts in species composition and the lack of

  6. Responses of Ammonia-Oxidising Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen, Lime, and Plant Species in Upland Grassland Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre C. Rooney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural improvement of seminatural grasslands has been shown to result in changes to plant and microbial diversity, with consequences for ecosystem functioning. A microcosm approach was used to elucidate the effects of two key components of agricultural improvement (nitrogen addition and liming on ammonia-oxidising bacterial (AOB communities in an upland grassland soil. Plant species characteristic of unimproved and improved pastures (A. capillaris and L. perenne were planted in microcosms, and lime, nitrogen (NH4NO3, or lime plus nitrogen added. The AOB community was profiled using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP of the amoA gene. AOB community structure was largely altered by NH4NO3 addition, rather than liming, although interactions between nitrogen addition and plant species were also evident. Results indicate that nitrogen addition drives shifts in the structure of key microbial communities in upland grassland soils, and that plant species may play a significant role in determining AOB community structure.

  7. Effects of four nitrogen substrates on growth of several red tide species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜天; 周名江; 钱培元

    2002-01-01

    --Eight common red tide species including the Dinoflagellates Ale randrium tamarense,Prorocentrum minimum, Prorocentrum mican, Diatoms Skeletonema costatum , Cerataulina pelagica, Leptocylindrus minimus, a Raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo and a Chrysophyte Ivohrysis galbana were chosen to study the effect of four nitrogen substrates ( NO3 - N, NH4 - N, Urea - N,Mixed - N) on the growth of these algae. After two transfers, the results showed that at N concentration of 550μrnol, NO3 N was the best nitrogen source among these four nitrogen substrates; Urea - N and Mixed- N were also good for the growth of most algae, but not as good as NO3 - N for some species; NH4 - N inhibited the growth of all these species except H. akashiwo. At concentrations of 280 and 50 μmnol experiments on the growth of I. galbana, P. minimum and L. minimus in NH4 - N and NO3 - N substrates were also performed. The results showed that the growth rates of I. galbana were not significantly different from each other in NO3 - N and NH4 - N substrates both concentrations of 280 and 50 μmol. In concentration of 280μmol NH4 - N substrate, the growth rates of P.minimum and L. minimus were slower than in same concentration of NO3 - N; At concentration of 50μrmol , the growth rate of P. minimum in NH4 - N was not significantly different from that in NO3 - N, while the growth rate of L. minimus was only about 30% of that in NO3 - N substrate.The results indicated that each alga had its own preference in N-substrate and concentration, therefore,different nitrogen substrates may play a role in red tide formation.

  8. Soil NH4+/NO3-nitrogen characteristics in primary forests and the adaptability of some coniferous species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xiaoyang; SONG Jinfeng

    2007-01-01

    the adaptation to NH4+-dominated systems (or limited ability to use NO3-) for the coniferous species include:i) distribution and activity of enzymes for catalyzing nitrogen reduction and assimilation,generally characterized by lower nitrate reductase (NR);ii) greater tolerance to NH4+ or rapid detoxification of ammonium nitrogen in the roots;iii) lower capacity of absorption to NO3-by roots that might be controlled by feedback regulations of certain N-transport compounds,such as glutamine;iv) relations and balance between nitrogen and other elements (such as Ca2+,Mg2+,and Zn2+ etc.).Some NH4+-preferred conifers might be more adapted (tolerant) to lower base cation conditions;v)NO3-nutrition,rather than NH4+,that may lead to the loss of considerable quantities of organic and inorganic carbon to the surrounding media and mycorrhizal symbiont and probably contribute to slower growth;and vi) the metabolic cost of reducing NO3-to NH4+ that may make shade-tolerant conifers favor the uptake of reduced nitrogen (NH4+).The adaptation of late successional conifers to NH4+-dominated habitats has profound ecological implications.First,it might be an important prerequisite for the climax forest communities dominated by these conifers to maintainlong-term stability.Second,primary coniferous or conifer-ous-broadleaved forests have been widely perturbed because of commercial exploitation,where the soil ammonium nitrogen pool tends to be largely transformed to nitrate after disturbance.In such a situation,the coniferous species that were dominant in undisturbed ecosystems may become poor competitors for nitrogen,and the site will be occupied by early successional (pioneer) plants better adapted to nitrate utilization.In other words,the implicit adaptation of many conifers dominant in undisturbed communities to ammonium nitrogen will cause difficulties in their regeneration on disturbed sites,which must be taken into account in the practical restoration of degraded temperate forest

  9. Effects of tree species, stand age and land-use change on soil carbon and nitrogen stock rates in northwestern Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sariyildiz T

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of tree species, stand age and land-use change on soil carbon and nitrogen stock rates were investigated in the northwest of Turkey using 4 common tree species as black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold., Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L., Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky and Uludag fir (Abies nordmanniana ssp. bornmuelleriana. Three tree species (black pine, Scots pine and Oriental beech were used to investigate the differences in soil C and N among tree species. Old and young Uludag fir stands and adjacent grassland were used to study the differences in soil C and N with stand age and land-use change. Mineral soil samples were taken from 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm soil depths, and analyzed for pH, soil texture, bulk density, total soil carbon and total nitrogen. The total soil carbon and total nitrogen pools were then calculated by multiplying soil volume, soil bulk density, and the total soil carbon or total nitrogen content. Results showed significant differences in soil carbon and nitrogen contents, carbon/nitrogen ratios and stock rates among the three species, and between old and young fir stands and grassland. In general, when 0-20 cm soil depth was considered, mean soil carbon stock rate was the highest under black pine (79 Mg C ha-1 followed by Scots pine (73 Mg C ha-1 and beech (67 Mg C ha-1, whereas mean soil nitrogen stock rate was the highest under beech (9.57 Mg N ha-1 followed by Scots pine (5.77 Mg N ha-1 and black pine (4.20 Mg N ha-1. Young fir stands showed lower soil carbon stock, but higher soil nitrogen stock rates compared to old fir stands and grassland. Our results demonstrated that tree species, stand tree age and land-use change can have significant effects on soil carbon and nitrogen content and stocks rates. These findings can help to enhance forest management activities, such as selection of tree species for carbon sequestration in plantation systems, design of sustainable agroforestry systems, and improvement of

  10. Seabird nutrient subsidies benefit non-nitrogen fixing trees and alter species composition in South American coastal dry forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Havik

    Full Text Available Marine-derived nutrients can increase primary productivity and change species composition of terrestrial plant communities in coastal and riverine ecosystems. We hypothesized that sea nutrient subsidies have a positive effect on nitrogen assimilation and seedling survival of non-nitrogen fixing species, increasing the relative abundance of non-nitrogen fixing species close to seashore. Moreover, we proposed that herbivores can alter the effects of nutrient supplementation by preferentially feeding on high nutrient plants. We studied the effects of nutrient fertilization by seabird guano on tree recruitment and how these effects can be modulated by herbivorous lizards in the coastal dry forests of northwestern Peru. We combined field studies, experiments and stable isotope analysis to study the response of the two most common tree species in these forests, the nitrogen-fixing Prosopis pallida and the non-nitrogen-fixing Capparis scabrida. We did not find differences in herbivore pressure along the sea-inland gradient. We found that the non-nitrogen fixing C. scabrida assimilates marine-derived nitrogen and is more abundant than P. pallida closer to guano-rich soil. We conclude that the input of marine-derived nitrogen through guano deposited by seabirds feeding in the Pacific Ocean affects the two dominant tree species of the coastal dry forests of northern Peru in contrasting ways. The non-nitrogen fixing species, C. scabrida may benefit from sea nutrient subsidies by incorporating guano-derived nitrogen into its foliar tissues, whereas P. pallida, capable of atmospheric fixation, does not.

  11. Interactions between elevated CO2 concentration, nitrogen and water : effects on growth and water use of six perennial plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arp, W.J.; Mierlo, J.E.M.; Berendse, F.; Snijders, W.

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments are described in which plants of six species were grown for one full season in greenhouse compartments with 350 or 560 mol mol1 CO2. In the first experiment two levels of nitrogen supply were applied to study the interaction between CO2 and nitrogen. In the second experiment two leve

  12. Nitrogen level changes the interactions between a native (Scirpus triqueter and an exotic species (Spartina anglica in Coastal China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-li Li

    Full Text Available The exotic species Spartina anglica, introduced from Europe in 1963, has been experiencing a decline in the past decade in coastal China, but the reasons for the decline are still not clear. It is hypothesized that competition with the native species Scirpus triqueter may have played an important role in the decline due to niche overlap in the field. We measured biomass, leaf number and area, asexual reproduction and relative neighborhood effect (RNE of the two species in both monoculture and mixture under three nitrogen levels (control, low and high. S. anglica showed significantly lower biomass accumulation, leaf number and asexual reproduction in mixture than in monoculture. The inter- and intra-specific RNE of S. anglica were all positive, and the inter-specific RNE was significantly higher than the intra-specific RNE in the control. For S. triqueter, inter- and intra-specific RNE were negative at the high nitrogen level but positive in the control and at the low nitrogen level. This indicates that S. triqueter exerted an asymmetric competitive advantage over S. anglica in the control and low nitrogen conditions; however, S. anglica facilitated growth of S. triqueter in high nitrogen conditions. Nitrogen level changed the interactions between the two species because S. triqueter better tolerated low nitrogen. Since S. anglica is increasingly confined to upper, more nitrogen-limited marsh areas in coastal China, increased competition from S. triqueter may help explain its decline.

  13. Seabird nutrient subsidies benefit non-nitrogen fixing trees and alter species composition in South American coastal dry forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havik, G.; Catenazzi, A.; Holmgren, M.

    2014-01-01

    Marine-derived nutrients can increase primary productivity and change species composition of terrestrial plant communities in coastal and riverine ecosystems. We hypothesized that sea nutrient subsidies have a positive effect on nitrogen assimilation and seedling survival of non-nitrogen fixing spec

  14. Nitrogen Level Changes the Interactions between a Native (Scirpus triqueter) and an Exotic Species (Spartina anglica) in Coastal China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-li; Lei, Guang-chun; Zhi, Ying-biao; An, Shu-qing; Huang, He-ping; Ouyang, Yan; Zhao, Lei; Deng, Zi-fa; Liu, Yu-hong

    2011-01-01

    The exotic species Spartina anglica, introduced from Europe in 1963, has been experiencing a decline in the past decade in coastal China, but the reasons for the decline are still not clear. It is hypothesized that competition with the native species Scirpus triqueter may have played an important role in the decline due to niche overlap in the field. We measured biomass, leaf number and area, asexual reproduction and relative neighborhood effect (RNE) of the two species in both monoculture and mixture under three nitrogen levels (control, low and high). S. anglica showed significantly lower biomass accumulation, leaf number and asexual reproduction in mixture than in monoculture. The inter- and intra-specific RNE of S. anglica were all positive, and the inter-specific RNE was significantly higher than the intra-specific RNE in the control. For S. triqueter, inter- and intra-specific RNE were negative at the high nitrogen level but positive in the control and at the low nitrogen level. This indicates that S. triqueter exerted an asymmetric competitive advantage over S. anglica in the control and low nitrogen conditions; however, S. anglica facilitated growth of S. triqueter in high nitrogen conditions. Nitrogen level changed the interactions between the two species because S. triqueter better tolerated low nitrogen. Since S. anglica is increasingly confined to upper, more nitrogen-limited marsh areas in coastal China, increased competition from S. triqueter may help explain its decline. PMID:21998676

  15. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Two Bornean Nepenthes Species with Differences in Nitrogen Acquisition Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickel, Wiebke; Grafe, T Ulmar; Meuche, Ivonne; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Keller, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes have been studied for over a century, but surprisingly little is known about associations with microorganisms. The two species Nepenthes rafflesiana and Nepenthes hemsleyana differ in their pitcher-mediated nutrient sources, sequestering nitrogen from arthropod prey and arthropods as well as bat faeces, respectively. We expected bacterial communities living in the pitchers to resemble this diet difference. Samples were taken from different parts of the pitchers (leaf, peristome, inside, outside, digestive fluid) of both species. Bacterial communities were determined using culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Bacterial richness and community structure were similar in leaves, peristomes, inside and outside walls of both plant species. Regarding digestive fluids, bacterial richness was higher in N. hemsleyana than in N. rafflesiana. Additionally, digestive fluid communities were highly variable in structure, with strain-specific differences in community composition between replicates. Acidophilic taxa were mostly of low abundance, except the genus Acidocella, which strikingly reached extremely high levels in two N. rafflesiana fluids. In N. hemsleyana fluid, some taxa classified as vertebrate gut symbionts as well as saprophytes were enriched compared to N. rafflesiana, with saprophytes constituting potential competitors for nutrients. The high variation in community structure might be caused by a number of biotic and abiotic factors. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were present in both study species, which might provide essential nutrients to the plant at times of low prey capture and/or rare encounters with bats.

  16. Differences in the growth response of three bryophyte species to nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salemaa, Maija [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa (Finland)], E-mail: maija.salemaa@metla.fi; Maekipaeae, Raisa [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Vantaa Research Unit, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301 Vantaa (Finland)], E-mail: raisa.makipaa@metla.fi; Oksanen, Jari [University of Oulu, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland)], E-mail: jarioksa@sun3.oulu.fi

    2008-03-15

    The effect of nitrogen on biomass production, shoot elongation and relative density of the mosses Pleurozium schreberi, Hylocomium splendens and Dicranum polysetum was studied in a chamber experiment. Monocultures were exposed to 10 N levels ranging from 0.02 to 7.35 g N m{sup -2} during a 90-day period. All the growth responses were unimodal, but the species showed differences in the shape parameters of the curves. Hylocomium and Pleurozium achieved optimum biomass production at a lower N level than Dicranum. Pleurozium had the highest biomass production per tissue N concentration. Tolerance to N was the widest in Dicranum, whereas Hylocomium had the narrowest tolerance. Dicranum retained N less efficiently from precipitation than the other two species, which explained its deviating response. All species translocated some N from parent to new shoots. The results emphasize that the individual responses of bryophytes to N should be known when species are used as bioindicators. - Boreal bryophytes display differences in their sensitivity to nitrogen.

  17. Rapidly growing tropical trees mobilize remarkable amounts of nitrogen, in ways that differ surprisingly among species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Ann E.; Raich, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Fast-growing forests such as tropical secondary forests can accumulate large amounts of carbon (C), and thereby play an important role in the atmospheric CO2 balance. Because nitrogen (N) cycling is inextricably linked with C cycling, the question becomes: Where does the N come from to match high rates of C accumulation? In unique experimental 16-y-old plantations established in abandoned pasture in lowland Costa Rica, we used a mass-balance approach to quantify N accumulation in vegetation, identify sources of N, and evaluate differences among tree species in N cycling. The replicated design contained four broad-leaved evergreen tree species growing under similar environmental conditions. Nitrogen uptake was rapid, reaching 409 (±30) kg⋅ha−1⋅y−1, double the rate reported from a Puerto Rican forest and greater than four times that observed at Hubbard Brook Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Nitrogen amassed in vegetation was 874 (±176) kg⋅ha−1, whereas net losses of soil N (0–100 cm) varied from 217 (±146) to 3,354 (±915) kg⋅ha−1 (P = 0.018) over 16 y. Soil C:N, δ13C values, and N budgets indicated that soil was the main source of biomass N. In Vochysia guatemalensis, however, N fixation contributed >60 kg⋅ha−1⋅y−1. All species apparently promoted soil N turnover, such that the soil N mean residence time was 32–54 y, an order of magnitude lower than the global mean. High rates of N uptake were associated with substantial N losses in three of the species, in which an average of 1.6 g N was lost for every gram of N accumulated in biomass. PMID:22689942

  18. Complementarity in mineral nitrogen use among dominant plant species in a subalpine community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Lamaze, Thierry

    2007-11-01

    The underlying mechanisms that enable plant species to coexist are poorly understood. Complementarity in resource use is among the major mechanisms proposed that could favor species coexistence but is insufficiently documented. In alpine soil, low temperatures are a major constraint for the supply of plant nitrogen. We carried out (15)N labeling of soil mineral N to determine to what extent four major species of a subalpine community compete for N, or develop ionic (NH(4)(+) vs. NO(3)(-)) or temporal complementarity. The Poaceae took up much more (15)N per soil area unit than the ericaceous species, and all species displayed three major strategies in exploiting (15)N: (1) uptake mainly early in the growing season (Vaccinium myrtillus), (2) uptake at a slow and similar rate throughout the growing season (Rhododendron ferrugineum), and (3) uptake at high rates over the growing season (Festuca eskia and Nardus stricta). However, while F. eskia used (15)NH(4)(+) mainly early and (15)NO(3)(-) mainly late in the growing season, the reverse was observed for N. stricta. Taking into account (15)N dilution in soil NH(4)(+) and NO(3)(-) pools, we calculated that NH(4)(+) provided more than 80% of the mineral N uptake in Ericaceae and about 60% in grasses. Together, such ionic and temporal complementarity would reduce competition between species and could be a major mechanism promoting species diversity.

  19. The role and fate of inorganic nitrogen species during UVA/TiO₂ disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, XiaoJun; Hu, Jiangyong; Chen, MinDong

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic nitrogen species have three states including ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)/NH3), nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)) and are often found in the disinfection system. However, no available literature could be found on their role and fate in photocatalytic disinfection systems. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate bacteria inactivation, H2O2 generated and inorganic nitrogen variation to understand the role and fate of inorganic nitrogen species during UVA/TiO2 disinfection and evaluate effects of initial pH and bacteria levels on the role and fate. NH4(+)/NH3 and NO2(-) inhibited the photocatalytic disinfection process obviously. It could be confirmed through that H2O2 yield used for pathogen inactivation was dependent on NH4(+)/NH3 and NO2(-) levels. The NH4(+)/NH3 remaining, NH4(+) remaining and NO3(-) yields in only NH4(+)/NH3 photocatalytic oxidation experiments were obviously different from the corresponding values in the photocatalytic disinfection experiments with NH4(+)/NH3, which confirmed that photocatalytic disinfection had an obvious effect on the fate of NH4(+)/NH3. However, photocatalytic disinfection had slight effects on the fate of NO2(-) and NO3(-). Escherischia coli inactivation rate was the highest in neutral solutions (Initial pH 7) while the lowest in alkaline solutions (Initial pH 8.5). The decrease of NH4(+)/NH3 in alkaline solutions was the most significant. In turn, the photocatalysis of NO2(-) was more evident in acidic solutions. E. coli inactivation was reduced with the increase of initial E. coli concentrations. The initial bacteria concentrations significantly influenced the increase of NH4(+)/NH3, NH4(+) and NO3(-), but slightly impacted the decrease of NO2(-). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling organic nitrogen conversions in activated sludge bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinia, Jacek; Pagilla, Krishna; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Stensel, H David

    2011-01-01

    For biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems designed to maximize nitrogen removal, the effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration may range from 2.0 to 4.0 g N/m(3) with about 25-50% in the form of organic nitrogen (ON). In this study, current approaches to modeling organic N conversions (separate processes vs. constant contents of organic fractions) were compared. A new conceptual model of ON conversions was developed and combined with Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d). The model addresses a new insight into the processes of ammonification, biomass decay and hydrolysis of particulate and colloidal ON (PON and CON, respectively). Three major ON fractions incorporated are defined as dissolved (DON) (model parameter set, the behaviors of both inorganic N forms (NH4-N, NOX-N) and ON forms (DON, CON) in the batch experiments were predicted. The challenges to accurately simulate and predict effluent ON levels from BNR systems are due to analytical methods of direct ON measurement (replacing TKN) and lack of large enough database (in-process measurements, dynamic variations of the ON concentrations) which can be used to determine parameter value ranges.

  1. Differential protein expression in Colletotrichum acutatum: changes associated with reactive oxygen species and nitrogen starvation implicated in pathogenicity on strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sigal Horowitz; Yarden, Oded; Gollop, Natan; Chen, Songbi; Zveibil, Aida; Belausov, Eduard; Freeman, Stanley

    2008-03-01

    The cellular outcome of changes in nitrogen availability in the context of development and early stages of pathogenicity was studied by quantitative analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of Colletotrichum acutatum infecting strawberry. Significant alterations occurred in the abundance of proteins synthesized during appressorium formation under nitrogen-limiting conditions compared with a complete nutrient supply. Proteins that were up- or down-regulated were involved in energy metabolism, nitrogen and amino acid metabolism, protein synthesis and degradation, response to stress and reactive oxygen scavenging. Members belonging to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger machinery, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, were up-regulated at the appressorium formation stage, as well as under nitrogen-limiting conditions relative to growth with a complete nutrient supply, whereas abundance of bifunctional catalase was up-regulated predominantly at the appressorium formation stage. Fungal ROS were detected within germinating conidia during host pre-penetration, penetration and colonization stages, accompanied by plant ROS, which were abundant in the apoplastic space. Application of exogenous antioxidants quenched ROS production and reduced the frequency of appressorium formation. Up-regulation in metabolic activity was detected during appressorium formation and nutrient deficiency compared with growth under complete nutrient supply. Enhanced levels of proteins related to the glyoxylate cycle and lipid metabolism (malate dehydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase and acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase) were observed at the appressorium formation stage, in contrast to down-regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase. The present study demonstrates that appressoria formation processes, occurring under nutritional deprivation, are accompanied by metabolic shifts, and that ROS production is an early fungal response that may modulate initial stages of pathogen

  2. Azospirillum fermentarium sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing species isolated from a fermenter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Liu, You-Cheng; Hameed, Asif; Hsu, Yi-Han; Lai, Wei-An; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2013-10-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, spiral or rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, diazotrophic bacterium (strain CC-LY743(T)) was isolated from a fermentative tank in Taiwan. Strain CC-LY743(T) was able to grow at 20-37 °C and pH 6.0-8.0 and tolerated up to 3.0 % (w/v) NaCl. It was positive for nitrogen fixation, with activity of 10.6 nmol ethylene h(-1). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain CC-LY743(T) showed highest similarity to Azospirillum picis DSM 19922(T) (96.1 %), Azospirillum oryzae JCM 21588(T) (96.0 %) and Azospirillum rugosum DSM 19657(T) (96.0 %) and lower similarity (Azospirillum species. Highest nifH gene sequence similarities were obtained with Azospirillum brasilense BCRC 12270(T) (92.0 %), Azospirillum formosense BCRC 80273(T) (92.3 %) and A. rugosum DSM 19657(T) (91.8 %). It was positive in the rapid identification by a genus-specific primer set. The predominant quinone system was ubiquinone 10 (Q-10) and the DNA G+C content was 69.6±0.1 mol%. The major fatty acids found in strain CC-LY743(T) were n-C16 : 0, C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c, C14 : 0 3-OH/C16 : 1 iso I, C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c. Based on its phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, strain CC-LY743(T) is considered to represent a novel species within the genus Azospirillum for which the name Azospirillum fermentarium sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-LY743(T) ( = BCRC 80505(T) = JCM 18688(T) = LMG 27264(T)).

  3. Mineralization of nitrogen by protozoan activity in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuikman, P.

    1990-01-01

    In general, more than 95% of the nitrogen in soils is present in organic forms. This nitrogen is not directly available to plants unless microbial decomposition takes place with the release of mineral nitrogen. In modern agriculture, nitrogen is often applied to arable soils as a fertilizer

  4. Mineralization of nitrogen by protozoan activity in soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuikman, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    In general, more than 95% of the nitrogen in soils is present in organic forms. This nitrogen is not directly available to plants unless microbial decomposition takes place with the release of mineral nitrogen. In modern agriculture, nitrogen is often applied to arable soils as a fertilizer to suppo

  5. Nitrogen transfer from forage legumes to nine neighbouring plants in a multi-species grassland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirhofer-Walzl, Karin; Høgh Jensen, Henning; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Legumes play a crucial role in nitrogen supply to grass-legume mixtures for ruminant fodder. To quantify N transfer from legumes to neighbouring plants in multi-species grasslands we established a grass-legume-herb mixture on a loamy-sandy site in Denmark. White clover (Trifolium repens L.), red...... amounts of N from legumes than dicotyledonous plants which generally have taproots. Slurry application mainly increased N transfer from legumes to grasses. During the growing season the three legumes transferred approximately 40 kg N ha-1 to neighbouring plants. Below-ground N transfer from legumes...

  6. Cryogenic Adsorption of Nitrogen and Carbon Dioxide in Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fuzhi; Liu, Huiming; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Hengcheng; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Laifeng

    2017-09-01

    Activated carbon have been used for a long time at low temperature for cryogenic applications. The knowledge of adsorption characteristics of activated carbon at cryogenic temperature is essential for some specific applications. However, such experimental data are very scare in the literature. In order to measure the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon under variable cryogenic temperatures, an adsorption measurement device was presented. The experiment system is based on the commercially available PCT-pro adsorption analyzer coupled to a two-stage Gifford McMahon refrigerator, which allows the sample to be cooled to 4.2K. Cryogenic environment can be maintained steadily without the cryogenic liquid through the cryocooler and temperature can be controlled precisely between 5K and 300K by the temperature controller. Adsorption measurements were performed in activated carbon for carbon dioxide and nitrogen and the adsorption isotherm were obtained.

  7. The role of above-ground competition and nitrogen vs. phosphorus enrichment in seedling survival of common European plant species of semi-natural grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceulemans, Tobias; Hulsmans, Eva; Berwaers, Sigi; Van Acker, Kasper; Honnay, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have severely altered fluxes of nitrogen and phosphorus in ecosystems worldwide. In grasslands, subsequent negative effects are commonly attributed to competitive exclusion of plant species following increased above-ground biomass production. However, some studies have shown that this does not fully account for nutrient enrichment effects, questioning whether lowering competition by reducing grassland productivity through mowing or herbivory can mitigate the environmental impact of nutrient pollution. Furthermore, few studies so far discriminate between nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. We performed a full factorial experiment in greenhouse mesocosms combining nitrogen and phosphorus addition with two clipping regimes designed to relax above-ground competition. Next, we studied the survival and growth of seedlings of eight common European grassland species and found that five out of eight species showed higher survival under the clipping regime with the lowest above-ground competition. Phosphorus addition negatively affected seven plant species and nitrogen addition negatively affected four plant species. Importantly, the negative effects of nutrient addition and higher above-ground competition were independent of each other for all but one species. Our results suggest that at any given level of soil nutrients, relaxation of above-ground competition allows for higher seedling survival in grasslands. At the same time, even at low levels of above-ground competition, nutrient enrichment negatively affects survival as compared to nutrient-poor conditions. Therefore, although maintaining low above-ground competition appears essential for species’ recruitment, for instance through mowing or herbivory, these management efforts are likely to be insufficient and we conclude that environmental policies aimed to reduce both excess nitrogen and particularly phosphorus inputs are also necessary. PMID:28333985

  8. Native and Alien Plant Species Richness Response to Soil Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Temperate Floodplain and Swamp Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hrivnák

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil nitrogen and phosphorus are commonly limiting elements affecting plant species richness in temperate zones. Our species richness-ecological study was performed in alder-dominated forests representing temperate floodplains (streamside alder forests of Alnion incanae alliance and swamp forests (alder carrs of Alnion glutinosae alliance in the Western Carpathians. Species richness (i.e., the number of vascular plants in a vegetation plot was analyzed separately for native and alien vascular plants in 240 vegetation plots across the study area covering Slovakia, northern Hungary and southern Poland. The relationship between the species richness of each plant group and total soil nitrogen content, plant-available phosphorus and carbon to nitrogen (C/N ratio was analyzed by generalized linear mixed models (GLMM with Poisson error distribution and log-link function. The number of recorded native and alien species was 17–84 (average 45.4 and 0–9 (average 1.5 species per plot, respectively. The GLMMs were statistically significant (p ˂ 0.001 for both plant groups, but the total explained variation was higher for native (14% than alien plants (9%. The richness of native species was negatively affected by the total soil nitrogen content and plant-available phosphorus, whereas the C/N ratio showed a positive impact. The alien richness was predicted only by the total soil nitrogen content showing a negative effect.

  9. Seasonal photochemical transformations of nitrogen species in a forest stream and lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Porcal

    Full Text Available The photochemical release of inorganic nitrogen from dissolved organic matter is an important source of bio-available nitrogen (N in N-limited aquatic ecosystems. We conducted photochemical experiments and used mathematical models based on pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics to quantify the photochemical transformations of individual N species and their seasonal effects on N cycling in a mountain forest stream and lake (Plešné Lake, Czech Republic. Results from laboratory experiments on photochemical changes in N speciation were compared to measured lake N budgets. Concentrations of organic nitrogen (Norg; 40-58 µmol L-1 decreased from 3 to 26% during 48-hour laboratory irradiation (an equivalent of 4-5 days of natural solar insolation due to photochemical mineralization to ammonium (NH4+ and other N forms (Nx; possibly N oxides and N2. In addition to Norg mineralization, Nx also originated from photochemical nitrate (NO3- reduction. Laboratory exposure of a first-order forest stream water samples showed a high amount of seasonality, with the maximum rates of Norg mineralization and NH4+ production in winter and spring, and the maximum NO3- reduction occurring in summer. These photochemical changes could have an ecologically significant effect on NH4+ concentrations in streams (doubling their terrestrial fluxes from soils and on concentrations of dissolved Norg in the lake. In contrast, photochemical reactions reduced NO3- fluxes by a negligible (<1% amount and had a negligible effect on the aquatic cycle of this N form.

  10. Involvement of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in the wound response of Dasycladus vermicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cliff; Küpper, Frithjof C; Jacobs, Robert S

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the signaling events involved in the wound response of the marine macroalga Dasycladus vermicularis, finding nitric oxide (NO) production in relation to injury. The addition of exogenous H2O2 to aliquots of injured algae accelerated the kinetics of NO production in the wounded region. Similarly, the addition of an NO donor caused an increase in detectable H2O2 around the site of injury. By wounding or incubating uninjured algae with an NO donor, peroxidase activity was enhanced. Based on the use of selected pharmacological probes, our results indicate that H2O2 production involves the upstream activation of signaling events similar to those observed in the physiology of higher plants.

  11. How interacting fungal species and mineral nitrogen inputs affect transfer of nitrogen from litter via arbuscular mycorrhizal mycelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuejun; Cornelissen, J Hans C; Zhong, Zhangcheng; Dong, Ming; Jiang, Changhong

    2017-04-01

    In the karst landscape, widespread in the world including southern China, soil nutrient supply is strongly constrained. In such environments, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may facilitate plant nutrient uptake. However, the possible role of different AM fungal species, and their interactions, especially in transferring nitrogen (N) from litter to plant, is poorly understood. We conducted two microcosm experiments to investigate the role that two karst soil AM fungi, Glomus etunicatum and Glomus mosseae, play in the transfer of N from decomposing litter to the host plant and to determine how N availability influences these processes. In experiment 1, Cinnamomum camphora tree seedlings were grown in compartments inoculated with G. etunicatum. Lolium perenne leaf litter labeled with δ(15)N was added to the soil in unplanted compartments. Compartments containing the δ(15)N labeled litter were either accessible to hyphae but not to seedling roots or were not accessible to hyphae or roots. The addition of mineral N to one of the host compartments at the start of the experiment significantly increased the biomass of the C. camphora seedlings, N content and N:P ratio, AM mycelium length, and soil microbial biomass carbon and N. However, significantly, more δ(15)N was acquired, from the leaf litter by the AM hyphae and transferred to the host when mineral N was not added to the soil. In experiment 2, in which C. camphora seedlings were inoculated with both G. etunicatum and G. mosseae rather than with G. mosseae alone, there was a significant increase in mycelial growth (50.21%), in soil microbial biomass carbon (417.73%) in the rhizosphere, and in the amount of δ(15)N that was transferred to the host. These findings suggest that maintaining AM fungal diversity in karst soils could be important for mediating N transfer from organic material to host plants in N-poor soils.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of some Alnus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınyay, Ç; Eryılmaz, M; Yazgan, A N; Sever Yılmaz, B; Altun, M L

    2015-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of resistant microorganisms forced scientists to find new antimicrobial substances from different sources like medicinal plants. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts of some Alnus sp. against some bacteria and a yeast. Aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of A. glutinosa subsp. glutinosa, A. orientalis var. orientalis, A. orientalis var. pubescens were screened for their antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 43300 (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231. Broth dilution method was used to determine the antimicrobial activities of plant extracts. Ethanolic extracts of tested species exhibited better antimicrobial activity than aqueous extracts. Ethanolic extracts of tested species possessed activity having MIC values of 0.125-0.250 mg/ml against the tested microorganisms. No antibacterial activity was observed against B. subtilis, E. coli, P. aeruginosa for all the aqueous extracts. Except these aqueous extracts, the others possessed activity having MIC value of 1.000 mg/ml against the tested microorganisms. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the evaluation of antimicrobial activities on aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of these species. This study provides significant information about antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts of A. glutinosa subsp. glutinosa, A. orientalis var. orientalis, A. orientalis var. pubescens. It is conceivable that one of the reason for the usage of Alnus glutinosa, in treatment of wound healing in folk medicine, is because of its antimicrobial activity.

  13. Nitrogen use efficiency by a slow-growing species as affected by CO2 levels, root temperature, N source and availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Cristina; Lips, Herman; Martins-Loução, Maria Amélia

    2003-12-01

    This study examines the importance of N source and concentration on plant response to distinct CO2 concentrations and root temperatures. The experimental design of this work was a factorial combination of: CO2 concentration, nitrogen concentration, nitrogen source and root temperature. Carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) was assessed as a potential model of a slow growing Mediterranean species. The results showed that: 1) biomass increment under high CO2 varied between 13 and 100% in relation to plants grown under the same conditions but at ambient CO2 concentrations, depending on the root temperature and nitrogen source; 2) nitrate-fed plants attained a larger increase in biomass production compared to ammonium-fed ones. This performance seems to be linked to the co-ordinated regulation of the activities of glutamine synthetase and sucrose phosphate synthase. The variations in the magnitude and nature of growth responses to elevated CO2 observed resulted in substantial changes in the chemical composition of the plant material and consequently in plant nitrogen use efficiency. Although performed with seedlings and under controlled conditions, this work emphasizes the importance of the nitrogen source used by the plants, a factor rarely taken into consideration when forecasting plant responses to global changes. Particularly, the results presented here, highlight the potential for uncoupling biomass accumulation from increment of air CO2 concentration and show that more than nitrogen availability N source may offset positive plant growth responses under elevated CO2 and root temperature.

  14. Influence of Nitrogen Availability on Growth of Two Transgenic Birch Species Carrying the Pine GS1a Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Lebedev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An alternative way to increase plant productivity through the use of nitrogen fertilizers is to improve the efficiency of nitrogen utilization via genetic engineering. The effects of overexpression of pine glutamine synthetase (GS gene and nitrogen availability on growth and leaf pigment levels of two Betula species were studied. Untransformed and transgenic plants of downy birch (B. pubescens and silver birch (B. pendula were grown under open-air conditions at three nitrogen regimes (0, 1, or 10 mM for one growing season. The transfer of the GS1a gene led to a significant increase in the height of only two transgenic lines of nine B. pubescens, but three of five B. pendula transgenic lines were higher than the controls. In general, nitrogen supply reduced the positive effect of the GS gene on the growth of transgenic birch plants. No differences in leaf pigment levels between control and transgenic plants were found. Nitrogen fertilization increased leaf chlorophyll content in untransformed plants but its effect on most of the transgenic lines was insignificant. The results suggest that birch plants carrying the GS gene use nitrogen more efficiently, especially when growing in nitrogen deficient soil. Transgenic lines were less responsive to nitrogen supply in comparison to wild-type plants.

  15. Influence of Nitrogen Availability on Growth of Two Transgenic Birch Species Carrying the Pine GS1a Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Vadim G.; Kovalenko, Nina P.; Shestibratov, Konstantin A.

    2017-01-01

    An alternative way to increase plant productivity through the use of nitrogen fertilizers is to improve the efficiency of nitrogen utilization via genetic engineering. The effects of overexpression of pine glutamine synthetase (GS) gene and nitrogen availability on growth and leaf pigment levels of two Betula species were studied. Untransformed and transgenic plants of downy birch (B. pubescens) and silver birch (B. pendula) were grown under open-air conditions at three nitrogen regimes (0, 1, or 10 mM) for one growing season. The transfer of the GS1a gene led to a significant increase in the height of only two transgenic lines of nine B. pubescens, but three of five B. pendula transgenic lines were higher than the controls. In general, nitrogen supply reduced the positive effect of the GS gene on the growth of transgenic birch plants. No differences in leaf pigment levels between control and transgenic plants were found. Nitrogen fertilization increased leaf chlorophyll content in untransformed plants but its effect on most of the transgenic lines was insignificant. The results suggest that birch plants carrying the GS gene use nitrogen more efficiently, especially when growing in nitrogen deficient soil. Transgenic lines were less responsive to nitrogen supply in comparison to wild-type plants. PMID:28067821

  16. Differential accumulation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in maize lines with contrasting drought tolerance and aflatoxin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiotic stresses such as drought stress can exacerbate aflatoxin contamination of maize kernels. Previous studies showed that maize lines resistance to aflatoxin contamination tend to exhibit enhanced drought tolerance and accumulate lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species...

  17. Identifying the active site in nitrogen-doped graphene for the VO2+/VO2(+) redox reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jutao; Fu, Xiaogang; Liu, Qiao; Liu, Yanru; Wei, Zhiyang; Niu, Kexing; Zhang, Junyan

    2013-06-25

    Nitrogen-doped graphene sheets (NGS), synthesized by annealing graphite oxide (GO) with urea at 700-1050 °C, were studied as positive electrodes in a vanadium redox flow battery. The NGS, in particular annealed at 900 °C, exhibited excellent catalytic performance in terms of electron transfer (ET) resistance (4.74 ± 0.51 and 7.27 ± 0.42 Ω for the anodic process and cathodic process, respectively) and reversibility (ΔE = 100 mV, Ipa/Ipc = 1.38 at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1)). Detailed research confirms that not the nitrogen doping level but the nitrogen type in the graphene sheets determines the catalytic activity. Among four types of nitrogen species doped into the graphene lattice including pyridinic-N, pyrrolic-N, quaternary nitrogen, and oxidic-N, quaternary nitrogen is verified as a catalytic active center for the [VO](2+)/[VO2](+) couple reaction. A mechanism is proposed to explain the electrocatalytic performance of NGS for the [VO](2+)/[VO2](+) couple reaction. The possible formation of a N-V transitional bonding state, which facilitates the ET between the outer electrode and reactant ions, is a key step for its high catalytic activity.

  18. Tree species control rates of free-living nitrogen fixation in a tropical rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sasha C; Cleveland, Cory C; Townsend, Alan R

    2008-10-01

    Tropical rain forests represent some of the most diverse ecosystems on earth, yet mechanistic links between tree species identity and ecosystem function in these forests remains poorly understood. Here, using free-living nitrogen (N) fixation as a model, we explore the idea that interspecies variation in canopy nutrient concentrations may drive significant local-scale variation in biogeochemical processes. Biological N fixation is the largest "natural" source of newly available N to terrestrial ecosystems, and estimates suggest the highest such inputs occur in tropical ecosystems. While patterns of and controls over N fixation in these systems remain poorly known, the data we do have suggest that chemical differences among tree species canopies could affect free-living N fixation rates. In a diverse lowland rain forest in Costa Rica, we established a series of vertical, canopy-to-soil profiles for six common canopy tree species, and we measured free-living N fixation rates and multiple aspects of chemistry of live canopy leaves, senesced canopy leaves, bulk leaf litter, and soil for eight individuals of each tree species. Free-living N fixation rates varied significantly among tree species for all four components, and independent of species identity, rates of N fixation ranged by orders of magnitude along the vertical profile. Our data suggest that variations in phosphorus (P) concentration drove a significant fraction of the observed species-specific variation in free-living N fixation rates within each layer of the vertical profile. Furthermore, our data suggest significant links between canopy and forest floor nutrient concentrations; canopy P was correlated with bulk leaf litter P below individual tree crowns. Thus, canopy chemistry may affect a suite of ecosystem processes not only within the canopy itself, but at and beneath the forest floor as well.

  19. Enhancement of oxygen reduction activity of nanoshell carbons by introducing nitrogen atoms from metal phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jozaki@cee.gunma-u.ac.j [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1, Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanifuji, Shin-ichi; Furuichi, Atsuya; Yabutsuka, Katsutoshi [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1, Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Nanoshell carbon is a type of catalytically grown nanocarbon with a hollow, round, shell-like structure, with a diameter in the range of approximately 20-50 nm. It has been shown to possess the electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and is also expected to be a non-Pt catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. This paper reports the synergetic enhancement of the ORR activity of nanoshell carbons caused by the coexistence of nitrogen atoms. The nanoshell carbons were prepared by the carbonization of furan resin in the presence of acetylacetonates (AAs) and of phthalocyanines (Pcs), which contained Fe, Co, and Ni. The Pc-derived nanoshells (MP-T series; M = Co or Fe, T = carbonization temperature) showed higher ORR activities than the AA-derived nanoshells (MA-T series; M = Co or Fe, T = carbonization temperature) when the same metal elements were employed. An XPS study revealed that nitrogen species were introduced to the surface of the nanoshells when Pcs were used as the nanoshell-forming catalysts, and that no metal species remained on the nanoshells. Principally, the ORR activity of the carbons was governed by the presence of the nanoshells and further enhancement could be achieved by the introduction of nitrogen atoms. 0.78 V of OCV and 0.21 W cm{sup -2} of the maximum power density were observed for a fuel cell whose MEA consisted of 3CoP1000 cathode and a commercial Pt/C anode, when it was operated at 80 deg. C under a pressurized condition of 0.35 MPa.

  20. Antifungal activity of five species of Polygala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Johann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Crude extracts and fractions of five species of Polygala - P. campestris, P. cyparissias, P. paniculata, P. pulchella and P. sabulosa - were investigated for their in vitro antifungal activity against opportunistic Candida species, Cryptococcus gattii and Sporothrix schenckii with bioautographic and microdilution assays. In the bioautographic assays, the major extracts were active against the fungi tested. In the minimal concentration inhibitory (MIC assay, the hexane extract of P. paniculata and EtOAc fraction of P. sabulosa showed the best antifungal activity, with MIC values of 60 and 30 µg/mL, respectively, against C. tropicalis, C. gattii and S. schenckii. The compounds isolated from P. sabulosa prenyloxycoumarin and 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexanehexol displayed antifungal activity against S. schenckii (with MICs of 125 µg/mL and 250 µg/mL, respectively and C. gattii (both with MICs of 250 µg/mL. Rutin and aurapten isolated from P. paniculata showed antifungal activity against C. gattii with MIC values of 60 and 250 µg/mL, respectively. In the antifungal screening, few of the isolated compounds showed good antifungal inhibition. The compound α-spinasterol showed broad activity against the species tested, while rutin had the best activity with the lowest MIC values for the microorganisms tested. These two compounds may be chemically modified by the introduction of a substitute group that would alter several physico-chemical properties of the molecule, such as hydrophobicity, electronic density and steric strain.

  1. Production characteristics of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in water using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Timoshkin, Igor; Given, Martin; MacGregor, Scott

    2016-07-01

    A pulsed discharge, a DC corona discharge, and a plasma jet are separately generated above a water surface, and reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the water are investigated. ROS/RNS in water after the sparging of the off-gas of a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge (PB-DBD) are also investigated. H2O2, NO2 -, and NO3 - are detected after plasma exposure and only NO3 - after off-gas sparging. Short-lifetime species in plasma are found to play an important role in H2O2 and NO2 - production and long-lifetime species in NO3 - production. NO x may inhibit H2O2 production through OH consumption to produce HNO2 and HNO3. O3 does not contribute to ROS/RNS production. The pulsed plasma exposure is found to be effective for the production of H2O2 and NO2 -, and the off-gas sparging of the PB-DBD for the production of NO3 -.

  2. Identification and quantification of nitrogen nutrient deficiency in the activated sludge process using respirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ning, Z.; Patry, G.G.; Spanjers, H.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental protocols to identify and quantify nitrogen nutrient deficiency in the activated sludge process were developed and tested using respirometry. Respirometric experiments showed that when a nitrogen nutrient deficient sludge is exposed to ammonia nitrogen, the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of t

  3. Identification and quantification of nitrogen nutrient deficiency in the activated sludge process using respirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ning, Z.; Patry, G.G.; Spanjers, H.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental protocols to identify and quantify nitrogen nutrient deficiency in the activated sludge process were developed and tested using respirometry. Respirometric experiments showed that when a nitrogen nutrient deficient sludge is exposed to ammonia nitrogen, the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of

  4. In vitro activities of pentamidine, pyrimethamine, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides against Aspergillus species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afeltra, J.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Vitale, R.G.; Mouton, J.W.; Verweij, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 70 strains of Aspergillus species were tested against seven different sulfa drugs and pentamidine by a microdilution method with RPMI 1640 and yeast nitrogen base media. Sulfamethoxazole, sulfadiazine, and pentamidine were active in vitro. The MICs obtained with RPMI 1640 wer

  5. Nitrogen in the Process of Waste Activated Sludge Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suschka Jan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary or secondary sewage sludge in medium and large WWTP are most often processed by anaerobic digestion, as a method of conditioning, sludge quantity minimization and biogas production. With the aim to achieve the best results of sludge processing several modifications of technologies were suggested, investigated and introduced in the full technical scale. Various sludge pretreatment technologies before anaerobic treatment have been widely investigated and partially introduced. Obviously, there are always some limitations and some negative side effects. Selected aspects have been presented and discussed. The problem of nitrogen has been highlighted on the basis of the carried out investigations. The single and two step - mesophilic and thermophilic - anaerobic waste activated sludge digestion processes, preceded by preliminary hydrolysis were investigated. The aim of lab-scale experiments was pre-treatment of the sludge by means of low intensive alkaline and hydrodynamic disintegration. Depending on the pretreatment technologies and the digestion temperature large ammonia concentrations, up to 1800 mg NH4/dm3 have been measured. Return of the sludge liquor to the main sewage treatment line means additional nitrogen removal costs. Possible solutions are discussed.

  6. Organic nitrogen rearranges both structure and activity of the soil-borne microbial seedbank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Márcio F. A.; Pan, Yao; Bloem, Jaap; Berge, Hein ten; Kuramae, Eiko E.

    2017-01-01

    Use of organic amendments is a valuable strategy for crop production. However, it remains unclear how organic amendments shape both soil microbial community structure and activity, and how these changes impact nutrient mineralization rates. We evaluated the effect of various organic amendments, which range in Carbon/Nitrogen (C/N) ratio and degradability, on the soil microbiome in a mesocosm study at 32, 69 and 132 days. Soil samples were collected to determine community structure (assessed by 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequences), microbial biomass (fungi and bacteria), microbial activity (leucine incorporation and active hyphal length), and carbon and nitrogen mineralization rates. We considered the microbial soil DNA as the microbial seedbank. High C/N ratio favored fungal presence, while low C/N favored dominance of bacterial populations. Our results suggest that organic amendments shape the soil microbial community structure through a feedback mechanism by which microbial activity responds to changing organic inputs and rearranges composition of the microbial seedbank. We hypothesize that the microbial seedbank composition responds to changing organic inputs according to the resistance and resilience of individual species, while changes in microbial activity may result in increases or decreases in availability of various soil nutrients that affect plant nutrient uptake. PMID:28198425

  7. Nitrogen:phosphorous supply ratio and allometry in five alpine plant species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Xi; Mazer, Susan J.; Guo, Hui;

    2016-01-01

    is highly plastic in response to variation in the N:P supply ratio. Studies of resource allocation of individual plants should focus on the effects of nutrient ratios as well as the availability of individual elements. The two forb species were more sensitive than grasses to unbalanced N:P supplies......In terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has greatly increased N availability relative to other elements, particularly phosphorus (P). Alterations in the availability of N relative to P can affect plant growth rate and functional traits, as well as resource allocation to above......- versus belowground biomass (MA and MB). Biomass allocation among individual plants is broadly size-dependent, and this can often be described as an allometric relationship between MA and MB, as represented by the equation MA=αMBβ, or log MA = logα + βlog MB. Here, we investigated whether the scaling...

  8. On the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene Oxide:Does the nature of nitrogen really control the activity towards oxygen reduction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourav Bag; Retna Raj C

    2016-03-01

    Synthesis of metal-free electrocatalyst for the cathodic reduction of oxygen is of great interest forfuel cell and metal-air battery applications. The heteroatom-doped graphene/reduced graphene oxide (rGO)is very promising and the nitrogen-doped rGO (N-rGO) is emerging as a new inexpensive electrocatalyst foroxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Herein, we describe the effect of the chemical nature and amount of nitrogenin N-rGO towards ORR in acidic solution. Four different samples of N-rGO with different nitrogen contentwere synthesized by simple chemical route. The chemical nature and nitrogen content were analyzed with Xray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The electrocatalytic performance of the catalyst was examinedby cyclic and hydrodynamic voltammetric studies. All the N-rGO samples favor 4-electron pathway for thereduction of oxygen in acidic solution. The onset potential and kinetic current density depends on the nature ofthe doped nitrogen. It is demonstrated that the chemical nature and the amount of nitrogen actually control theORR activity. The N-rGO which contains a large amount of pyridinic nitrogen with N/C ratio of 0.074 has highcatalytic activity. The carbon bonded to pyridinic nitrogen could be a possible catalytic site in ORR. Our studiessuggest that the graphitic nitrogen does not significantly influence the electrocatalytic activity of N-rGO.

  9. Plant nutrient acquisition strategies in tundra species: at which soil depth do species take up their nitrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpens, Juul; Heijmans, Monique; Nauta, Ake; van Huissteden, Corine; van Rijssel, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic is warming at unprecedented rates. Increased thawing of permafrost releases nutrients locked up in the previously frozen soils layers, which may initiate shifts in vegetation composition. The direction in which the vegetation shifts will co-determine whether Arctic warming is mitigated or accelerated, making understanding successional trajectories urgent. One of the key factors influencing the competitive relationships between plant species is their access to nutrients, in particularly nitrogen (N). We assessed the depth at which plant species took up N by performing a 15N tracer study, injecting 15(NH4)2SO4 at three depths (5, 15, 20 cm) into the soil in arctic tundra in north-eastern Siberia in July. In addition we explored plant nutrient acquisition strategy by analyzing natural abundances of 15N in leaves. We found that vascular plants took up 15N at all injection depths, irrespective of species, but also that species showed a clear preference for specific soil layers that coincided with their functional group (graminoids, dwarf shrubs, cryptogams). Graminoids took up most 15N at 20 cm depth nearest to the thaw front, with grasses showing a more pronounced preference than sedges. Dwarf shrubs took up most 15N at 5 cm depth, with deciduous shrubs displaying more preference than evergreens. Cryptogams did not take up any of the supplied 15N . The natural 15N abundances confirmed the pattern of nutrient acquisition from deeper soil layers in graminoids and from shallow soil layers in both deciduous and evergreen dwarf shrubs. Our results prove that graminoids and shrubs differ in their N uptake strategies, with graminoids profiting from nutrients released at the thaw front, whereas shrubs forage in the upper soil layers. The above implies that graminoids, grasses in particular, will have a competitive advantage over shrubs as the thaw front proceeds and/or superficial soil layers dry out. Our results suggest that the vertical distribution of nutrients

  10. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Saima; Huma, Nuzhat; Pasha, Imran; Sameen, Aysha; Mukhtar, Omer; Khan, Muhammad Issa

    2016-07-01

    Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%), solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%), total solids (18.05%±0.05%), protein (5.15%±0.06%) and casein (3.87%±0.04%) contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%), buffalo (0.68%±0.02%) and sheep (0.66%±0.02%) milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82), cow (r = 0.88), sheep (r = 0.86) and goat milk (r = 0.98). The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g), camel (96±2.2 mg/g) and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g) milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products.

  11. Phosphorus, and nitrogen co-doped carbon dots as a fluorescent probe for real-time measurement of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species inside macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yunqian; Yu, Bin; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2016-05-15

    Phosphorus and nitrogen doped carbon dots (PN-CDs) were conveniently prepared by carbonization of adenosine-5'-triphosphate using a hydrothermal treatment. The PN-CDs with P/C atomic ratio of ca. 9.2/100 emit blue luminescence with high quantum yields of up to 23.5%. The PN-CDs were used as a novel sensing platform for live cell imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including ClO(-), ONOO(-), and NO in macrophages. The nanosensor design is based on our new finding that the strong fluorescence of the PN-CDs can be sensitively and selectively quenched by ROS and RNS both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal that the PN-CDs can serve as a sensitive sensor for rapid imaging of ROS and RNS signaling with high selectivity and contrast.

  12. Influence of nitrogen form on growth of invasive species Acer negundo L. and Ailanthus altissima (Mill. swingle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Matilda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Relative amounts of nutrients, especially nitrogen, the most abundant macro-element, and also the distribution of ammonium ions in relation to nitrate ions, in the soils of different ecosystems, are determined by many factors. The most important are: temperature, pH of substrate, accumulation of organic matter, presence of allelopathic compounds, degree of oxygenation, etc. The ability of plants to adapt to these variations influences their production of bio-mass, the rate of expansion in different habitats, and the impact on ecosystem and biodiversity. This paper analyzes the impact of different forms of nitrogen (NO3 - and NH4 + on the growth of seedlings of invasive species Acer negundo L. and Ailanthus altissima (Mill. Swingle. The results show that nitrogen nutrition only in the form of NH4 + ions significantly affects the reduction in shoot dry weight. Compared to the nutrition with both forms of nitrogen together, aerial parts of Ailanthus altissima were reduced by 62.5%, and leaf area by 66.7%, while Acer negundo seedlings had reduction in dry mass of aboveground part by 89.5%, root by 81.2% and leaf area by 85.8%. Nutrition with nitrate form of nitrogen led to a proportionally small, but statistically significant decrease in dry mass of aboveground parts and roots as well as leaf area of Acer negundo, while in Ailanthus altissima seedlings, it was only the mass reduction of aboveground parts that was significantly influenced, so it can be assumed that this species is more resistant to the lack of both forms of nitrogen. The fact that both species produced significantly more biomass when nitrogen was present in both forms may be important in controlling the spread of alien species, or in their potential use in phytoremediation.

  13. The Effect of Different Nitrogen Form on Key Enzyme Activity of Sugarbeet (Vulgaris L.) Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This article analyses the effect of the proportion of the different nitrogen forms on key enzyme activity of carbon and nitrogen metabolism under the condition of nutritional water while Tian Yan-7 was used as experimental material. The result showed that nitrate reductase(NR) activity in the leaves gradually enhanced with the increase of NO-3. No matter in root or leaves ,glutamina synthetase (GS) activity first enhanced with increasing NH4+ when NH4+ was lower than that of NO-3 ,and GS activity was the highest when NH4+and NO3-was equal ,then GS activity declined with NH4+ increasing further. In the anaphase of growth ,synthetic activity in root of sucrose synthetase(SS) in the mixed NH4+ and NO3- was obviously highr than or NO3- alone. Both of the root and sugar yields were the highest when the proportion of NH4+ and NO3- was 1: 1.

  14. Species and rotation frequency influence soil nitrogen in simplified tropical plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewel, John J

    2006-04-01

    Among the many factors that potentially influence the rate at which nitrogen (N) becomes available to plants in terrestrial ecosystems are the identity and diversity of species composition, frequency of disturbance or stand turnover, and time. Replicated suites of investigator-designed communities afforded an opportunity to examine the effects of those factors on net N mineralization over a 12-year period. The communities consisted of large-stature perennial plants, comprising three tree species (Hyeronima alchorneoides, Cedrela odorata, and Cordia alliodora), a palm (Euterpe oleracea), and a large, perennial herb (Heliconia imbricata). Trees were grown in monoculture and in combination with the other two life-forms; tree monocultures were subjected to rotations of one or four years, or like the three-life-form systems, left uncut. The work was conducted on fertile soil in the humid lowlands of Costa Rica, a site with few abiotic constraints to plant growth. Rates of net N mineralization and nitrification were high, typically in the range of 0.2-0.8 microg x g(1) x d(-1), with net nitrification slightly higher than net mineralization, indicating preferential uptake of ammonium (NH4+) by plants and microbes. Net rates of N mineralization were about 30% lower in stands of one of the three tree species, Hyeronima, than in stands of the other two. Contrary to expectations, short-rotation management (one or four years) resulted in higher net rates of N mineralization than in uncut stands, whether the latter were composed of a single tree species or a combination of life-forms. Neither additional species richness nor replenishment of leached N augmented mineralization rates. The net rate at which N was supplied tended to be lowest in stands where demand for N was highest. Careful choice of species, coupled with low frequency of disturbance, can lead to maintenance of N within biomass and steady rates of within-system circulation, whereas pulses, whether caused by cutting

  15. Deciduous Tree Species Alter Nitrogen and Phosphorus Availability in Mid-successional Alaskan Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, A. M.; Mack, M. C.; Johnstone, J. F.; Schuur, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    In Alaskan boreal forest, increased fire severity associated with climate change is altering successional processes and ecosystem nutrient dynamics. Fire is a common disturbance in Interior Alaska and typically burns forests dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana), a tree species associated with slow nutrient turnover and high soil organic matter accumulation rates. Historically, low severity fires have driven black spruce regeneration post-fire, thereby maintaining slow nutrient cycling rates and large soil organic matter stocks. In contrast, high severity fires consume the organic layer and can lead to the establishment of deciduous tree species on exposed mineral soil, which produce less recalcitrant leaf litter and exhibit faster nutrient cycling rates. To improve our understanding of the long-term impacts of tree species composition on nutrient cycling in boreal forest, we quantified nitrogen (N) cycling rates and estimated soil N, phosphorus (P), and base cation pools in adjacent, mid-successional stands of black spruce and Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana) that established following a 1960 fire near Fairbanks, Alaska. Results indicate significantly higher net N mineralization in paper birch soils relative to black spruce for both the fibric organic layer and top 10 cm of mineral soil during 30-day and 90-day lab incubation studies. Net nitrification was significantly higher in the paper birch fibric layer after 90 days. Total soil N concentrations did not differ between paper birch and black spruce stands, however the black spruce organic layer was significantly larger than that of birch, resulting in larger organic layer N stocks (130 vs. 87 g N m2). In contrast, total P concentrations were significantly higher in the organic layer in birch forest, but the total P stocks did not differ significantly between species because of the larger mass of soil organic matter in the black spruce. These findings suggest that a shift towards greater deciduous

  16. Variation in structure of proteins by adjusting reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated from dielectric barrier discharge jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Minsup; Shiratani, Masaharu; Cho, Art. E.; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-10-01

    Over the last few years, the variation in liquid chemistry due to the development of radicals generated by cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has played an important role in plasma medicine. CAP direct treatment or CAP activated media treatment in cancer cells shows promising anticancer activity for both in vivo and in vitro studies. However, the anticancer activity or antimicrobial activity varies between plasma devices due to the different abilities among plasma devices to generate the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) at different ratios and in different concentrations. While the generation of RONS depends on many factors, the feeding gas plays the most important role among the factors. Hence, in this study we used different compositions of feeding gas while fixing all other plasma characteristics. We used Ar, Ar-O2 (at different ratios), and Ar-N2 (at different ratios) as the working gases for CAP and investigated the structural changes in proteins (Hemoglobin (Hb) and Myoglobin (Mb)). We then analyzed the influence of RONS generated in liquid on the conformations of proteins. Additionally, to determine the influence of H2O2 on the Hb and Mb structures, we used molecular dynamic simulation.

  17. High nitrogen and elevated [CO2] effects on the growth, defense and photosynthetic performance of two eucalypt species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novriyanti, Eka; Watanabe, Makoto; Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Utsugi, Hajime; Uemura, Akira; Koike, Takayoshi

    2012-11-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition and [CO(2)] are increasing and represent environmental problems. Planting fast-growing species is prospering to moderate these environmental impacts by fixing CO(2). Therefore, we examined the responses of growth, photosynthesis, and defense chemical in leaves of Eucalyptus urophylla (U) and the hybrid of E. deglupta × E. camadulensis (H) to different CO(2) and nitrogen levels. High nitrogen load significantly increased plant growth, leaf N, net photosynthetic rate (A(growth)), and photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE). High CO(2) significantly increased A(growth), photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE) and WUE. Secondary metabolite (SM, i.e. total phenolics and condensed tannin) was specifically altered; as SM of U increased by high N load but not by elevated [CO(2)], and vice versa for SM of H.

  18. Species-specific Response of Photosynthesis to Burning and Nitrogen Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanfang Zhang; Shuli Niu; Wenhua Xu; Yi Han

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine photosynthetic characteristics of three dominant grass species (Agropyron cristatum, Leymus chinensis, and Cleistogenes squarrosa) and their responses to burning and nitrogen fertilization in a semiarid grassland in northern China. Photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), and water use efficiency (WUE) showed strong temporal variability over the growing season. C. squarrosa showed a significantly higher Pn and WUE than A. cristatum and L. chinensis. Burning stimulated Pn of A. cristatum and L. chinensis by 24-59% (P<0.05) in the early growing season, but not during other time periods. Light-saturated photosynthetic rate (φmax) in A. cristatum C. squarrosa. The burning-induced changes in soil moisture could explain 51% (P=0.01) of the burning-induced changes The stimulation of Pn under N fertilization was mainly observed in the early growing season when the soil extractable N content was significantly higher in the fertilized plots. The N fertilization-induced changes in soil extractable N content could explain 66% (P=0.001) of the changes in Pn, under N fertilization. The photosynthetic responses of the three species indicate that burning and N fertilization will potentially change the community structure and ecosystem productivity in the semiarid grasslands of northern China.

  19. Novel interactions of mitochondria and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in alcohol mediated liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is known to be a contributing factor to a number of diseases including chronic alcohol induced liver injury. While there is a detailed understanding of the metabolic pathways and proteins of the liver mitochondrion, little is known regarding how changes in the mitochondrial proteome may contribute to the development of hepatic pathologies.Emerging evidence indicates that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species disrupt mitochondrial function through post-translational modifications to the mitochondrial proteome. Indeed, various new affinity labeling reagents are available to test the hypothesis that post-translational modification of proteins by reactive species contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and alcoholic fatty liver disease. Specialized proteomic techniques are also now available, which allow for identification of defects in the assembly of multi-protein complexes in mitochondria and the resolution of the highly hydrophobic proteins of the inner membrane. In this review knowledge gained from the study of changes to the mitochondrial proteome in alcoholic hepatotoxicity will be described and placed into a mechanistic framework to increase understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in liver disease.

  20. Differential Effects of Legume Species on the Recovery of Soil Microbial Communities, and Carbon and Nitrogen Contents, in Abandoned Fields of the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin Hua; Jiao, Shu Mei; Gao, Rong Qing; Bardgett, Richard D.

    2012-12-01

    Plant-soil interactions are known to influence a wide range of ecosystem-level functions. Moreover, the recovery of these functions is of importance for the successful restoration of soils that have been degraded through intensive and/or inappropriate land use. Here, we assessed the effect of planting treatments commonly used to accelerate rates of grassland restoration, namely introduction of different legume species Medicago sativa, Astragalus adsurgens, Melilotus suaveolens, on the recovery of soil microbial communities and carbon and nitrogen contents in abandoned fields of the Loess Plateau, China. The results showed effects were species-specific, and either positive, neutral or negative depending on the measure and time-scale. All legumes increased basal respiration and metabolic quotient and had a positive effect on activity and functional diversity of the soil microbial community, measured using Biolog EcoPlate. However, soil under Astragalus adsurgens had the highest activity and functional diversity relative to the other treatments. Soil carbon and nitrogen content and microbial biomass were effectively restored in 3-5 years by introducing Medicago sativa and Astragalus adsurgens into early abandoned fields. Soil carbon and nitrogen content were retarded in 3-5 years and microbial biomass was retarded in the fifth year by introducing Melilotus suaveolens. Overall, the restoration practices of planting legumes can significantly affect soil carbon and nitrogen contents, and the biomass, activity, and functional diversity of soil microbial community. Therefore, we propose certain legume species could be used to accelerate ecological restoration of degraded soils, hence assist in the protection and preservation of the environment.

  1. Atmospherically-promoted photosynthetic activity in a well-mixed ecosystem: Significance of wet deposition events of nitrogen compounds

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Wet atmospheric deposition of dissolved N, P and Si species is studied in well-mixed coastal ecosystem to evaluate its potential to stimulate photosynthetic activities in nutrient-depleted conditions. Our results show that, during spring, seawater is greatly depleted in major nutrients: Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen (DIN), Dissolved Inorganic Phosphorus (DIP) and Silicic acid (Si), in parallel with an increase of phytoplanktonic biomass. In spring (March-May) and summer (June-September), wet a...

  2. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments.

  3. Paenibacillus jilunlii sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing species isolated from the rhizosphere of Begonia semperflorens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hao-Jie; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Liu, Hong-Can; Chen, San-Feng

    2011-06-01

    A nitrogen-fixing bacterium, designated strain Be17(T), was isolated from rhizosphere soil of Begonia semperflorens planted in Beijing Botanical Garden, PR China. Phylogenetic analyses based on a segment of the nifH gene sequence and a full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain Be17(T) was a member of the genus Paenibacillus. High levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity were found between strain Be17(T) and Paenibacillus graminis RSA19(T) (97.9 %), Paenibacillus sonchi LMG 24727(T) (97.8 %), Paenibacillus riograndensis CECT 7330(T) (96.2 %) and Paenibacillus borealis DSM 13188(T) (96.1 %), respectively. Levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain Be17(T) and the type strains of other recognized members of the genus Paenibacillus were below 96.0 %. However, the DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain Be17(T) and P. graminis RSA19(T), P. sonchi LMG 24727(T) and P. riograndensis CECT 7330(T) were 47.9 %, 38.7 % and 37.5 %, respectively. The DNA G+C content of strain Be17(T) was 52.9 mol%. The major fatty acid component of strain Be17(T) was anteiso-branched C(15 : 0) (30.92 %). The major isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics, 16S rRNA gene sequences, DNA G+C content, DNA-DNA relatedness, chemotaxonomic properties and nifH gene sequence, strain Be17(T) represents a nitrogen-fixing strain of a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus jilunlii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Be17(T) ( = CGMCC 1.10239(T) = DSM 23019(T)).

  4. Biologically active sesquiterpene coumarins from Ferula species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Zeinab Esmail; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2011-03-01

    Extracts from different species of the genus Ferula (Apiaceae) have had various biomedical applications for many centuries. Many biological features of this genus such as cytotoxicity, antibacterial, antiviral, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitory and antiinflammatory activity have been attributed to sesquiterpene coumarins; structures containing a common coumarin group and a sesquiterpene moiety. This both highlights the importance of sesquiterpene coumarins as biologically active natural products and necessitates further studies on these compounds. Taking into account the versatile biological properties of compounds isolated from Ferula and the unprecedented interest in the application of natural products as a new generation of therapeutics, the present review will discuss reports on biological activities of sesquiterpene coumarins of the genus Ferula, from 1990 onwards.

  5. Biofilter design for effective nitrogen removal from stormwater - influence of plant species, inflow hydrology and use of a saturated zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Emily G I; Pham, Tracey; Cook, Perran L M; Fletcher, Tim D; Hatt, Belinda E; Deletic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The use of biofilters to remove nitrogen and other pollutants from urban stormwater runoff has demonstrated varied success across laboratory and field studies. Design variables including plant species and use of a saturated zone have large impacts upon performance. A laboratory column study of 22 plant species and designs with varied outlet configuration was conducted across a 1.5-year period to further investigate the mechanisms and influences driving biofilter nitrogen processing. This paper presents outflow concentrations of total nitrogen from two sampling events across both 'wet' and 'dry' frequency dosing, and from sampling across two points in the outflow hydrograph. All plant species were effective under conditions of frequent dosing, but extended drying increased variation between species and highlighted the importance of a saturated zone in maintaining biofilter function. The saturated zone also effectively treated the volume of stormwater stored between inflow events, but this extended detention provided no additional benefit alongside the rapid processing of the highest performing species. Hence, the saturated zone reduced performance differences between plant species, and potentially acts as an 'insurance policy' against poor sub-optimal plant selection. The study shows the importance of biodiversity and inclusion of a saturated zone in protecting against climate variability.

  6. Nitrogen cycling in summer active perennial grass systems in South Australia: Non-symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, V.V.S.R.; Kroker, S.J.; Hicks, M.; Davoren, W.; Descheemaeker, K.K.E.; Llewellyn, R.

    2014-01-01

    Non-symbiotic nitrogen (N2) fixation by diazotrophic bacteria is a potential source for biological N inputs in non-leguminous crops and pastures. Perennial grasses generally add larger quantities of above- and belowground plant residues to soil, and so can support higher levels of soil biological

  7. Inorganic Reactive Sulfur-Nitrogen Species: Intricate Release Mechanisms or Cacophony in Yellow, Blue and Red?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grman, Marian; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Leontiev, Roman; Misak, Anton; Jakusova, Veronika; Ondrias, Karol; Jacob, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Since the heydays of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS) research during the first decade of the Millennium, numerous sulfur species involved in cellular regulation and signalling have been discovered. Yet despite the general predominance of organic species in organisms, recent years have also seen the emergence of inorganic reactive sulfur species, ranging from inorganic polysulfides (HSx−/Sx2−) to thionitrous acid (HSNO) and nitrosopersulfide (SSNO−). These inorganic species engage in a complex interplay of reactions in vitro and possibly also in vivo. Employing a combination of spectrophotometry and sulfide assays, we have investigated the role of polysulfanes from garlic during the release of nitric oxide (•NO) from S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) in the absence and presence of thiol reducing agents. Our studies reveal a distinct enhancement of GSNO decomposition by compounds such as diallyltrisulfane, which is most pronounced in the presence of cysteine and glutathione and presumably proceeds via the initial release of an inorganic mono- or polysulfides, i.e., hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or HSx−, from the organic polysulfane. Albeit being of a preliminary nature, our spectrophotometric data also reveals a complicated underlying mechanism which appears to involve transient species such as SSNO−. Eventually, more in depth studies are required to further explore the underlying chemistry and wider biological and nutritional implications of this interplay between edible garlic compounds, reductive activation, inorganic polysulfides and their interplay with •NO storage and release. PMID:28212297

  8. Inorganic Reactive Sulfur-Nitrogen Species: Intricate Release Mechanisms or Cacophony in Yellow, Blue and Red?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grman, Marian; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Leontiev, Roman; Misak, Anton; Jakusova, Veronika; Ondrias, Karol; Jacob, Claus

    2017-02-15

    Since the heydays of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS) research during the first decade of the Millennium, numerous sulfur species involved in cellular regulation and signalling have been discovered. Yet despite the general predominance of organic species in organisms, recent years have also seen the emergence of inorganic reactive sulfur species, ranging from inorganic polysulfides (HSx(-)/Sx(2-)) to thionitrous acid (HSNO) and nitrosopersulfide (SSNO(-)). These inorganic species engage in a complex interplay of reactions in vitro and possibly also in vivo. Employing a combination of spectrophotometry and sulfide assays, we have investigated the role of polysulfanes from garlic during the release of nitric oxide ((•)NO) from S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) in the absence and presence of thiol reducing agents. Our studies reveal a distinct enhancement of GSNO decomposition by compounds such as diallyltrisulfane, which is most pronounced in the presence of cysteine and glutathione and presumably proceeds via the initial release of an inorganic mono- or polysulfides, i.e., hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) or HSx(-), from the organic polysulfane. Albeit being of a preliminary nature, our spectrophotometric data also reveals a complicated underlying mechanism which appears to involve transient species such as SSNO(-). Eventually, more in depth studies are required to further explore the underlying chemistry and wider biological and nutritional implications of this interplay between edible garlic compounds, reductive activation, inorganic polysulfides and their interplay with (•)NO storage and release.

  9. Inorganic Reactive Sulfur-Nitrogen Species: Intricate Release Mechanisms or Cacophony in Yellow, Blue and Red?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Grman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the heydays of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS research during the first decade of the Millennium, numerous sulfur species involved in cellular regulation and signalling have been discovered. Yet despite the general predominance of organic species in organisms, recent years have also seen the emergence of inorganic reactive sulfur species, ranging from inorganic polysulfides (HSx−/Sx2− to thionitrous acid (HSNO and nitrosopersulfide (SSNO−. These inorganic species engage in a complex interplay of reactions in vitro and possibly also in vivo. Employing a combination of spectrophotometry and sulfide assays, we have investigated the role of polysulfanes from garlic during the release of nitric oxide (•NO from S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO in the absence and presence of thiol reducing agents. Our studies reveal a distinct enhancement of GSNO decomposition by compounds such as diallyltrisulfane, which is most pronounced in the presence of cysteine and glutathione and presumably proceeds via the initial release of an inorganic mono- or polysulfides, i.e., hydrogen sulfide (H2S or HSx−, from the organic polysulfane. Albeit being of a preliminary nature, our spectrophotometric data also reveals a complicated underlying mechanism which appears to involve transient species such as SSNO−. Eventually, more in depth studies are required to further explore the underlying chemistry and wider biological and nutritional implications of this interplay between edible garlic compounds, reductive activation, inorganic polysulfides and their interplay with •NO storage and release.

  10. Soybean seed treatment with nickel improves biological nitrogen fixation and urease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José eLavres Junior

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nickel (Ni is an essential micronutrient required for plants’ metabolism due to its role as a structural component of urease and hydrogenase, which in turn perform nitrogen (N metabolism in many legume species. Seed treatment with cobalt, molybdenum and Bradyrhizobium strains has been widely practiced to improve crops. Additionally, seed treatment together with Ni fertilization of soybean might improve the efficiency of biological nitrogen fixation (BNF, boosting grain dry matter yield and N content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of soybean seed treatment with Ni rates (0, 45, 90,135, 180, 360 and 540 mg kg-1 on biological nitrogen fixation (BNF, directly by the 15N natural abundance method (δ15N‰ and by measurement of urease [E.C. 3.5.1.5] activity, as well as indirectly by nitrogenase (N-ase activity [E.C. 1.18.6.1]. Soybean plants (cultivar BMX Potência RR were grown in a sandy soil up to the R7 developmental stage (grain maturity, at which point the nutrient content in the leaves, chlorophyll content, urease and N-ase activities, Ni and N content in the grains, nodulation (at R1 - flowering stage, as well as the contribution of biological nitrogen fixation (δ15N ‰, were evaluated. The proportion of N derived from N2 fixation varied from 77 to 99% using the natural 15N abundance method and non-nodulating Panicum miliaceum and Phalaris canariensis as references. A Ni rate of 45 mg kg-1 increased BNF by 12% compared to the control. The increased N uptake in the grains was closely correlated with chlorophyll content in the leaves, urease and N-ase activities, as well as with nodulation. Grain dry matter yield and aerial part dry matter yield increased, respectively, by 84% and 51% in relation to the control plants at 45 mg kg-1 Ni via seed treatment. Despite, Ni concentration was increased with Ni-seed treatment, Ni rates higher than 135 mg kg-1 promoted negative effects on plant growth and yield. In these

  11. Monitoring organic nitrogen species in the UT/LS - a new system for analysis of CARIBIC whole air samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, Carina; Thorenz, Ute; Baker, Angela; Brenninkmeijer, Carl; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    The CARIBIC project is a unique program for long term and global scale monitoring of the atmosphere (http://www.caribic-atmospheric.com). An instrument container is installed monthly into a civil aircraft operated by Lufthansa (Airbus A 340-600) and makes atmospheric observations en route from Frankfurt, Germany to various destinations around the globe. In four to six long distance flights at a cruising altitude of 10 to 12 km online measurements of various atmospheric tracers are performed during the flight as well as whole air samples are taken with two different sampling units (116 samples in both glass and stainless steel canisters). These samples are routinely analyzed for greenhouse gases, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) and halogenated compounds. Nitrogen containing compounds play various important roles in the atmosphere. Alkyl nitrates (RONO2) are products of the reaction of NMHC with OH and other oxidants in the presence of NO. They can provide information on the oxidative history of an air mass. Moreover they influence photolchemical ozone formation and act as a transport mechanism for reactive nitrogen. Less reactive nitrogen containing species such as HCN and acetonitrile are important markers for biomass burning, while organic amines are involved in gas to particle partitioning. Finally N2O is a long lived nitrogen containing gas important for the Earth's radiative budget. Regular measurements of such nitrogen compounds would therefore be a significant contribution to the CARIBIC data set. Especially for high altitude samples, in which the mixing ratios of many species are expected to be in the low ppt range, a highly sensitive method for analysis is required. Therefore a new system for measurement of nitrogen compounds has been built up, comprising a gas chromatograph (GC) using a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). An important advantage of the NCD is that it is selective for nitrogen and equimolar. The nitrogen compounds are sequentially pre

  12. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species induce protein and DNA modifications driving arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Theresa A; Parvizi, Javad; Della Valle, Craig J; Steinbeck, Marla J

    2009-11-13

    Arthrofibrosis, occurring in 3%-4% of patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), is a challenging condition for which there is no defined cause. The hypothesis for this study was that disregulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) mediates matrix protein and DNA modifications, which result in excessive fibroblastic proliferation. We found increased numbers of macrophages and lymphocytes, along with elevated amounts of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in arthrofibrotic tissues when compared to control tissues. MPO expression, an enzyme that generates ROS/RNS, is usually limited to neutrophils and some macrophages, but was found by immunohistochemistry to be expressed in both macrophages and fibroblasts in arthrofibrotic tissue. As direct measurement of ROS/RNS is not feasible, products including DNA hydroxylation (8-OHdG), and protein nitrosylation (nitrotyrosine) were measured by immunohistochemistry. Quantification of the staining showed that 8-OHdg was significantly increased in arthrofibrotic tissue. There was also a direct correlation between the intensity of inflammation and ROS/RNS to the amount of heterotopic ossification (HO). In order to investigate the aberrant expression of MPO, a real-time oxidative stress polymerase chain reaction array was performed on fibroblasts isolated from arthrofibrotic and control tissues. The results of this array confirmed the upregulation of MPO expression in arthrofibrotic fibroblasts and highlighted the downregulated expression of the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase1 and microsomal glutathione S-transferase 3, as well as the significant increase in thioredoxin reductase, a known promoter of cell proliferation, and polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase, a key enzyme in the base excision repair pathway for oxidative DNA damage. Based on our current findings, we suggest that ROS/RNS initiate and sustain the arthrofibrotic response driving aggressive fibroblast proliferation and subsequent HO.

  13. Production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species by angiosperm stigmas and pollen: potential signalling crosstalk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Stephanie M; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John T; Hiscock, Simon J

    2006-01-01

    Angiosperm stigmas exhibit high levels of peroxidase activity when receptive to pollen. To explore possible function(s) of this peroxidase activity we investigated amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly hydrogen peroxide, in stigmas and pollen. Because nitric oxide (NO) was recently implicated in pollen tube growth, we also investigated amounts of NO in pollen and stigmas. Reactive oxygen species accumulation was assessed with confocal microscopy and light microscopy using ROS probes DCFH2-DA and TMB, respectively. NO was assayed using the NO probe DAF-2DA and confocal microscopy. Stigmas from various different angiosperms were found to accumulate ROS, predominantly H2O2, constitutively. In Senecio squalidus and Arabidopsis thaliana high amounts of ROS/H2O2 were localized to stigmatic papillae. ROS/H2O2 amounts appeared reduced in stigmatic papillae to which pollen grains had adhered. S. squalidus and A. thaliana pollen produced relatively high amounts of NO compared with stigmas; treating stigmas with NO resulted in reduced amounts of stigmatic ROS/H2O2. Constitutive accumulation of ROS/H2O2 appears to be a feature of angiosperm stigmas. This novel finding is discussed in terms of a possible role for stigmatic ROS/H2O2 and pollen-derived NO in pollen-stigma interactions and defence.

  14. Targeting reactive nitrogen species: a promising therapeutic strategy for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-miao CHEN; Han-sen CHEN; Ming-jing XU; Jian-gang SHEN

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of stroke cases.Recanalization with thrombolysis is a currently crucial therapeutic strategy for re-building blood supply,but the thrombolytic therapy often companies with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury,which are mediated by free radicals.As an important component of free radicals,reactive nitrogen species (RNS),including nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONO0ˉ),play important roles in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.Ischemia-reperfusion results in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOOˉ) in ischemic brain,which trigger numerous molecular cascades and lead to disruption of the blood brain barrier and exacerbate brain damage.There are few therapeutic strategies available for saving ischemic brains and preventing the subsequent brain damage.Recent evidence suggests that RNS could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.Herein,we reviewed the recent progress regarding the roles of RNS in the process of cerebral ischemic-reperfusion injury and discussed the potentials of drug development that target NO and ONO0ˉ to treat ischemic stroke.We conclude that modulation for RNS level could be an important therapeutic strategy for preventing cerebral ischemiareperfusion injury.

  15. Paenibacillus sonchi sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing species isolated from the rhizosphere of Sonchus oleraceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Yu-Chao; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Gao, Fei; Liu, Hong-Can; Chen, San-Feng

    2009-11-01

    A nitrogen-fixing bacterium, designated strain X19-5(T), was isolated from rhizosphere soil of Sonchus oleraceus. Phylogenetic analysis based on a fragment of the nifH gene and the full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain X19-5(T) was a member of the genus Paenibacillus. Strain X19-5(T) showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (98.8 %) with Paenibacillus graminis RSA19(T) and below 97 % similarity with other recognized members of the genus. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain X19-5(T) and P. graminis RSA19(T) was 45.7 %. The DNA G+C content of strain X19-5(T) was 46.8 mol%. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0), C(16 : 0) and iso-C(16 : 0). On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and the level of DNA-DNA hybridization, strain X19-5(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus sonchi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is X19-5(T) (=CCBAU 83901(T)=LMG 24727(T)).

  16. Inhibitory effect of ammonia nitrogen on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A series of batch experiments were conducted in 125 mL serum bottles to assess the toxicity of different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen to the specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge from upflow anaerobic sludge bed(UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed(EGSB) reactors. The effects of pH value and temperature on toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to anaerobes were investigated. The results show that the specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge suffers inhibition from ammonia nitrogen, the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen that produce 50% inhibition of specific methanogenic activity for sludge from UASB and EGSB reactor are 2.35 and 2.75 g/L, respectively. Hydrogen utilizing methanogens suffers less inhibition from ammonia nitrogen than that of acetate utilizing methanogens. Hydrogen-producing acetogens that utilize propionate and butyrate as substrates suffer serious inhibition from ammonia nitrogen. The toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to anaerobic granular sludge enhances when pH value and temperature increase. Anaerobic granular sludge can bear higher concentrations of ammonia nitrogen after being acclimated by ammonia nitrogen for 7 d.

  17. Regulation of sucrose synthase activity and sugar yield by nitrogen in sugar beet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Caifeng; MA Fengming; LI Wenhua; WANG Rui; CHEN Shengyong; LUO Yu

    2007-01-01

    The content of sugar is influenced by sucrose synthase (SS) activity in roots. The effects of nitrogen level in the aminonitrate ratio on SS activity of leaves and roots, roots yield and sugar content in sugar beet were studied in the field experiment by nutrient solution culture. The results showed that SS activity in leaves was lower than that in roots. With nitrogen level increasing,SS decomposition activity enhanced, and synthesis activity reduced. SS activity was regulated by different nitrogen forms and the ratio of NO3- and NH4+. SS synthesis activity was enhanced as NH4+ increasing when NO3-: NH4+≥ 1, and it decreased as increasing NH4+ when NO3-: NH4+≤1, and it was the highest when NO3-: NH4+=1. SS decomposition activity was enhanced as NO3- increasing.Sucrose content in root was lowed as nitrogen level increasing, but it was enhanced as NH4+ increasing in the same nitrogen level.Root and sugar yield were the highest in the medium nitrogen level and NO3-: NH4+=1. The result in field experiment corresponded with that in the nutrient fluid culture. It provides a basis for using reasonably nitrogen fertilizer in sugar beet production.

  18. Lipoteichoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus induces lung endothelial cell barrier dysfunction: role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Barton Pai

    Full Text Available Tunneled central venous catheters (TCVCs are used for dialysis access in 82% of new hemodialysis patients and are rapidly colonized with Gram-positive organism (e.g. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm, a source of recurrent infections and chronic inflammation. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA, a cell wall ribitol polymer from Gram-positive organisms, mediates inflammation through the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. The effect of LTA on lung endothelial permeability is not known. We tested the hypothesis that LTA from Staphylococcus aureus induces alterations in the permeability of pulmonary microvessel endothelial monolayers (PMEM that result from activation of TLR2 and are mediated by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS. The permeability of PMEM was assessed by the clearance rate of Evans blue-labeled albumin, the activation of the TLR2 pathway was assessed by Western blot, and the generation of RONS was measured by the fluorescence of oxidized dihydroethidium and a dichlorofluorescein derivative. Treatment with LTA or the TLR2 agonist Pam((3CSK((4 induced significant increases in albumin permeability, IκBα phosphorylation, IRAK1 degradation, RONS generation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activation (as measured by the p-eNOS(ser1177:p-eNOS(thr495 ratio. The effects on permeability and RONS were effectively prevented by co-administration of the superoxide scavenger Tiron, the peroxynitrite scavenger Urate, or the eNOS inhibitor L-NAME and these effects as well as eNOS activation were reduced or prevented by pretreatment with an IRAK1/4 inhibitor. The results indicate that the activation of TLR2 and the generation of ROS/RNS mediates LTA-induced barrier dysfunction in PMEM.

  19. Elevated stream inorganic nitrogen impacts on a dominant riparian tree species: Results from an experimental riparian stream system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultine, K. R.; Jackson, T. L.; Burtch, K. G.; Schaeffer, S. M.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    The release of inorganic nitrogen from intensive agricultural practices and urbanization has resulted in significant alterations of the aquatic nitrogen cycle in riparian ecosystems. Nevertheless, impacts of stream nitrogen inputs on the terrestrial nitrogen cycle and the water and carbon cycles are unclear. Information on terrestrial ecosystem responses to stream N loading is largely absent in part because of the difficulty in controlling for temporal and spatial variation in streamflow, geomorphology, climate, and vegetation. To address these issues, we constructed a dual-plot artificial stream riparian system within a 10-year-old plantation of a dominant riparian tree species, box elder (Acer negundo). The dual-plot design allowed for different concentrations of stream inorganic nitrogen between plots while controlling for ecohydrologic and geohydrologic variability. The system was used to investigate elevated inorganic stream nitrogen impacts on water use patterns, above-ground productivity, and leaf chemistry of streamside box elder trees over two consecutive growing seasons (2006 and 2007). One plot received inorganic soluble fertilizer that brought the NO3 concentration of stream water from 5 μmol l-1 to about 100 μmol l-1, while the second plot received no additional nitrogen. Relative stem sap flux density (Js) did not vary between plots until near the conclusion of the 2006 growing season, when trees in the fertilized plot showed a steep upswing in Js relative to trees in the control plot. Sap flux in 2007 increased consistently by 0.4% day-1 in the fertilized plot relative to the control plot over a 75-day period, before leveling off near the conclusion of the growing season. At the onset of the experiment, leaf nitrogen per unit mass and leaf nitrogen per unit area were significantly higher in the control plot, and leaf C:N ratios were lower. In 2007, however, differences in leaf chemistry disappeared, suggesting that leaf nitrogen increased in the

  20. Biocompatibility and antibacterial activity of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles for use in dental resin formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zane, Andrew; Zuo, Ranfang; Villamena, Frederick A; Rockenbauer, Antal; Digeorge Foushee, Ann Marie; Flores, Kristin; Dutta, Prabir K; Nagy, Amber

    2016-01-01

    The addition of antibacterial functionality to dental resins presents an opportunity to extend their useful lifetime by reducing secondary caries caused by bacterial recolonization. In this study, the potential efficacy of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles for this purpose was determined. Nitrogen doping was carried out to extend the ultraviolet absorbance into longer wavelength blue light for increased biocompatibility. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (approximately 20–30 nm) were synthesized with and without nitrogen doping using a sol–gel method. Ultraviolet–Visible spectroscopy indicated a band of trap states, with increasing blue light absorbance as the concentration of the nitrogen dopant increased. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements indicated the formation of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals upon particle exposure to visible light and oxygen. The particles were significantly toxic to Escherichia coli in a dose-dependent manner after a 1-hour exposure to a blue light source (480 nm). Intracellular reactive oxygen species assay demonstrated that the particles caused a stress response in human gingival epithelial cells when exposed to 1 hour of blue light, though this did not result in detectable release of cytokines. No decrease in cell viability was observed by water-soluble tetrazolium dye assay. The results show that nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles have antibacterial activity when exposed to blue light, and are biocompatible at these concentrations. PMID:27980404

  1. Biocompatibility and antibacterial activity of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles for use in dental resin formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zane, Andrew; Zuo, Ranfang; Villamena, Frederick A; Rockenbauer, Antal; Digeorge Foushee, Ann Marie; Flores, Kristin; Dutta, Prabir K; Nagy, Amber

    The addition of antibacterial functionality to dental resins presents an opportunity to extend their useful lifetime by reducing secondary caries caused by bacterial recolonization. In this study, the potential efficacy of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles for this purpose was determined. Nitrogen doping was carried out to extend the ultraviolet absorbance into longer wavelength blue light for increased biocompatibility. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (approximately 20-30 nm) were synthesized with and without nitrogen doping using a sol-gel method. Ultraviolet-Visible spectroscopy indicated a band of trap states, with increasing blue light absorbance as the concentration of the nitrogen dopant increased. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements indicated the formation of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals upon particle exposure to visible light and oxygen. The particles were significantly toxic to Escherichia coli in a dose-dependent manner after a 1-hour exposure to a blue light source (480 nm). Intracellular reactive oxygen species assay demonstrated that the particles caused a stress response in human gingival epithelial cells when exposed to 1 hour of blue light, though this did not result in detectable release of cytokines. No decrease in cell viability was observed by water-soluble tetrazolium dye assay. The results show that nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles have antibacterial activity when exposed to blue light, and are biocompatible at these concentrations.

  2. Bioavailable and biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen in activated sludge and trickling filter wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was carried out to understand the fate of biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen (BDON) and bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen (ABDON) along the treatment trains of a wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) equipped with an activated sludge (AS) system and a WWTF equipped with a two-stag...

  3. Sensitivity of modeled atmospheric nitrogen species and nitrogen deposition to variations in sea salt emissions in the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Daniel; Matthias, Volker; Bieser, Johannes; Aulinger, Armin; Quante, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Coarse sea salt particles are emitted ubiquitously from the ocean surface by wave-breaking and bubble-bursting processes. These particles impact the atmospheric chemistry by affecting the condensation of gas-phase species and, thus, indirectly the nucleation of new fine particles, particularly in regions with significant air pollution. In this study, atmospheric particle concentrations are modeled for the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions in northwestern Europe using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and are compared to European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurement data. The sea salt emission module is extended by a salinity-dependent scaling of the sea salt emissions because the salinity in large parts of the Baltic Sea is very low, which leads to considerably lower sea salt mass emissions compared to other oceanic regions. The resulting improvement in predicted sea salt concentrations is assessed. The contribution of surf zone emissions is considered separately. Additionally, the impacts of sea salt particles on atmospheric nitrate and ammonium concentrations and on nitrogen deposition are evaluated. The comparisons with observational data show that sea salt concentrations are commonly overestimated at coastal stations and partly underestimated farther inland. The introduced salinity scaling improves the predicted Baltic Sea sea salt concentrations considerably. The dates of measured peak concentrations are appropriately reproduced by the model. The impact of surf zone emissions is negligible in both seas. Nevertheless, they might be relevant because surf zone emissions were cut at an upper threshold in this study. Deactivating sea salt leads to minor increases in NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- and a decrease in NO3- concentrations. However, the overall effect on NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- concentrations is smaller than the deviation from the measurements. Nitrogen wet deposition is underestimated by the model at most

  4. Nitrogen Mineralization of Prunings of Six N2-Fixing Hedgerow Species in a Dry Valley of the Jinsha River

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A litterbag experiment of 12 weeks was conducted to study nitrogen mineralization process of prunings of six nitrogen-fixing hedgerow species in a dry valley of the Jinsha River. Prunings were incorporated into soil or used as mulch. The results indicated that pruning N of the six hedgerow species was mineralized fast in the first week and then decreased slowly in the rest of the study period. When prunings were incorporated into soil, the amount of nitrogen mineralized by the end of the first week accounted for 69.9%, 58.2%, 54.5%,43.0%, 29.6% and 20.6% of the total N in prunings of Desmodium rensonii, Tephrosia candida, Leucaena leucocuphala, Albizia yunnanensis, Acacia dealbata, and Acacia mearnsii, respectively. When prunings of L. leucocephala were used as mulch materials, the amount of nitrogen mineralized in the first week was 16.2% less than that of prunings incorporated into soil. The mineralization pattern of pruning N could be simulated by an exponent model Nt% = N01% (1 - exp(-k1t))+ N02% (1 - exp(-k2t)) where Nt% is cumulative mineralized N in time t, N01% and N02 % are readily and less readily mineralizable N in prunings,respectively, and k1 and k2 are rate constants. A half-life period of pruning nitrogen mineralization could ~ be determined by this model. The nitrogen content in the pruning residues decreased quickly in the first week but fluctuated thereafter. The initial C/N ratio was negatively related to the mineralization rate of prunings.``

  5. Experimental and numerical investigations on nitrogen species transport in unsaturated soil during various irrigation patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Berlin; Indumathi M Nambi; G Suresh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The transport of nitrogen coming from wastewater applied agricultural field is a major problem in assessing the vulnerability of groundwater contamination. In this study, laboratory column experiments are conducted in order to simulate the paddy, groundnut and wheat irrigation with wastewater. The experiments are carried out with high clay content (≈35%) soil from Kancheepuram, Tamilnadu and low clay (≈9%) soil from Ludhiana, Punjab, India. Furthermore, a numerical model and HYDRUS-1D model are developed to simulate the experimental results. The experimental results show that there is no effluent collected at the bottom of the column during groundnut irrigation in Kancheepuram soil and effluent collected except during first irrigation in the case of wheat irrigation in Ludhiana soil. The experimental and numerical results illustrate that when 50 mg/l of ammonium and 20 mg/l of nitrate nitrogen applied during paddy irrigation, the peak nitrate nitrogen concentration of 50 mg/l is arrived after 10 days in Kancheepuram soil due to low permeability and relatively less background soil nitrogen. But in the case of Ludhiana soil with 94 mg/l of total nitrogen applied during paddy irrigation, the peak nitrate nitrogen concentration of 1,620 mg/l is observed at first day due to high permeability and high soil background nitrogen concentration. Additionally, the model results show that the application of high nitrogen content wastewater for irrigation in Ludhiana soil will affect the groundwater quality even when the groundwater table is deep as compared with Kancheepuram soil.

  6. Adsorptive Removal of Nitrate from Aqueous Solution Using Nitrogen Doped Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Motoi; Goto, Tatsuru; Amano, Yoshimasa; Iida, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been widely applied for adsorptive removal of organic contaminants from aqueous phase, but not for ionic pollutants. In this study, nitrogen doped AC was prepared to increase the adsorption capacity of nitrate from water. AC was oxidized with (NH4)2S2O8 solution to maximize oxygen content for the first step, and then NH3 gas treatment was carried out at 950°C to aim at forming quaternary nitrogen (N-Q) species on AC surface (Ox-9.5AG). Influence of solution pH was examined so as to elucidate the relationship between surface charge and adsorption amounts of nitrate. The results showed that Ox-9.5AG exhibited about twice higher adsorption capacity than non-treatment AC at any initial nitrate concentration and any equilibrium solution pH (pHe) investigated. The more decrease in pHe value, the more adsorption amount of negatively charged nitrate ion, because the surface charge of AC and Ox-9.5AG could become more positive in acidic solution. The oxidation and consecutive ammonia treatments lead to increase in nitrogen content from 0.35 to 6.4% and decrease in the pH of the point of zero charge (pHpzc) from 7.1 to 4.0 implying that positively charged N-Q of a Lewis acid was created on the surface of Ox-9.5AG. Based on a Langmuir data analysis, maximum adsorption capacity attained 0.5-0.6 mmol/g of nitrate and adsorption affinity was 3.5-4.0 L/mmol at pHe 2.5 for Ox-9.5AG.

  7. The Effect of Compaction on Urease Enzyme Activity, Carbon Dioxide Evaluation and Nitrogen Mineralisation

    OpenAIRE

    Ayten KARACA; Abdullah BARAN; KAKTANIR, Koray

    2000-01-01

    The effects of compaction on urease enzyme activity, carbon dioxide evaluation and nitrogen mineralisation of urea-treated and untreated soils were investigated. Soils were compacted at compaction levels of O kgcm -2 , 2 kgcm -2 and 4 kgcm -2 and incubated for 28 days. The changes in urease enzyme activity, CO 2 evaluation and nitrogen mineralization were determined during incubation periods. Urease enzyme activity was decreased significantly (P

  8. Summertime distribution of PAN and other reactive nitrogen species in the northern high-latitude atmosphere of eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.; Herlth, D.; O'Hara, D.; Zahnle, K.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.; Talbot, R.; Gregory, G. L.; Sachse, G. W.; Blake, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Aircraft measurements of key reactive nitrogen species (NO, NO2, HNO3, PAN, PPN, NO3(-), NO(y)), C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, acetone, O3, chemical tracers (C2Cl4, CO), and important meteorological parameters were performed over eastern Canada during July to August 1990 at altitudes between 0 and 6 km as part of an Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE3B). In the free troposphere, PAN was found to be the single most abundant reactive nitrogen species constituting a major fraction of NO(y) and was significantly more abundant than NO(x) and HNO3. PAN and O3 were well correlated both in their fine and gross structures. Compared to data previously collected in the Arctic/subarctic atmosphere over Alaska (ABLE3A), the lower troposphere (0-4 km) over eastern Canada was found to contain larger reactive nitrogen and anthropogenic tracer concentrations. At higher altitudes (4-6 km) the atmospheric composition was in many ways similar to what was seen over Alaska and supports the view that a large-scale reservoir of PAN (and NO(y)) is present in the upper troposphere over the entire Arctic/subarctic region. The reactive nitrogen budget based on missions conducted from the North Bay site (missions 2-10) showed a small shortfall, whereas the budget for data collected from the Goose Bay operation (missions 11-19) showed essential balance. It is calculated that 15-20 ppt of the observed NO(x) may find its source from the available PAN reservoir. Meteorological considerations as well as relationships between reactive nitrogen and tracer species suggest that the atmosphere over eastern Canada during summer is greatly influenced by forest fires and transported industrial pollution.

  9. Asbestos inhalation induces reactive nitrogen species and nitrotyrosine formation in the lungs and pleura of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S; Choe, N; Hemenway, D R; Zhu, S; Matalon, S; Kagan, E

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether asbestos inhalation induces the formation of reactive nitrogen species, three groups of rats were exposed intermittently over 2 wk to either filtered room air (sham-exposed) or to chrysotile or crocidolite asbestos fibers. The rats were killed at 1 or 6 wk after exposure. At 1 wk, significantly greater numbers of alveolar and pleural macrophages from asbestos-exposed rats than from sham-exposed rats demonstrated inducible nitric oxide synthase protein immunoreactivity. Alveolar macrophages from asbestos-exposed rats also generated significantly greater nitrite formation than did macrophages from sham-exposed rats. Strong immunoreactivity for nitrotyrosine, a marker of peroxynitrite formation, was evident in lungs from chrysotile- and crocidolite-exposed rats at 1 and 6 wk. Staining was most evident at alveolar duct bifurcations and within bronchiolar epithelium, alveolar macrophages, and the visceral and parietal pleural mesothelium. Lungs from sham-exposed rats demonstrated minimal immunoreactivity for nitrotyrosine. Significantly greater quantities of nitrotyrosine were detected by ELISA in lung extracts from asbestos-exposed rats than from sham-exposed rats. These findings suggest that asbestos inhalation can induce inducible nitric oxide synthase activation and peroxynitrite formation in vivo, and provide evidence of a possible alternative mechanism of asbestos-induced injury to that thought to be induced by Fenton reactions. PMID:9664087

  10. meta-Tyrosine induces modification of reactive nitrogen species level, protein nitration and nitrosoglutathione reductase in tomato roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Borucki, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2017-08-01

    A non-protein amino acid (NPAA) - meta-Tyrosine (m-Tyr), is a harmful compound produced by fescue roots. Young (3-4 days old) tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were supplemented for 24-72 h with m-Tyr (50 or 250 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. Fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives was determined to show reactive nitrogen species (RNS) localization and level in roots of tomato plants. m-Tyr-induced restriction of root elongation growth was related to formation of nitrated proteins described as content of 3-nitrotyrosine. Supplementation with m-Tyr enhanced superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated protein nitration. It correlated well to increase of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives corresponding respectively to NO and ONOO(-) formation. Alterations in RNS formation induced by m-Tyr were linked to metabolism of nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Activity of nitrosoglutatione reductase (GSNOR), catalyzing degradation of GSNO was enhanced by long term plant supplementation with m-Tyr, similarly as protein abundance, while transcripts level were only slightly altered by tested NPAA. We conclude, that although in animal cells m-Tyr is considered as a marker of oxidative stress, its secondary mode of action in tomato plants involves perturbation in RNS formation, alteration in GSNO metabolism and modification of protein nitration level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Invasive species' leaf traits and dissimilarity from natives shape their impact on nitrogen cycling: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marissa R; Bernhardt, Emily S; van Bodegom, Peter M; Cornelissen, J Hans C; Kattge, Jens; Laughlin, Daniel C; Niinemets, Ülo; Peñuelas, Josep; Reich, Peter B; Yguel, Benjamin; Wright, Justin P

    2017-01-01

    Many exotic species have little apparent impact on ecosystem processes, whereas others have dramatic consequences for human and ecosystem health. There is growing evidence that invasions foster eutrophication. We need to identify species that are harmful and systems that are vulnerable to anticipate these consequences. Species' traits may provide the necessary insights. We conducted a global meta-analysis to determine whether plant leaf and litter functional traits, and particularly leaf and litter nitrogen (N) content and carbon: nitrogen (C : N) ratio, explain variation in invasive species' impacts on soil N cycling. Dissimilarity in leaf and litter traits among invaded and noninvaded plant communities control the magnitude and direction of invasion impacts on N cycling. Invasions that caused the greatest increases in soil inorganic N and mineralization rates had a much greater litter N content and lower litter C : N in the invaded than the reference community. Trait dissimilarities were better predictors than the trait values of invasive species alone. Quantifying baseline community tissue traits, in addition to those of the invasive species, is critical to understanding the impacts of invasion on soil N cycling. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Reactive nitrogen species in acetaminophen-induced mitochondrial damage and toxicity in mouse hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Angela S; MacMillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Hinson, Jack A

    2010-07-19

    Acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in primary mouse hepatocytes occurs in two phases. The initial phase (0-2 h) occurs with metabolism to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine which depletes glutathione, and covalently binds to proteins, but little toxicity is observed. Subsequent washing of hepatocytes to remove APAP and reincubating in media alone (2-5 h) results in toxicity. We previously reported that the reincubation phase occurs with mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and increased oxidative stress (dichlorodihydrofluorescein fluorescence) (DCFH(2)). Since DCFH(2) may be oxidized by multiple oxidative mechanisms, we investigated the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leading to 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins by ELISA and by immunoblots. Incubation of APAP with hepatocytes for 2 h did not result in toxicity or protein nitration; however, washing hepatocytes and reincubating in media alone (2-5 h) resulted in protein nitration which correlated with toxicity. Inclusion of the MPT inhibitor, cyclosporine A, in the reincubation media eliminated toxicity and protein nitration. The general nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NMMA and the neuronal NOS (NOS1) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, added in the reincubation media decreased toxicity and protein nitration; however, neither the inducible NOS (NOS2) inhibitors L-NIL (N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine) nor SAIT (S-(2-aminoethyl)isothiourea) decreased protein nitration or toxicity. The RNS scavengers, N-acetylcysteine, and high concentrations of APAP, added in the reincubation phase decreased toxicity and protein nitration. 7-Nitroindazole and cyclosporine A inhibited the APAP-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential when added in the reincubation phase. The data indicate a role for RNS in APAP induced toxicity.

  13. Thermochemistry and Dynamics of Reactive Species: Nitrogen-rich Compounds, Metals and SiC Clusters in Free and Solvated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-31

    of Reactive Species : Nitrogen-rich F49620-02-1-0371 Compounds, Metals and SiC clusters in Free and Solvated Environments Sb. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...F49620-02-1-0371 Thermochemistry and Dynamics of Reactive Species : Nitrogen-rich Compounds, Metals, and SiC clusters in Free and Solvated Environments...research program remain the same as before: obtaining fundamental thermochemical and dynamical data on reactive species Status of Effort This report

  14. [Effects of nitrogen application period on the nitrogen metabolism key enzymes activities and antioxidant characteristics of high-yielding summer maize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Peng; Zhang, Ji-Wang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jin-Sheng; Dong, Shu-Ting; Liu, Peng; Li, Deng-Hai

    2012-06-01

    Taking the high-yielding summer maize cultivars Denghai 661 (DH661) and Zhengdan 958 (ZD958) as test materials, a field experiment was conducted to study their grain yield, nitrogen use efficiency, key enzymes activities of nitrogen metabolism, and antioxidant enzymes activities under effects of different nitrogen application periods. One-dose nitrogen application at jointing stage was not beneficial to the increase of grain yield and the nitrogen accumulation in plant and grain, while split application in combination with application after anthesis increased the nitrogen accumulation in plant and grain significantly and increased the grain yield. When the nitrogen was applied at a ratio of 2:4:4 at jointing stage, 10-leaf stage, and 10 days after anthesis, the grain yield of DH661 was up to 14123.0 kg x hm(-2); when the nitrogen was applied at a ratio of 1:2:5:2 as the basal and at jointing stage, 10-leaf stage, and 10 days after anthesis, the grain yield of ZD958 was up to 14517.1 kg x hm(-2). These two nitrogen application modes increased the grain yield of DH661 and ZD958 by 14.5% and 17.5%, respectively, as compared with one-dose nitrogen application at jointing stage. Split nitrogen application before anthesis increased plant nitrate reductase activity significantly. In the 0-42 days after anthesis under split nitrogen application, the glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase, and glutamate dehydrogenase activities of DH661 and ZD958 were averagely increased by 32.6%, 47.1% and 50.4%, and 14.5%, 61.8% and 25.6%, and the superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased by 22. 0% and 36.6%, and 13.4% and 62.0%, respectively, and the malondialdehyde content was decreased significantly, as compared with one-off nitrogen application. It was suggested that for the high-yielding of summer maize, split application of nitrogen and appropriately increasing the nitrogen application ratio after anthesis could enhance the plant key nitrogen metabolism enzymes

  15. Thermochemistry and Dynamics of Reactive Species: Nitrogen-Rich Substituted Heterocycles and Anionic Components of Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    of a wide variety of organic and inorganic species, utilizing the flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube- triple quadrupole (FA- SIFT-TQ...chemistry techniques (negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy and flow/drift selected ion flow kinetics) together with state-of-the-art quantum... technique . This powerful and versatile approach has allowed the study of the chemistry of many nitrogenous ions and compounds. An arsenal of ionization and

  16. Cars, Cows, and Checkerspot Butterflies: Nitrogen Deposition and Management of Nutrient-Poor Grasslands for a Threatened Species

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart B Weiss

    1999-01-01

    Nutrient-poor, serpentinitic soils in the San Francisco Bay area sustain a native grassland that supports many rare species, including the Bay checkerspot butterfly ( Euphydryas editha bayensis). Nitrogen (N) deposition from air pollution threatens biodiversity in these grasslands because N is the primary limiting nutrient for plant growth on serpentinitic soils. I investigated the role of N deposition through surveys of butterfly and plant populations across different grazing regimes, by lit...

  17. Incorporation of low energy activated nitrogen onto HOPG surface: Chemical states and thermal stability studies by in-situ XPS and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the chemical states analysis of activated nitrogen incorporated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface under well-controlled conditions. Nitrogen incorporation is carried out by two different processes: an indirect RF nitrogen plasma and low energy (1 keV) N2+ implantation. Bonding configuration, concentration and thermal stability of the incorporated nitrogen species by aforesaid processes are systematically compared by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively large concentration of nitrogen is incorporated onto RF nitride HOPG surface (16.2 at.%), compared to N2+ implanted HOPG surface (7.7 at.%). The evolution of N 1s components (N1, N2, N3) with annealing temperature is comprehensively discussed, which indicates that the formation and reorganization of local chemical bonding states are determined by the process of nitridation and not by the prior chemical conditioning (i.e., amorphization or hydrogenation) of the HOPG surface. A combined XPS and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed that N2+ implantation process resulted in a high level of defects to the HOPG surface, which cannot be annealed-out by heat treatment up to 1000 °C. On the other hand, the RF nitrogen plasma process did not produce a high level of surface defects, while incorporating nearly the same amount of stable nitrogen species.

  18. Theoretical evaluation on nitrogen removal of step-feed anoxic/oxic activated sludge process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Gui-bing; PENG Yong-zhen

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation on nitrogen removal of step-feed anoxic/oxic activated sludge process at the standpoint of reaction kinetics and process kinetics was conducted. Theoretical biological nitrogen removal efficiency was deduced based on the mass balance of nitrate in the last stage. The comparison of pre-denitrification process and step feed process in the aspects of nitrogen removal efficiency, volume of reactor and building investment was studied, and the results indicated that step-feed anoxic/oxic activated sludge process was superior to pre-denitrification process in these aspects.

  19. [Nitrogen-containing mycotoxins of fungi of Aspergillus and Penicillium species infesting grain and its products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetilova, T A; Vinokurova, N G; L'vova, L S

    1993-01-01

    The review summarizes the literature data on distribution of nitrogen-containing mycotoxins (alkaloids) among Penicillium and Aspergillus fungi infesting grain and products of grain processing. Particular attention in given to clavins (ergotalkaloids) and tremorgens (roquefortine, verruculogen, penitrems).

  20. Thermal removal of nitrogen species from wood waste containing urea formaldehyde and melamine formaldehyde resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girods, P; Dufour, A; Rogaume, Y; Rogaume, C; Zoulalian, A

    2008-11-30

    The removal of nitrogen from wood board waste through a low temperature pyrolysis (523-573 K) is investigated with two analytical methods. The kinetic study of the thermal behaviour of wood board and of its components (wood, UF and MF resins) shows the feasibility of removing thermally nitrogen from wood board waste. Indeed, the range of temperatures associated with the degradation of wood is different from the one obtained for the degradation of UF and MF resin. Isothermal conditions enable the determination of a kinetic model for degradation of wood board and of its components and demonstrate that the thermal behaviour of wood board is not the reflection of the sum of its components' behaviour. FTIR analysis of gas products confirms the feasibility removing nitrogen thermally and enables the evaluation of the optimum treatment conditions (temperature/duration). Elementary analysis of the treated samples and study of their low heating value (LHV) enable to quantify the efficiency of the thermal treatment in terms of nitrogen removal and of energy recovery. Results show that around 70% of the initial nitrogen can be removed from the waste, and that the temperature of treatment (between 523 K and 573 K) does not influence the efficiency in terms of nitrogen removal. Nevertheless, the ratio Residual energy/Initial energy (between 76% and 90%) is improved with the lowest temperature of treatment.

  1. Automatic flow injection based methodologies for determination of scavenging capacity against biologically relevant reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Luís M; Lúcio, Marlene; Segundo, Marcela A; Reis, Salette; Lima, José L F C

    2009-06-15

    Redox reactions are the heart of numerous biochemical pathways found in cellular chemistry, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), that includes superoxide anion radical (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (HO), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), hypochlorite anion (OCl-), peroxynitrite anion (ONOO-) and nitric oxide radical (NO). The measurement of scavenging capacity against these reactive species presents new challenges, which can be met by flow injection analysis (FIA). In the present review several methods based on FIA and also on its predecessors computer-controlled techniques (sequential injection analysis, multisyringe flow injection analysis, multicommutated and multipumping flow systems) are critically discussed. The selectivity and applicability of the methodology, the generation and detection of the target reactive species, the benefits and limitations of automation when compared to batch methods are some of the issues addressed.

  2. Model of Calculating Activity of Nitrogen and Vanadium in Fe-C-V-N Molten Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jun; WANG Shi-jun; DONG Yuan-chi; LIU Li-xia; ZHOU Yun; CHEN Er-bao

    2008-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in the Fe-C-V-N system was measured at 1 708 K and the model of calculating activity (action concentration) of nitroge.n (N) and vanadium (V) was derived according to the phase diagram and the coexistence theory of the metal melt structure.The solubility expression of nitrogen in the Fe-C-V-N system at 1 708 K was wN=0.058 194-0.010 367WC+0.005 543 4wV.Comparing the computing results with the experimental results,a satisfactory conclusion could be obtained.The analysis of the Fe-C-V-N system using this model showed that VN was present in a high temperature metal melt,which would reduce the action concentration of nitrogen obviously.It was consequently disadvantageous to the removal of nitrogen from hot metal.

  3. Functional complementation in yeast reveals a protective role of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxin against reactive nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Tsukamoto, Shigefumi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Ueda-Hashimoto, Manami; Takahashi, Misa; Suzuki, Hitomi; Morikawa, Hiromichi

    2003-03-01

    The importance of nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule to various plant physiological and pathophysiological processes is becoming increasingly evident. However, little is known about how plants protect themselves from nitrosative and oxidative damage mediated by NO and NO-derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Peroxynitrite, the product of the reaction between NO and superoxide anion, is considered to play a central role in RNS-induced cytotoxicity, as a result of its potent ability to oxidize diverse biomolecules. Employing heterologous expression in bacteria and yeast, we investigated peroxynitrite-scavenging activity in plants of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2CPRX), originally identified as a hydroperoxide-reducing peroxidase that is ubiquitously distributed among organisms. The putative mature form of a chloroplast-localized 2CPRX from Arabidopsis thaliana was overproduced in Escherichia coli as an amino-terminally hexahistidine-tagged fusion protein. The purified recombinant 2CPRX, which was catalytically active as peroxidase, efficiently prevented the peroxynitrite-induced oxidation of a sensitive compound. We also examined in vivo the ability of the Arabidopsis 2CPRX to complement the 2CPRX deficiency of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant. Functional expression in the mutant strain of the Arabidopsis 2CPRX not only increased cellular tolerance to hydrogen peroxide, but also complemented the hypersensitive growth defect induced by nitrite-mediated cytotoxicity. The complemented cells significantly enhanced the capacity to reduce RNS-mediated oxidative damages. The results presented here demonstrate a new role of plant 2CPRX as a critical determinant of the resistance to RNS, and support the existence of a plant enzymatic basis for RNS metabolism.

  4. Field observations on nitrogen catch crops. I. Potential and actual growth and nitrogen accumulation in relation to sowing date and crop species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.; Putten, van der P.E.L.

    1997-01-01

    In temperate climates with a precipitation surplus during autumn and winter, nitrogen catch crops can help to reduce nitrogen losses from cropping systems by absorbing nitrogen from the soil and transfer it to a following main crop. The actual and potential accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in

  5. [Effects of water stress and nitrogen fertilization on peanut root morphological development and leaf physiological activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Zhang, Zhi-meng; Dai, Liang-xiang; Ci, Dun-wei; Qin, Fei-fei; Song, Wen-wu; Liu, Meng-juan; Fu, Xiao

    2015-02-01

    Taking 'Huayu 22' peanut as test material, effect of soil water content and nitrogen fertilization on the leaf physiological activities and root morphological characteristics of peanut plants were analyzed. Two levels of soil water condition were: (1) well-watered condition and (2) moderate water stress, and three levels of nitrogen were: (1) none nitrogen (N0), (2) moderate nitrogen (N1, 90 kg · hm(-2)) and (3) high nitrogen (N2, 180 kg · hm(-2)). The results showed that N1 significantly increased the peanut yield under two water conditions, but showed no significant effect on harvest index compared with N0. Under water stress condition, N1 had no significant effects on total root biomass and total root length, but the total root surface area was remarkably increased. The nitrogen fertilization significantly increased the root length and root surface area in 20-40 cm soil layer, and N2 significantly increased the root biomass and root surface area in the soil layer below 40 cm. The application of nitrogen remarkably increased CAT and POD activities in leaf, while MDA content was decreased with the increase of nitrogen level. Under well-watered condition, the root biomass, root length and root surface area in the soil layer below 40 cm and total root surface area were significantly reduced by nitrogen application, however, only N1 could increase leaf protective enzyme activities. Correlation analysis showed that the root length in 20-40 cm soil layer and SOD, CAT, POD activities in leaf were highly significantly related with peanut yield.

  6. Feed-derived volatile basic nitrogen increases reactive oxygen species production of blood leukocytes in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Ei; Gross, Josef J; Kawashima, Chiho; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Kida, Katsuya; Miyamoto, Akio

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated over 9 months the changes of fermentative quality of total mixed rations (TMR) containing grass silage (GS) as a major component, associated with changes in the volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) levels in an experimental dairy farm. Effects of VBN levels in TMR on metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and conception rates for dairy cows were analyzed. According to VBN levels in TMR during survey periods, three distinct phases were identified; phase A with low VBN; phase B with high VBN; and phase C with mid-VBN. Metabolic parameters in blood were all within normal range. However, during phases B and C, nitrogen metabolic indices such as blood urea nitrogen and milk urea nitrogen showed higher levels compared to those in phase A, and a simultaneous increase in ROS production by blood PMNs and the load on hepatic function in metabolic parameters was observed in the cows with a lower conception rate. This suggests that feeding TMR with elevated VBN levels due to poor fermented GS results in stimulation of ROS production by PMNs by ammonia, and negatively affects metabolism and reproductive performance in lactating dairy cow.

  7. Plant species diversity reduces N2O but not CH4 emissions from constructed wetlands under high nitrogen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenjuan; Shi, Mengmeng; Chang, Jie; Ren, Yuan; Xu, Ronghua; Zhang, Chongbang; Ge, Ying

    2017-02-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been widely used for treating wastewater. CWs also are the sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) due to high pollutant load. It has been reported that plant species diversity can enhance nitrogen (N) removal efficiency in CWs for treating wastewater. However, the influence of plant species diversity on GHG emissions from CWs in habitats with high N levels still lack research. This study established four species richness levels (1, 2, 3, 4) and 15 species compositions by using 75 simulated vertical flow CWs microcosms to investigate the effects of plant species diversity on the GHG emissions and N removal efficiency of CWs with a high N level. Results showed plant species richness reduced nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and N (NO3(-)-N, NH4(+)-N, and TIN) concentrations in wastewater, but had no effect on methane (CH4) emission. Especially, among the 15 compositions of plant species, the four-species mixture emitted the lowest N2O and had under-depletion of N (DminTIN CWs for treating wastewater with a high N level.

  8. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in forest soils depending on light conditions and tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselinovic, Bojana; Hager, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Climate change mitigation actions under the Kyoto Protocol apply among other decreases of CO2-emissions and/or increases of carbon (C) stocks. As soils represent the second biggest C-reservoir on Earth, an exact estimation of the stocks and reliable knowledge on C-dynamics in forest soils is of high importance. Anyhow, here, the accurate GHG-accounting, emission reductions and increase in C stocks is hampered due to lack of reliable data and solid statistical methods for the factors which influence C-sequestration in and its release from these systems. In spite of good progress in the scientific research, these factors are numerous and diverse in their interactions. This work focuses on influence of the economically relevant tree species - Picea abies, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus spp. - and light conditions on forest floor and mineral soil C and N dynamics in forest soils. Spruce monocultures have been widely used management practices in central European forests during the past century. Such stands are in lower altitudes and on heavy and water logged soils unstable and prone to disturbances, especially to windthrows. We hypothesize that windthrow areas loose C & N and that the establishment of the previous nutrient stocks is, if at all, only possible to be reached over the longer periods of time. We research also how the increased OM depletion affects the change of C & N stocks in forest floor vs. mineral soil. Conversion of such secondary spruce monocultures to site adequate beech and oak forests may enable higher stocks allocated predominantly as stable organic carbon and as plant available nitrogen. For this purpose sites at 300-700 m altitude with planosols were chosen in the region of the Northern Alpine Foothills. A false chronosequence approach was used in order to evaluate the impacts of the tree species and change in light conditions on dynamic of C & N in the forest floor and mineral soil, over the period 0-100 (for oak 120 y.) years. The C- and N

  9. Relationship between lightning activity and tropospheric nitrogen dioxide and the estimation of lightning-produced nitrogen oxides over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengxia; Ju, Xiaoyu; Bao, Min; Lu, Ganyi; Liu, Zupei; Li, Yawen; Mu, Yijun

    2017-02-01

    To better understand the relationship between lightning activity and nitrogen oxides (NO X ) in the troposphere and to estimate lightning-produced NO X (LNO X ) production in China more precisely, spatial and temporal distributions of vertical column densities of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 VCDs) and lightning activity were analyzed using satellite measurements. The results showed that the spatial distribution of lightning activity is greater in the east than in the west of China, as with NO2 VCDs. However, the seasonal and annual variation between lightning and NO2 density show different trends in the east and west. The central Tibetan Plateau is sparsely populated without modern industry, and NO2 VCDs across the plateau are barely affected by anthropogenic sources. The plateau is an ideal area to study LNO X . By analyzing 15 years of satellite data from that region, it was found that lightning density is in strong agreement with annual, spatial and seasonal variations of NO2 VCDs, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 from the linear fit. Combining Beirle's method and the linear fit equation, LNO X production in the Chinese interior was determined to be 0.07 (0.02-0.27) TgN yr-1 for 1997-2012, within the range of 0.016-0.384 TgN yr-1 from previous estimates.

  10. Gross chemical profile and calculation of nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors for nine species of fishes from coastal waters of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela S Diniz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid composition and contents of nitrogen, phosphorus, lipid, carbohydrate and protein were determined in muscles of Dactylopterus volitans, Genypterus brasiliensis, Mullus argentinae, Paralichthys patagonicus, Percophis brasiliensis, Pinguipes brasilianus, Rhizoprionodon lalandii, Rhizoprionodon porosus, and Urophycis cirrata. The samples showed low carbohydrate content (66% dry weight in all species. The percentage of total lipid varied widely among species, andM. argentinae showed the highest concentrations (16%. The percentage of nitrogen and phosphorus was high and similar among species, with overall average values of 13.3% and 1.2%, respectively. The amino acids composition was similar among the animals, with glutamic acid and lisine as the most abundant amino acid and histidine in low concentrations. Among species, the content of proteinaceous nitrogen was high, with an average of 96.8% of the total nitrogen. From data of total amino acid and total nitrogen, specific nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors were calculated for each species. The nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors ranged from 5.39 to 5.98, with an overall average of 5.71. These findings showed that the traditional conversion factor of 6.25 overestimates the actual protein content and should be avoided.

  11. Nitrogen-regulated transcription and enzyme activities in continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Raeven, L J; Boonstra, J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T

    1995-05-01

    Variations in the transcription of nitrogen-regulated genes and in the activities of nitrogen-regulated enzymes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by changing the carbon and nitrogen fluxes. S. cerevisiae was grown in continuous culture at various dilution rates (D) under nitrogen limitation with NH4Cl as sole nitrogen source. With an increase in D from 0.05 to 0.29 h-1, both the glucose and the ammonia flux increased sixfold. The activities of the two ammonia-incorporating enzymes, NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS), encoded by GDH1 and GLN1, respectively, increased with increasing D, while the activity of the glutamate-degrading enzyme, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), decreased. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in the transcription of GDH1 and GLN1; however increased D was accompanied by an increase in GAP1 transcription. At the metabolite level, the increase in the glucose and nitrogen flux did not result in changes in the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate or glutamine concentrations. It is shown that growth on ammonia alone is not sufficient to cause repression of GAP1 and GLN1 transcription and that the regulation of GAP1 transcription and both NADPH-GDH and GS activity is not an on/off switch, but is gradually modulated in correlation with the ammonia concentration.

  12. Performance of Conventional Activated Sludge to Remove Nitrogen Compounds from Tomato Factory Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghdad Pirsaheb

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Today discharge of raw or treated wastewater containing nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus compounds to the surface water causing an Utrification phenomenon, will be due to excessive growth of algae in the receptive water source. Each of the of wastewater treatment system, providing principled design and operation can be reduced nutrients to standard level [1]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of conventional activated sludge systems to remove nitrogen compounds from wastewater of Kermanshah Rojintak tomato factory and comparison of the final effluent quality with discharge standards to water resource and reuse it in agricultural irrigation in term of nitrogen compounds are considered.

  13. 几种丛生竹根际联合固氮研究%Study on Associated Nitrogen Fixation of Sev eral Sympodial Bamboo Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾小平; 吴晓丽; 汪阳东

    2001-01-01

    对几种丛生竹种麻竹、吊丝球竹、青皮竹、粉丹竹、马甲竹、绿竹等进行根系固氮能力调查 测定,用直接法测定(干根样品)前5个种竹种的根系最高固氮酶活性分别为20.50、24.81、 10. 83、7.49、2.46nmol(C2H4).g-1.h-1,用富集培养法测定(鲜根 样品) 前5个种竹种的根系平均固氮酶活性分别为275、431、169、188、79nmol(C2H4).g -1.h-1。不同生境和不同季节丛生竹根系固氮能力的调查显示,充足的水分供 应 、较高的温度及适当施用有机肥有利于竹子固氮。对几种丛生竹种根际不同部位固氮菌数调 查测定显示,根际固氮菌数最多的竹种是吊丝球竹,在根际不同部位固氮菌数由非根际土 →根际土→根表→根内依次急剧递增,越往内部根际效应越明显。用2#、12#、14 #、7#菌及混合菌液对麻竹组培苗进行接种显示,接种固氮菌可提高苗木成活率和植株 含氮量,14#、7#菌和混合菌接种可显著提高麻竹组培苗生物量。%Root nitrogen fixing activities of several s ympodial bamboo species, namely Dendrocalamus latiflorus, Dendrocalamopsis beecheyana, Bambus a textilis, Bambusa chungii, Bambusa tulda, Dendrocalamopsis oldhami were investiga ted and tested. It is shown that using direct testing methods the root nitrogen fixing a ctivity of first five bamboo species above mentioned can reach to 20.50, 24.81, 10.83, 7.49, 2.46 nmol(C2H4)*g-1*h-1 respectively, when usin g e nrichment culture methods the roots nitrogen fixing activity of first five bambo o species can reach 275, 431, 169, 188, 79 nmol(C2H4)*g-1*h- 1 respectively. The root nitrogen fixing activity of bamboo species grown in di ffe rent environments and different seasons were investigated and tested. It is show n that sufficient water supply, suitable high temperature and applying organic f ertilizer can moderately promote root nitrogen fixing activity. When counting t h e amount

  14. Measurement and meaning of markers of reactive species of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur in healthy human subjects and patients with inflammatory joint disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winyard, Paul G; Ryan, Brent; Eggleton, Paul; Nissim, Ahuva; Taylor, Emma; Lo Faro, Maria Letizia; Burkholz, Torsten; Szabó-Taylor, Katalin E; Fox, Bridget; Viner, Nick; Haigh, Richard C; Benjamin, Nigel; Jones, Andrew M; Whiteman, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Reactive species of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur play cell signalling roles in human health, e.g. recent studies have shown that increased dietary nitrate, which is a source of RNS (reactive nitrogen species), lowers resting blood pressure and the oxygen cost of exercise. In such studies, plasma nitrite and nitrate are readily determined by chemiluminescence. At sites of inflammation, such as the joints of RA (rheumatoid arthritis) patients, the generation of ROS (reactive oxygen species) and RNS overwhelms antioxidant defences and one consequence is oxidative/nitrative damage to proteins. For example, in the inflamed joint, increased RNS-mediated protein damage has been detected in the form of a biomarker, 3-nitrotyrosine, by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, ELISAs and MS. In addition to NO•, another cell-signalling gas produced in the inflamed joint is H2S (hydrogen sulfide), an RSS (reactive sulfur species). This gas is generated by inflammatory induction of H2S-synthesizing enzymes. Using zinc-trap spectrophotometry, we detected high (micromolar) concentrations of H2S in RA synovial fluid and levels correlated with clinical scores of inflammation and disease activity. What might be the consequences of the inflammatory generation of reactive species? Effects on inflammatory cell-signalling pathways certainly appear to be crucial, but in the current review we highlight the concept that ROS/RNS-mediated protein damage creates neoepitopes, resulting in autoantibody formation against proteins, e.g. type-II collagen and the complement component, C1q. These autoantibodies have been detected in inflammatory autoimmune diseases.

  15. High-nitrogen and low-irradiance can restrict energy utilization in photosynthesis of successional tree species in low subtropical forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xi'An; SUN GuChou; ZHAO Ping; LIU XiaoJing

    2008-01-01

    Responses of photosynthesis and the partition of energy utilization to high-nitrogen importation and high-light intensity in leaves of three dominant tree species of subtropical forest, including sun plant or early-successional species Schima superba, mesophyte or intermediate-successional species Can-stanopsis hystrix, and shading-tolerant plant or late-successional species Cryptocarya concinna were studied by using the CO2 exchange system and chlorophyll fluorescence method. Our results showed that, regardless of plant species, net photosynthetic rate (Pn) was higher in high-nitrogen supply and high irradiance (HNHL)plants than in low-nitrogen supply and high irradiance (LNHL) plants, implying that low-nitrogen importation would limit Pn of plants grown under high irradiance. However, high-nitrogen supply and low irradiance (HNLL) plants had a lower Pn. Insignificant change of quantum yield (Fv'/Fm') in opened PS II was found in leaves of HNHL, LNHL or HNLL plants of S. superba and C. hystrix, while a higher Fv'/Fm' occurred in HNHL plants of C. concinna in comparison with LNHL or HNLL plants. The HNHL plants of C. concinna also had a higher photochemical quantum yield (ARFm') than LNHL or HNLL plants, however no similar responses were found in plants of S. superba and C. hystrix (P0.05) and it was significantly higher than in HNLL plants (P<0.05). C. hystrixalso had a similar response in φPSII to nitrogen supply and irradiance. Regardless of species HNLL plants had a significant φPSII, and higher heat dissipation in light, and this effect was more severe in C. concinna than in S. superba or C. hystrix. The results may mean that high-nitrogen importation by nitrogen deposit and low irradiance caused by changing climate or air pollution would more severely restrict photo-synthetic processes in the late-successional species C. concinna than in the early-successional species S. superba and intermediate-successional species C. hystrix. The continuous high-nitrogen

  16. Plant inter-species effects on rhizosphere priming effect and nitrogen acquisition by plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Xu, Xingliang; Yang, Baijie; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Rhizosphere interactions play a central role linking roots-soil system and regulate various aspects of nutrient cycling. Rhizodeposition inputs are known to change soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition via rhizosphere priming effects (RPEs) through enhancing soil biological activity and altering microbial community structure. The magnitude of RPEs varies widely among plant-species and root biomass possibly due to different quality and quantity of rhizodeposits. However, it is virtually unknown whether the RPEs are influenced by plant inter-species interactions and how these processes affect N mineralization and available N for plants. Monocultures of maize (M) and soybean (S), and mixed cultures of maize/maize (MM), soybean/soybean (SS), maize/soybean (MS) were grown over a 45-day greenhouse experiment. We labeled them with plant litter that was enriched in13C and 15N. The 15N distributions in plants and microbial biomass were measured at 14, 35, and 45days after labeling. The RPEs were positive under all plants, ranging from 11.7% to 138.3% and gradually decreased with plant growth. The RPE in the SS was significantly higher than these in others treatments at 14 days, while at 45 days it was higher in the MS than these from their monocultures, suggesting that the RPE was enhanced by the inter-species effects of maize and soybean. The litter decomposition ratio and 15N recovery of plants and microorganism increased with the root growth across all plants. The 15N recovery of plants in the MS (14.2%) was higher than these in the MM (12.3%) and SS(9.7%) at 45 days. Similarly, the 15N recovery of microorganism in the corresponding treatments was 6.7%, 2.2%, and 6.8%, respectively. The MS showed higher soil organic N mineralization amount than that from all soybean and maize monocultures at 45 days. We conclude that plant inter-species interactions may have significant effect on rhizosphere priming and modify the plant N uptake from litter resource and SOM.

  17. Evidence for Detrimental Cross Interactions between Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Here we have collected evidence suggesting that chronic changes in the NO homeostasis and the rise of reactive oxygen species bioavailability can contribute to cell dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. We report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), derived from a female LHON patient with bilateral reduced vision and carrying the pathogenic mutation 11778/ND4, display increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), as revealed by flow cytometry, fluorometric measurements of nitrite/nitrate, and 3-nitrotyrosine immunodetection. Moreover, viability assays with the tetrazolium dye MTT showed that lymphoblasts from the same patient are more sensitive to prolonged NO exposure, leading to cell death. Taken together these findings suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress cooperatively play an important role in driving LHON pathology when excess NO remains available over time in the cell environment. PMID:26881022

  18. Evidence for Detrimental Cross Interactions between Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Micol; Forte, Elena; Magnifico, Maria Chiara; Santini, Paolo; Arese, Marzia; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Radić, Kristina; Chessa, Luciana; Coarelli, Giulia; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Mechelli, Rosella; Salvetti, Marco; Sarti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Here we have collected evidence suggesting that chronic changes in the NO homeostasis and the rise of reactive oxygen species bioavailability can contribute to cell dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. We report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), derived from a female LHON patient with bilateral reduced vision and carrying the pathogenic mutation 11778/ND4, display increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), as revealed by flow cytometry, fluorometric measurements of nitrite/nitrate, and 3-nitrotyrosine immunodetection. Moreover, viability assays with the tetrazolium dye MTT showed that lymphoblasts from the same patient are more sensitive to prolonged NO exposure, leading to cell death. Taken together these findings suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress cooperatively play an important role in driving LHON pathology when excess NO remains available over time in the cell environment.

  19. Evidence for Detrimental Cross Interactions between Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Falabella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we have collected evidence suggesting that chronic changes in the NO homeostasis and the rise of reactive oxygen species bioavailability can contribute to cell dysfunction in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON patients. We report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, derived from a female LHON patient with bilateral reduced vision and carrying the pathogenic mutation 11778/ND4, display increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS, as revealed by flow cytometry, fluorometric measurements of nitrite/nitrate, and 3-nitrotyrosine immunodetection. Moreover, viability assays with the tetrazolium dye MTT showed that lymphoblasts from the same patient are more sensitive to prolonged NO exposure, leading to cell death. Taken together these findings suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress cooperatively play an important role in driving LHON pathology when excess NO remains available over time in the cell environment.

  20. Interactive effects of ocean acidification and nitrogen limitation on two bloom-forming dinoflagellate species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberlein, T.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Brandenburg, Karen M.; John, U.; Voss, M.; Achterberg, E.P.; Rost, B.

    2016-01-01

    Global climate change involves an increase in oceanic CO2 concentrations as well as thermal stratification of the water column, thereby reducing nutrient supply from deep to surface waters. Changes in inorganic carbon (C) or nitrogen (N) availability have been shown to affect marine primary

  1. Effects of nitrogen and water addition on trace element stoichiometry in five grassland species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Jiangping; Weiner, Jacob; Wang, Ruzhen

    2017-01-01

    A 9-year manipulative experiment with nitrogen (N) and water addition, simulating increasing N deposition and changing precipitation regime, was conducted to investigate the bioavailability of trace elements, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) in soil, and their uptake by plant...

  2. Nitrogen starvation for lipid accumulation in the microalga species Desmodesmus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, L F; Klein, B C; Luz, L F; Maciel Filho, R; Wolf Maciel, M R

    2015-01-01

    Recently, to obtain lipids from microalgae has been the object of extensive research, since it is viewed as a promising feedstock for biodiesel production, especially when compared with crops such as soybean and sunflower, in terms of theoretical performance. The reduction of nutrient availability in culture media, especially nitrogen, stresses the microorganisms and affects cell growth, thus inducing lipid accumulation. This is an interesting step in biodiesel feedstock obtention from microalgae and should be better understood. In this study, four levels of nitrogen concentration in the BG-11 culture medium were evaluated in the growth of the chlorophycean microalga Desmodesmus sp. Both cell growth and lipid content were monitored over 7 days of cultivation, which yielded a final cell density of 33 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) with an initial NaNO3 concentration of 750 mg L(-1) in the medium and a maximum lipid content of 23 % with total nitrogen starvation. It was observed that the microalgae presented high lipid accumulation in the fourth day of cultivation with nitrogen starvation, although with moderate cell growth.

  3. EFFECTS OF MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI ON IN-VITRO NITROGEN RESPONSE OF SOME DUTCH INDIGENOUS ORCHID SPECIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJK, E; ECK, ND

    The effect of mycorrhizal infection on the response to mineral nitrogen was studied in Orchis morio L., Dactylorhiza praetermissa (Druce) Soo var. junialis (Vermin.) Sengh., Dactylorhiza majalis (Reichb.) Hunt & Summerh., and Dactylorhiza incarnara (L.) Soo, using two strains of Ceratorhiza sp. and

  4. Nitrogen detection with hyperspectral normalized ratio indices across multiple plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferwerda, J.G.; Skidmore, A.K.; Mutanga, O.

    2005-01-01

    The main focus of recent studies relating vegetation leaf chemistry with remotely sensed data is the prediction of chlorophyll and nitrogen content using indices based on a combination of bands from the red and infrared wavelengths. The use of high spectral resolution data offers the opportunity to

  5. Nitrogen containing species as intermediates in the oxidation of ammonia over silica supported molybdena catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, J.J.P.; Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1992-01-01

    The behaviour of ammonia and oxygen over silica supported molybdena catalysts has been studied by means of thermal analysis techniques, such as thermo-gravimetry and heat-flow calorimetry. The composition of the reactants and products was determined by means of mass spectrometric analysis. Nitrogen-

  6. Interactive effects of ocean acidification and nitrogen limitation on two bloom-forming dinoflagellate species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberlein, T.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Brandenburg, Karen M.; John, U.; Voss, M.; Achterberg, E.P.; Rost, B.

    2016-01-01

    Global climate change involves an increase in oceanic CO2 concentrations as well as thermal stratification of the water column, thereby reducing nutrient supply from deep to surface waters. Changes in inorganic carbon (C) or nitrogen (N) availability have been shown to affect marine primary producti

  7. Faecal nitrogen of browser and mixed feeder game species during different seasons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janecke, Beanélri B; Smit, G Nico

    2015-01-01

    A practical measure of assessing periods of potential nutritional stress of game species is needed in the management of these species in the Acacia karroo Riparian Thicket of the central Free State...

  8. Ecophysiological mechanisms characterising fen and bog species: focus on variations in nitrogen uptake traits under different soil-water pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Nakamura, Motoka

    2012-04-01

    Although the productivity and nitrogen (N)-use traits of mire plants differ dramatically between fens and bogs, soil N richness does not necessarily differ, whereas the soil-water pH is distinctly lower in bogs than in fens. The ecophysiological mechanisms underlying these relations are unclear. To assess the relative availability of N forms in relation to soil-water pH, we focused on the net N uptake rate per unit root weight (NNUR), glutamine synthetase activity and nitrate reductase activity, and performed reciprocal transplant experiments with the seedlings of fen (Carex lyngbyei) and bog (C. middendorffii) sedge species in intact habitat sites. The soil-water pH was clearly lower at the bog site, but the NH(4) (+), NO(3) (-) or dissolved organic-N concentrations did not differ between the fen and bog sites. The activity of both enzymes for inorganic-N assimilation did not differ among the sites and species. However, the fen species grown at bog sites showed a drastic decrease in the NNUR, suggesting a suppression of organic-N uptake. The bog species showed no NNUR difference between the sites. These results indicate that inorganic-N availability does not differ between the two habitats, but organic-N availability is lowered in a low-pH bog, particularly in the case of fen species. Therefore, the relative availability of N forms shows species-specific variations that depend on the differences in the soil-water pH of root zone, even at similar N richness, which would play a key role in plant distribution strategies in relation to the fen-bog gradient.

  9. Effect of nitrogen limitation on enrichment of activated sludge for PHA production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Bertan; Ince, Orhan; Artan, Nazik; Yagci, Nevin; Ince, Bahar Kasapgil

    2011-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are good candidates to plastics because of their material properties similar to conventional plastics and complete biodegradability. The use of activated sludge can be a cheaper alternative to pure cultures for PHA production. In this study, effect of nitrogen limitation during acclimatization period of biomass on production of polyhydroxyalkanoate was investigated. Activated sludge was selected in two sequencing batch reactors operated with and without nitrogen limitation. Batch tests were performed to examine polymer productions of activated sludges acclimatized to different nitrogen regimes. Responses of biomass to different organic loading rates, organic acids, and carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios were studied by determining specific polymer storage rate, polymer storage yield, and sludge polymer content of biomasses. Results obtained from batch experiments showed that concentrations of polymer accumulated by two different sludges increased directly with initial substrate concentration. Observed highest polymer yields for the biomasses enriched with and without nitrogen deficiency were 0.69 g COD PHA g(-1) COD S and 0.51 g COD PHA g(-1) COD S, and corresponding polymer contents of biomasses were 43.3% (g COD PHA g(-1) COD X) and 38.3% (g COD PHA g(-1) COD X), respectively. Polymer yields for both biomasses decreased with substrate shift however, biomass enriched with nitrogen deficiency adapted well to acetate-propionate mixture. The results presented in this study showed that polymer storage ability of biomass was improved more under dynamic conditions with nitrogen deficiency when compared to that without nitrogen deficiency. Limiting ammonia availability during batch experiments also caused higher polymer production by suppressing growth, as well as during enrichment of biomass.

  10. Preparation and Photocatalytic Activity of Nitrogen-doped Nano TiO2/Tourmaline Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Xin-wei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using Ti(OC4H94 as precursor, CO(NH22 as nitrogen source, tourmaline as support, the nitrogen-doped nano TiO2/tourmaline composites were synthesized by sol-gel method with ultrasound assisted.The structure and performance of composites were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis DRS, SEM, EDS.The effects of calcining temperature, nitrogen-doped content, tourmaline amount, catalyst system on the photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped nano TiO2/tourmaline composites were studied.The results show that the photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped nano TiO2/tourmaline composites calcined under 500℃, the nitrogen doped amount of 5% (mole fraction, tourmaline added in an amount of 10% (mass fraction, catalyst dosage of 3g/L, under 500W UV light irradiation conditions, the photocatalytic degradation effect of TNT(10mg/L is the best, and has a good recycling performance.

  11. The import and export of organic nitrogen species at a Scottish ombrotrophic peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, R. M.; Özel, M. Z.; Cape, J. N.; Drewer, J.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Nemitz, E.; Hamilton, J. F.; Sutton, M. A.; Gallagher, M. W.; Skiba, U.

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can contribute significantly to the overall nitrogen budget, but is not routinely measured in precipitation or stream water. In order to investigate the contribution of DON to deposition and export of N, precipitation, stream and soil water samples were collected from an ombrotrophic peatland and analysed for DON Over a two year period. In wet only deposition DON contributed up to 10% of the total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), 99% in soil water, and 75% in stream water. No correlations were observed between DIN and DON in precipitation stream water or soil water. DIN is an important source of nutrients and in ombrotrophic peatlands, is only deposited via precipitation. Too much nitrogen to a sensitive ecosystem can result in problems with the way in which it is processed, such as an increase in the export of N via nearby water bodies. It is therefore important to monitor N deposition and export. Precipitation DIN showed a loose seasonal pattern, with peak concentrations occurring between January and June, while DON concentrations tended to be lower in the winter months. Stream water DON and NH4+ showed no obvious seasonal pattern but NO3- showed larger concentrations in cooler months and the smallest during warmer months, with the exception of June and July 2010, when concentrations were high. Precipitation and stream DON was qualitatively analysed using GC × GC-NCD. Ten unique compounds were detected, of which only five could be identified: pyrrole, benzonitrile, dodecylamine, N-nitrosodipropylamine and decylamine. Five compounds were present in both precipitation and stream samples: pyrrole, benzonitrile and three unidentified compounds. A more detailed DON speciation may be used to identify sources and pathways of DON.

  12. The import and export of organic nitrogen species at a Scottish ombrotrophic peatland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. McKenzie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON can contribute significantly to the overall nitrogen budget, but is not routinely measured in precipitation or stream water. In order to investigate the contribution of DON to deposition and export of N, precipitation, stream and soil water samples were collected from an ombrotrophic peatland and analysed for DON Over a two year period. In wet only deposition DON contributed up to 10% of the total dissolved nitrogen (TDN, 99% in soil water, and 75% in stream water. No correlations were observed between DIN and DON in precipitation stream water or soil water. DIN is an important source of nutrients and in ombrotrophic peatlands, is only deposited via precipitation. Too much nitrogen to a sensitive ecosystem can result in problems with the way in which it is processed, such as an increase in the export of N via nearby water bodies. It is therefore important to monitor N deposition and export. Precipitation DIN showed a loose seasonal pattern, with peak concentrations occurring between January and June, while DON concentrations tended to be lower in the winter months. Stream water DON and NH4+ showed no obvious seasonal pattern but NO3- showed larger concentrations in cooler months and the smallest during warmer months, with the exception of June and July 2010, when concentrations were high. Precipitation and stream DON was qualitatively analysed using GC × GC-NCD. Ten unique compounds were detected, of which only five could be identified: pyrrole, benzonitrile, dodecylamine, N-nitrosodipropylamine and decylamine. Five compounds were present in both precipitation and stream samples: pyrrole, benzonitrile and three unidentified compounds. A more detailed DON speciation may be used to identify sources and pathways of DON.

  13. Prone to fix: Resilience of the active nitrogen-fixing rice root microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurek, Thomas; Sabale, Mugdha; Sarkar, Abhijit; Pees, Tobias; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Due to water consumption, many lowland rice areas in Asia are undergoing a transition that involves adoption of new management strategies, with crop rotations encompassing a non-flooded crop, including maize. Shifting from flooded to non-flooded cropping is likely to affect microbial nitrogen cycling. For analysis of the root-associated microbiome of rice and maize in response to flooding or nitrogen fertilizer, we combine methods of microbial ecology (Next-Generation sequencing of amplicons), and a reductionist approach with pure cultures of the endophytic diazotroph Azoarus sp.. Field plots of the ICON project (Introducing non-flooded crops in rice-dominated landscapes: Impact on Carbon, nitrogen and water budgets) at the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines were analyzed. Root-associated activity of nitrogenase gene expression was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR of nifH. For rice, expression levels were surprisingly stable, in response to non-flooded versus flooded conditions, or in response to conventional nitrogen fertilizer applications versus lack of N-fertilizer. In contrast, the active diazotrophic population of maize roots was not resistant to N-fertilization, nifH expression strongly decreased. Concordant changes in the diazotrophic resident or active communities were detected by nifH amplicon sequence analysis, based on bacterial DNA or mRNA, respectively. For high-resolution analyses of the endobiome in gnotobiotic culture, we developed a dual fluorescence reporter system for Azoarcus sp. BH72 which allows to quantify and visualize epi- and endophytic gene expression by concfocal microscopy (CLSM). This allowed us to demonstrate sites of active nitrogen fixation (gene expression) in association with rice roots. We confirmed that at low nitrogen fertilizer levels, endophytic nifH gene expression persisted in rice roots, while it was repressed in maize roots. This supports our observation of remarkable stability of nitrogen fixation

  14. Metabolomics Reveals Cryptic Interactive Effects of Species Interactions and Environmental Stress on Nitrogen and Sulfur Metabolism in Seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Castorani, Max C. N.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication of estuaries and coastal seas is accelerating, increasing light stress on subtidal marine plants and changing their interactions with other species. To date, we have limited understanding of how such variations in environmental and biological stress modify the impact of interactions...... among foundational species and eventually affect ecosystem health. Here, we used metabolomics to assess the impact of light reductions on interactions between the seagrass Zostera marina, an important habitat-forming marine plant, and the abundant and commercially important blue mussel Mytilus edulis....... Plant performance varied with light availability but was unaffected by the presence of mussels. Metabolomic analysis, on the other hand, revealed an interaction between light availability and presence of M. edulis on seagrass metabolism. Under high light, mussels stimulated seagrass nitrogen and energy...

  15. Helicon Discharge with Selectable Nitrogen Reactive Species Production as a Plasma Source for III-group Nitrides Growth by MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biloiu, Costel; Doss, Forest; Scime, Earl

    2004-11-01

    Plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) of III-N materials is a potential alternative to MOCVD for fabrication of high quality wide band gap semiconductor devices. In the helicon plasma source, it may be possible to control the population of specific reactive nitrogen species by modification of the electron energy distribution function through the resonant wave-particle interaction arising from electrons traveling at same velocity as the helicon wave phase velocity. We report preliminary results on control of reactive nitrogen species performed in a steady state, high density, helicon plasma source CHEWIE (Compact HElicon Waves and Instabilities Experiment). The helicon vacuum chamber is a 12 cm long, Pyrex tube, 6 cm in diameter, connected to a stainless steel diffusion chamber. RF power of up to 1.0 kW over a frequency range of 3-28 MHz is used to create the steady state plasma. A 7 cm long, half wave, m = +1, helical antenna couples the rf energy into the plasma. A single solenoidal magnetic field coil surrounds the source and is capable of generating axial magnetic fields up to 600 G. Optical emission spectroscopy investigations show that under certain conditions, the decay from the long lived A^3Σ_u^+ state dominates the emission spectrum of the plasma.

  16. Lanthanide ions (III) as sensitizers of melatonin oxidation in reaction mixtures providing reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of the reactive systems providing strong oxidants (reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen) containing lanthanide ions (III) and melatonin, was studied. Kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence were obtained. Analysis of differences in the intensity of chemiluminescence and CL spectra proved that excitation of Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions takes place with the energy transfer from the products of melatonin oxidation: N{sup 1}-acetyl-N{sup 2}-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N{sup 1}-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) to the lanthanide ions. In the system Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) a linear correlation was established between the integrated CL intensity and melatonin concent. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence (CL) of melatonin (Mel) oxidation by reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. • Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions as sensitizers of a melatonin oxidation process. • New CL method for determination of melatonin in pharmaceutical preparations based on CL of Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) system.

  17. [SCREENING AND SELECTION OF THE SOIL MICROORGANISMS ON THE ABILITY OF "NITROGEN-FIXING ACTIVITY"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyka V Ph; Kyrychenko, O V; Kots, S Ya

    2015-01-01

    The isolates of microorganisms from the rhizosphere of spring barley plants and soil at the use of analytical selection method was isolated. Its isolates on the ability of "nitrogen-fixing activity" was tested. It was shown that isolates of microorganisms had different of the colonies formed and cultural growth on the Eshbi's selective medium as well as the ability to fixing of molecular nitrogen. The different levels of intensity and dynamics of isolates nitrogenase activity in vitro were identified. New isolates of the soil microorganisms complement of the gene pool diazotrophic bacteria. Its isolates are perspectivity for the study as the basis or components of the bacterial fertilizers for the crops.

  18. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EUROPEAN CORN BORER FEEDING ACTIVITY AND NITROGEN LEAF CONTENT UNDER DIFFERENT AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankica Sarajlić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most destructive maize pest in Croatia is European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis Hübner (ECB. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of irrigation, nitrogen fertilization, different maize genotypes and nitrogen leaf content on ECB feeding activity. The experiment was set up in Osijek, Croatia under field conditions during 2012-2013 vegetation season. Experiment treatments were as follows: three irrigation levels (A1 - control, A2 from 60% to 80% field water capacity - FWC and A3 from 80% to100% FWC, three nitrogen fertilizer levels (B1 - 0, B2 - 100 and B3 - 200 kg N/ha and four different genotypes (C1 - OSSK 596; C2 - OSSK 617; C3 - OSSK 602 and C4 - OSSK 552. Ear weight, number of larvae in stem and shank, tunnel length and nitrogen leaf content were evaluated. Genotype C1 was the most susceptible for following the tested variables of ECB feeding: tunnel length (TL, larvae in stalk (LS and total number of larvae (TNL at P<0.05 probability level. By raising the level of irrigation, European corn borer feeding activity was reduced while by raising the level of nitrogen fertilization feeding activity was increased. These results suggest that good production practices can significantly affect the susceptibility of maize to European corn borer.

  19. Enhanced photoelectric property and visible activity of nitrogen doped TiO2 synthesized from different nitrogen dopants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiuwen; Yu, Xiujuan; Xing, Zipeng

    2013-03-01

    N doped TiO2 nano-particles were synthesized through simple sol-gel reactions from different nitrogen dopants. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) and surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS). Furthermore, the photoelectric property and activity enhanced mechanism were investigated in detail. It was found that the introduction of N dopants could effectively inhibit the crystal growth of TiO2 nano-particles, enhance the light absorption in visible region, possess more surface hydroxyl groups and separate the photoinduced charge carriers. The effects of dopants on the photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) were investigated in detail. It is clearly demonstrated that the photocatalytic activity of N)-TiO nano-particle was higher than that of NCl)-TiO and undoped TiO2. The enhanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the smaller crystal size, more hydroxyl groups on surface of the catalyst, stronger light absorption in visible region and higher separation efficiency of photoinduced charge carriers.

  20. Carbon, nitrogen and pH regulate the production and activity of a polygalacturonase isozyme produced by Penicillium expansum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of carbon, nitrogen and pH on polygalacturonase activity produced by Penicillium expansum were investigated. P. expansum mycelial growth was greatest on lyophilized fruit tissue and the highest PG activity occurred in apple pectin medium. Nitrogen source influenced PG activity and was ...

  1. The interaction between nitrogen and phosphorous is a strong predictor of intra-plant variation in nitrogen isotope composition in a desert species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinxin; Gu, Lianhong; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Rina; Wang, Feng; Lin, Guanghui; Wu, Bo; Lu, Qi; Meng, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Understanding intra-plant variations in δ15N is essential for fully utilizing the potential of δ15N as an integrator of the terrestrial nitrogen (N) cycle and as an indicator of the relative limitation of N and phosphorous (P) on plant growth. Studying such variations can also yield insights into N metabolism by plant as a whole or by specific organs. However, few researchers have systematically evaluated intra-plant variations in δ15N and their relationships with organ nutrient contents. We excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species of vital regional ecological importance, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured N isotope ratios and N and P contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We found that intra-plant variations in δ15N of N. tangutorum were positively correlated with corresponding organ N and P contents. However, it was the N × P interaction, not N and P individually or their linear combination, that was the strongest predictor of intra-plant δ15N. Additionally, we showed that root δ15N increased with depth into soil, a pattern similar to profiles of soil δ15N reported by previous studies in different ecosystems. We hypothesized that the strong positive intra-plant δ15N-N and P relationships are caused by three processes acting in conjunction: (1) N and P content-driven fractionating exchanges of ammonia between leaves and the atmosphere (volatilization) during photorespiration, (2) resorption and remobilization of N and P from senescing leaves, and (3) mixture of the re-translocated foliar N and P with existing pools in stems and roots. To test our hypothesis, future studies should investigate plant N volatilization and associated isotope fractionation and intra-plant variations in δ15N in different species across ecosystems and climates.

  2. The transcriptional activator NrpA is crucial for inducing nitrogen fixation in Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 under nitrogen-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenbach, Katrin; Ehlers, Claudia; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2014-08-01

    With the aim of unraveling their potential involvement in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1, we characterized five genes that are differentially transcribed in response to changing nitrogen availability and encoding putative transcriptional regulators. Study of the respective mutant strains under nitrogen-limited conditions revealed a growth delay for M. mazei MM0444::pac and MM1708::pac, and strongly reduced diazotrophic growth for MM0872::pac, whereas the absence of MM2441 or MM2525 did not affect growth behaviour. Transcriptome analyses further demonstrated that only MM1708 - encoding a CxxCG zinc finger protein - plays a regulatory role in nitrogen metabolism, most likely by specifically enhancing transcription of the N2 fixation (nif) operon under nitrogen-limited conditions. In agreement with this, a palindromic binding motif was predicted in silico in the nifH promoter region, nine nucleotides upstream of the BRE box, and confirmed to bind purified maltose-binding protein-MM1708 by electromobility shift assays. As MM1708 itself is under the control of the global nitrogen repressor NrpR, this adds a secondary level to the transcriptional regulation of the nif genes, and is most likely crucial for maximal nif induction under nitrogen-limited conditions. This is in accordance with the finding that protein expression of NifH is highly reduced in the absence of MM1708 under nitrogen-limited conditions. On the basis of our findings, we hypothesize that, in M. mazei, nitrogen fixation is controlled by a hierarchical network of two transcriptional regulators, the global nitrogen repressor NrpR, and the newly identified activator NrpA (MM1708), thereby providing tight control of N2 fixation.

  3. Revealing the Origin of Activity in Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons towards Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Junyuan; Kan, Yuhe; Huang, Rui;

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are functionalized with nitrogen atoms for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2). The investigation explores the origin of the catalyst’s activity and the role of nitrogen chemical states therein. The catalysts show excellent performances, with about 90% current efficiency...... for CO formation and stability over 60 hours. The Tafel analyses and density functional theory calculations suggest that the reduction of CO2 proceeds through an initial rate-determining transfer of one electron to CO2, which leads to the formation of carbon dioxide radical anion (CO2C). The initial...... reduction barrier is too high on pristine CNTs, resulting in a very high overpotentials at which the hydrogen evolution reaction dominates over CO2 reduction.The doped nitrogen atoms stabilize the radical anion,thereby lowering the initial reduction barrier and improving the intrinsic activity. The most...

  4. Effect of nitrogen sources on the activities of lipogenic enzymes in oleaginous fungus Cunninghamella echinulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certik, Milan; Megova, Jana; Horenitzky, Robert

    1999-12-01

    Various inorganic and organic nitrogen sources were used to compare their effects on the lipogenesis and the activities of lipogenic enzymes (providing acetyl-CoA and donating NADPH) in gamma-linolenic acid-producing fungus Cunninghamella echinulata. Lipid accumulation was enhanced by organic nitrogen, among them the presence of corn-steep led to almost 40% oil in the biomass. While organic nitrogen increased activities of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and malic enzyme (ME), ATP:citrate lyase (ACL) was rapidly enhanced by ammonium ion. The use of NaNO(3) resulted in high activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD). NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICD) was more active when the fungus utilized all inorganic N-compounds. The rise of nitrogen concentration in medium was accompanied with reduced lipid accumulation and a fall of ACL, ACC, and ME. In contrast, N-sufficient conditions favored biomass growth and elevated activities of GPD and PGD. Kinetic experiments also suggest that a significant portion of the required acetyl-CoA was being provided via ACL and ACC, and ME (probably coupled with GPD) channeled the NADPH into the fatty acid biosynthesis. The contribution of the lipogenic enzymes to metabolic pathways other than lipogenesis is also discussed.

  5. Agaricus subrufescens: substratum nitrogen concentration and mycelial extraction method on antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÍRIA B.D. BERTÉLI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Antitumor activity of Agaricus subrufescens has been shown on vegetative mycelium and basidiocarp. However, few studies have assessed the effect of A. subrufescens cultivation conditions and extraction methods on antitumor activity. This study evaluated the effect of nitrogen concentration on the cultivation medium of A. subrufescens and the extraction method of mycelial antineoplastic actives against sarcoma 180 cells implanted in mice. Two nitrogen sources (isolated soybean protein and NaNO3 and 10 nitrogen concentrations (0.25 to 8.0 g/L were used. Dried mycelium extract was obtained by hot water infusion (1:10 mass:volume; 90 °C or by aqueous mixture (1:10 mass:volume, ambient temperature in ultrapure water. The doses were administered daily by gavage to mice implanted with sarcoma 180 cells. Isolated soy protein is more efficient to mycelial biomass production than NaNO3. The mycelial biomass production increases when the cultivation medium is added with high nitrogen concentrations as well as the splenic index and the antitumor activity of the moistened mycelial powder. Hot water extract is more effective than the moistened mycelial powder to reduce tumor. The antitumor activity of hot water mycelial extract is similar to the one of basidiocarps, presenting lower metabolic demand on the spleen, keeping blood parameters normal and promoting animal wellness.

  6. Visible light active photocatalytic degradation of bisphenol-A using nitrogen doped TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, N; Vinu, A; Anandan, S; Arabindoo, Banumathi; Murugesan, V

    2006-08-01

    Nitrogen doped titania was prepared by low temperature sol-gel method using titanium precursor and nitrogen containing bases like triethylamine and tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide compounds. The materials were characterized by XRD, BET, SEM, XPS, DRS-UV, and FT-IR techniques. DRS-UV study substantially indicates shift of the absorption edge of TiO2 to lower energy region. The phase composition, crystallinity, specific surface area, and visible light activity of nitrogen doped titania depend upon the preparation conditions. Photocatalytic degradation of bisphenol-A in aqueous medium was investigated by TiO2 and nitrogen doped TiO2 under visible light irradiation in a batch photocatalytic reactor. The results indicate higher visible light activity for nitrogen doped TiO2 than commercial TiO2 (Degussa P25) for bisphenol-A degradation. The influence of various parameters such as initial concentration of bisphenol-A, catalyst loading and pH was examined for maximum degradation efficiency.

  7. Quantitative trait locus analysis of symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity in the model legume Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Akiyoshi; Gondo, Takahiro; Akashi, Ryo; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Arima, Susumu; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2012-05-01

    Many legumes form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. An elevation of nitrogen fixation in such legumes would have significant implications for plant growth and biomass production in agriculture. To identify the genetic basis for the regulation of nitrogen fixation, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was conducted with recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross Miyakojima MG-20 × Gifu B-129 in the model legume Lotus japonicus. This population was inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 and grown for 14 days in pods containing vermiculite. Phenotypic data were collected for acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per plant (ARA/P), ARA per nodule weight (ARA/NW), ARA per nodule number (ARA/NN), NN per plant, NW per plant, stem length (SL), SL without inoculation (SLbac-), shoot dry weight without inoculation (SWbac-), root length without inoculation (RLbac-), and root dry weight (RWbac-), and finally 34 QTLs were identified. ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL showed strong correlations and QTL co-localization, suggesting that several plant characteristics important for symbiotic nitrogen fixation are controlled by the same locus. QTLs for ARA/P, ARA/NN, NW, and SL, co-localized around marker TM0832 on chromosome 4, were also co-localized with previously reported QTLs for seed mass. This is the first report of QTL analysis for symbiotic nitrogen fixation activity traits.

  8. Does diet influence salivary enzyme activities in elephant species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlke, Carolin; Pötschke, Sandra; Behringer, Verena; Hannig, Christian; Zierau, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) and African elephants (Loxodonta africana) are herbivore generalists; however, Asian elephants might ingest a higher proportion of grasses than Africans. Although some studies have investigated nutrition-specific morphological adaptations of the two species, broader studies on salivary enzymes in both elephant species are lacking. This study focuses on the comparison of salivary enzymes activity profiles in the two elephant species; these enzymes are relevant for protective and digestive functions in humans. We aimed to determine whether salivary amylase (sAA), lysozyme (sLYS), and peroxidase (sPOD) activities have changed in a species-specific pattern during evolutionary separation of the elephant genera. Saliva samples of 14 Asian and eight African elephants were collected in three German zoos. Results show that sAA and sLYS are salivary components of both elephant species in an active conformation. In contrast, little to no sPOD activity was determined in any elephant sample. Furthermore, sAA activity was significantly higher in Asian compared with African elephants. sLYS and sPOD showed no species-specific differences. The time of food provision until sample collection affected only sAA activity. In summary, the results suggest several possible factors modulating the activity of the mammal-typical enzymes, such as sAA, sLYS, and sPOD, e.g., nutrition and sampling procedure, which have to be considered when analyzing differences in saliva composition of animal species.

  9. Cross-Species Hybridization with Fusarium verticillioides Microarrays Reveals New Insights into Fusarium fujikuroi Nitrogen Regulation and the Role of AreA and NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    In filamentous fungi, the GATA-type transcription factor AreA plays a major role in transcriptional activation of genes needed to utilize poor nitrogen sources. Previously we have shown that in Fusarium fujikuroi AreA also controls genes involved in biosynthesis of nitrogen-free secondary metabolit...

  10. [Active crop canopy sensor-based nitrogen diagnosis for potato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Li, Fei; Qin, Yong-Lin; Fan, Ming-Shou

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, two potato experiments involving different N rates in 2011 were conducted in Wuchuan County and Linxi County, Inner Mongolia. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was collected by an active GreenSeeker crop canopy sensor to estimate N status of potato. The results show that the NDVI readings were poorly correlated with N nutrient indicators of potato at vegetative Growth stage due to the influence of soil background. With the advance of growth stages, NDVI values were exponentially related to plant N uptake (R2 = 0.665) before tuber bulking stage and were linearly related to plant N concentration (R2 = 0.699) when plant fully covered soil. In conclusion, GreenSeeker active crop sensor is a promising tool to estimate N status for potato plants. The findings from this study may be useful for developing N recommendation method based on active crop canopy sensor.

  11. Carbon and Nitrogen Sources Influence Tricalcium Phosphate Solubilization and Extracellular Phosphatase Activity by Talaromyces flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoni Rubio, P J; Godoy, M S; Della Mónica, I F; Pettinari, M J; Godeas, A M; Scervino, J M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study phosphate (P) solubilization (and the processes involved in this event) by Talaromyces flavus (BAFC 3125) as a function of carbon and/or nitrogen sources. P solubilization was evaluated in NBRIP media supplemented with different carbon (glucose, sorbitol, sucrose, and fructose) and nitrogen (L-asparagine, urea, ammonium sulfate (AS), and ammonium nitrate (AN) combinations. The highest P solubilization was related to the highest organic acid production (especially gluconic acid) and pH drop for those treatments where glucose was present. Also P solubilization was higher when an inorganic nitrogen source was supplemented to the media when compared to an organic one. Although not being present an organic P source, phosphatase activity was observed. This shows that P mineralization and P solubilization can occur simultaneously, and that P mineralization is not induced by the enzyme substrate. The combination that showed highest P solubilization was for AN-glucose. The highest acid phosphatase activity was for AS-fructose, while for alkaline phosphatase were for AS-fructose and AN-fructose. Acid phosphatase activity was higher than alkaline. P solubilization and phosphatase activity (acid and alkaline) were influenced by the different carbon-nitrogen combinations. A better understanding of phosphate-solubilizing fungi could bring a better use of soil P.

  12. Role of ureolytic activity in Bacillus cereus nitrogen metabolism and acid survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Abee, T.

    2008-01-01

    The presence and activities of urease genes were investigated in 49 clinical, food, and environmental Bacillus cereus isolates. Ten strains were shown to have urease genes, with eight of these strains showing growth on urea as the sole nitrogen source. Two of the urease-positive strains, including t

  13. Modelling the impact of climatic conditions and plant species on the nitrogen release from mulch of legumes at the soil surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudinat, Germain; Lorin, Mathieu; Valantin-morison, Muriel; Garnier, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Cover crops provide multiple services to the agro ecosystem. Among them, the use of legumes as cover crop is one of the solutions for limiting the use of herbicides, mineral fertilizers, and insecticides. However, the dynamic of mineralization is difficult to understand because of the difficulty of measuring nitrogen release from mulch in field. Indeed, residues are degraded at the soil surface as mulch, while the nitrogen uptake by the main crop occurred simultaneously in the soil. This work aims to study the dynamics of nitrogen mineralization from legume residues through i) the use of a model able to describe the physical and biological dynamic of mulch and ii) a data set from a field experiment of intercropping systems "oilseed rape-legumes" from different species (grass pea, lentil, Berseem clover, field pea, vetch). The objective of the simulations is to identify the variations of expected quantities of nitrogen from different legumes. The soil-plant model of mulch decomposition PASTIS-Mulch was used to determine the nitrogen supply from mulch available for rapeseed. These simulation results were compared to the data collected in the experimental field of Grignon (France). We performed analyzes of biochemical and physical characteristics of legume residues and monitored the evolution of mulches (moisture, density, cover surface, biomass) in fields. PASTIS simulations of soil temperature, soil moisture, mulch humidity and mulch decomposition were close to the experimental results. The PASTIS model was suitable to simulate the dynamic of legume mulches in the case of "rape - legume" associations. The model simulated nitrogen restitution of aerial and root parts. We found a more rapid nitrogen release by grass pea than other species. Vetch released less nitrogen than the other species. The scenarios for climate conditions were : i) a freezing in December that causes the destruction of plants, or a destruction by herbicide in March, ii) a strong or a weak rainy

  14. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and cellular and organismal decline: amelioration with melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun-xian; Burkhardt, Susanne

    2002-04-30

    Cellular and organismal decline is, in part, believed to be a consequence of oxygen and nitrogen-based reactants which persistently damage macromolecules throughout a lifetime. The resulting accumulation of damaged molecules eventually seriously compromises essential functions of cells leading to their death. Excessive cellular loss causes deterioration of organ function and inevitably to the demise of the organism. The sequence of events, known as the free radical theory of aging, is widely espoused by biological gerontologists. Antioxidants are commonly employed to combat molecular damage mediated by oxygen and nitrogen-based reactants. One of these protective agents is melatonin. Melatonin has several distinct advantages as a preserver of organelle structure and function. It is widely distributed in organisms and within cells. It works via a number of mechanisms to reduce oxidative damage. Thus, melatonin scavenges a number of reactants including the hydroxyl radical (*OH), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), nitric acid (NO*), peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH). One of the products of melatonin's interaction with H(2)O(2), i.e., N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK), is also a highly efficient radical scavenger. The cascade of reactions where the secondary metabolites are also effective scavenges is believed to contribute to melatonin's high efficacy in reducing oxidative damage. Besides its direct scavenging actions, melatonin stimulates several antioxidative enzymes including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in addition to inhibiting a proxidative enzyme, nitric oxide synthase. This combination of actions assists melatonin in protecting cells from the degenerative changes normally associated with aging and age-related diseases.

  15. In vitro activity of NifL, a signal transduction protein for biological nitrogen fixation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, H S; Narberhaus, F; Kustu, S

    1993-01-01

    In the free-living diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae, the NifA protein is required for transcription of all nif (nitrogen fixation) operons except the regulatory nifLA operon itself. NifA activates transcription of nif operons by the alternative holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase, sigma 54 holoenzyme. In vivo, NifL is known to antagonize the action of NifA in the presence of molecular oxygen or combined nitrogen. We now demonstrate inhibition by NifL in vitro in both a coupled transcription-tra...

  16. Growth response of four freshwater algal species to dissolved organic nitrogen of different concentration and complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiedler, Dorothea; Graeber, Daniel; Badrian, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    is within the range of concentrations that have been observed in a typical Central European shallow, eutrophic lake. 3. All studied species grew in all treatments, but their biomass gains decreased with increasing complexity of the N source. Urea addition caused the strongest biomass increase, only in some...... concentrations. The importance of complex DON compounds for growth of common phytoplankton species is still unknown. 2. This study compared changes in chlorophyll a concentrations of freshwater phytoplankton with different DON compounds of varying complexity (urea, dissolved free (DFAA) and combined amino acids...... cases matched by nitrate. 4. Urea was also utilised over a longer time period than any other compound, including nitrate. The assumed delay in availability with increasing compound complexity was not supported by this experiment. 5. The studied species differed in their temporal response...

  17. Dose-dependent intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) production from particulate matter exposure: comparison to oxidative potential and chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuet, Wing Y.; Fok, Shierly; Verma, Vishal; Tagle Rodriguez, Marlen S.; Grosberg, Anna; Champion, Julie A.; Ng, Nga L.

    2016-11-01

    Elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations have been associated with cardiopulmonary risks. In this study, alveolar macrophages and ventricular myocytes were exposed to PM extracts from 104 ambient filters collected in multiple rural and urban sites in the greater Atlanta area. PM-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) were measured to investigate the effect of chemical composition and determine whether chemical assays are representative of cellular responses. For summer samples, the area under the ROS/RNS dose-response curve per volume of air (AUCvolume) was significantly correlated with dithiothreitol (DTT) activity, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), brown carbon, titanium, and iron, while a relatively flat response was observed for winter samples. EC50 was also correlated with max response for all filters investigated, which suggests that certain PM constituents may be involved in cellular protective pathways. Although few metal correlations were observed, exposure to laboratory-prepared metal solutions induced ROS/RNS production, indicating that a lack of correlation does not necessarily translate to a lack of response. Collectively, these results suggest that complex interactions may occur between PM species. Furthermore, the strong correlation between organic species and ROS/RNS response highlights a need to understand the contribution of organic aerosols, especially photochemically driven secondary organic aerosols (SOA), to PM-induced health effects.

  18. Profiling Hyporheic Microbial Community Nitrogen Cycle and Carbohydrate Active Enzyme Gene Abundances across Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. C.; Graham, E.; Stegen, J.

    2016-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the permanently inundated sediment layer between a surface channel and adjacent groundwater-saturated sediments. It has been hypothesized to play a major role in macronutrient (C, N, P) cycling in rivers. The correlation between community taxonomic composition dynamics and functional gene representation is poorly understood for hyporheic communities. To explore how microbial communities respond to temporal changes in environmental conditions, metagenomes were derived from communities captured in sterile sandpacks deployed within the HZ of the Columbia River. HMM databases were used to enumerate protein families present. Functional classification of reads allowed a general assessment of community function over time, while targeted assembly of specific genes enabled investigation of the diversity of organisms encoding these functions. Preliminary analysis of nitrogen cycle pathways shows most gene families examined to have quite steady representation across seasons, with most observed changes being less than an order of magnitude. Analysis of ammonia oxidation genes showed bacterial ammonia oxidizers (AOB) to be stably present across the year, while the archaeal amoA gene increased in late summer, peaking sharply in November, mirroring results from 16S rRNA amplicon analysis which showed an increase in Thaumarcheal OTUs during that same period. Most glycosyl hydrolase GH families had low representation. Highly abundant classes of GH included the GH94 (beta-glucosidase), GH95 (1-2-alpha-L-fucosidase) and GH103 (lytic transglycosylase) families, suggesting activity on plant, fungus and insect polysaccharides and peptidoglycans. Further work is investigating the taxonomy of the sequences identified, to determine how changes in the community composition contribute to the stable gene family profiles observed. These results are intended to work towards a greater understanding of the role of species diversity and functional redundancy in the

  19. Apparatus for the measurement of total body nitrogen using prompt neutron activation analysis with californium-252.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, A; Hannan, W J; Smith, M A; Tothill, P

    1988-01-01

    Details of clinical apparatus designed for the measurement of total body nitrogen (as an indicator of body protein), suitable for the critically ill, intensive-care patient are presented. Californium-252 radio-isotopic neutron sources are used, enabling a nitrogen measurement by prompt neutron activation analysis to be made in 40 min with a precision of +/- 3.2% for a whole body dose equivalent of 0.145 mSv. The advantages of Californium-252 over alternative neutron sources are discussed. A comparison between two irradiation/detection geometries is made, leading to an explanation of the geometry adopted for the apparatus. The choice of construction and shielding materials to reduce the count rate at the detectors and consequently to reduce the pile-up contribution to the nitrogen background is discussed. Salient features of the gamma ray spectroscopy system to reduce spectral distortion from pulse pile-up are presented.

  20. Effect of powdered activated carbon technology on short-cut nitrogen removal for coal gasification wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Han, Hongjun; Xu, Chunyan; Zhuang, Haifeng; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Linghan

    2013-08-01

    A combined process consisting of a powdered activated carbon technology (PACT) and short-cut biological nitrogen removal reactor (SBNR) was developed to enhance the removal efficiency of the total nitrogen (TN) from the effluent of an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor, which was used to treat coal gasification wastewater (CGW). The SBNR performance was improved with the increasing of COD and TP removal efficiency via PACT. The average removal efficiencies of COD and TP in PACT were respectively 85.80% and 90.30%. Meanwhile, the NH3-N to NO2-N conversion rate was achieved 86.89% in SBNR and the total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency was 75.54%. In contrast, the AOB in SBNR was significantly inhibited without PACT or with poor performance of PACT in advance, which rendered the removal of TN. Furthermore, PAC was demonstrated to remove some refractory compounds, which therefore improved the biodegradability of the coal gasification wastewater.

  1. Post effect of repetitive exposures to pressure nitrogen-induced narcosis on the dopaminergic activity at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoute, C; Weiss, M; Sainty, J M; Risso, J J; Rostain, J C

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen at pressure produces a neurological syndrome called nitrogen narcosis. Neurochemical experiments indicated that a single exposure to 3 MPa of nitrogen reduced the concentration of dopamine by 20% in the striatum, a structure involved in the control of extrapyramidal motor activity. This effect of nitrogen was explained by enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission through GABAA receptors and, to a lesser extent, by a decreased glutamatergic input to DA cells through NMDA receptors. The aim of this study was to study, under normobaric conditions, possible alterations of NMDA receptor activity in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) induced by repetitive exposures to nitrogen pressure. Under general anesthesia, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted in the striatum with multifiber carbon dopamine-sensitive electrodes and in the SNc with guide cannulae for drug injections. After recovery from surgery, the striatal dopamine level was recorded by voltammetry in freely-moving rats, in normobaric conditions, before and after 5 repetitive exposures to 1MPa of nitrogen (threshold of nitrogen narcosis occurrence in rat). The effect of NMDA receptor activity on DA concentration was investigated using agonist (NMDA) and specific antagonist (AP7) SNc administration. Following repetitive nitrogen exposures, the ability of NMDA to elevate DA concentrations was enhanced. In contrast, after nitrogen exposure AP7 produced a paradoxical increase in DA concentration compared to its inhibitory effect before any exposure. Similar responses were obtained after a single exposure to 3MPa nitrogen. Thus, repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis produced a sensitization of postsynaptic NMDA receptors on DA cells, related to a decreased glutamatergic input in SNc. Consequently, successive nitrogen narcosis exposures disrupted ion-channel receptor activity revealing a persistent nitrogen-induced neurochemical change underlying the pathologic process.

  2. Gas-phase Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Air Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharges by FTIR and UV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hung-Wen; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Graves, David B.

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas are considered promising for biomedical treatment purpose due to the production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species during the discharge. In this study, a surface micro-discharge system which operates at 10 kHz, 0.01 -- 1 W/cm^2 in ambient air is used. FTIR and UV-absorbance are used to investigate the time-average gas phase composition and time-resolved ozone concentration, respectively. The results showed that the gas composition is greatly influenced by the power consumption in plasmas. At 0.3 W/cm^2, the gas phase is dominant by NOx species and nearly no ozone is observed while at 0.05 W/cm^2 the amount of NOx is less and the ozone is dominant. Also, time-resolved ozone measurement by means of UV (254 nm) absorbance shows that ozone concentration reaches higher than 1000 ppm in the first tens of seconds and quenched within 1 minutes at high power condition. However, at low power condition no obvious quench of ozone is observed and the ozone concentration attains a steady state in response to the equilibrium of ozone generation and diffusion loss

  3. Role of six European tree species and land-use legacy for nitrogen and water budgets in forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis Christiansen, Jesper; Vesterdal, Lars; Callesen, Ingeborg

    2010-01-01

    Water and nutrient fluxes for single stands of different tree species have been reported in numerous studies, but comparative studies of nutrient and hydrological budgets of common European deciduous tree species are rare. Annual fluxes of water and inorganic nitrogen (N) were established in a 30...... in Denmark, Mattrup and Vallø during 2 years. Mean annual percolation below the root zone (mm yr−1±SE, n=4) ranked in the following order: maple (351±38)>lime (284±32), oak (271±25), beech (257±30), ash (307±69)≫ spruce (75±24). There were few significant tree species effects on N fluxes. However, the annual...... mean N throughfall flux (kg N ha−1 yr−1±SE, n=4) for spruce (28±2) was significantly larger than for maple (12±1), beech (11±1) and oak (9±1) stands but not different from that of lime (15±3). Ash had a low mean annual inorganic N throughfall deposition of 9.1 kg ha−1, but was only present at Mattrup...

  4. Differential changes in galactolipid and phospholipid species in soybean leaves and roots under nitrogen deficiency and after nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Rama; Wang, Geliang; Li, Maoyin; Roth, Mary; Welti, Ruth; Wang, Xuemin

    2013-12-01

    The availability of nitrogen (N) to plants has a profound impact on carbohydrate and protein metabolism, but little is known about its effect on membrane lipid species. This study examines the changes in galactolipid and phospholipid species in soybean as affected by the availability of N, either supplied to soil or obtained through Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodulation. When N was limited in soil, the content of galactolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacyglycerol (DGDG), decreased drastically in leaves, while a smaller decrease of DGDG was observed in roots. In both leaves and roots, the overall content of different phospholipid classes was largely unchanged by N limitation, although some individual phospholipid molecular species did display significant changes. Nodulation with Bradyrhizobium of soybean grown in N-deficient soil resulted in a large increase in levels of plastidic lipid classes, MGDG, DGDG, and phosphatidylglycerol, along with smaller increases in non-plastidic phospholipids in leaves. Nodulation also led to higher levels of phospholipids in roots without changes in root levels of MGDG and DGDG. Overall, N availability alters lipid content more in leaves than roots and more in galactolipids than phospholipids. Increased N availability leads to increased galactolipid accumulation in leaves, regardless of whether N is supplied from the soil or symbiotic fixation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High concentrations and dry deposition of reactive nitrogen species at two sites in the North China Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, J.L.; Tang, A.H.; Liu, X.J.; Fangmeier, A.; Goulding, K.T.W.; Zhang, F.S. [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

    2009-11-15

    Atmospheric concentrations of major reactive nitrogen (N{sub r}) species were quantified using passive samplers, denuders, and particulate samplers at Dongbeiwang and Quzhou, North China Plain (NCP) in a two-year study. Average concentrations of NH{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, pNH{sub 4}{sup +} and pNO{sub 3}{sup -} were 12.0, 12.9, 0.6, 10.3, and 4.7 {mu} g N m{sup -3} across the two sites, showing different seasonal patterns of these N, species. For example, the highest NH{sub 3} concentration occurred in summer while NO{sub 2} concentrations were greater in winter, both of which reflected impacts of N fertilization (summer) and coal-fueled home heating (winter). Based on measured N{sub r} concentrations and their deposition velocities taken from the literature, annual N dry deposition was up to 55 kg N ha{sup -1}. Such high concentrations and deposition rates of N{sub r} species in the NCP indicate very serious air pollution from anthropogenic sources and significant atmospheric N input to crops.

  6. Do varying aquatic plant species affect phytoplankton and crustacean responses to a nitrogen-permethrin mixture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulically connected wetland microcosms vegetated with either Typha latifolia or Myriophyllum aquaticum were amended with an NH4NO3 and permethrin mixture to assess the effectiveness of both plant species in mitigating ecological effects of the pollutant mixture on phytoplankton (as chlorophyll a...

  7. Cupriavidus necator isolates are able to fix nitrogen in symbiosis with different legume species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Krisle; Florentino, Ligiane Aparecida; da Silva, Karina Barroso; de Brandt, Evie; Vandamme, Peter; de Souza Moreira, Fatima Maria

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify a collection of 35 Cupriavidus isolates at the species level and to examine their capacity to nodulate and fix N(2). These isolates were previously obtained from the root nodules of two promiscuous trap species, Phaseolus vulgaris and Leucaena leucocephala, inoculated with soil samples collected near Sesbania virgata plants growing in Minas Gerais (Brazil) pastures. Phenotypic and genotypic methods applied for this study were SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins, and 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequencing. To confirm the ability to nodulate and fix N(2), the presence of the nodC and nifH genes was also determined, and an experiment was carried out with two representative isolates in order to authenticate them as legume nodule symbionts. All 35 isolates belonged to the betaproteobacterium Cupriavidus necator, they possessed the nodC and nifH genes, and two representative isolates were able to nodulate five different promiscuous legume species: Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia, L. leucocephala, Macroptilium atropurpureum, P. vulgaris and Vigna unguiculata. This is the first study to demonstrate that C. necator can nodulate legume species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Protein intake and nitrogen balance in male non-active adolescents and soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau, N; Le Creff, C; Loyens, M; Poortmans, J R

    2002-12-01

    Recommendations for the requirements for protein intake amount usually to 0.8-1.0 g x kg(-1) body mass x day(-1) in adolescents without any reference to the undertaking of acute exercise or to the training status. The present investigation intended to determine the nitrogen balance and protein intake in 8 healthy male non-active adolescents and 11 adolescent soccer players, both groups aged about 15 years. An assessment of nutrient intake was obtained by analysing 7 day food records collected by a questionnaire. Nitrogen excretion rate was determined and nitrogen balance was calculated from the mean daily protein intake and the urinary excretion. The results showed that the nutritional status of the two groups was similar. Nevertheless, we found that their diets were quite inappropriate in terms of the intakes of carbohydrate, some minerals (zinc, calcium, magnesium), vitamins (A, B6, D) and fibre. A positive nitrogen balance was observed from a mean protein intake of 1.57 g x kg(-1) body mass x day(-1) in these adolescents, whether they were non-active or athletes. Thus, the present investigation indicated that the growth and development in non-active adolescents and in adolescent soccer-players give rise to a need for a higher protein intake than is usually recommended. However, the higher protein requirements did not seem to be related only to the increased energy expenditure imposed by the exercise training in the soccer-player group.

  9. Cellulose decomposition and associated nitrogen fixation by mixed cultures of Cellulomonas gelida and Azospirillum species or Bacillus macerans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsall, D.M.; Gibson, A.H.

    1985-10-01

    Mixed cultures of Cellulomonas gelida plus Azospirillum lipoferum or Azospirillum brasilense and C. gelida plus Bacillus macerans were shown to degrade cellulose and straw and to utilize the energy-yielding products to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This cooperative process was followed over 30 days in sand-based cultures in which the breakdown of 20% of the cellulose and 28 to 30% of the straw resulted in the fixation of 12 to 14.6 mg of N per g of cellulose and 17 to 19 mg of N per g of straw consumed. Cellulomonas species have certain advantages over aerobic cellulose-degrading fungi in being able to degrade cellulose at oxygen concentrations as low as 1% O/sub 2/ (vol/vol) which would allow a close association between cellulose-degrading and microaerobic diazotrophic microorganisms. Cultures inoculated with initially different proportions of A. brasilense and C. gelida all reached a stable ratio of approximately 1 Azospirillum/3 Cellulomonas cells.

  10. Comparative study of hemolytic activity of Bordetella species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C N Khobragade

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Bordetella species colonize the respiratory tract of mammals and thereby cause the whooping cough. Most of the species produce adenylate cyclase - a toxin ( hemolysin responsible for increasing intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP levels in mammalian neutrophils and macrophages and as a consequence their phagocytic function get impaired . This study was carried out to isolate species of Bordetella and to study the hemolytic activity of each species on RBCs of sheep, human and poultry at varied culture conditions by altering the temperature, pH and cell age."nMaterials and Methods: Three pathogenic Bordetella species were isolated from fifty suspected whooping cough patients on Bordet-Gengou agar and identified by their biochemical profiles. The hemolytic activity of B. pertussis, B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica was investigated in terms of cell bound and cell free hemolysin on human, poultry and sheep RBCs at variable pH, temperature and cell age in Stainer Scholt broth. The hemolysin activity was also determined qualitatively on blood agar containing different blood samples."nResults: All the species revealed optimum hemolytic activity in pH range 7.5-8.0 (in slight alkaline condition, temperature 37°C and cell age up to 20-24 hrs. The cell bound hemolytic activity was found to be maximum than cell free activity and varied with blood samples of different species. B. pertussis showed maximum hemolytic activity on human red blood cells followed by poultry and sheep RBCs. B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica showed maximum hemolytic activity on sheep and poultry RBCs respectively."nConclusion: The findings of our study revealed that different determinants are involved in host interactions and virulence of Bordetella species.

  11. [Soil enzyme activities under two forest types as affected by different levels of nitrogen deposition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-tao; Li, Xue-feng; Han, Shi-jie; Hu, Yan-ling

    2008-12-01

    A simulation test was conducted to study the change trends of soil cellulase, polyphenol oxidase, and sucrase activities under natural broadleaf-Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) and secondary poplar (Populus davidiana) -birch (Betula platyphylla) mixed forests as affected by 0, 25, and 50 kg x hm(-2) x a(-1) of N deposition. The results showed that the effects of elevated N deposition on test enzyme activities varied with forest type, and short-term nitrogen addition could significantly affect the test enzyme activities. High N deposition decreased soil polyphyneol oxidase activity, and correspondingly, soil cellulase and sucrase activities also had a trend of decrease.

  12. The emerging role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and some implications for plasma applications to medicine and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2012-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the closely related reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are often generated in applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas intended for biomedical purposes. These species are also central players in what is sometimes referred to as ‘redox’ or oxidation-reduction biology. Oxidation-reduction biochemistry is fundamental to all of aerobic biology. ROS and RNS are perhaps best known as disease-associated agents, implicated in diabetes, cancer, heart and lung disease, autoimmune disease and a host of other maladies including ageing and various infectious diseases. These species are also known to play active roles in the immune systems of both animals and plants and are key signalling molecules, among many other important roles. Indeed, the latest research has shown that ROS/RNS play a much more complex and nuanced role in health and ageing than previously thought. Some of the most potentially profound therapeutic roles played by ROS and RNS in various medical interventions have emerged only in the last several years. Recent research suggests that ROS/RNS are significant and perhaps even central actors in the actions of antimicrobial and anti-parasite drugs, cancer therapies, wound healing therapies and therapies involving the cardiovascular system. Understanding the ways ROS/RNS act in established therapies may help guide future efforts in exploiting novel plasma medical therapies. The importance of ROS and RNS to plant biology has been relatively little appreciated in the plasma biomedicine community, but these species are just as important in plants. It appears that there are opportunities for useful applications of plasmas in this area as well.

  13. BASAL MEDIA FORMULATION USING CANAVALIA ENSIFORMIS AS CARBON AND NITROGEN SOURCE FOR THE GROWTH OF SOME FUNGI SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.J. Akinyele2

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of developing alternative media to commercial potato dextrose agar was assessed using, Canavalia ensiformis (Linn (jack beans as carbon and nitrogen source. Six leguminous meal media were used as substitute for either carbon or nitrogen or both, while potato dextrose broth (PDB was used as a positive control and basal medium as a negative control. Six species of fungi Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Meria coniospora, Mucor sp, Neurospora crassa and Rhizopus oryzae were aseptically inoculated into the formulated media and allowed to grow. Their mycelia dry weights were taken after 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours. Growth of all fungal species was observed to be slightly lower, about the same or better in the formulated media relative to the control. Aspergillus flavus had its highest biomass of 1.70g in the media formulated with Canavalia ensiformis as the carbon source relative to 1.42g as the standard at the 120 hour. A. niger had a growth of 0.62g relative to 0.61g at 120 hours of the control. Meria coniospora had a growth of 0.27g relative to 0.38g at 120 hours. Mucor sp had a growth of 0.54g relative to 0.44g at 120 hours. Neurospora crassa had a growth of 1.05g relative to 0.24g at 120 hours. Rhizopus oryzae had a growth of 0.14g relative to 0.25g at 120 hours. The study revealed that Canavalia ensiformis contains minerals and nutrients that is able to provide the nutritional requirements of these fungi. Thus, it can be used as an alternative material in the preparation of culture media for in vitro cultivation of these fungi for teaching and research purposes.

  14. Stress Sensitivity Is Associated with Differential Accumulation of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Maize Genotypes with Contrasting Levels of Drought Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liming; Fountain, Jake C; Wang, Hui; Ni, Xinzhi; Ji, Pingsheng; Lee, Robert D; Kemerait, Robert C; Scully, Brian T; Guo, Baozhu

    2015-10-19

    Drought stress decreases crop growth, yield, and can further exacerbate pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination. Tolerance and adaptation to drought stress is an important trait of agricultural crops like maize. However, maize genotypes with contrasting drought tolerances have been shown to possess both common and genotype-specific adaptations to cope with drought stress. In this research, the physiological and metabolic response patterns in the leaves of maize seedlings subjected to drought stress were investigated using six maize genotypes including: A638, B73, Grace-E5, Lo964, Lo1016, and Va35. During drought treatments, drought-sensitive maize seedlings displayed more severe symptoms such as chlorosis and wilting, exhibited significant decreases in photosynthetic parameters, and accumulated significantly more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) than tolerant genotypes. Sensitive genotypes also showed rapid increases in enzyme activities involved in ROS and RNS metabolism. However, the measured antioxidant enzyme activities were higher in the tolerant genotypes than in the sensitive genotypes in which increased rapidly following drought stress. The results suggest that drought stress causes differential responses to oxidative and nitrosative stress in maize genotypes with tolerant genotypes with slower reaction and less ROS and RNS production than sensitive ones. These differential patterns may be utilized as potential biological markers for use in marker assisted breeding.

  15. Measurement of nitrogen species NO{sub y} at the exhaust of an aircraft engine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristori, A. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Palaiseau (France); Baudoin, C. [Societe Nationale d`Etude et de Construction de Moteurs d`Aviation (SNECMA), Villaroche (France)

    1997-12-31

    A research programme named AEROTRACE was supported by the EC (CEC contract AERA-CT94-0003) in order to investigate trace species measurements at the exhaust of aero-engines. Within this project, NO{sub y}, NO, HNO{sub 3} and HONO were measured at the exhaust of aircraft engine combustors. Major species (NO{sub y},NO) were measured by using a chemiluminescence instrument. Minor species (HNO{sub 3},HONO) were measured by using filter packs. Two combustors were tested under various running conditions; the first one at ONERA (Task 2) and the second one at DRA (Task 5). Results show that EI{sub NOy} < 50 g/kg, EI{sub HNO3} < 0.2 g/kg and EI{sub HONO} < 0.55 g/kg. Regarding ratios, (HNO{sub 3})/(NO{sub y}) < 0.5%, (HONO)/(NO{sub y}) < 8%, (HONO)/(NO{sub 2}) {approx} 19.2%, and (HNO{sub 3})/(NO{sub 2}) {approx} 0.8% was found. (author) 9 refs.

  16. N-fertilization has different effects on the growth, carbon and nitrogen physiology, and wood properties of slow- and fast-growing Populus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Li, Mengchun; Luo, Jie; Cao, Xu; Qu, Long; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning; Liu, Tongxian; Bai, Hua; Janz, Dennis; Polle, Andrea; Peng, Changhui; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2012-10-01

    To investigate how N-fertilization affects the growth, carbon and nitrogen (N) physiology, and wood properties of poplars with contrasting growth characteristics, slow-growing (Populus popularis, Pp) and fast-growing (P. alba×P. glandulosa, Pg) poplar saplings were exposed to different N levels. Above-ground biomass, leaf area, photosynthetic rates (A), instantaneous photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE (i)), chlorophyll and foliar sugar concentrations were higher in Pg than in Pp. Foliar nitrate reductase (NR) activities and root glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities were higher in Pg than in Pp as were the N amount and NUE of new shoots. Lignin contents and calorific values of Pg wood were less than that of Pp wood. N-fertilization reduced root biomass of Pg more than of Pp, but increased leaf biomass, leaf area, A, and PNUE(i) of Pg more than of Pp. Among 13 genes involved in the transport of ammonium or nitrate or in N assimilation, transcripts showed more pronounced changes to N-fertilization in Pg than in Pp. Increases in NR activities and N contents due to N-fertilization were larger in Pg than in Pp. In both species, N-fertilization resulted in lower calorific values as well as shorter and wider vessel elements/fibres. These results suggest that growth, carbon and N physiology, and wood properties are more sensitive to increasing N availability in fast-growing poplars than in slow-growing ones, which is probably due to prioritized resource allocation to the leaves and accelerated N physiological processes in fast-growing poplars under higher N levels.

  17. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Reactive Species Generation of N-Benzenesulfonyl Derivatives of Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Sol Romina; Miana, Gisele Emilse; Albesa, Inés; Mazzieri, María Rosa; Becerra, María Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Two N-benzenesulfonyl (BS) derivatives of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) were designed, prepared, and screened for antibacterial activity. This approach was based on combining the two privileged structures, BS and THQ, which are known to be active. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of BS-THQ and its analogue 4-NH2BS-THQ, and to investigate the roles of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in their lethality. Both showed bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300, with transmission electron microscopy revealing a disturbed membrane architecture. Furthermore, an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in strains treated with BS-THQ with respect to the control was detected when fluorescent microscopy and spectrophotometric techniques were used. The analogue 4-NH2BS-THQ demonstrated a broader spectrum of activity than BS-THQ, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL against reference strains of S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The assayed compounds represent promising structures for the development of new synthetic classes of antimicrobials.

  18. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance of different wine yeast species during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Viana, Tiago; Ardö, Ylva; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the influence of twenty different single (i.e. 19 amino acids and ammonium sulphate) and two multiple nitrogen sources (N-sources) on growth and fermentation (i.e. glucose consumption and ethanol production) performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of four wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeast species (Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Torulaspora delbrueckii) was investigated during alcoholic fermentation. Briefly, the N-sources with beneficial effects on all performance parameters (or for the majority of them) for each yeast species were alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, isoleucine, ammonium sulphate, serine, valine and mixtures of 19 amino acids and of 19 amino acids plus ammonium sulphate (for S. cerevisiae), serine (for L. thermotolerans), alanine (for H. uvarum), alanine and asparagine (for M. pulcherrima), arginine, asparagine, glutamine, isoleucine and mixture of 19 amino acids (for T. delbrueckii). Furthermore, our results showed a clear positive effect of complex mixtures of N-sources on S. cerevisiae and on T. delbrueckii (although to a lesser extent) as to all performance parameters studied, whereas for L. thermotolerans, H. uvarum and M. pulcherrima, single amino acids affected growth and fermentation performance to the same extent as the mixtures. Moreover, we found groups of N-sources with similar effects on the growth and/or fermentation performance of two or more yeast species. Finally, the influences of N-sources observed for T. delbrueckii and H. uvarum resembled those of S. cerevisiae the most and the least, respectively. Overall, this work contributes to an improved understanding of how different N-sources affect growth, glucose consumption and ethanol production of wine-related yeast species under oxygen-limited conditions, which, in turn, may be used to, e.g. optimize growth and fermentation performance of the given yeast upon N-source supplementation during

  19. Effects of excess nitrogen on biogeochemistry of a temperate hardwood forest: Evidence of nutrient redistribution by a forest understory species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Frank S.; Billmyer, Jake H.; Walter, Christopher A.; Peterjohn, William T.

    2016-12-01

    Excess nitrogen (N) in terrestrial ecosystems can arise from anthropogenically-increased atmospheric N deposition, a phenomenon common in eastern US forests. In spite of decreased N emissions over recent years, atmospheric concentrations of reactive N remain high in areas within this region. Excess N in forests has been shown to alter biogeochemical cycling of essential plant nutrients primarily via enhanced production and leaching of nitrate, which leads to loss of base cations from the soil. The purpose of our study was to investigate this phenomenon using a multifaceted approach to examine foliar nutrients of two herbaceous layer species in one N-treated watershed (WS3-receiving aerial applications of 35 kg N/ha/yr as ammonium sulfate, from 1989 to the present) and two untreated reference watersheds at the Fernow Experimental Forest, WV, USA. In 1993, we analyzed foliar tissue of Viola rotundifolia, a dominant herb layer species and prominent on all seven sample plots in each watershed. In 2013 and 2014, we used foliar tissue from Rubus allegheniensis, which had become the predominant species on WS3 and had increased, though to a lesser extent, in cover on both reference watersheds. Foliar N and potassium (K) were higher and foliar calcium (Ca) was lower on WS3 than on the reference watersheds for both species. Magnesium (Mg) was lower on WS3 for Viola, but was not different among watersheds for Rubus. Results support the stream chemistry-based observation that excess N lowers plant-available Ca and, to a lesser degree, Mg, but not of K. Foliar manganese (Mn) of Rubus averaged >4 times that of Viola, and was >50% higher on WS3 than on the reference watersheds. A Mn-based mechanism is proposed for the N-meditated increase in Rubus on WS3. Data suggest that excess N deposition not only alters herb community composition and biogeochemical cycling of forest ecosystems, but can do so simultaneously and interactively.

  20. A co-activator of nitrogen-regulated transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soussi-Boudekou, S; André, B

    1999-02-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factors Gln3p and Nil1p of the GATA family play a determinant role in expression of genes that are subject to nitrogen catabolite repression. Here we report the isolation of a new yeast mutant, gan1-1, exhibiting dramatically decreased NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. The GAN1 gene was cloned and found to encode a 488-amino-acid polypeptide bearing no typical DNA binding domain. Gan1p is required for full expression of GLN1, GDH2 and also other nitrogen utilization genes, including GAP1, PUT4, MEP2 and GDH1. The extent to which Gan1p is required, however, varies according to the gene and to the nitrogen source available. We show that Gan1p is in fact involved in Gln3p- and Nil1p-dependent transcription. In the case of Gln3p-dependent transcription, the degree to which Gan1p is required appears to be gene specific. The contribution of Gan1p to gene expression is also influenced by the nitrogen status of the cell. We found that GAN1 is identical to ADA1, which encodes a component of the ADA/GCN5 co-activator complex. Ada1/Gan1p thus represents the first reported case of an accessory protein (a co-activator) linking the GATA-binding proteins Gln3p and Nil1p, mediating nitrogen-regulated transcription, to the basal transcription machinery.

  1. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective.

  2. Recurrent winter warming pulses enhance nitrogen cycling and soil biotic activity in temperate heathland and grassland mesocosms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schuerings

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Winter air temperatures are projected to increase in the temperate zone, whereas snow cover is projected to decrease, leading to more extreme soil temperature variability, and potentially to changes in nutrient cycling. Therefore, we applied six winter warming pulses by infra-red heating lamps and surface heating wires in a field experiment over one winter in temperate heathland and grassland mesocosms. The experiment was replicated at two sites, a colder mountainous upland site with high snow accumulation and a warmer and dryer lowland site. Winter warming pulses enhanced soil biotic activity for both sites during winter, as indicated by 35% higher nitrogen (N availability in the soil solution, 40% higher belowground decomposition and a 25% increase in the activity of the enzyme cellobiohydrolase. The mobilization of N differed between sites, and the incorporation of 15N into leaves was reduced by 31% in response to winter warming pulses, but only at the cold site, with significant reductions occurring for three of four tested plant species at this site. Furthermore, there was a trend of increased N leaching in response to the recurrent winter warming pulses. Overall, projected winter climate change in the temperate zone, with less snow and more variable soil temperatures, appears important for shifts in ecosystem functioning (i.e. nutrient cycling. While the effects of warming pulses on plant N mobilization did not differ among sites, reduced plant 15N incorporation at the colder temperate site suggests that frost damage may reduce plant performance in a warmer world, with important implications for nitrogen cycling and nitrogen losses from ecosystems.

  3. High-nitrogen and low-irradiance can restrict energy utilization in photosynthesis of successional tree species in low subtropical forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Responses of photosynthesis and the partition of energy utilization to high-nitrogen importation and high-light intensity in leaves of three dominant tree species of subtropical forest,including sun plant or early-successional species Schima superba,mesophyte or intermediate-successional species Canstanopsis hystrix,and shading-tolerant plant or late-successional species Cryptocarya concinna were studied by using the CO2 exchange system and chlorophyll fluorescence method.Our results showed that,regardless of plant species,net photosynthetic rate(Pn)was higher in high-nitrogen supply and high irradiance(HNHL)plants than in low-nitrogen supply and high irradiance(LNHL)plants,implying that low-nitrogen importation would limit Pn of plants grown under high irradiance.However, high-nitrogen supply and low irradiance(HNLL)plants had a lower Pn.Insignificant change of quantum yield(Fv′/Fm′)in opened PS II was found in leaves of HNHL,LNHL or HNLL plants of S.superba and C. hystrix,while a higher Fv′/Fm′occurred in HNHL plants of C.concinna in comparison with LNHL or HNLL plants.The HNHL plants of C.concinna also had a higher photochemical quantum yield(△F/Fm′) than LNHL or HNLL plants,however no similar responses were found in plants of S.superba and C. hystrix(P<0.05).In the irradiance range of 0―2000μmol photon·m -2·s -1,the fraction of energy consumed by photochemistry(φ PSII )was 18.2%in LNHL plants of S.superba which was higher than that in HNHL plants(P>0.05)and it was significantly higher than in HNLL plants(P<0.05).C.hystrix also had a similar response inφ PSII to nitrogen supply and irradiance.Regardless of species HNLL plants had a significantφ PSII and higher heat dissipation in light,and this effect was more severe in C.concinna than in S.superba or C.hystrix.The results may mean that high-nitrogen importation by nitrogen deposit and low irradiance caused by changing climate or air pollution would more severely restrict photosynthetic

  4. Seasonal and annual deposition rates of sulphur, nitrogen and chloride species to an oak forest in north-eastern austria (wolkersdorf, 240 m a.s.l.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puxbaum, Hans; Gregori, Martin

    Dry deposition estimates of sulphur, nitrogen and chloride components to an oak forest in north-eastern Austria were performed using an "Inferential model." The deposition calculations were performed with a modified Hicks et al. (1985) model based on chemical measurement data with 0.5 h (SO 2, NO, NO 2) and 24 h (HCl, HNO 3, NH 3, particulate chloride, nitrate, sulphate and ammonium) time resolution. Annual dry deposition rates of sulphur (SO 2+pSO 4) were estimated to amount around 13 kg ha -1, of oxidised nitrogen (NO+NO 2+HNO 3+pNO 3) 8.4 kg ha -1, of reduced nitrogen (NH 3+pNH 4) 5.6 kg ha -1 and of chloride (HCl+pCl) 2.1 kg ha -1. The relative contribution of dry to total (dry+wet) deposition is 68% for sulphur, 77% for oxidised nitrogen, 55% for reduced nitrogen and 40% for chloride species. Total deposition of sulphur and reduced nitrogen species showed good agreement with data from throughfall measurements and a canopy exchange model. For oxidised nitrogen species the inferential modeling approach yielded a considerably higher deposition which could be explained by the inability of the canopy exchange model to account for stomatal uptake of NO 2. A comparison of dry and wet fluxes of sulphur and nitrogen species at European and U.S. sites indicates that in both environments large regional differences occur. Thus the hypothesis, that European forests receive substantially higher inputs of "major ions" than U.S. forests ( Lindberg et al., 1990) cannot be generalised. "Dry+wet" deposition of nitrogen species at two Austrian sites is well within the range of deposition at 11 forested sites in the U.S., while at one Austrian site it is slightly higher than the highest N-deposition reported for U.S. sites. Compared sites from the U.S. are from the Mountain Cloud Chemistry Project and the Integrated Forest Study ( Lovett and Lindberg, 1993).

  5. Combined effect of protein and oxygen on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the plasma treatment of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Nishtha; Szili, Endre J.; Oh, Jun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Ha; Michelmore, Andrew; Graves, David B.; Hatta, Akimitsu; Short, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of protein and molecular, ground state oxygen (O2) on the plasma generation, and transport of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in tissue are investigated. A tissue target, comprising a 1 mm thick gelatin film (a surrogate for real tissue), is placed on top of a 96-well plate; each well is filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) containing one fluorescent or colorimetric reporter that is specific for one of three RONS (i.e., H2O2, NO2-, or OH•) or a broad spectrum reactive oxygen species reporter (2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein). A helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet contacts the top of the gelatin surface, and the concentrations of RONS generated in PBS are measured on a microplate reader. The data show that H2O2, NO2-, or OH• are generated in PBS underneath the target. Independently, measurements are made of the O2 concentration in the PBS with and without the gelatin target. Adding bovine serum albumin protein to the PBS or gelatin shows that protein either raises or inhibits RONS depending upon the O2 concentration. Our results are discussed in the context of plasma-soft tissue interactions that are important in the development of CAP technology for medicine, biology, and food manufacturing.

  6. Gelidium elegans, an edible red seaweed, and hesperidin inhibit lipid accumulation and production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in 3T3-L1 and RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Seo, Min-Jung; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Ok-Hwan; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2014-11-01

    Gelidium elegans is an edible red alga native to the intertidal area of northeastern Asia. We investigated the effect of G. elegans extract and its main flavonoids, rutin and hesperidin, on lipid accumulation and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in 3T3-L1 and RAW264.7 cells. Our data show that G. elegans extract decreased lipid accumulation and ROS/RNS production in a dose-dependent manner. The extract also inhibited the mRNA expression of adipogenic transcription factors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, while enhancing the protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutases 1 and 2, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase compared with controls. In addition, lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production was significantly reduced in G. elegans extract-treated RAW264.7 cells. In analysis of the effects of G. elegans flavonoids on lipid accumulation and ROS/RNS production, only hesperidin showed an inhibitory effect on lipid accumulation and ROS production; rutin did not affect adipogenesis and ROS status. The antiadipogenic effect of hesperidin was evidenced by the downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, and fatty acid binding protein 4 gene expression. Collectively, our data suggest that G. elegans is a potential food source containing antiobesity and antioxidant constituents.

  7. Determination of nitrogen in boron carbide by instrumental photon activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchel, Silke; Berger, Achim

    2007-05-01

    Boron carbide is widely used as industrial material, because of its extreme hardness, and as a neutron absorber. As part of a round-robin exercise leading to certification of a new reference material (ERM-ED102) which was demanded by the industry we analysed nitrogen in boron carbide by inert gas fusion analysis (GFA) and instrumental photon activation analysis (IPAA) using the 14N(gamma,n)13N nuclear reaction. The latter approach is the only non-destructive method among all the methods applied. By using photons with energy below the threshold of the 12C(gamma,n)11C reaction, we hindered activation of matrix and other impurities. A recently installed beam with a very low lateral activating flux gradient enabled us to homogeneously activate sample masses of approximately 1 g. Taking extra precautions, i.e. self-absorption correction and deconvolution of the complex decay curves, we calculated a nitrogen concentration of 2260+/-100 microg g-1, which is in good agreement with our GFA value of 2303+/-64 microg g-1. The values are the second and third highest of a rather atypical (non-S-shape) distribution of data of 14 round-robin participants. It is of utmost importance for the certification process that our IPAA value is the only one not produced by inert gas fusion analysis and, therefore, the only one which is not affected by a possible incomplete release of nitrogen from high-melting boron carbide.

  8. Selection of effective macroalgal species and tracing nitrogen sources on the different part of Yantai coast, China indicated by macroalgal δ{sup 15}N values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yujue [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Liu, Dongyan, E-mail: dyliu@yic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Richard, Pierre [Littoral, Environnement et Sociétés, UMR 7266 CNRS-Université de La Rochelle, 2 rue Olympe de Gouges, 17000 La Rochelle (France); Di, Baoping [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China)

    2016-01-15

    To determine the dominant nitrogen sources and select effective macroalgal species for monitoring eutrophication along the Yantai coast, the total carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ{sup 15}N) in macroalgal tissue were analyzed in conjunction with environmental variables in seawater along the Yantai coastline. The ranges of macroalgal tissue δ{sup 15}N values together with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) composition indicated that except for the atmospheric deposition, there were three dominant types of nitrogen sources along the Yantai coast, with the agricultural fertilizer usage and factorial wastewater input at the S1 (Zhifu Island coast), the sewage discharge at S2 (the Moon Bay coast), the sewage discharge together with aquaculture impacts at S3 (Fisherman Wharf coast) and S4 (the Horse Island coast). Macroalgal growth were not limited by DIN but limited by P at S2, S3 and S4. Macroalgal species suitable or not for DIN source tracing along the Yantai coast were discussed. For sites with low DIN concentration, many species of three phyla could be used for DIN sources tracing with Laurencia okamurai, Gloiopeltis furcata and Ulva pertusa being ideal species. For site with high DIN concentration, however, species of Rhodophyta were not suitable and only Scytosiphon lomentaria and Monostroma nitidium were chosen. - Highlights: • Yantai coast was affected by three types of DIN sources. • Macroalgal species suitable or not for DIN source tracing were suggested; • TN and δ{sup 15}N were affected by nutrient concentrations and the metabolic factors. • P instead of N limited the tissue N uptake in low nutrient concentration sites.

  9. System dynamics modeling of nitrogen removal in a stormwater infiltration basin with biosorption-activated media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Zhemin; Chang, Ni-Bin; Wanielista, Martin P; Williams, Evan Shane

    2013-07-01

    Stormwater infiltration basins, one of the typical stormwater best management practices, are commonly constructed for surface water pollution control, flood mitigation, and groundwater restoration in rural or residential areas. These basins have soils with better infiltration capacity than the native soil; however, the ever-increasing contribution of nutrients to groundwater from stormwater due to urban expansion makes existing infiltration basins unable to meet groundwater quality criteria related to environmental sustainability and public health. This issue requires retrofitting current infiltration basins for flood control as well as nutrient control before the stormwater enters the groundwater. An existing stormwater infiltration basin in north-central Florida was selected, retrofitted, and monitored to identify subsurface physiochemical and biological processes during 2007-2010 to investigate nutrient control processes. This implementation in the nexus of contaminant hydrology and ecological engineering adopted amended soil layers packed with biosorption activated media (BAM; tire crumb, silt, clay, and sand) to perform nutrient removal in a partitioned forebay using a berm. This study presents an infiltration basin-nitrogen removal (IBNR) model, a system dynamics model that simulates nitrogen cycling in this BAM-based stormwater infiltration basin with respect to changing hydrologic conditions and varying dissolved nitrogen concentrations. Modeling outputs of IBNR indicate that denitrification is the biogeochemical indicator in the BAM layer that accounted for a loss of about one third of the total dissolved nitrogen mass input.

  10. Effects of Nitrogen Doping on Microstructure and Photocatalytic Activity of Nanocrystalline TiO2 Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO2 nanocrystalline powders were prepared by hydrolysis of tetrachloride titanium (TiCl4) in a mixed solution of ethanol and ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) at ambient temperature and atmosphere followed by calcination at 400 C for 2 h in air. FTIR spectra demonstrate that amine group in original gel is eliminated by calcination, and the TiO2 powder is liable to absorb water onto its surface and into its capillary pore. XRD and SEM results show that the average size of nanocrystalline TiO2 particles is no more than 60 nm and with increasing the calcination temperature, the size of particles increases. XPS studies indicate the nitrogen atom enters into the TiO2 lattice and occupies the position of oxygen atom. The nitrogen doping not only depresses the grain growth of TiO2 particles, but also reduces the phase transformation temperature of anatase to rutile. The photocatalytic activity of the nitrogen-doped TiO2 powders has been evaluated by experiments ofphotocatalytic degradation aqueous methylene blue.

  11. Design studies related to an in vivo neutron activation analysis facility for measuring total body nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatelatos, I E; Chettle, D R; Green, S; Scott, M C

    1992-08-01

    Design studies relating to an in vivo prompt capture neutron activation analysis facility measuring total body nitrogen are presented. The basis of the design is a beryllium-graphite neutron collimator and reflector configuration for (alpha, n) type radionuclide neutron sources (238PuBe or 241AmBe), so as to reflect leaking, or out-scattered, neutrons towards the subject. This improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to dose and the spatial distribution of thermal flux achieved with these sources, whilst retaining their advantage of long half-lives as compared to 252Cf based systems. The common problem of high count-rate at the detector, and therefore high nitrogen region of interest background due to pile-up, is decreased by using a set of smaller (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(Tl) detectors instead of large ones. The facility described presents a relative error of nitrogen measurement of 3.6% and a nitrogen to background ratio of 2.3 for 0.45 mSv skin dose (assuming ten 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm NaI(Tl) detectors).

  12. Design studies related to an in vivo neutron activation analysis facility for measuring total body nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamatelatos, I.E.M.; Chettle, D.R.; Green, S.; Scott, M.C. (Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Space Research)

    1992-08-01

    Design studies relating to an in vivo prompt capture neutron activation analysis facility measuring total body nitrogen are presented. The basis of the design is a beryllium-graphite neutron collimator and reflector configuration for ({alpha}, n) type radionuclide neutron sources ({sup 238}PuBe or {sup 241}AmBe), so as to reflect leaking, or out-scattered, neutrons towards the subject. This improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to dose and the spatial distribution of thermal flux achieved with these sources, whilst retaining their advantage of long half-lives as compared to {sup 252}Cf based systems. The common problem of high count-rate at the detector, and therefore high nitrogen region of interest background due to pile-up, is decreased by using a set of smaller (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(Tl) detectors instead of large ones. The facility described presents a relative error of nitrogen measurement of 3.6% and a nitrogen to background ratio of 2.3 for 0.45 mSv skin dose (assuming ten 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm NaI(Tl) detectors). (author).

  13. Candida species exhibit differential in vitro hemolytic activities

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Gang; Lakshman P Samaranayake; Yau, Joyce Y. Y.

    2001-01-01

    A total of 80 Candida isolates representing 14 species were examined for their respective responses to an in vitro hemolytic test. A modification of a previously described plate assay system where the yeasts are incubated on glucose (3%)-enriched sheep blood agar in a carbon dioxide (5%)-rich environment for 48 h was used to evaluate the hemolytic activity. A group of eight Candida species which included Candida albicans (15 isolates), C. dubliniensis (2), C. kefyr (2), C. krusei (4), C. zeyl...

  14. Optimum operation conditions of nitrogen and phosphorus removal by a biofilm-activated-sludge system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In the biofilm and activated sludge combined system, denitrifying bacteria attached on the fibrous carriers in the anoxic tank, while the sludge containing nitrifying and phosphorus removal bacteria was only recirculated between the aerobic and anaerobic tanks. Therefore, the factors affected and restricted nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal in a traditional A/A/O process were resolved. This paper describes the optimum operation conditions for nitrogen and phosphorus removal using this system.

  15. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  16. Effects of nickel and nitrogen soil fertilization on lettuce growth and urease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Carlos Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is a micronutrient involved in nitrogen metabolism and a constituent of the urease molecule. Plant growth and urease activity were evaluated in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. grown in soil-filled pots in a 2 x 8 factorial design with two nitrogen (N sources and eight Ni rates, with five replications. Nitrogen was applied at 200 mg dm-3 (half the dose incorporated into the soil at seedling transplanting and half top-dressed later using the sources NH4NO3 (AN and CO(NH22 (Ur. The Ni treatments (0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 32 mg dm-3 were applied as NiCl2. The shoot dry-matter yield, leaf urease activity, Ni levels in the lettuce leaves and Ni levels extracted from soil with Mehlich-3 (M-3 and DTPA were determined. In the plants supplied with AN, the shoot dry-matter yield was higher than in those supplied with Ur. There was no difference in shoot dry matter in response to soil-applied Ni. The leaf urease activity increased with Ni application, regardless of the N source. The extractions with M-3 and DTPA were efficient to evaluate Ni availability for lettuce in the Red-Yellow Latosol.

  17. Influence of Water Activated by Far infrared Porous Ceramics on Nitrogen Absorption in the Pig Feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Junping; Liu, Jie; Liang, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hongchen; Ding, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Under modern and, intensive feeding livestock and poultry density has increased, and brought a deterioration of the farm environment. The livestock and their excrement generate harmful gases such as ammonia, etc. which restricted the sustainable development and improvement of production efficiency of animal husbandry. In this paper, a new kind of far infrared porous ceramics was prepared to activate, the animal drinking water. The activated water and common water were then supplied to pigs, and the fresh pig feces of experimental group and:control group were collected on a regular basis. The residual protein content in feces was tested by Kjeldahl nitrogen method to study the influence law of the porous ceramics on absorbing nitrogen element in animal feces. The results showed that compared with the control group, the protein content in the experimental group decreased on average by 39.2%. The activated drinking water was conducive to the absorption of nitrogen in pig feed. The clusters of water molecules became smaller under the action of the porous ceramics. Hence, they were easy to pass through the water protein channel on the cell membrane for speeding up the metabolism.

  18. Leaf nitrogen distribution in relation to crown architecture in the tall canopy species, Fagus crenata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Noriyuki; Yasumura, Yuko; Ishida, Atsushi

    2014-08-01

    The theory of optimal leaf N distribution predicts that the C gain of plants is maximized when the N content per unit area (N(area)) scales with light availability, but most previous studies have demonstrated that the N distribution is not proportional to light availability. In tall trees, the leaves are often clustered on twigs (leaf cluster) and not evenly distributed within the crowns. Thus, we hypothesized that the suboptimal N distribution is partly caused by the limited capacity to translocate N between leaf clusters, and consequently, the relationship between light and N(area) differs for leaves in different clusters. We investigated the light availability and N content of all individual leaves within several leaf clusters on tall trees of a deciduous canopy species Fagus crenata in Japan. We observed that the within-cluster leaf N distribution patterns differed from the between-cluster patterns and the slopes of the relationships between light and N(area) were lower within clusters than between clusters. According to the detailed analysis of the N distribution within leaf clusters, N(area) was greater for current-year shoots with greater light availability or a larger total leaf area. The latter pattern was probably caused by the greater sink strength of the current-year shoots with a larger leaf area. These N distribution patterns suggest that leaf clusters are fairly independent with respect to their N use, and the productivity of real F. crenata crowns may be less than optimal.

  19. Activated carbon-based magnetic TiO2 photocatalyst codoped with iodine and nitrogen for organic pollution degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejiang; Song, Jingke; Huang, Jiayu; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xin; Ma, RongRong; Wang, Jiayi; Zhao, Jianfu

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic photocatalyst - iodine and nitrogen codoped TiO2 based on chitosan decorated magnetic activated carbon (I-N-T/CMAC) was prepared via simple coprecipitation and sol-gel method. The characteristics of photocatalysts were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It turned out that the prepared material had large surface area, enhanced absorption of visible light, and magnetically separable properties when mole ratio of I/Ti was 0.1. Iodine-nitrogen codoped magnetic photocatalyst was used for the removal of salicylic acid (SA), and the rate of adsorption reaction for SA by I0.1-N-T/CMAC followed the pseudo second-order kinetic. Under visible light irradiation, 89.71% SA with initial concentration = 30 mg/L could be removed by I0.1-N-T/CMAC, and photodegradation rate of SA on I0.1-N-T/CMAC composites was 0.0084 min-1 which is about 4 times higher than that of magnetic photocatalyst with nitrogen doped only. The effects of SA initial concentration, pH, coexisting anions and humic acid to the degradation of SA with the prepared material were also investigated. Main oxidative species in the photodegradation process are rad OH and h+.

  20. The complex interplay of iron metabolism, reactive oxygen species, and reactive nitrogen species: insights into the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskenkorva-Frank, Taija S; Weiss, Günter; Koppenol, Willem H; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2013-12-01

    Production of minute concentrations of superoxide (O2(*-)) and nitrogen monoxide (nitric oxide, NO*) plays important roles in several aspects of cellular signaling and metabolic regulation. However, in an inflammatory environment, the concentrations of these radicals can drastically increase and the antioxidant defenses may become overwhelmed. Thus, biological damage may occur owing to redox imbalance-a condition called oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. A complex interplay exists between iron metabolism, O2(*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and NO*. Iron is involved in both the formation and the scavenging of these species. Iron deficiency (anemia) (ID(A)) is associated with oxidative stress, but its role in the induction of nitrosative stress is largely unclear. Moreover, oral as well as intravenous (iv) iron preparations used for the treatment of ID(A) may also induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. Oral administration of ferrous salts may lead to high transferrin saturation levels and, thus, formation of non-transferrin-bound iron, a potentially toxic form of iron with a propensity to induce oxidative stress. One of the factors that determine the likelihood of oxidative and nitrosative stress induced upon administration of an iv iron complex is the amount of labile (or weakly-bound) iron present in the complex. Stable dextran-based iron complexes used for iv therapy, although they contain only negligible amounts of labile iron, can induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress through so far unknown mechanisms. In this review, after summarizing the main features of iron metabolism and its complex interplay with O2(*-), H2O2, NO*, and other more reactive compounds derived from these species, the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress is discussed and possible underlying mechanisms are proposed. Understanding the mechanisms, by which various iron formulations may induce oxidative and nitrosative stress, will help us

  1. [Response of active nitrogen to salinity in a soil from the Yellow River Delta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Qiu, Shao-Jun; Chen, Yin-Ping; Zhao, Xi-Men; Liu, Jing-Tao; Lu, Zhao-Hu

    2014-06-01

    Soil salinity can inhibit the processes of nitrogen cycle, and the active nitrogen is the important indicator to reflect the turnover of nitrogen. A laboratory experiment was conducted to study the effect of soil salinity on the active nitrogen in a soil of the Yellow River Delta incubated aerobically under 25 degrees C for 45 days. Four levels of salinity (S1: 0.1%, S2: 0.5%, S3: 0.9%, S4: 1.3%) were imposed using NaCl (mass fraction), and glucose with or without NH4Cl were added to the soils. NO3(-) -N, NH4(+) -N, total soluble nitrogen (TSN) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) were monitored. Results showed that NO3(-)-N was significantly higher in the low salinity soil (S1, S2) than in the high salinity soil (S3, S4) under the control and with NH4Cl addition, and especially the difference was larger with NH4Cl addition. Comparing with the control, NO3(-) -N was increased significantly in S1 and S2. NO3(-) -N was decreased significantly with glucose addition, and there was no difference among the four salinity soils during the whole incubation period. NH4(+) -N was significantly higher in the high salinity soil (S3, S4) than in the low salinity soil (S1, S2), and it was increased particularly in S4 after day 5. With the addition of NH4Cl, NH4(+) -N was increased in S3 and S4. MBN was higher in the low salinity soil than in the high salinity soil, and it was not increased with NH4Cl addition, though TSN was increased. With glucose addition, MBN was increased by 89.9% - 130.9% in the low salinity soil (S1, S2) and 36.9% - 79.5% in the high salinity soil (S3, S4). It was suggested that soil salinity had influence on N transformation, and high salinity inhibited the transformation and assimilation of N by microorganism. The addition of C depressed the effect of salinity, and improved the microbial activity. The application of organic matter is an effective measure to improve N transformation in saline soils.

  2. Azospirillum Inoculation Alters Nitrate Reductase Activity and Nitrogen Uptake in Wheat Plant under Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Aliasgharzad N. Aliasgharzad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water deficit stress usually diminishes nitrogen uptake by plants. There are evidences that some nitrogen fixing bacteria can alleviate this stress by supplying nitrogen and improving its metabolism in plants. Four Azospirillum strains, A. lipoferum AC45-II, A. brasilense AC46-I, A. irakense AC49-VII and A. irakense AC51-VI were tested for nitrate reductase activity (NRA. In a pot culture experiment using a sandy loam soil, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sardari were inoculated with these bacterial strains and three ranges of soil water potential (W1: -10 to -20, W2: -40 to -50 and W3: -65 to -75 kPa were applied to the pots. All strains were positive in NRA test and the highest (7.63mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was recorded for AC49-VII and the least (0.23mg NO2-N.L-1.48h-1 was belong to AC51-VI. Leaf and root NRA, root and shoot nitrogen concentrations, and dry weights of root and shoot decreased by increasing water deficit stress. All four bacterial strains caused a significant enhancement in root NRA and in each water deficit level, the higher root NRA was recorded in AC46-I and AC49-VII inoculated plants. The highest leaf NRA was achieved by AC49-VII. The mean increment of root NRA by bacterial strains was 171% compared to the non-bacterial plants. Moreover, at the highest level of water deficit stress, the highest dry weight and nitrogen concentration in root and shoot were obtained by AC46-I and AC49-VII treatments.

  3. Phosphorus uptake in four tree species under nitrogen addition in subtropical China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juxiu; Li, Yiyong; Xu, Yue; Liu, Shuange; Huang, Wenjuan; Fang, Xiong; Yin, Guangcai

    2017-07-10

    Atmospheric N deposition is a serious problem in subtropical China where N is present in large amounts but P is deficient. Several studies hypothesized that N2 fixers can overcome phosphorus limitation by trading fixed N2 for soil phosphorus. In order to know whether N2 fixers could invest fixed N2 in extracellular phosphatase production and could stimulate arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to acquire soil P in N-rich subtropical China, an open-air greenhouse experiment was carried out. Two N2 fixers (Acacia mangium and Ormosia pinnata) and two non-N2 fixers (Schima superba and Pinus massoniana) were exposed to three levels of N addition: 5.6 kg ha(-1) a(-1) (ambient N), 15.6 kg ha(-1) a(-1) (middle N), and 20.6 kg ha(-1) a(-1) (high N). We found that the capacity of plants to acquire soil P in N-rich subtropical China is species specific. The higher P uptake rates were found for N2 fixers than non-N2 fixers under N addition, which were related to the greater soil APA and higher AMF (p < 0.01) in the soil of N2 fixers. However, with time, high N addition decreased more significant quantities of soil microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in the soil of N2 fixers than that of non-N2 fixers (p < 0.05). We conclude that N2 fixers have higher P uptake capacity than non-N2 fixers under ambient N deposition in subtropical China. However, continuing N deposition in the future might affect P uptake ability of N2 fixers as high N addition would decrease soil microbial PLFAs of N2 fixers.

  4. Photocatalytic Activity for Water Decomposition to Hydrogen over Nitrogen-doped TiO2 Nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Xiao-Bo; JIANG,Xiao-Ying; HUANG,Jian-Hua; WANG,Xue-Jing

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO2 nanoparticle photocatalysts were obtained by an annealing method with gaseous ammonia and nitrogen. The influence of dopant N on the crystal structure was characterized by XRD, XPS, BET, TEM and UV-Vis spectra. The results of XRD indicate that, the crystal phase transforms from anatase to rutile structure gradually with increase of annealing temperature from 300 to 700 ℃. XPS studies indicate that the nitrogen atom enters the TiO2 lattice and occupies the position of oxygen atom. Agglomeration of particles is found in TEM im-ages after annealing. BET results show that the specific surface areas of N-doped samples from 44.61 to 38.27 m2/g are smaller than that of Degussa TiO2. UV-Vis spectra indicate that the absorption threshold shifts gradually with increase of annealing temperature, which shows absorption in the visible region. The influence of annealing condi-tion on the photocatalytic property has been researched over water decomposition to hydrogen, indicating that ni-trogen raises the photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution, and the modified TiO2 annealed for 2 h at 400 ℃ under gas of NH3/N2 (V/V= 1/2) mixture shows better efficiency of hydrogen evolution. Furthermore, the N-doped TiO2 nanoparticle catalysts have obvious visible light activity, evidenced by hydrogen evolution under visible light (λ>400 nm) irradiation. However, the catalytic activity under visible light irradiation is absent for Degussa as ref-erence and the N-doped TiO2 annealed at 700 ℃.

  5. Antimycobacterial and Antifungal Activities of Selected Four Salvia Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Tan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The content of essential oils of endemic Salvia cilicica was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS techniques. Spathulenol (23.8 %, caryophyllene oxide (14.9 % and hexadecanoic acid (10.3 % were identified as the major components in the oil of Salvia cilicica. Additionally, in this study ethanol extracts of the aerial parts and essential oils of four Salvia species ( S. cilicica, S. officinalis, S. fruticosa, S. tomentosa , as well as the roots of S. cilicica were investigated their antimycobacterial and antifungal activities including infectious diseases. The antimycobacterial activity was analyzed against three Mycobacterium tuberculosis (sensitive-, resistant-standard strains and multidrug resistance clinical isolate strains and the antifungal activity was compared with two dermotophytes (Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. erinacei and three Candida species by the broth microdilution method. The essentials oils of the four tested Salvia species showed high antimycobacterial and antifungal activity (MIC between 0.2-12.5 mcg/mL in comparison to the aerial parts and root extracts . The antifungal and antimycobacterial potential of the ethanol extracts and essential oils were introduced to determine whether, Salvia species can be used in phytotherapy against the yeasts, dermatophytes and M. tuberculosis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study of S. cilicica about their antimycobacterial and antifungal activities and chemical composition of its essential oils.

  6. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel McCormick

    2016-08-01

    Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner.

  7. Measurement of total-body oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon in vivo by photon activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulin, K.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of assessing nutritional status, the feasibility of measuring the total body quantities of the major body elements, i.e. oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon, using the photon beam of a 45 MV betatron and a whole-body counter, has been evaluated in detail. Following photon activation a single energy ..gamma..-radiation (.511 MeV) is observed from all three elements to be measured. The half-lives of /sup 15/O, /sup 13/N, and /sup 11/C, however, are sufficiently different (20.5 min, 10.0 min, and 20.4 min. respectively) to permit their measurement from an analysis of the measured decay curve. Following corrections for interfering reactions, a computer curve-fitting algorithm is used to resolve the data into /sup 15/O, /sup 13/N, and /sup 11/C components. Measurements of O, N, and C have been made both in phantoms and in live and dead rats. A comparison of the body composition results from this technique with results from chemical analysis indicates that measured carbon can quite accurately predict total body fat. The comparison of the total body nitrogen measurement by photon activation with total body protein by chemical analysis was inconclusive and suggests that further work be done to verify the estimated accuracy of the nitrogen measurement.

  8. Hierarchical nitrogen doped bismuth niobate architectures: Controllable synthesis and excellent photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Jungang, E-mail: lorinhjg@yahoo.com.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cao, Rui; Wang, Zheng [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiao, Shuqiang, E-mail: sjiao@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhu, Hongmin [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-05-30

    Graphical abstract: Efficient visible-light-driven photocatalysts of peony-like nitrogen doped Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} hierarchical architectures and silver-layered Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7-x}Nx heterostructures were successfully synthesized in this discovery. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} architectures were synthesized via two-step hydrothermal process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure calculations indicated that N replaced O in samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth mechanism is proposed for transformation of nanoparticles to microflowers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent activities of N-Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} architectures were obtained for degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced photocatalytic performance was observed for Ag/N-Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} architectures. - Abstract: Nitrogen doped bismuth niobate (N-Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}) hierarchical architectures were synthesized via a facile two-step hydrothermal process. XRD patterns revealed that the defect fluorite-type crystal structure of Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} remained intact upon nitrogen doping. Electron microscopy showed the N-Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} architecture has a unique peony-like spherical superstructure composed of numerous nanosheets. UV-vis spectra indicated that nitrogen doping in the compound results in a red-shift of the absorption edge from 450 nm to 470 nm. XPS indicated that [Bi/Nb]-N bonds were formed by inducing nitrogen to replace a small amount of oxygen in Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7-x}N{sub x}, which is explained by electronic structure calculations including energy band and density of states. Based on observations of architectures formation, a possible growth mechanism was proposed to explain the transformation of polyhedral-like nanoparticles to peony-like microflowers via an Ostwald riping mechanism followed by self-assembly. The N-Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} architectures due to the large specific surface area and nitrogen doping exhibited higher

  9. Adsorption measurements of argon, neon, krypton, nitrogen, and methane on activated carbon up to 650 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malbrunot, P.; Vidal, D.; Vermesse, J. (Centre Universitaire Paris-Nord, Villetaneuse (France)); Chahine, R.; Bose, T.K. (Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada))

    1992-02-01

    The physisorption of argon, krypton, neon, nitrogen, and methane on GAC activated carbon has been measured in the above critical region by a dielectric method. The measurements were done at room temperature and at pressures up to 650 MPa corresponding to reduced densities of up to 3.25. With the exception of nitrogen, all the measured excess adsorption isotherms show a similar behavior. They exhibit a maximum followed by a downward straight line intercepting the bulk density axis at around the liquid density of the adsorbate in the normal liquid range. The surface excess adsorption isotherms are well represented over the entire density range by Fischer's three-parameter integral equation. The results are also characterized in terms of the critical parameters and the reduced variables of the adsorbates. 21 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Determination of whole-body nitrogen and radiation assessment using in vivo prompt gamma activation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, C; Wei, Y Y; Chen, Y Y

    1993-06-01

    Body nitrogen content in the phantom is measured by semiconducting and scintillation spectrometers using in vivo prompt gamma-ray activation analysis technique. The effective dose rate equivalents for sensitive organs and tissues inside the phantom are assessed by dosimetric measurement and neutron transport calculation. The bismuth germanate scintillator is found superior to the germanium semiconducting detector to quantitatively measure the photopeak of the 10.829 MeV prompt gamma-ray emitted from the 14N(n, gamma) reaction. Recommended scanning period for current setup using the BGO detector is 1 h on the modified mobile nuclear reactor. The effective dose equivalents from both neutrons and gamma-rays are estimated around 63 microSv per scan in the phantom test, making it a safe and reliable nuclear analytical method for in vivo body nitrogen measurement.

  11. Determination of whole-body nitrogen and radiation assessment using in vivo prompt gamma activation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien Chung; Yuanyaw Wei; Yayu Chen (National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Science)

    1993-06-01

    Body nitrogen content in the phantom is measured by semiconducting and scintillation spectrometers using in vivo prompt gamma-ray activation analysis technique. The effective dose rate equivalents for sensitive organs and tissues inside the phantom are assessed by dosimetric measurement and neutron transport calculation. The bismuth germanate scintillator is found superior to the germanium semiconducting detector to quantitatively measure the photopeak of the 10.829 MeV prompt gamma-ray emitted from the [sup 14]N(n,[gamma]) reaction. Recommended scanning period for current setup using the BGO detector is 1 h on the modified mobile nuclear reactor. The effective dose equivalents from both neutrons and gamma-rays are estimated around 63 [mu]Sv per scan in the phantom test, making it a safe and reliable nuclear analytical method for in vivo body nitrogen measurement. (author).

  12. Synthesis, characterization and visible light photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped zinc oxide nanospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul B. Lavand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pure and Nitrogen (N-doped ZnO nanospheres were successfully prepared using microemulsion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD study indicates formation of nanosized N-doped ZnO with wurtzite phase. Nitrogen incorporation into oxygen site of ZnO causes lattice compression and small peak shift toward lower 2θ value. Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR measurements revealed the presence of N in ZnO lattice. Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM study revealed spherical morphology of pure and N-doped ZnO samples. UV–visible spectra show that N-doping significantly enhanced the light absorption capacity of ZnO in the visible region. N-doped ZnO exhibits higher photocatalytic activity compared with that of commercial and pure ZnO nanoparticles. As prepared nanosized N-doped ZnO photocatalyst is highly stable and reusable.

  13. Nitrogen fractions and mineral content in different lupin species (Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius, and Lupinus luteus). Changes induced by the alpha-galactoside extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres, Jesus M; Aranda, Pilar; López-Jurado, María; Urbano, Gloria

    2007-09-05

    The protein and mineral composition of different varieties of three different lupin species (Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius, and Lupinus luteus) and the effect of alpha-galactoside removal by means of a hydroalcoholic extraction process on such composition were studied in relationship to nutrient distribution among the different anatomical parts of the seed (embryo, cotyledon, and seed coat). The extent of processing-derived protein insolubilization was assessed by both chemical and electrophoretic techniques and related to the amount of nitrogen soluble in H(2)O, NaCl, ethanol, NaOH, and sodium dodecyl sulfate/beta-mercaptoethanol (SDS/BME). The alpha-galactoside extraction process caused a significant increase in the amount of total and insoluble nitrogen and decreased the amount of soluble protein nitrogen, without affecting the content of soluble nonprotein nitrogen. alpha-Galactoside extraction was not effective at decreasing the levels of Mn present in lupins, and processing caused an increase in the content of this mineral in all of the species studied with the exception of L. albus var. multolupa. In general, the effect of processing on mineral content varied with the different lupin species, and mineral losses were lower in L. luteus.

  14. Control of the aeration volume in an activated sludge process for nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, P; Carlsson, B

    2002-01-01

    Biological nitrogen removal in an activated sludge process is obtained by two biological processes; nitrification and denitrification. Nitrifying bacteria need dissolved oxygen and a sufficiently large aeration volume for converting ammonium to nitrate in the wastewater. The objective of this paper is to develop an automatic control strategy for adjusting the aerated volume so that the effluent ammonium level can be kept close to a desired value despite major changes in the influent load. The strategy is based on applying exact linearization of the IAWO Activated Sludge Process Model No 1. Simulation results show that the suggested controller effectively attenuates process disturbances.

  15. ADSORPTION ISOTHERMS AND POTENTIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF NITROGEN ON VARIOUS ACTIVATED CARBONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of four activated carbons (Norit RB1, Chemviron BPL, Monolit, and Ambersorb-572) have been examined by nitrogen adsorption at 77.5 K. A method for adsorption potential distribution calculation has been proposed based on the adsorption isotherms. This distribution provides information about possible changes in the Gibbs free energy caused by the energetic and geometrical heterogeneities of an activated carbon as well as by the adsorbate-related entropic effects. The general character of the adsorption potential distribution is clearly visible by its simple relation to the micropore and mesopore distribution.

  16. Bioactive compounds and scavenging capacity of extracts from different parts of Vismia cauliflora against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Alessandra Braga; Berto, Alessandra; Chisté, Renan Campos; Freitas, Marisa; Visentainer, Jesuí V; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2015-01-01

    Vismia cauliflora A.C.Sm. [Hypericaceae (Clusiaceae)] is a plant from Amazonian forest. It is used by Amerindians to treat dermatosis and inflammatory processes in the skin and has been considered an interesting source of bioactive compounds. We evaluated the scavenging capacity of extracts from V. cauliflora (leaf, branch, stem bark, flower, and whole fruit) against reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS), namely, superoxide radical ([Formula: see text]), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), nitric oxide ((•)NO), and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). In addition, for the first time, the profile of phenolic compounds and carotenoids was determined. The scavenging capacities of each extract were determined using specific probes (fluorescent, colorimetric, and chemiluminescent) to detect different reactive species ((1)O2, HOCl, H2O2, [Formula: see text], (•)NO, and ONOO(-)). The identification and the quantification of phenolic compounds and carotenoids were carried out by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and HPLC-DAD, respectively. (-)-Epicatechin and proanthocyanidin dimers and trimer were the major phenolic compounds tentatively identified in leaf, branch, stem bark, and flower extracts, while dihydroxybenzoic acids were the major compounds in whole fruit extracts. All-trans-zeinoxanthin and all-trans-β-carotene were the major carotenoids tentatively identified in leaf extracts. All extracts of V. cauliflora showed high efficiency against all tested ROS and RNS, although flower and stem bark extracts exhibited the most remarkable scavenging capacity, especially for (•)NO and ONOO(-). Vismia cauliflora has great potential to be used in the development of phytopharmaceutical products due to its characteristic of being a promising source of bioactive compounds with high antioxidant properties.

  17. Assessment of Serum Nitrogen Species and Inflammatory Parameters in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Different Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Niedziela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of nitric oxide and its reactive derivatives (NOx is well known in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, which is an inflammatory disease while NOx seems to be important in coordinating inflammatory response. The purpose of the present study was to assess serum NOx as one of the nitrogen species and inflammatory parameters in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and to compare the effectiveness of various types of disease-modifying therapies that reduce nitric oxide and inflammatory biomarkers. Elevated NOx level was observed in patients who received the first-line disease-modifying therapy (interferons beta-1a and beta-1b in comparison with the subjects treated with the second-line disease-modifying therapy (natalizumab; fingolimod and healthy controls without significant differences in C-reactive protein and interleukin-1 beta. A negative correlation was observed between serum NOx level and the duration of multiple sclerosis confirmed in the whole study population and in subjects treated with the first-line agents. Only serum NOx, concentration could reveal a potential efficacy of disease-modifying therapy with a better reduction in NOx level due to the second-line agents of disease-modifying therapy.

  18. Infrared Measurements of Several Nitrogen Species Above the South Pole in December 1980 and November - December 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1987-01-01

    In December 1980 and November-December 1986, the University of Denver atmospheric spectroscopy group recorded numerous high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra from the Amundsen-Scott south pole station. These spectra were obtained by Frank J. Murcray and Frank H. Murcray with a Michelson-type Fourier transform spectrometer and show absorption features of a number of minor and trace atmospheric gases with a minimum of atmospheric water vapor absorption. Quantifications of the total column amounts of O3, CH4, N2O, and H2O from the 1980 observations and RCI from the 1986 observations have been reported along with an atlas of the 750-960/ cm spectral region. In the present study, we report measurements of HNO3 total column amounts deduced from both data sets and NO, and NO2 total column amounts from the 1986 data set. Nitric acid may be important in the chemistry which creates the spring Antarctic ozone minimum, since it may condense in the cold winter polar stratosphere and become the dominant component of polar stratospheric clouds. The present measurements were obtained shortly after the austral spring ozone minimum and define for the first time the ambient levels of these nitrogen species immediately following the breakup of the polar vortex.

  19. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species disturb Ca2+ oscillations in insulin-secreting MIN6 β-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Salvatore; Tagliavini, Alessia; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances in pulsatile insulin secretion and Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic β-cells are early markers of diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are still incompletely understood. Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) are implicated in reduced β-cell function, and ROS/RNS target several Ca2+ pumps and channels. Thus, we hypothesized that ROS/RNS could disturb Ca2+ oscillations and downstream insulin pulsatility. We show that ROS/RNS production by photoactivation of aluminum phthalocyanine chloride (AlClPc) abolish or accelerate Ca2+ oscillations in the MIN6 β-cell line, depending on the amount of ROS/RNS. Application of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin modifies the Ca2+ response to high concentrations of ROS/RNS. Further, thapsigargin produces effects that resemble those elicited by moderate ROS/RNS production. These results indicate that ROS/RNS interfere with endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handling. This idea is supported by theoretical studies using a mathematical model of Ca2+ handling adapted to MIN6 cells. Our results suggest a putative link between ROS/RNS and disturbed pulsatile insulin secretion. PMID:26732126

  20. Depletion of ozone and reservoir species of chlorine and nitrogen oxide in the lower Antarctic polar vortex measured from aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat, T.; Voigt, C.; Kaufmann, S.; Grooß, J.-U.; Ziereis, H.; Dörnbrack, A.; Hoor, P.; Bozem, H.; Engel, A.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Hüneke, T.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Zahn, A.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.; Schlager, H.

    2017-06-01

    Novel airborne in situ measurements of inorganic chlorine, nitrogen oxide species, and ozone were performed inside the lower Antarctic polar vortex and at its edge in September 2012. We focus on one flight during the Transport and Composition of the LMS/Earth System Model Validation (TACTS/ESMVal) campaign with the German research aircraft HALO (High-Altitude LOng range research aircraft), reaching latitudes of 65°S and potential temperatures up to 405 K. Using the early winter correlations of reactive trace gases with N2O from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), we find high depletion of chlorine reservoir gases up to ˜40% (0.8 ppbv) at 12 km to 14 km altitude in the vortex and 0.4 ppbv at the edge in subsided stratospheric air with mean ages up to 4.5 years. We observe denitrification of up to 4 ppbv, while ozone was depleted by 1.2 ppmv at potential temperatures as low as 380 K. The advanced instrumentation aboard HALO enables high-resolution measurements with implications for the oxidation capacity of the lowermost stratosphere.

  1. Active Optical Sensing of Spring Maize for In-Season Diagnosis of Nitrogen Status Based on Nitrogen Nutrition Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Xia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen (N nutrition index (NNI is a reliable indicator of crop N status and there is an urgent need to develop efficient technologies for non-destructive estimation of NNI to support the practical applications of precision N management strategies. The objectives of this study were to: (i validate a newly established critical N dilution curve for spring maize in Northeast China; (ii determine the potential of using the GreenSeeker active optical sensor to non-destructively estimate NNI; and (iii evaluate the performance of different N status diagnostic approaches based on estimated NNI via the GreenSeeker sensor measurements. Four field experiments involving six N rates (0, 60, 120,180, 240, and 300 kg·ha−1 were conducted in 2014 and 2015 in Lishu County, Jilin Province in Northeast China. The results indicated that the newly established critical N dilution curve was suitable for spring maize N status diagnosis in the study region. Across site-years and growth stages (V5–V10, GreenSeeker sensor-based vegetation indices (VIs explained 87%–90%, 87%–89% and 83%–84% variability of leaf area index (LAI, aboveground biomass (AGB and plant N uptake (PNU, respectively. However, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI became saturated when LAI > 2 m2·m−2, AGB > 3 t·ha−1 or PNU > 80 kg·ha−1. The GreenSeeker-based VIs performed better for estimating LAI, AGB and PNU at V5–V6 and V7–V8 than the V9–V10 growth stages, but were very weakly related to plant N concentration. The response index calculated with GreenSeeker NDVI (RI–NDVI and ratio vegetation index (R2 = 0.56–0.68 performed consistently better than the original VIs (R2 = 0.33–0.55 for estimating NNI. The N status diagnosis accuracy rate using RI–NDVI was 81% and 71% at V7–V8 and V9–V10 growth stages, respectively. We conclude that the response indices calculated with the GreenSeeker-based vegetation indices can be used to estimate spring maize NNI non

  2. Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov., a nitrogen fixing species isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) with the ability to effectively nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Salazar-Salazar, Corelly; Méndez, Rafael Díaz; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Hirsch, Ann M; Vásquez-Murrieta, María Soledad; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina

    2013-12-01

    During a survey of Burkholderia species with potential use in agrobiotechnology, a group of 12 strains was isolated from the rhizosphere and rhizoplane of tomato plants growing in Mexico (Nepantla, Mexico State). A phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strains are related to Burkholderia kururiensis and Burkholderia mimosarum (97.4 and 97.1 %, respectively). However, they induced effective nitrogen-fixing nodules on roots of Phaseolus vulgaris. Based on polyphasic taxonomy, the group of strains represents a novel species for which the name Burkholderia caballeronis sp. nov. is proposed. The type species is TNe-841(T) (= LMG 26416(T) = CIP 110324(T)).

  3. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Lichen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Marković

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+ bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells.

  4. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of five lichen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Tatjana; Stamenković, Slaviša; Cvetković, Vladimir; Tošić, Svetlana; Stanković, Milan; Radojević, Ivana; Stefanović, Olgica; Comić, Ljiljana; Dačić, Dragana; Curčić, Milena; Marković, Snežana

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidative, antimicrobial and antiproliferative potentials of the methanol extracts of the lichen species Parmelia sulcata, Flavoparmelia caperata, Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea were evaluated. The total phenolic content of the tested extracts varied from 78.12 to 141.59 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GA)/g of extract and the total flavonoid content from 20.14 to 44.43 mg of rutin equivalent (Ru)/g of extract. The antioxidant capacities of the lichen extracts were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging. Hypogymnia physodes with the highest phenolic content showed the strongest DPPH radical scavenging effect. Further, the antimicrobial potential of the lichen extracts was determined by a microdilution method on 29 microorganisms, including 15 strains of bacteria, 10 species of filamentous fungi and 4 yeast species. A high antimicrobial activity of all the tested extracts was observed with more potent inhibitory effects on the growth of Gram (+) bacteria. The highest antimicrobial activity among lichens was demonstrated by Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea. Finally, the antiproliferative activity of the lichen extracts was explored on the colon cancer adenocarcinoma cell line HCT-116 by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) viability assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. The methanol extracts of Hypogymnia physodes and Cladonia foliacea showed a better cytotoxic activity than the other extracts. All lichen species showed the ability to induce apoptosis of HCT-116 cells.

  5. Daily dynamics of the number and activity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria in fallow and intensely cultivated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emer, N. R.; Semenov, A. M.; Zelenev, V. V.; Zinyakova, N. B.; Kostina, N. V.; Golichenkov, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    The daily dynamics (during 33 days) of the number (colony-forming units (CFU)) of nitrogen-fixing bacteria and of the nitrogen-fixing activity (the acetylene method) were determined in a gray forest soil under a fallow land and under an intensely cultivated field. The daily dynamics of the CFUs determined on the nitrogen-free medium in the samples from both plots had wavelike patterns. The daily values of the actual and potential activities of nitrogen fixation in the samples from the fallow land plot and of the actual activity of nitrogen fixation in the samples from the intensely cultivated soil were low and close to the detection limit. The potential activity of nitrogen fixation in the intensely cultivated soil was significant and also had a wavelike pattern. The harmonic analysis of the daily dynamics of the CFUs and nitrogen fixation showed the statistically significant harmonics of these biological characteristics pointing to the objective and regular character of the wavelike dynamics. The revealed dynamics of the biological characteristics of the soils and the methods of their analysis are important in terms of the comparative study of the biological properties of different soils.

  6. Microorganisms in dry polar snow are involved in the exchanges of reactive nitrogen species with the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, A; Domine, F; Esposito, G; Morin, S; Savarino, J; Nardino, M; Montagnoli, M; Bonneville, J-M; Clement, J-C; Ianniello, A; Beine, H J

    2010-01-15

    The snowpack is a complex photochemical reactor that emits a wide variety of reactive molecules to the atmosphere. In particular, the photolysis of nitrate ions, NO(3)(-), produces NO, NO(2), and HONO, which affects the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. We report measurements in the European High Arctic where we observed for the first time emissions of NO, NO(2), and HONO by the seasonal snowpack in winter, in the complete or near-complete absence of sunlight and in the absence of melting. We also detected unusually high concentrations of nitrite ions, NO(2)(-), in the snow. These results suggest that microbial activity in the snowpack is responsible for the observed emissions. Isotopic analysis of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) in the snow confirm that these ions, at least in part, do not have an atmospheric origin and are most likely produced by the microbial oxidation of NH(4)(+) coming from clay minerals into NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-). These metabolic pathways also produce NO. Subsequent dark abiotic reactions lead to NO(2) and HONO production. The snow cover is therefore not only an active photochemical reactor but also a biogeochemical reactor active in the cycling of nitrogen and it can affect atmospheric composition all year round.

  7. Elucidation of major contributors involved in nitrogen removal and transcription level of nitrogen-cycling genes in activated sludge from WWTPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, You; Liang, Peixin; Gong, Ting; Cao, Xiangyu; Zhao, Ying; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2017-01-01

    We investigated nitrogen-cycle bacterial communities in activated sludge from 8 municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Redundancy analyses (RDA) showed that temperature was the most significant driving force in shaping microbial community structure, followed by influent NH4+ and total nitrogen (TN). The diversity of ammonia oxidizing and nitrite reducing bacteria were investigated by the construction of amoA, nirS and nirK gene clone libraries. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Thauera and Mesorhizobium were the predominant nitrite reducing bacteria, and Nitrosomonas was the only detected ammonia oxidizing bacteria in all samples. Quantification of transcription level of nirS and nirK genes indicated that nirS-type nitrite reducing bacteria played the dominant roles in nitrite reduction process. Transcription level of nirS gene positively correlated with influent NH4+ and TN significantly, whereas inversely linked with hydraulic retention time. Temperature had a strong positive correlation to transcription level of amoA gene. Overall, this study deepened our understanding of the major types of ammonia oxidizing and nitrite reducing bacteria in activated sludge of municipal WWTPs. The relationship between transcription level of nitrogen-cycle genes and operational or environmental variables of WWTPs revealed in this work could provide guidance for optimization of operating parameters and improving the performance of nitrogen removal. PMID:28294196

  8. Influence of carbon and nitrogen sources on growth, nitrogenase activity, and carbon metabolism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera, Noel A; Ortega, Eduardo; Rodés, Rosa; Lluch, Carmen

    2004-09-01

    The effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources on the growth, nitrogenase activity, and carbon metabolism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus were investigated. The amino acids asparagine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid affected microbial growth and nitrogenase activity. Several enzymatic activities involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were affected by the carbon source used. In addition, glucose and gluconate significantly increased the oxygen consumption (respiration rate) of whole cells of G. diazotrophicus grown under aerobic conditions. Enzymes responsible for direct oxidation of glucose and gluconate were especially active in cells grown with sucrose and gluconate. The presence of amino acids in the apoplastic and symplastic sap of sugarcane stems suggests that these compounds might be of importance in the regulation of growth and nitrogenase activity during the symbiotic association. The information obtained from the plant-bacterium association together with the results of other biochemical studies could contribute to the development of biotechnological applications of G. diazotrophicus.

  9. Electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes with different morphologies for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhu; Higgins, Drew [Department of Chemical Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Chen Zhongwei, E-mail: zhwchen@uwaterloo.c [Department of Chemical Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2010-06-30

    Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) were synthesized by a single step chemical vapor deposition technique using either ferrocene or iron(II) phthalocyanine as catalyst and pyridine as the carbon and nitrogen precursor. Variations in surface morphology and electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were observed between the NCNTs synthesized using different catalysts. The structural and chemical characterizations were carried out using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical activity of NCNTs was evaluated with rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) voltammetry. Structural characterization suggested more defects formed on the NCNTs synthesized from ferrocene (Fc-NCNTs) which led to a rugged surface morphology compared to the NCNTs synthesized from iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc-NCNTs). Based on the RRDE voltammetry study, Fc-NCNTs demonstrated much higher activity for ORR than FePc-NCNT. Evidences from the structural and chemical characterizations illustrate the potential impact of catalyst structure in shaping the surface structure of NCNTs and the positive effect of surface defects on ORR activity. These results showed that potential improvements on ORR activity of NCNTs could be achieved by tailoring the surface structure of NCNTs by using catalysts with different structures.

  10. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSkimming, Brian M., E-mail: mcskimming@engineering.ucsb.edu; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Chaix, Catherine [RIBER S.A., 3a Rue Casimir Périer, BP 70083, 95873 Bezons Cedex (France)

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  11. Modification of the Kjeldahl noncasein nitrogen method to include bovine milk concentrates and milks from other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Karen L; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    The objective of our research was to modify the current indirect casein method for bovine milk to enable it to be applied to bovine milk, bovine milk concentrates, and milks of other species that contain a protein concentration up to 9% (wt/wt). Our work used a series of bovine milk concentrates from about 3 to 9% protein with the same casein as a percentage of true protein to determine the amount of buffer required and pH of the noncasein nitrogen (NCN) filtrate to achieve consistent estimates of casein and casein as percent of true protein. As the concentration of protein in milk increased (either in bovine milk concentrates or in milks of other species), the amount of buffer needed for the NCN sample preparation method to achieve a filtrate pH of 4.6 increased. In the first part of the study using a series of bovine milk concentrates, it was demonstrated that the method gave more consistent predictions of casein as a percentage of true protein when the final NCN filtrate pH was between 4.5 and 4.6 at 38°C. When the amount of buffer added to the sample was not sufficient (i.e., the filtrate pH was too high), the filtrates were not clear. A polynomial equation was developed for prediction of the amount of acetic acid or sodium acetate buffer required to achieve pH 4.5 to 4.6 for milk protein concentrations from 3 to 9% protein using bovine milk and milk concentrates. When the equation developed using cow milk was applied to goat, sheep, and water buffalo milks, it correctly predicted the volume of reagents needed to achieve a final NCN filtrate pH of 4.6 at 38°C. We also verified as part of this work that the ability to measure NPN content of milk was not influenced by protein content of milk in the range from 3 to 9% protein. The results of this study will be used as the basis for proposed changes in the official methods for measurement of the casein content of milk to expand the scope of the method so it can be used to achieve accurate results for milk

  12. Effects of Nitrogen Addition on Leaf Decomposition of Single-Species and Litter Mixture in Pinus tabulaeformis Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The litter decomposition process is closely correlated with nutrient cycling and the maintenance of soil fertility in the forest ecosystem. In particular, the intense environmental concern about atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition requires a better understanding of its influence on the litter decomposition process. This study examines the responses of single-species litter and litter mixture decomposition processes to N addition in Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. ecosystems. Chinese pine litter, Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica Fisch. ex Ledeb. litter, and a pine–oak mixture were selected from a plantation and a natural forest of Chinese pine. Four N addition treatments, i.e., control (N0: 0 kg N ha−1·year−1, low-N (N1: 5 kg N ha−1·year−1, medium-N (N2: 10 kg N ha−1·year−1, and high-N (N3: 15 kg N ha−1·year−1, were applied starting May 2010. In the plantation, N addition significantly stimulated the decomposition of the Chinese pine litter. In the natural forest, N addition had variable effects on the decomposition of single-species litter and the litter mixture. A stimulatory effect of the high-N treatment on the Chinese pine litter decomposition could be attributed to a decrease in the substrate C:N ratio. However, an opposite effect was found for the Mongolian oak litter decomposition. The stimulating effect of N addition on the Chinese pine litter may offset the suppressive effect on the Mongolian oak litter, resulting in a neutral effect on the litter mixture. These results suggest that the different responses in decomposition of single-species litter and the litter mixture to N addition are mainly attributed to litter chemical composition. Further investigations are required to characterize the effect of long-term high-level N addition on the litter decomposition as N deposition is likely to increase rapidly in the region where this study was conducted.

  13. Sulfite Oxidase Activity Is Essential for Normal Sulfur, Nitrogen and Carbon Metabolism in Tomato Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brychkova, Galina; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Batushansky, Albert; Grishkevich, Vladislav; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Fait, Aaron; Amir, Rachel; Fluhr, Robert; Sagi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Plant sulfite oxidase [SO; E.C.1.8.3.1] has been shown to be a key player in protecting plants against exogenous toxic sulfite. Recently we showed that SO activity is essential to cope with rising dark-induced endogenous sulfite levels in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum/Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Rheinlands Ruhm). Here we uncover the ramifications of SO impairment on carbon, nitrogen and sulfur (S) metabolites. Current analysis of the wild-type and SO-impaired plants revealed that under controlled conditions, the imbalanced sulfite level resulting from SO impairment conferred a metabolic shift towards elevated reduced S-compounds, namely sulfide, S-amino acids (S-AA), Co-A and acetyl-CoA, followed by non-S-AA, nitrogen and carbon metabolite enhancement, including polar lipids. Exposing plants to dark-induced carbon starvation resulted in a higher degradation of S-compounds, total AA, carbohydrates, polar lipids and total RNA in the mutant plants. Significantly, a failure to balance the carbon backbones was evident in the mutants, indicated by an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle intermediates, whereas a decrease was shown in stressed wild-type plants. These results indicate that the role of SO is not limited to a rescue reaction under elevated sulfite, but SO is a key player in maintaining optimal carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in tomato plants. PMID:27135342

  14. Antibacterial activities of extracts from twelve Centaurea species from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekeli Yener

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Centaurea (Asteraceae have been used in traditional plant-based medicine. The methanol extracts of twelve Centaurea species, of which five are endemic to Turkey flora, were screened for antibacterial activity against four bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by the microdilution method and the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC of the extracts were determined. C. cariensis subsp. microlepis exhibited an antimicrobial effect on all tested microorganisms. The extracts from eight Centaurea species (C. balsamita, C. calolepis, C. cariensis subsp. maculiceps, C. cariensis subsp. microlepis, C. kotschyi var. kotschyi, C. solstitialis subsp. solstitialis, C. urvillei subsp. urvillei and C. virgata possessed antibacterial activity against several of the tested microorganisms.

  15. The influence of oxidation with nitric acid on the preparation and properties of active carbon enriched in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzak, Robert [Laboratory of Coal Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)], E-mail: pietrob@amu.edu.pl; Nowicki, Piotr; Wachowska, Helena [Laboratory of Coal Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)

    2009-01-01

    The effect of oxidation by 20% nitric acid on the properties and performance of active carbons enriched with nitrogen by means of the reaction with urea in the presence of air has been studied. The study has been made on demineralised orthocoking coal and the carbonisates obtained from it at 600 or 700 deg. C, subjected to the processes of nitrogenation, oxidation and activation with KOH in different sequences. The amount of nitrogen introduced into the carbon with the aid of urea has been found to depend on the stage at which the process of nitrogenation was performed. The process of oxidation of the demineralised coal and the active carbon obtained from the former has been found to favour nitrogen introduction into the carbon structure. In the process of nitrogenation of the carbonisates the amount of nitrogen introduced has inversely depended on the temperature of carbonisation. The modifications of the processes permitted obtaining materials of different textural parameters, different acid-base character of the surface and different iodine sorption capacity.

  16. Natural clinoptilolite exchanged with iron: characterization and catalytic activity in nitrogen monoxide reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Tito-Ferro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the natural clinoptilolite from Tasajeras deposit, Cuba, modified by hydrothermal ion-exchange with solutions of iron (II sulfate and iron (III nitrate in acid medium. Besides this, its catalytic activity to reduce nitrogen monoxide with carbon monoxide/propene in the presence of oxygen was evaluated. The characterization was performed by Mössbauer and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopies and adsorption measurements. The obtained results lead to conclude that in exchanged samples, incorporated divalent and trivalent irons are found in octahedral coordination. Both irons should be mainly in cationic extra-framework positions inside clinoptilolite channels as charge compensating cations, and also as iron oxy-hydroxides resulting from limited hydrolysis of these cations. The iron (III exchanged samples has a larger amount of iron oxy-hydroxides agglomerates. The iron (II exchanged samples have additionally iron (II sulfate adsorbed. The catalytic activity in the nitrogen monoxide reduction is higher in the exchanged zeolites than starting. Among all samples, those exchanged of iron (II has the higher catalytic activity. This lead to outline that, main catalytically active centers are associated with divalent iron.

  17. Differential Effects of Oxidised and Reduced Nitrogen on Vegetation and Soil Chemistry of Species-Rich Acidic Grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorland, E.; Stevens, C.J.; Gaudnik, C.; Corcket, E.; Rotthier, S.L.F.; Wotherspoon, K.; Jokerud, M.; Vandvik, V.; Soons, M.B.; Hefting, M.M.; Aarrestad, P.A.; Alard, D.; Diekmann, M.; Dupre, C.; Dise, N.B.; Gowing, D.J.G.; Bobbink, R.

    2013-01-01

    Emissions and deposition of ammonia and nitrogen oxides have strongly increased since the 1950s. This has led to significant changes in the nitrogen (N) cycle, vegetation composition and plant diversity in many ecosystems of high conservation value in Europe. As a consequence of different regional p

  18. Comparing compound-specific and bulk stable nitrogen isotope trophic discrimination factors across multiple freshwater fish species and diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of nitrogen stable isotopes for estimation of animal trophic position has become an indispensable approach in food web ecology. Compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids is a new approach for estimating trophic position that may overcome key issues associated with nitrogen stable iso...

  19. Effects of different nitrogen sources on growth, chlorophyll concentration, nitrate reductase activity and carbon and nitrogen distribution in Araucaria angustifolia

    OpenAIRE

    Garbin,Mário L.; Dillenburg,Lúcia R.

    2008-01-01

    The southern Brazilian highland plateau is a mosaic of two contrasting plant communities, Araucaria forests and grasslands, which differ in the relative abundances and spatial patterns of soil nitrate and ammonium. However, we still do not know the inorganic N preferences of one key species in this mosaic, Araucaria angustifolia, the dominant tree species in the Araucaria forests and an important tree species invading the adjacent grasslands. Growth responses measured in a greenhouse study de...

  20. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of extracts prepared from Polygonaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Lajter, Ildikó; Hohmann, Judit; Jakab, Gusztáv; Vasas, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of aqueous and organic extracts of 27 selected species belonging in five genera (Fallopia, Oxyria, Persicaria, Polygonum and Rumex) of the family Polygonaceae occurring in the Carpathian Basin were tested in vitro. From different plant parts (aerial parts, leaves, flowers, fruits and roots), a total of 196 extracts were prepared by subsequent extraction with methanol and hot H2O and solvent-solvent partition of the MeOH extract yielding n-hexane, chloroform and 50% MeOH subextracts. It was found that the chloroform subextracts and/or the remaining 50% MeOH extracts of Fallopia species (F. bohemica, F. japonica and F. sachalinensis), Rumex species (R. acetosa, R. acetosella, R. alpinus, R. conglomeratus, R. crispus, R. hydrolapathus, R. pulcher, R. stenophyllus, R. thyrsiflorus, R. obtusifolius subsp. subalpinus, R. patientia) and Polygonum bistorta, Polygonum hydropiper, Polygonum lapathifolium and Polygonum viviparum demonstrated the highest XO inhibitory activity (>85% inhibition) at 400 µg/mL. The IC50 values of the active extracts were also determined. On the basis of the results, these plants, and especially P. hydropiper and R. acetosella, are considered worthy of activity-guided phytochemical investigations. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. How nitrogen and sulphur addition, and a single drought event affect root phosphatase activity in Phalaris arundinacea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robroek, B.J.M.; Adema, E.B.; Venterink, H.O.; Leonardson, L.; Wassen, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Conservation and restoration of fens and fen meadows often aim to reduce soil nutrients, mainly nitrogen (N) andphosphorus (P). The biogeochemistry of P has received much attention as P-enrichment is expected to negatively impact on species diversity in wetlands. It is known that N, sulphur (S) and

  2. Visible-light activity of N-LiInO2: Band structure modifications through interstitial nitrogen doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaiqiang; Xu, Difa; Zhang, Xiangchao; Luo, Zhuo; Wang, Yutang; Zhang, Shiying

    2017-01-01

    Element doping is a promising strategy to improve the photo-response and photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalyst with a wide band gap. To reduce the band gap of LiInO2 that is considered as a novel photocatalyst, nitrogen-doped LiInO2 (N-LiInO2) is successfully fabricated by treating LiInO2 and urea at 200 °C. It is found that interstitial instead of substitutional configurations are formed in the crystal structure of N-LiInO2 due to the low-treating temperature and rich-oxygen conditions. The interstitial N-doping forms a doping state with 0.6 eV above the valence band maximum and a defect state with 0.1 eV below the conduction band minimum, reducing the band gap of LiInO2 from 3.5 to 2.8 eV. N-LiInO2 exhibits higher photocatalytic activity towards methylene blue (MB) degradation under 380 nm light irradiation, which is 1.4 times that of pure LiInO2. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of N-LiInO2 is attributed to the extended light absorption and the improved charge carrier separation, which result in more reactive species participating in the photcatalytic process. This work provides a further understanding on tuning the band structure of semiconductor photocatalyst by N-doping strategies.

  3. Stoichiometric deduction of activated sludge process for organic carbon and nitrogen removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-yong; ZOU Lian-pei

    2009-01-01

    The activated sludge process (ASP) is the most generally applied biological wastewater treatment method. The ASP for the removal of organic carbon and nitrogen can be looked as the combination of eight processes. In order to set up an ASP model, the stoichiometric coefficients should be deduced so that the stoichiometric matrix can be presented. The important assumptions and simplifications behind the model for ASP are enumerated. Using the matrix, mass balance equation and consistent units, the stoichiometric coefficients in the eight processes are exclusively deduced one by one.

  4. Effect of plasma jet diameter on the efficiency of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kakuta, Maito; Furuta, Hiroshi; Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-06-01

    The plasma jet generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in solution is important in biology, medicine, and disinfection. Studies using a wide variety of plasma jet devices have been carried out for this purpose, making it difficult to compare the performance between devices. In this study, we compared the efficiency of RONS generation in deionized (DI) water between 3.7-mm- and 800-µm-sized helium (He) plasma jets (hereafter mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively) at different treatment distances and times. The efficiency of RONS generation was determined by considering the total amount of RONS generated in DI water with respect to the input energy and gas consumption. We found that the mm-jet generated 20% more RONS in the DI water than the µm-jet at the optimized distance. However, when the input power and He gas consumption were taken into account, we discovered that the µm-jet was 5 times more efficient in generating RONS in the DI water. Under the parameters investigated in this study, the concentration of RONS continued to increase as a function of treatment time (up to 30 min). However treatment distance had a marked effect on the efficiency of RONS generation: treatment distances of 25 and 30 mm were optimal for the mm-jet and µm-jet, respectively. Our method of comparing the efficiency of RONS generation in solution between plasma jets could be used as a reference protocol for the development of efficient plasma jet sources for use in medicine, biology, and agriculture.

  5. Phenol Adsorption on Nitrogen-enriched Activated Carbon Prepared from Bamboo Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-enriched activated carbons prepared from bamboo residues were characterized by means of BET, XPS, and elemental analysis. Then adsorption experiments were carried out to study the effects of various physicochemical parameters such as contact time, temperature, pH, and initial concentration. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 120 min at a phenol concentration of 250 mg/L. When the pH was 4 and 0.1 g of the carbon absorbent and 100 mL of phenol solution at 250 mg/L were used, the phenol adsorption of the ACs with melamine and urea modifications were 219.09 mg/g and 214.45 mg/g, respectively. Both were greater than the capacity of unmodified AC, which was 163.82 mg/g. The Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation well described the experimental adsorption isotherms. The adsorption kinetics was well explained by pseudo-second-order kinetics rather than the pseudo-first-order. In conclusion, the nitrogen-enriched activated carbon proposed as adsorbents of the phenol wastewater were shown to be effective, which also means that bamboo residues have promise as activated carbon precursors for liquid phase adsorbents for environmental protection.

  6. Root carbon inputs to the rhizosphere stimulate extracellular enzyme activity and increase nitrogen availability in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Phillips, R.; Dragoni, D.; Drake, J. E.; Finzi, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    The mobilization of nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter in temperate forest soils is controlled by the microbial production and activity of extracellular enzymes. The exudation of carbon (C) by tree roots into the rhizosphere may subsidize the microbial production of extracellular enzymes in the rhizosphere and increase the access of roots to N. The objective of this research was to investigate whether rates of root exudation and the resulting stimulation of extracellular enzyme activity in the rhizosphere (i.e., rhizosphere effect) differs between tree species that form associations with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This research was conducted at two temperate forest sites, the Harvard Forest (HF) in Central MA and the Morgan Monroe State Forest (MMSF) in Southern IN. At the HF, we measured rates of root exudation and the rhizosphere effects on enzyme activity, N cycling, and C mineralization in AM and ECM soils. At the MMSF, we recently girdled AM and ECM dominated plots to examine the impact of severing belowground C allocation on rhizosphere processes. At both sites, the rhizosphere effect on proteolytic, chitinolytic and ligninolytic enzyme activities was greater in ECM soils than in AM soils. In particular, higher rates of proteolytic enzyme activity increased the availability of amino acid-N in ECM rhizospheres relative to the bulk soils. Further, this stimulation of enzyme activity was directly correlated with higher rates of C mineralization in the rhizosphere than in the bulk soil. Although not significantly different between species, root exudation of C comprised 3-10% of annual gross primary production at the HF. At the MMSF, experimental girdling led to a larger decline in soil respiration and enzyme activity in ECM plots than in AM plots. In both ECM and AM soils, however, girdling resulted in equivalent rates of enzyme activity in rhizosphere and corresponding bulk soils. The results of this study contribute to the

  7. Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-14

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Spores of Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis were harvested shortly after release from sporangia, incubated under...Dec-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Measurement of Metabolic Activity in Dormant Spores of Bacillus Species...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 spores, Bacillus , spore dormancy, 3-phosphoglycerate REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  8. Preparation and characterization of visible-light-active nitrogen-doped TiO2 photocatalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xian-huai; TANG Yu-chao; HU Chun; YU Han-qing; CHEN Chu-sheng

    2005-01-01

    A visible-light photocatalyst was prepared by calcination of the hydrolysis product of Ti(SO4 )2 with ammonia as precipitator. The color of this photocatalyst was vivid yellow. It could absorb light under 550 nm wavelength. The crystal structure of anatase was characterized by XRD. The structure analysis result of X-ray fluorescence(XRF) shows that doped-nitrogen was presented in the sample.The photocatalytic activities were evaluated using methyl orange and phenol as model pollutants. The photocatalytic activities of samples were increasing gradually with calcination temperature from 400℃ to 700℃ under UV irradiation. It can be seen that the degradation of methyl orange follows zero-order kinetics. However, the calcination temperatures have no significant influence on the degradation of phenol under sunlight. The N-doped catalyst shows higher activity than the bare one under solar irradiation.

  9. Thermodynamic Model for Calculating Activity of Nitrogen and Boron in Fe-C-B-N Molten Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shi-jun; PENG Jun; DONG Yuan-chi; LIU Li-xia; ZHOU Yun; CHEN Er-bao

    2009-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in Fe-C-B-N system was measured at 1 758 K,and the computational model on activity (action concentration) of nitrogen and boron was established based on phase diagram and the coexistence theory about metal melt structure model.Comparing the computed results with the experimental results,satisfactory conclusion can be obtained.The result shows that BN and B4C can exist in Fe-C-B-N molten metal at high temperature,which consequently restrains the nitrogen removal from the melt.However,B4C content is extremely low.Before graphite is precipitated,the influence of carbon on activity of nitrogen in melt is higher in ternary system than in binary system; however,this effect is contrary to that after graphite is precipitated.

  10. CNS active potentials of some Hypericum species of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P K; Suresh, B; Verpoorte, R

    2001-09-01

    Hypericum is a large genus comprising 200 species, wide spread on temperate region and tropical mountains. Several different species are available in Indian subcontinent. Psychopharmacological profiles of the two different Hypericum species e.g., H. hookerianum and H. patulum available in Nilgiris, India were investigated at two different doses (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) in different animal models viz. Spontaneous motor activity (SMA) test in mice; Exploratory behaviour test by Head dip test in mice and Y-maze test in rats; Effects on pentobarbitone induced sleeping time in mice and study of the effects on body temperature in rats. All the extracts tested showed enhancement in spontaneous motor activity (SMA) in mice and exploratory behavior by head dip test in mice and Y-maze test in rats. The extracts reduce significantly the pentobarbitone induced sleeping time in mice. When tested for their effect on body temperature in rats, the extract of H. hookerianum showed significant reduction in yeast induced pyrexia with no effect on normal body temperature, while H. patulum showed no activity in this experimental model.

  11. Nitrogen-fixing aerobic bacteria have higher genomic GC content than non-fixing species within the same genus

    OpenAIRE

    McEwan, Catriona E.; Gatherer, Derek; McEwan, Neil R.

    1998-01-01

    The genomic GC contents of both nitrogen-fixing and non-fixing members of eight genera of bacteria are investigated. Analysis by t-tests showed that in the two aerobic genera investigated (Aquaspirillum and Vibrio) there is a significantly higher GC content in the nitrogen-fixing members of the genus than in those unable to Fix nitrogen, whilst in anaerobic genera there is either no GC bias, or in the case of two genera (Rhodospirillum and Clostridium) there is a significantly higher GC conte...

  12. Nitrogen and carbohydrate fractions in exclusive Tifton 85 and in pasture oversown with annual winter forage species - 10.4025/actascianimsci.v34i1.11428

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Ruggieri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was undertaken at the Faculty of Agrarian and Veterinary Sciences (FCAV Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil, during winter-spring-summer of 2001-2002, to determine the fractionation of nitrogen and carbohydrates in Tifton 85 (Cynodon dactylon Vanderyst x Cynodon nlemfuensis (L. Pers, exclusively or oversown with winter annual forage species. Treatments comprised bristle oat (Avena strigosa Schreb, yellow oat (Avena byzantina C. Koch, triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack, bristle oat + yellow oat, bristle oat + triticale, yellow oat + triticale, bristle oat + yellow oat + triticale seeded in Tifton 85 and sole crop (control. Experimental design was composed of completely randomized blocks with three replications. Fodder was cut 20 cm high (presence of winter forage and 10 cm high (Tifton 85 pasture. Crude protein, total carbohydrate and the fractions of nitrogen compounds and carbohydrates were determined. Decrease was reported in the levels of chemical compounds in winter forage species and in Tifton 85 during the evaluation periods. The content of nitrogen compounds and carbohydrates varied widely during the evaluation period according to the morphological characteristics of grass species and botanical composition of pastures.

  13. Nitrogen substitution modifies the activity of cytisine on neuronal nicotinic receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnelle, Eric; Sparatore, Fabio; Canu-Boido, Caterina; Salvagno, Cristian; Baldani-Guerra, Barbara; Terstappen, Georg; Zwart, Ruud; Vijverberg, Henk; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2003-06-20

    Cytisine very potently binds and activates the alpha 3 beta 4 and alpha 7 nicotinic subtypes, but only partially agonises the alpha 4 beta 2 subtype. Although with a lower affinity than cytisine, new cytisine derivatives with different substituents on the basic nitrogen (CC1-CC8) bind to both the heteromeric and homomeric subtypes, with higher affinity for brain [3H]epibatidine receptors. The cytisine derivatives were tested on the Ca(2+) flux of native or transfected cell lines expressing the rat alpha 7, or human alpha 3 beta 4 or alpha 4 beta 2 subtypes using Ca(2+) dynamics in conjunction with a fluorescent image plate reader. None elicited any response at doses of up to 30-100 microM, but all inhibited agonist-induced responses. Compounds CC5 and CC7 were also electrophysiologically tested on oocyte-expressed rat alpha 4 beta 2, alpha 3 beta 4 and alpha 7 subtypes. CC5 competitively antagonised the alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 4 subtypes with similar potency, whereas CC7 only partially agonised them with maximum responses of respectively 3% and 11% of those of 1 mM acetylcholine. Neither compound induced any current in the oocyte-expressed alpha 7 subtype, and both weakly inhibited acetylcholine-induced currents. Adding chemical groups of a different class or size to the basic nitrogen of cytisine leads to compounds that lose full agonist activity on the alpha 3 beta 4 and alpha 7 subtypes.

  14. Oxovanadium(IV Complexes with Nitrogen Donors: Synthesis, Characterisation, and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri D. Bajju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some oxovanadium(IV complexes of SA/SSA and 5, 10, 15, and 20-meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (H2tpp with unidentate and bidentate nitrogen donors have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, magnetic susceptibility, UV-Vis, IR, mass spectroscopy, TGA/DTA, and 1H, 13C and 51V NMR studies to investigate the steric and electronic effects of axial ligands on the properties of porphyrins. On the basis of these studies, it has been investigated that the axial ligands bind to the sixth coordination site of the vanadium ion to form a relatively stable six-coordinate-porphyrin complex where as in the case of SA/SSA complexes the nitrogen donors bind to the equatorial position giving square pyramidal geometry. The in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines and antimicrobial activities of the synthesized compounds have been done against various fungal and bacterial pathogens. The [VO(SA/SSAL/L-L] complexes were found to possess higher antibacterial, antifungal activity and in vitro cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines than VO(tppL complexes.

  15. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  16. Should Ecosystem Management Involve Active Control of Species Abundances?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E. Essington

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We review four case studies in which there is a risk of extinction or severe reduction in highly valued species if we ignore either, or both, of two ecosystem control options. “Symptomatic control” implies direct control of extinction risk through direct harvesting or culling of competitors and predators. “Systemic control” implies treating the causes of the problem that led to an unnaturally high abundance in the first place. We demonstrate, with a discussion of historically observed population trends, how surprising trophic interactions can emerge as a result of alterations to a system. Simulation models were developed for two of the case studies as aids to adaptive policy design, to expose possible abundance changes caused by trophic interactions and to highlight key uncertainties about possible responses to ecosystem management policies involving active intervention to control abundances. With reasonable parameter values, these models predict a wide range of possible responses given available data, but do indicate a good chance that active control would reverse declines and reverse extinction risks. We find that controlling seal (Phoca vitulina populations in the Georgia Strait increases juvenile survival rates of commercial salmon (Oncorhynchus spp. species, but that commensurate increases in hake populations from decreased seal predation could be a compensatory source of predation on juvenile salmon. We also show that wolf (Canis lupus control and moose (Alces alces harvest bring about a recovery in caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou populations, where simple habitat protection policies fail to recover caribou before wolf predation causes severe declines. The results help address a common problem in disturbed ecosystems, where controlling extinction risks can mean choosing between active control of species abundance or establishing policies of protection, and allowing threatened species to recover naturally.

  17. Isolation of novel Bacillus species showing high mosquitocidal activity against several mosquito species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sabrina R; Hudon, Michael; Park, Hyun-Woo

    2011-05-01

    Two novel mosquitocidal bacteria, VB17 and VB24, identified as new Bacillus species were isolated from dead mosquito larvae obtained in Florida aquatic habitats. Gas chromatographic analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (GC-FAME) and 16S rRNA sequencing indicated that VB24 is closely related to Bacillus sphaericus whereas VB17 does not have a close relationship with either Bacillus thuringiensis or B. sphaericus. Both isolates were significantly more active than B. sphaericus 2362 against Aedes taeniorhynchus, Anopheles quadrimaculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus larvae, and as active as B. sphaericus 2362 against Anopheles gambiae. Interestingly, however, both were not active against Aedes aegypti larvae, indicating some level of insecticidal specificity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Absorption of different nitrogen species by Enteromorpha prolifera%浒苔对不同氮源吸收特性的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴婷; 田小亭; 刘召辉; 石晓勇; 史华明

    2011-01-01

    A large scale of Enteromorpha prolifera tide occurred in the coastal area of Qingdao in 2008 utilizations of NO3-N、 NH4-N and CO(NH2)2 by Enteromorpha prolifera and the absorption kinetics of Michaelis-Menten were studied in this paper. The apparent Michaelis constant Ks for various nitrogen species followed the order of NO3-N >NH4-N> CO(NH2)2, indicating that Enteromorpha prolifera has affinity to organic nitrogen than to inorganic nitrogen. In addition, Vmax for various nitrogen species followed the order of NO3-N >NH4-N> CO(NH2)2,indicating that the order of Enteromorpha prolifera absorbing potential on different types of nitrogen is NO3-N > NH4-N > CO(NH2)2.%采用Michaelis-Menten动力学方法,研究了浒苔对NO-N、NH-N和CO(NH)吸收利用关系.结果显示,浒苔对三种不同氮源的K(表观米氏常数)大小顺序为:NO-N>NH-N>CO(NH),表明浒苔对有机氮的亲和力大于对无机氮的亲和力,且对NH-N的亲和力大于其对NO-N的亲和力;浒苔对三种不同氮源的最大吸收速率顺序为:NO-N>NH-N>CO(NH),表明浒苔对氮源的吸收潜力由大到小依次为NO-N、NH-N、CO(NH).

  19. One-Step Cohydrothermal Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Oxide Nanotubes with Enhanced Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ching Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped TiO2 nanotubes with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity have been synthesized using commercial titania P25 as raw material by a facile P25/urea cohydrothermal method. Morphological and microstructural characteristics were conducted by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms; chemical identifications were performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the interstitial nitrogen linkage to the TiO2 nanotubes is identified. The photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped TiO2 nanotubes, evaluated by the decomposition of rhodamine B dye solution under visible light using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, is found to exhibit ~ four times higher than that of P25 and undoped titanate nanotubes. Factors affecting the photocatalytic activity are analyzed; it is found that the nitrogen content and surface area, rather than the crystallinity, are more crucial in affecting the photocatalytic efficiency of the nitrogen-doped TiO2 nanotubes.

  20. XPS study and physico-chemical properties of nitrogen-enriched microporous activated carbon from high volatile bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Pietrzak [Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan (Poland). Laboratory of Coal Chemistry and Technology

    2009-10-15

    N-enriched microporous active carbons of different physico-chemical parameters have been obtained from high volatile bituminous coal subjected to the processes of ammoxidation, carbonisation and activation in different sequences. Ammoxidation was performed by a mixture of ammonia and air at the ratio 1:3 (flow ratio 250 ml/min:750 ml/min) at 350{sup o}C, at each stage of production i.e. that of precursor, carbonisate and active carbon. Ammoxidation performed at the stage of demineralised coal or carbonisate has been shown to lead to a significant nitrogen enrichment and to have beneficial effect on the porous structure of the carbon during activation, allowing obtaining samples of the surface area of 2600-2800 m{sup 2}/g and pore volume 1.29-1.60 cm{sup 3}/g to be obtained with the yield of about 50%. The amount of nitrogen introduced into the carbon structure was found to depend on the sequence of the processes applied. The greatest amount of nitrogen was introduced for the processes in the sequence carbonisation {yields} activation {yields} ammoxidation. The introduction of nitrogen at the stage of active carbon leads to a reduction in the surface area and lowering of its sorption capacity. From the XPS study, ammoxidation introduces nitrogen mainly in the form of imines, amines, amides, N-5 and N-6, irrespective of the processing stage at which it is applied. 40 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Electrical activation of nitrogen heavily implanted 3C-SiC(1 0 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fan, E-mail: f.li.1@warwick.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Sharma, Yogesh; Shah, Vishal; Jennings, Mike [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Pérez-Tomás, Amador [ICN2 – Institut Catala de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Myronov, Maksym [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Fisher, Craig [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Leadley, David [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Mawby, Phil [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Nitrogen is fully activated by 1175 °C annealing for 1.5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} doped 3C-SiC. • Free donor concentration is found to readily saturate in 3C-SiC at ∼7 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. • 3C-SiC is found to have complete donor thermal ionization above 150 K. • Donor in 1.5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} nitrogen implanted 3C-SiC has an energy level ∼15 meV. • The SiO{sub 2} cap is found to have a bigger influence on low and medium doped samples. - Abstract: A degenerated wide bandgap semiconductor is a rare system. In general, implant levels lie deeper in the band-gap and carrier freeze-out usually takes place at room temperature. Nevertheless, we have observed that heavily doped n-type degenerated 3C-SiC films are achieved by nitrogen implantation level of ∼6 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} at 20 K. According to temperature dependent Hall measurements, nitrogen activation rates decrease with the doping level from almost 100% (1.5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}, donor level 15 meV) to ∼12% for 6 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. Free donors are found to saturate in 3C-SiC at ∼7 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The implanted film electrical performances are characterized as a function of the dopant doses and post implantation annealing (PIA) conditions by fabricating Van der Pauw structures. A deposited SiO{sub 2} layer was used as the surface capping layer during the PIA process to study its effect on the resultant film properties. From the device design point of view, the lowest sheet resistivity (∼1.4 mΩ cm) has been observed for medium doped (4 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}) sample with PIA 1375 °C 2 h without a SiO{sub 2} cap.

  2. PII Overexpression in Lotus japonicus Affects Nodule Activity in Permissive Low-Nitrogen Conditions and Increases Nodule Numbers in High Nitrogen Treated Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Valkov, Vladimir Totev; Parlati, Aurora; Omrane, Selim; Barbulova, Ani; Sainz, Maria Martha; Lentini, Marco; Esposito, Sergio; Rogato, Alessandra; Chiurazzi, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    We report here the first characterization of a GLNB1 gene coding for the PII protein in leguminous plants. The main purpose of this work was the investigation of the possible roles played by this multifunctional protein in nodulation pathways. The Lotus japonicus LjGLB1 gene shows a significant transcriptional regulation during the light-dark cycle and different nitrogen availability, conditions that strongly affect nodule formation, development, and functioning. We also report analysis of the spatial profile of expression of LjGLB1 in root and nodule tissues and of the protein's subcellular localization. Transgenic L. japonicus lines overexpressing the PII protein were obtained and tested for the analysis of the symbiotic responses in different conditions. The uncoupling of PII from its native regulation affects nitrogenase activity and nodule polyamine content. Furthermore, our results suggest the involvement of PII in the signaling of the nitrogen nutritional status affecting the legumes' predisposition for nodule formation.

  3. Phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three Potentilla species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan-Shan; Wang, Dong-Mei; Pu, Wen-Jun; Li, Deng-Wu

    2013-11-19

    Extracts from Potentilla species have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibit antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and anti-ulcerogenic properties, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemistry and pharmacology on this genus. This study investigated and compared the phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from three Potentilla species (Potentilla fruticosa, Potentilla glabra and Potentilla parvifolia) in order to discover new resources for lead structures and pharmaceutical products. Chemical composition and content of six phenolic compounds were evaluated and determined by RP-HPLC; Total phenolic and total flavonoid content were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau colourimetric method and sodium borohydride/chloranil-based method (SBC); Antioxidant activities were determined using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays; Antimicrobial properties were investigated by agar dilution and mycelial growth rate method. The results showed hyperoside was the predominant phenolic compound in three Potentilla species by RP-HPLC assay, with the content of 8.86 (P. fruticosa), 2.56 (P. glabra) and 2.68 mg/g (P. parvifolia), respectively. The highest content of total identified phenolic compounds (hyperoside, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and ellagic acid) was observed in P. parvifolia (14.17 mg/g), follow by P. fruticosa (10.01 mg/g) and P. glabra (7.01 mg/g). P. fruticosa possessed the highest content of total phenolic (84.93 ± 0.50 mmol gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total flavonoid (84.14 ± 0.03 mmol quercetin equivalent/100 g), which were in good correlation with its significant DPPHIC50 (16.87 μg/mL), ABTS (2763.48 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) and FRAP (1398.70 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) capacities. Furthermore, the effective methodology to distinguish the different species of Potentilla was also established by chromatographic fingerprint analysis for the first time. The results

  4. Synthesis and enhancement of visible light activities of nitrogen-doped BaTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Jiafeng, E-mail: cjf786@163.com [School of Mathematics and Physics, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Ji, Yuexia [School of Mathematics and Physics, Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Tian, Chongbin; Yi, Zhiguo [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • N-doped BaTiO{sub 3} photocatalyst was synthesized by urea addition solid state synthesis. • N-doped BaTiO{sub 3} shows improved photocatalytic activity irradiated by visible light. • Nitrogen dopant and oxygen vacancy are the main factors that enhance the activities. - Abstract: Regular nitrogen-doped BaTiO{sub 3} particles were synthesized by urea addition solid state sintering method. Compared with the undoped samples, the N-doped photocatalyst shows improved activities of photodegradation to Rhodamine-B under visible light irradiation (420 nm < λ < 780 nm). The obviously increased performance of N-doped BaTiO{sub 3} is mainly ascribed to the broadening of valence band (VB) width. Based on the analysis of absorption spectra and the illustration of photocatalytic role for N-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, nitrogen dopants and oxygen vacancies are both responsible for the improved photocatalytic activities.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and tin/copper-nitrogen substitutional effect on photocatalytic activity of honeycomb ordered P2-Na2Ni2TeO6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadari, Ramaswamy; Velchuri, Radha; Sreenu, K.; Ravi, Gundeboina; Munirathnam, Nagegownivari R.; Vithal, Muga

    2016-11-01

    We have successfully prepared visible light active tin/copper-nitrogen co-doped honeycomb ordered P2-Na2Ni2TeO6 photocatalysts by solid state/ion exchange methods. Powder XRD, TG analysis, SEM, surface area, O-N-H analysis, ICP-OES, FT-IR and UV-DRS measurements are employed to characterize all the samples. All the doped compositions adopted hexagonal lattice with space group P63/mcm. The photocatalytic activity of all the samples was studied against the degradation of methyl violet (MV) and methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The variation of the photocatalytic activity due to the substitution of cation, anion and co-doping in Na2Ni2TeO6 is investigated. Co-doped samples have exhibited higher activity compared to rest of the materials. The role of reactive intermediate species in the photocatalytic degradation of dyes is also studied using appropriate scavengers.

  6. Long-term nitrogen addition leads to loss of species richness due to litter accumulation and soil acidification in a temperate steppe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Fang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although community structure and species richness are known to respond to nitrogen fertilization dramatically, little is known about the mechanisms underlying specific species replacement and richness loss. In an experiment in semiarid temperate steppe of China, manipulative N addition with five treatments was conducted to evaluate the effect of N addition on the community structure and species richness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Species richness and biomass of community in each plot were investigated in a randomly selected quadrat. Root element, available and total phosphorus (AP, TP in rhizospheric soil, and soil moisture, pH, AP, TP and inorganic N in the soil were measured. The relationship between species richness and the measured factors was analyzed using bivariate correlations and stepwise multiple linear regressions. The two dominant species, a shrub Artemisia frigida and a grass Stipa krylovii, responded differently to N addition such that the former was gradually replaced by the latter. S. krylovii and A. frigida had highly-branched fibrous and un-branched tap root systems, respectively. S. krylovii had higher height than A. frigida in both control and N added plots. These differences may contribute to the observed species replacement. In addition, the analysis on root element and AP contents in rhizospheric soil suggests that different calcium acquisition strategies, and phosphorus and sodium responses of the two species may account for the replacement. Species richness was significantly reduced along the five N addition levels. Our results revealed a significant relationship between species richness and soil pH, litter amount, soil moisture, AP concentration and inorganic N concentration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that litter accumulation and soil acidification accounted for 52.3% and 43.3% of the variation in species richness, respectively. These findings would advance our knowledge on the

  7. Non-destructive photon activation analysis of carbon and nitrogen in thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikano, Koji; Katoh, Masaaki [Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Opto-electronics Labs.; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu

    1998-09-01

    Study was made on interference nuclear reactions with {sup 12}C({gamma},n){sup 11}C and {sup 14}N({gamma},n){sup 13}N reactions, interference radioactivity from the matrix, and prevention of contamination from the atmosphere. The following were made clear: Interference nuclear reactions can be neglected by controlling the radiation energy of bremsstrahlung below 30 MeV; radiation interference can be avoided by starting measurement 20-30 min after irradiation, though {sup 29}Al is formed from Si substrate; and contamination from the atmosphere can be controlled by He gas replacement. With graphite and boron nitride used as the reference standards, carbon in silicon carbide film and nitrogen in silicon nitride film were determined with the result that their concentrations in the films were 37.03{+-}1.28 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} and 52.97{+-}2.97 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The determination limits of this method were 0.3 {mu}g for carbon and 3 {mu}g for nitrogen. The measurement of film thickness distribution revealed that these film samples could be used as light element reference standards for charged particle activation analysis. (N.H.)

  8. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Titanium Dioxide and Evaluation of Its Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Qian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-doped TiO2 photocatalyst was synthesized from nanotube titanic acid (denoted as NTA; molecular formula H2Ti2O5·H2O precursor via a hydrothermal route in ammonia solution. As-synthesized N-doped TiO2 catalysts were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. It was found that nanotube ammonium titanate (NAT was produced as an intermediate during the preparation of N-doped TiO2 from NTA, as evidenced by the N1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic peak of NH4 + at 401.7 eV. The catalyst showed much higher activities to the degradation of methylene blue and p-chlorophenol under visible light irradiation than Degussa P25. This could be attributed to the enhanced absorption of N-doped TiO2 in visible light region associated with the formation of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies and the inhibition of recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pair by doped nitrogen.

  9. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Fiber Paper by Active Screen Plasma Nitriding and Its Microwave Heating Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Naishu; Ma, Shining; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) treatment was performed on polyacrylonitrile carbon fiber papers. Electric resistivity and microwave loss factor of carbon fiber were described to establish the relationship between processing parameters and fiber's ability to absorb microwaves. The surface processing effect of carbon fiber could be characterized by dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer testing on composites made of carbon fiber. When the process temperature was at 175 °C, it was conducive to obtaining good performance of dynamical mechanical properties. The treatment provided a way to change microwave heating properties of carbon fiber paper by performing different treatment conditions, such as temperature and time parameters. Atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that, during the course of ASPN treatment on carbon fiber paper, nitrogen group was introduced and silicon group was removed. The treatment of nitrogen-doped carbon fiber paper represented an alternative promising candidate for microwave curing materials used in repairing and heating technology, furthermore, an efficient dielectric layer material for radar-absorbing structure composite in metamaterial technology.

  10. Antiinflammatory activities of Hungarian Stachys species and their iridoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Háznagy-Radnai, Erzsébet; Balogh, Ágnes; Czigle, Szilvia; Máthé, Imre; Hohmann, Judit; Blazsó, Gábor

    2012-04-01

    The antiinflammatory activities of aqueous extracts prepared from the aerial parts of ten Hungarian Stachys species were investigated in vivo in the carrageenan-induced paw oedema test after intraperitoneal and oral administration to rats. Some of the extracts were found to display significant antiphlogistic effects when administered intraperitoneally and orally; in particular, the extracts of S. alpina, S. germanica, S. officinalis and S. recta demonstrated high activity following intraperitoneal administration. At the same dose of 5.0 mg/kg, these extracts exhibited similar or greater potency than that of the positive control diclofenac-Na. The main iridoids present in the investigated extracts, ajugoside, aucubin, acetylharpagide, harpagide and harpagoside, were also assayed in the same test, and high dose-dependent antiphlogistic effects were recorded for aucubin and harpagoside. These results led to the conclusion that most probably iridoids are responsible for the antiinflammatory effect of Stachys species, but other active constituents or their synergism must also be implicated in the antiinflammatory effect.

  11. Nitrogen and carbohydrate fractions on Tifton-85 pastures overseeded with annual winter and summer forage species in different seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Luciane Moreira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted during the 2001-2002 winter-spring-summer to determine the nitrogen and carbohydrate fractions in Tifton-85 pastures exclusively or overseeded with oats, millet and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids. The treatments were Tifton-85 overseeded with millet + bristle oat; sorghum-sudangrass + bristle oat, on 06/19/2002 and 07/02/2002, respectively; and Tifton-85 (Control. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design with three replications. Nitrogen and carbohydrate fractions were affected by the nitrogen and total carbohydrate contents observed in the pasture overseeded at different seeding times, and by the different growth periods. The highest nitrogen fractions (A + B1 were observed in the early growth periods. Overseeding affected the forage nitrogen and carbohydrate fraction contents positively. The high solubility of both carbohydrate and protein from millet + bristle oat and bristle oat + sorghum-sudangrass mixtures indicates the quality of these forages and their potential use as an important supplement in forage systems based on tropical pastures.

  12. Nitrogen fixation associated with development and localization of mixed populations of Cellulomonas species and Azospirillium brasilense grown on cellulose or wheat straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsall, D.M.; Goodchild, D.J.

    1986-04-01

    Mixed cultures of Cellulomonas sp. and Azospirillum brasilense were grown with straw or cellulose as the carbon source under conditions favoring the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. Rapid increases in cell numbers, up to 10/sup 9/ cells per g of substrate, were evident after 4 and 5 days of incubation at 30 degrees C for cellulose and straw, respectively. Nitrogen fixation (detected by acetylene reduction measured on parallel cultures) commenced after 2 and 4 days of incubation for straw and cellulose, respectively, and continued for the duration of the experiment. Pure cultures of Cellulomonas sp. showed an increase in cell numbers, but CO/sub 2/ production was low, and acetylene reduction was not detected on either cellulose or straw. Pure cultures of A. brasilense on cellulose showed an inital increase in cell numbers (10/sup 7/ cells per g of substrate) over 4 days, followed by a decline presumably caused by the exhaustion of available carbon substrate. On straw, A. brasilense increased to 10/sup 9/ cells per g of substrate over 5 days and then declined slowly; this growth was accompanied by acetylene reduction. Scanning electron micrographs of straw incubated with a mixture under the above conditions for 8 days showed cells of both species in close proximity to each other. Evidence was furnished that the close spatial relatioship of cells from the two species facilitated the mutally beneficial association between them and thus increased the efficiency with which the products of straw breakdown were used for nitrogen fixation. 17 references.

  13. Soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics linked to Piliostigma species in ferugino-tropical soils in the Sudano-Sahelian zone of Burkina Faso,West Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barthélémy Yélémou; Sidzabda Djibril Dayamba; Dasmane Bambara; Georges Yaméogo; Salawu Assimi

    2013-01-01

    In the Sudano-Sahelian zone of Burkina Faso,Piliostigma reticulatum (DC) Hochst and Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach) are precursor species of fallow land colonization and they are used by rural villagers.The present study aimed to assess the contribution of Piliostigma species to soil quality improvement.We quantified organic carbon,total nitrogen,soil microbial biomass,soil basal respiration and metabolic quotient from soil samples taken under and outside Piliostigma canopies.We used one-way ANOVA to test for differences in the above parameters between locations (beneath and outside Piliostigma canopies).We recorded increased total organic carbon under Piliostigma from 31%-105% and in total nitrogen from 23%-66%.Microbial biomass was 13%-266% higher beneath canopies as compared to outside canopies.Basal respiration was also higher beneath canopies.The chemical elements varied by class of soil texture.Metabolic quotient (qCO2) was significantly correlated to clay (r =0.80) and silt (r =0.79) content.Piliostigma stands produced abundant litter due to their leaf biomass.Thus,they contribute to improved total organic carbon and total nitrogen content in the different phytogeographic zones and improve soil fertility

  14. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjeeta Bhari

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to D-ribose, L-fucose, D-glucose, L-arabinose, D-mannitol, D-galactosamine hydrochloride, D-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-D-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age.

  15. Lectin activity in mycelial extracts of Fusarium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhari, Ranjeeta; Kaur, Bhawanpreet; Singh, Ram S

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunogenic carbohydrate-recognizing proteins that bind to glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides with high affinity and exhibit remarkable ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and other cells. In the present study, ten Fusarium species previously not explored for lectins were screened for the presence of lectin activity. Mycelial extracts of F. fujikuroi, F. beomiformii, F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, F. incarnatum, and F. tabacinum manifested agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. Neuraminidase treatment of rabbit erythrocytes increased lectin titers of F. nisikadoi and F. tabacinum extracts, whereas the protease treatment resulted in a significant decline in agglutination by most of the lectins. Results of hapten inhibition studies demonstrated unique carbohydrate specificity of Fusarium lectins toward O-acetyl sialic acids. Activity of the majority of Fusarium lectins exhibited binding affinity to d-ribose, l-fucose, d-glucose, l-arabinose, d-mannitol, d-galactosamine hydrochloride, d-galacturonic acid, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, 2-deoxy-d-ribose, fetuin, asialofetuin, and bovine submaxillary mucin. Melibiose and N-glycolyl neuraminic acid did not inhibit the activity of any of the Fusarium lectins. Mycelial extracts of F. begoniae, F. nisikadoi, F. anthophilum, and F. incarnatum interacted with most of the carbohydrates tested. F. fujikuroi and F. anthophilum extracts displayed strong interaction with starch. The expression of lectin activity as a function of culture age was investigated. Most species displayed lectin activity on the 7th day of cultivation, and it varied with progressing of culture age. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of bacterial activities on nitrogen uptake rates determined by the application of antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clavery Tungaraza

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of bacterial activities on inorganic nutrients has always affected total phytoplankton uptake rates owing to the absence of a reliable method that can exclude these effects. The use of natural samples to determine the contribution of bacterial activities has been based on the size fractionation method which, unfortunately, is encumbered with uncertainties, especially because of the size overlap between bacteria and phytoplankton communities. In this paper, the results are reported of an estimation of bacterial activities by the use of inhibitors (antibiotics. It was shown that the contribution of bacterial activities to the uptake of nitrogenous nutrients was highest for ammonium (79%, followed by nitrate (72% and urea (62%. In a second set of experiments the concentration of ammonium was raised by 5 µM. This was done to avoid nutrient limitation resulting from the absence of recycled nutrients following the addition of antibiotics and the maximum contribution of bacterial activity to the uptake rate of ammonium increased to 87%. It can be concluded that the use of inhibitors is a good method, a reliable alternative to the fractionation method. However, it is important to note that inhibitors can affect both phytoplankton growth and the nutrient recycling process. Our results indicate that the application of antibiotics had measurable effects not only on the target bacteria but also on the uptake behaviour of phytoplankton. Our observations were therefore limited to the period when there was no effect on the phytoplankton, as was demonstrated by a carbon protein incorporation experiment.

  17. Defect induced nickel, nitrogen-codoped mesoporous TiO2 microspheres with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Mingming; Feng, Lu; Ganeshraja, Ayyakannu Sundaram; Xiong, Fengqiang; Yang, Minghui

    2016-10-01

    Nickel, nitrogen-codoped mesoporous TiO2 microspheres (Ni-N-TiO2) with high surface area, and an effective direct band gap energy of ∼2.58 eV. Nickel sulfate used as the Ni source and ammonia gas as the N source here. The efficiency of the as-prepared samples was investigated by monitoring the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. The experimental results indicate that Ni-doped mesoporous TiO2 microspheres show higher photocatalytic activity than mesoporous TiO2 microspheres under visible light irradiation. It mainly due to that the electron trap level (Ni2+/Ni+) promoting the separation of charge carriers and the oxygen vacancies inducing the visible light absorption. In addition, Ni-N-TiO2 shows enhanced activity compared with Ni-TiO2. Codopants and dopants are found to be uniformly distributed in TiO2 matrix. Among the all samples the 0.5% molar quantity of Ni dopant and 500 °C 2 h nitriding condition gives the highest photocatalytic activity. The treatment of ammonia gas on Ni-TiO2 sample induced oxygen vancancies, substitutional and interstitial N. A suitable treatment by ammonia gas also promote separation of charge carriers and the absorption of visible light. The active species generated in the photocatalytic system were also investigated. The strategy presented here gives a promising route towards the development of a metal and non-metal codoped semiconductor materials for applied photocatalysis and related applications.

  18. Anticancer activities of selected species of North American lichen extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Gajendra; El-Naggar, Atif M; St Clair, Larry L; O'Neill, Kim L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of human deaths in the USA. Despite continuous efforts to treat cancer over the past 50 years, human mortality rates have not decreased significantly. Natural products, such as lichens, have been good sources of anticancer drugs. This study reports the cytotoxic activity of crude extracts of 17 lichen species against Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji) cells. Out of the 17 lichen species, extracts from 14 species showed cytotoxicity against Raji cells. On the basis of IC50 values, we selected Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa and Tuckermannopsis ciliaris to study the mechanism of cell death. Viability of normal lymphocytes was not affected by the extracts of X. chlorochroa and T. ciliaris. We found that extracts from both lichens decreased proliferation, accumulated cells at the G0 /G1 stage, and caused apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Both lichen extracts also caused upregulation of p53. The T. ciliaris extract upregulated the expression of TK1 but X. chlorochroa did not. We also found that usnic, salazinic, constictic, and norstictic acids were present in the extract of X. chlorochroa, whereas protolichesterinic acid in T. ciliaris extracts. Our data demonstrate that lichen extracts merit further research as a potential source of anticancer drugs.

  19. Differential activity of innate defense antimicrobial peptides against Nocardia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Dirk

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the genus Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes capable to cause human pulmonary, disseminated and cutaneous nocardiosis or bovine mastitis. Innate immunity appears to play an important role in early defense against Nocardia species. To elucidate the contribution of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in innate defense against Nocardia, the activity of human α-defensins human neutrophil peptides (HNPs 1-3, human β-defensin (hBD-3 and cathelicidin LL-37 as well as bovine β-defensins lingual and tracheal antimicrobial peptides (LAP, TAP and bovine neutrophil-derived indolicidin against four important Nocardia species was investigated. Results Whereas N. farcinica ATCC 3318 and N. nova ATCC 33726 were found to be susceptible to all investigated human and bovine AMPs, N. asteroides ATCC 19247 was killed exclusively by neutrophil-derived human α-defensins HNP 1-3 and bovine indolicidin. N. brasiliensis ATCC 19296 was found to exhibit complete resistance to investigated human AMPs and to be susceptible only to bovine indolicidin. Conclusion Selected AMPs are capable to contribute to the first line of defense against Nocardia, yet, susceptibility appears to vary across different Nocardia species. Obtained results of neutrophil-derived AMPs to possess the broadest antinocardial spectrum are remarkable, since nocardiosis is characterized by a neutrophil-rich infiltrate in vivo.

  20. Imbalances in faecal and duodenal Bifidobacterium species composition in active and non-active coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Yolanda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gut bifidobacteria are believed to influence immune-related diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the possible relationships between the gut bifidobacteria composition and coeliac disease (CD in children. A total of 48 faecal samples (30 and 18 samples from active and no active CD patients, respectively and 33 duodenal biopsy specimens of CD patients (25 and 8 samples from active and non-active CD patients, respectively were analysed. Samples (30 faecal samples and 8 biopsies from a control age-matched group of children were also included for comparative purposes. Gut Bifidobacterium genus and species were analyzed by real-time PCR. Results Active and non-active CD patients showed lower numbers of total Bifidobacterium and B. longum species in faeces and duodenal biopsies than controls, and these differences were particularly remarkable between active CD patients and controls. B. catenulatum prevalence was higher in biopsies of controls than in those of active and non-active CD patients, whereas B. dentium prevalence was higher in faeces of non-active CD patients than in controls. Correlations between levels of Bifidobacterium and B. longum species in faecal and biopsy samples were detected in both CD patients and controls. Conclusion Reductions in total Bifidobacterium and B. longum populations were associated with both active and non-active CD when compared to controls. These bacterial groups could constitute novel targets for adjuvant dietary therapies although the confirmation of this hypothesis would require further investigations.

  1. Thermal activation of nitrogen acceptors in ZnO thin films grown by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dangbegnon, J.K.; Talla, K.; Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth (South Africa)

    2010-06-15

    Nitrogen doping in ZnO is inhibited by spontaneous formation of compensating defects. Perfect control of the nitrogen doping concentration is required, since a high concentration of nitrogen could induce the formation of donor defects involving nitrogen. In this work, the effect of post-growth annealing in oxygen ambient on ZnO thin films grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition, using NO as both oxidant and nitrogen dopant, is studied. After annealing at 700 C and above, low-temperature photoluminescence shows the appearance of a transition at {proportional_to}3.23 eV which is interpreted as pair emission involving a nitrogen acceptor. A second transition at {proportional_to}3.15 eV is also discussed. This work suggests annealing as a potential means for p-type doping using nitrogen (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Coupled hydrological and biogeochemical processes controlling variability of nitrogen species in streamflow during autumn in an upland forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Shanley, James B.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Kendall, Carol; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Autumn is a season of dynamic change in forest streams of the northeastern United States due to effects of leaf fall on both hydrology and biogeochemistry. Few studies have explored how interactions of biogeochemical transformations, various nitrogen sources, and catchment flow paths affect stream nitrogen variation during autumn. To provide more information on this critical period, we studied (1) the timing, duration, and magnitude of changes to stream nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and ammonium concentrations; (2) changes in nitrate sources and cycling; and (3) source areas of the landscape that most influence stream nitrogen. We collected samples at higher temporal resolution for a longer duration than typical studies of stream nitrogen during autumn. This sampling scheme encompassed the patterns and extremes that occurred during base flow and stormflow events of autumn. Base flow nitrate concentrations decreased by an order of magnitude from 5.4 to 0.7 µmol L−1 during the week when most leaves fell from deciduous trees. Changes to rates of biogeochemical transformations during autumn base flow explained the low nitrate concentrations; in-stream transformations retained up to 72% of the nitrate that entered a stream reach. A decrease of in-stream nitrification coupled with heterotrophic nitrate cycling were primary factors in the seasonal nitrate decline. The period of low nitrate concentrations ended with a storm event in which stream nitrate concentrations increased by 25-fold. In the ensuing weeks, peak stormflow nitrate concentrations progressively decreased over closely spaced, yet similarly sized events. Most stormflow nitrate originated from nitrification in near-stream areas with occasional, large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate, which has rarely been reported for nonsnowmelt events. A maximum input of 33% unprocessed atmospheric nitrate to the stream occurred during one event. Large inputs of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate

  3. Cytotoxic and genotoxic activity of some Helleborus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čakar, Jasmina; Haverić, Anja; Haverić, Sanin; Maksimović, Milka; Parić, Adisa

    2014-01-01

    Despite their known toxic properties, various Helleborus species are used as medicaments in folk medicine to treat some diseases and health conditions. As the main mechanism of many cytostatic drugs is based on their cytotoxic activity, there is potential for the toxicity of hellebore to be used in anticancer therapy. This study tested the geno- and cytotoxic effects of extracts of three hellebore taxa (Helleborus odorus, Helleborus multifidus and Helleborus hercegovinus) on meristemic onion (Alliumcepa L.) cells and human lymphocytes. Treatments with Helleborus extracts induced cytotoxic and cytostatic effects in meristemic onion cells as well as in cultivated cytokinesis-blocked human lymphocytes. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay indicated that treatments with hellebore extracts induce genotoxic effects in human lymphocytes, and that the significant mechanism of their antiproliferative activity is apoptosis induction.

  4. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815T, a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Lionel; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Caroline, Bournaud; Booth, Kristina; Vriezen, Jan A.C.; Melkonian, Rémy; James, Euan K.; Young, J. Peter W.; Bena, Gilles; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Kyrpides, Nikos; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Bristow, Jim; Riley, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815T, was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp). PMID:25197461

  5. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815, a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulin, Lionel [UMR, France; Klonowska, Agnieszka [UMR, France; Caroline, Bournaud [UMR, France; Booth, Kristina [University of Massachusetts; Vriezen, Jan A.C. [University of Massachusetts; Melkonian, Remy [UMR, France; James, Euan [James Hutton Institute, Dundee, United Kingdom; Young, Peter W. [University of York, United Kingdom; Bena, Gilles [UMR, France; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle [University of Massachusetts; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Riley, Monica [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815T, was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp).

  6. Complete Genome sequence of Burkholderia phymatum STM815(T), a broad host range and efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiont of Mimosa species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Lionel; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Caroline, Bournaud; Booth, Kristina; Vriezen, Jan A C; Melkonian, Rémy; James, Euan K; Young, J Peter W; Bena, Gilles; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Kyrpides, Nikos; Bruce, David; Chain, Patrick; Copeland, Alex; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Bristow, Jim; Riley, Margaret

    2014-06-15

    Burkholderia phymatum is a soil bacterium able to develop a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with species of the legume genus Mimosa, and is frequently found associated specifically with Mimosa pudica. The type strain of the species, STM 815(T), was isolated from a root nodule in French Guiana in 2000. The strain is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod, and is a highly competitive strain for nodulation compared to other Mimosa symbionts, as it also nodulates a broad range of other legume genera and species. The 8,676,562 bp genome is composed of two chromosomes (3,479,187 and 2,697,374 bp), a megaplasmid (1,904,893 bp) and a plasmid hosting the symbiotic functions (595,108 bp).

  7. Enzymatic activities of allergen extracts from three species of dust mites and cockroaches commonly found in Korean home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Kim, Chungryul; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2010-06-01

    Allergen extracts from dust mites and cockroaches commonly found in Korean homes were used to evaluate their enzymatic activity as they are believed to influence allergenicity. Allergen extracts were prepared from 3 dust mite species (Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and 3 cockroach species (Blattella germanica, Periplaneta americana, and P. fuliginosa) maintained in the Korea National Arthropods of Medical Importance Resource Bank. Proteins were extracted in PBS after homogenization using liquid nitrogen. The activities of various enzymes were investigated using the API Zym system. No significant difference in phosphatase, lipase, or glycosidase activity was observed among the 6 allergen extracts, but much difference was observed in protease activity. Protease activity was assessed in more detail by gelatin zymography and the EnzChek assay. Extract from T. putrescentiae showed the highest protease activity, followed by those of the cockroach extracts. Extracts from D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus showed only weak protease activity. Gelatinolytic activity was detected mainly in a 30-kDa protein in D. farinae, a 28-kDa protein in D. pteronyssinus, a > 26-kDa protein in T. putrescentiae, a > 20-kDa protein in B. germanica, and a > 23-kDa protein in P. americana and P. fuliginosa. The information on various enzymatic activities obtained in this study may be useful for future studies. In particular, the strong protease activity found in cockroach extracts could contribute to sensitization to cockroach allergens, which is known to be associated with the development of asthma.

  8. Photosynthesis acclimation, leaf nitrogen concentration, and growth of four tree species over 3 years in response to elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen treatment in subtropical China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juxiu; Zhou, Guoyi; Duan, Honglang; Li, Yuelin; Zhang, Deqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). South China Botanical Garden; Xu, Zhihong [Griffith Univ., Nathan, Brisbane (Australia). Centre for Forestry and Horticultural Research

    2011-10-15

    Up to date, most studies about the plant photosynthetic acclimation responses to elevated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration have been performed in temperate areas, which are often N limited under natural conditions and with low ambient N deposition. It is unclear whether photosynthetic downregulation is alleviated with increased N availability, for example, from increased N deposition due to fossil fuel combustion in the tropics and subtropics. Awareness of plant photosynthetic responses to elevated CO{sub 2} concentration will contribute to the better understanding and prediction of future forest productivity under global change. Four tree species, Schima superba Gardn. et Champ., Ormosia pinnata (Lour.) Merr, Castanopsis hystrix AC. DC., and Acmena acuminatissima (Blume) Merr. et Perry were exposed to a factorial combination of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} concentration at ca. 700 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1}) and N deposition (ambient and ambient + 100 kg N ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}) in open-top chambers in southern China for 3 years since March 2005. Light-saturated net photosynthetic rate, leaf N concentration, and tree growth of all species were measured. The CO{sub 2} treatments did not affect light-saturated net photosynthetic rate of all species grown with the high N treatment. However, S. superba grown with the low N treatment (ambient) had 23% and 47% greater net photosynthesis in the ambient CO{sub 2} concentration than those in the elevated CO{sub 2} concentration for December 2006 and November 2007 (20 and 31 months after the treatments were applied), respectively, and A. acuminatissima grown with the low N treatment had 173%, 26%, and 121% greater net photosynthesis in trees grown in the ambient CO{sub 2} concentration than those in the elevated CO{sub 2} concentration for July 2006 (16 months after the treatments), December 2006 (20 months), and November 2007 (31 months), respectively, whereas

  9. Critical role of intercalated water for electrocatalytically active nitrogen-doped graphitic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ulises; Dumont, Joseph H.; Holby, Edward F.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Purdy, Geraldine M.; Singh, Akhilesh; Mack, Nathan H.; Atanassov, Plamen; Cullen, David A.; More, Karren L.; Chhowalla, Manish; Zelenay, Piotr; Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Mohite, Aditya D.; Gupta, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Graphitic materials are essential in energy conversion and storage because of their excellent chemical and electrical properties. The strategy for obtaining functional graphitic materials involves graphite oxidation and subsequent dissolution in aqueous media, forming graphene-oxide nanosheets (GNs). Restacked GNs contain substantial intercalated water that can react with heteroatom dopants or the graphene lattice during reduction. We demonstrate that removal of intercalated water using simple solvent treatments causes significant structural reorganization, substantially affecting the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and stability of nitrogen-doped graphitic systems. Amid contrasting reports describing the ORR activity of GN-based catalysts in alkaline electrolytes, we demonstrate superior activity in an acidic electrolyte with an onset potential of ~0.9 V, a half-wave potential (E½) of 0.71 V, and a selectivity for four-electron reduction of >95%. Further, durability testing showed E½ retention >95% in N2- and O2-saturated solutions after 2000 cycles, demonstrating the highest ORR activity and stability reported to date for GN-based electrocatalysts in acidic media. PMID:27034981

  10. Hyperspectral canopy reflectance as a predictor for root concentrations of nitrogen and carbon in native and non native grass species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land managers, scientists, and crop professionals need real-time, inexpensive, and labor-saving methods to determine below-ground biomass and potential carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) inputs of that biomass. Remote sensing is a non-destructive tool that monitors vigor of vegetation and has been used t...

  11. UTILIZATION OF ORGANIC NITROGEN-SOURCES BY 2 PHYTOPLANKTON SPECIES AND A BACTERIAL ISOLATE IN PURE AND MIXED CULTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IETSWAART, T; SCHNEIDER, PJ; PRINS, RA

    1994-01-01

    Algal production of dissolved organic carbon and the regeneration of nutrients from dissolved organic carbon by bacteria are important aspects of nutrient cycling in the sea, especially when inorganic nitrogen is limiting. Dissolved free amino acids are a major carbon source for bacteria and can be

  12. Influence of the atmospheric species water, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the degradation of aluminum doped zinc oxide layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Dasgupta, S.; Vroon, Z.; Kniknie, B.; Barreau, N.; Berkum, J. van; Zeman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers were exposed to the atmospheric gases carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N 2) and air as well as liquid H2O purged with these gases, in order to investigate the chemical degradation behavior of these layers. The samples were analyzed by electrical,

  13. Submerged culture of Magne-tospirillum gryphiswaldense under N2-fixing condition and regulation of activity of nitrogen fixation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A submerged culture technique for Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense under the nitrogen-fixing condition (microaerobic and N-limited) was set up. In N-limited medium with Na-lactate as a sole carbon source, the optical density (A600 nm) and activity of nitrogen fixation of cells were 1.3 and 217 nmol of ethylene produced per hour per A600nm respectively within 21 h by three times of feeds. The pH and temperature were controlled at 7.2 and 30℃ respectively, and the oxygen concentration was controlled by sparging with N2 containing 0.4%-0.8% of O2. The activity of nitrogen fixation of cells was obviously inhibited by oxygen and ammonium. It indicated that the posttranslational regulation of nitrogenase existed in M. gryphiswaldense.

  14. Functional Species Encapsulated in Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon as a Highly Efficient Catalyst for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Wang, Tao; Ma, Yiou; Xue, Hairong; Guo, Hu; Fan, Xiaoli; Xia, Wei; Gong, Hao; He, Jianping

    2017-03-08

    The scarcity, high cost, and poor stability of precious metal-based electrocatalysts have stimulated the development of novel non-precious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for use in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Here, we fabricated in situ a hybrid material (Co-W-C/N) with functional species (tungsten carbide and cobalt nanoparticles) encapsulated in an N-doped porous carbon framework, through a facile multi-constituent co-assembly method combined with subsequent annealing treatment. The unique structure favors the anchoring active nanoparticles and facilitates mass transfer steps. The homogenously distributed carbide nanoparticles and adjacent Co-N-C sites lead to the electrocatalytic synergism for the ORR. The existence of Co and W can promote the graphitization of the carbon matrix. Benefiting from its structural and material superiority, the Co-W-C/N electrocatalyst exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity (with a half-wave potential of 0.774 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)), high stability (96.3 % of the initial current remaining after 9000 s of continuous operation), and good immunity against methanol in alkaline media.

  15. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance of different wine yeast species during alcoholic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Monteiro Lomba Viana, Tiago; Ardö, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    -Saccharomyces yeast species (Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Torulaspora delbrueckii) was investigated during alcoholic fermentation. Briefly, the N-sources with beneficial effects on all performance parameters (or for the majority of them) for each yeast species were...

  16. NITROGEN, WATER AND BENZENE ADSORPTION IN MESOPOROUS CARBON (CMK-1 AND COMMERCIAL ACTIVATED CARBON (NORIT SX22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Taba

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption at various interfaces has attracted the attention of many scientists. This article discusses gas-solid and vapour-solid adsorption in CMK-1 and Norit SX22 using nitrogen, water and benzene as adsorbates. For comparison, MCM-48 used as template in synthesizing CMK-1 was also utilized as adsorbent. Results showed that the shape of nitrogen isotherm for CMK-1 is categorized as Type IV shape, whereas activated carbon (Norit SX2 has Type I shape with a hysteresis loop at P/P0 > 0.5, which is a H4 type of hysteresis. The shape of nitrogen isotherm for MCM-48 is categorized as Type IV shape with small hysteresis loop observed at P/P0 above 0.45, indicating that the larger pores are filled at high P/P0, which is typical of an H3 hysteresis loop The amount of nitrogen adsorbed in activated carbon at the high relative pressure is considerably smaller than that in CMK-1. The hydrophobicity feature of CMK-1 is the same as activated carbon (Norit SX2, but slightly different to the template MCM-48. The affinity of CMK-1 to benzene is considerably higher than activated carbon, suggesting the promising future of CMK-1 to be used as a selective adsorbent for the removal of organic compounds from water environment.   Keywords: Adsorption, water, benzene, CMK-1, activated carbon

  17. Adsorption/oxidation of sulfur-containing gases on nitrogen-doped activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coconut shell-based activated carbon (CAC was used for the removal of methyl mercaptan (MM. CAC was modified by urea impregnation and calcined at 450°C and 950°C. The desulfurization activity was determined in a fixed bed reactor under room temperature. The results showed that the methyl mercaptan adsorption/oxidation capacity of modified carbon caicined at 950°C is more than 3 times the capacity of original samples. On the other hand, the modified carbon caicined at 950°C also has a high capacity for the simultaneous adsorption/oxidation of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.The introduce of basic nitrogen groups siginificantly increases the desulfurization since it can facilitate the electron transfer process between sulfur and oxygen. The structure and chemical properties are characterized using Boehm titration, N2 adsorption-desorption method, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The results showed that the major oxidation products were dimethyl disulfide and methanesulfonic acid which adsorbed in the activated carbon.

  18. Nitrogen doped microporous carbon by ZnCl2 activation of protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Praveen; Vijayan, Sujith; Prabhakaran, K.

    2017-09-01

    ZnCl2 activation of protein containing biomass has been studied for the preparation of N-doped activated carbon (NDC) using powdered dry fish as a source of protein. Nearly 52% increase in the yield of NDC is observed by activation with ZnCl2 due to an increase in the thermal stability of Zn2+-fish protein complex compared to the protein alone. The NDCs obtained are characterized by XRD, IR, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, TEM, elemental analysis and N2 adsorption–desorption studies. The activation at 550 °C produces NDC with the highest surface area and total pore volume of 1001 m2 g‑1 and 0.719 cm3 g‑1, respectively, at a ZnCl2 to fish powder weight ratio of 3. A maximum micropore volume of 0.273 cm3 g‑1 is obtained at a ZnCl2 to fish powder weight ratio of 1:1. The N-content (12.4–5.2 wt%) decreases with an increase in activation temperature and ZnCl2 to fish powder weight ratio. The NDC obtained by activation at 550 °C at a ZnCl2 to fish powder weight ratio of 1:1 shows the maximum CO2 adsorption capacity of 2.4 and 3.73 mmol g‑1 at 25 and 0 °C, respectively, at 1 atmosphere. The CO2 adsorption on the NDC shows excellent cyclic stability and high selectivity over nitrogen gas.

  19. Nitrogen Incorporation in TiO2: Does It Make a Visible Light Photo-Active Material?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Viswanathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of hydrogen production by photo-catalytic decomposition of water on titania has provided the incentive for intense research. Titania is the preferred semiconductor for this process, in spite of its large band gap (~3.2 eV that restricts its utility only in the UV region. Various sensitization methodologies have been adopted to make titania to be active in the visible region. Doping of TiO2 with nitrogen is one such method. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the state and location of nitrogen introduced in TiO2 lattice and how far the shift of optical response to visible radiation can be beneficial for the observed photo-catalysis. The specific aspects that are discussed in this article are: (i N-doped titania surface adopts a non-native configuration, though the bulk material is still in the native configuration of pure TiO2 (ii\tThough the nitrogen doped materials showed optical response in the visible region, the changes/improvements in photo-catalytic activity are only marginal in most of the cases. (iii\tThe exact chemical nature/state of the introduced nitrogen, and its location in titania lattice, substitutional and/or interstitial, is still unclear (iv\tIs there a limit to the incorporation of nitrogen in the lattice of TiO2?

  20. Plant Functional Diversity Can Be Independent of Species Diversity: Observations Based on the Impact of 4-Yrs of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions in an Alpine Meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Cheng, Ji-Min; Yu, Kai-Liang; Epstein, Howard E; Guo, Liang; Jing, Guang-Hua; Zhao, Jie; Du, Guo-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have widely documented the decrease in species diversity in response to addition of nutrients, however functional diversity is often independent from species diversity. In this study, we conducted a field experiment to examine the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization ((NH4)2 HPO4) at 0, 15, 30 and 60 g m-2 yr-1 (F0, F15, F30 and F60) after 4 years of continuous fertilization on functional diversity and species diversity, and its relationship with productivity in an alpine meadow community on the Tibetan Plateau. To this purpose, three community-weighted mean trait values (specific leaf area, SLA; mature plant height, MPH; and seed size, SS) for 30 common species in each fertilization level were determined; three components of functional diversity (functional richness, FRic; functional evenness, FEve; and Rao's index of quadratic entropy, FRao) were quantified. Our results showed that: (i) species diversity sharply decreased, but functional diversity remained stable with fertilization; (ii) community-weighted mean traits (SLA and MPH) had a significant increase along the fertilization level; (iii) aboveground biomass was not correlated with functional diversity, but it was significantly correlated with species diversity and MPH. Our results suggest that decreases in species diversity due to fertilization do not result in corresponding changes in functional diversity. Functional identity of species may be more important than functional diversity in influencing aboveground productivity in this alpine meadow community, and our results also support the mass ratio hypothesis; that is, the traits of the dominant species influenced the community biomass production.

  1. Anatomical basis of the change in leaf mass per area and nitrogen investment with relative irradiance within the canopy of eight temperate tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, I.; Pardo, F.; Gil, L.; Pardos, J. A.

    2004-05-01

    Changes in leaf mass per area (LMA), nitrogen content on a mass-basis (N m) and on an area basis (N a) with relative irradiance were assessed in leaves of eight temperate species harvested at different depths in a canopy. Relative irradiance (GSF) at the points of leaf sampling was estimated by hemispheric photographs. There was a strong species-dependent positive relationship between LMA and GSF for all species. Shade-tolerant species such as Fagus sylvatica showed lower LMA for the same GSF than less tolerant species as Quercus pyrenaica or Quercus petraea. The only evergreen species in the study, Ilex aquifollium, had the highest LMA, independent of light environment, with minimum values much higher than the rest of the broad-leaved species studied. There was no relation between N m and GSF for most species studied and only a very weak relation for the relative shade-intolerant species Q. pyrenaica. Within each species, the pattern of N a investment with regard to GSF was linked mainly to LMA. At the same relative irradiance, differences in N a among species were conditioned both by the LMA-GSF relationship and by the species N m value. The lowest N m value was measured in I. aquifollium (14.3 ± 0.6 mg g -1); intermediate values in Crataegus monogyna (16.9 ± 0.6 mg g -1) and Prunus avium (19.1 ± 0.6 mg g -1) and higher values, all in a narrow range (21.3 ± 0.6 to 23 ± 0.6 mg g -1), were measured for the other five species. Changes in LMA with the relative irradiance were linked both to lamina thickness (LT) and to palisade/spongy parenchyma ratio (PP/SP). In the second case, the LMA changes may be related to an increase in lamina density as palisade parenchyma involves higher cell packing than spongy parenchyma. However, since PP/SP ratio showed a weak species-specific relationship with LMA, the increase in LT should be the main cause of LMA variation.

  2. The inhibition and adaptability of four wetland plant species to high concentration of ammonia wastewater and nitrogen removal efficiency in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhui; Wang, Junfeng; Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Song, Xinshan; Gong, Juan

    2016-02-01

    Four plant species, Typha orientalis, Scirpus validus, Canna indica and Iris tectorum were selected to assess their physiological response and effects on nitrogen and COD removal to high total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) in constructed wetlands. Results showed that high TAN caused decreased relative growth rate, net photosynthetic rate, and leaf transpiration. C. indica and T. orientalis showed higher TAN adaptability than S. validus and I. tectorum. Below TAN of 200 mg L(-1), growth of C. indica and T. orientalis was less affected or even stimulated at TAN range 100-200 mg L(-1). However, S. validus and I. tectorum was obviously suppressed when TAN was above 100 mg L(-1). High TAN generated obvious oxidative stress showing increased proline and malondialdehyde contents, and superoxide dismutase was inhibited. It indicated that the threshold for plant self-bioremediation against high TAN was 200 mg L(-1). What's more, planted CWs showed higher nitrogen and COD removal. Removal rate of C. indica and T. orientalis was higher than S. validus and I. tectorum.

  3. Preparation of nitrogen-doped graphene/activated carbon composite papers to enhance energy storage in supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-feng; Liu, Yan-zhen; Liang, Yu; Guo, Xiao-hui; Chen, Cheng-meng

    2017-09-01

    This report presents a facile and effective method to synthesize freestanding nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/activated carbon (AC) composite papers for supercapacitors by a method combining vacuum filtration with post-annealing in NH3 atmosphere. The effect of activated carbon contents on the microstructure and capacitive behavior of the resulting composite papers before and after the annealing was investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show that the composite paper with a 30% activated carbon loading has a high nitrogen content of 14.6 at% and superior capacitive performance (308 F/g, 1 A/g) to the other composite papers with various activated carbon loadings. Nitrogen was doped and GO reduced during the annealing. The rGO nanosheets acted as a framework, and the AC particles served as spacers to avoid agglomeration of graphene sheets. The high capacitance of the composite paper is ascribed to the electric double-layer behavior and the reversible redox reactions of the nitrogen and oxygen groups. The entire process is simple, environmental friendly and easily scalable for mass production.

  4. Assessment of the associated particle prompt gamma neutron activation technique for total body nitrogen measurement in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total Body Nitrogen (TBN) can be used to estimate Total Body Protein (TBP), an important body composition component at the molecular level. A system using the associated particle technique in conjunction with prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been developed for the measurement of TBN in ...

  5. Numerical analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms on active carbons by an employment of the new LBET class models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Mirosław

    2007-09-15

    The reported research concerns properties of the new LBET class models designed to describe the heterogeneous adsorption on microporous carbonaceous materials. In particular, the new adsorption models were used for the analysis of the microporous structure of two active carbons on the basis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms. This paper gives more information on the properties of the proposed identification technique.

  6. Together but different: co-occurring dune plant species differ in their water- and nitrogen-use strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Raimundo; Retuerto, Rubén

    2014-03-01

    Stress factors may severely constrain the range of plant physiological responses in harsh environments. Convergence of traits is expected in coastal dunes because of environmental filtering imposed by severe abiotic factors. However, the wide range of morphological and phenological traits exhibited by coexisting dune species suggests considerable variation in functional traits. We hypothesized that the constraints imposed by structural traits ought to translate into physiological differences. Five dominant species with different morphological traits, but coexisting in a homogeneous dune area in Northwest Spain, were selected for study. Soil characteristics and leaf functional traits were measured in April, June and November 2008. Integrated water-use efficiency (assessed by C isotope discrimination) and N acquisition and use strategies (estimated by N isotope composition) varied significantly among species and the differences changed over time. Species differences in specific leaf area, relative water content, leaf N and C:N ratio, also varied over time. The species differed in stomatal density but not in soil characteristics, with the exception of pH. Species differences in functional traits related to the use of resources suggest species niche segregation. Species-specific temporal effects on the use of these resources support temporal niche differentiation. Somewhat in contrast to the findings of previous studies on harsh environments, this study revealed a considerable level of functional diversity and complexity, suggesting that dune plant species have evolved species-specific strategies to survive by partitioning growth-limiting resources.

  7. Nitrogen regulation of fungal secondary metabolism in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina eTudzynski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fungi occupy diverse environments where they are constantly challenged by stressors such as extreme pH, temperature, UV exposure and nutrient deprivation. Nitrogen is an essential requirement for growth, and the ability to metabolize a wide variety of nitrogen sources enable fungi to colonize different environmental niches and survive nutrient limitations. Favored nitrogen sources, particularly ammonium and glutamine, are used preferentially, while the expression of genes required for the use of various secondary nitrogen sources is subject to a regulatory mechanism called nitrogen metabolite repression. Studies on gene regulation in response to nitrogen availability were carried out first in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus nidulans, and Neurospora crassa. These studies revealed that fungi respond to changes in nitrogen availability with physiological and morphological alterations and activation of differentiation processes. In all fungal species studied, the major GATA transcription factor AreA and its co-repressor Nmr are central players of the nitrogen regulatory network. In addition to growth and development, the quality and quantity of nitrogen also affects the formation of a broad range of secondary metabolites (SMs. Recent studies, mainly on species of the genus Fusarium, revealed that AreA does not only regulate a large set of nitrogen catabolic genes, but can also be involved in regulating production of SMs. Furthermore, several other regulators, e.g. a second GATA transcription factor, AreB, that was proposed to negatively control nitrogen catabolic genes by competing with AreA for binding to GATA elements, was shown to act as activator of some nitrogen-repressed as well as nitrogen-induced SM gene clusters. This review highlights our latest understanding of canonical (AreA-dependent and non-canonical nitrogen regulation mechanisms by which fungi may regulate biosynthesis of certain SMs in response to nitrogen availability.

  8. A minimal nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 enables expression of active nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Zhang, Lihong; Liu, Zhanzhi; Liu, Zhangzhi; Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ(70) (σ(A))-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes.

  9. A minimal nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 enables expression of active nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Wang

    Full Text Available Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ(70 (σ(A-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes.

  10. A minimal nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 enables expression of active nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Wang

    Full Text Available Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ(70 (σ(A-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes.

  11. A Minimal Nitrogen Fixation Gene Cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 Enables Expression of Active Nitrogenase in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ70 (σA)-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes. PMID:24146630

  12. Photocatalytic Activity and Characterization of Carbon-Modified Titania for Visible-Light-Active Photodegradation of Nitrogen Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hung Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of carbon-modified titania powders were prepared by impregnation method using a commercial available titania powder, Hombikat UV100, as matrix material while a range of alcohols from propanol to hexanol were used as precursors of carbon sources. Rising the carbon number of alcoholic precursor molecule, the modified titania showed increasing visible activities of NOx photodegradation. The catalyst modified with cyclohexanol exhibited the best activities of 62%, 62%, 59%, and 54% for the total NOx removal under UV, blue, green, and red light irradiation, respectively. The high activity with long wavelength irradiation suggested a good capability of photocatalysis in full visible light spectrum. Analysis of UV-visible spectrum indicated that carbon modification promoted visible light absorption and red shift in band gap. XPS spectroscopic analysis identified the existence of carbonate species (C=O, which increased with the increasing carbon number of precursor molecule. Photoluminescence spectra demonstrated that the carbonate species suppressed the recombination rate of electron-hole pair. As a result, a mechanism of visible-light-active photocatalyst was proposed according to the formation of carbonate species on carbon-modified TiO2.

  13. OxyR-regulated catalase activity is critical for oxidative stress resistance, nodulation and nitrogen fixation in Azorhizobium caulinodans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Nickels, Logan M; Wang, Hui; Ling, Jun; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The legume-rhizobial interaction results in the formation of symbiotic nodules in which rhizobia fix nitrogen. During the process of symbiosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated. Thus, the response of rhizobia to ROS is important for successful nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In this study, we investigated how Azorhizobium caulinodans, a rhizobium that forms both root and stem nodules on its host plant, regulates ROS resistance. We found that in-frame deletions of a gene encoding the putative catalase-peroxidase katG or a gene encoding a LysR-family regulatory protein, oxyR, exhibited increased sensitivity to H2O2 We then showed that OxyR positively regulated katG expression in an H2O2-independent fashion. Furthermore, we found that deletion of katG or oxyR led to significant reduction in the number of stem nodules and decrease of nitrogen fixation capacities in symbiosis. Our results revealed that KatG and OxyR are not only critical for antioxidant defense in vitro, but also important for nodule formation and nitrogen fixation during interaction with plant hosts. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Generation and remote delivery of plasma activated species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Paul; Mahony, Charles; Kelsey, Colin; Rutherford, David; Mariotti, Davide; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Diver, Declan

    2016-09-01

    Plasma interactions with microdroplets offer new opportunities to deliver active chemical agents and nanoparticles to remote substrates downstream with many potential applications from cancer theranostics and wound healing in biomedicine, gentle food decontamination and seed germination in plasma agriculture to catalyst production and photonic structures fabrication, among others. We demonstrate plasma-liquid based pristine nanomaterials synthesis in flight and subsequent delivery up to 120mm from the atmospheric pressure plasma source. Monosized and non-aggregating metal nanoparticles are formed in the rf plasma in less than 100us, representing an increase in precursor reduction rate that is many (>4) orders of magnitude faster than that observed with standard colloidal chemistry or via high energy radiolytic techniques. Also the collection and purification limitations of the latter are avoided. Plasma activated liquid including OH radicals and H2O2 are transported over 120mm and have demonstrated high efficacy bacterial decontamination. These results will be compared with charge species and radical transport from the rf plasma without microdroplets. Reaction models based on high solvated surface electron concentrations will be presented. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  15. Nitrate reductase activity in some subarctic species and UV influence in the foliage of Betula pendula Roth. seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krywult, Marek; Turunen, Minna; Sutinen, Marja-Liisa; Derome, Kirsti; Norokorpi, Yrjö

    2002-02-04

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity was studied in the foliage of five subarctic species: mature trees of European white birch (Betula pubescens Erch. S.S.), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), Ericaceous shrub bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), naturally growing in a forest, and seed-grown silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) seedlings in an ultraviolet (UV) exclusion field experiment at the Pallas-Ounastunturi National Park in Finnish Lapland (68 degrees N). Mean NR activity ranged from 0 in bilberry to 1477 (S.D. = 277.7) and 1910 (S.D. = 785.4) nmol g(-1) DW h(-1) in mature trees of European white birch and silver birch seedlings, respectively. Significant differences due to UV exclosure treatments were determined for the NR activity of silver birch seedlings (F = 3.62, P= 0.025*) after three growing seasons (191 days) of UV exclusion. The ambient and control silver birch seedlings had or tended to have higher NR activity than those grown under UV exclusion. No relationship was found between the foliage NR activity and total nitrogen content, which ranged from 0.61 to 1.35% per seedling. The present study suggests large differences in NR activity between the species and the induction of NR activity in silver birch seedlings due to ambient UV radiation.

  16. Vertical patterns of ecoenzyme activities in forest soils after 20 years of simulated nitrogen deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, Stefan J.; Kloss, Stefanie; Keiblinger, Katharina M.; Schleppi, Patrick; Hagedorn, Frank; Gundersen, Per; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gerzabek, Martin H.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    The below-ground part of terrestrial carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles are controlled by soil microorganisms. In order to meet their energy and nutrient requirements, soil microbes produce enzymes which catalyze the release of smaller molecules from decomposing organic matter. Recent work has shown that the potential activities of commonly measured enzymes for C-, N-, and P-acquisition can be related to microbial demand of these elements and link stoichiometry of soil microbes and their resources. Regulation of enzyme production might therefore be an important mechanism for microbes to adapt to different resource regimes. To investigate links between ecoenzyme activities, soil depth and N availability we make use of two long-term experiments where N has been added to two temperate forest stands for over 20 years. At both sites Norway spruce is the dominating tree whereas other site characteristics like soil type, climate, parent material and morphology differ. Increased N deposition was simulated by regularly applying NH4NO3 in the range of 35 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Klosterhede, Denmark; since 1992) and 25 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Alptal, Switzerland; since 1995), respectively. We hypothesize that ecoenzyme activities will decline exponentially with depth reflecting well-established similar trends in organic matter and microbial biomass. However, when normalized to microbial biomass we further hypothesize that activities will not change or even increase down the soil profile. Concerning microbial nutrient limitation, we expect to see a shift from N- to C-limitation with depth which should be reflected in increasing ratios of C- to N-acquiring enzymes. Preliminary results suggest that activity of hydrolytic enzymes generally decreases with depth, although this drop in activity is not so pronounced when normalized to microbial biomass. Oxidative enzymes, on the other hand, do not follow this pattern, often showing increased activities with depth. We further see site

  17. Harvesting natural forests for biomass in the Lake States: Using a landscape disturbance and succession model to evaluate long-term carbon, nitrogen and species composition change

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Puma, I. P.; Mladenoff, D.; Bradford, J.; Forrester, J. A.; D'Amato, A.

    2013-12-01

    We used the LANDIS-II spatial forest landscape disturbance and succession model with a modified Century carbon and nitrogen cycling model to investigate how the harvest of branches for biomass will affect above and below-ground carbon and nitrogen allocations under several long term harvest scenarios. We focused on aspen/birch sites along climate and soil composition gradients in the Lake States in order to understand how state guidelines for biomass harvesting may affect long term forest ecosystem sustainability and composition across the landscape. Preliminary results suggest that above-ground biomass does not differ significantly between bole-only and whole-tree harvest over 280 years with 40 year harvest intervals for aspen birch forests. However, differences in above-ground biomass at year 280 between harvest and no harvest scenarios are two-fold. Additionally, aspen dominated sites succeed to maple and pine dominated composition for non-harvest scenarios. Simulations are most sensitive to species physiological traits, and small changes in these parameters strongly affect model results. Our results suggest that details of species specific physiological traits may be important in understanding landscape level changes in carbon sequestration and ecosystem sustainability.

  18. Effects of initial climatic conditions on growth and accumulation of fluoride and nitrogen in leaves of two tropical tree species exposed to industrial air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlan, Claudia Maria; Salatino, Antonio [Departamento de Botanica, Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 11461, 05422-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Domingos, Marisa [Secao de Ecologia, Instituto de Botanica, SMA, CP 4005, 01061-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-03-15

    Saplings of Tibouchina pulchra and Psidium guajava, cultivated under standardized soil conditions, were placed in two sites at Cubatao (state of Sao Paulo, southeast Brazil) to study the effects of air pollution on growth, biomass allocation and foliar nitrogen and fluoride concentrations. Thirty-six potted plants were maintained over two periods of one year (Jul/00 to Jun/01; Dec/00 to Nov/01) at each of two experimental sites with distinct levels of air pollution: Piloes River Valley (PV) with vegetation virtually unaffected by air pollution; and Mogi River Valley (MV) severely affected by pollutants released mainly by chemical, fertilizer, iron and steel industries. For both species, saplings growing at MV showed alterations of growth and biomass allocation, as well as increased leaf concentrations of nitrogen and fluoride. Comparing both experimental periods, the one starting in winter (the driest season in Southeastern Brazil) seemed to affect the saplings more severely, the differences of the measured parameters between MV and PV being higher than in the second period. Multivariate analysis revealed two groups of data: one representing the MV and the other the PV saplings. For both species, saplings growing at MV showed differences in chemical composition, growth and biomass allocation, compared with the PV saplings. The results suggested that seasonal conditions of the first months of sapling exposure (summer or winter) modulate the intensity of responses to pollution stress. (author)

  19. The Relationship of Nitrogen and C/N Ratio with Secondary Metabolites Levels and Antioxidant Activities in Three Varieties of Malaysian Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafiz Ibrahim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kacip Fatimah (Labisia pumila Blume, one of the most famous and widely used herbs, especially in Southeast Asia, is found to have interesting bioactive compounds and displays health promoting properties. In this study, the antioxidant activities of the methanol extracts of leaves, stems and roots of three varieties of L. pumila (var. alata, pumila and lanceolata were evaluated in an effort to compare and validate the medicinal potential of this indigenous Malaysian herb species. The antioxidant activity determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, as well as the total amount of phenolics and flavonoids were the highest in the leaves, followed by the stems and roots in all the varieties. A similar trend was displayed by the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP activity, suggesting that the L. pumila varieties possess high foliar antioxidant properties. At low FRAP activity concentrations, the values of the leaves’ inhibition activity in the three varieties were significantly higher than those of the stems and roots, with var. alata exhibiting higher antioxidant activities and total contents of phenolics and flavonoids compared to the varieties pumila and lanceolata. The high production of secondary metabolites and antioxidant activities in var. alata were firmly related to low nitrogen content and high C/N ratio in plant parts. The study also demonstrated a positive correlation between secondary metabolite content and antioxidant activities, and revealed that the consumption of L. pumila could exert several beneficial effects by virtue of its antioxidant activity.

  20. Discovering Engangered Species. A Learning and Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Nancy; Machlis, Sally

    Up to 33 million species share the earth; no one knows the exact number for sure. All over the world, many species are becoming extinct. This workbook is designed to help children become more aware of the concept of extinction, and to develop personal strategies for helping with the problem of endangered species. Included are 31 activities…

  1. Biomass and nitrogen accumulation of hairy vetch-cereal rye cover crop mixtures as influenced by species proportions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The performance and suitability of a legume-grass cover crop mixture for specific functions may be influenced by the proportions of each species in the mixture. The objectives of this study were to: 1) evaluate aboveground biomass and species biomass proportions at different hairy vetch (Vicia villo...

  2. Responses of Nitrogen and related enzyme Activities to Fertilization in Rhizosphere of Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUANLING; YUSHANGQI; 等

    1997-01-01

    In the present experiment,wheat seedlings(Trticucum aestivum L.)were grown on a purple soil with various fertilizer treatments in order to investigate the responses of nitrogen and related enzyme activities in the rhizosphere,The results revealed the increments of both organic matter and total N in the soil with the proximity to the growing roots,especially in treatment of supplying pig manure in combination with chemical fertilizer,suggesting that they could ome from root and microorganism exudation which could be intensified by inorganic-organic fertiliztion,being of benefit to improving the physical and bilogical envi-ronment in the rhizosphere of wheat.Much more inorganic N was observed in the fertilized soils surrounding wheat roots than in the CK treatment ,indicating ,the improvement of crop N supply in the rhizosphere of wheat by fertilization. The activities of invertase,urease and protease in the root zone were greatly enhanced as compared to those in the other parts of soil except that the urease activities were similar in the rhizospher and nonrhi-zosphere of the CK and pig manure treatments,indicating that invertase and protese could be produced by growing roots and rhizosphere microorganisms,in contrast to urease which could be stimulated by urea,Also,significant increment of chemical fertilizer combined with pig manure,suggested that fertilization not only accelerated the renewal of organic matter bu also enhanced bioavailability of organic N in that soil zone .This could be the reason why the total amount of inorganic N available for plants was increased more obviously in the rhizosphere of wheat of the fertilizaton treatments than in taht of the CK treatment.

  3. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  4. Direct functionalization of nitrogen heterocycles via Rh-catalyzed C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jared C; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct functionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes our work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. We initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2 alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. We then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, we discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh- N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. We then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy 3)2] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazoline, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy 3) 2 fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid cocatalysts accelerate the alkylation, we developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  5. Nitrogen doped TiO2 nanotube arrays with high photoelectrochemical activity for photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bao; Wang, Yan; Bian, Haidong; Shen, Tiankuo; Wu, Yucheng; Chen, Zhong

    2013-09-01

    Nitrogen doped TiO2 nanotube arrays (N-TNAs) were prepared by immersing TNAs in 1 M NH3·H2O solution and then annealing in different temperatures. The morphology, structure and composition of the N-TNAs were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis spectroscopy, respectively. Effects of annealing temperatures on structure, photocatalytic properties, and the crystal structure transformation process of the N-TNAs were discussed. Photocatalytic properties of the N-TNAs were evaluated in term of the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under UV light and visible light, and the photocurrent of N-TNAs were tested by electrochemical workstation. The XPS results showed that the N-TNAs were achieved by interstitial doping and substitutional doping, and the FESEM results showed the morphology was not changed after doping process. Compared with the pure TNAs, the N-TNAs annealed at 500 ̊C for 2 h with a mixed phase of anatase and rutile exhibited higher photocatalytic degradation activity to MO. Furthermore, the photocatalytic mechanism of organic pollutants degradation (MO) was discussed based on our experiments.

  6. Experimental study on activated carbon-nitrogen pair in a prototype pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anupam, Kumar; Palodkar, Avinash V.; Halder, G. N.

    2016-04-01

    Pressure swing adsorption of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon in the single-bed adsorber-desorber chamber has been studied at six different pressures 6-18 kgf/cm2 to evaluate their performance as an alternative refrigeration technique. Refrigerating effect showed a linear rise with an increase in the operating pressure. However, the heat of adsorption and COP exhibited initial rise with the increasing operating pressure but decreased later after reaching a maximum value. The COP initially increases with operating pressures however, with the further rise of operating pressure it steadily decreased. The highest average refrigeration, maximum heat of adsorption and optimum coefficient of performance was evaluated to be 415.38 W at 18 kgf/cm2, 92756.35 J at 15 kgf/cm2 and 1.32 at 12 kgf/cm2, respectively. The system successfully produced chilled water at 1.7 °C from ambient water at 28.2 °C.

  7. Abundances and potential activities of nitrogen cycling microbial communities along a chronosequence of a glacier forefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankatschk, Robert; Töwe, Stefanie; Kleineidam, Kristina; Schloter, Michael; Zeyer, Josef

    2011-06-01

    Glacier forefields are ideal ecosystems to study the development of nutrient cycles as well as single turnover processes during soil development. In this study, we examined the ecology of the microbial nitrogen (N) cycle in bulk soil samples from a chronosequence of the Damma glacier, Switzerland. Major processes of the N cycle were reconstructed on the genetic as well as the potential enzyme activity level at sites of the chronosequence that have been ice-free for 10, 50, 70, 120 and 2000 years. In our study, we focused on N fixation, mineralization (chitinolysis and proteolysis), nitrification and denitrification. Our results suggest that mineralization, mainly the decomposition of deposited organic material, was the main driver for N turnover in initial soils, that is, ice-free for 10 years. Transient soils being ice-free for 50 and 70 years were characterized by a high abundance of N fixing microorganisms. In developed soils, ice-free for 120 and 2000 years, significant rates of nitrification and denitrification were measured. Surprisingly, copy numbers of the respective functional genes encoding the corresponding enzymes were already high in the initial phase of soil development. This clearly indicates that the genetic potential is not the driver for certain functional traits in the initial phase of soil formation but rather a well-balanced expression of the respective genes coding for selected functions.

  8. Land use mediates riverine nitrogen export under the dominant influence of human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binhui; Chang, Scott X.; Lam, Shu Kee; Erisman, Jan Willem; Gu, Baojing

    2017-09-01

    Riverine nitrogen (N) export is a crucial process that links upstream and downstream ecosystems and coastal zones. However, the driving forces of riverine N export that is closely related to water N pollution are still not well understood. In this study, we used a mass balance approach to quantify the sources of N discharge and analyzed the effect of land use composition on riverine N export, taking Zhejiang Province, China as a case study. We found that the total reactive N discharge to rivers in Zhejiang increased from 0.22 to 0.26 Tg yr‑1 from 2000 to 2015. At the watershed scale, our estimate of N export agrees well with the monitored riverine N concentration in the eight major watersheds in Zhejiang. Direct discharge of domestic wastewater and effluents from wastewater treatment plants are dominant sources of riverine N export, followed by agricultural non-point sources. Although riverine N export increases with the increasing proportion of urban and agricultural land uses, we did not find any relationship between land use change and changes in riverine N export. This suggests that the dominant factor affecting riverine N export should be human activities (e.g. wastewater discharge and fertilization level), while land use only mediates riverine N export.

  9. A novel endo-hydrogenase activity recycles hydrogen produced by nitrogen fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrogen (N(2 fixation also yields hydrogen (H(2 at 1:1 stoichiometric amounts. In aerobic diazotrophic (able to grow on N(2 as sole N-source bacteria, orthodox respiratory hupSL-encoded hydrogenase activity, associated with the cell membrane but facing the periplasm (exo-hydrogenase, has nevertheless been presumed responsible for recycling such endogenous hydrogen. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As shown here, for Azorhizobium caulinodans diazotrophic cultures open to the atmosphere, exo-hydrogenase activity is of no consequence to hydrogen recycling. In a bioinformatic analysis, a novel seven-gene A. caulinodans hyq cluster encoding an integral-membrane, group-4, Ni,Fe-hydrogenase with homology to respiratory complex I (NADH: quinone dehydrogenase was identified. By analogy, Hyq hydrogenase is also integral to the cell membrane, but its active site faces the cytoplasm (endo-hydrogenase. An A. caulinodans in-frame hyq operon deletion mutant, constructed by "crossover PCR", showed markedly decreased growth rates in diazotrophic cultures; normal growth was restored with added ammonium--as expected of an H(2-recycling mutant phenotype. Using A. caulinodans hyq merodiploid strains expressing beta-glucuronidase as promoter-reporter, the hyq operon proved strongly and specifically induced in diazotrophic culture; as well, hyq operon induction required the NIFA transcriptional activator. Therefore, the hyq operon is constituent of the nif regulon. CONCLUSIONS: Representative of aerobic N(2-fixing and H(2-recycling alpha-proteobacteria, A. caulinodans possesses two respiratory Ni,Fe-hydrogenases: HupSL exo-hydrogenase activity drives exogenous H(2 respiration, and Hyq endo-hydrogenase activity recycles endogenous H(2, specifically that produced by N(2 fixation. To benefit human civilization, H(2 has generated considerable interest as potential renewable energy source as its makings are ubiquitous and its combustion yields no greenhouse gases. As

  10. Nitrogen, Phosphor, and Potassium Level in Soil and Oil Palm Tree at various Composition of plant species mixtures grown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanum, C.; Rauf, A.; Fazrin, D. A.; Habibi, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    In productive oil palm plantation areas, poor vegetation is generally caused by low light intensity. This condition causes excessive erosion and decreases soil fertility. One of the efforts for soil and water conservation at oil palm plantations is through increased vegetation diversity. The changes of soil and plant nitrogen, phosporus, and potassium content, observed by planting two types of herbs under oil palm tree, with different compositions. Vegetation composition was set as: Arachis glabrata 100%; Stenotaprum secundatum 100%; Arachis glabrata 50% + Stenotaprum secundatum 50%; Arachis glabrata 75% + Stenotaprum secundatum 25%; Arachis glabrata 25% + Stenotaprum secundatum 75%. The shoot and root fresh/dry weight, nutrient content (nitrogen, phosphor, and potassium) of each cutting were measured at the end of the experiment. Ten of treatment plant were harvested and divided shoots and roots after washing out of soil. Biomass samples were dried at 70 °C for 48 h and weighed. The total N and its proportional concentration (N%) were analyzed with the micro- Kjeldahl method. Potasium analyzing with flamephotometry, and phosphor and from samples was determined by analyzing with spectrophotometry method. The results showed the highest shoot growth of A.glabarata if planting was mixed with S. secundatum, but the result was different with S.secundatum being superior if planted with monoculture system. Combination of interrow cultivation is more recommended for soil conservation and nutrient maintenance in palm oil trees were A. Glabarata 75% + S.secundatum 25%.

  11. "Invented Invaders": An Engaging Activity to Teach Characteristics Control of Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species, defined as exotic species that reach pest status, are major threats to global biodiversity. Although invasive species can belong to any taxonomic group, general characteristics such as rapid growth and reproduction are shared by many invasive species. "Invented Invaders" is a collaborative activity in which students…

  12. Numerical simulation of the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in water by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their effects on Escherichia coli (E. coli)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuse, Kazumasa; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    We have used two types of numerical simulations to examine biological effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated in water by an atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) that irradiates the water surface. One is numerical simulation for the generation and transport of RONS in water based on the reaction-diffusion-advection equations coupled with Poisson equation. The rate constants, mobilities, and diffusion coefficients used in the equations are obtained from the literature. The gaseous species are given as boundary conditions and time evolution of the concentrations of chemical species in pure water is solved numerically as functions of the depth in one dimension. Although it is not clear how living organisms respond to such exogenous RONS, we also use numerical simulation for metabolic reactions of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and examine possible effects of such RONS on an in-silico model organism. The computation model is based on the flux balance analysis (FBA), where the fluxes of the metabolites in a biological system are evaluated in steady state, i.e., under the assumption that the fluxes do not change in time. The fluxes are determined with liner programming to maximize the growth rate of the bacteria under the given conditions. Although FBA cannot be directly applied to dynamical responses of metabolic reactions, the simulation still gives insight into the biological reactions to exogenous chemical species generated by an APP. Partially supported by JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research.

  13. Enhanced Catalytic Activity of Pt Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes for Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qizhong; Park, Soo-Jin; Kim, Seok

    2015-11-01

    We report an efficient method for the synthesis of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide supported Pt nanocatalysts (Pt/N-RGO). Nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) was prepared by pyrolysis of graphene oxide with cyanamide as a nitrogen source. Then, the Pt nanoparticles were deposited over N-RGO by one-step chemical polyol reduction process. The morphology and structure of as-prepared catalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, electrocatalytic activities of the catalysts were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). As a result, the Pt/N-RGO catalysts exhibit the superior electrochemical activity toward methanol oxidation in compared with that of Pt loaded on undoped reduced graphene oxide (Pt/RGO) and Pt/carbon blacks (Pt/C). This was mainly attributed to the better distribution of Pt nanoparticles as well as the synergistic electrochemical effects of the nitrogen doped supports. These results demonstrate that N-RGO could be a promising candidate as a high performance catalyst support for a fuel cell application.

  14. CARBONACEOUS, NITROGENOUS AND PHOSPHORUS MATTERS REMOVAL FROM DOMESTIC WASTEWATER BY AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE REACTOR OF NITRIFICATION-DENITRIFICATION TYPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMAD ALI FULAZZAKY

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an environmental engineering method based on biotechnology approach as one of the expected solutions that should be considered to implementing the activated sludge for improving the quality of water and living environment, especially to remove the major pollutant elements of domestic wastewater. Elimination of 3 major pollutant elements, i.e., carbon, nitrogen and phosphor containing the domestic wastewater is proposed to carry out biological method of an anoxic-aerobic reactor therein these types of pollutants should be consecutively processed in three steps. Firstly, eliminate the carbonaceous matter in the aerobic reactor. Secondly, to remove the carbonaceous and nitrogenous matters, it is necessary to modify the reactor’s nature from the aerobic condition to an anoxic-aerobic reactor. And finally, when the cycle of nitrification-denitrification is stable to achieve the target’s efficiency of reactor by adding the ferric iron into the activated sludge, it can be continued to remove the carbonaceous, nitrogenous and phosphorous matters simultaneously. The efficiency of carbonaceous and nitrogenous matters removal was confirmed with the effluent standard, COD is less than 100 mgO2/L and the value of global nitrogen is less than 10 mgN/L. The effectiveness of suspended matter removal is higher than 90% and the decantation of activated sludge is very good as identifying the Molhman’s index is below of 120 mL/L. The total phosphorus matter removal is more effective than the soluble phosphorus matter. By maintaining the reactor’s nature at the suitable condition, identifying the range of pH between 6.92 and 7.16 therefore the excellent abatement of phosphor of about 80% is achieving with the molar Fe/P ratio of 1.4.

  15. Effects of Benzo(epyrene on reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and inflammatory cytokines induction in human RPE cells and attenuation by mitochondrial-involved mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Fernanda Estrago-Franco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify inhibitors that could effectively lower reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS, complement and inflammatory cytokine levels induced by Benzo(epyrene [B(ep], an element of cigarette smoke, in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 in vitro. Methods: ARPE-19 cells were treated for 24 hours with 200 μM, 100 μM, and 50 μM B(ep or DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide-equivalent concentrations. Some cultures were pre-treated with ROS/RNS inhibitors (NG nitro-L-arginine, inhibits nitric oxide synthase; Apocynin, inhibits NADPH oxidase; Rotenone, inhibits mitochondrial complex I; Antimycin A, inhibits mitochondria complex III and ROS/RNS levels were measured with a fluorescent H 2 DCFDA assay. Multiplex bead arrays were used to measure levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6, Interleukin-8 (IL-8, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF, Transforming Growth Factor alpha (TGF-α and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. IL-6 levels were also measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Real-time qPCR analyses were performed with primers for C3 (component 3, CFH (inhibits complement activation, CD59 (inhibitor of the complement membrane attack complex (MAC and CD55/DAF (accelerates decay of target complement target proteins. Results: The ARPE-19 cultures treated with B(ep showed significantly increased ROS/RNS levels (P < 0.001, which were then partially reversed by 6 μM Antimycin A (19%, P = 0.03, but not affected by the other ROS/RNS inhibitors. The B(ep treated cultures demonstrated increased levels of IL-6 (33%; P = 0.016 and GM-CSF (29%; P = 0.0001 compared to DMSO-equivalent controls, while the expression levels for components of the complement pathway (C3, CFH, CD59 and CD55/DAF were not changed. Conclusion: The cytotoxic effects of B(ep include elevated ROS/RNS levels along with pro-inflammatory IL-6 and GM-CSF proteins. Blocking the Qi site of cytochrome c reductase (complex III with Antimycin A led to

  16. Role of reactive nitrogen species generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase in vesicant-induced lung injury, inflammation and altered lung functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Shen, Jianliang; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by sulfur mustard and related vesicants is associated with oxidative stress. In the present studies we analyzed the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung injury and inflammation induced by vesicants using 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) as a model. C57Bl/6 (WT) and iNOS −/− mice were sacrificed 3 days or 14 days following intratracheal administration of CEES (6 mg/kg) or control. CEES intoxication resulted in transient (3 days) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell and protein content in WT, but not iNOS −/− mice. This correlated with expression of Ym1, a marker of oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. In contrast, in iNOS −/− mice, Ym1 was only observed 14 days post-exposure in enlarged alveolar macrophages, suggesting that they are alternatively activated. This is supported by findings that lung tumor necrosis factor and lipocalin Lcn2 expression, mediators involved in tissue repair were also upregulated at this time in iNOS −/− mice. Conversely, CEES-induced increases in the proinflammatory genes, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, were abrogated in iNOS −/− mice. In WT mice, CEES treatment also resulted in increases in total lung resistance and decreases in compliance in response to methacholine, effects blunted by loss of iNOS. These data demonstrate that RNS, generated via iNOS play a role in the pathogenic responses to CEES, augmenting oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressing tissue repair. Elucidating inflammatory mechanisms mediating vesicant-induced lung injury is key to the development of therapeutics to treat mustard poisoning. -- Highlights: ► Lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress are induced by the model vesicant CEES ► RNS generated via iNOS are important in the CEES-induced pulmonary toxicity ► iNOS −/− mice are protected from CEES-induced lung toxicity and

  17. Impacts of nitrogen deposition on herbaceous ground flora and epiphytic foliose lichen species in southern Ontario hardwood forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Andrew M; Watmough, Shaun A

    2015-01-01

    In this study 70 sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) dominated plots in Ontario, Canada were sampled in the spring of 2009 and 2010 and herbaceous plant and epiphytic foliose lichen species data were compared against modeled N and S deposition data, climate parameters and measured soil and plant/lichen S and N concentration. Herbaceous plant species richness was positively correlated with temperature and indices of diversity (Shannon Weiner and Simpson's Index) were positively correlated with soil pH but not N or S deposition or standardized foliar N scores. Herbaceous community composition was strongly controlled by traditional factors, but there was a small and significant influence of atmospheric S and N deposition. Epiphytic lichen species richness exhibited a strong negative relationship with standardized foliar N score and only one lichen species (Phaeophyscia rubropulchra) was observed at sites with a standardized foliar N score of 0.76.

  18. Delta15N values of tropical savanna and monsoon forest species reflect root specialisations and soil nitrogen status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S; Stewart, G R

    2003-03-01

    A large number of herbaceous and woody plants from tropical woodland, savanna, and monsoon forest were analysed to determine the impact of environmental factors (nutrient and water availability, fire) and biological factors (microbial associations, systematics) on plant delta(15)N values. Foliar delta(15)N values of herbaceous and woody species were not related to growth form or phenology, but a strong relationship existed between mycorrhizal status and plant delta(15)N. In woodland and savanna, woody species with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) associations and putative N(2)-fixing species with ECM/arbuscular (AM) associations had lowest foliar delta(15)N values (1.0-0.6 per thousand ), AM species had mostly intermediate delta(15)N values (average +0.6 per thousand ), while non-mycorrhizal Proteaceae had highest delta(15)N values (+2.9 to +4.1 per thousand ). Similar differences in foliar delta(15)N were observed between AM (average 0.1 and 0.2 per thousand ) and non-mycorrhizal (average +0.8 and +0.3 per thousand ) herbaceous species in woodland and savanna. Leguminous savanna species had significantly higher leaf N contents (1.8-2.5% N) than non-fixing species (0.9-1.2% N) indicating substantial N acquisition via N(2) fixation. Monsoon forest species had similar leaf N contents (average 2.4% N) and positive delta(15)N values (+0.9 to +2.4 per thousand ). Soil nitrification and plant NO(3)(-) use was substantially higher in monsoon forest than in woodland or savanna. In the studied communities, higher soil N content and nitrification rates were associated with more positive soil delta(15)N and plant delta(15)N. In support of this notion, Ficus, a high NO(3)(-) using taxa associated with NO(3)(-) rich sites in the savanna, had the highest delta(15)N values of all AM species in the savanna. delta(15)N of xylem sap was examined as a tool for studying plant delta(15)N relations. delta(15)N of xylem sap varied seasonally and between differently aged Acacia and other savanna

  19. Litter mixture dominated by leaf litter of the invasive species, Flaveria bidentis, accelerates decomposition and favors nitrogen release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyan; Wei, Zishang; Huangfu, Chaohe; Chen, Xinwei; Yang, Dianlin

    2017-01-01

    In natural ecosystems, invasive plant litter is often mixed with that of native species, yet few studies have examined the decomposition dynamics of such mixtures, especially across different degrees of invasion. We conducted a 1-year litterbag experiment using leaf litters from the invasive species Flaveria bidentis (L.) and the dominant co-occurring native species, Setaria viridis (L.). Litters were allowed to decompose either separately or together at different ratios in a mothproof screen house. The mass loss of all litter mixtures was non-additive, and the direction and strength of effects varied with species ratio and decomposition stage. During the initial stages of decomposition, all mixtures had a neutral effect on the mass loss; however, at later stages of decomposition, mixtures containing more invasive litter had synergistic effects on mass loss. Importantly, an increase in F. bidentis litter with a lower C:N ratio in mixtures led to greater net release of N over time. These results highlight the importance of trait dissimilarity in determining the decomposition rates of litter mixtures and suggest that F. bidentis could further synchronize N release from litter as an invasion proceeds, potentially creating a positive feedback linked through invasion as the invader outcompetes the natives for nutrients. Our findings also demonstrate the importance of species composition as well as the identity of dominant species when considering how changes in plant community structure influence plant invasion.

  20. Alteration of soil carbon and nitrogen pools and enzyme activities as affected by increased soil coarseness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhen; Lü, Linyou; Creamer, Courtney A.; Dijkstra, Feike A.; Liu, Heyong; Feng, Xue; Yu, Guoqing; Han, Xingguo; Jiang, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Soil coarseness decreases ecosystem productivity, ecosystem carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks, and soil nutrient contents in sandy grasslands subjected to desertification. To gain insight into changes in soil C and N pools, microbial biomass, and enzyme activities in response to soil coarseness, a field experiment was conducted by mixing native soil with river sand in different mass proportions: 0, 10, 30, 50, and 70 % sand addition. Four years after establishing plots and 2 years after transplanting, soil organic C and total N concentrations decreased with increased soil coarseness down to 32.2 and 53.7 % of concentrations in control plots, respectively. Soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN) declined with soil coarseness down to 44.1 and 51.9 %, respectively, while microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP) increased by as much as 73.9 %. Soil coarseness significantly decreased the enzyme activities of β-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, and acid phosphomonoesterase by 20.2-57.5 %, 24.5-53.0 %, and 22.2-88.7 %, used for C, N and P cycling, respectively. However, observed values of soil organic C, dissolved organic C, total dissolved N, available P, MBC, MBN, and MBP were often significantly higher than would be predicted from dilution effects caused by the sand addition. Soil coarseness enhanced microbial C and N limitation relative to P, as indicated by the ratios of β-glucosidase and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase to acid phosphomonoesterase (and MBC : MBP and MBN : MBP ratios). Enhanced microbial recycling of P might alleviate plant P limitation in nutrient-poor grassland ecosystems that are affected by soil coarseness. Soil coarseness is a critical parameter affecting soil C and N storage and increases in soil coarseness can enhance microbial C and N limitation relative to P, potentially posing a threat to plant productivity in sandy grasslands suffering from desertification.

  1. Inhibition of soil microbial activity by nitrogen-based energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Roman G; Minyard, Morgan L; Checkai, Ronald T; Sunahara, Geoffrey I; Rocheleau, Sylvie; Dodard, Sabine G; Paquet, Louise; Hawari, Jalal

    2017-05-18

    We investigated individual toxicities of the nitrogen-based energetic materials (EMs) 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT); 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-ADNT); 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT); and nitroglycerin (NG) on microbial activity in Sassafras sandy loam (SSL) soil, which has physicochemical characteristics that support very high qualitative relative bioavailability for organic chemicals. Batches of SSL soil for basal respiration (BR) and substrate-induced respiration (SIR) assays were separately amended with individual EMs or acetone carrier control. Total microbial biomass carbon (biomass C) was determined from CO2 production increases after addition of 2500 mg/kg of glucose-water slurry to the soil. Exposure concentrations of each EM in soil were determined using US Environmental Protection Agency method 8330A. Basal respiration was the most sensitive endpoint for assessing the effects of nitroaromatic EMs on microbial activity in SSL, whereas SIR and biomass C were more sensitive endpoints for assessing the effects of NG in soil. The orders of toxicity (from greatest to least) were 4-ADNT > 2,4-DNT = 2-ADNT > NG for BR; but for SIR and biomass C, the order of toxicity was NG > 2,4-DNT > 2-ADNT = 4-ADNT. No inhibition of SIR was found up to and including the greatest concentration of each ADNT tested in SSL. These ecotoxicological data will be helpful in identifying concentrations of contaminant EMs in soil that present acceptable ecological risks for biologically mediated processes in soil. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-10. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc., on behalf of SETAC.

  2. [Advances in studies on chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Qian-Jun; Kang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Qing-Di

    2013-12-01

    The chemical constituents isolated from Desmodium species (Leguminosae) included terpenoids, flavonoids, steroids, alkaloids compounds. Modem pharmacological studies have showed that the Desmodium species have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, diuretic, antipyretic, analgesic and choleretic activity. This article mainly has reviewed the research advances of chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species since 2003.

  3. Changes in species richness and composition in European acidic grasslands over the past 70 years: the contribution of cumulative atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupre, C.; Ranke, T.; Diekmann, M. [Institute of Ecology, FB 2, University of Bremen, Leobener Str., DE-28359 Bremen (Germany); Stevens, C.J.; Dise, N.B. [Department of Environmental and Geographical Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 GD (United Kingdom); Bleeker, A. [Department of Air Quality and Climate Change, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, PO Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Peppler-Lisbach, C. [Department of Biology and Environmental Sciences, University of Oldenburg, PO Box 2503, DE-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Gowing, D.J.G. [The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Dorland, E. [Utrecht University, Institute of Environmental Biology, Section of Landscape Ecology, PO Box 80084, 3508 TB Utrecht (Netherlands); Bobbink, R. [B-WARE Research Centre, Radboud University, PO Box 9010, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    Our study investigates the negative impact of nitrogen (N) deposition on species richness in acidic grasslands, based on a temporal comparison of vegetation data spanning a period of almost 70 years. We compiled a large data base of plots assigned to the Violion caninae grassland type, composed of managed, but unfertilized semi-natural grasslands on nutrient-poor, acidic soils. In total 1114 plots, mainly from Great Britain, the Netherlands and Germany, were compiled, dating back to 1939. Environmental site information included geographical and soil (mean Ellenberg values) variables as well as estimates of cumulative N and sulphur (S) deposition since 1939. Statistical analyses were carried out separately for the data subsets from the three regions. In all regions, the vegetation differentiation was mainly related to soil acidity and nutrient availability, as well as to the year of sampling and the cumulative amounts of N and S deposition. Plot-species richness of vascular plants and bryophytes (analysed for Great Britain only) decreased with time and analyses suggest these are affected by various factors, notably soil pH, but also latitude and cumulative N deposition. The latter explained more of the variation in species number than the year of sampling and cumulative S deposition, which supports the interpretation that the decline in species richness is mainly caused by increasing N availability and less by altered management and soil acidification. For Great Britain and Germany, cumulative N deposition showed a strong negative relationship with several biodiversity measures, especially the proportion of dicots, whereas it was positively related to the proportion of grass species. In general, our results give temporal evidence for the negative effect of N deposition on species richness in semi-natural vegetation.

  4. Species-Specificity of Sperm Motility Activation and Chemotaxis: a Study on Ascidian Species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MANABU YOSHIDA; YUKI HIRADATE; NOBURU SENSUI; JACKY COSSON; MASAAKI MORISAWA

    2013-01-01

    .... These phenomena constitute the first communication signaling between males and females in the process of fertilization in many animals and plants, and in many cases, these are species-specific events...

  5. Changes in catalase activity in leaves of woody and bushy plants in the conditions of air pollution by compounds of fluorine, sulfur and nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prysedskyj

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently environmental pollution by industrial waste products has become a significant environmental factor that essentially limits the vital functions of plants and reduces their species diversity. The antioxidant system is of special importance for tolerance reactions of plants to stressful environmental conditions, in particular, contamination by industrial pollutants. One of the constituents of this system is oxidoreductase, including catalase. Consequently, we have conducted experiments to determine how the nature of the complex compounds of fluorine, nitrogen and sulfur influences catalase activity in leaves of selected species of trees and shrubs. The investigation was made according to the complete factorial experiment that allowed us to study the effect of these pollutants both individually and in combination. We used the iodometric method to determine the level of catalase activity. Statistical analysis of the obtained results was performed by means of dispersion analysis with the comparison according to the Duncan method. The results of the research showed the possible impact of pollutants on the activity of catalase, which depends on the resilience of the plants, structure and duration of potency of the pollutants. With less resilient plant species (Sorbus aucuparia L., Fraxinus lanceolata Borkh. air pollution with a combination of fluorine, sulfur and nitrogen in most cases caused a reduction of catalase activity. Thus, in S. aucuparia a 5-hour exposure to low concentrations of pollutants (HF – 0.2 ml/m3, NH3 – 1.2 ml/m3, SO2 and H2SO4 – 0.9–1.0 ml/m3 caused an inhibition of catalase activity by 40.5%, and a ten-hour exposure caused a 61.4% inhibition compared with the control plants. With increased concentrations of pollutants  catalase function was inhibited by 35.8–73.6%, depending on the duration of their fumigation. For F. lanceolata, the pollutants’ effect on catalase activity caused a decrease in function of this

  6. Foliar Reflectance and Fluorescence Responses for Plants Under Nitrogen Stress Determined with Active and Passive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, E. M.; McMurtrey, J. E.; Campbell, P. K. Entcheva; Corp, L. A.; Butcher, L. M.; Chappelle, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Vegetation productivity is driven by nitrogen (N) availability in soils. Both excessive and low soil N induce physiological changes in plant foliage. In 2001, we examined the use of spectral fluorescence and reflectance measurements to discriminate among plants provided different N fertilizer application rates: 20%, 50%, 100% and 150% of optimal N levels. A suite of optical, fluorescence, and biophysical measurements were collected on leaves from field grown corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean plants (Glycine max L.) grown in pots (greenhouse + ambient sunlight daily). Three types of steady state laser-induced fluorescence measurements were made on adaxial and abaxial surfaces: 1) fluorescence images in four 10 nm bands (blue, green, red, far-red) resulting from broad irradiance excitation; 2) emission spectra (5 nm resolution) produced by excitation at single wavelengths (280,380 or 360, and 532 nm); and 3) excitation spectra (2 nm resolution), with emission wavelengths fixed at wavelengths centered on selected solar Fraunhofer lines (532,607,677 and 745 nm). Two complementary sets of high resolution (less than 2 nm) optical spectra were acquired for both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces: 1) optical properties (350-2500 nm) for reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance; and 2) reflectance spectra (500-1000 nm) acquired with and without a short pass filter at 665 nm to determine the fluorescence contribution to apparent reflectance in the 650-750 spectrum, especially at the 685 and 740 nm chlorophyll fluorescence (ChIF) peaks. The strongest relationships between foliar chemistry and optical properties were demonstrated for C/N content and two optical parameters associated with the red edge inflection point. Select optical properties and ChIF parameters were highly correlated for both species. A significant contribution of ChIF to apparent reflectance was observed, averaging 10-25% at 685 nm and 2 - 6% at 740 nm over all N treatments. Discrimination of N treatment

  7. Nitrogen-doped graphene/ZnSe nanocomposites: hydrothermal synthesis and their enhanced electrochemical and photocatalytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Xiao, Tian-Yuan; Li, Hui-Hui; Yang, Jing-Jing; Wang, Zheng; Yao, Hong-Bin; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-01-24

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (GN) has great potential applications in many fields because doping with nitrogen can alter the electrical properties of graphene. It is still a challenge to develop a convenient method for synthesis of GN sheets. In this paper, we first report the synthesis of a nitrogen-doped graphene/ZnSe nanocomposite (GN-ZnSe) by a one-pot hydrothermal process at low temperature using graphene oxide nanosheets and [ZnSe](DETA)(0.5) nanobelts as precursors. ZnSe nanorods composed of ZnSe nanoparticles were found to deposit on the surface of the GN sheets. The results demonstrated that [ZnSe](DETA)(0.5) nanobelts were used not only as the source of ZnSe nanoparticles but also as the nitrogen source. Interestingly, it was found that the as-prepared nanocomposites exhibit remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance for oxygen reduction reaction and photocatalytic activities for the bleaching of methyl orange dye under visible-light irradiation. This facile and catalyst-free approach for depositing ZnSe nanoparticles onto the graphene sheets may provide an alternative way for preparation of other nanocomposites based on GN sheets under mild conditions, which show their potential applications in wastewater treatment, fuel cells, energy storage, nanodevices, and so on.

  8. A facile fabrication of nitrogen-doped electrospun In2O3 nanofibers with improved visible-light photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Na; Shao, Changlu; Li, Xinghua; Miao, Fujun; Wang, Kexin; Liu, Yichun

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysis demonstrates to be an effective approach for eliminating most types of environment contaminants and for producing hydrogen. Herein, a facile synthesis route combining electrospinning technique and thermal treatment method under NH3 atmosphere has been presented as a straightforward protocol for the fabrication of nitrogen-doped In2O3 (N-In2O3) nanofibers, the nitrogen content of which can be well controlled by adjusting the annealing temperature. Photocatalytic tests show that the N-In2O3 nanofibers demonstrate an improved degradation rate of Rhodamine B (RB) compared with pure In2O3 nanofibers under visible-light irradiation. This can be attributed to the nitrogen atom introducing at interstitial sites as well as the generation of oxygen vacancy on the surface of In2O3 nanofibers, resulting in the enhanced utilization of visible light for the N-In2O3 nanofibers. Furthermore, the obtained N-In2O3 nanofibers with the advantage of ultra-long one-dimensional nanostructures can be recycled several times by facile sedimentation and hence present almost no decrease in photocatalytic activity indicative of a well regeneration capability. Therefore, the as-fabricated nitrogen-doped In2O3 nanofibers as a promising photocatalyst present good photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant in waste water for practical application.

  9. Fast Degradation for High Activity: Oxygen- and Nitrogen-Functionalised Carbon Nanotubes in Solid-Acid Fuel-Cell Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Olga; Naumov, Sergej; Flyunt, Roman; Abel, Bernd; Varga, Aron

    2016-12-08

    Similar to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, the widespread application of solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) has been hindered partly by the necessity of the use of the precious-metal catalyst Pt in the electrodes. Here we investigate multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for their potential catalytic activity by using symmetric cell measurements of solid-acid-based electrochemical cells in a cathodic environment. For all measurements, the carbon nanotubes were Pt free and subject to either nitrogen or oxygen plasma treatment. AC impedance spectroscopy of the electrochemical cells, with and without a DC bias, was performed and showed significantly lower initial impedances for oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs compared to those treated with a nitrogen plasma. In symmetric cell measurements with a DC bias, the current declines quickly for oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs and more slowly, over 12 days, for nitrogen-plasma-treated MWCNTs. To elucidate the degradation mechanisms of the oxygen-plasma-treated MWCNTs under SAFC operating conditions, theoretical calculations were performed using DFT. The results indicate that several degradation mechanisms are likely to occur in parallel through the reduction of the surface oxygen groups that were introduced by the plasma treatment. This finally leads to an inert MWCNT surface and a very low electrode performance. Nitrogen-plasma-treated MWCNTs appear to have a higher stability and may be worthwhile for future investigations.

  10. Responses of Soil Acid Phosphomonoesterase Activity to Simulated Nitrogen Deposition in Three Forests of Subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wen-Juan; LIU Shi-Zhong; CHU Guo-Wei; ZHANG De-Qiang; LI Yue-Lin; LU Xian-Kai; ZHANG Wei; HUANG Juan; D. OTIENO; Z. H. XU; LIU Ju-Xiu

    2012-01-01

    Soil acid phosphomonoesterase activity (APA) plays a vital role in controlling phosphorus (P) cycling and reflecting the current degree of P limitation Responses of soil APA to elevating nitrogen (N) deposition are important because of their potential applications in addressing the relationship between N and P in forest ecosystems.A study of responses of soll APA to simulated N deposition was conducted in three succession forests of subtropical China.The three forests include a Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) forest (MPF)—pioneer community,a coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF)—transition community and a monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest (MEBF)—climax community.Four N treatments were designed for MEBF:control (without N added),low-N (50 kg N ha-1 year-1),and medium-N (100 kg N ha-1 year-1) and high-N (150 kg N ha-1 year-1),and only three N treatments (i.e.,control,low-N,mediun-N) were established for MPF and MF.Results showed that soil APA was highest in MEBF.followed by MPF and MF.Soil APAs in both MPF and MF were not influenced by low-N treatments but depressed in medium-N trcatments.However,soil APA in MEBF exhibited negative responses to high N additions,indicating that the environment of enhanced N depositions would reduce P supply for the mature forest ecosystem.Soil APA and its responses to N additions in subtropical forests were closely related to the succession stages in the forests.

  11. Cost of reactive nitrogen release from human activities to the environment in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Daniel J.; Compton, Jana E.; McCrackin, Michelle L.; Singh, Shweta

    2015-02-01

    Leakage of reactive nitrogen (N) from human activities to the environment can cause human health and ecological problems. Often these harmful effects are not reflected in the costs of food, fuel, and fiber that derive from N use. Spatial analyses of damage costs attributable to source at management-relevant scales could inform decisions in areas where anthropogenic N leakage causes harm. We used recently compiled data describing N inputs in the conterminous United States (US) to assess potential damage costs associated with anthropogenic N. We estimated fates of N leaked to the environment (air/deposition, surface freshwater, groundwater, and coastal zones) in the early 2000s by multiplying watershed-level N inputs (8-digit US Geologic Survey Hydrologic Unit Codes; HUC8s) with published coefficients describing nutrient uptake efficiency, leaching losses, and gaseous emissions. We scaled these N leakage estimates with mitigation, remediation, direct damage, and substitution costs associated with human health, agriculture, ecosystems, and climate (per kg of N) to calculate annual damage cost (US dollars in 2008 or as reported) of anthropogenic N per HUC8. Estimates of N leakage by HUC8 ranged from effects of atmospheric N pollution were important across HUC8s. However, significant data gaps remain in our ability to fully assess N damages, such as damage costs from harmful algal blooms and drinking water contamination. Nationally, potential health and environmental damages of anthropogenic N in the early 2000s totaled 210 billion yr-1 USD (range: 81-441 billion yr-1). While a number of gaps and uncertainties remain in these estimates, overall this work represents a starting point to inform decisions and engage stakeholders on the costs of N pollution.

  12. Influence of Agricultural Activity on Nitrogen Budget in Chinese and Japanese Watersheds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. D. KIMURA; K. KURAMOCHI; CAI Zu-Cong; M. SAITO; YAN Xiao-Yuan; R. HATANO; A. HAYAKAWA; K. KOHYAMA; TI Chao-Pu; DENG Mei-Hua; M. HOJITO; S. ITAHASHI

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the effect of agricultural activity on nitrogen (N) budget at the watershed scale,a comparative study was conducted at two Japanese watersheds,the Shibetsu River watershed (SRW) and Upper-Naka River watershed (UNRW),and one Chinese watershed,the Jurong Reservoir watershed (JRW).The total area and the proportion of agricultural area (in parentheses) of the watersheds were 685 (51%),1 299 (21%),and 46 km2 (55%) for SRW,UNRW,and JRW,respectively.The main agricultural land use in SRW was forage grassland,while paddy fields occupied the highest proportion of cropland in UNRW (11% of total area) and JRW (31% of total area).The farmland surplus N was 61,48,and 205 kg N ha-1 year-1 for SRW,UNRW,and JRW,respectively.The total input and output for the whole watershed were 89 and 76,83 and 61,and 353 and 176 kg N ha-1 year-1 for SRW,UNRW,and JRW,respectively.The proportion of discharged N to net anthropogenic N input was 31%,37%,and 1.7% for SRW,UNRW,and JRW,respectively.The two watersheds in Japan showed similar proportions of discharged N to those of previous reports,while the watershed in China (JRW) showed a totally different characteristic compared to previous studies.The high N input in JRW did not increase the amount of discharged N at the outlet of the watershed due to high proportions of paddy fields and water bodies,which was an underestimated N sink at the landscape scale.

  13. Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract, an indigenous drug preparation, modulates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species levels and antioxidative system in adjuvant arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasath, Vanu Ramkumar; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanatham

    2005-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are highly reactive transient chemical species, which play an important role in the etiology of tissue injury in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The effects of milk extract of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut (SA) was studied on adjuvant arthritis in rats. Arthritis was induced by injecting 0.1 ml of heat killed mycobacterium tuberculosis (10 mg/ml of paraffin oil) intradermally into the left hind paw. A significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxides (LPO), ROS (superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical, H(2)O(2) and myeloperoxidase) and RNS (nitrate+nitrite) observed in adjuvant arthritic animals were found to be significantly decreased on administration of the drug at 150 mg/kg body weight/day. The antioxidant defense system studied in arthritic animals were altered significantly as evidenced by the decrease in antioxidants. Treatment with SA recouped the altered antioxidant defense components to near normal levels. These evidences suggest that the free radical mediated damage during arthritis could have been controlled by SA by its free radical quenching and antioxidative potential. (Mol Cell Biochem 276: 97-104, 2005).

  14. Water activity and activation diameters from hygroscopicity data - Part II: Application to organic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Koehler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A method has been developed for using particle hygroscopicity measurements made with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA to determine water activity as a function of solute weight percent. In Part I, the method was tested for particles composed of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate. Here, we report results for several atmospherically-relevant organic species: glutaric acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid and levoglucosan. Predicted water activities for aqueous dicarboxylic acid solutions are quite similar in some cases to published estimates and the simplified predictions of Köhler theory, while in other cases substantial differences are found, which we attribute primarily to the semivolatile nature of these compounds that makes them difficult to study with the HTDMA. In contrast, estimates of water activity for levoglucosan solutions compare very well with recently-reported measurements and with published data for aqueous glucose and fructose solutions. For all studied species, the critical dry diameters active at supersaturations between 0.2 and 1% that are computed with the HTDMA-derived water activities are generally within the experimental error (~20% estimated in previously-published direct measurements using cloud condensation nuclei counters. For individual compounds, the variations in reported solution water activity lead to uncertainties in critical dry diameters of 5-25%, not significantly larger than the uncertainty in the direct measurements. To explore the impact of these uncertainties on modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, we incorporate the variations in estimates of solution water activities into the description of hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles in an adiabatic parcel model and examine the impact on the predicted drop number concentrations. For the limited set of initial conditions examined here, we find that the uncertainties in critical dry diameters for individual species lead to 0-21% changes in

  15. Amino substituted nitrogen heterocycle ureas as kinase insert domain containing receptor (KDR) inhibitors: Performance of structure–activity relationship approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Hayriye Yilmaz; Natalia Sizochenko; Bakhtiyor Rasulev; Andrey Toropov; Yahya Guzel; Viktor Kuz'min; Danuta Leszczynska; Jerzy Leszczynski

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) study was performed on a set of amino-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic urea derivatives. Two novel approaches were applied: (1) the simplified molecular input-line entry systems (SMILES) based optimal descriptors approach; and (2) the fragment-based simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) approach. Comparison with the classic scheme of building up the model and balance of correlation (BC) for optimal descriptors approach sho...

  16. Uptake of pulse injected nitrogen by soil microbes and mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants in a species-diverse subarctic heath ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Louise Christoffersen; Jonasson, Sven; Strom, Lena;

    2008-01-01

    N label from amino acid injection was lower than, and the acquisition of 15N label from NH4 injection was similar to that of the mycorrhizal species. We conclude that the soil microorganisms were more efficient than plants in acquiring pulses of nutrients which, under natural conditions, occur after......-mycorrhizal plants and in soil microorganisms, in order to reveal probable differences in acquisition patterns between the two functional plant types and between plants and soil microorganisms. Three weeks after the label addition, with the 15N-forms added with same amount of nitrogen per square meter, we analyzed...... after label addition. The soil microorganisms had very high 15N recovery from all the N sources compared to plants. Microorganisms incorporated most 15N from the glutamic acid source, intermediate amounts of 15N from the glycine source and least 15N from the NH4 + source. In contrast to microorganisms...

  17. Leaf photosynthesis and respiration of three bioenergy crops in relation to temperature and leaf nitrogen: how conserved are biochemical model parameters among crop species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archontoulis, S. V.; Yin, X.; Vos, J.; Danalatos, N. G.; Struik, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Given the need for parallel increases in food and energy production from crops in the context of global change, crop simulation models and data sets to feed these models with photosynthesis and respiration parameters are increasingly important. This study provides information on photosynthesis and respiration for three energy crops (sunflower, kenaf, and cynara), reviews relevant information for five other crops (wheat, barley, cotton, tobacco, and grape), and assesses how conserved photosynthesis parameters are among crops. Using large data sets and optimization techniques, the C3 leaf photosynthesis model of Farquhar, von Caemmerer, and Berry (FvCB) and an empirical night respiration model for tested energy crops accounting for effects of temperature and leaf nitrogen were parameterized. Instead of the common approach of using information on net photosynthesis response to CO2 at the stomatal cavity (An–Ci), the model was parameterized by analysing the photosynthesis response to incident light intensity (An–Iinc). Convincing evidence is provided that the maximum Rubisco carboxylation rate or the maximum electron transport rate was very similar whether derived from An–Ci or from An–Iinc data sets. Parameters characterizing Rubisco limitation, electron transport limitation, the degree to which light inhibits leaf respiration, night respiration, and the minimum leaf nitrogen required for photosynthesis were then determined. Model predictions were validated against independent sets. Only a few FvCB parameters were conserved among crop species, thus species-specific FvCB model parameters are needed for crop modelling. Therefore, information from readily available but underexplored An–Iinc data should be re-analysed, thereby expanding the potential of combining classical photosynthetic data and the biochemical model. PMID:22021569

  18. Rubisco activity and gene expression of tropical tree species under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Young

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... species, photosynthetic response under different light intensities of tropical ... photosynthetic rate and leaf area ratio, and relative growth rate ..... photosynthetic pigments, and antioxidants in Turkey oak (Quercus cerris L.) and.

  19. Impact of salinity on organic matter and nitrogen removal from a municipal wastewater RO concentrate using biologically activated carbon coupled with UV/H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Shovana; Fan, Linhua; Roddick, Felicity A; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Ball, Andrew S

    2016-05-01

    The concentrate streams generated from reverse osmosis (RO)-based municipal wastewater reclamation processes contain organic substances and nutrients at elevated concentrations, posing environmental and health risks on their disposal to confined receiving environments such as bays. The impact of salinity (TDS at 7, 10 and 16 g/L) of a RO concentrate (ROC) on the treatment efficiency of a biological activated carbon (BAC) system after pre-oxidation with UV/H2O2 was characterised in terms of removal of organic matter and nitrogen species, and the bacterial communities. Organic matter removal was comparable for the ROC over the tested salinity range, with 45-49% of DOC and 70-74% of UVA254 removed by the combined treatment. However, removal in total nitrogen (TN) was considerably higher