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Sample records for active gastrointestinal bleeding

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  2. Gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, T A

    2011-11-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most important emergencies in gastroenterology. Despite this, only about 100 abstracts concerning gastrointestinal bleeding (excluding bleeding complicating endoscopic procedures) were presented at this year's Digestive Disease Week (DDW; 7-10 May 2011; Chicago, Illinois, USA), accounting for less than 2% of all presented lectures and posters. It seems that the number of such abstracts has been decreasing over recent years. This may be due in part to the high level of medical care already achieved, especially in the areas of pharmacotherapy and endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review of gastrointestinal bleeding, priority has been given to large epidemiological studies reflecting "real life," and abstracts dealing more or less directly with endoscopic management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  4. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: fatima.rsreis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Cardia, P.P. [Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. (author)

  5. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J; Adámek, S

    2013-08-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding represents 5% of all cases of bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The cause of this type of bleeding cannot be found by gastroscopy or colonoscopy - the most common cause being bleeding from the source in the small intestine. In other cases it is bleeding from other parts of the digestive tube which has already stopped or was not noticed during admission endoscopy. Imaging methods (X-ray, CT, MRI, scintigraphy) and endoscopic methods (flexible or capsule enteroscopy) are used in the diagnosis and treatment. If, despite having used these methods, the source of bleeding is not found and the bleeding continues, or if the source is known but the bleeding cannot be stopped by radiologic or endoscopic intervention, surgical intervention is usually indicated. The article provides an overview of current diagnostic and treatment options, including instructions on how to proceed in these diagnostically difficult situations.

  6. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    This article examines causes of occult, moderate and severe lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The difference in the workup of stable vs unstable patients is stressed. Treatment options ranging from minimally invasive techniques to open surgery are explored.

  7. Electrodermal screening of biologically active points for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ying-Jung; Hu, Wen-Long; Hung, I-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between the electrical resistance of the skin at biologically active points (BAPs) on the main meridians and upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Electrical resistance to direct current at 20 BAPs on the fingers and toes of 100 patients with (38 men, 12 women; mean age [range], 58.20 ± 19.62 [18-83] years) and without (27 men, 23 women; 49.54 ± 12.12 [22-74] years) UGIB was measured through electrodermal screening (EDS), based on the theory of electroacupuncture according to Voll (EAV). Data were compared through analysis of variance (ANOVA), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and logistic regression. The initial readings were lower in the UGIB group, indicating blood and energy deficiency due to UGIB. Significant differences in indicator drop values were observed at nine BAPs (p < 0.05) on the bilateral small intestine, bilateral stomach, bilateral circulation, bilateral fibroid degeneration, and right lymph meridians. The area under the ROC curve values of the BAPs on the bilateral small intestine and stomach meridians were larger than 0.5, suggesting the diagnostic accuracy of EDS for UGIB on the basis of the indicator drop of these BAPs. Logistic regression revealed that when the indicator drop of the BAP on the left stomach meridian increased by one score, the risk of UGIB increased by about 1.545-3.523 times. In conclusion, the change in the electrical resistance of the skin measured by EDS at the BAPs on the bilateral small intestine and stomach meridians provides specific information on UGIB.

  8. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  9. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Irfan-Ur; Saeian, Kia

    2016-04-01

    In the intensive care unit, vigilance is needed to manage nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A focused history and physical examination must be completed to identify inciting factors and the need for hemodynamic stabilization. Although not universally used, risk stratification tools such as the Blatchford and Rockall scores can facilitate triage and management. Urgent evaluation for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds requires prompt respiratory assessment, and identification of hemodynamic instability with fluid resuscitation and blood transfusions if necessary. Future studies are needed to evaluate the indication, safety, and efficacy of emerging endoscopic techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Matthew; Lobo, Alan J

    2015-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is a frequently encountered medical emergency with an incidence of 84-160/100000 and associated with mortality of approximately 10%. Guidelines from the National Institute for Care and Care Excellence outline key features in the management of AUGIB. Patients require prompt resuscitation and risk assessment using validated tools. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy provides accurate diagnosis, aids in estimating prognosis and allows therapeutic intervention. Endoscopy should be undertaken immediately after resuscitation in unstable patients and within 24 hours in all other patients. Interventional radiology may be required for bleeding unresponsive to endoscopic intervention. Drug therapy depends on the cause of bleeding. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors should be used in patients with high-risk ulcers. Terlipressin and broad-spectrum antibiotics should be used following variceal haemorrhage. Hospitals admitting patients with AUGIB need to provide well organised services and ensure access to relevant services for all patients, and particularly to out of hours endoscopy. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  12. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding - state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a condition requiring immediate medical intervention, with high associated mortality exceeding 10%. The most common cause of upper GI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, which largely corresponds to the intake of NSAIDs and Helicobacter pylori infection. Endoscopy is the essential tool for the diagnosis and treatment of active upper GI hemorrhage. Endoscopic therapy together with proton pump inhibitors and eradication of Helicobacter pylori significantly reduces rebleeding rates, mortality and number of emergency surgical interventions. This paper presents contemporary data on the diagnosis and treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. The Clinical Outcomes of Transcatheter Microcoil Embolization in Patients with Active Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Small Bowel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Soo Teik [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To assess the clinical outcomes of the transcatheter microcoil embolization in patients with active lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding in the small bowel, as well as to compare the mortality rates between the two groups based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus determined by an angiography. We retrospectively evaluated all of the consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for treatment of acute LGI bleeding between January 2003 and October 2007. In total, the study included 36 patients who underwent a colonoscopy and were diagnosed to have an active bleeding in the LGI tracts. Based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus, determined by an angiography, the patients were classified into two groups. The clinical outcomes included technical success, clinical success (no rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (> 30 days), as well as the major and minor complication rates. Of the 36 patients, 17 had angiography-proven bleeding that was distal to the marginal artery. The remaining 19 patients did not have a bleeding focus based on the angiography results. The technical and clinical success rates of performing transcatheter microcoil embolizations in patients with active bleeding were 100% and 88%, respectively (15 of 17). One patient died from continued LGI bleeding and one patient received surgery to treat the continued bleeding. There was no note made on the delayed bleeding or on the major or minor complications. Of the 19 patients without active bleeding, 16 (84%) did not have recurrent bleeding. One patient died due to continuous bleeding and multi-organ failure. The superselective microcoil embolization can help successfully treat patients with active LGI bleeding in the small bowel, identified by the results of an angiography. The mortality rate is not significantly different between the patients of the visualization and non-visualization groups on angiography.

  14. The management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Y; Lebreton, G; Le Pennec, V; Hourna, E; Viennot, S; Alves, A

    2014-06-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding is generally less severe than upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding with spontaneous cessation of bleeding in 80% of cases and a mortality of 2-4%. However, unlike UGI bleeding, there is no consensual agreement about management. Once the patient has been stabilized, the main objective and greatest difficulty is to identify the location of bleeding in order to provide specific appropriate treatment. While upper endoscopy and colonoscopy remain the essential first-line examinations, the development and availability of angiography have made this an important imaging modality for cases of active bleeding; they allow diagnostic localization of bleeding and guide subsequent therapy, whether therapeutic embolization, interventional colonoscopy or, if other techniques fail or are unavailable, surgery directed at the precise site of bleeding. Furthermore, newly developed endoscopic techniques, particularly video capsule enteroscopy, now allow minimally invasive exploration of the small intestine; if this is positive, it will guide subsequent assisted enteroscopy or surgery. Other small bowel imaging techniques include enteroclysis by CT or magnetic resonance imaging. At the present time, exploratory surgery is no longer a first-line approach. In view of the lesser gravity of LGI bleeding, it is most reasonable to simply stabilize the patient initially for subsequent transfer to a specialized center, if minimally invasive techniques are not available at the local hospital. In all cases, the complexity and diversity of LGI bleeding require a multidisciplinary collaboration involving the gastroenterologist, radiologist, intensivist and surgeon to optimize diagnosis and treatment of the patient.

  15. Prognosis following upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Roberts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is one of the most common, high risk emergency disorders in the western world. Almost nothing has been reported on longer term prognosis following upper GI bleeding. The aim of this study was to establish mortality up to three years following hospital admission with upper GI bleeding and its relationship with aetiology, co-morbidities and socio-demographic factors. METHODS: Systematic record linkage of hospital inpatient and mortality data for 14 212 people in Wales, UK, hospitalised with upper GI bleeding between 1999 and 2004 with three year follow-up to 2007. The main outcome measures were mortality rates, standardised mortality ratios (SMRs and relative survival. RESULTS: Mortality at three years was 36.7% overall, based on 5215 fatalities. It was highest for upper GI malignancy (95% died within three years and varices (52%. Compared with the general population, mortality was increased 27-fold during the first month after admission. It fell to 4.3 by month four, but remained significantly elevated during every month throughout the three years following admission. The most important independent prognostic predictors of mortality at three years were older age (mortality increased 53 fold for people aged 85 years and over compared with those under 40 years; oesophageal and gastric/duodenal malignancy (48 and 32 respectively and gastric varices aetiologies (2.8 when compared with other bleeds; non-upper GI malignancy, liver disease and renal failure co-morbidities (15, 7.9 and 3.9; social deprivation (29% increase for quintile V vs I; incident bleeds as an inpatient (31% vs admitted with bleeding and male patients (25% vs female. CONCLUSION: Our study shows a high late as well as early mortality for upper GI bleeding, with very poor longer term prognosis following bleeding due to malignancies and varices. Aetiologies with the worst prognosis were often associated with high levels of social

  16. [Gastrointestinal bleeding: the role of radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga Gómez, S; Pérez Lafuente, M; Abu-Suboh Abadia, M; Castell Conesa, J

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a diagnostic challenge both in its acute presentation, which requires the point of bleeding to be located quickly, and in its chronic presentation, which requires repeated examinations to determine its etiology. Although the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding is based on endoscopic examinations, radiological studies like computed tomography (CT) angiography for acute bleeding or CT enterography for chronic bleeding are becoming more and more common in clinical practice, even though they have not yet been included in the clinical guidelines for gastrointestinal bleeding. CT can replace angiography as the diagnostic test of choice in acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding, and CT can complement the endoscopic capsule and scintigraphy in chronic or recurrent bleeding suspected to originate in the small bowel. Angiography is currently used to complement endoscopy for the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preoperative CT-guided percutaneous needle localization of the bleeding small bowel segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Peter; Feuerbach, Stefan; Iesalnieks, Igors; Rockmann, Felix; Wrede, Christian E; Zorger, Niels; Schlitt, Hans J; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Hamer, Okka W

    2009-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Double balloon enteroscopy, angiography, and surgery including intraoperative enteroscopy failed to identify the bleeding site. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) depicted active bleeding of a small bowel segment. The bleeding segment was localized by CT-guided percutaneous needle insertion and subsequently removed surgically.

  18. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-11-17

    BACKGROUND Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. CASE REPORT A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. CONCLUSIONS Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding.

  19. Acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amir; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    Acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common medical emergency encountered worldwide. Despite medical and technological advances, it remains associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid patient assessment and management are paramount. When indicated, upper endoscopy in patients presenting with acute UGIB is effective for both diagnosis of the bleeding site and provision of endoscopic hemostasis. Endoscopic hemostasis significantly reduces rebleeding rates, blood transfusion requirements, length of hospital stay, surgery, and mortality. Furthermore, early upper endoscopy, defined as being performed within 24 h of patient presentation, improves patient outcomes. A structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes early hemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization, preendoscopic risk stratification using validated instruments, pharmacologic and endoscopic intervention, and postendoscopy therapy is important to optimize patient outcome and assure efficient use of medical resources.

  20. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Massive upper gastrointestinal bleed from epiphrenic diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Cesar J; Dias, Ajoy; Hejazi, Reza A; Burgos, Jose D; Huerta, Ana; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2011-05-01

    Epiphrenic diverticula are outpouchings of the esophagus that retain some or all layers of the esophageal wall. Symptoms such as intermittent dysphagia and vomiting may occur. The authors present a case of an elderly woman with a history of dysphagia who presented with a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed because of a bleeding epiphrenic diverticulum seen at endoscopy who responded to conservative management. Bleeding epiphrenic diverticula should be considered as a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  2. Endoscopy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions...

  3. Gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Hillemeier, C.; Gryboski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage in infants and children is a catastrophic event but is not associated with significant mortality except in those with a severe primary illness. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in infants and young children is most often associated with stress ulcers or erosions, but in older children it may also be caused by duodenal ulcer, esophagitis, and esophageal varices. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding may be caused by a variety of lesions among which are infectious colitides...

  4. An unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C K Adarsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleed often brings the patient to the emergency medical service with great anxiety. Known common causes of GI bleed include ulcers, varices, Mallory-Weiss among others. All causes of GI bleed should be considered however unusual during the evaluation. Aortoenteric fistula (AEF is one of the unusual causes of GI bleed, which has to be considered especially in patients with a history of abdominal surgery in general and aortic surgery in particular.

  5. [Antithrombotic therapy and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanová, Veronika; Gřiva, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is about 85-108/100,000 inhabitants per year, nonvariceal bleeding accounts for 80-90%. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation treatment are the significant risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To evaluate the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the general community of patients in a county hospital. And to compare the role played by antiplatelet and anticoagulation drugs and other risk medication. Retrospective analysis of patients over 18 years of age who underwent endoscopy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia (haemoglobinupper gastrointestinal tract during a hospital stay in 2013 (from January to June). We included 111 patients of average age 69±15 years, men 60%. Nonvariceal bleeding accounted for 90% of the cases. None of the patients with variceal bleeding (10% of patients) took antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy. There were 100 patients with nonvariceal bleeding of average age 70±15, 61% men. With the symptoms of acute bleeding (hematemesis, melena) presented in 73% of patients. The most frequent cause of bleeding was gastric and duodenal ulcer (54%). 32% of patients with nonvariceal bleeding had antiplatelets, 19% anticoagulants and 10% used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or corticosteroids. 30-days mortality of patients with nonvariceal bleeding was 11%, annual mortality was 23%. There was no significant difference in mortality, blood transfusion requirements or surgical intervention between the patients with antithrombotic agents and without them. 25% of patients (8 patients) using acetylsalicylic acid did not fulfil the indication for this treatment. Among the patients examined by endoscopy for symptomatic nonvariceal bleeding and/or anaemia (haemoglobingastrointestinal bleeding. With regard to that, it is alarming, that there still exists a nonnegligible percentage of patients taking acetylsalicylic acid even

  6. Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngu, Jing H.; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Chin, YK

    2017-01-01

    Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study.......Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study....

  7. Role of videocapsule endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Carretero; Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Maite Betes; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is defined as bleeding of an unknown origin that persists or recurs after negative initial upper and lower endoscopies.Several techniques,such as endoscopy,arteriography,scintigraphy and barium radiology are helpful for recognizing the bleeding source;nevertheless,in about 5%-10% of cases the bleeding lesion cannot be determined.The development of videocapsule endoscopy (VCE) has permitted a direct visualization of the small intestine mucosa.We will analyze those techniques in more detail.The diagnostic yield of CE for OGIB varies from 38% to 93%,being in the higher range in those cases with obscure-overt bleeding.

  8. Interventional management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weldon, Derik T.; Burke, Stephen J.; Sun, Shiliang; Mimura, Hidefumi; Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) arises from a number of sources and is a significant cause of hospitalization and mortality in elderly patients. Whereas most episodes of acute LGIB resolve spontaneously with conservative management, an important subset of patients requires further diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention. Endovascular techniques such as microcatheter embolization are now recognized as safe, effective methods for controlling LGIB that is refractory to endoscopic intervention. In addition, multidetector CT has shown the ability to identify areas of active bleeding in a non-invasive fashion, enabling more focused intervention. Given the relative strengths and weaknesses of various diagnostic and treatment modalities, a close working relationship between interventional radiologists, gastroenterologists and diagnostic radiologists is necessary for the optimal management of LGIB patients. (orig.)

  9. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is more common in patients with chronic kidney disease and is associated with higher mortality than in the general population. Blood losses in this patient population can be quite severe at times and it is important to differentiate anemia of chronic diseases from anemia due to GI bleeding. We review the literature on common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGI in chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. We suggest an approach to diagnosis and management of this problem.

  10. Gastrointestinal bleeding 30 years after a complicated cholecystectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thorsten; Brechmann; Wolff; Schmiegel; Volkmar; Nicolas; Markus; Reiser

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding from small-bowel varices is a rare and difficult to treat complication of portal hypertension. We describe the case of a 79-year-old female patient with recurrent severe hemorrhage from smallbowel varices 30 years after a complicated cholecystectomy. When double balloon enteroscopy was unsuccessful to reach the site of bleeding, a rendezvous approach was favored with intraoperative endoscopy. Active bleeding from varices within a biliodigestive anastomosis was found and controlled ...

  11. Management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, E

    2011-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is unique from variceal bleeding in terms of patient characteristics, management, rebleeding rates, and prognosis, and should be managed differently. The majority of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds will not rebleed once treated successfully. The incidence is 80 to 90% of all upper gastrointestinal bleeds and the mortality is between 5 to 10%. The causes include nonacid-related ulceration from tumors, infections, inflammatory disease, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosions, esophagitis, dieulafoy lesions, angiodysplasias, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and portal hypertensive gastropathy. Rarer causes include hemobilia, hemosuccus pancreaticus, and aortoenteric fistulas. Hematemesis and melena are the key features of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, but fresh per rectal bleeding may be present in a rapidly bleeding lesion. Resuscitation and stabilization before endoscopy leads to improved outcomes. Fluid resuscitation is essential to avoid hypotension. Though widely practiced, there is currently insufficient evidence to show that routine red cell transfusion is beneficial. Coagulopathy requires correction, but the optimal international normalized ratio has not been determined yet. Risk stratification scores such as the Rockall and Glasgow-Blatchford scores are useful to predict rebleeding, mortality, and to determine the urgency of endoscopy. Evidence suggests that high-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPI) should be given as an infusion before endoscopy. If patients are intolerant of PPIs, histamine-2 receptor antagonists can be given, although their acid suppression is inferior. Endoscopic therapy includes thermal methods such as coaptive coagulation, argon plasma coagulation, and hemostatic clips. Four quadrant epinephrine injections combined with either thermal therapy or clipping reduces mortality. In hypoxic patients, endoscopy masks allow high-flow oxygen during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The

  12. Management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is unique from variceal bleeding in terms of patient characteristics, management, rebleeding rates, and prognosis, and should be managed differently. The majority of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeds will not rebleed once treated successfully. The incidence is 80 to 90% of all upper gastrointestinal bleeds and the mortality is between 5 to 10%. The causes include nonacid-related ulceration from tumors, infections, inflammatory disease, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosions, esophagitis, dieulafoy lesions, angiodysplasias, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and portal hypertensive gastropathy. Rarer causes include hemobilia, hemosuccus pancreaticus, and aortoenteric fistulas. Hematemesis and melena are the key features of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, but fresh per rectal bleeding may be present in a rapidly bleeding lesion. Resuscitation and stabilization before endoscopy leads to improved outcomes. Fluid resuscitation is essential to avoid hypotension. Though widely practiced, there is currently insufficient evidence to show that routine red cell transfusion is beneficial. Coagulopathy requires correction, but the optimal international normalized ratio has not been determined yet. Risk stratification scores such as the Rockall and Glasgow-Blatchford scores are useful to predict rebleeding, mortality, and to determine the urgency of endoscopy. Evidence suggests that high-dose proton pump inhibitors (PPI should be given as an infusion before endoscopy. If patients are intolerant of PPIs, histamine-2 receptor antagonists can be given, although their acid suppression is inferior. Endoscopic therapy includes thermal methods such as coaptive coagulation, argon plasma coagulation, and hemostatic clips. Four quadrant epinephrine injections combined with either thermal therapy or clipping reduces mortality. In hypoxic patients, endoscopy masks allow high-flow oxygen during upper

  13. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine [Department of Radiology, Hopital Huriez, 1 rue Polonovski, 59037 Lille (France); Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude [Department of Gastroenterology, Hopital Huriez, 1 rue Polonovski, 59037 Lille (France)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  14. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures.

  15. AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kishwar; Zarin, Muhammad; Latif, Humera

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (GI) is a serious condition that presents both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. Resuscitation of the patient is the first and most important step in its management followed by measures to localize and treat the exact source and site of bleeding. These modalities are upper and lower GI endoscopies, radionuclide imaging and angiography. Surgery is the last resort to handle the situation, if the patient does not respond to resuscitative measures and the various interventional procedures fail to locate and stop the bleeding. We present a case of upper GI bleeding which presented with massive per rectal bleeding and the patient was not responding to resuscitation with multiple blood transfusions. Ultimately an exploratory laparotomy was done which revealed an extra-intestinal source of bleeding into the lumen of duodenum, presenting as upper GI bleeding.

  16. Bayesian network modelling of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisha, Nazziwa; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Adam, Mohd Bakri

    2013-09-01

    Bayesian networks are graphical probabilistic models that represent causal and other relationships between domain variables. In the context of medical decision making, these models have been explored to help in medical diagnosis and prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the Bayesian network formalism in building medical support systems and we learn a tree augmented naive Bayes Network (TAN) from gastrointestinal bleeding data. The accuracy of the TAN in classifying the source of gastrointestinal bleeding into upper or lower source is obtained. The TAN achieves a high classification accuracy of 86% and an area under curve of 92%. A sensitivity analysis of the model shows relatively high levels of entropy reduction for color of the stool, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, consistency and the ratio of blood urea nitrogen to creatinine. The TAN facilitates the identification of the source of GIB and requires further validation.

  17. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Cathy; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe

    2014-01-01

    no intervention, placebo or other antiulcer drugs for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.Search methods We updated the review by performing electronic database searches (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index) and manual searches in July 2014.Selection...... and should include all participants with suspected bleeding or with endoscopically verified bleeding, as well as a tranexamic placebo arm and co-administration of pump inhibitors and endoscopic therapy. Assessment of outcome measures in such studies should be clearly defined. Endoscopic examination...

  18. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  19. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bong; Sik; Matthew; Kim; Bob; T; Li; Alexander; Engel; Jaswinder; S; Samra; Stephen; Clarke; Ian; D; Norton; Angela; E; Li

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is notapparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians.

  20. Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Enns

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lower gastrointestinal (LGI bleeding is typically caused by vascular malformations, diverticuli and neoplasia. Although endoscopic evaluation of the colon is relatively standard in stable patients with LGI bleeding, those with significant ongoing hemorrhage are often more difficult to evaluate endoscopically. Other investigative techniques such as nuclear scintigraphy, angiography and surgical exploration have been commonly used in unstable patients with LGI bleeding when the exact site is unknown. These investigative techniques have had variable measures of success. This two-part review evaluates the literature in an attempt to review the optimal investigative approach in patients with LGI hemorrhage, in particular patients who have had significant and ongoing bleeding. Part 1 of this article concentrates on the etiology of LGI hemorrhage, followed in a subsequent article by diagnostic and management strategies. Following the review, a consensus update will be included with guidelines for clinical use.

  1. The Approach to Occult Gastrointestinal Bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naut, Edgar R

    2016-09-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not visible and may present with a positive fecal occult blood test or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure bleeding can be overt or occult, with no source identified despite an appropriate diagnostic workup. A stepwise approach to this evaluation after negative upper and lower endoscopy has been shown to be cost effective. This includes repeat endoscopies if warranted, followed by video capsule endoscopy (VCE) if no obstruction is present. If the VCE is positive then specific endoscopic intervention may be possible. If negative, patients may undergo either repeat testing or watchful waiting with iron supplements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Epidemiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Gabon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudong Mbethe, G L; Mounguengui, D; Ondounda, M; Magne, C; Bignoumbra, R; Ntsoumou, S; Moussavou Kombila, J-B; Nzenze, J R

    2014-01-01

    The department of internal medicine of the military hospital of Gabon managed 92 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from April 2009 to November 2011. The frequency of these hemorrhages in the department was 8.2%; they occurred most often in adults aged 30-40 years and 50-60 years, and mainly men (74%). Erosive-ulcerative lesions (65.2%) were the leading causes of hemorrhage, followed by esophageal varices (15.2%). These results underline the importance of preventive measures for the control of this bleeding.

  3. Jejunal diverticulosis as the obscure cause of overt gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyin, L Y; Zainun, A R; Tee, H P

    2011-08-01

    Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare gastrointestinal condition manifested as benign outpouching from the jejunal wall. It is usually asymptomatic, but may present as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. This condition is often found incidentally in the imaging work-up of patients with other gastrointestinal conditions. We present a case of jejunal diverticulosis in a 65-year-old gentleman with obscure overt gastrointestinal bleed.

  4. Angiographic diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Sung, Kyu Bo; Koo, Kyung Hoi; Bae, Tae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    Diagnostic angiographic evaluations were done in 33 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding for recent 5 years at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. On 11 patients of them, therapeutic interventional procedures were made and the results were analysed. 1. In a total of 33 cases, there were 18 cases of upper GI bleeding and 15 cases of lower GI bleeding. The most frequent causes were peptic ulcer in the former and intestinal typhoid fever in the latter. 2. Bleeding sites were localized angiographically in 28 cases, so the detection rate was 85%. Four of the five angiographically negative cases were lower GI bleeding cases. 3. The most frequent bleeding site was left gastric artery (7/33). The next was ileocecal branch of superior mesenteric artery (6/33). 4. Among the 11 interventional procedures, Gelfoam embolization was done in 7 cases and Vasopressin infusion was tried in 4 cases. They were successful in 4 and 3 cases, suggesting 57% and 47% success rates respectively.

  5. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: emerging role of multidetector CT angiography and review of current imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Christopher J; Tobias, Terrence; Rosenblum, David I; Banker, Wade L; Tseng, Lee; Tamarkin, Stephen W

    2007-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common cause of hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality in the United States. The evaluation and treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding are complex and often require a multispecialty approach involving gastroenterologists, surgeons, internists, emergency physicians, and radiologists. The multitude of pathologic processes that can result in gastrointestinal bleeding, the length of the gastrointestinal tract, and the often intermittent nature of gastrointestinal bleeding further complicate patient evaluation. In addition, there are multiple imaging modalities and therapeutic interventions that are currently being used in the evaluation and treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. Initial experience indicates that multidetector computed tomographic angiography is a promising first-line modality for the time-efficient, sensitive, and accurate diagnosis or exclusion of active gastrointestinal hemorrhage and may have a profound impact on the evaluation and subsequent treatment of patients who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  6. [Bleeding non-epithelial gastrointestinal neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, V I; Galtsev, A P

    1993-01-01

    Inefficiency of x-ray and endoscopic examinations of a bleeding hollow organ of the gastrointestinal tract may be explained by the effection of its wall with nonepithelial tumor (lipoma, neurinoma, leiomyoma). In some cases only laparotomy and examination of the abdominal cavity succeed in localization of the tumor. Intraoperative cytodiagnosis of nonepithelial benign tumors is a method conducive to sparing surgery (partial resection, dissection).

  7. [Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Espinosa, Larry; Souza-Gallardo, Luis Manuel; Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; de la Fuente-Lira, Mauricio; Arellano-Sotelo, Jorge

    The gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common soft tissue sarcomas of the digestive tract. They are usually found in the stomach (60-70%) and small intestine (25-30%) and, less commonly, in the oesophagus, mesentery, colon, or rectum. The symptoms present at diagnosis are, gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain, abdominal mass, or intestinal obstruction. The type of symptomatology will depend on the location and size of the tumour. The definitive diagnosis is histopathological, with 95% of the tumours being positive for CD117. This is an observational and descriptive study of 5cases of small intestinal GIST that presented with gastrointestinal bleeding as the main symptom. The period from the initial symptom to the diagnosis varied from 1 to 84 months. The endoscopy was inconclusive in all of the patients, and the diagnosis was made using computed tomography and angiography. Treatment included resection in all patients. The histopathological results are also described. GIST can have multiple clinical pictures and unusual symptoms, such as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The use of computed tomography and angiography has shown to be an important tool in the diagnosis with patients with small intestine GISTs. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  8. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benedeto-Stojanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB is a common medical emergency problem with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this paper is to establish the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to sex and age, determine the prevalence of bleeding lesions and perform analysis of bleeding peptic ulcer in relation to the location, age, gender, Forrest classification and the need for endoscopic hemostasis. Thе prospective study included 70 patients with UGB, 42 men and 28 women, mean age 68.64±13.66 years. The diagnosis of bleeding lesions was made exclusively by means of esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Forrest classification was used in the evaluation of the activity of bleeding ulcers of the stomach and duodenum. The largest number of bleeding patients was of male sex (60%. Bleeding most commonly occurred in patients older than 60 years (84.29%. Statistically, female patients were significantly older than patients of male gender (p=0.001. The most common cause of bleeding was peptic ulcer (65.71%. The average age of patients with gastric ulcer was 70.57±15.68 years, with a duodenal ulcer 63.78±16.70 years. In the duodenum, Forrest Ib, IIa and IIb ulcers were usually confirmed, whereas Forrest IIc ulcers were identified in the stomach. Endoscopic hemostasis was required in 55.56% of patients with duodenal and in 23.81% of patients with gastric ulcer. The incidence of UGB is higher in men and it increases with age. The most common cause of bleeding is ulcer disease. Patients with gastric ulcer are older than patients with duodenal ulcer, while both gastric and duodenal ulcers are found in the oldest patients. Duodenal ulcers cause serious bleeding and more often require endoscopic hemostasis.

  9. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  10. Approach to upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elements of an approach to this medical and surgical emergency are ... and require active management. Monitoring and ... and supplemental oxygen through nasal prongs should be ... Alternatively, use endoscopic clipping devices which pass ...

  11. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P. (Saint James' s Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-10-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author).

  12. Endoscopy for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Bae; Yoon, Soon Man; Youn, Sei Jin

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding plays an important role in primary diagnosis and management, particularly with respect to identification of high-risk stigmata lesions and to providing endoscopic hemostasis to reduce the risk of rebleeding and mortality. Early endoscopy, defined as endoscopy within the first 24 hours after presentation, improves patient outcome and reduces the length of hospitalization when compared with delayed endoscopy. Various endoscopic hemostatic methods are available, including injection therapy, mechanical therapy, and thermal coagulation. Either single treatment with mechanical or thermal therapy or a treatment that combines more than one type of therapy are effective and safe for peptic ulcer bleeding. Newly developed methods, such as Hemospray powder and over-the-scope clips, may provide additional options. Appropriate decisions and specific treatment are needed depending upon the conditions.

  13. Hemospray application in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Lyn A; Stanley, Adrian J; Bergman, Jacques J

    2013-01-01

    patients, who otherwise may have required either surgery or interventional radiology, were treated with TC-325 as second-line therapy after failure of other endoscopic treatments, all of whom achieved hemostasis following the adjunct of TC-325. CONCLUSIONS: This multicentre registry identifies potentially......BACKGROUND: Hemospray TM (TC-325) is a novel hemostatic agent licensed for use in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe. GOALS: We present the operating characteristics and performance of TC-325 in the largest registry to date of patients presenting with NVUGIB in everyday...... in combination with other hemostatic modalities at the endoscopists' discretion. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients (44 men, 19 women), median age 69 (range, 21 to 98) years with NVUGIB requiring endoscopic hemostasis were treated with TC-325. There were 30 patients with bleeding ulcers and 33 with other NVUGIB...

  14. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N. Fiorino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA, which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. 123Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine (123MIBG scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and 123MIBG in evaluation and treatment.

  15. Capsule endoscopy: Current status in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R Gupta; Nageshwar Duvvuru Reddy

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a safe, non invasive diagnostic modality for the evaluation of small bowel lesions. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is one of the most important indications of capsule endoscopy.Capsule endoscopy has a very high diagnostic yield especially if the bleeding is ongoing. This technique appears to be superior to other techniques for the detection of suspected lesions and the source of bleeding. Capsule endoscopy has been shown to change the outcome in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI)bleed.

  16. A STUDY ON ENDOSCOPIC EVALUATION OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranaya Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB is one of the commonest gastrointestinal emergencies encountered by clinicians. Peptic ulcers are the most common cause of UGIB. Endoscopy has become the preferred method for diagnosis in patients with acute UGIB. This study is done in a diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE setup of a tertiary care hospital to ascertain the causes of UGIB prevalent in this part of our country which might differ from other studies. AIM To ascertain prevalent causes of UGIB in patients of this part of India admitted to a Govt. Tertiary Hospital with a provisional diagnosis of UGIB. METHOD One hundred consecutive patients with UGIB were subjected to UGIE to find out the aetiology. The clinical profile and endoscopic findings were analysed and compared with the data on UGIB from other studies. RESULTS The mean age of patients was 47.03 years with male: female ratio of 2.33:1. 58% of patients were first time bleeders. Majority of patients presented with melaena. Visualisation of active bleeding achieved to 85.7% when endoscopy was done within first 24 hrs. The commonest cause of UGIB was duodenal ulcer (DU which accounted for 41% cases. Gastric ulcer was responsible in 13% of cases. Portal hypertension was responsible for bleed in only 13%. Neoplasms accounted for 25% of cases. Other less common causes were erosive gastritis (3%, gastric polyp (3%, Mallory-Weiss tear (1%, and Dieulafoy’s lesion (1%. Among bleeding peptic ulcers, 27.8% of cases were classified as Forrest IIa and 20.4% in Forrest IIb & IIc each. Acid peptic disease was past history elicited in majority (33% followed by NSAID (26% and alcohol (26%. CONCLUSION The present study has diagnosed various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this part of country. The incidence of gastric carcinoma as a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is significantly high compared to those in other studies. UGI endoscopy should be done in every case

  17. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimi, Mircelal; Ulas, Murat; Ibis, Cem; Unver, Mutlu; Ozsan, Nazan; Yilmaz, Funda; Ersoz, Galip; Zeytunlu, Murat; Kilic, Murat; Coker, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19178725

  18. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Hemospray treatment is effective for lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holster, I.L.; Brullet, E.; Kuipers, E.J.; Campo, R.; Fernandez-Atutxa, A.; Tjwa, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is diverse in origin and can be substantial, requiring urgent hemostasis. Hemospray is a promising novel hemostatic agent for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). It has been claimed in a small series that the use of Hemospray is also feasible in LGIB.

  20. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  1. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other...... of statins with UGB were 0.94 (0.78-1.12) for current use, 1.40 (0.89-2.20) for recent use and 1.42 (0.96-2.10) for past use. The lack of effect was consistent across most patient subgroups, different cumulative or current statin doses and different statin substances. In explorative analyses, a borderline...... significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18-1.05)]. CONCLUSION: Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin....

  2. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding during anticoagulant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas-Gimeno, Aitor; Lanas, Angel

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a major problem in patients on oral anticoagulation therapy. This issue has become even more pressing since the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in 2009. Areas covered: Here we review current evidence related to GIB associated with oral anticoagulants, focusing on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and post-marketing observational studies. Dabigatran 150 mg twice daily and rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily increase the risk of GIB compared to warfarin. The risk increase with edoxaban is dose-dependent, while apixaban shows apparently, no increased risk. We summarize what is known about GIB risk factors for individual anticoagulants, the location of GIB in patients taking these compounds, and prevention strategies that lower the risk of GIB. Expert opinion: Recently there has been an important shift in the clinical presentation of GIB. Specifically, upper GIB has decreased with the decreased incidence of peptic ulcers due to the broad use of proton pump inhibitors and the decreased prevalence of H. pylori infections. In contrast, the incidence of lower GIB has increased, due in part to colonic diverticular bleeding and angiodysplasia in the elderly. In this population, the addition of oral anticoagulation therapy, especially DOACs, seems to increase the risk of lower GIB.

  3. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding after open heart surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aithoussa Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The occurrence of digestive complications especially upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB has increased after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of UGIB and identify the independent risk factors. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data of 1077 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB from 1994 to 2012 The group of patients with UGIB (n1 = 20 was compared with the population group (n2 = 1057. Demographic characteristics, therapeutic management, endoscopic findings, and outcomes were analyzed. Through a regression analysis we identified independent risk factors of UGIB. Results: The mean age of the group n1 was 58.2 ± 12.4 years and 50.18 ± 13.5 years in the group n2 . UGIB occurred about 13 ± 5.5 days after cardiac surgery. Gastroduodenal ulcer was the most common etiology of hemorrhage (n = 13, 65%. Renal insufficiency, previous gastric ulcer, increased lactate concentration during CPB, prolonged mechanical ventilation, use of vasopressor drug and pulmonary infection was likely contributing factors in UGIB. Conclusion: UGIB following open cardiac surgery is most frequently secondary to gastroduodenal ulceration. Many determinant factors of bleeding are incriminated. Surgeons must be aware of these factors to avoid fatal complications.

  4. A predominant pelvic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) mass observed on Tc-99m red blood cell gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ravi; Tee, Shang Ian

    2011-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman presented with recurrent bleeding per rectum. Her earlier endoscopies were negative. Tc-99m RBC GI bleeding scintigraphy was performed. It demonstrated an apparent hypervascular pelvic mass, and active small bowel bleeding. Based on scintigraphic finding of a predominant pelvic mass indicating tumor, CT of the abdomen and pelvis was performed for further gastrointestinal bleeding localization work up instead of an invasive angiography or endoscopy, which detected a small bowel tumor in the pelvis. A small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumor was resected subsequently.

  5. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Scintigraphy in the Early 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Erin

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy performed with (99m)Tc-labeled autologous erythrocytes or historically with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid has been a clinically useful tool since the 1970s. This article reviews the history of the techniques, the different methods of radiolabeling erythrocytes, the procedure, useful indications, diagnostic accuracy, the use of SPECT/CT and CT angiography to evaluate gastrointestinal bleeding, and Meckel diverticulum imaging. The causes of pediatric bleeding are discussed by age.

  6. Endovascular treatment of nonvariceal acute arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization as treatment of upper nonvariceal gastrointestinal bleeding is increasingly being used after failed primary endoscopic treatment. The results after embolization have become better and surgery still has a high mortality. Embolization is a safe and effective...... procedure, but its use is has been limited because of relatively high rates of rebleeding and high mortality, both of which are associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and non-gastrointestinal related mortality causes. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a valuable minimal invasive method...

  7. Complex endoscopic treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding of ulcer origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Izbitsky

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB is determined in 20-30% of patients with peptic ulcer disease. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is on the first place as the main cause of deaths from peptic ulcer ahead of the other complications. Rebleeding occurs in 30-38% of patients. Materials and Methods For getting of the objective endoscopic picture in patients with bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers we used the classification of J.A. Forrest in our study: Type I - active bleeding: • I a - pulsating jet; • I b - stream. Type II - signs of recent bleeding: • II a - visible (non-bleeding visible vessel; • II b - fixed thrombus - a clot; • II c - flat black spot (black bottom ulcers. Type III - ulcer with a clean (white down. Integrated endoscopic hemostasis included: irrigation of ulcer defect and area around it with 3% hydrogen peroxide solution in a volume of 10 - 30ml; Injection of 2-4 mL of diluted epinephrine (1:10000 for hemostasis; use of Argon plasma coagulation. Results and Discussion Integrated endoscopic stop of bleeding was performed in 57 patients who were examined and treated at the Department of Surgery from 2006 to 2012. In 16 patients bleeding was caused by gastric ulcer. Gastric ulcer type I localization according to classification (HD Johnson, 1965 was determined in 9 patients, type II - in 2 patients, type III – in 5 patients. In 31 patients bleeding was caused by duodenal peptic ulcer, in 4 patients - erosive gastritis, 1 - erosive esophagitis, and in 5 patients - gastroenteroanastomosis area peptic ulcer. Final hemostasis was achieved in 55 (96.5% patients. In 50 (87.7% patients it was sufficient to conduct a single session of complex endoscopic treatment. In 5 (8.8% patients – it was done two times. In 2 (3.5% cases operation was performed due to the recurrent bleeding. The source of major bleeding in these patients was: chronic, duodenal ulcer penetrating into the head of the pancreas in one case complicated by subcompensated

  8. Bleeding and starving: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Meira, Tânia; Nunes, Ana; Santos, Carla Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. The aim of this study was obtaining objective data on refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. From 1 year span records of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients that underwent urgent endoscopy: clinical features; rockall score; endoscopic data, including severity of lesions and therapy; feeding related records of seven days: liquid diet prescription, first liquid intake, soft/solid diet prescription, first soft/solid intake. From 133 patients (84 men) Rockall classification was possible in 126: 76 score ≥5, 50 score bleeding, eight rebled, two underwent surgery, 13 died. Ulcer was the major bleeding cause, 63 patients underwent endoscopic therapy. There was 142/532 possible refeeding records, no record 37% patients. Only 16% were fed during the first day and half were only fed on third day or later. Rockall upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients must be refed earlier, according to guidelines.

  9. Diagnosis and management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owensby, Susan; Taylor, Kellee; Wilkins, Thad

    2015-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon but potentially serious, life-threatening condition in children. Rapid assessment, stabilization, and resuscitation should precede all diagnostic modalities in unstable children. The diagnostic approach includes history, examination, laboratory evaluation, endoscopic procedures, and imaging studies. The clinician needs to determine carefully whether any blood or possible blood reported by a child or adult represents true upper gastrointestinal bleeding because most children with true upper gastrointestinal bleeding require admission to a pediatric intensive care unit. After the diagnosis is established, the physician should start a proton pump inhibitor or histamine 2 receptor antagonist in children with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Consideration should also be given to the initiation of vasoactive drugs in all children in whom variceal bleeding is suspected. An endoscopy should be performed once the child is hemodynamically stable. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  10. Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: Variceal and Nonvariceal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirio, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is generally defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz, which leads to hematemesis. There are several causes of UGI bleeding necessitating a detailed history to rule out comorbid conditions, medications, and possible exposures. In addition, the severity, timing, duration, and volume of the bleeding are important details to note for management purposes. Despite the source of the bleeding, acid suppression with a proton-pump inhibitor has been shown to be effective in minimizing rebleeding. Endoscopy remains the interventional modality of choice for both nonvariceal and variceal bleeds because it can be diagnostic and therapeutic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastrointestinal bleeding from supraduodenal artery with aberrant origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Han, MD, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiography and endovascular embolization play an important role in controlling acute arterial upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, particularly when endoscopic intervention fails to do so. In our case, the patient presented with recurrent life-threatening bleed in spite of multiple prior endoscopic interventions and gastroduodenal artery embolization. Our teaching points focus on the role of angiography in acute upper gastrointestinal bleed and when to conduct empiric embolization, while reviewing the supraduodenal artery as an atypical but important potential culprit for refractory upper gastrointestinal bleed.

  12. Splenic duplication: a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Alkadhi, Hatem; Gubler, Christoph; Bauerfeind, Peter; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency. We report the rare case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by varices in the gastric fundus secondary to splenic duplication. Splenic duplication has been only rarely reported in the literature, and no case so far has described the associated complication of gastrointestinal bleeding, caused by venous drainage of the upper spleen via varices in the gastric fundus. We describe the imaging findings from endoscopy, endosonography, computed tomography (CT), flat-panel CT, and angiography in this rare condition and illustrate the effective role of intra-arterial embolization.

  13. Tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Cathy; Klingenberg, Sarah Louise; Langholz, Ebbe; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2014-11-21

    Background Tranexamic acid reduces haemorrhage through its antifibrinolytic effects. In a previous version of the present review, we found that tranexamic acid may reduce mortality. This review includes updated searches and new trials.Objectives To assess the effects of tranexamic acid versus no intervention, placebo or other antiulcer drugs for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.Search methods We updated the review by performing electronic database searches (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL),MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index) and manual searches in July 2014.Selection criteriaRandomised controlled trials, irrespective of language or publication status.Data collection and analysis We used the standard methodological procedures of the The Cochrane Collaboration. All-cause mortality, bleeding and adverse events were the primary outcome measures. We performed fixed-effect and random-effects model meta-analyses and presented results as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used I² as a measure of between-trial heterogeneity. We analysed tranexamic acid versus placebo or no intervention and tranexamic acid versus antiulcer drugs separately. To analyse sources of heterogeneity and robustness of the overall results, we performed subgroup, sensitivity and sequential analyses.Main results We included eight randomised controlled trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Additionally, we identified one large ongoing pragmatic randomised controlled trial from which data are not yet available. Control groups were randomly assigned to placebo (seven trials) or no intervention (one trial). Two trials also included a control group randomly assigned to antiulcer drugs(lansoprazole or cimetidine). The included studies were published from 1973 to 2011. The number of participants randomly assigned ranged from 47 to 216 (median 204). All trials reported mortality. In total, 42 of 851 participants randomly assigned to

  14. The Acute Management of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham AL Dhahab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The mortality from nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is still around 5%, despite the increased use of proton-pump inhibitors and the advancement of endoscopic therapeutic modalities. Aim. To review the state-of-the-art management of acute non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the presentation to the emergency department, risk stratification, endoscopic hemostasis, and postendoscopic consolidation management to reduce the risk of recurrent bleeding from peptic ulcers. Methods. A PubMed search was performed using the following key words acute management, non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and bleeding peptic ulcers. Results. Risk stratifying patients with acute non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding allows the categorization into low risk versus high risk of rebleeding, subsequently safely discharging low risk patients early from the emergency department, while achieving adequate hemostasis in high-risk lesions followed by continuous proton-pump inhibitors for 72 hours. Dual endoscopic therapy still remains the recommended choice in controlling bleeding from peptic ulcers despite the emergence of new endoscopic modalities such as the hemostatic powder. Conclusion. The management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding involves adequate resuscitation, preendoscopic risk assessment, endoscopic hemostasis, and post endoscopic pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment.

  15. Provocative Endoscopy to Identify Bleeding Site in Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Novel Approach in Transarterial Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Minobu; Fuwa, Sokun; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    This report describes a novel approach to endoscopically induce bleeding by removing a clot from the bleeding site during angiography for upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage. This procedure enabled accurate identification of the bleeding site, allowing for successful targeted embolization despite a negative initial angiogram. Provocative endoscopy may be a feasible and useful option for angiography of obscure bleeding sites in patients with UGI arterial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GI Bleeding in Children (North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) - PDF Patient Handouts Bleeding esophageal varices (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Bloody or tarry stools (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ...

  17. New insights to occult gastrointestinal bleeding: From pathophysiology to therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio; Damián; Sánchez-Capilla; Paloma; De; La; Torre-Rubio; Eduardo; Redondo-Cerezo

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is still a clinical challenge for gastroenterologists. The recent development of novel technologies for the diagnosis and treatment of different bleeding causes has allowed a better management of patients, but it also determines the need of a deeper comprehension of pathophysiology and the analysis of local expertise in order to develop a rational management algorithm. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding can be divided in occult, when a positive occult blood fecal test is the main manifestation, and overt, when external sings of bleeding are visible. In this paper we are going to focus on overt gastrointestinal bleeding, describing the physiopathology of the most usual causes, analyzing the diagnostic procedures available, from the most classical to the novel ones, and establishing a standard algorithm which can be adapted depending on the local expertise or availability. Finally, we will review the main therapeutic options for this complex and not so uncommon clinical problem.

  18. Endoscopic Management of Nonvariceal, Nonulcer Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjwa, E.T.; Holster, I.L.; Kuipers, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common emergency condition in gastroenterology. Although peptic ulcer and esophagogastric varices are the predominant causes, other conditions account for up to 50% of UGIBs. These conditions, among others, include angiodysplasia, Dieulafoy and Mall

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, M N; Ismail, A R; Barras, C D; Tan, W J

    2000-12-01

    Despite advancements in endoscopy and pharmacology in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease the overall mortality has remained constant at 10% for the past four decades. The aim of this study was to determine the age, gender, racial distribution, incidence and causes of endoscopically diagnosed cases of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding to summarise treatments undertaken and to report their outcome. A prospective study of UGI bleeding in 128 patients was performed in two surgical wards of Kuala Lumpur Hospital, involving both elective and emergency admissions. The study group comprised of 113 (88.2%) males and 15 (11.7%) females. The mean age was 51.9 years (range 14 to 85 years) and 37.5% (48 of 128 patients) were older than 60 years. The Indian race was over-represented in all disease categories. Smoking (50.1%), alcohol consumption (37.5%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (17.2%), traditional remedies (5.5%), anti-coagulants (2.3%) and steroids (0.8%) were among the risk factors reported. Common presenting symptoms and signs included malaena (68.8%), haematemesis (59.4%) and fresh per rectal bleeding (33.6%). The commonest causes of UGI bleeding were duodenal ulcer (32%), gastric ulcer (29.7%), erosions (duodenal and gastric) (21.9%), oesophageal varices (10.9%) and malignancy (3.9%). UGI bleeding was treated non-surgically in 90.6% of cases. Blood transfusions were required in 62.6% (67/107) of peptic ulcer disease patients. Surgical intervention for bleeding peptic ulcer occurred in around 10% of cases and involved under-running of the bleeding vessel in most high risk duodenal and gastric ulcer patients. The overall mortality from bleeding peptic ulcer disease was 4.7%. Six patients died from torrential UGI haemorrhage soon after presentation, without the establishment of a cause. Active resuscitative protocols, early endoscopy, more aggressive interventional therapy, early surgery by more senior surgeons, increasing intensive care unit

  20. Congenital portosystemic shunts with and without gastrointestinal bleeding - case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ying; Chen, Jun; Chen, Qi; Ji, Min; Pa, Mier; Qiao, Zhongwei [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hui [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Shan [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-15

    The clinical presentation of congenital portosystemic shunt is variable and gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon presentation. To describe the imaging features of congenital portosystemic shunt as it presented in 11 children with (n = 6) and without gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 5). We performed a retrospective study on a clinical and imaging dataset of 11 children diagnosed with congenital portosystemic shunt. A total of 11 children with congenital portosystemic shunt were included in this study, 7 with extrahepatic portosystemic shunts and 4 with intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Six patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and the imaging results showed that the shunts originated from the splenomesenteric junction (n = 5) or splenic vein (n = 1) and connected to the internal iliac vein. Among the five cases of congenital portosystemic shunt without gastrointestinal bleeding, one case was an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt and the other four were intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Most congenital portosystemic shunt patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had a shunt that drained portal blood into the iliac vein via an inferior mesenteric vein. This type of shunt was uncommon, but the concomitant rate of gastrointestinal bleeding with this type of shunt was high. (orig.)

  1. Current status of endoscopic management for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Takuji; Yasuda, Kenjiro; Morikawa, Soichiro; Itonaga, Masahiro; Nakajima, Masatsugu

    2010-07-01

    Endoscopic hemostasis is widely performed for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding. As the aged Japanese population rapidly increases, the number of patients experiencing complications increases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recent results of endoscopic hemostasis for nonvariceal UGI bleeding. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent endoscopic procedures for nonvariceal UGI bleeding was performed. We performed 223 endoscopic procedures on 217 patients between January 1995 and July 2000, and 238 endoscopic procedures on 236 patients between January 2006 and September 2009 at the Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital. We divided the patients into the 1995-2000 group and the 2006-2009 group. Patient characteristics, hemostasis methods chosen, rates of temporary hemostasis and rebleeding, and mortality were analyzed. There were many serious and actively bleeding cases in the 2006-2009 group (P < 0.001). The endoclip method and intravenous proton pump inhibitor were mainly used in the 2006-2009 group compared with the drug-injection method and intravenous H2 receptor antagonist in the 1995-2000 group (P < 0.001). Through these treatments, the two groups were able to obtain similar treatment outcomes. Through the progress of endoscopic management we obtained similar satisfactory results in the 2006-2009 group, which had multiple complicated cases, compared to the 1995-2000 group.

  2. Strongyloides hyper-infection causing life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lajos Csermely; Hassan Jaafar; Jorgen Kristensen; Antonio Castella; Waldemar Gorka; Ahmed Ali Chebli; Fawaz Trab; Hussain Alizadeh; Béla Hunyady

    2006-01-01

    A 55-year old male patient was diagnosed with strongyloides hyper-infection with stool analysis and intestinal biopsy shortly after his chemotherapy for myeloma.He was commenced on albendazole anthelmintic therapy. After initiation of the treatment he suffered lifethreatening gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Repeated endoscopies showed diffuse multi-focal intestinal bleeding. The patient required huge amounts of red blood cells and plasma transfusions and correction of haemostasis with recombinant activated factor Ⅶ.Abdominal aorto-angiography showed numerous microinferior mesenteric arteries' territories. While the biopsy taken prior to the treatment with albendazole did not show evidence of vasculitis, the biopsy taken after initiation of therapy revealed leukoclastic aggregations around the vessels. These findings suggest that, in addition to direct destruction of the mucosa, vasculitis could be an important additive factor causing the massive GI bleeding during the anthelmintic treatment.This might result from substances released by the worms that have been killed with anthelmintic therapy.Current guidelines advise steroids to be tapered and stopped in case of systematic parasitic infections as they might reduce immunity and precipitate parasitic hyper-infection. In our opinion, steroid therapy might be of value in the management of strongyloides hyperinfection related vasculitis, in addition to the anthelmintic treatment. Indeed, steroid therapy of vasculitis with other means of supportive care resulted in cessation of the bleeding and recovery of the patient.

  3. A Cause of Mortal Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Aortoesophageal Fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Akin, Mete; Yalcinkaya, Tolga; Alkan, Erhan; Arslan, Gokhan; Tuna, Yasar; Yildirim, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aortoesophageal fistula is an uncommon but mortal cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common causes are thoracic aortic aneurisym, foreign body reaction, malignancy and postoperative complication. It can be seen in different pattern on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. There are surgical, endoscopic and interventional radiological treatment options, however, definitive treatment is surgical intervention. Diagnosis and treatment desicion should be made quic...

  4. An Unusual Appearance of Meckel's Diverticulum as a Site of Bleed on Gastrointestinal Bleeding Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Madhuri Shimpi

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a frequently encountered and challenging clinical problem. GI bleeding scans are extremely useful for localizing the source of GI bleeding before interventional radiology procedures. It is essential that physicians understand the numerous possible pitfalls when interpreting these scans. Understanding the potential causes of false-positive scan interpretation eliminates unnecessary procedures for the patient and minimizes costs. We report a rare case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with GI bleeding. Upper and lower GI endoscopy did not reveal a source of bleeding. We emphasize case of Meckel's diverticulum appearing as a proximal jejunum false-positive site of bleed on bleeding scan. In addition, we reinforce the criteria needed for diagnosis of GI bleeding site on the nuclear bleeding scan. A high index of suspicion is the most important diagnostic aid that can prevent the nuclear medicine physicians from misdiagnosing the site of lower GI hemorrhage. PMID:25165421

  5. Assessment of multi-modality evaluations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ryan; Varayil, Jithinraj E; WongKeeSong, Louis M; Fidler, Jeff; Fletcher, Joel G; Barlow, John; Alexander, Jeffrey; Rajan, Elizabeth; Hansel, Stephanie; Becker, Brenda; Larson, Joseph J; Enders, Felicity T; Bruining, David H; Coelho-Prabhu, Nayantara

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the frequency of bleeding source detection in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) after pre-procedure imaging [multiphase computed tomography enterography (MPCTE), video capsule endoscopy (VCE), or both] and assess the impact of imaging on DBE diagnostic yield. METHODS Retrospective cohort study using a prospectively maintained database of all adult patients presenting with OGIB who underwent DBE from September 1st, 2002 to June 30th, 2013 at a single tertiary center. RESULTS Four hundred and ninety five patients (52% females; median age 68 years) underwent DBE for OGIB. AVCE and/or MPCTE performed within 1 year prior to DBE (in 441 patients) increased the diagnostic yield of DBE (67.1% with preceding imaging vs 59.5% without). Using DBE as the gold standard, VCE and MPCTE had a diagnostic yield of 72.7% and 32.5% respectively. There were no increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to VCE (OR = 1.3, P = 0.150). There were increased odds of finding a bleeding site at DBE compared to MPCTE (OR = 5.9, P < 0.001). In inpatients with overt OGIB, diagnostic yield of DBE was not affected by preceding imaging. CONCLUSION DBE is a safe and well-tolerated procedure for the diagnosis and treatment of OGIB, with a diagnostic yield that may be increased after obtaining a preceding VCE or MPCTE. However, inpatients with active ongoing bleeding may benefit from proceeding directly to antegrade DBE. PMID:28216967

  6. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding. PMID:22563285

  7. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding.

  8. The Clinical Outcomes of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Are Not Better than Those of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Min Seob; Cha, Jae Myung; Han, Yong Jae; Yoon, Jin Young; Jeon, Jung Won; Shin, Hyun Phil; Joo, Kwang Ro; Lee, Joung Il

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is increasing; however, predictors of outcomes for patients with LGIB are not as well defined as those for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The aim of this study was to identify the clinical outcomes and the predictors of poor outcomes for patients with LGIB, compared to outcomes for patients with UGIB. We identified patients with LGIB or UGIB who underwent endoscopic procedures between July 2006 and February 2013. Propensity score matching was used to improve comparability between LGIB and UGIB groups. The clinical outcomes and predictors of 30-day rebleeding and mortality rate were analyzed between the two groups. In total, 601 patients with UGIB (n = 500) or LGIB (n = 101) were included in the study, and 202 patients with UGIB and 101 patients with LGIB were analyzed after 2:1 propensity score matching. The 30-day rebleeding and mortality rates were 9.9% and 4.5% for the UGIB group, and 16.8% and 5.0% for LGIB group, respectively. After logistic regression analysis, the Rockall score (P = 0.013) and C-reactive protein (CRP; P = 0.047) levels were significant predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB; however, we could not identify any predictors of rebleeding in patients with LGIB. The clinical outcomes for patients with LGIB are not better than clinical outcomes for patients with UGIB. The clinical Rockall score and serum CRP levels may be used to predict 30-day mortality in patients with LGIB.

  9. Multidetector computed tomography in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Palma

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available John Palma, Marius Mihaila, Frank PilleulDépartement de Radiologie Digestive et des Urgences, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, CHU, Lyon, FranceBackground: The aim of this study is to evaluate multidetector computed tomography (MDCT in acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding, with endoscopy and surgery as reference examinations.Methods: A single-center retrospective study involving 34 patients with acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding was carried out. All patients were evaluated by MDCT scan then endoscopic or surgical examinations. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of MDCT scan were calculated using the extravasation of the contrast agent as the main criterion.Results: Extravasation of the contrast agent was found in 30 of 34 patients (88%. The bleeding site seen on CT was always the same as on endoscopic or surgical examinations (100%. Sensitivity of MDCT scan was 94%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 50% (P < 0.001. Twelve diverticulum bleedings were seen on MDCT scan compared with 13 (92% on endoscopic or surgical examinations. Angiodysplasia was overestimated by MDCT scan.Conclusion: MDCT scan appears to be an excellent tool to find and localize the bleeding site in cases of acute massive lower gastrointestinal disease.Keywords: MDCT, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, extravasation, contrast agent

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of CT angiography in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, A E; Ridley, L J

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the study was to carry out a systematic review determining the accuracy of CT angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. A search of published work in Medline and manual searching of reference lists of articles was conducted. Studies were included if they compared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eight published studies evaluating 129 patients were included. Data were used to form 2 x 2 tables. Computed tomography angiography showed pooled sensitivity of 86% (95% confidence interval 78-92%) and specificity of 95% (95% confidence interval 76-100%), without showing significant heterogeneity (chi(2) = 3.5, P = 0.6) and (chi(2) = 5.4, P = 0.6), respectively. Summary receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.93. Computed tomography angiography is accurate in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can show the precise location and aetiology of bleeding, thereby directing further management. Strong recommendations for use of CT cannot be made from this review because of the methodological limitations and further large prospective studies are needed to define the role of CT in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Yamamoto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth.

  12. AETIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS PRESENTING WITH UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Govind Kamat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the recent years, the number of studies exclusively examining epidemiologic patterns of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding (UGIB has been quite limited. However, most epidemiologic studies have shown a decrease in the incidence of all causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Although, the incidences of peptic ulcers have remained unchanged. Gastrointestinal bleeding is a very common emergency accounting for 7-8% of acute medical admissions. UGIB is 4-5 times more common than the lower GI haemorrhage. Acute erosive gastritis is the most common cause followed by oesophageal varices, peptic ulcer and reflux oesophagitis. Upper GI bleed is more common in men than women (ratio 3:2 and the frequency increases with age. Hence, the present study was designed to study the aetiological profile of patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. MATERIALS AND METHODS This one year cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2013. Sample size of 50 was considered. Patients aged 18 years and above presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and who are fit for endoscopy were selected. Endoscopy was performed in all patients within 24 hrs. of admission and data was plotted in terms of rates, ratios and percentages and continuous data was expressed as mean ± standard deviation. RESULTS In the present study, most of the patients reported past history of liver disease and intake of NSAIDs and aspirins. In the present study, on clinical examination, most of the patients had pallor followed by tenderness. In the present study, the commonest diagnosis was cirrhosis of liver due to alcohol-induced with portal hypertension. CONCLUSION Upper GI endoscopy revealed varices as most common cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. Management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in older adults.

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    Triadafilopoulos, George

    2012-09-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, acute overt, occult or obscure in nature, causes significant morbidity and mortality in older adults. As the elderly population is expected to increase in the future, healthcare costs and the clinical burden of lower gastrointestinal bleeding will rise. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding, by definition, originates from a site distal to the ligament of Treitz and is usually suspected when patients present with haematochezia, or maroon stools per rectum. A thorough history is paramount in guiding the diagnostic steps and management but is frequently inadequate in elderly, poorly communicating, nursing home patients. The causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in older adults may be anatomic, vascular, inflammatory, neoplastic or iatrogenic. Comorbidity from cardiopulmonary disease, renal disease, diabetes or underlying cancer, all prevalent in older adults, may affect the incidence, severity, morbidity and mortality of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly. The use of multiple medications, particularly non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet and anticoagulant agents, needs to be always considered in elderly patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding and anaemia. CT imaging and early colonoscopy are useful in determining the site of bleeding and allowing haemostasis. If unsuccessful, angiographic intervention and surgery need to be considered. Videocapsule endoscopy is useful in cases where the small bowel is suspected as the source, and its results guide the performance of double- or single-balloon enteroscopy. Optimal care should involve a coordinated effort among the primary physician, endoscopist, interventional radiologist and surgeon in order to improve prognosis and subsequent management and reduce morbidity, mortality, length of stay and overall healthcare costs.

  14. Endoscopic Removal of an Unusual Foreign Body Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    A. Karaman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body ingestion is a condition more common in the pediatric population than in adults. In adults, although foreign body ingestion can be well tolerated, approximately 10–20% of patients require endoscopic intervention. Delayed diagnosis and unremoved foreign bodies can cause serious and fatal complications including perforation, fistula and gastrointestinal bleeding. Here we report a patient with bleeding duodenal ulcer thought to be initiated by a large foreign body.

  15. Review article: the diagnosis and investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K; Kaffes, A J

    2011-08-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is a commonly encountered clinical problem in gastroenterology and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The investigation and management of OGIB has changed dramatically over the past decade with the advent of newer gastroenterological and radiological technologies. To review the current evidence on the diagnosis and investigation of OGIB. We searched the PubMed database (1985-2010) for full original articles in English-language journals relevant to the investigation of OGIB. The search terms we used were 'gastrointestinal bleeding' or 'gastrointestinal hemorrhage' or 'small bowel bleeding' each in combination with 'obscure', or 'capsule endoscopy', or 'enteroscopy' or 'enterography' or 'enteroclysis'. Capsule endoscopy (CE) or double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) should be first line investigations. They are complimentary procedures with comparable high diagnostic yields. DBE is also able to provide therapeutic intervention. Newer technologies such as single balloon and spiral enteroscopy are currently being evaluated. Radiological and nuclear medicine investigations, such as CT enterography and CT enteroclysis, are alternative diagnostic tools when CE or DBE are contraindicated. Repeating the gastroscopy and/or colonoscopy may be considered in selective situations. An algorithm for investigation of obscure bleeding is proposed. The development of capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy has transformed the approach to the evaluation and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding over the past decade. Older diagnostic modalities still play a complementary, but increasingly selective role. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Spironolactone use and the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem E; Lassen, Annmarie T; Aalykke, Claus

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT * Recent studies have suggested an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) in spironolactone users. * We conducted this population-based case-control study to confirm the association between spironolactone use and acute nonvaricose UGB alone...... is not modified by high cumulative doses or by concurrent use of antithrombotic or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. AIMS Recent studies have suggested an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) in spironolactone users. The aim was to confirm the association, identify the risk factors...

  17. Novel capsules for potential theranostics of obscure gastrointestinal bleedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolak, Bayram; Şakalak, Hüseyin; Çavuşoğlu, Halit; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman

    2016-09-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is identified as persistent or repeated bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract which could not be defined by conventional gastrointestinal endoscopy and radiological examinations. These GI bleedings are assessed through invasive diagnostic and treatment methods including enteroscopy, angiography and endoscopy. In addition, video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a non-invasive method used to determine the location of the bleeding, however, this does not provide any treatment. Despite of these successful but invasive methods, an effective non-invasive treatment is desperately needed. Herein, we prepare non-invasive theranostic capsules to cure obscure GI bleeding. An effective theranostic capsule containing endothelin as the targeting agent, thrombin-fibrinogen or fibrin as the treating agent, and fluorescein dye as the diagnostic tool is suggested. These theranostic capsules can be administered orally in a simple and non-invasive manner without a risk of complication. By using these novel capsules, one can diagnose obscure GI bleeding with having a possibility of curing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. BLEEDING AND STARVING: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding

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    Jorge FONSECA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. Objectives The aim of this study was obtaining objective data on refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Methods From 1 year span records of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients that underwent urgent endoscopy: clinical features; rockall score; endoscopic data, including severity of lesions and therapy; feeding related records of seven days: liquid diet prescription, first liquid intake, soft/solid diet prescription, first soft/solid intake. Results From 133 patients (84 men Rockall classification was possible in 126: 76 score ≥5, 50 score <5. One persistent bleeding, eight rebled, two underwent surgery, 13 died. Ulcer was the major bleeding cause, 63 patients underwent endoscopic therapy. There was 142/532 possible refeeding records, no record 37% patients. Only 16% were fed during the first day and half were only fed on third day or later. Rockall <5 patients started oral diet sooner than Rockall ≥5. Patients that underwent endoscopic therapy were refed earlier than those without endotherapy. Conclusions Most feeding records are missing. Data reveals delayed refeeding, especially in patients with low-risk lesions who should have been fed immediately. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients must be refed earlier, according to guidelines.

  19. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

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    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment.

  20. A STUDY ON UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPIC FINDINGS IN PATIENTS WITH UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

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    Salla Surya Prakasa Rao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Vomiting of blood almost always proximal to the ligament of Treitz is the upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage has been estimated to be 50-100 per 1,00,000 person per year, with an annual hospitalization rate of approximately 100 per 1, 00,000 hospital admission. This study is to find out the prevalence of nature of lesion on Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in patients admitted for Gastrointestinal bleeding. (UGI Bleed. MATERIALS AND METHODS Place of Study- Department of General Medicine, Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, India. Type of Study- Prospective study. Period of Study- July 2015 to August 2016. RESULTS The Results Study on Endoscopic Findings in Upper Gastro Intestinal Bleed are 1. The peptic ulcer disease was the most common lesion found on endoscopy with prevalence of 54%. 2. Varices contributes second common lesion, next to peptic ulcer disease in UGI bleed with prevalence of 16%. 3. Minor UGI bleed was the commonest presentation. Majority of lesions (60% presented with minor UGI bleed, 28% lesions presented as moderate UGI bleed. Only 8% presented as major UGI bleed. 4. Varices account for the most common cause for major UGI bleed contributing 50%. 5. Gastric ulcer was commonest lesions accounting for 37 cases (37% among 72 cases having single acid peptic lesions on endoscopy. The second most common is duodenal ulcer (31%. 6. Multiple lesions were found in 10% of cases. Peptic ulcer lesions were found in 20% of total number of varices cases. CONCLUSION Peptic ulcer disease was found to be most common lesion causing UGI bleed, with most common presentation as minor UGI bleed and variceal bleed being most common cause of major UGI bleed.

  1. Emerging endoscopic therapies for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Louis M Wong Kee; Levy, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Several new devices and innovative adaptations of existing modalities have emerged as primary, adjunctive, or rescue therapy in endoscopic hemostasis of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. These techniques include over-the-scope clip devices, hemostatic sprays, cryotherapy, radiofrequency ablation, endoscopic suturing, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided angiotherapy. This review highlights the technical aspects and clinical applications of these devices in the context of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostics and therapy by interventional radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingen, M; Günther, R W

    2006-02-01

    Modern imaging modalities such as (multislice) helical CT allow new diagnostic strategies for gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Today, interventional radiology with superselective transcatheter embolization or TIPS procedures allow minimally invasive therapeutic management which can support or replace surgery. This review is a synopsis of the possibilities and relative merits of diagnostic and therapeutic radiological procedures for gastrointestinal bleeding. Which of them to use should be decided collaboratively by gastroenterologist, surgeon, and radiologist depending on local availability, personal experience, and individual patient factors.

  3. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Five-year experience from one centre

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    Jovanović Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is the commonest emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Objective To assess the frequency of erosive gastropathy and duodenal ulcer as a cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding as well as its relation to age, gender and known risk factors. METHOD We conducted retrospective observational analysis of emergency endoscopy reports from the records of the Emergency Department of Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, during the period from 2000 to 2005. Data consisted of patients' demographics, endoscopic findings and potential risk factors. Results During the period 2000-2005, three thousand nine hundred and fifty four emergency upper endoscopies were performed for acute bleeding. In one quarter of cases, acute gastric erosions were the actual cause of bleeding. One half of them were associated with excessive consumption of salicylates and NSAIDs. In most of the examined cases, bleeding stopped spontaneously, while 7.6% of the cases required endoscopic intervention. Duodenal ulcer was detected as a source of bleeding in 1320 (33.4% patients and was significantly associated with a male gender (71.8% and salicylate or NSAID abuse (59.1% (χ2-test; p=0.007. Conclusion Erosive gastropathy and duodenal ulcer represent a significant cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding accounting for up to 60% of all cases that required emergency endoscopy during the 5- year period. Consumption of NSAIDs and salicylates was associated more frequently with bleeding from a duodenal ulcer than with erosive gastropathy leading to a conclusion that we must explore other causes of erosive gastropathy more thoroughly. .

  4. Efficacy of endoscopic therapy for gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy's lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Cui; Liu-Ye Huang; Yun-Xiang Liu; Bo Song; Long-Zhi Yi; Ning Xu; Bo Zhang; Cheng-Rong Wu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the endoscopic hemostasis for gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion. METHODS: One hundred and seven patients with gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion were treated with three endoscopic hemostasis methods: aethoxysklerol injection (46 cases), endoscopic hemoclip hemostasis (31 cases), and a combination of hemoclip hemostasis with aethoxysklerol injection (30 cases). RESULTS: The rates of successful hemostasis using the three methods were 71.7% (33/46), 77.4% (24/31) and 96.7% (29/30), respectively, with significant differences between the methods (P < 0.05). Among those who had unsuccessful treatment with aethoxysklerol injection, 13 were treated with hemoclip hemostasis and 4 underwent surgical operation; 9 cases were successful in the injection therapy. Among the cases with unsuccessful treatment with hemoclip hemostasis, 7 were treated with injection of aethoxysklerol and 3 cases underwent surgical operation; 4 cases were successful in the treatment with hemoclip hemostasis. Only 1 case had unsuccessful treatment with a combined therapy of hemoclip hemostasis and aethoxysklerol injection, and surgery was then performed. No serious complications of perforation occurred in the patients whose bleeding was treated with the endoscopic hemostasis, and no re-bleeding was found during a 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSION: The combined therapy of hemoclip hemostasis with aethoxysklerol injection is the most effective method for gastrointestinal bleeding due to Dieulafoy's lesion.

  5. Risk stratification in upper gastrointestinal bleeding; prediction, prevention and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, N.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341387924

    2013-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis we developed a novel prediction score for predicting upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in both NSAID and low-dose aspirin users. Both for NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin use risk scores were developed by identifying the five most dominant predictors. The risk of upper

  6. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: CT angiography with multi-planar reformatting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Kate; Gollub, Frank; Stuart, Sam; Papadopoulou, Anthie; Woodward, Nick

    2011-04-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency, which carries a significant mortality. CT Angiography is an important non-invasive diagnostic tool, which can be used to plan subsequent endovascular or surgical management. The cases presented demonstrate that a meticulous and systematic approach to image interpretation is necessary, in particular, to detect focal sites of contrast extravasation and small pseudoaneurysms.

  7. New Endoscopic Techniques for Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk den Ouden

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a postmenopausal woman with a congenital aortic stenosis is presented. She presented with severe iron deficiency anemia. After negative extensive gastrointestinal analysis, she was treated with octreotide for six months. After cessation of octreotide, anemia rapidly recurred. A second capsule endoscopy and a double balloon enteroscopy were performed, and an intestinal vascular malformation was found. After surgical segment resection, the patient had stable, normal levels of hemoglobin and no complaints after 14 months of follow-up.

  8. Evaluation and outcomes of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cositha; Santhakumar; Ken; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding(OGIB) is defined as recurrent or persistent bleeding or presence of iron deficiency anaemia after evaluation with a negative bidirectional endoscopy. OGIB accounts for 5% of gastrointestinal bleeding and presents a diagnostic challenge. Current modalities available for the investigation of OGIB include capsule endoscopy, balloon assisted enteroscopy, spiral enteroscopy and computed tomography enterography. These modalities overcome the limitations of previous techniques. Following a negative bidirectional endoscopy, capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy remain the cornerstone of investigation in OGIB given their high diagnostic yield. Longterm outcome data in patients with OGIB is limited, but is most promising for capsule endoscopy. This article reviews the current literature and provides an overview of the clinical evaluation of patients with OGIB, available diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and longterm clinical outcomes.

  9. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Patients with Portal Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecker, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension is a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. Most patients bleed from esophageal or gastric varices, but bleeding from ectopic varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy is also possible. The management of acute bleeding has changed over the last years. Patients are managed with a combination of endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is variceal band ligation. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the time point of endoscopy. The first-line treatment for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding is nonselective beta blockers. Pharmacologic therapy is recommended for most patients; band ligation is an alternative in patients with contraindications for or intolerability of beta blockers. Treatment options for secondary prophylaxis include variceal band ligation, beta blockers, a combination of nitrates and beta blockers, and combination of band ligation and pharmacologic treatment. A clear superiority of one treatment over the other has not been shown. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy or ectopic varices is less common. Treatment options include beta blocker therapy, injection therapy, and interventional radiology. PMID:27335828

  10. Approach to a child with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit; Jain, Puneet; Jayashree, M; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a potentially life threatening medical emergency requiring an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Therefore, the primary focus in a child with UGIB is resuscitation and stabilization followed by a diagnostic evaluation. The differential diagnosis of UGIB in children is determined by age and severity of bleed. In infants and toddlers mucosal bleed (gastritis and stress ulcers) is a common cause. In children above 2 y variceal bleeding due to Extra-Hepatic Portal Venous Obstruction (EHPVO) is the commonest cause of significant UGIB in developing countries as against peptic ulcer in the developed countries. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most accurate and useful diagnostic tool to evaluate UGIB in children. Parenteral vitamin K (infants, 1-2 mg/dose; children, 5-10 mg) and parenteral Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI's), should be administered empirically in case of a major UGIB. Octreotide infusion is useful in control of significant UGIB due to variceal hemorrhage. A temporarily placed, Sengstaken-Blakemore tube can be life saving if pharmacologic/ endoscopic methods fail to control variceal bleeding. Therapy in patients having mucosal bleed is directed at neutralization and/or prevention of gastric acid release; High dose Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs, Pantoprazole) are more efficacious than H2 receptor antagonists for this purpose.

  11. Endovascular treatment of nonvariceal acute arterial upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Poul Erik; Duvnjak, Stevo

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization as treatment of upper nonvariceal gastrointestinal bleeding is increasingly being used after failed primary endoscopic treatment. The results after embolization have become better and surgery still has a high mortality. Embolization is a safe and effective procedure, but its use is has been limited because of relatively high rates of rebleeding and high mortality, both of which are associated with gastrointestinal bleeding and non-gastrointestinal related mortality causes. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a valuable minimal invasive method in the treatment of early rebleeding and does not involve a high risk of treatment associated complications. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary in the treatment of these patients and should comprise gastroenterologists, interventional radiologists, anaesthesiologists, and surgeons to achieve the best possible results. PMID:21160665

  12. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  13. Duodenal variceal bleed: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed and a difficult diagnosis to make.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagani, Shradha; Winters, Conchubhair; Moreea, Sulleman

    2017-02-27

    We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a man aged 57 years with primary biliary cholangitis who was ultimately diagnosed with an isolated duodenal variceal bleed, which was successfully treated with histoacryl glue injection. Duodenal varices are an uncommon presentation of portal hypertension and can result in significant GI bleeding with a high mortality. Diagnosis can be difficult and therapeutic options limited. Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy with histoacryl glue provides an effective treatment, though endoscopists need to remain aware of and vigilant for the serious complications of this treatment option. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Bleeding from gastrointestinal angioectasias is not related to bleeding disorders - a case control study

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    Lärfars Gerd

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angioectasias in the gastrointestinal tract can be found in up to 3% of the population. They are typically asymptomatic but may sometimes result in severe bleeding. The reasons for why some patients bleed from their angioectasias are not fully understood but it has been reported that it may be explained by an acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS. This condition has similar laboratory findings to congenital von Willebrand disease with selective loss of large von Willebrand multimers. The aim of this study was to find out if AVWS or any other bleeding disorder was more common in patients with bleeding from angioectasias than in a control group. Methods We compared bleeding tests and coagulation parameters, including von Willebrand multimers, from a group of 23 patients with anemia caused by bleeding from angioectasias, with the results from a control group lacking angioectasias. Results No significant differences between the two groups were found in coagulation parameters, bleeding time or von Willebrand multimer levels. Conclusion These results do not support a need for routine bleeding tests in cases of bleeding from angioectasias and do not show an overall increased risk of AVWS among these patients.

  15. The evaluation and management of obscure and occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common clinical presentation increasing in an aging population, frequently requiring hospitalization and emergent intervention, with significant morbidity, mortality, and costs. It may manifest overtly as hematemesis, melena, or hematochezia, or as an asymptomatic occult bleed. Management typically involves an esophagogastroduodenoscopy or a colonoscopy; these in combination sometimes do not identify a source of bleeding, with the source remaining obscure. Further work up to identify an obscure source frequently requires radiologically detecting the leakage of an intravascular tracer (using tagged red blood cells or angiography) with brisk bleeding or in other cases CT enterography (CTE) to detect bowel wall changes consistent with a bleeding source. Recent advances including capsule endoscopy, CTE, and double-balloon endoscopy have helped to identify bleeding sources beyond the reach of conventional endoscopy. Clinical decision-making about their use is complex and evolving. Knowing their relative merits and weaknesses including yield, contraindications, complications, and cost is essential in coming up with an appropriate management plan. This review covers the rationale for clinical management of obscure sources of GI bleeding, mentioning the approach to and the yield of conventional methods, with an emphasis on the recent advances mentioned above.

  16. Emergency endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding after bariatric surgery. Therapeutic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, María Luisa; Martín-Lorenzo, Juan Gervasio; Torralba-Martínez, José Antonio; Lirón-Ruiz, Ramón; Miguel Perelló, Joana; Flores Pastor, Benito; Pérez Cuadrado, Enrique; Aguayo Albasini, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) is a potential complication after bariatric surgery and its frequency is around 2-4% according to the literature. The aim of this study is to present our experience with GB after bariatric surgery, its presentation and possible treatment options by means of an algorithm. From January 2004 to December 2012, we performed 300 consecutive laparoscopic bariatric surgeries. A total of 280 patients underwent a laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass with creation of a gastrojejunal anastomosis using a circular stapler type CEAA No 21 in 265 patients and with a linear stapler in 15 patients. Demographics, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and treatment were reviewed. A total of 20 patients underwent a sleeve gastrectomy. Twenty-seven cases (9%) developed GB. Diagnosis and therapeutic endoscopy was required in 13 patients. The onset of bleeding occurred between the 1(st)-6(th) postop days in 10 patients, and the origin was at the gastrojejunostomy staple-lines, and 3 patients had bleeding from an anastomotic ulcer 15-20 days after surgery. All other patients were managed non-operatively. Conservative management of gastrointestinal bleeding is effective in most cases, but endoscopy with therapeutic intent should be considered in patients with severe or recurrent bleeding. Multidisciplinary postoperative follow- up is very important for early detention and treatment of this complication. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors affecting hospital mortality in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Mohammed

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective analysis studied the records of 564 consecutive patients admitted to Gastrointestinal Bleeding Unit of Riyadh Medical Complex with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 2-year period (May 1996-April 1998. The purpose of the study was to analyze the mortality with an aim to identify the risk factors affecting mortality in these patients. Majority of patients were men (82% and Saudis (54%. Their mean age was 52.46 + 17.8 years. Esophageal varices (45% were the main causes of bleeding followed by duodenal ulcers (24%. Overall mortality in this series was 15.8% (89 patients. Comorbid diseases were responsible for death in 68 (76% patients, whereas, bleeding was considered to be directly responsible for death in 21 (24% patients. On analysis of data from this study, old age (>60 years, systolic pressure < 90 mm Hg on admission, comorbid disease, variceal bleeding and Child′s grade C in patients with chronic liver disease were associated with adverse outcome.

  18. Epidemiology and diagnosis of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondano, Gianluca

    2014-12-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common gastroenterological emergency. A vast majority of these bleeds have nonvariceal causes, in particular gastroduodenal peptic ulcers. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, low-dose aspirin use, and Helicobacter pylori infection are the main risk factors for UGIB. Current epidemiologic data suggest that patients most affected are older with medical comorbidit. Widespread use of potentially gastroerosive medications underscores the importance of adopting gastroprotective pharamacologic strategies. Endoscopy is the mainstay for diagnosis and treatment of acute UGIB. It should be performed within 24 hours of presentation by skilled operators in adequately equipped settings, using a multidisciplinary team approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Gastric lipoma as an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, W; Allemann, J; Simeon, B; Fornaro, M; Rehli, V

    1995-04-18

    This is a case report of a gastric lipoma causing a severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding. About 200 cases of this very rare benign gastric tumor have been reported so far. Symptoms are not characteristic, but may also mimic malignancy when occurring with bleeding, obstruction or weight loss. Malignant transformation is possible, but extremely rare. Because the tumor is situated under the submucosal layer in 90%, preoperative diagnosis by endoscopic biopsy is almost never possible. The tumor has to be treated by resection. A diagnosis by frozen section during the operation is recommended.

  20. Pitfalls in detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding with multi-detector row helical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, T; Hoffmann, M H K; Stuber, G; Klass, O; Feuerlein, S; Aschoff, A J

    2009-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced multi-detector row helical CT angiography is establishing itself as an accurate, rapid, and non-invasive diagnostic modality in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. On arterial phase MDCT images ongoing hemorrhage can be revealed as an area of active extravasation of contrast material within the bowel lumen. This pictorial essay gives a short overview of current diagnostic modalities in assessing acute GI tract bleeding, typical MDCT findings, and depicts potential pitfalls in the detection of acute GI bleeding with MDCT.

  1. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  2. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erwin; Biecker

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding(UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions,erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor(PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application(oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased.

  3. Boerhaave's syndrome presenting as an upper gastrointestinal bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William; Siau, Keith; Singh, Gurjit

    2013-11-29

    A 64-year-old man without any significant medical history presented to accident and emergency department with haematemesis and melaena, quite similar to an upper gastrointestinal bleed. However, the unexplained left-sided neck pain with a history of overnight vomiting prompted further imaging. Air was visible in the soft tissues on a lateral X-ray of the neck, which led to a CT scan and this showed a proximal-mid oesophageal rupture. The patient was stabilised and transferred to a cardiothoracic unit for observation. An inpatient endoscopy did not detect a perforation and the patient was discharged 5 days later without any further complications. This case report highlights how a high oesophageal rupture can mimic an upper gastrointestinal bleed and also the need for further imaging when there is an incongruent history, so that appropriate care is provided to minimise mortality.

  4. Zenker's diverticulum, a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bălălău, C; Stoian, S; Motofei, I; Popescu, B; Popa, F; Scăunaşu, R V

    2013-01-01

    The most common complication of Zenker's diverticulum is aspiration pneumonia, compression of the trachea and esophageal obstruction with large diverticulum, and increased risk of development of carcinoma. Thus bleeding occurs rarely, can be massive and life threatening, with ulceration being the most common cause. We describe a patient with sever upper gastrointestinal bleeding as a result of a Zenker's diverticulum. A 75 year-old woman was referred to the emergency room and hospitalized for hematemesis, melena, asthenia and total dysphagia. In this particular case we preferred open technique because of the diverticulum dimensions and bleeding episode. Left cervicotomy was practiced on the anterior edge of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, being known that Zenker diverticulum extend into the left neck 90% of the time, fact also confirmed by radiology in this case. Postoperatively, the patient showed a complication free recovery. Five days after treatment the patient resumed nourishment. Several days later our patient was able to return home. Follow-up at 12 months after the operation showed complete recovery. Ulcer of the basis of Zenker's diverticulum is a rare entity and, only a few cases were reported in the literature to date. Omitting thecricomyotomy predisposes to fistula or diverticulum recurrence due to the persistence of a high pharyngeal intraluminal pressure that acts on the posterior wall just proximal to the upper esophageal sphincter. Zenker's diverticulum is an unusual site of origin for clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and differential diagnosis must include other more frequent causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. In our opinion, classicalsurgical therapy is indicated when distal esophageal imaging cannot be obtained during endoscopic examination, there is a large diverticulum or in an emergency setting when fast control over the bleeding source is required.

  5. Mechanical Hemostasis Techniques in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Andrew S; Rockey, Don C

    2015-07-01

    One of the most important advances in gastroenterology has been the use of endoscopic hemostasis techniques to control nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly when high-risk stigmata are present. Several options are available, including injection therapy, sprays/topical agents, electrocautery, and mechanical methods. The method chosen depends on the nature of the lesion and experience of the endoscopist. This article reviews the available mechanical hemostatic modalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Small bowel stromal tumour revealed by a lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assamoi B. F. Kassi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Small bowel stromal tumour must be systematically researched in the presence of obscure and persistent low gastrointestinal bleeding despite a normal endoscopic examination (OGDF and colonoscopy. Video capsule endoscopy is the best diagnosis examination; if it is not available a CT enterography could be useful. Surgical treatment is effective on localized and weak malignancy small bowel stromal tumours. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1248-1250

  7. A rare upper gastrointestinal system bleeding case: Aortoesophageal fistula

    OpenAIRE

    AYYILDIZ, Talat; Nas, Ömer Fatih; YILDIRIM, Çınar; Dolar, Enver; Gurel, Selim

    2014-01-01

    Aortoesophageal fistula is a rare condition with fatal prognosis. It is one of the life-threatining causes of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. With this case report, we will discuss an instance of a fatal aortoesophageal fistula in a patient to whom was implanted a stent due to an aorta aneurysm. In endoscopic examination blood clot on the mouth of the fistula was visualized. J. Exp. Clin. Med., 2014; 31:51-53

  8. An Unusual Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Duodenal Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kadaba

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Common causes of chronic upper gastrointestinal bleeding include oesophageal varices, gastroduodenal ulcers and malignancy, and patients mostly present with iron deficiency type anaemia. We present the case of a 60-year-old lady who presented with iron deficiency anaemia and on investigation was found to have a large duodenal polyp requiring surgical excision. On histological examination, the polyp was revealed to be a lipoma. We review the recent literature and formulate a management plan for this rare entity.

  9. [Risk factors associated with failure from endoscopic therapy in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-ying; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Jing; Ding, Shi-gang; Zhou, Li-ya; Lin, San-ren

    2010-12-18

    To determine risk factors associated with failure of endoscopic therapy in acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB ). This was a retrospective cohort study of 223 patients admitted to Peking University Third Hospital between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2009, with acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Data on clinical presentation, laboratory test, endoscopic findings, and treatment outcomes were collected. Risk factors for treatment failure were identified using multivariable Logistic regression with backward selection. Therapeutic failure rate was 19.3%(43/223). In univariate analysis, the two groups had significant difference in age, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, ASA, shock, haemoglobin level, Hct, PLT, time of endoscopic treatment, gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, lesion size and active spurting of blood. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis revealed that shock [odds ratio (OR) 3.058, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.295-7.221], history of gastrointestinal bleeding (OR 2.809, 95% CI 1.207-6.539), PLT>100×10⁹/L (OR 0.067, 95% CI 0.009-0.497), active spurting of blood (OR 10.390, 95% CI 2.835-38.080) and lesion size≥2.0 cm (OR 7.111, 95% CI 1.628-31.069) were risk factors associated with failure of endoscopic therapy. The number of comorbidities>1 (OR 9.580,95%CI 1.383-66.390) and active spurting of blood (OR 9.971, 95% CI 1.820-54.621) were factors related with need for surgical intervention or death. Patients with shock, history of gastrointestinal bleeding, PLTrisks for continued bleeding or rebleeding after endoscopic treatment. These patients may be more likely to benefit from aggressive post-hemostasis care.

  10. Multidetector computed tomography mesentericography for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, P.; Hamer, O.W.; Mueller-Wille, R.; Rennert, J.; Feuerbach, S.; Zorger, N. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Wrede, C.E. [Helios-Klinikum Berlin-Buch (Germany). Interdisziplinaeres Notfallzentrum mit Rettungsstelle; Siebig, S.; Schoelmerich, J. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic yield of 16-row multidetector computed tomography (CT) mesentericography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods: The radiological information system database was used to retrospectively identify all patients in whom CT mesentericography (CTM) was performed for the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding between July 2002 and September 2006. A subsequent prospective study was conducted between October 2006 and September 2009 to evaluate CTM in patients with major obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The retrospectively identified patients (six patients) as well as the prospectively evaluated patients (seven patients) constitute the study population. Following mesenteric DSA the catheter was left in the superior mesenteric artery, the patient was transferred to the CT suite and CTM was carried out by scanning the abdomen after contrast material injection via the catheter. Active bleeding was suspected if a focal area of high attenuation consistent with contrast material extravasation was found within the bowel lumen. Results: CTM detected the site of active bleeding in three of 13 patients (23 %). In the subpopulation of patients who were prospectively evaluated, CT mesentericography identified the site of active bleeding in one of seven patients (14 %). Depiction of active bleeding by CTM prompted surgical intervention in each case and surgery confirmed the findings of CT mesentericography. Conclusion: Due to the relatively low rate of positive findings and inherent drawbacks, we feel that CTM cannot be recommended in general. However, in selected patients who are continuously bleeding at a low rate and in whom iv-CT was negative, CT mesentericography might be helpful. (orig.)

  11. Trends in Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju-Yeh; Lee, Tsung-Chun; Montez-Rath, Maria E.; Paik, Jane; Chertow, Glenn M.; Desai, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Impaired kidney function is a risk factor for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, an event associated with poor outcomes. The burden of upper GI bleeding and its effect on patients with ESRD are not well described. Using data from the US Renal Data System, we quantified the rates of occurrence of and associated 30-day mortality from acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding in patients undergoing dialysis; we used medical claims and previously validated algorithms where available. Overall, 948,345 patients contributed 2,296,323 patient-years for study. The occurrence rates for upper GI bleeding were 57 and 328 episodes per 1000 person-years according to stringent and lenient definitions of acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding, respectively. Unadjusted occurrence rates remained flat (stringent) or increased (lenient) from 1997 to 2008; after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid conditions, however, we found a significant decline for both definitions (linear approximation, 2.7% and 1.5% per year, respectively; Pupper GI bleeding episodes and were more likely to receive blood transfusions during an episode. Overall 30-day mortality was 11.8%, which declined significantly over time (relative declines of 2.3% or 2.8% per year for the stringent and lenient definitions, respectively). In summary, despite declining trends worldwide, crude rates of acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding among patients undergoing dialysis have not decreased in the past 10 years. Although 30-day mortality related to upper GI bleeding declined, perhaps reflecting improvements in medical care, the burden on the ESRD population remains substantial. PMID:22266666

  12. Trends in acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju-Yeh; Lee, Tsung-Chun; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Paik, Jane; Chertow, Glenn M; Desai, Manisha; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2012-03-01

    Impaired kidney function is a risk factor for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, an event associated with poor outcomes. The burden of upper GI bleeding and its effect on patients with ESRD are not well described. Using data from the US Renal Data System, we quantified the rates of occurrence of and associated 30-day mortality from acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding in patients undergoing dialysis; we used medical claims and previously validated algorithms where available. Overall, 948,345 patients contributed 2,296,323 patient-years for study. The occurrence rates for upper GI bleeding were 57 and 328 episodes per 1000 person-years according to stringent and lenient definitions of acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding, respectively. Unadjusted occurrence rates remained flat (stringent) or increased (lenient) from 1997 to 2008; after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid conditions, however, we found a significant decline for both definitions (linear approximation, 2.7% and 1.5% per year, respectively; Pupper GI bleeding episodes and were more likely to receive blood transfusions during an episode. Overall 30-day mortality was 11.8%, which declined significantly over time (relative declines of 2.3% or 2.8% per year for the stringent and lenient definitions, respectively). In summary, despite declining trends worldwide, crude rates of acute, nonvariceal upper GI bleeding among patients undergoing dialysis have not decreased in the past 10 years. Although 30-day mortality related to upper GI bleeding declined, perhaps reflecting improvements in medical care, the burden on the ESRD population remains substantial.

  13. Clinical outcomes of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Kosova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telaku, Skender; Kraja, Bledar; Qirjako, Gentiana; Prifti, Skerdi; Fejza, Hajrullah

    2014-12-01

    The aim was to determine the sociodemographic and etiologic factors, endoscopic accuracy, treatment efficiency and clinical outcome of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal system bleeding in Kosova. We retrospectively evaluated patients who had applied to our Gastroenterology Department between January 2006 and December 2010. There were 460 eligible cases with mean age 56.85+16.18 years, while male /female ratio was 2.71/1. The greatest occurrence was at age group of 60-69 years (27.1 %). The most common clinical symptom was melena (62.6%). Comorbid diseases were present in 57, 6% of the patients. The percentage of patients using acetylsalicylic acid and /or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was 43.7%. Five point two percent were using anticoagulants. Peptic ulcer was the main cause of bleeding (82.2%) and most of them were Forrest III (41.6%). Endoscopic treatment was performed in 90 patients, primary hemostasis was achieved in 96.7% while rebleeding developed in 10% of these patients. The average length of hospital stay was 9.29+5.58 (1-35) days. Rebleeding was reported in 4.1% of all patients while the overall mortality rate was 5.7%. Age over 60 years, previous history of gastrointestinal bleeding, treatment with anticoagulants, low hemoglobin values at presentation (bleeding, comorbidities, tachycardia, transfusion requirement>2 unit, type of treatment and time of endoscopy were predictors of poor outcome in study present.

  14. Dual-source dual-energy CT angiography with virtual non-enhanced images and iodine map for active gastrointestinal bleeding: Image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hao, E-mail: sunhao_robert@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Hou, Xin-Yi, E-mail: hxy_pumc@126.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Xue, Hua-Dan, E-mail: bjdanna95@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Li, Xiao-Guang, E-mail: xglee88@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Jin, Zheng-Yu, E-mail: zhengyu_jin@126.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan No. 1, Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Qian, Jia-Ming, E-mail: qjiaming57@gmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Jian-Chun, E-mail: yu-jch@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhu, Hua-Dong, E-mail: huadongzhu@hotmail.com [Department of Emergency, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • GIB is a common gastrointestinal emergency with a high mortality rate. • Detection and localization of GIB source are important for imaging modality. • DSDECTA using a dual-phase scan protocol is clinically feasible. • DSDECTA with VNE and iodine map images can diagnose the active GIB source accurately. • DSDECTA can reduce radiation dose compared with conventional CT examination in GIB. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of dual-source dual-energy CT angiography (DSDECTA) with virtual non-enhanced images and iodine map for active gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB). Methods: From June 2010 to December 2012, 112 consecutive patients with clinical signs of active GIB underwent DSDECTA with true non-enhanced (TNE), arterial phase with single-source mode, and portal-venous phase with dual-energy mode (100 kVp/230 mAs and Sn 140 kVp/178 mAs). Virtual non-enhanced CT (VNE) image sets and iodine map were reformatted from ‘Liver VNC’ software. The mean CT number, noise, signal to noise ratio (SNR), image quality and radiation dose were compared between TNE and VNE image sets. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data, interpreted images from DSDECTA with TNE (protocol 1), and DSDECTA with VNE and iodine map (protocol 2) respectively, with discordant interpretation resolved by consensus. The standards of reference included digital subtraction angiography, endoscopy, surgery, or final pathology reports. Receiver–operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was undertaken and the area under the curve (AUC) calculated for CT protocols 1 and 2, respectively. Results: There was no significant difference in mean CT numbers of all organs (including liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, abdominal aorta, and psoas muscle) (P > 0.05). Lower noise and higher SNR were found on VNE images than TNE images (P < 0.05). Image quality of VNE was lower than that of TNE without significant difference (P > 0.05). The active GIB source was identified

  15. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco; Bustamante-Balén; Gema; Plumé

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding(AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal(GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325(Hemospray), EndoClotTM polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a secondline treatment, and they seem to be especially indi-cated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area.

  16. Bleeding with the artificial heart: Gastrointestinal hemorrhage in CF-LVAD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Fradkov, Elena

    2017-06-14

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) have significantly improved outcomes for patients with end-stage heart failure when used as a bridge to cardiac transplantation or, more recently, as destination therapy. However, its implantations carries a risk of complications including infection, device malfunction, arrhythmias, right ventricular failure, thromboembolic disease, postoperative and nonsurgical bleeding. A significant number of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) recipients may experience recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage, mainly due to combination of antiplatelet and vitamin K antagonist therapy, activation of fibrinolytic pathway, acquired von Willebrand factor deficiency, and tendency to develop small intestinal angiodysplasias due to increased rotary speed of the pump. Gastrointestinal bleeding in LVAD patients remains a source of increased morbidity including the need for blood transfusions, extended hospital stays, multiple readmissions, and overall mortality. Management of gastrointestinal bleeding in LVAD patients involves multidisciplinary approach in stabilizing the patients, addressing risk factors and performing structured endoluminal evaluation with focus on upper gastrointestinal tract including jejunum to find and eradicate culprit lesion. Medical and procedural intervention is largely successful and universal bleeding cessation occurs in transplanted patients.

  17. Emergency management of lower gastrointestinal bleed in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Binesh; Singhi, Sunit

    2013-03-01

    Lower gastro intestinal bleed (LGIB) is defined as any bleeding that occurs distal to the ligament of Treitz (situated at the duodeno jejunal junction). It constitutes the chief complaint of about 0.3 % of children presenting to the pediatric emergency department(ED). Among Indian children the most common causes are colitis and polyps. In most of the cases of LGIB the bleeding is small and self limiting, but conditions like Meckel's diverticulum often presents with life threatening bleeds. The approach in ED should include in order of priority-assessment and maintenance of hemodynamic stability, confirmation of LGIB and then to attempt for specific diagnoses and their management. This is achieved with help of rapid cardiopulmonary assessment, focused history and examination. The management of all serious hemodynamically significant bleeds includes, rapid IV access, volume replacement with normal saline 20 ml/kg, blood sampling (for cross matching, hematocrit, platelet, coagulogram and liver function tests), Inj. Vit K 5-10 mg IV, acid suppression with H2 antagonists/PPI and nasogastric lavage to rule out upper gastrointestinal bleed. Continuous ongoing monitoring of vital signs is important after stabilization. In ill looking infant, infectious colitis, Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), Hirschsprung enterocolitis and volvulus and in older infants and children, intussusceptions, typhoid fever, volvulus should be looked for. Proctosigmoidoscopy remains the first investigation to be done and reveals majority of etiology. Multidetector CT scan, Tc 99 m RBC scan, angiography and Push enteroscopy are the further investigation choices according to the clinical condition of the child. Intra operative enteroscopy is reserved for refractory cases with an obscure etiology.

  18. Application of endoscopic hemoclips for nonvariceal bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shi-Bin; Gong, Ai-Xia; Leng, Jing; Ma, Jing; Ge, Lin-Mei

    2009-09-14

    To investigate acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and evaluate the effects of endoscopic hemoclipping. Sixty-eight cases of acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper GI tract were given endoscopic treatment with hemoclip application. Clinical data, endoscopic findings, and the effects of the therapy were evaluated. The 68 cases (male:female = 42:26, age from 9 to 70 years, average 54.4) presented with hematemesis in 26 cases (38.2%), melena in nine cases (13.3%), and both in 33 cases (48.5%). The causes of the bleeding included gastric ulcer (29 cases), duodenal ulcer (11 cases), Dieulafoy's lesion (11 cases), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (six cases), post-operative (three cases), post-polypectomy bleeding (five cases), and post-sphincterotomy bleeding (three cases); 42 cases had active bleeding. The mean number of hemoclips applied was four. Permanent hemostasis was obtained by hemoclip application in 59 cases; 6 cases required emergent surgery (three cases had peptic ulcers, one had Dieulafoy's lesion, and two were caused by sphincterotomy); three patients died (two had Dieulafoy's lesion and one was caused by sphincterotomy); and one had recurrent bleeding with Dieulafoy's lesion 10 mo later, but in a different location. Endoscopic hemoclip application was an effective and safe method for acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper GI tract with satisfactory outcomes.

  19. Application of endoscopic hemoclips for nonvariceal bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Bin Guo; Ai-Xia Gong; Jing Leng; Jing Ma; Lin-Mei Ge

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and evaluate the effects of endoscopic hemoclipping. METHODS: Sixty-eight cases of acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper GI tract were given endoscopic treatment with hemoclip application. Clinical data, endoscopic findings, and the effects of the therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The 68 cases (male:female = 42:26, age from 9 to 70 years, average 54.4) presented with hematemesis in 26 cases (38.2%), melena in nine cases (13.3%), and both in 33 cases (48.5%). The causes of the bleeding included gastric ulcer (29 cases), duodenal ulcer (11 cases), Dieulafoy's lesion (11 cases), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (six cases), postoperative (three cases), post-polypectomy bleeding (five cases), and post-sphincterotomy bleeding (three cases); 42 cases had active bleeding. The mean number of hemoclips applied was four. Permanent hemostasis was obtained by hemoclip application in 59 cases; 6 cases required emergent surgery (three cases had peptic ulcers, one had Dieulafoy's lesion, and two were caused by sphincterotomy); three patients died (two had Dieulafoy's lesion and one was caused by sphincterotomy); and one had recurrent bleeding with Dieulafoy's lesion 10 mo later, but in a different location. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic hemoclip application was an effective and safe method for acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper GI tract with satisfactory outcomes.

  20. Ineffective off-label use of recombinant activated factor VII in a case of bone-marrow transplantation-related gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedermann CJ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with a normal coagulation system, who experience serious bleeding, sound evidence for recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa as an effective haemostatic agent is only scarcely available so far from controlled clinical trials. In systematic reviews on the clinical use of rFVIIa, treatment failures were only rarely reported. Case presentation We present a 45-year old, Caucasian male with persistent intestinal bleeding due to enterocolitis associated with cytomegalovirus infection and acute graft-versus-host-disease. He had received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from an unrelated HLA-identical donor because of chronic myelogenous leukaemia diagnosed two years earlier. Bleeding started at day 18 after transplantation with bloody diarrhea, which was treated with multiple transfusions of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, and red blood cell concentrates, and continued relentlessly, despite all efforts, including continued transfusions, high-dose prednisolone, broad antibiotic and antiviral coverage, and tranexamic acid. Recombinant FVIIa was started at boluses of 90–120 μg/kg every 4–8 hours. Despite more than 10 doses, recurrent severe bleeding progressed to refractory shock, multiorgan failure and death. Conclusions Little can be concluded from single case reports of clinical improvement, because publication bias in favour of positive effects is likely. Our case suggests that rFVIIa is not a panacea, in particular for severe bleeding after bone-marrow transplantation. As long as rigorous, controlled studies or comprehensive registries are lacking, conventional interventions remain the standard of care in non-haemophilic patients with severe bleeding.

  1. Severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding in extraluminal diverticula in the third part of the duodenum

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The successful management of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding requires identification of the source of bleeding and when this is achieved the bleeding can often be treated endoscopically. However, the identification of the bleeding can be challenging due to the location of the bleeding or technical aspects. Therefore it might be necessary to use other measures than endoscopy such as CT angiography. Duodenal diverticula is a rare cause of upper GI bleeding and can be challenging to diagnos...

  2. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) - initial evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaysi, Iyad; Gralnek, Ian M

    2013-10-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common reason that the 'on-call' gastroenterologist is consulted. Despite the diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities of upper endoscopy, there is still significant associated morbidity and mortality in patients experiencing acute UGIB, thus this is a true GI emergency. Acute UGIB is divided into non-variceal and variceal causes. The most common type of acute UGIB is 'non-variceal' and includes diagnoses such as peptic ulcer (gastric and duodenal), gastroduodenal erosions, Mallory-Weiss tears, erosive oesophagitis, arterio-venous malformations, Dieulafoy's lesion, and upper GI tract tumours and malignancies. This article focuses exclusively on initial management strategies for acute upper GI bleeding. We discuss up to date and evidence-based strategies for patient risk stratification, initial patient management prior to endoscopy, potential causes of UGIB, role of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetic agents, prophylactic antibiotics, vasoactive pharmacotherapies, and timing of endoscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Downhill varices: an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Ontanilla-Clavijo

    Full Text Available Background: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB is a common condition in gastroenterology, but "Downhill varices" (DHV or varices of the upper oesophagus are an uncommon cause of UGIB, with different aetiology from lower third oesophageal varices and different therapeutic implications. Case report: A 28-year-old male patient, with a history of chronic kidney failure secondary undergoing haemodialysis and superior vena cava syndrome (SCVS due to multiple catheter replacements, was admitted to the Emergency Department with haematemesis secondary to a varicose vein rupture in the proximal third of oesophagus, treated initially with ethanolamine. Subsequent diagnostic studies showed the collateral circulation secondary to the SCVS. No further endoscopic or endovascular therapy could be performed and the patient will finally undergo a surgical bypass. Discussion: DHVs are a very uncommon condition and endoscopic band ligation emerges as the appropriate therapeutic approach for the bleeding event. The definitive therapy continues to be that for the cause of the SVCS.

  4. Downhill varices: an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontanilla Clavijo, Guillermo; Trigo Salado, Claudio; Rojas Mercedes, Norberto; Caballero Gómez, Juan Antonio; Rincón Gatica, Adalberto; Alcívar-Vasquez, Juan Manuel; Márquez Galán, José Luis

    2016-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common condition in gastroenterology, but "Downhill Varices" (DHV) or varices of the upper oesophagus are an uncommon cause of UGIB, with different aetiology from lower third oesophageal varices and different therapeutic implications. A 28-year-old male patient, with a history of chronic kidney failure secondary undergoing haemodialysis and superior vena cava syndrome (SCVS) due to multiple catheter replacements, was admitted to the Emergency Department with haematemesis secondary to a varicose vein rupture in the proximal third of oesophagus, treated initially with ethanolamine. Subsequent diagnostic studies showed the collateral circulation secondary to the SCVS. No further endoscopic or endovascular therapy could be performed and the patient will finally undergo a surgical bypass. DHVs are a very uncommon condition and endoscopic band ligation emerges as the appropriate therapeutic approach for the bleeding event. The definitive therapy continues to be that for the cause of the SVCS.

  5. Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielleman, Thomas; Bujanda, Daniel; Cryer, Byron

    2015-07-01

    Although the incidence of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) has been decreasing worldwide, nonvariceal UGIB continues to be a significant problem. Even with the advent of advanced endoscopic procedures and potent medications to suppress acid production, UGIB carries significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most common risk factors for nonvariceal UGIB include Helicobacter pylori infection, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and other antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications. In patients with cardiovascular disease and kidney disease, UGIB tends to be more severe and has greater morbidity. Many of the newer NSAIDs have been removed from the market. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Role of Medical Therapy for Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortinsky, Kyle J; Bardou, Marc; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Mortality from UGIB has remained 5-10% over the past decade. This article presents current evidence-based recommendations for the medical management of UGIB. Preendoscopic management includes initial resuscitation, risk stratification, appropriate use of blood products, and consideration of nasogastric tube insertion, erythromycin, and proton pump inhibitor therapy. The use of postendoscopic intravenous proton pump inhibitors is strongly recommended for certain patient populations. Postendoscopic management also includes the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori, appropriate use of proton pump inhibitors and iron replacement therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endoscopic management of nonvariceal, nonulcer upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjwa, Eric T T L; Holster, I Lisanne; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2014-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is the most common emergency condition in gastroenterology. Although peptic ulcer and esophagogastric varices are the predominant causes, other conditions account for up to 50% of UGIBs. These conditions, among others, include angiodysplasia, Dieulafoy and Mallory-Weiss lesions, gastric antral vascular ectasia, and Cameron lesions. Upper GI cancer as well as lesions of the biliary tract and pancreas may also result in severe UGIB. This article provides an overview of the endoscopic management of these lesions, including the role of novel therapeutic modalities such as hemostatic powder and over-the-scope-clips. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena.

  9. Evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding: Update of current radiologic strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parth; J; Parekh; Ross; C; Buerlein; Rouzbeh; Shams; Harlan; Vingan; David; A; Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding(GIB) is a common presenta-tion with significant associated morbidity and mortality, the prevalence of which continues to rise with the ever-increasing aging population. Initial evaluation includes an esophagoduodeonscopy and/or colonoscopy, which may fail to reveal a source. Such cases prove to be a dilemma and require collaboration between gastroen-terology and radiology in deciding the most appropriate approach. Recently, there have been a number of ra-diologic advances in the approach to GIB. The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based update on the most current radiologic modalities available and an algorithmic approach to GIB.

  10. Endoscopic difficulties in the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. N. Appleyard; C.P. Swain

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal ( GI ) tract remains common ,with a reported annual incidence of up to 172 per 100 000 [1],which has of anything increased from earlier series. Case fatality was recently reported as 14%[2] ,which has probably not changed over several decades .These figures may reflect a rising proportion of elderly patients and increasing non 杝teroidal anti-inflammatory use ,but occur despite apparently better treatments and understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of peptic ulcer disease.

  11. Initial Assessment and Resuscitation in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Tracey G; Travis, Anne C; Saltzman, John R

    2015-07-01

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding remains an important cause of hospital admission with an associated mortality of 2-14%. Initial patient evaluation includes rapid hemodynamic assessment, large-bore intravenous catheter insertion and volume resuscitation. A hemoglobin transfusion threshold of 7 g/dL is recommended, and packed red blood cell transfusion may be necessary to restore intravascular volume and improve tissue perfusion. Patients should be risk stratified into low- and high-risk categories, using validated prognostic scoring systems such as the Glasgow-Blatchford, AIMS65 or Rockall scores. Effective early management of acute, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is critical for improving patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictors of a Variceal Source among Patients Presenting with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alharbi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB require an early, tailored approach best guided by knowledge of the bleeding lesion, especially a variceal versus a nonvariceal source.

  13. Telemetric real-time sensor for the detection of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-04-15

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleedings from ulcers or esophago-gastric varices are life threatening medical conditions which require immediate endoscopic therapy. Despite successful endoscopic hemostasis, there is a significant risk of rebleeding often requiring close surveillance of these patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Any time delay to recognize bleeding may lead to a high blood loss and increases the risk of death. A novel telemetric real-time bleeding sensor can help indicate blood in the stomach: the sensor is swallowed to detect active bleeding or is anchored endoscopically on the gastrointestinal wall close to the potential bleeding source. By telemetric communication with an extra-corporeal receiver, information about the bleeding status is displayed. In this study the novel sensor, which measures characteristic optical properties of blood, has been evaluated in an ex-vivo setting to assess its clinical applicability and usability. Human venous blood of different concentrations, various fluids, and liquid food were tested. The LED-based sensor was able to reliably distinguish between concentrated blood and other liquids, especially red-colored fluids. In addition, the spectrometric quality of the small sensor (size: 6.5mm in diameter, 25.5mm in length) was comparable to a much larger and technically more complex laboratory spectrophotometer. The experimental data confirm the capability of a miniaturized sensor to identify concentrated blood, which could help in the very near future the detection of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and to survey high-risk patients for rebleeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An Unusual Case of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with Coeliac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the journey of a patient with coeliac disease who presented with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy did not reveal a source of bleeding, but an abdominal CT scan detected abnormal lymphadenopathy and a wireless capsule endoscopy diagnosed a jejunal tumour, which was surgically removed. Gastrointestinal bleeding is rare in celiac disease. Malignant tumours of the small intestine are generally uncommon, but celiac disease rep...

  15. Emergency single-balloon enteroscopy in overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: Efficacy and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Fernandes, Carlos; Ribeiro, Iolanda; Fraga, José; Carvalho, João

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of emergency single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) on the diagnosis and treatment for active overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods SBE procedures for OGIB were retrospectively reviewed and sub-divided according to the bleeding types: active-overt and inactive-overt bleeding. The patient’s history, laboratory results, endoscopic findings and therapeutic interventions were registered. Emergency SBE was defined as an endoscopy that was performed for active-overt OGIB, within 24 hours of clinical presentation. Results Between January 2010 and February 2013, 53 SBEs were performed in 43 patients with overt OGIB. Seventeen emergency SBEs were performed in 15 patients with active overt-OGIB procedures (group A), which diagnosed the bleeding source in 14: angiodysplasia (n = 5), ulcers/erosions (n = 3), bleeding tumors (gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), n = 3; neuroendocrine tumor, n = 1), and erosioned polyps (n = 2). Endoscopic treatment was performed in nine patients, with one or multiple hemostatic therapies: argon plasma coagulation (n = 5), epinephrine submucosal injection (n = 5), hemostatic clips (n = 3), and polypectomy (n = 2). Twenty-eight patients with inactive bleeding (group B) were submitted to 36 elective SBEs, which successfully diagnosed 18 cases. The diagnostic yield in group A (93.3%) was significantly higher than in group B (64.3%)—Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.038. Conclusion This study revealed an important role of emergency SBE in the diagnosis of bleeding etiology in active overt OGIB. PMID:25452844

  16. An Unusual Case of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient with Coeliac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gwiggner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the journey of a patient with coeliac disease who presented with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy did not reveal a source of bleeding, but an abdominal CT scan detected abnormal lymphadenopathy and a wireless capsule endoscopy diagnosed a jejunal tumour, which was surgically removed. Gastrointestinal bleeding is rare in celiac disease. Malignant tumours of the small intestine are generally uncommon, but celiac disease represents a significant risk factor. Wireless capsule endoscopy has been a useful tool to investigate patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding.

  17. Accurate triage of lower gastrointestinal bleed (LGIB) - A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Vincent; Hill, Andrew G; MacCormick, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common acute presenting complaint to hospital. Unlike upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the diagnostic and therapeutic approach is not well-standardised. Intensive monitoring and urgent interventions are essential for patients with severe LGIB. The aim of this study is to investigate factors that predict severe LGIB and develop a clinical predictor tool to accurately triage LGIB in the emergency department of a busy metropolitan teaching hospital. We retrospectively identified all adult patients who presented to Middlemore Hospital Emergency Department with LGIB over a one year period. We recorded demographic variables, Charlson Co-morbidities Index, use of anticoagulation, examination findings, vital signs on arrival, laboratory test results, treatment plans and further investigations results. We then identified a subgroup of patients who suffered severe LGIB. A total of 668 patients presented with an initial triage diagnosis of LGIB. 83 of these patients (20%) developed severe LGIB. Binary logistic regression analysis identified four independent risk factors for severe LGIB: use of aspirin, history of collapse, haemoglobin on presentation of less than 100 mg/dl and albumin of less than 38 g/l. We have developed a clinical prediction tool for severe LGIB in our population with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 88% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 44% respectively. We aim to validate the clinical prediction tool in a further cohort to ensure stability of the multivariate model. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The role of capsule endoscopy after negative CT enterography in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyun Mi; Park, Chan Hyuk; Lee, Jin Ha; Kim, Bo Kyung; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Hong, Sung Pil [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Institute of Gastroenterology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Joon Seok [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) after negative computed tomographic (CT) enterography. We retrospectively included 30 patients with OGIB who received capsule endoscopy after negative CT enterography. The median age of the patients was 60 years, and 60% of patients were male. The median follow-up duration was 8 months. Overt bleeding was 60%, and occult bleeding was 40%. Based on capsule endoscopy results, a definitive diagnosis was made for 17 patients (57%): ulcer in nine patients (30%), active bleeding with no identifiable cause in five (17%), angiodysplasia in two (7%) and Dieulafoy's lesion in one (3%). Two patients with jejunal ulcers were diagnosed with Crohn's disease. Seven patients (41%) with positive capsule endoscopy received double balloon enteroscopy and two patients (12%) received steroid treatment for Crohn's disease. Patients with overt bleeding, a previous history of bleeding, or who received large amounts of blood transfusions were more likely to show positive capsule endoscopy. Capsule endoscopy showed high diagnostic yields in patients with OGIB after negative CT enterography and may help to provide further therapeutic plans for patients with OGIB and negative CT enterography. circle CT enterography has been widely used in evaluating obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). circle Capsule endoscopy showed high diagnostic yield for OGIB after negative CT enterography. circle Negative CT enterography does not exclude important causes of small bowel bleeding. circle Most lesions missed at CT-enterography are flat and can be detected by capsule endoscopy. (orig.)

  19. Critical gastrointestinal bleed due to secondary aortoenteric fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad U. Malik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF is a rare yet lethal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and occurs as a complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Clinical presentation may vary from herald bleeding to overt sepsis and requires high index of suspicion and clinical judgment to establish diagnosis. Initial diagnostic tests may include computerized tomography scan and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Each test has variable sensitivity and specificity. Maintaining the hemodynamic status, control of bleeding, removal of the infected graft, and infection control may improve clinical outcomes. This review entails the updated literature on diagnosis and management of SAEF. A literature search was conducted for articles published in English, on PubMed and Scopus using the following search terms: secondary, aortoenteric, aorto-enteric, aortoduodenal, aorto-duodenal, aortoesophageal, and aorto-esophageal. A combination of MeSH terms and Boolean operators were used to device search strategy. In addition, a bibliography of clinically relevant articles was searched to find additional articles (Appendix A. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SAEF.

  20. Critical gastrointestinal bleed due to secondary aortoenteric fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Mohammad U; Ucbilek, Enver; Sherwal, Amanpreet S

    2015-01-01

    Secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF) is a rare yet lethal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and occurs as a complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Clinical presentation may vary from herald bleeding to overt sepsis and requires high index of suspicion and clinical judgment to establish diagnosis. Initial diagnostic tests may include computerized tomography scan and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Each test has variable sensitivity and specificity. Maintaining the hemodynamic status, control of bleeding, removal of the infected graft, and infection control may improve clinical outcomes. This review entails the updated literature on diagnosis and management of SAEF. A literature search was conducted for articles published in English, on PubMed and Scopus using the following search terms: secondary, aortoenteric, aorto-enteric, aortoduodenal, aorto-duodenal, aortoesophageal, and aorto-esophageal. A combination of MeSH terms and Boolean operators were used to device search strategy. In addition, a bibliography of clinically relevant articles was searched to find additional articles (Appendix A). The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SAEF.

  1. Infliximab stopped severe gastrointestinal bleeding in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satimai Aniwan; Surasak Eakpongpaisit; Boonlert Imraporn; Surachai Amornsawadwatana; Rungsun Rerknimitr

    2012-01-01

    To report the result of rapid ulcer healing by infliximab in Crohn's patients with severe enterocolic bleeding.During 2005 and 2010,inflammatory bowel disease database of King Chulalongkorn Memorial and Samitivej hospitals were reviewed.There were seven Crohn's disease (CD) patients (4 women and 3 men; mean age 52 ± 10.4 years; range:11-86 years).Two of the seven patients developed severe gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) as a flare up of CD whereas the other five patients presented with GIB as their first symptom for CD.Their mean hemoglobin level dropped from 12 ± 1.3 g/dL to 8.7 ± 1.3 g/dL in a 3-d period.Median packed red blood cells units needed for resuscitation was 4 units.Because of uncontrolled bleeding,surgical resection was considered.However,due to the poor surgical candidacy of these patients (n =3) and/or possible development of short bowel syndrome (n =6),surgery was not pursued.Likewise angiographic embolization was not considered in any due to the risk of large infarction.All severe GIBs successfully stopped by one or two doses of intravenous infliximab.Our data suggests that infliximab is an alternative therapy for CD with severe GIB when surgery has limitation or patient is a high risk.

  2. Effect of Ramadan fasting on acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mekkaoui Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged fasting may precipitate or exacerbate gastrointestinal complaints. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between Ramadan fasting and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB, and to assess characteristics of those occurred in the holly month. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was conducted for all patients, who underwent endoscopy for AUGIB in Ramadan (R and the month before Ramadan (BR. Epidemiological, clinical and etiological characteristics and outcome of patients having AUGIB were compared between the two periods from 2001 to 2010. Results: Two hundred and ninety-one patients had endoscopy for AUGIB during the two periods study. There was an increasing trend in the overall number of patients in Ramadan period (n = 132, 45.4% versus n = 159, 54.6%, especially with duodenal ulcer (n = 48, 37.2% versus n = 81, 62.8%. The most frequent etiology was peptic ulcer but it was more observed in group R than in group BR (46.2% versus 57.9%, P = 0.04, especially duodenal ulcer (36.4% versus 50.3%, P = 0.01; this finding persisted in multivariable modeling (adjusted odds ratio: 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.69, P = 0.03. In contrast, there was a decreasing trend in rate of variceal bleeding from BR period (26.5% to R period (18.9%; P = 0.11. Regarding the outcome, there were no significant differences between the two periods of the study: Recurrent bleeding (10.6% versus 7.5%, P = 0.36 and mortality rate (5.3% versus 4.4%, P = 0.7. Conclusion: The most frequent etiology of AUGIB was peptic ulcer during Ramadan. However, Ramadan fasting did not influence the outcome of the patients. Prophylactic measures should be taken for people with risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

  3. Single antiplatelet therapy for patients with previous gastrointestinal bleeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellatly, Rochelle M; Ackman, Margaret L

    2008-06-01

    To determine whether aspirin plus a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is preferable, from a gastrointestinal bleed (GIB) risk perspective, to clopidogrel in patients who have experienced a GIB while on aspirin and who require single antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. A literature search was conducted using EMBASE (1980-January 2008), PubMed (1966-January 2008), Google, and a manual search of the reference lists using the search terms gastrointestinal bleed, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, peptic ulcer hemorrhage, ASA, aspirin, Plavix, clopidogrel, and PPI. The search, limited to human and English studies, yielded 110 returns. Randomized trials that compared aspirin with clopidogrel, involved patients who had previously experienced a GIB, and provided detailed information on the type and dose of drugs used were included. Studies were required to provide information on the recurrence of GIB. Two randomized trials were reviewed to assess the safety of secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease with respect to previous GIB. These noninferiority trials compared aspirin plus a PPI with clopidogrel over 12 months following confirmed healing of an aspirin-induced ulcer. In both trials, the majority of the GIB recurrences were in the clopidogrel group (8.6% vs 0.7%; difference 7.9%; 95% CI 3.4 to 12.4; p = 0.001 and 13.6% vs 0%; difference 13.6%; 95% CI 6.3 to 20.9; p = 0.0019) and the difference in recurrence rates exceeded the a priori selected upper boundary. Findings reported in the limited literature available support that clopidogrel is not equivalent to the combination of aspirin plus a PPI in the patient population studied. Aspirin plus a PPI would be considered clinically superior and should be used in medically managed patients who require single antiplatelet therapy but have had a prior GIB while on aspirin. Further research regarding dual antiplatelet therapy and a PPI is required.

  4. A cerebrovascular stroke following endoscopy for an elderly patient with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Gado

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elderly people constitute an increasing proportion of those presenting with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Not only in upper gastrointestinal bleeding is advanced age a risk of death, but also exceeding 60 years of age results in an increased risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events. Factors likely to influence the morbidity and mortality associated with endoscopy in an elderly cohort with acute gastrointestinal bleeding include the acuity and severity of bleeding and the presence of comorbid conditions. Audits have shown a surprisingly high incidence of both morbidity and mortality following upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The following incident is a case report of a cerebrovascular accident following diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for an elderly patient with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  5. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by severe esophagitis: a unique clinical syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntipalli, Prathima; Chason, Rebecca; Elliott, Alan; Rockey, Don C

    2014-12-01

    We have recognized a unique clinical syndrome in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who are found to have severe esophagitis. We aimed to more clearly describe the clinical entity of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with severe esophagitis. We conducted a retrospective matched case-control study designed to investigate clinical features in patients with carefully defined upper gastrointestinal bleeding and severe esophagitis. Patient data were captured prospectively via a Gastrointestinal Bleeding Healthcare Registry, which collects data on all patients admitted with gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with endoscopically documented esophagitis (cases) were matched with randomly selected controls that had upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by other lesions. Epidemiologic features in patients with esophagitis were similar to those with other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, hematemesis was more common in patients with esophagitis 86% (102/119) than in controls 55% (196/357) (p bleeding than those without cirrhosis. We have described a unique clinical syndrome in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who have erosive esophagitis. This syndrome is manifest by typical clinical features and is associated with favorable outcomes.

  6. "Downhill" Esophageal Varices due to Dialysis Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Caval Occlusion: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayudu, Suresh Kumar; Dev, Anil; Kanneganti, Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    "Downhill" varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Rarely these varices are reported in patients receiving hemodialysis as a complication of chronic dialysis vascular access. We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an individual with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed "downhill" varices in the upper third of the esophagus without any active bleeding at the time of the procedure. An angiogram was performed disclosing superior vena caval occlusion, which was treated with balloon angioplasty. Gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion for these rare "downhill" varices when dealing with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving hemodialysis and manage it appropriately using endoscopic, radiological, and surgical interventions.

  7. [Current management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Aisa, Angeles; Nuevo, Javier; López Morante, Anibal Alejandro; González Galilea, Angel; Martin de Argila, Carlos; Aviñoa Arreal, David; Feu, Faust; Borda Celaya, Fernando; Gisbert, Javier P; Pérez Roldan, Francisco; Gonzalvo Sorribes, José Manuel; Palazón Azorín, José María; Ponce Romero, Marta; Castro Fernández, Manuel; Catalina Rodriguez, M Vega; Gallego Montañés, Sonia; Calvet, Xavier; Rodrigo Saez, Luis; Montoro Huguet, Miguel; González Méndez, Yanira; Sierra Hernández, Angel; Sánchez Hernández, Eloy; Dominguez Muñoz, Enrique; Pérez Cuadrado, Enrique; Muñoz, Maria; Lanas, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Mortality related to nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) has not changed. More information is needed to improve the management of this entity. The aims of this study were: a) to determine the characteristics of bleeding episodes, b) to describe the clinical approaches routinely used in NVUGIB, and c) to identify adverse outcomes related to endoscopic or medical treatments in Spain. The European survey of nonvariceal upper GI bleeding (ENERGiB) was an observational, retrospective cohort study on NVUGIB with endoscopic evaluation carried out across Europe. The present study focused on Spanish patients in the ENERGiB study. The patients were managed according to routine care. The mean and standard deviation were calculated for quantitative variables and absolute and relative frequencies were calculated for categorical variables. Patients (n=403) were mostly men (71%), with a mean age of 65 years, and co-morbidities (62.5%). Most of the patients were managed by gastroenterologists (57.1%) or internal medicine teams (25.1%). A proton pump inhibitor was used empirically in 80% before endoscopy. Bleeding persistence occurred in 6.4% and recurrence in 6.7%. The mortality rate at 30 days was 3.5%. This study contributes to the characterization of Spanish patients and NVUGIB episodes in a real clinical setting and identifies the routine management of this entity, which is in line with the standards proposed by recent clinical practice guidelines. A notable finding was that age and the number of comorbidities in NVUGIB patients were increasing. These factors could explain the persistent mortality rate, despite the evident advances in the management of this entity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  8. Short-term use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yen-Po; Chen, Yung-Tai; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Luo, Jiing-Chyuan; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Tang, Chao-Hsiun; Liu, Chia-Jen; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Chang, Full-Young; Lu, Ching-Liang

    2014-01-01

    The association between selective serotonin receptor inhibitors (SSRIs) and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding remains controversial. Previous studies have generally evaluated the issue for approximately 3 months, even though the SSRI-mediated inhibition of platelet serotonin concentrations occurs within 7-14 days. The authors explored the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after short-term SSRI exposure by a case-crossover design. The records of psychiatric inpatients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database (1998-2009). Rates of antidepressant use were compared for case and control periods with time windows of 7, 14, and 28 days. The adjusted self-matched odds ratios from a conditional logistic regression model were used to determine the association between SSRI use and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A total of 5,377 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding were enrolled. The adjusted odds ratio for the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after SSRI exposure was 1.67 (95% CI=1.23-2.26) for the 7-day window, 1.84 (95% CI=1.42-2.40) for the 14-day window, and 1.67 (95% CI=1.34-2.08) for the 28-day window. SSRIs with high and intermediate, but not low, affinity for serotonin transporter were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. An elevated risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after SSRI exposure was seen in male but not female patients. Short-term SSRI use (7-28 days) is significantly associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Gender differences may exist in the relationship between SSRI use and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Physicians should carefully monitor signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding even after short-term exposure to SSRIs, as is done with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin.

  9. PROPOSAL OF A CLINICAL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Matheus Cavalcante; Nakao, Frank Shigueo; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Maluf-Filho, Fauze; Paulo, Gustavo Andrade de; Libera, Ermelindo Della

    2015-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding implies significant clinical and economic repercussions. The correct establishment of the latest therapies for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. The use of clinical pathways for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with shorter hospital stay and lower hospital costs. The primary objective is the development of a clinical care pathway for the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to be used in tertiary hospital. It was conducted an extensive literature review on the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, contained in the primary and secondary information sources. The result is a clinical care pathway for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with evidence of recent bleeding, diagnosed by melena or hematemesis in the last 12 hours, who are admitted in the emergency rooms and intensive care units of tertiary hospitals. In this compact and understandable pathway, it is well demonstrated the management since the admission, with definition of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, passing through the initial clinical treatment, posterior guidance for endoscopic therapy, and referral to rescue therapies in cases of persistent or rebleeding. It was also included the care that must be taken before hospital discharge for all patients who recover from an episode of bleeding. The introduction of a clinical care pathway for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding may contribute to standardization of medical practices, decrease in waiting time for medications and services, length of hospital stay and costs.

  10. PROPOSAL OF A CLINICAL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Cavalcante FRANCO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Upper gastrointestinal bleeding implies significant clinical and economic repercussions. The correct establishment of the latest therapies for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. The use of clinical pathways for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with shorter hospital stay and lower hospital costs. Objective - The primary objective is the development of a clinical care pathway for the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to be used in tertiary hospital. Methods - It was conducted an extensive literature review on the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, contained in the primary and secondary information sources. Results - The result is a clinical care pathway for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with evidence of recent bleeding, diagnosed by melena or hematemesis in the last 12 hours, who are admitted in the emergency rooms and intensive care units of tertiary hospitals. In this compact and understandable pathway, it is well demonstrated the management since the admission, with definition of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, passing through the initial clinical treatment, posterior guidance for endoscopic therapy, and referral to rescue therapies in cases of persistent or rebleeding. It was also included the care that must be taken before hospital discharge for all patients who recover from an episode of bleeding. Conclusion - The introduction of a clinical care pathway for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding may contribute to standardization of medical practices, decrease in waiting time for medications and services, length of hospital stay and costs.

  11. An upper gastrointestinal ulcer still bleeding after endoscopy : what comes next?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craenen, E. M. E.; Hofker, Hendrik; Peters, Frans; Kater, G. M.; Glatman, K. R.; Zijlstra, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Recurrent bleeding from an upper gastrointestinal ulcer when endoscopy fails is a reason for radiological or surgical treatment, both of which have their advantages and disadvantages. Case: Based on a patient with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, we reviewed the available evidence

  12. Management by the intensivist of gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Intensivists are regularly confronted with the question of gastrointestinal bleeding. To date, the latest international recommendations regarding prevention and treatment for gastrointestinal bleeding lack a specific approach to the critically ill patients. We present recommendations for management by the intensivist of gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and children, developed with the GRADE system by an experts group of the French-Language Society of Intensive Care (Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF), with the participation of the French Language Group of Paediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Emergency Medicine (SFMU), the French Society of Gastroenterology (SNFGE), and the French Society of Digestive Endoscopy (SFED). The recommendations cover five fields of application: management of gastrointestinal bleeding before endoscopic diagnosis, treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding unrelated to portal hypertension, treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension, management of presumed lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in intensive care. PMID:23140348

  13. An upper gastrointestinal ulcer still bleeding after endoscopy : what comes next?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craenen, E. M. E.; Hofker, Hendrik; Peters, Frans; Kater, G. M.; Glatman, K. R.; Zijlstra, J. G.

    Introduction: Recurrent bleeding from an upper gastrointestinal ulcer when endoscopy fails is a reason for radiological or surgical treatment, both of which have their advantages and disadvantages. Case: Based on a patient with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, we reviewed the available evidence

  14. Incidental detection of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor on Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Vikas; Singh, Rajinder; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-10-01

    The role of 99m-technetium labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy in acute gastro-intestinal bleed is well-established. The authors report a case of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) incidentally discovered on Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy.

  15. Novel nasogastric tube-related criteria for urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Shimura, Takaya; Yamada, Tomonori; Aoki, Miho; Nomura, Satoshi; Kusakabe, Atsunori; Kanie, Hiroshi; Ban, Tesshin; Hayashi, Katsumi; Joh, Takashi; Orito, Etsuro

    2013-09-01

    Patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require urgent endoscopy, but appropriate criteria for urgent endoscopy in these patients have not yet been established. The goal of this study is to establish a simple system for the selection of UGIB patients who may benefit from urgent endoscopy. Of the 335 patients who required emergency hospitalization for UGIB from May 2010 to March 2012 at Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, 166 patients who underwent placement of a nasogastric tube (NGT) were retrospectively identified. Active bleeding on the endoscopic image was used as an endpoint that reflected the need for urgent endoscopy. The ratio of the heart rate to the systolic blood pressure (HR/SBP ratio) and aspiration of fresh or dark red fluid from the NGT [NGT(+)] were significant predictors of active bleeding in the univariate analysis [HR/SBP ratio, P=0.016; NGT(+), Pbleeding in the multivariate analysis. Moreover, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed a setting with HR/SBP ratio>1.4 or NGT(+) to be optimal criteria to predict active bleeding. These criteria were associated with a sensitivity of 64.9% (24/37) and a specificity of 76.7% (99/129) for the prediction of active bleeding; consequently, they are superior to the sensitivity and specificity of previously proposed criteria. A novel and simple criteria system using NGT(+) and HR/SBP is a good predictor of the need for urgent endoscopy in patients with nonvariceal UGIB.

  16. 兰索拉唑治疗胃镜下活动性非静脉曲张性上消化道出血的疗效观察%The Clinical Curative Effect Observation of Lansoprazole in Therapy of Active Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding after Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何灏澜

    2012-01-01

      Objective To observe the homeostasis effect of Lansoprazole in the therapy of active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding after gastrointestinal endoscopy examination. Methods 70 cases with active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding after gastrointestinal endoscopy examination were randomly divided into two groups. The therapy group was used Lansoprazole, the control group was used Omeprazole.Results In the therapy group, the significant effective cases,effective cases were 31, 5, respectively, and the total effective ratio was 97.30%. And in the control group, the significant effective cases,effective cases were 14, 13, respectively, and the total effective ratio was 81.81%. And there was statistical significance. In both groups, no side effect was found. Conclusion Early use Lansoprazole in the therapy of active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding after gastrointestinal endoscopy examination, the incidence rate of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and mortality can be lower markedly.%  目的观察应用兰索拉唑对胃镜下活动性非静脉曲张性上消化道出血的治疗作用.方法将70例胃镜下活动性非静脉曲张性上消化道出血患者随机分为两组.治疗组应用兰索拉唑;对照组应用奥美拉唑.结果治疗组显效31例,有效5例,总有效率为97.30%;对照组分别为14例,13例及81.81%,两组间差异有统计学意义.两组均无明显不良反应.结论胃镜下活动性非静脉曲张性上消化道出血患者早期应用兰索拉唑,可显著降低消化道出血的发生率,降低病死率,值得临床推广.

  17. Preventive transarterial embolization in upper nonvariceal gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminskis, Aleksejs; Kratovska, Aina; Ponomarjova, Sanita; Tolstova, Anna; Mukans, Maksims; Stabiņa, Solvita; Gailums, Raivis; Bernšteins, Andrejs; Ivanova, Patricija; Boka, Viesturs; Pupelis, Guntars

    2017-01-01

    Transarterial embolization (TAE) is a therapeutic option for patients with a high risk of recurrent bleeding after endoscopic haemostasis. The aim of our prospective study was a preliminary assessment of the safety, efficacy, and clinical outcomes following preventive TAE in patients with non-variceal acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) with a high risk of recurrent bleeding after endoscopic haemostasis. Preventive visceral angiography and TAE were performed after endoscopic haemostasis on patients with NVUGIB who were at a high risk of recurrent bleeding (PE+ group). The comparison group consisted of similar patients who only underwent endoscopic haemostasis, without preventive TAE (PE- group). The technical success of preventive TAE, the completeness of haemostasis, the incidence of rebleeding and the need for surgical intervention and the main outcomes were compared between the groups. The PE+ group consisted of 25 patients, and the PE- group of 50 patients, similar in age (median age 66 vs. 63 years), gender and comorbid conditions. The ulcer size at endoscopy was not significantly different (median of 152 mm vs. 127 mm). The most frequent were Forest II type ulcers, 44% in both groups. The distribution of the Forest grade was even. The median haemoglobin on admission was 8, 2 g/dl vs. 8,7 g/dl, p = 0,482, erythrocyte count was 2,7 × 10(12)/L vs. 2,9 × 10(12)/L, p = 0,727. The shock index and Rockall scores were similar, as well as and transfusion - on average, four units of packed red blood cells for the majority of patients in both groups, however, significantly more fresh frozen plasma was transfused in the PE- group, p = 0,013. The rebleeding rate was similar, while surgical treatment was needed notably more often in the PE- group, 8% vs. 35% accordingly, p = 0,012. The median ICU stay was 3 days, hospital stay - 6 days vs. 9 days, p = 0.079. The overall mortality reached 20%; in the PE+ group it was 4%, not

  18. Treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasumasa; Sato, Yoshinori; Ozawa, Sun-ichiro; Ishigooka, Shinya; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the standard of care for the secondary prevention of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic stroke, especially after coronary intervention. However, this therapy is associated with bleeding complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding, which is one of the most common life-threatening complications. Early endoscopy is recommended for most patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After successful endoscopic hemostasis, immediate resumption of antiplatelet therapy with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) is recommended to prevent further ischemic events. PPI prophylaxis during antiplatelet therapy reduces the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The potential negative metabolic interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel is still unclear. PMID:25685721

  19. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding in Ilorin, Nigeria--a report of 30 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olokoba, A B; Olokoba, L B; Jimoh, A A G

    2009-09-01

    Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding refers to blood loss within the intraluminal gastrointestinal tract from any location between the upper oesophagus to the duodenum at the ligament of Treitz. The onset and severity of blood loss varies widely. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially life-threatening abdominal emergency that remains a common cause of hospitalization. There is no local data on the clinical presentation, endoscopic findings and the risk factors for upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding in Ilorin. This study was therefore to review the cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleed in Ilorin. To review the cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding seen in Ilorin. A retrospective review of the cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding who had upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy as part of their workup was undertaken to cover a eighteen month period from June 2006 to November 2007. Their clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, and the risk factors which predisposed them to bleeding were evaluated. The endoscopy register and the request forms were reviewed. A total of thirty patients had upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding for which upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy was performed during the period under review. Twenty-three of the patients were males (76.7%) while seven were females (23.3%). Sixteen patients (53.3%) presented with malaena only; eleven patients (36.7%) with malaena and haematemesis only; while three patients (10.0%) presented with malaena, haematemesis and haematochexia. However all the patients presented with malaena, haematemesis or haematochexia. The commonest clinical presentation of patients with upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding passage of malaena (53.3%). The commonest endoscopic finding was multiple sources of bleeding (66.7%) while the commonest risk factor for upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding was NSAID use (36.7%). The passage of malaena, multiple source of bleeding, and NSAID use are

  20. Distribution of bleeding gastrointestinal angioectasias in a Western population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth Bollinger; Daniel Raines; Patrick Saitta

    2012-01-01

    AIM:TO define which segments of the gastrointestinal tract are most likely to yield angioectasias for ablative therapy.METHODS:A retrospective chart review was performed for patients treated in the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Gastroenterology clinics between the dates of July 1,2007 and October 1,2010.The selection of cases for review was initiated by use of our electronic medical record to identify all patients with a diagnosis of angioectasia,angiodysplasia,or arteriovenous malformation.Of these cases,chart reviews identified patients who had a complete evaluation of their gastrointestinal tract as defined by at least one upper endoscopy,colonoscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy within the past three years.Patients without evidence of overt gastrointestinal bleeding or iron deficiency anemia associated with intestinal angioectasias were classified as asymptomatic and excluded from this analysis.Thirty-five patients with confirmed,bleeding intestinal angioectasias who had undergone complete endoscopic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract were included in the final analysis.RESULTS:A total of 127 cases were reviewed.Sixtysix were excluded during subsequent screening due to lack of complete small bowel evaluation and/or lack of documentation of overt bleeding or iron deficiency anemia.The 61 remaining cases were carefully examined with independent review of endoscopic images as well as complete capsule endoscopy videos.This analysis excluded 26 additional cases due to insufficient records/images for review,incomplete capsule examination,poor capsule visualization or lack of confirmation of typical angioectasias by the principal investigator on independent review.Thirty-five cases met criteria for final analysis.All study patients were age 50 years or older and 13 patients (37.1%) had chronic kidney disease stage 3 or higher.Twenty of 35 patients were taking aspirin (81 mg or 325 mg),clopidogrel,and/or warfarin,with 8/20 on combination

  1. The Application of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeding during Emergency Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Hagel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastrointestinal bleeding represents the main indication for emergency endoscopy (EE. Lately, several hemostatic powders have been released to facilitate EE. Methods. We evaluated all EE in which Hemospray was used as primary or salvage therapy, with regard to short- and long-term hemostasis and complications. Results. We conducted 677 EE in 474 patients (488 examinations in 344 patients were upper GI endoscopies. Hemospray was applied during 35 examinations in 27 patients (19 males, 33 during upper and 2 during lower endoscopy. It was used after previous treatment in 21 examinations (60% and in 14 (40% as salvage therapy. Short-term success was reached in 34 of 35 applications (97.1%, while long-term success occurred in 23 applications (65.7%. Similar long-term results were found after primary application (64,3% or salvage therapy (66,7%. Rebleeding was found in malignant and extended ulcers. One major adverse event (2.8% occurred with gastric perforation after Hemospray application. Discussion. Hemospray achieved short-term hemostasis in virtually all cases. The long-term effect is mainly determined by the type of bleeding source, but not whether it was applied as first line or salvage therapy. But, even in the failures, patients had benefit from hemodynamic stabilization and consecutive interventions in optimized conditions.

  2. Gastric Glomus Tumor: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Handa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old woman was referred to our department because of melena. These symptoms combined with severe anemia prompted us to perform an emergency upper endoscopy, which showed bleeding from an ulcerated 30 mm submucosal tumor in the gastric antrum. A computed tomography scan revealed a homogeneously enhanced mass, and endoscopic ultrasonography identified a well-demarcated mass in the third and fourth layers of the gastric wall. Because analysis of the possible medical causes remained inconclusive and the risk of rebleeding, laparoscopy-assisted gastric wedge resection was performed after administration of 10 units of red cell concentrate. Histological and immunohistological analysis revealed the tumor to be a gastric glomus tumor. Gastric submucosal tumors remain challenging to diagnose preoperatively as they show a variety of radiologic and clinicopathologic features and are associated with the risk of bleeding upon biopsy, as is indicated in the guidelines for gastric submucosal tumors. Gastric glomus tumors characteristically present with exsanguinating gastrointestinal hemorrhaging that often requires blood transfusion. Additionally, gastric submucosal tumors typically occur in elderly patients; however, this case involved a young patient who was 24 years old. Here, we describe this case in order to identify features that may aid in early differentiation of gastric submucosal tumors.

  3. Hemosuccus pancreaticus: a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Song, Zeng-Fu; Sun, Bei

    2012-10-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus (HP) is defined as upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage from the papilla of Vater via the pancreatic duct and is a rare cause of digestive bleeding. A PubMed search of relevant articles published from January 1967 to September 2011 was performed to identify current information about HP in terms of its etiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management. A variety of etiological factors, most commonly chronic pancreatitis but also tumors and vascular diseases, can lead to this condition. Appropriate endoscopic or radiologic procedures should be chosen to establish a precise diagnosis for patients, especially those with a known history of pancreatic disorders, who present with abdominal pain, GI hemorrhage and hyperamylasemia. There are two main therapeutic options for this condition: angiographic embolotherapy and surgery. Both treatments can stop bleeding, but angiographic embolotherapy is the treatment of choice for stable patients. Recently, new and less invasive treatments have emerged to treat this condition. Because of its rarity and broad spectrum of causes, HP is difficult to diagnose accurately. However, appropriate endoscopic and radiologic procedures are extremely helpful for establishing a correct diagnosis. Both angiographic embolotherapy and surgery are reliable treatment options for this condition, and transcatheter intervention is the treatment of choice for clinically stable patients. Additional innovative treatments have emerged, but their effectiveness and safety must be confirmed.

  4. The Application of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeding during Emergency Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Heinz; Nägel, Andreas; Vitali, Francesco; Vetter, Marcel; Dauth, Christine; Neurath, Markus F.; Raithel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal bleeding represents the main indication for emergency endoscopy (EE). Lately, several hemostatic powders have been released to facilitate EE. Methods. We evaluated all EE in which Hemospray was used as primary or salvage therapy, with regard to short- and long-term hemostasis and complications. Results. We conducted 677 EE in 474 patients (488 examinations in 344 patients were upper GI endoscopies). Hemospray was applied during 35 examinations in 27 patients (19 males), 33 during upper and 2 during lower endoscopy. It was used after previous treatment in 21 examinations (60%) and in 14 (40%) as salvage therapy. Short-term success was reached in 34 of 35 applications (97.1%), while long-term success occurred in 23 applications (65.7%). Similar long-term results were found after primary application (64,3%) or salvage therapy (66,7%). Rebleeding was found in malignant and extended ulcers. One major adverse event (2.8%) occurred with gastric perforation after Hemospray application. Discussion. Hemospray achieved short-term hemostasis in virtually all cases. The long-term effect is mainly determined by the type of bleeding source, but not whether it was applied as first line or salvage therapy. But, even in the failures, patients had benefit from hemodynamic stabilization and consecutive interventions in optimized conditions. PMID:28232848

  5. [Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding - endoscopy sheds light in the darkness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, A

    2014-08-01

    Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as a bleeding of the small bowel and is the most common indication for small bowel endoscopy. Intraoperative enteroscopy has been regarded as gold standard for a long time. With the introduction of different endoscopy techniques, they play now the central role, whereas intraoperative enteroscopy has become a reserve method for selected patients. Actually, there are, beside capsule endoscopy, five non-surgical, flexible enteroscopy techniques available. In Germany and Europe balloon-assisted enteroscopy (double balloon and single balloon enteroscopy) is mainly used. Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is the "oldest" flexible enteroscopy technique and has become established throughout the world for diagnostic and therapeutic examinations of the small bowel. The majority of the studies have been performed with DBE and it provides the highest rate of complete enteroscopy. Nevertheless, technical improvements to make enteroscopy easier and faster are still required. In patients with chronic MGI or problematic situations capsule endoscopy is an ideal screening option. In case of acute MGI the flexible enteroscopy techniques should be preferred because of the high diagnostic yield combined with the possibility of endoscopic therapeutic interventions. In difficult cases with unsuccessful enteroscopy, CT angiography and conventional angiography with the option of embolisation had proved their value.

  6. New advances in lower gastrointestinal bleeding management with embolotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Urbano, Josè; De Marchi, Giuseppe; Micieli, Camilla; Duka, Ejona; Iacobellis, Francesca; Fontana, Federico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Embolization is currently proposed as the first step in the treatment of acute, life-threatening LGIB, when endoscopic approach is not possible or is unsuccessful. Like most procedures performed in emergency setting, time represents a significant factor influencing outcome. Modern tools permit identifying and reaching the bleeding site faster than two-dimensional angiography. Non-selective cone-beam CT arteriography can identify a damaged vessel. Moreover, sophisticated software able to detect the vessel may facilitate direct placement of a microcatheter into the culprit vessel without the need for sequential angiography. A further important aspect is the use of an appropriate technique of embolization and a safe and effective embolic agent. Current evidence shows the use of detachable coils (with or without a triaxial system) and liquid embolics has proven advantages compared with other embolic agents. The present article analyses these modern tools, making embolization of acute LGIB safer and more effective.

  7. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from duodenal vascular ectasia in a patient with cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We report a cirrhotic patient with duodenal vascular ectasia and spontaneous bleeding. The bleeding was successfully controlled with argon plasma coagulation.Duodenal vascular ectasia may be a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis, and argon plasma coagulation may be effective and safe to achieve hemostasis of this lesion.

  8. Pros and cons of colonoscopy in management of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dekey Y Lhewa; Lisa L Strate

    2012-01-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a frequent gastrointestinal cause of hospitalization,particularly in the elderly,and its incidence appears to be on the rise.Endoscopic and radiographic measures are available for the evaluation and treatment of LGIB including flexible sigmoidoscopy,colonoscopy,angiography,radionuclide scintigraphy and multi-detector row computed tomography.Although no modality has emerged as the gold standard in the management of LGIB,colonoscopy is the current preferred initial test for the majority of the patients presenting with hematochezia felt to be from a colon source.Colonoscopy has the ability to diagnose all sources of bleeding from the colon and,unlike the radiologic modalities,does not require active bleeding at the time of the examination.In addition,therapeutic interventions such as cautery and endoclips can be applied to achieve hemostasis and prevent recurrent bleeding.Studies suggest that colonoscopy,particularly when performed early in the hospitalization,can decrease hospital length of stay,rebleeding and the need for surgery.However,results from available small trials are conflicting and larger,multicenter studies are needed.Compared to other management options,colonoscopy is a safe procedure with complications reported in less than 2% of patients,including those undergoing urgent examinations.The requirement of bowel preparation (typically 4 or more liters of polyethylene glycol),the logistical complexity of coordinating after-hours colonoscopy,and the low prevalence of stigmata of hemorrhage complicate the use of colonoscopy for LGIB,particularly in urgent situations.This review discusses the above advantages and disadvantages of colonoscopy in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in further detail.

  9. Acute Middle Gastrointestinal Bleeding Risk Associated with NSAIDs, Antithrombotic Drugs, and PPIs: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Niikura, Ryota; Yamada, Atsuo; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Shimbo, Takuro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Okamoto, Makoto; Mitsuno, Yuzo; Ogura, Keiji; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Akiyama, Junichi; Uemura, Naomi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Middle gastrointestinal bleeding (MGIB) risk has not been fully investigated due to its extremely rare occurrence and the need for multiple endoscopies to exclude upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding...

  10. Left ventricular assist devices and gastrointestinal bleeding: a narrative review of case reports and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Sameer; Cevik, Cihan; Madonna, Rosalinda; Frandah, Wesam; Islam, Ebtesam; Islam, Sherazad; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-04-01

    The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has become a state-of-the-art therapy for advanced cardiac heart failure; however, multiple reports in the literature describe an increased risk for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients. We characterized this association by reviewing recent studies on this topic. GI bleeding occurs frequently in patients with LVADs, especially with devices with nonpulsatile flow patterns. We performed a comprehensive literature review to identify articles that reported GI bleeding in patients with LVADs. Databases used included PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and Ovid. Baseline and outcome data were then ed from these reports. We identified 10 case reports and 22 case series with 1543 patients. The mean age was 54.2 years. Most patients had nonpulsatile LVADs (1316, 85.3%). Three hundred and seventeen patients (20.5%) developed GI bleeding; this occurred more frequently in patients with nonpulsatile LVADs. Multiple procedures were performed without complications but often did not identify a definite bleeding site. Suspect lesions occurred throughout the GI tract but were more frequent in the upper GI tract. Many patients had arteriovenous malformations. All patients received medical therapy. None of the patients had their LVAD replaced. The use of anticoagulation did not appear to predispose these patients to more GI bleeding episodes. Patients with LVADs have frequent GI bleeds, especially from arteriovenous malformations, which can occur throughout the GI tract. Most diagnostic and therapeutic interventions can be used safely in these patients. The pathogenesis of the GI bleeding in these patients may involve the use of anticoagulant medications, the formation of arteriovenous malformations, loss of von Willebrand factor activity, and mucosal ischemia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  12. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding-review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miros?aw; Szura; Artur; Pasternak

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a conditionthat requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate(exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the firstline treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy(within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature.

  13. Predicting risk of upper gastrointestinal bleed and intracranial bleed with anticoagulants: cohort study to derive and validate the QBleed scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippisley-Cox, Julia; Coupland, Carol

    2014-07-28

    To develop and validate risk algorithms (QBleed) for estimating the absolute risk of upper gastrointestinal and intracranial bleed for patients with and without anticoagulation aged 21-99 years in primary care. Open cohort study using routinely collected data from general practice linked to hospital episode statistics data and mortality data during the five year study period between 1 January 2008 and 1 October 2013. 565 general practices in England contributing to the national QResearch database to develop the algorithm and 188 different QResearch practices to validate the algorithm. All 753 general practices had data linked to hospital episode statistics and mortality data at individual patient level. Gastrointestinal bleed and intracranial bleed recorded on either the linked mortality data or the linked hospital records. We studied 4.4 million patients in the derivation cohort with 16.4 million person years of follow-up. During follow-up, 21,641 patients had an incident upper gastrointestinal bleed and 9040 had an intracranial bleed. For the validation cohort, we identified 1.4 million patients contributing over 4.9 million person years of follow-up. During follow-up, 6600 patients had an incident gastrointestinal bleed and 2820 had an intracranial bleed. We excluded patients without a valid Townsend score for deprivation and those prescribed anticoagulants in the 180 days before study entry. Candidate variables recorded on the general practice computer system before entry to the cohort, including personal variables (age, sex, Townsend deprivation score, ethnicity), lifestyle variables (smoking, alcohol intake), chronic diseases, prescribed drugs, clinical values (body mass index, systolic blood pressure), and laboratory test results (haemoglobin, platelets). We also included previous bleed recorded before entry to the study. The final QBleed algorithms incorporated 21 variables. When applied to the validation cohort, the algorithms in women explained 40% of the

  14. [Risk for the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children in an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Glenda Karina; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Angel; González-Ortiz, Beatriz; Troconis-Trens, Germán; Tapia-Monge, Dora María; Flores-Calderón, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Although gastrointestinal tract bleeding can occur at any age, most studies trying to establish causes or risk factors for its development have been conducted in adults. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors in children admitted in a pediatric intensive care unit. A retrospective case-control study was conducted. Children who developed upper gastrointestinal bleeding children during their stay at the intensive care unit were considered the cases. Variables were obtained from medical records including age, sex, nutritional status, mechanical ventilation, use of nasogastric tube, development of complications, presence of coagulopathy, use of prophylaxis for upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, fasting and use of steroids. Using a multivariate analysis, risk factors were identified, with odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) calculations. Out of 165 patients, 58 had upper gastrointestinal bleeding (35 %). Risk factors identified were prolonged clotting times (OR = 3.35), thrombocytopenia (OR = 2.39), development of sepsis (OR = 6.74) or pneumonia (OR = 4.37). Prophylaxis for upper gastrointestinal bleeding was not a protective factor. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding frequency in children hospitalized in an intensive care unit was high. Identifying risk factors should help to reduce upper gastrointestinal bleeding frequency.

  15. Comorbidities Affect Risk of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Colin John; West, Joe; Card, Timothy Richard

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) has not been reduced despite the decreasing incidence of peptic ulcers, strategies to eradicate Helicobacter pylori infection, and prophylaxis against ulceration from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Other factors might therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of GIB. Patients with GIB have increasing nongastrointestinal comorbidity, so we investigated whether comorbidity itself increased the risk of GIB. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study using linked primary and secondary care data collected in England from April 1, 1997 through August 31, 2010. Patients older than 15 years with nonvariceal GIB (n = 16,355) were matched to 5 controls by age, sex, year, and practice (n = 81,636). All available risk factors for GIB were extracted and modeled using conditional logistic regression. Adjusted associations with nongastrointestinal comorbidity, defined using the Charlson Index, were then tested and sequential population attributable fractions calculated. Results Comorbidity had a strong graded association with GIB; the adjusted odds ratio for a single comorbidity was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35–1.52) and for multiple or severe comorbidity was 2.26 (95% CI: 2.14%–2.38%). The additional population attributable fraction for comorbidity (19.8%; 95% CI: 18.4%–21.2%) was considerably larger than that for any other measured risk factor, including aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use (3.0% and 3.1%, respectively). Conclusions Nongastrointestinal comorbidity is an independent risk factor for GIB, and contributes to a greater proportion of patients with bleeding in the population than other recognized risk factors. These findings could help in the assessment of potential causes of GIB, and also explain why the incidence of GIB remains high in an aging population. PMID:23470619

  16. Spectrum of upper gastrointestinal bleed: An experience from Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Nadeem Parvez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The etiology of upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB is variable in different geographical regions. Epidemiological data are helpful in knowing the burden of the problem. This study was conducted to know the etiological spectrum, mortality, morbidity, and predictors of outcome in patients with acute UGIB. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of patients admitted to our hospital between January 2013 and May 2015, with UGIB and noted the clinical presentation, etiology of bleed, and outcome. Results: A total of 337 patients [272 (80.7% male, 65 (19.3% female (male:female ratio: 4:1] of UGIB were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.11 ± 14.8 years (Range - 14-85 years. The most common etiology of UGIB was peptic ulcer (40.05% followed by varices (33%. Majority of patients were managed medically. Endotherapy was required only in 33% patients. The mean duration of hospital stay was 6.6 ± 5.79 days. Rebleed was seen in 11 (3.2 patients and surgery was required in 6 (1.7%. In hospital, mortality was 2.6%. Age ≥65 years (odds ratio [OR]: 9.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.108-29.266, serum albumin 2 mg/dl (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 1.068-8.591 were associated with increased mortality. Conclusions: Peptic ulcer disease is still the most common cause of UGIB. Majority of patients can be managed medically. Rebleed rate, need for surgery, and mortality due to UGIB are declining. Elderly age (>65, hypoalbuminemia serum albumin2 are important factors associated with increased mortality.

  17. Comorbidities affect risk of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Colin John; West, Joe; Card, Timothy Richard

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) has not been reduced despite the decreasing incidence of peptic ulcers, strategies to eradicate Helicobacter pylori infection, and prophylaxis against ulceration from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Other factors might therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of GIB. Patients with GIB have increasing nongastrointestinal comorbidity, so we investigated whether comorbidity itself increased the risk of GIB. We conducted a matched case-control study using linked primary and secondary care data collected in England from April 1, 1997 through August 31, 2010. Patients older than 15 years with nonvariceal GIB (n = 16,355) were matched to 5 controls by age, sex, year, and practice (n = 81,636). All available risk factors for GIB were extracted and modeled using conditional logistic regression. Adjusted associations with nongastrointestinal comorbidity, defined using the Charlson Index, were then tested and sequential population attributable fractions calculated. Comorbidity had a strong graded association with GIB; the adjusted odds ratio for a single comorbidity was 1.43 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35-1.52) and for multiple or severe comorbidity was 2.26 (95% CI: 2.14%-2.38%). The additional population attributable fraction for comorbidity (19.8%; 95% CI: 18.4%-21.2%) was considerably larger than that for any other measured risk factor, including aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use (3.0% and 3.1%, respectively). Nongastrointestinal comorbidity is an independent risk factor for GIB, and contributes to a greater proportion of patients with bleeding in the population than other recognized risk factors. These findings could help in the assessment of potential causes of GIB, and also explain why the incidence of GIB remains high in an aging population. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  19. Effect of Gastric Acid Suppressant Prophylaxis on Incidence of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahoora Abdollahi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Critically ill children admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU are at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding due to stress related mucosal injury. Reducing gastric acid by acid suppressant medication is the accepted prophylaxis treatment, but there is not any definitive guideline for using prophylaxis in PICU patients. The present study aimed to assess the effect of Proton Pump Inhibitor (PPI and H2 Blocker (H2B prophylaxis on gastrointestinal bleeding in admitted patients of PICU, Mashhad- Iran.Materials and Methods: In this study, 100 patients admitted in PICU divided into two equal groups on the first day of admission. They received ranitidine or pantoprazole as prophylaxis of stress ulcer. Those patients who had history of gastrointestinal bleeding or coagulation disorder were excluded. 100 PICU patients who had not received prophylaxis during last 6 months retrospectively evaluated as control of the study. Data were collected as demographic characteristics, admission reason, definitive diagnosis, receiving corticosteroid and mechanical ventilation in each patient. Gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, coffee ground aspirate, and melena and clinically significant gastrointestinal bleeding were daily monitored. Data analyzed through descriptive statistical tests, Chi-square, logistic regression, t-test and using SPSS-16 software.Results: Among 204 patients (control group=105 and case group=99, incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding (GB was 13.2% in which 6.9% of cases presented with clinically significant gastrointestinal bleeding (CSGB. Loss of consciousness and respiratory distress were the main reason of admission. There was no significant differences between the incidence of (GB and (CSGB in experimental and control groups (P>0.05 as well as ranitidine and pantoprazole prophylaxis (P>0.05. Significant risk factors of (GB were mechanical ventilation and loss of consciousness and corticosteroid therapy

  20. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckle, T.; Stuber, G.; Hoffmann, M.H.K.; Jeltsch, M.; Schmitz, B.L.; Aschoff, A.J. [University Hospital of Ulm, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT. (orig.)

  1. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeckle, T; Stuber, G; Hoffmann, M H K; Jeltsch, M; Schmitz, B L; Aschoff, A J

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT.

  2. Severe Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Patient With Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis Treated With Thalidomide and Octreotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S; Poulsen, Steen H; Agnholt, Jørgen S

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) due to angiodysplasias can cause severe, recurrent bleeding, especially in elderly patients. Angiodysplastic bleedings in the gastrointestinal tract have been associated with aortic stenosis and, more recently, hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, caused...... to resolve bleeding, especially in patients with large numbers of angiodysplasias. In patients with aortic stenosis and GB, the main treatment is aortic valve replacement but the patients may be unfit to undergo surgery due to the complicating anemia. In this case story, we present a patient with severe, GB...

  3. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding following aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde's sindrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, G D; Salvatori, F; Masone, S; Simeoli, I; Rega, M; Celiento, M; Persico, G

    2007-09-01

    A 58-year old man was admitted to the hospital because of melena. He had a 1-year history of mechanical aortic valve replacement and coronary stent placement because of myocardial infarction and he was taking warfarin and clopidogrel. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were negative for bleeding. Capsule endoscopy showed bleeding diffuse angiodysplasia of the small bowel. The patient was treated with octreotide 20 mg, at monthly interval. After 25 months there had been no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. The case suggests that mechanical valve replacement may not prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in Heyde syndrome and that octreotide treatment should be considered in these cases.

  4. ArterioVenous Malformation within Jejunal Diverticulum: An Unusual Cause of Massive Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive gastrointestinal (GI bleeding can occur with multiple jejunal diverticulosis. However, significant bleeding in the setting of few diverticulae is very unusual and rare. We report a case of massive gastrointestinal bleeding from an arteriovenous malformation (AVM within a jejunal diverticulum to underscore the significance of such coexisting pathologies. Mesenteric angiogram was chosen to help identify the source of bleeding and to offer an intervention. Despite endovascular coiling, emergent intestinal resection of the bleeding jejunal segment was warranted to ensure definitive treatment. However several reports have shown jejunal diverticulosis as a rare cause of massive GI bleeding. The coexistence of jejunal diverticulum and AVM is rare and massive bleeding from an acquired Dieulafoy-like AVM within a diverticulum has never previously been described. Awareness of Dieulafoy-like AVM within jejunoileal diverticulosis is useful in preventing delay in treatment.

  5. Gastrointestinal bleeding after intracerebral hemorrhage: a retrospective review of 808 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tie-Cheng; Li, Jian-Guo; Shi, Hong-Mei; Yu, Dong-Ming; Shan, Kai; Li, Li-Xia; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Ren, Tian-Hua

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the incidence and risk factors for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The available medical records of patients with ICH admitted from June 2008 to December 2009 for any episode of GI bleeding, possible precipitating factors and administration of ulcer prophylaxis were reviewed. The prevalence of GI bleeding was 26.7%, including 3 cases of severe GI bleeding (0.35%). Patients with GI bleeding had significantly longer hospital stay and higher in-hospital mortality compared with patients without GI bleeding. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that age, Glasgow Coma Scale scores, sepsis and ICH volume were independent predictors of GI bleeding. About 63.4% of patients with ICH received stress ulcer prophylaxis. GI bleeding occurred frequently after ICH, but severe events were rare. Age, Glasgow Coma Scale score, sepsis and ICH volume were independent predictors of GI bleeding occurring after ICH.

  6. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wildi, Stefan [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Visceral and Transplant Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauerfeind, Peter [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Gastroenterology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  7. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding: detection of source and etiology with multi-detector-row CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Hans; Pfammatter, Thomas; Wildi, Stefan; Bauerfeind, Peter; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2007-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the ability of multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) to identify the source and etiology of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Eighteen patients with acute upper (n = 10) and lower (n = 8) gastrointestinal bleeding underwent 4-detector-row CT (n = 6), 16-detector-row CT (n = 11), and 64-slice CT (n = 1) with an arterial and portal venous phase of contrast enhancement. Unenhanced scans were performed in nine patients. CT scans were reviewed to determine conspicuity of bleeding source, underlying etiology, and for potential causes of false-negative prospective interpretations. Bleeding sources were prospectively identified with CT in 15 (83%) patients, and three (17%) bleeding sources were visualized in retrospect, allowing the characterization of all sources of bleeding with CT. Contrast extravasation was demonstrated with CT in all 11 patients with severe bleeding, but only in 1 of 7 patients with mild bleeding. The etiology could not be identified on unenhanced CT scans in any patient, whereas arterial-phase and portal venous-phase CT depicted etiology in 15 (83%) patients. Underlying etiology was correctly identified in all eight patients with mild GI bleeding. Multi-detector-row CT enables the identification of bleeding source and precise etiology in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  8. Hemobilia: An Uncommon But Notable Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathcart, Scott; Birk, John W; Tadros, Michael; Schuster, Micheal

    2017-06-21

    A literature review to improve practitioners' knowledge and performance concerning the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of hemobilia. A search of Pubmed, Google Scholar, and Medline was conducted using the keyword hemobilia and relevant articles were reviewed and analyzed. The findings pertaining to hemobilia etiology, investigation, and management techniques were considered and organized by clinicians practiced in hemobilia. The majority of current hemobilia cases have an iatrogenic cause from either bile duct or liver manipulation. Blunt trauma is also a significant cause of hemobilia. The classic triad presentation of right upper quadrant pain, jaundice, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding is rarely seen. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are the preferred diagnostic modalities, and the preferred therapeutic management includes interventional radiology and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Surgery is rarely a therapeutic option. With advances in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging technology, diagnosis with these less invasive investigations are the favored option. However, traditional catheter angiography is still the gold standard. The management of significant hemobilia is still centered on arterial embolization, but arterial and biliary stents have become accepted alternative therapies.

  9. Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and hepatic infarction after liver biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Ting, Peng-Sheng; Green, Richard M

    2014-02-21

    Hepatic artery pseudoaneurysms (HAP) are rare events, particularly after liver biopsy, but can be associated with serious complications. Therefore a high suspicion is necessary for timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. We report on a case of HAP that potentially formed after a liver biopsy in a patient with sarcoidosis. The HAP in our case was virtually undetectable initially by angiography but resulted in several complications including recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic cholecystitis and finally hepatic infarction with abscess formation until it became detectable at a size of 5-mm. The patient remains asymptomatic over a year after endovascular embolization of the HAP. In this report, we demonstrate that a small HAP can avoid detection by angiography at an early stage while being symptomatic for a prolonged course. A high clinical suspicion with a close clinical/radiological follow-up is needed in symptomatic patients with history of liver biopsy despite initial negative work up. Once diagnosed, HAP can be safely and effectively treated by endovascular embolization.

  10. Pancreatic Perivascular Epithelioid Cell Tumour Presenting with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Petrides

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PEComa is a family of rare mesenchymal tumours which can occur in any part of the human body. Primary PEComas of the pancreas are extremely rare tumours with uncertain malignant potential. A 17-year-old female was admitted to the hospital due to melena. She required several transfusions. CT scan demonstrated a mass at the head of the pancreas measuring 4.2 cm in maximum diameter. An endoscopic ultrasound showed an ulcerating malignant looking mass infiltrating 50% of the wall of the second part of the duodenum in the region of the ampulla. Multiple biopsies taken showed extensive ulceration with granulation tissue formation and underlying large macrophages without being able to establish a definite diagnosis. We proceeded with pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The postoperative course of the patient was unremarkable, and she was discharged on the 8th postoperative day. Histology examination of the specimen showed a PEComa of pancreas. Eighteen months after resection the patient is disease free. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time we describe a case of a pancreatic PEComa presenting with massive gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk scores: Who, when andwhy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a significant cause of hospital admission. In order tostratify patients according to the risk of the complications,such as rebleeding or death, and to predict theneed of clinical intervention, several risk scores havebeen proposed and their use consistently recommendedby international guidelines. The use of risk scoringsystems in early assessment of patients suffering fromUGIB may be useful to distinguish high-risks patients,who may need clinical intervention and hospitalization,from low risk patients with a lower chance of developingcomplications, in which management as outpatientscan be considered. Although several scores havebeen published and validated for predicting differentoutcomes, the most frequently cited ones are the Rockallscore and the Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS). WhileRockall score, which incorporates clinical and endoscopicvariables, has been validated to predict mortality,the GBS, which is based on clinical and laboratorialparameters, has been studied to predict the need ofclinical intervention. Despite the advantages previouslyreported, their use in clinical decisions is still limited. Thisreview describes the different risk scores used in theUGIB setting, highlights the most important research,explains why and when their use may be helpful, reflectson the problems that remain unresolved and guidesfuture research with practical impact.

  12. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in operated stomach: Outcome of 105 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vassiliki N Nikolopoulou; Konstantinos C Thomopoulos; George I Theocharis; Vassiliki A Arvaniti; Constantine E Vagianos

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the causes and clinical outcome of patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGB) and a history of gastric surgery to those with AUGB but without a history of gastric surgery in the past.METHODS: The causes and clinical outcome were compared between 105 patients with AUGB and a history of gastric surgery, and 608 patients with AUGB but without a history of gastric surgery.RESULTS: Patients who underwent gastric surgery in the past were older (mean age: 68.1±11.7 years vs 62.8±17.8 years, P= 0.001), and the most common cause of bleeding was marginal ulcer in 63 patients (60%). No identifiable source of bleeding could be found in 22 patients (20.9%) compared to 42/608 (6.9%) in patients without a history of gastric surgery (P = 0.003). Endoscopic hemostasis was permanently successful in 26 out of 35 patients (74.3%) with peptic ulcers and active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessel. Nine patients (8.6%) were operated due to continuing or recurrent bleeding,compared to 23/608 (3.8%) in the group of patients without gastric surgery in the past (P= 0.028). Especially in peptic ulcer bleeding patients, emergency surgery was more common in the group of patients with gastric surgery in the past [9/73 (12.3%) vs 19/360 (5.3%), P = 0.025].Moreover surgically treated patients in the past required more blood transfusion (3.3±4.0 vs 1.5±1.7, P = 0.0001) and longer hospitalization time (8.6±4.0 vs 6.9±4.9 d,P = 0.001) than patients without a history of gastric surgery. Mortality was not different between the two groups [4/105 (3.8%) vs 19/608 (3.1%)].CONCLUSION: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding seems to be more severe in surgically treated patients than in non-operated patients.

  13. Transcatheter arterial embolization for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Cercueil, J P; Krausé, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, transcatheter arterial embolization has become the first-line therapy for the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic hemostasis...

  14. Characteristics and outcomes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Pausawasdi, Nonthalee; Laosanguaneak, Nuttiya; Bubthamala, Jakkrapan; Tanwandee, Tawesak; Leelakusolvong, Somchai

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the effects of age on clinical presentations and endoscopic diagnoses and to determine outcomes after endoscopic therapy among patients aged ≥ 65 years admitted for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) compared with those aged < 65 years.

  15. Reproducibility of Wireless Capsule Endoscopy in the Investigation of Chronic Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Christodoulou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Capsule endoscopy (CE is a valuable tool in the diagnostic evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, but limited information is available on the reproducibility of CE findings.

  16. Occult gastrointestinal bleeding due to a Dieulafoy lesion in the terminal ileum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegdam, J.A.; Hofker, H.S.; Dijkstra, G; Stolk, M.F.; Jacobs, M.A.; Suurmeijer, A.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    A 50-year-old man awaiting liver transplantation for primary sclerosing cholangitis developed iron-deficiency anaemia. Repeated occult gastrointestinal bleeding led to an increasing need for blood transfusions. After multiple oesophagogastroduodenoscopies and colonoscopies, videocapsule endoscopy fi

  17. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: which factors are associated with positive capsule endoscopy findings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Background: Capsule endoscopy is a first line examination to evaluate obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The identification of factors associated with the detection of lesions by capsule endoscopy could improve resource utilization and patient selection. Objectives: To identify factors associated with positive capsule endoscopy findings in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Methods: Retrospective, single-center study, including 203 patients (214 capsule endoscopy procedures submitted to capsule endoscopy in the setting of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Type of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, number of units of packed red blood cells transfused, type of positive finding, number of endoscopy studies performed prior to capsule endoscopy, comorbidities, medication and Charlson index were evaluated. Overt bleeding was subdivided into ongoing and previous gastrointestinal bleeding. Only lesions with high hemorrhagic potential (P2 were classified as positive findings. Results: The mean age was 62.2 years and 59.7% of patients were female. Most patients were referred for occult gastrointestinal bleeding (64.5%, while 35.5% were referred for overt gastrointestinal bleeding (63.2% previous-overt gastrointestinal bleeding. The most frequent positive findings included ulcers/erosions (34% and angioectasias (32%. In univariate analysis, the identification of positive findings was significantly higher in those with ongoing-overt bleeding (p < 0.001, advanced age (p = 0.003, increasing number of pre-capsule endoscopies (p < 0.001, increasing transfusion requirements (p < 0.001, moderate/severe renal disease (p = 0.009 and antiplatelet drugs (p = 0.021 and NSAID intake (p = 0.005. In multivariate analysis, positive findings were significantly higher only in those with ongoing-overt bleeding (odds ratio [OR] 18.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.98-85.6, p < 0.001, higher transfusion requirements (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.1-1.4, p < 0.001 and NSAID

  18. A prospective study of aspirin use and the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Edward S; Strate, Lisa L; Ho, Wendy W; Lee, Salina S; Chan, Andrew T

    2010-12-29

    Data regarding the influence of dose and duration of aspirin use on risk of gastrointestinal bleeding are conflicting. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 32,989 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) in 1994 who provided biennial aspirin data. We estimated relative risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding requiring hospitalization or a blood transfusion. During 14 years of follow-up, 707 men reported an episode of major gastrointestinal bleeding over 377,231 person-years. After adjusting for risk factors, regular aspirin use (≥2 times/week) had a multivariate relative risk (RR) of gastrointestinal bleeding of 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.55) compared to non-regular use. The association was particularly evident for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (multivariate RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.16-1.92). Compared to men who denied any aspirin use, multivariate RRs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 1.05 (95% CI 0.71-1.52) for men who used 0.5-1.5 standard tablets/week, 1.31 (95% CI 0.88-1.95) for 2-5 aspirin/week, 1.63 (95% CI, 1.15-2.32) for 6-14 aspirin/week and 2.40 (95% CI, 1.10-5.22) for >14 aspirin/week (P(trend)risk also appeared to be dose-dependent among short-term users risk (P(trend) = 0.749). Regular aspirin use increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, especially from the upper tract. However, risk of bleeding appears to be more strongly related to dose than to duration of use. Risk of bleeding should be minimized by using the lowest effective dose among short-term and long-term aspirin users.

  19. [Historical schedule of management of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Jacek; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract were changed many times. First there were waiting (Hipocrates, Sydenham, Stahl), next transfusion of the blood were initiated (Denis, Blundell, Dieffenbach, Bierkowski, Dungren, Hirszfeld). Big (Rydygier) and small (Dragstedt) operations procedures were attempted. Discovery of endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract (Mikulicz) and initiation of elastic scopes (Hirschowitz) and exploration inhibitor of histamine receptors (H2) and proton pump inhibitors with recognition of role Helicobacter pylori in bleeding were permitted elaborate actual schemas of proceedings.

  20. Endoscopic treatment of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding: hemoclips and other hemostatic techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rossana M. Moura; Jamie S. Barkin

    2000-01-01

    @@ Although the number of hospitalizations for nonvariccal gastrointestinal bleeding has decreased in recent years, acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage continues to be a common reason for hospital admission, and peptic ulcers account for at least fifty percent of all cases. Despite the fact that bleeding from ulcers ceases spontaneously in approximately 80% of patients, it is still a diagnosis associated with substantial medical costs and significant morbidity and mortality, the latter ranging between 8 and 14%[1], especially in the elderly.

  1. Meta-analysis: antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding - an updated Cochrane review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavez-Tapia, N C; Barrientos-Gutierrez, T; Tellez-Avila, F

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention.......Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention....

  2. Gastrointestinal bleeding and iron absorption in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannella, R A; Toskes, P P

    1976-07-01

    Rats with surgically created self-filling jejunal blind loops and the blind loop syndrome manifested gastrointestinal bleeding and hyperabsorption of iron. Although the mean hematocrit and serum iron levels of rats with self-filling blind loops became overtly anemic and manifested low-serum iron levels. It is suggested that the documented gastrointestinal bleeding in these rats with the experimental blind loop syndrome is another manifestation of damage to the intestinal epithelium in conditions of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

  3. Outcomes of Propofol Sedation During Emergency Endoscopy Performed for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Han, Dong Soo; Jeong, Jae Yoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Yoo, Kyo-Sang; Jeon, Yong Cheol; Sohn, Joo Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Although propofol-based sedation can be used during emergency endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), there is a potential risk of sedation-related adverse events, especially in patients with variceal bleeding. We compared adverse events related to propofol-based sedation during emergency endoscopy between patients with non-variceal and variceal bleeding. Clinical records of patients who underwent emergency endoscopy for UGIB under sedation were reviewed. Adverse events, including shock, hypoxia, and paradoxical reaction, were compared between the non-variceal and variceal bleeding groups. Of 703 endoscopies, 539 and 164 were performed for non-variceal and variceal bleeding, respectively. Shock was more common in patients with variceal bleeding compared to those with non-variceal bleeding (12.2 vs. 3.5%, P bleeding (non-variceal bleeding vs. variceal bleeding: hypoxia, 3.5 vs. 1.8%, P = 0.275; paradoxical reaction interfering with the procedure, 4.1 vs. 5.5%, P = 0.442). Although shock was more common in patients with variceal bleeding compared to those with non-variceal bleeding, most cases could be controlled without procedure interruption. Paradoxical reaction, rather than shock or hypoxia, was the most common cause of procedure interruption in patients with variceal bleeding, but the rate did not differ between patients with non-variceal and variceal bleeding.

  4. Investigation of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding with 16- and 64-slice multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Welman, C J; Ramsay, D

    2009-02-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of 16- and 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) in the detection of a bleeding site in acute lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) haemorrhage by conducting a retrospective study of cases of presumed acute lower GIT haemorrhage imaged with CT in two teaching hospitals in an 11-month period. The patients underwent contrast enhanced CT using either a 16 or 64 MDCT. No oral contrast was used. One hundred milliliters of non-ionic intravenous contrast agent was injected at 4.5 mL/s, followed by a 60 mL saline flush at 4 mL/s through a dual head injector. Images were acquired in arterial phase with or without non-contrast and portal phase imaging with 16 x 1.5 mm or 64 x 0.625 mm collimation. Active bleeding was diagnosed by the presence of iodinated contrast extravasation into the bowel lumen on arterial phase images with attenuation greater than and distinct from the normal mucosal enhancement or focal pooling of increased attenuation contrast material within a bowel segment on portal-venous images. Further management and final diagnosis was recorded. Fourteen patients and 15 studies were reviewed. CT detected and localized a presumed bleeding site or potential causative pathology in 12 (80%) of the patients. Seven of these were supported by other investigations or surgery, while five were not demonstrated by other modalities. Eight patients had mesenteric angiography, of which only four corroborated the site of bleeding. CT did not detect the bleeding site in three patients, of which two required further investigation and definitive treatment. We propose that MDCT serves a useful role as the initial rapid investigation to triage patients presenting with lower GIT bleeding for further investigation and management.

  5. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopic Approaches to Upper Gastrointestinal System Bleeding in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Aygün

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ti­on: Upper gastrointestinal system bleeding in children is always very important problems requiring further investigation. The aim of the study was to investigate retrospectively the etiologies of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the therapeutic endoscopic approach to the bleeding, and the efficacy of the endoscopy in the treatment of pediatric age group. Materials and Methods: In this study, 139 (F/M: 63/76 cases diagnosed as upper gastrointestinal bleeding and followed up by the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology were classified into groups according to the age, etiology, the presence of varicose veins, and history of drug ingestion. In addition bleedings caused by peptic ulcer disease were classified according to Forrest classification. Values of p0.68. Discussion: Endoscopic procedure is very useful in both the determination of etiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in childhood. (Jo­ur­nal of Cur­rent Pe­di­at­rics 2012; 10: 1-7

  6. Rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding owing to hepatic cancer invasion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Ding; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hong-Guo; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Zhao, Da-Jian; Hu, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-21

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding refers to bleeding that arises from the gastrointestinal tract proximal to the ligament of Treitz. The primary reason for gastrointestinal bleeding associated with hepatocellular carcinoma is rupture of a varicose vein owing to pericardial hypotension. We report a rare case of gastrointestinal bleeding with hepatocellular carcinoma in a patient who presented with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding. The initial diagnosis was gastric cancer with metastasis to the multiple lymph nodes of the lesser curvature. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, which identified two lesions in the gastric wall. Total gastrectomy and hepatic local excision was then performed. Pathological results indicated that the hepatocellular carcinoma had invaded the stomach directly, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. The patient is alive with a disease-free survival of 1 year since the surgery. Hepatocellular carcinoma with gastric invasion should be considered as a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in hepatocellular carcinoma patients, especially with lesions located in the left lateral hepatic lobe. Surgery is the best solution.

  7. Systematic review: Helicobacter pylori and the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk in patients taking aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, E H; Johnston, D E; Fisher, C R; Koerner, R J; Newton, J L; Gray, C S

    2010-10-01

    Aspirin is widely used to modify the risk of recurrent vascular events. It is, however, associated with increased upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. The influence of Helicobacter pylori on this risk is uncertain. To determine the influence of H. pylori on upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk in patients taking aspirin. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched. All studies providing data regarding H. pylori infection in adults taking aspirin and presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding were included. A total of 13 studies that included 1 case-control, 10 cohort studies and 2 randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) were analysed. The case-control study (n = 245) determined H. pylori to be a significant independent risk factor for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The cohort studies were heterogeneous, varying in inclusion criteria, doses and duration of aspirin used, mode of H. pylori testing and causative GI pathology considered. Comprising 5465 patients, H. pylori infection was tested for in 163 (0.03%) aspirin users with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The RCTs yielded no significant results. The current data are not sufficient to allow meta-analyses. The widely held belief that H. pylori is a risk factor for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in regular aspirin users is not supported by the very limited evidence available. 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Colonoscopic findings and management of patients with outbreak typhoid fever presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikhani, Mohammad A R; Husein, Hiwa A B; Karbuli, Taha A; Mohamed, Mohamed Abdulrahman

    2013-09-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) along with intestinal perforation is a well-known complication of typhoid fever. Reports of colonoscopic appearance and intervention of typhoid perforation involve only few cases. This series reports the colonoscopic findings and the role of colonoscopic hemostatic interventions in controlling the bleeding ileocolonic lesions. During the typhoid fever outbreak in Sulaymaniyah City in Iraqi Kurdistan Region, we received 52 patients with LGIB manifesting as fresh bleeding per rectum or melena. We performed total colonoscopy with ileal intubation for all cases. The findings were recorded and endoscopic hemostatic intervention with adrenaline-saline injection and argon plasma coagulation was applied to actively bleeding lesion. These patients were young, 11-30 years of age, with female preponderance. Blood culture was positive in 50 %. Colonoscopic findings were mostly located in the ileocecal region, although other areas of the colon were involved in many cases. Twenty-four percent of the cases required endoscopic hemostatic intervention by adrenaline injection with argon plasma coagulation which was effective in all patients except one who died in spite of surgical intervention in addition of endoscopic hemostasis. Dual endoscopic hemostatic intervention can be a safe and effective management option for patients with LGIB due to typhoid fever.

  9. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding after low anterior resection for middle rectal cancer -case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mircea Beuran; Ionut Negoi; Sorin Paun; Valentina Negoita; Bogdan Stoica; Ioan Tanase; Mihaela Vartic; Ruxandra Irina Negoi; Sorin Hostiuc

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To emphasize the value of emergency diagnostic angiography and angioembolization in massive postoperative bleeding. Methods:A case report was presented and electronic search of U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, ISI Web of Knowledge, to identify original articles and reviews about the subject. Results: A 55 year-old male patient was addmited for rectal bleeding. ECOG index=2, digital rectal examination revealed the inferior pole of a middle rectal tumor. Colonoscopy exam validated the presence of a middle rectal tumor, 8 cm from the anal verge. CT scan showed rectal wall thickening up to 3 cm, that extends 9 cm proximally, whit infiltration of the perirectal fatty tissue and multiple enlarged lymph nodes up to 12 mm in dimension. There was a laparoscopic converted to open approach, with low anterior resection of the rectum and total mesorectal excision, an end to end stapled colorectal anastomosis and protective loop ileostomy. In the 5th postoperative day a massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding occured, with hypovolemic shock and a decrease in hemoglobin. Emergency angiography was performed. This revealed active bleeding from an internal iliac branch that was successfully angioembolized. Conclusions: Angiography with angioembolization is an effective tool in emergency setting, avoiding the morbidity and associated mortality of a surgical reinervention. In early postoperative hemorrhages, only a rapid clinical recognition, a personalized diagnostic workup and an agressive intervention may offer the patient the best chances for cure.

  10. Management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Current policies and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAcute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a gastroenterological emergency with a mortality of 6%-13%. The vast majority of these bleeds are due to peptic ulcers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and Helicobacter pylori are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endosco

  11. Wireless Capsule Endoscopy for Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Single Center, One Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-jiang Tang

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE is increasingly being used in the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal (GI bleeding, but some studies have found that many of the bleeding lesions recognized by this technique are within the reach of conventional endoscopy.

  12. Does this patient have a severe upper gastrointestinal bleed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srygley, F Douglas; Gerardo, Charles J; Tran, Tony; Fisher, Deborah A

    2012-03-14

    Emergency physicians must determine both the location and the severity of acute gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) to optimize the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. To identify the historical features, symptoms, signs, bedside maneuvers, and basic laboratory test results that distinguish acute upper GIB (UGIB) from acute lower GIB (LGIB) and to risk stratify those patients with a UGIB least likely to have severe bleeding that necessitates an urgent intervention. A structured search of MEDLINE (1966-September 2011) and reference lists from retrieved articles, review articles, and physical examination textbooks. High-quality studies were included of adult patients who were either admitted with GIB or evaluated in emergency departments with bedside evaluations and/or routine laboratory tests, and studies that did not include endoscopic findings in prediction models. The initial search yielded 2628 citations, of which 8 were retained that tested methods of identifying a UGIB and 18 that identified methods of determining the severity of UGIB. One author abstracted the data (prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios [LRs]) and assessed methodological quality, with confirmation by another author. Data were combined using random effects measures. The majority of patients (N = 1776) had an acute UGIB (prevalence, 63%; 95% CI, 51%-73%). Several clinical factors increase the likelihood that a patient has a UGIB, including a patient-reported history of melena (LR range, 5.1-5.9), melenic stool on examination (LR, 25; 95% CI, 4-174), a nasogastric lavage with blood or coffee grounds (LR, 9.6; 95% CI, 4.0-23.0), and a serum urea nitrogen:creatinine ratio of more than 30 (summary LR, 7.5; 95% CI, 2.8-12.0). Conversely, the presence of blood clots in stool (LR, 0.05; 95% CI, 0.01-0.38) decreases the likelihood of a UGIB. Of the patients clinically diagnosed with acute UGIB, 36% (95% CI, 29%-44%) had severe bleeding. A nasogastric lavage with red blood (summary

  13. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jae, Hwan Jun; Chung, Jin Wook; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1 1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy.

  14. Usefulness of angiographic embolization endoscopic metallic clip placement in patient with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Min Jae; Hwang, Cheol Mog; Kim, Ho Jun; Cho, Young Jun; Bae, Seok Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok; Ohm, Joon Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chae Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Pusan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of angiographic embolization after endoscopic metallic clip placement around the edge of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding ulcers. We have chosen 41 patients (mean age, 65.2 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (22 gastric ulcers, 16 duodenal ulcers, 3 malignant ulcers) between January 2010 and December 2012. We inserted metallic clips during the routine endoscopic treatments of the bleeding ulcers. Subsequent transcatheter arterial embolization was performed within 2 hours. We analyzed the angiographic positive rates, angiographic success rates and clinical success rates. Among the 41 patients during the angiography, 19 patients (46%) demonstrated active bleeding points. Both groups underwent embolization using microcoils, N-butyl-cyano-acrylate (NBCA), microcoils with NBCA or gelfoam particle. There are no statistically significant differences between these two groups according to which embolic materials are being used. The bleeding was initially stopped in all patients, except the two who experienced technical failures. Seven patients experienced repeated episodes of bleeding within two weeks. Among them, 4 patients were successful re-embolized. Another 3 patients underwent gastrectomy. Overall, clinical success was achieved in 36 of 41 (87.8%) patients. The endoscopic metallic clip placement was helpful to locate the correct target vessels for the angiographic embolization. In conclusion, this technique reduced re-bleeding rates, especially in patients who do not show active bleeding points.

  15. Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome: A rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in an African child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Blue rubber bleb naevus syndrome (BRBNS is characterised by vascular malformations of the skin and gastrointestinal tract. We present the rare case of BRBNS in an African child. She presented with large-volume gastrointestinal bleeding and was managed by on-table colonoscopic identification and surgical excision, of all her enteric, vascular malformations.

  16. Transcatheter arterial embolisation in upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a sample of 29 patients in a gastrointestinal referral center in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heining-Kruz, S; Finkenzeller, T; Schreyer, A; Dietl, K H; Kullmann, F; Paetzel, C; Schedel, J

    2015-09-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of interventional embolisation performed with catheter angiography in 29 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the setting of a secondary care hospital. From April 2007 to February 2013, 29 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding underwent endovascular diagnostics and treatment. The diagnosis was established by endoscopy, computed tomography or clinically based on a significant decrease in hemoglobin. Transcatheter arterial embolisation was performed with coils, liquid embolic agents, and particles. The technical and clinical outcomes were assessed by postinterventional endoscopy, hemoglobin concentrations, number of necessary transfusions, or surgical interventions, as well as by post-interventional mortality within 28 days after the procedure. Selective angiographic embolisation in upper gastrointestinal bleeding was primarily successful technically and clinically in 22 of 29 patients. In 4/29 cases an angiographic reintervention was performed, which was successful in 3 cases. In 3 cases of primarily technically unsuccessful procedures reintervention was not attempted. No catheterisation-related complications were recorded. Peri-interventional mortality was 31%, but only 2 of these patients died due to uncontrolled massive bleeding, whereas the lethal outcome in the other 7 patients was due to their underlying diseases. Transcatheter arterial embolisation is an effective and rapid method in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Radiological endovascular interventions may considerably contribute to reduced mortality in GI bleeding by avoiding a potential surgical procedure following unsuccessful endoscopic treatment. The study underlines the importance of the combination of interventional endoscopy with interventional radiology in secondary care hospitals for patient outcome in complex and complicated upper gastrointestinal bleeding situations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Tranexamic Acid in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: an Evidence-based Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Atikah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to review the effectiveness of tranexamic acid therapy which has been proposed to reduce bleeding and in turn lower mortality rate. Methods: following literature searching based on our clinical question on Cochrane Library, PubMed, Clinical Key, EBSCO, Science Direct and Proquest, one systematic review that includes seven randomized controlled trials is obtained. The article meets validity and relevance criteria. Results: the systematic review found that there is no any clear evidence between intervention and control groups in term of mortality. Conclusion: the use of tranexamic acid to reduce mortality in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding is not recommended. Key words: tranexamic acid, mortality, upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  18. Discharge hemoglobin and outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kang, Seung Hun; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-08-01

    Many patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding present with anemia and frequently require red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. A restrictive transfusion strategy and a low hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for transfusion had been shown to produce acceptable outcomes in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, most patients are discharged with mild anemia owing to the restricted volume of packed RBCs (pRBCs). We investigated whether discharge Hb influences the outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We retrospectively analyzed patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who had received pRBCs during hospitalization between January 2012 and January 2014. Patients with variceal bleeding, malignant lesion, stroke, or cardiovascular disease were excluded. We divided the patients into 2 groups, low (8 g/dL ≤ Hb  10 g/dL. Patients in the low Hb group had a lower consumption of pRBCs and shorter hospital stay than did those in the high Hb group. The Hb levels were not fully recovered at outpatient follow-up until 7 days after discharge; however, most patients showed Hb recovery at 45 days after discharge. The rate of rebleeding after discharge was not significantly different between the 2 groups. In patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a discharge Hb between 8 and 10 g/dL was linked to favorable outcomes on outpatient follow-up. Most patients recovered from anemia without any critical complication within 45 days after discharge.

  19. Unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in a cirrhotic patient:hepatocellular carcinoma with gastric invasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcos Vinicius Perini; Paulo Herman; Rodrigo Pessoa; Willian Abraao Saad

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common complication of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common tumor in cirrhotic livers. Bleeding from tumor erosion into the GI tract is very rare. A patient with HCC and gastric tumor invasion was described and the previously reported cases were reviewed. METHOD: A patient with upper GI bleeding was treated in a tertiary hospital. RESULTS: A cirrhotic patient with a HCC invading the stomach leading to upper GI bleeding was treated by left lateral segmentectomy and sub-total gastrectomy. The bleeding was controlled and a good surgical outcome was achieved. CONCLUSIONS: HCC with gastric invasion should be differentially diagnosed from upper GI bleeding in cirrhotic patients. Bleeding can be controlled and symptomatic relief marked in selected cases.

  20. Transcatheter arterial embolization for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Indications, techniques and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffroy, R; Favelier, S; Pottecher, P; Estivalet, L; Genson, P Y; Gehin, S; Cercueil, J P; Krausé, D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, transcatheter arterial embolization has become the first-line therapy for the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic hemostasis. Advances in catheter-based techniques and newer embolic agents, as well as recognition of the effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment options, have expanded the role of interventional radiology in the treatment of bleeding for a variety of indications. Transcatheter arterial embolization is a fast, safe, and effective minimally invasive alternative to surgery, when endoscopic treatment fails to control acute bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the role of arterial embolization in the management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and summarizes the literature evidence on the outcomes of endovascular therapy in such a setting. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chookhuan Nithiwathanapong; Sanit Reungrongrat; Nuthapong Ukarapol

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency and the risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).METHODS: The medical records of children aged between 1 month and 15 years admitted to the PICU between January 2002 and December 2002 were reviewed.Demographic data, indications for PICU admission, principle diagnosis, and basic laboratory investigations were recorded. Previously described factors for stress ulcer bleeding (mechanical ventilation, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal insufficiency, coagulopathy,thrombocytopenia, and intracranial pathology) were used as independent variables in a multivariate analysis.RESULTS: One hundred and seventy of two hundred and five medical records were eligible for review. The most common indication for PICU admission was respiratory failure (48.8%). Twenty-five children received stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis with ranitidine. The incidence of stress ulcer bleeding was 43.5%, in which 5.3% were clinically significant bleeding. Only mechanical ventilation and thrombocytopenia were significantly associated with stress ulcer bleeding using the univariate analysis.The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were 5.13(1.86-14.12) and 2.26 (1.07-4.74), respectively. However, the logistic regression analysis showed that mechanicai ventilation was the only significant risk factor with the odds ratio of 14.1.CONCLUSION: The incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding was high in critically ill children. Mechanical ventilation was an important risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding.

  2. A retrospective study demonstrating properties of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Dağli, Ulkü; Sarer, Banu; Gürel, Selim; Tözün, Nurdan; Sıvrı, Bülent; Akbaş, Türkay; Sahın, Burhan; Memık, Faruk; Batur, Yücel

    2011-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and peptic ulcer are considered as the major factors for upper gastrointestinal system bleeding. The objective of the study was to determine the sociodemographic and etiologic factors, management and outcome of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal system bleeding in Turkey. Patients who admitted to hospitals with upper gastrointestinal system bleeding and in whom upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed were enrolled in this retrospective study. The detailed data of medical history, comorbid diseases, medications, admission to intensive care units, Helicobacter pylori infection, blood transfusion, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and treatment outcome were documented. The most frequent causes of bleeding (%) were duodenal ulcer (49.4), gastric ulcer (22.8), erosion (9.6), and cancer (2.2) among 1,711 lesions in endoscopic appearances of 1,339 patients from six centers. Seven hundred and four patients were evaluated for Helicobacter pylori infection and the test was positive in 45.6% of those patients. Comorbid diseases were present in 59.2% of the patients. The percentage of patients using acetylsalicylic acid and/or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug was 54.3%. Bleeding was stopped with medical therapy in 66.9%. Only 3.7% of the patients underwent emergency surgery, and a 1.1% mortality rate was determined. Patients with upper gastrointestinal system bleeding were significantly older, more likely to be male, and more likely to use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Though most of the patients were using gastro-protective agents, duodenal and gastric ulcers were the contributing factors in more than 70% of the upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The extensive use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is a hazardous health issue considering the use of these drugs in half of the patients.

  3. Angiographically Negative Acute Arterial Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Incidence, Predictive Factors, and Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chae, Eun Young; Myung, Seung Jae; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of angiographically negative acute arterial upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. From 2001 to 2008, 143 consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for acute arterial upper or lower GI bleeding were examined. The angiographies revealed a negative bleeding focus in 75 of 143 (52%) patients. The incidence of an angiographically negative outcome was significantly higher in patients with a stable hemodynamic status (p < 0.001), or in patients with lower GI bleeding (p = 0.032). A follow-up of the 75 patients (range: 0-72 months, mean: 8 {+-} 14 months) revealed that 60 of the 75 (80%) patients with a negative bleeding focus underwent conservative management only, and acute bleeding was controlled without rebleeding. Three of the 75 (4%) patients underwent exploratory surgery due to prolonged bleeding; however, no bleeding focus was detected. Rebleeding occurred in 12 of 75 (16%) patients. Of these, six patients experienced massive rebleeding and died of disseminated intravascular coagulation within four to nine hours after the rebleeding episode. Four of the 16 patients underwent a repeat angiography and the two remaining patients underwent a surgical intervention to control the bleeding. Angiographically negative results are relatively common in patients with acute GI bleeding, especially in patients with a stable hemodynamic status or lower GI bleeding. Most patients with a negative bleeding focus have experienced spontaneous resolution of their condition.

  4. Meta-analysis: erythromycin before endoscopy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Guo, J-F; Li, Z-S

    2011-07-01

    Studies evaluating the effect of erythromycin on patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) had been reported, but the results were inconclusive. To compare erythromycin with control in patients with acute UGIB by performing a meta-analysis. Electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index, were searched to find relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Two reviewers independently identified relevant trials evaluating the effect of erythromycin on patients with acute UGIB. Outcome measures were the incidence of empty stomach, need for second endoscopy, blood transfusion, length of hospital stay, endoscopic procedure time and mortality. Four RCTs including 335 patients were identified. Meta-analysis demonstrated the incidence of empty stomach was significantly increased in patients receiving erythromycin (active group 69%, control group 37%, Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding to decrease the amount of blood in the stomach and reduce the need for second endoscopy, amount of blood transfusion. It may shorten the length of hospital stay, but its effects on mortality need further larger trials to be confirmed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Stress ulcer, gastritis, and gastrointestinal bleeding prophylaxis in critically ill pediatric patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveiz, Ludovic; Guerrero-Lozano, Rafael; Camacho, Angela; Yara, Lina; Mosquera, Paola Andrea

    2010-01-01

    To identify and evaluate the quality of evidence supporting prophylactic use of treatments for stress ulcers and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Stress ulcers, erosions of the stomach and duodenum, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding are well-known complications of critical illness in children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. Studies were identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PUBMED; LILACS; Scirus. We also scanned bibliographies of relevant studies. This systematic review of randomized controlled trials assessed the effects of drugs for stress-related ulcers, gastritis, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. Two reviewers independently extracted the relevant data. Most randomized controlled trials were judged as having unclear risk of bias. When pooling two randomized controlled trials, treatment was significantly more effective in preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding (macroscopic or important bleeding) compared with no treatment (two studies = 300 participants; relative risk, 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.91; I = 12%). Meta-analysis of two studies found no significant difference in death rates among groups (two randomized controlled trials = 132 participants; relative risk, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-2.79; I = 4%). The rate of pneumonia was not significantly different when comparing treatment and no treatment in one study. When comparing ranitidine with no treatment, significant differences were found in the proportion of mechanically ventilated children with normal gastric mucosal endoscopic findings by histologic specimens (one randomized controlled trial = 48 participants; relative risk, 3.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.34-9.29). No significant differences were found when comparing different drugs (omeprazole, ranitidine, sucralfate, famotidine, amalgate), doses, or regimens for main outcomes (deaths, endoscopic findings of

  6. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Panikkath, Ragesh; Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up.

  7. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  8. Safety and efficacy of Hemospray® in upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Alan Hoi Lun; Ou, George; Galorport, Cherry; Amar, Jack; Bressler, Brian; Donnellan, Fergal; Ko, Hin Hin; Lam, Eric; Enns, Robert Allan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemospray (Cook Medical, USA) has recently been approved in Canada for the management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestional bleeding (UGIB). OBJECTIVE: To review the authors’ experience with the safety and efficacy of Hemospray for treating UGIB. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who required endoscopic evaluation for suspected UGIB and were treated with Hemospray. RESULTS: From February 2012 to July 2013, 19 patients (mean age 67.6 years) with UGIB were treated with Hemospray. A bleeding lesion was identified in the esophagus in one (5.3%) patient, the stomach in five (26.3%) and duodenum in 13 (68.4%). Bleeding was secondary to peptic ulcers in 12 (63.2%) patients, Dieulafoy lesions in two (10.5%), mucosal erosion in one (5.3%), angiodysplastic lesions in one (5.3%), ampullectomy in one (5.3%), polypectomy in one (5.3%) and an unidentified lesion in one (5.3%). The lesions showed spurting hemorrhage in four (21.1%) patients, oozing hemorrhage in 11 (57.9%) and no active bleeding in four (21.1%). Hemospray was administered as monotherapy in two (10.5%) patients, first-line modality in one (5.3%) and rescue modality in 16 (84.2%). Hemospray was applied prophylactically to nonbleeding lesions in four (21.1%) patients and therapeutically to bleeding lesions in 15 (78.9%). Acute hemostasis was achieved in 14 of 15 (93.3%) patients. Rebleeding within seven days occurred in seven of 18 (38.9%) patients. Potential adverse events occurred in two (10.5%) patients and included visceral perforation and splenic infarct. Mortality occurred in five (26.3%) patients but the cause of death was unrelated to gastrointestinal bleeding with the exception of one patient who developed hemoperitoneum. CONCLUSIONS: The high rates of both acute hemostasis and recurrent bleeding suggest that Hemospray may be used in high-risk cases as a temporary measure or a bridge toward more definitive therapy. PMID:24501723

  9. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with AIDS: a relatively uncommon condition associated with reduced survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, F; Cernuschi, M; Valsecchi, L; Rizzardini, G; Musicco, M; Lazzarin, A; Bianchi Porro, G

    1991-01-01

    To determine the cumulative incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding and its effect upon survival in patients with AIDS, 453 consecutive AIDS patients diagnosed in our hospital between June 1985 and March 1989 were followed for a median period of six months (maximum 42 months). The cumulative probability of acute gastrointestinal bleeding was 3% at six months and 6% at 14 months. This event was associated with significantly reduced survival. Independent risk factors for bleeding were: severe thrombocytopenia at the time of diagnosis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as the first clinical manifestation of AIDS. The potential causes of bleeding were investigated in all cases by emergency endoscopy or by necropsy examination in those patients whose clinical condition precluded the procedure. In nine of 15 patients, bleeding was due to lesions specifically associated with AIDS, but in the remainder the source of bleeding was not a direct consequence of HIV infection. We conclude that acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding rarely complicates the course of AIDS, but its occurrence is associated with decreased survival. As many of the causes are potentially treatable, a complete diagnostic approach is indicated in these patients, except those who are terminally ill. PMID:1916503

  10. Rescue endoscopic bleeding control for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage using clipping and detachable snaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Kim, B K; Seol, D C; Byun, S J; Park, K H; Sung, I K; Park, H S; Shim, C S

    2013-06-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding recurs after appropriate endoscopic therapy in 10 % - 15 % of cases. The mortality rate can be as high as 25 % when bleeding recurs, but there is no consensus about the best modality for endoscopic re-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate clipping and detachable snaring (CDS) for rescue endoscopic control of nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage. We report a case series of seven patients from a Korean tertiary center who underwent endoscopic hemostasis using the combined method of detachable snares with hemoclips. The success rate of endoscopic hemostasis with CDS was 86 %: six of the seven patients who had experienced primary endoscopic treatment failure or recurrent bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis were treated successfully. In conclusion, rescue endoscopic bleeding control by means of CDS is an option for controlling nonvariceal UGI bleeding when no other method of endoscopic treatment for recurrent bleeding and primary hemostatic failure is possible.

  11. Severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding in extraluminal diverticula in the third part of the duodenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Andersen, Johnny Fredsbo; Lauritsen, Morten Laksafoss

    2014-05-13

    The successful management of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding requires identification of the source of bleeding and when this is achieved the bleeding can often be treated endoscopically. However, the identification of the bleeding can be challenging due to the location of the bleeding or technical aspects. Therefore it might be necessary to use other measures than endoscopy such as CT angiography. Duodenal diverticula is a rare cause of upper GI bleeding and can be challenging to diagnose as they often require specialised endoscopy procedures such as endoscopy with a side-viewing scope. This case describes the first successful management of this rare condition with an upper GI endoscopy with a colonoscope and afterwards intravascular coiling.

  12. Diagnostic role of capsule endoscopy in patients of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding after negative CT enterography

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    Jaswinder Singh Sodhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Computed tomographic enterography (CT-EG has emerged a useful tool for the evaluation of small bowel in patients of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB. However, CT-EG may be negative in about 50-60% of patients. We aimed to see the efficacy of capsule endoscopy (CE in patients of OGIB, who had initial negative CT-EG. Materials and Methods: All consecutive patients of OGIB after initial hemodynamic stabilization were subjected to CT-EG. Those having negative CT-EG were further evaluated with CE. Results: Fifty-five patients of OGIB with mean standard deviation age, 52.7 (19.0, range 18-75 years, women 31/55 (56.4% were subjected to CT-EG. Nine (17.6% patients had positive findings on CT-EG, which included mass lesions in six, thickened wall of distal ileal loops, narrowing, and wall enhancement in two and jejunal wall thickening with wall hyperenhancement in one patient. Forty-two patients had negative CT-EG of which 25 underwent CE for further evaluation. CE detected positive findings in 11 of 25 (48% patients which included vascular malformations in three, ulcers in seven, and fresh blood without identifiable source in one. The diagnostic yield of CE in overt OGIB was more compared to occult OGIB ((7/14, 50% vs (4/11, 36.4% P = 0.2 and was higher if performed within 2 weeks of active gastrointestinal (GI bleed (P = 0.08. Conclusions: In conclusion, CE is an additional tool in the evaluation of obscure GI bleed, especially mucosal lesions which can be missed by CT-EG.

  13. Capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戈之铮; 胡运彪; 萧树东

    2004-01-01

    Background In obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, it is often difficult to detect the bleeding sites located in the small bowel with conventional radiological, scintigraphic or angiographic techniques. Push enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy are currently considered to be the most effective diagnostic procedures. The aim of this study was to compare the detection rates between capsule endoscopy and push enteroscopy. Methods From May 2002 through January 2003, we prospectively examined by capsule endoscopy 39 patients with suspected small bowel diseases, in particular GI bleeding of unknown origin in Renji Hospital. Among them, 32 complained of obscure recurrent GI bleeding. Between January 1993 and October 1996, we used push enteroscopy on 36 patients who suffered from unexplained GI bleeding. All patients had prior normal results on gastroscopy, colonoscopy, small bowel barium radiography, scintigraphy and/or angiography. Results M2A capsule endoscopy disclosed abnormal small bowel findings in 26 (82%) out of 32 patients. Twenty-one of them had significant pathological findings explaining their clinical disorders. Diagnostic yield was therefore 66% (21 of 32 patients). Definite bleeding sites diagnosed by capsule endoscopy in 21 patients included angiodysplasia (8), inflammatory small-bowel (5), small-bowel polyps (4), gastrointestinal stromal tumour (2), carcinoid tumour and lipoma (1), and hemorrhagic gastritis (1). Push enteroscopy detected the definite sources of bleeding in 9 (25%) of the 36 patients. Patients with definite bleeding sources included angiodysplasias (2), leiomyosarcoma (2), leiomyoma (1), lymphoma (1), Crohn's disease (1), small-bowel polyps (1) and adenocarcinoma of ampulla (1). Suspected bleeding sources were shown by push enteroscopy in two additional patients (6%), and in other five patients (16%) by capsule endoscopy.Conclusions The present study of patients with obscure GI bleeding showed that capsule endoscopy significantly superior

  14. Gastrointestinal bleeding from Dieulafoy's lesion: Clinicalpresentation, endoscopic findings, and endoscopic therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Borko Nojkov; Mitchell S Cappell

    2015-01-01

    Although relatively uncommon, Dieulafoy's lesion is animportant cause of acute gastrointestinal bleeding dueto the frequent difficulty in its diagnosis; its tendency tocause severe, life-threatening, recurrent gastrointestinalbleeding; and its amenability to life-saving endoscopictherapy. Unlike normal vessels of the gastrointestinaltract which become progressively smaller in caliberperipherally, Dieulafoy's lesions maintain a large caliberdespite their peripheral, submucosal, location withingastrointestinal wall. Dieulafoy's lesions typicallypresent with severe, active, gastrointestinal bleeding,without prior symptoms; often cause hemodynamicinstability and often require transfusion of multipleunits of packed erythrocytes. About 75% of lesionsare located in the stomach, with a marked proclivity oflesions within 6 cm of the gastroesophageal junctionalong the gastric lesser curve, but lesions can alsooccur in the duodenum and esophagus. Lesions inthe jejunoileum or colorectum have been increasinglyreported. Endoscopy is the first diagnostic test, but hasonly a 70% diagnostic yield because the lesions arefrequently small and inconspicuous. Lesions typicallyappear at endoscopy as pigmented protuberances fromexposed vessel stumps, with minimal surrounding erosionand no ulceration (visible vessel sans ulcer). Endoscopictherapy, including clips, sclerotherapy, argon plasmacoagulation, thermocoagulation, or electrocoagulation,is the recommended initial therapy, with primary hemostasisachieved in nearly 90% of cases. Dual endoscopictherapy of epinephrine injection followed by ablative ormechanical therapy appears to be effective. Althoughbanding is reportedly highly successful, it entails asmall risk of gastrointestinal perforation from bandingdeep mural tissue. Therapeutic alternatives after failedendoscopic therapy include repeat endoscopic therapy,angiography, or surgical wedge resection. The mortalityhas declined from about 30% during the 1970's to9

  15. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with refractory ulcer disease and gastrointestinal bleeding as a rare manifestation of seronegative gastrointestinal food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Martin; Hahn, Markus; Donhuijsen, Konrad; Hagel, Alexander F; Nägel, Andreas; Rieker, Ralf J; Neurath, Markus F; Reinshagen, Max

    2014-09-17

    Gastrointestinal bleeding and iron deficiency anaemia may cause severe symptoms and may require extensive diagnostics and substantial amounts of health resources.This case report focuses on the clinical presentation of a 22 year old patient with recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding from multilocular non-healing ulcers of the stomach, duodenum and jejunum over a period of four years. Extensive gastroenterological and allergological standard diagnostic procedures showed benign ulcerative lesions with tissue eosinophilia, but no conclusive diagnosis. Multiple diagnostic procedures were performed, until finally, endoscopically guided segmental gut lavage identified locally produced, intestinal IgE antibodies by fluoro-enzyme-immunoassay.IgE antibody concentrations at the intestinal level were found to be more-fold increased for total IgE and food-specific IgE against nuts, rye flour, wheat flour, pork, beef and egg yolk compared with healthy controls.Thus, a diet eliminating these allergens was introduced along with antihistamines and administration of a hypoallergenic formula, which resulted in complete healing of the multilocular ulcers with resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. All gastrointestinal lesions disappeared and total serum IgE levels dropped to normal within 9 months. The patient has been in remission now for more than two years.Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is well known to induce refractory ulcer disease. In this case, the mechanisms for intestinal damage and gastrointestinal bleeding were identified as local gastrointestinal type I allergy. Therefore, future diagnostics in EG should also be focused on the intestinal level as identification of causative food-specific IgE antibodies proved to be effective to induce remission in this patient.

  16. A rare cause of anemia due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Cameron lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet Özaydın

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic large hiatal hernias may lead to iron deficiency anemia due to occult and massive bleeding from linear gastric erosions or ulcers on the mucosal folds at the level of the diaphragm called the Cameron lesions. The diagnosis is usually made during upper gastrointestinal system endoscopies. Current therapy includes the medication with proton pump inhibitors in combination with oral iron supplements and in some cases surgical reconstruction of hiatal hernia with fundoplication. We present a case of a 78-year-old woman who was admitted to the outpatient clinic with the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia without signs of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. She was treated with medication and her follow-up gastroscopy showed a total cure. She is asymptomatic for two years after treatment with proton pump inhibitors and iron supplements. Cameron lesions should be kept in mind as an unusual cause of iron deficiency anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding

  17. Development of optimal management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to pancreatic sinistral portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of pancreatic sinistral portal hypertension (PSPH is quite different from that of cirrhotic portal hypertension, and PSPH is the only curable type of portal hypertension. Gastric variceal bleeding is a less common manifestation of PSPH; however, it probably exacerbates the patient’s condition and leads to critical illness, and inappropriate management would result in death. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the optimal management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in PSPH patients. Splenectomy is considered as a definitive procedure, together with surgical procedures to treat underlying pancreatic diseases. For patients in poor conditions or ineligible for surgery, splenic artery coil embolization is a preferable and effective method to stop bleeding before second-stage operation. The therapeutic decision should be made individually, and the further multi-center study to optimize the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from PSPH is warranted.

  18. Efficacy of intra-arterial treatment for massive gastrointestinal bleeding in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banshodani, Masataka; Kawanishi, Hideki; Moriishi, Misaki; Shintaku, Sadanori; Sato, Tomoyasu; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of acute nonvariceal massive gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is higher in hemodialysis (HD) patients than in healthy individuals, and this is often a life-threatening event. We evaluated the efficacy of intra-arterial treatment for GIB in HD patients. Between January 2006 and June 2012, eight HD patients with GIB were treated with superselective transarterial embolization. Of the eight cases, one was duodenal bleeding, two were jejunal bleeding, one was ileocecum bleeding, two were ascending colonic bleeding, and two were sigmoid colonic bleeding. After examining the site of bleeding by endoscopy or contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), embolizations with microcoils, gelatin sponges, or N-butyl cyanoacrylate were performed through interventional radiology (IVR). In all cases, blood transfusions were frequently administered. Six of the eight patients with GIB were successfully salvaged by transarterial embolization. In one case, duodenal bleeding was refractory to endoscopic treatment. Embolization was performed twice in this case; however, the patient died of an aneurysm rupture at the embolization site 24 days after the embolizations. In another case, massive jejunal bleeding and disseminated intravascular coagulation were identified at the time of the first examination, and the patient died of multiorgan failure 26 days after the embolization. On the basis of our experience, we established an effective treatment strategy for HD patients with acute nonvariceal massive GIB, by immediately identifying the exact site and degree of bleeding using contrast-enhanced computed tomography and performing early treatment with transarterial embolization.

  19. A study of clinical and endoscopic profile of acute upper, gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, K R; Patowary, B S; Bhattarai, S

    2014-01-01

    Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding is a common medical emergency with a hospital mortality of approximately 10 percent. Higher mortality rate is associated with rebleeding. Rockall scoring system identifies patients at higher risk of rebleed and mortality. To study the clinical and endoscopic profile of acute upper gastrointestinal bleed to know the etiology, clinical presentation, severity of bleeding and outcome. This is a prospective, descriptive hospital based study conducted in Gastroenterology unit of College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur, Nepal from January 2012 to January 2013. It included 120 patients at random presenting with manifestations of upper gastrointestinal bleed. Their clinical and endoscopic profiles were studied. Rockall scoring system was used to assess their prognosis. Males were predominant (75%). Age ranged from 14 to 88 years, mean being 48.76+17.19. At presentation 86 patients (71.7%) had both hematemesis and malena, 24 patients (20%) had only malena and 10 patients (8.3%) had only hematemesis. Shock was detected in 21.7%, severe anemia and high blood urea were found in 34.2% and 38.3% respectively. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding endoscopy revealed esophageal varices (47.5%), peptic ulcer disease (33.3%), erosive mucosal disease (11.6%), Mallory Weiss tear (4.1%) and malignancy (3.3%). Median hospital stay was 7.28+3.18 days. Comorbidities were present in 43.3%. Eighty six patients (71.7%) had Rockall score 6. Five patients (4.2%) expired. Risk factors for death being massive rebleeeding, comorbidities and Rockall score >6. Acute Upper Gastrointestinal bleeding is a medical emergency. Mortality is associated with massive bleeding, comorbidities and Rockall score >6. Urgent, appropriate hospital management definitely helps to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  20. Non-small-bowel lesions encountered during double-balloon enteroscopy performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoi-Poh; Tee; Arthur; J; Kaffes

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To report the incidence of non-small-bowel bleeding pathologies encountered during double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) procedures and to analyse their significance.METHODS: A retrospective study of a prospective DBE database conducted in a tertiary-referral center was conducted. A total of 179 patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) referred for DBE from June 2004 to November 2008 were analysed looking for the incidence of non-small-bowel lesions (NSBLs; all and newly diagnosed) encountered ...

  1. Usefulness of CT angiography in diagnosing acute gastrointestinal bleeding:A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. METHODS: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, Cochrane Library database, Sciencedirect, Springerlink and Scopus, from January 1995 to December 2009, were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of CT angiography in diagnosing acute GI bleeding. Studies were included if the ycompared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in ...

  2. Management of Antiplatelet Agents and Anticoagulants in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Neena S

    2015-07-01

    Antithrombotic drugs (anticoagulants, aspirin, and other antiplatelet agents) are used to treat cardiovascular disease and to prevent secondary thromboembolic events. These drugs are independently associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and, when prescribed in combination, further increase the risk of adverse bleeding events. Clinical evidence to inform the choice of endoscopic hemostatic procedure, safe temporary drug cessation, and use of reversal agents is reviewed to optimize management following clinically significant GIB.

  3. “Downhill” Esophageal Varices due to Dialysis Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Caval Occlusion: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar Nayudu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available “Downhill” varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Rarely these varices are reported in patients receiving hemodialysis as a complication of chronic dialysis vascular access. We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an individual with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed “downhill” varices in the upper third of the esophagus without any active bleeding at the time of the procedure. An angiogram was performed disclosing superior vena caval occlusion, which was treated with balloon angioplasty. Gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion for these rare “downhill” varices when dealing with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving hemodialysis and manage it appropriately using endoscopic, radiological, and surgical interventions.

  4. A prospective study of aspirin use and the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward S Huang

    Full Text Available Data regarding the influence of dose and duration of aspirin use on risk of gastrointestinal bleeding are conflicting.We conducted a prospective cohort study of 32,989 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS in 1994 who provided biennial aspirin data. We estimated relative risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding requiring hospitalization or a blood transfusion.During 14 years of follow-up, 707 men reported an episode of major gastrointestinal bleeding over 377,231 person-years. After adjusting for risk factors, regular aspirin use (≥2 times/week had a multivariate relative risk (RR of gastrointestinal bleeding of 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.55 compared to non-regular use. The association was particularly evident for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (multivariate RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.16-1.92. Compared to men who denied any aspirin use, multivariate RRs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 1.05 (95% CI 0.71-1.52 for men who used 0.5-1.5 standard tablets/week, 1.31 (95% CI 0.88-1.95 for 2-5 aspirin/week, 1.63 (95% CI, 1.15-2.32 for 6-14 aspirin/week and 2.40 (95% CI, 1.10-5.22 for >14 aspirin/week (P(trend<0.001. The relative risk also appeared to be dose-dependent among short-term users <5 years; P(trend<.001 and long-term users (≥5 years; P(trend = 0.015. In contrast, after controlling for dose, increasing duration of use did not appear to be associated with risk (P(trend = 0.749.Regular aspirin use increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, especially from the upper tract. However, risk of bleeding appears to be more strongly related to dose than to duration of use. Risk of bleeding should be minimized by using the lowest effective dose among short-term and long-term aspirin users.

  5. Unusual Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding due to Late Metastasis from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tsan Chang

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A case of recurrent massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding originating from metastatic renal cell carcinoma is reported. A 63-year-old woman underwent right nephrectomy 9 years previously and experienced no recurrence during follow-up. A gradually enlarging ulcerative tumor over the bulb of the duodenum and four subsequent episodes of massive bleeding from this tumor occurred between June 2001 and March 2002. The patient underwent surgery in April 2002 for intractable bleeding from the tumor. Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the duodenum was confirmed from the surgical specimen. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is very rare and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Furthermore, a solitary late renal cell carcinoma metastasis 9 years after a nephrectomy is extremely uncommon. This case suggests that life-long follow-up of renal cell carcinoma patients is necessary, owing to unpredictable behavior and the possibility of long disease-free intervals. In nephrectomized patients suffering from gastrointestinal bleeding, complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination, is indicated. The possibility of late recurrent renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the gastrointestinal tract should be kept in mind, although it is rare. If the patient is fit for surgery, metastatectomy is the first choice of treatment.

  6. Comparison of a novel bedside portable endoscopy device with nasogastric aspiration for identifying upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Hwan; Choi, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hyung Ki; Choi, Wang Yong; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2014-07-07

    To compare outcomes using the novel portable endoscopy with that of nasogastric (NG) aspiration in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients who underwent NG aspiration for the evaluation of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding were eligible for the study. After NG aspiration, we performed the portable endoscopy to identify bleeding evidence in the UGI tract. Then, all patients underwent conventional esophagogastroduodenoscopy as the gold-standard test. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the portable endoscopy for confirming UGI bleeding were compared with those of NG aspiration. In total, 129 patients who had GI bleeding signs or symptoms were included in the study (age 64.46 ± 13.79, 91 males). The UGI tract (esophagus, stomach, and duodenum) was the most common site of bleeding (81, 62.8%) and the cause of bleeding was not identified in 12 patients (9.3%). Specificity for identifying UGI bleeding was higher with the portable endoscopy than NG aspiration (85.4% vs 68.8%, P = 0.008) while accuracy was comparable. The accuracy of the portable endoscopy was significantly higher than that of NG in the subgroup analysis of patients with esophageal bleeding (88.2% vs 75%, P = 0.004). Food material could be detected more readily by the portable endoscopy than NG tube aspiration (20.9% vs 9.3%, P = 0.014). No serious adverse effect was observed during the portable endoscopy. The portable endoscopy was not superior to NG aspiration for confirming UGI bleeding site. However, this novel portable endoscopy device might provide a benefit over NG aspiration in patients with esophageal bleeding.

  7. Clinical predictors of poor outcomes among patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, A; Aabakken, L; Fonseca, J; Mungan, Z A; Papatheodoridis, G V; Piessevaux, H; Cipolletta, L; Nuevo, J; Tafalla, M

    2011-06-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common medical emergency associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in endoscopic and pharmacological treatment during the past two decades, the incidence of mortality associated with NVUGIB has remained relatively constant. To report outcomes and predictive factors for bleeding continuation/re-bleeding and mortality of NVUGIB in clinical practice in different European countries. This observational, retrospective cohort study (NCT00797641; ENERGIB) was conducted in Belgium, Greece, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Spain and Turkey. Eligible patients were hospitalised (new admissions or inpatients), presenting with overt NVUGIB with endoscopy from 1 October to 30 November, 2008. Patients were managed according to routine care, and data regarding bleeding continuation/re-bleeding, pharmacological treatment, surgery and mortality during 30-days after the initial bleed were collected. A multivariate analysis of clinical factors predictive of poor outcomes was conducted. Overall, 2660 patients (64.7% men; mean age 67.7 years) were evaluable. Significant differences across countries in bleeding continuation/re-bleeding (range: 9-15.8%) or death (2.5-8%) at 30 days were explained by clinical factors (number of comorbidities, age > 65 years, history of bleeding ulcers, in-hospital bleeding, type of lesion or type of concomitant medication). Other factors (country, size of hospital, profile of team managing the event, or endoscopic/pharmacological therapy received) did not affect these outcomes. Similar predictors were observed in patients with high-risk stigmata. Differences in the outcomes of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in clinical practice across some European countries are explained mainly by patient-related factors, and not by management factors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to Kaposi sarcoma as initial presentation of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Sara A; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A; Forbes, Rachel C; Papadimos, Thomas J; Lindsey, David E

    2013-12-01

    Despite our decades of experience with Kaposi Sarcoma its true nature remains elusive. This angioproliferative disease of the vascular endothelium has a propensity to involve visceral organs in the immunocompromised population. There are four variants of the disease and each has its own pathogenesis and evolution. While the common sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are familiar to surgeons and critical care physicians, here we present the exceedingly rare report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding attributable to this malady, explore its successful management, and review the various forms of Kaposi Sarcoma including the strategies in regard to their management.

  9. BET 1: should tranexamic acid be given to patients who are having an upper gastrointestinal bleed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anna; Jeffrey-Smith, Anna

    2012-09-01

    A short cut review was carried out to establish whether tranexamic acid should be given to patients having an upper gastrointestinal bleed. Seven studies and two systematic reviews were directly relevant to the question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that there is insufficient evidence, at the moment, to recommend the use of tranexamic acid in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  10. Etiology and Outcome of Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Iran:A Review Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Mohsen; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding that results from lesions located above the ligament of Treitz and is a common cause for emergency hospital admissions in patients with gastrointestinal disorders. UGIB also increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in patients already hospitalized for other reasons. According to epidemiological surveys of acute UGIB in Iran, peptic ulcer is the most common endoscopic diagnosis. Gastric and duodenal erosion accounts for 16.4%-25% of etiologies. Other relatively common causes of UGIB are variceal hemorrhage, Mallory-Weiss tears, and arterial and venous malformations. However, in 9%-13.3% of patients, the endoscopy is normal. PMID:24829656

  11. Massive gastrointestinal bleeding:An unusual case of asymptomatic extrarenal,visceral,fibromuscular dysplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Extrarenal fibromuscular dysplasia causing gastrointestinal bleeding without other manifestations and especially sparing renal vasculature is uncommon. The diagnosis of this entity is usually made by radiographic appearance and the treatment is controversial. To our knowledge only seven cases of visceral fibromuscular dysplasia as a primary manifestation of the disease have been described, symptoms range from abdominal pain to gangrene. This is the first case of visceral fibromuscular dysplasia presenting with otherwise asymptomatic gastrointestinal bleeding, without bowel necrosis or ischemic changes. We provide a review of the literature.

  12. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Nick; Lummis, Katie; Sood, Ruchit; Kane, John Samuel; Corp, Aaron; Subramanian, Venkataraman

    2017-02-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants are increasingly used for a wide range of indications. However, data are conflicting about the risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with these drugs. We compared the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants, warfarin, and low-molecular-weight heparin. For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched MEDLINE and Embase from database inception to April 1, 2016, for prospective and retrospective studies that reported the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with use of a direct oral anticoagulant compared with warfarin or low-molecular-weight heparin for all indications. We also searched the Cochrane Library for systematic reviews and assessment evaluations, the National Health Service (UK) Economic Evaluation Database, and ISI Web of Science for conference abstracts and proceedings (up to April 1, 2016). The primary outcome was the incidence of major gastrointestinal bleeding, with all gastrointestinal bleeding as a secondary outcome. We did a Bayesian network meta-analysis to produce incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% credible intervals (CrIs). We identified 38 eligible articles, of which 31 were included in the primary analysis, including 287 692 patients exposed to 230 090 years of anticoagulant drugs. The risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants did not differ from that with warfarin or low-molecular-weight heparin (factor Xa vs warfarin IRR 0·78 [95% CrI 0·47-1·08]; warfarin vs dabigatran 0·88 [0·59-1·36]; factor Xa vs low-molecular-weight heparin 1·02 [0·42-2·70]; and low-molecular-weight heparin vs dabigatran 0·67 [0·20-1·82]). In the secondary analysis, factor Xa inhibitors were associated with a reduced risk of all severities of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin (0·25 [0.07-0.76]) or dabigatran (0.24 [0.07-0.77]). Our findings show no increase in risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants compared with

  13. Dieulafoy lesion: CT diagnosis of this lesser-known cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batouli, A; Kazemi, A; Hartman, M S; Heller, M T; Midian, R; Lupetin, A R

    2015-06-01

    A Dieulafoy lesion describes a tortuous, submucosal artery in the gastrointestinal tract--most commonly the posterior stomach--that penetrates through the mucosa over time, eventually perforating to cause severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Due to its insidious onset, tendency to cause intermittent but severe bleeding, and difficulty of endoscopic diagnosis, Dieulafoy lesion has a very high mortality rate. Although originally thought not to be a radiologically diagnosable entity, Dieulafoy lesions can be seen at enhanced CT of the abdomen. The purpose of this review is to summarize the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of Dieulafoy lesions with a focus on diagnostic findings at enhanced CT imaging.

  14. Endoscopic Evaluation and Management of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients with Ventricular Assist Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty M. Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal diagnostic approach and yield for gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB in patients with ventricular assist devices (VAD are unknown. We explored the etiology of bleeding and yield of upper and lower endoscopy, balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and video capsule endoscopy in the evaluation of GIB in patients with VADs. Methods. All VAD patients with overt gastrointestinal bleeding and drop in hematocrit from April 1, 2000 to July 31, 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. The endoscopic evaluation of each episode was recorded. Overall yield of EGD, colonoscopy, balloon-assisted, and video capsule endoscopy were evaluated. Results. Thirty-six bleeding episodes occurred involving 20 patients. The site of GIB was identified in 32/36 episodes (88.9%, and the etiology of bleeding was determined in 30/36 cases (83.3%. Five VAD patients underwent VCE. The VCE exams demonstrated a high yield with 80% of exams identifying the etiology of GIB. Endoscopic intervention was successful in 8/9 attempts. No adverse events were recorded. Two patients required surgical intervention for GIB. Conclusion. Upper, lower, video capsule, and balloon-assisted enteroscopies are safe and demonstrate a high yield in the investigation of gastrointestinal bleeding in VAD patients. Medical centers caring for VAD patients should employ a standardized protocol to optimize endoscopic evaluation and intervention.

  15. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jae, Hwan Jun; Jung, Ah Young; Lee, Whal; Park, Jae Hyung

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods Between March 1999 and December 2002, TAE for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding was performed in 93 patients. The endoscopic approach had failed or was discarded as an approach for control of bleeding in all study patients. Among the 93 patients NBCA was used as the primary embolic material for TAE in 32 patients (28 men, four women; mean age, 59.1 years). The indications for choosing NBCA as the embolic material were: inability to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and effective wedging of the microcatheter into the bleeding artery. TAE was performed using 1:1-1:3 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. The angiographic and clinical success rate, recurrent bleeding rate, procedure related complications and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Results The angiographic and clinical success rates were 100% and 91% (29/32), respectively. There were no serious ischemic complications. Recurrent bleeding occurred in three patients (9%) and they were managed with emergency surgery (n = 1) and with a successful second TAE (n = 2). Eighteen patients (56%) had a coagulopathy at the time of TAE and the clinical success rate in this group of patients was 83% (15/18). Conclusion TAE with NBCA is a highly effective and safe treatment modality for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when it is not possible to advance the microcatheter to the bleeding site and when the patient has a coagulopathy. PMID:17277563

  16. Abnormal gastrointestinal accumulation of radiotracer by gastric bleeding during {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung A.; Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    We present a case in which a patient with acute hemorrhagic gastritis demonstrated abnormal gastrointestinal accumulation of radiotracer during {sup 99m}Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) skeletal scintigraphy. A hemorrhagic gastritis was subsequently demonstrated by endoscopy. The mechanism for the intestinal localization of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP in this patients is not clear, but we guess that the extravasated blood containing the radiopharmaceutical cannot recirculate and stays at the bleeding site, so we can see the intestinal activity.

  17. The changing face of hospitalization due to gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation

    OpenAIRE

    Lanas, Angel; Garcia Rodriguez, Luis Alberto; Polo-Tomas, Monica; Ponce, Marta; Quintero, Enrique; Perez-Aisa, Maria Angeles; Gisbert, Javier P; Bujanda, Luis; Castro, Manuel; Muñoz, Maria; Del Pino, Maria Dolores; Garcia, Santiago; Calvet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: Temporal changes in the incidence of cause-specific gastrointestinal (GI) complications may be one of the factors underlying changing medical practice patterns. Aim: To report temporal changes in the incidence of five major causes of specific gastrointestinal (GI) complication events. Methodology: Population-based study of patients hospitalized due to GI bleeding and perforation from 1996?2005 in Spain. We report crude rates, and estimate regression coefficient...

  18. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome with gastrointestinal bleeding,splenic hemangiomas and left inferior vena cava

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a congenital vascular anomaly characterized by a triad of varicose veins,cutaneous capillary malformation,and hypertrophy of bone and(or)soft tissue.Gastrointestinal vascular malformations in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome may present with gastrointestinal bleeding.The majority of patients with spleenic hemangiomatosis and/or left inferior vena cava are asymptomatic.We herein report a case admitted to the gastroenterology clinic with life-threatening hematochezia and symptomatic ir...

  19. 99mTechnetium-labelled red blood cell scintigraphy as an alternative to angiography in the investigation of gastrointestinal bleeding: clinical experience in a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearn, P.; Persad, R.; Wilson, N.; Flanagan, J.; Williams, T.

    1992-01-01

    99mTechnetium-labelled red blood cell scintigraphy (99mTc RBC scintigraphy) was used as the second-line investigation to localise bleeding in 23 patients (11 male, 12 female; mean age 67 years) presenting with active bleeding per rectum. Scintigraphy was available on a 24 h basis. A total of 18 patients had positive scans (78%). Surgery was performed urgently in 11 patients and the site of bleeding, as predicted by scintigraphy, was confirmed in 9 (82%). 99mTc RBC scintigraphy was less useful in patients who were not bleeding actively or who were being investigated for chronic anaemia. This study suggests that 99mTc RBC scintigraphy can play a useful role in the preoperative localisation of unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding in hospitals with nuclear medicine facilities, but confirms it has little place in the management of patients unless they are bleeding actively. PMID:1319696

  20. Recurrent Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Dilemmas and Success with Pharmacological Therapies. Case Series and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Almadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes three difficult cases of recurrent bleeding from obscure causes, followed by a review of the pitfalls and pharmacological management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. All three patients underwent multiple investigations. An intervening complicating diagnosis or antiplatelet drugs may have compounded long-term bleeding in two of the cases. A bleeding angiodysplasia was confirmed in one case but was aggravated by the need for anticoagulation. After multiple transfusions and several attempts at endoscopic management in some cases, long-acting octreotide was associated with decreased transfusion requirements and increased hemoglobin levels in all three cases, although other factors may have contributed in some. In the third case, however, the addition of low-dose thalidomide stopped bleeding for a period of at least 23 months.

  1. Safety of enteral feeding in patients with open abdomen, upper gastrointestinal bleed, and perforation peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Alexandra; Seres, David S

    2012-08-01

    Provision of enteral nutrition (EN) has historically been withheld after major abdominal operations until bowel activity returns. Evidence suggests that EN is safe in critically ill patients with a variety of illnesses, specifically after abdominal surgery. There is a strong association between poor nutrition status and worse outcomes in critically ill patients. The fear has been that EN, by virtue of increased luminal pressure or demand to the splanchnic circulation, may compromise the integrity of anastomotic repairs and place patients at risk for complications. In this review, the authors analyze the safety of EN in the setting of the open abdomen, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and perforation peritonitis, with evidence from published clinical trials and meta-analyses.

  2. Discharge hemoglobin and outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Eun Sun; Chun, Hoon Jai; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kang, Seung Hun; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Many patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding present with anemia and frequently require red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. A restrictive transfusion strategy and a low hemoglobin (Hb) threshold for transfusion had been shown to produce acceptable outcomes in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, most patients are discharged with mild anemia owing to the restricted volume of packed RBCs (pRBCs). We investigated whether discharge Hb influences the outcome in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who had received pRBCs during hospitalization between January 2012 and January 2014. Patients with variceal bleeding, malignant lesion, stroke, or cardiovascular disease were excluded. We divided the patients into 2 groups, low (8 g/dL ≤ Hb  10 g/dL. Patients in the low Hb group had a lower consumption of pRBCs and shorter hospital stay than did those in the high Hb group. The Hb levels were not fully recovered at outpatient follow-up until 7 days after discharge; however, most patients showed Hb recovery at 45 days after discharge. The rate of rebleeding after discharge was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Conclusions: In patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a discharge Hb between 8 and 10 g/dL was linked to favorable outcomes on outpatient follow-up. Most patients recovered from anemia without any critical complication within 45 days after discharge. PMID:27540574

  3. Renal failure after upper-gastrointestinal bleeding among cirrhotic patients in Upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlouf, Nahed A; Morsy, Khairy H

    2012-09-01

    Renal dysfunction is a common and serious problem in patients with advanced liver disease. The study aims to assess the incidence, risk factors and short-term prognosis of renal failure after upper-gastrointestinal bleeding among cirrhotic patients in Upper Egypt. We recruited 159 cirrhotic patients with 168 episodes of upper-gastrointestinal bleeding from Tropical Medicine and Gastroenterology Department, Assiut University Hospital. For all participants, the following were conducted: clinical evaluation, abdominal ultrasonography (US) examination, laboratory investigations and upper endoscopy. Risk factors of renal failure were identified using univariate, then multivariate analysis. The incidence of renal failure among bleeding episodes was 28%. Higher risk of renal failure among cirrhotic patients with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding was observed with shock (odds ratio (OR) 0.171, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.047:0.624), bacterial infection (OR 0.310, 95% CI 107:897), Child-Pugh class C (OR 2.79, 95% CI 1.018:7.62), higher serum bilirubin (OR 0.122, 95% CI 0.000:0.002), lower serum albumin (OR -0.188, 95% CI -0.288:-0.056) and raised baseline blood urea (OR 0.181, 95% CI 0.003:0.017) and serum creatinine (OR 0.533, 95% CI 0.002:0.004). Mortality among patients with renal failure was 31.9%. Renal failure is a frequent event among cirrhotic patients with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding and there are many contributing factors for its development. Mortality is relatively high among patients with renal failure in cirrhotics with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2012 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sinan Dal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of gastrointestinal complications especially gastric bleeding increased in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. The aim of this study was to comparatively investigate upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB in patients with non-hemodialysis CRF and the patients without CRF.Materials and Methods: Seventy-six patients (55 men and 21 women with and without CRF and UGB was included. The first group who had CRF consisted of 23 patients and the control group 53. All patients were evaluated in the view point of age, gender, smoking status, other illnesses, medicine usage, laboratory parameters, endoscopic evidence and endoscopic intervention (scleroteraphy.Results: Calcium levels of patients with a history of previous UGB was significantly lower compared with those bleeding for the first time (p<0.05. The mean parathormon level was higher in patients with CRF (171.24 ± 141.96 pg/ml (p<0.05. Serum albumin level was negatively correlated with urea and creatinine (p<0.001, and positively correlated with hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (p=0.003 and p=0.005. The patients undergoing sclerotherapy more frequently needed transfusions (p<0.05. The hospitalization time found to be shortening with increasing hemoglobin, hematocrit, calcium and albumin levels; and lengthens with increased urea and creatinine.Conclusion: The history of previous gastrointestinal bleeding and detection of pathological findings in endoscopy were more frequent in patients with CRF. Gastrointestinal bleeding risk did not reduce using by gastric protection against acetylsalicylic acid and other non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Also, low albumin levels and secondary hiperparathyroidism in these patients may be risky for gastrointestinal bleeding. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:207-13

  5. Predictors of In-hospital Mortality Among Patients Presenting with Variceal Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amith S Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The recent years have witnessed an increase in number of people harboring chronic liver diseases. Gastroesophageal variceal bleeding occurs in 30% of patients with cirrhosis, and accounts for 80%-90% of bleeding episodes. We aimed to assess the in-hospital mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding and (2 to investigate the predictors of mortality rate among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from treatment records of 317 subjects who presented with variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding to Government Medical College, Patiala, between June 1, 2010, and May 30, 2014. The data thus obtained was compiled using a preset proforma, and the details analyzed using SPSSv20. Results: Cirrhosis accounted for 308 (97.16% subjects with bleeding varices, with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction 9 (2.84% completing the tally. Sixty-three (19.87% subjects succumbed to death during hospital stay. Linear logistic regression revealed independent predictors for in-hospital mortality, including higher age (P = 0.000, Child-Pugh Class (P = 0.002, altered sensorium (P = 0.037, rebleeding within 24 h of admission (P = 0.000, low hemoglobin level (P = 0.023, and serum bilirubin (P = 0.002. Conclusion: Higher age, low hemoglobin, higher Child-Pugh Class, rebleeding within 24 h of admission, higher serum bilirubin, and lower systolic blood pressure are the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality among subjects presenting with variceal gastrointestinal bleeding.

  6. Simple measures to prevent a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Raghav; Vyas, Neil; Companioni, Rafael Antonio Ching; Rajnish, Ishita; Salehi, Ilnaz

    2017-08-01

    Nasogastric (NG) tube is frequently used in clinical practice for a variety of indications; however, NG tubes are not without risks, and there are a multitude of gastrointestinal complications that are associated with their use. Simple precautions can help prevent these NG tube-related injuries.

  7. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection: an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Trazzi Rios

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SummaryStrongyloidiasis is a parasitic disease that may progress to a disseminated form, called hyperinfection syndrome, in patients with immunosuppression. The hyperinfection syndrome is caused by the wide multiplication and migration of infective larvae, with characteristic gastrointestinal and/or pulmonary involvement. This disease may pose a diagnostic challenge, as it presents with nonspecific findings on endoscopy.

  8. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a rectal leiomyoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni D De Palma; Maria Rega; Stefania Masone; Saverio Siciliano; Marcello Persico; Francesca Salvatori; Francesco Maione; Dario Esposito; Antonio Bellino; Giovanni Persico

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of leiomyoma of the rectum is uncommon. Most of these lesions are clinically silent and are found incidentally during laparotomy or endoscopic procedures for unrelated conditions. Symptomatic leiomyomas of the rectum are encountered less frequently, with only sporadic reports in the literature. We describe a case of a leiomyoma of the rectum presenting as recurrent lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage and secondary anemia.

  9. Multidisciplinary management strategies for acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Loffroy, R; Lau, J Y W; Barkun, A

    2014-01-01

    The modern management of acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is centred on endoscopy, with recourse to interventional radiology and surgery in refractory cases. The appropriate use of intervention to optimize outcomes is reviewed. A literature search was undertaken of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials between January 1990 and April 2013 using validated search terms (with restrictions) relevant to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Appropriate and adequate resuscitation, and risk stratification using validated scores should be initiated at diagnosis. Coagulopathy should be corrected along with blood transfusions, aiming for an international normalized ratio of less than 2·5 to proceed with possible endoscopic haemostasis and a haemoglobin level of 70 g/l (excluding patients with severe bleeding or ischaemia). Prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can be administered while awaiting endoscopy, although they do not affect rebleeding, surgery or mortality rates. Endoscopic haemostasis using thermal or mechanical therapies alone or in combination with injection should be used in all patients with high-risk stigmata (Forrest I-IIb) within 24 h of presentation (possibly within 12 h if there is severe bleeding), followed by a 72-h intravenous infusion of PPI that has been shown to decrease further rebleeding, surgery and mortality. A second attempt at endoscopic haemostasis is generally made in patients with rebleeding. Uncontrolled bleeding should be treated with targeted or empirical transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is required in the event of failure of endoscopic and radiological measures. Secondary PPI prophylaxis when indicated and Helicobacter pylori eradication are necessary to decrease recurrent bleeding, keeping in mind the increased false-negative testing rates in the setting of acute bleeding. An evidence-based approach with multidisciplinary collaboration is required to optimize

  10. CT enteroclysis in the diagnosis of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, T.P. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Gulati, M.S. [Department of Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Makharia, G.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)]. E-mail: govindmakharia@aiims.ac.in; Bandhu, S. [Department ofRadiodiagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Garg, P.K. [Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) enteroclysis in patients with obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Materials and methods: In a prospective study, CT enteroclysis was performed in 21 patients (median age 50 years; range 13-71 years) with obscure GI bleeding in which the source of the bleeding could not be detected despite the patient having undergone both upper GI endoscopic and colonoscopic examinations. The entire abdomen and pelvis was examined in the arterial and venous phases using multisection CT after distending the small intestine with 2 l of 0.5% methylcellulose as a neutral enteral contrast medium and the administration of 150 ml intravenous contrast medium. Results: Adequate distension of the small intestine was achieved in 20 of the 21 (95.2%) patients. Potential causes of GI bleeding were identified in 10 of the 21 (47.6%) patients using CT enteroclysis. The cause of the bleeding could be detected nine of 14 (64.3%) patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding. However, for patients with occult, obscure GI bleeding, the cause of the bleeding was identified in only one of the seven (14.3%) patients. The lesions identified by CT enteroclysis included small bowel tumours (n = 2), small bowel intussusceptions (n = 2), intestinal tuberculosis (n = 2), and vascular lesions (n = 3). All vascular lesions were seen equally well in both the arterial and venous phases. Conclusions: The success rate in detection of the cause of bleeding using CT enteroclysis was 47.6% in patients with obscure GI bleeding. The diagnostic yield was higher in patients with overt, obscure GI bleeding than in those with occult obscure GI bleeding.

  11. Recent advances in endovascular techniques for management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffroy, Romaric F; Abualsaud, Basem A; Lin, Ming D; Rao, Pramod P

    2011-07-27

    Over the past two decades, transcatheter arterial embolization has become the first-line therapy for the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic hemostasis. Advances in catheter-based techniques and newer embolic agents, as well as recognition of the effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment options, have expanded the role of interventional radiology in the management of hemorrhage for a variety of indications, such as peptic ulcer bleeding, malignant disease, hemorrhagic Dieulafoy lesions and iatrogenic or trauma bleeding. Transcatheter interventions include the following: selective embolization of the feeding artery, sandwich coil occlusion of the gastroduodenal artery, blind or empiric embolization of the supposed bleeding vessel based on endoscopic findings and coil pseudoaneurysm or aneurysm embolization by three-dimensional sac packing with preservation of the parent artery. Transcatheter embolization is a fast, safe and effective, minimally invasive alternative to surgery when endoscopic treatment fails to control bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article reviews the various transcatheter endovascular techniques and devices that are used in a variety of clinical scenarios for the management of hemorrhagic gastrointestinal emergencies.

  12. Prediction scores or gastroenterologists' Gut Feeling for triaging patients that present with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, N.; Oijen, M.G. van; Kessels, K.; Hemmink, M.; Weusten, B.; Timmer, R.; Hazen, W.; Lelyveld, N. van; Vermeijden, J.R.; Curvers, W.; Baak, L.; Verburg, R.; Bosman, J.; Wijkerslooth, L. de; Rooij, J van; Venneman, N.; Pennings, M.C.P.; Hee, K. van; Scheffer, R.; Eijk, R. van; Meiland, R.; Siersema, P.; Bredenoord, A.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Several prediction scores for triaging patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding have been developed, yet these scores have never been compared to the current gold standard, which is the clinical evaluation by a gastroenterologist. The aim of this study was to assess the added

  13. The Role of Rapid Endoscopy for High-Risk Patients with Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Targownik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Performance of endoscopy within 24 h is recommended for patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB. It is unknown whether performing endoscopy early within this 24 h window is beneficial for clinically high-risk patients.

  14. Gastrointestinal bleedings during therapy with new oral anticoagulants are rarely reported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Kampmann, Jens Peter; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    , Surgical Section, Hvidovre Hospital, during a one-year-period. Patients in treatment with NOAC and admitted for gastrointestinal bleeding were identified. Relevant patients were cross-checked for a reported adverse drug event in the Danish Health and Medi-cines Authority's database on adverse medical...

  15. Helicobacter pylori and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among users of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Michael; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B; Møller Hansen, Jane

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies have reported a possible association between use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB). We conducted this case-control study to assess if Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) potentiates the risk of serious UGB in SSRI ...

  16. Gastrointestinal bleedings during therapy with new oral anticoagulants are rarely reported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Kampmann, Jens Peter; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    , Surgical Section, Hvidovre Hospital, during a one-year-period. Patients in treatment with NOAC and admitted for gastrointestinal bleeding were identified. Relevant patients were cross-checked for a reported adverse drug event in the Danish Health and Medi-cines Authority's database on adverse medical...

  17. The influence of the full moon on the number of admissions related to gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Eva María; Soriano, Germán; Fuentes, Mercedes; Gálvez, María Luz; Fernández, Clotilde

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse whether the number of admissions for gastrointestinal bleeding to our bleeding unit increases during the full moon. In a prospective study, we included 447 consecutive patients with gastrointestinal haemorrhage admitted to our bleeding unit during a period of two years. The number of admissions was allocated to the corresponding day of the lunar cycle, and full moon and non-full moon days were compared. A wide variation in the number of admissions throughout the lunar cycle was observed. There were 26 admissions on the 25 days of full moon and 421 admissions in the remaining 713 days of non-full moon. This difference was mainly related to a higher incidence of haemorrhage in men and variceal haemorrhage at full moon. The results of this study suggest an increase in the number of admissions related to gastrointestinal haemorrhage in our bleeding unit during the full moon, especially in men and in patients experiencing variceal haemorrhage. However, the wide variation in the number of admissions throughout the lunar cycle could limit interpretation of the results. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify the possible influence of the moon on gastrointestinal haemorrhage.

  18. Effect of Transfusion Strategy in Acute Non-variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Rasmus; Svenningsen, Peter; Hillingsø, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common cause of admissions as well as aggressive transfusion of blood products. Whether the transfusion strategy in NVUGIB impacts on hemostasis is unknown and constitutes the focus of this study. METHOD: Retrospective...

  19. Therapeutic Endoscopy for the Control of Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banc-Husu, Anna M; Ahmad, Nuzhat A; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Jaffe, David L; Kochman, Michael L; Rajala, Michael W; Mamula, Petar

    2017-04-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most common indications for urgent endoscopy in the pediatric setting. The majority of these procedures are performed for control of variceal bleeding, with few performed for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (NVUGI) bleeding. The data on therapeutic endoscopy for NVUGI are sparse. The aims of our study were to review our experience with NVUGI bleeding, describe technical aspects and outcomes of therapeutic endoscopy, and determine gastroenterology fellows' training opportunities according to the national training guidelines. We performed a retrospective review of endoscopy database (Endoworks, Olympus Inc, Center Valley, PA) from January 2009 to December 2014. The search used the following keywords: bleeding, hematemesis, melena, injection, epinephrine, cautery, clip, and argon plasma coagulation. The collected data included demographics, description of bleeding lesion and medical/endoscopic therapy, rate of rebleeding, relevant laboratories, physical examination, and need for transfusion and surgery. The study was approved by the institutional review board. During the study period 12,737 upper endoscopies (esophagogastroduodenoscopies) were performed. A total of 15 patients underwent 17 esophagogastroduodenoscopies that required therapeutic intervention to control bleeding (1:750 procedures). The mean ± standard deviation (median) age of patients who required endoscopic intervention was 11.6 ± 6.0 years (14.0 years). Seven out of 17 patients received dual therapy to control the bleeding lesions. All but 3 patients received medical therapy with intravenous proton pump inhibitor, and 3 received octreotide infusions. Six of the patients experienced rebleeding (40%), with 4 out of 6 initially only receiving single modality therapy. Two of these patients eventually required surgical intervention to control bleeding and both patients presented with bleeding duodenal ulcers. There were no cases of aspiration

  20. Vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with acute or chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2012-09-12

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. Several treatments are used for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with liver diseases. One of them is vitamin K administration, but it is not known whether it benefits or harms patients with acute or chronic liver disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin K for patients with acute or chronic liver disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register (12 June 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (Issue 5 of 12, 2012), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to 12 June 2012), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to 12 June 2012), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to 12 June 2012), and LILACS (1982 to 19 June 2012). Additional randomised trials were sought from two registries of clinical trials: the Clinical Trials Search Portal of the WHO, and the Metaregister of Controlled Trials. We looked through the reference lists of the retrieved publications and review articles. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. Observational studies were considered for assessment of harms only. Data from randomised clinical trials were to be summarised by standard Cochrane Collaboration methodologies. We could not find any randomised trials on vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with liver diseases in which we could assess benefits and harms. We could not identify quasi-randomised studies, historically controlled or observational studies in which we could assess harms. This updated review found no randomised clinical trials on the benefits and harms of vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with liver diseases. The effects of vitamin K need to be tested in randomised clinical

  1. Vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2015-06-09

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. Several treatments are used for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. One of them is vitamin K administration, but it is not known whether it benefits or harms people with acute or chronic liver disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This is an update of this Cochrane review. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin K for people with acute or chronic liver disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Controlled Trials Register (February 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2 of 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to February 2015), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to February 2015), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to February 2015), and LILACS (1982 to 25 February 2015). We sought additional randomised trials from two registries of clinical trials: the World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials. We looked through the reference lists of the retrieved publications and review articles. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. We considered observational studies for assessment of harms only. \\We aimed to summarise data from randomised clinical trials using Standard Cochrane methodology and assess them according to the GRADE approach. We found no randomised trials on vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases assessing benefits and harms of the intervention. We identified no quasi-randomised studies, historically controlled studies, or observational studies assessing harms. This updated review found no randomised clinical trials of vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. The benefits and harms of vitamin K need to be tested

  2. Risk factors of the rebleeding according to the patterns of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ji Hyung; Jeon, Tae Joo; Cho, Jae Hee; Kim, Jae Hak

    2017-07-01

    Despite of successful endoscopic hemostasis of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NGIB), rebleeding rate has not decreased. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for rebleeding after endoscopic hemostasis in patients with NGIB according to bleeding patterns. A retrospective analysis was performed on the consecutive patients with NGIB in whom successful primary endoscopic hemostasis had been achieved at three university hospitals in Korea. All patients underwent endoscopic treatment with hemoclips, epinephrine injection, argon-plasma coagulation, or its combinations within 12 h. A total of 198 patients were studied. The male-to-female ratio was 3:1. Mean age was 60.7±14.9 years. Rebleeding occurred in 41 cases (20.7%). Median day of rebleeding after endoscopic therapy was 2.0 days. Overall mortality rate was 5.1%. Risk factors for rebleeding were inpatients [odds ratio (OR) 2.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-6.46, p=0.038) and Forrest Ib (OR=2.73, 95% CI: 1.15-6.47, p=0.023) by multivariate regression analysis. Despite of successful emergent endoscopic therapy for NGIB, rebleeding occurred in 17.7% within a week. Endoscopic treatments should be more carefully performed for patients in hospitalization or patients with active oozing.

  3. Risk Factors Associated with Mortality and Increased Drug Costs in Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingliang; Sun, Gang; Zhang, Xiu-li; Zhang, Xiao-mei; Liu, Qing-sen; Huang, Qi-yang; Lau, James W Y; Yang, Yun-sheng

    2015-06-01

    To determine risk factors associated with mortality and increased drug costs in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients hospitalized with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding between January 2001-December 2011. Demographic and clinical characteristics and drug costs were documented. Univariate analysis determined possible risk factors for mortality. Statistically significant variables were analyzed using a logistic regression model. Multiple linear regression analyzed factors influencing drug costs. p 60, systolic blood pressurebleeding rate is 11.20% and mortality is 5.74%. The mortality risk in patients with comorbidities was higher than in patients without comorbidities, and was higher in patients requiring blood transfusion than in patients not requiring transfusion. Rebleeding was associ-ated with mortality. Rebleeding, blood transfusion, and prolonged hospital stay were associated with increased drug costs, whereas bleeding from lesions in the esophagus and duodenum was associated with lower drug costs.

  4. Hemosuccus pancreaticus as a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: a report of two cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodratollah Maddah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic diseases are known to be associated with complications such as pseudocyst and abscess. A pseudoaneurysm associated with pancreatitis may develop as well. The pseudoaneurysm may rupture into various parts of the gastrointestinal tract; the peritoneal cavity, or the retroperitoneum. We report two cases of Hemosuccus pancreaticus admitted to our center in the past five years. One case was associated with acute pancreatitis, and another case was associated with chronic pancreatitis. A pseudocyst was found in two cases. Both were successfully managed by emergency surgery. So, Hemosuccus pancreaticus is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding with difficult diagnosis, and surgery is the effective treatment for the patient with severe bleeding. However in cases with no life-threatening bleeding angiography and embolization can be performed.

  5. Is there still a role for intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Monsanto

    Full Text Available Background: in 21st century, endoscopic study of the small intestine has undergone a revolution with capsule endoscopy and balloon-assisted enteroscopy. The difficulties and morbidity associated with intraoperative enteroscopy, the gold-standard in the 20th century, made this technique to be relegated to a second level. Aims: evaluate the actual role and assess the diagnostic and therapeutic value of intraoperative enteroscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients and methods: we conducted a retrospective study of 19 patients (11 males; mean age: 66.5 ± 15.3 years submitted to 21 IOE procedures for obscure GI bleeding. Capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy had been performed in 10 and 5 patients, respectively. Results: with intraoperative enteroscopy a small bowel bleeding lesion was identified in 79% of patients and a gastrointestinal bleed-ing lesion in 94%. Small bowel findings included: angiodysplasia (n = 6, ulcers (n = 4, small bowel Dieulafoy's lesion (n = 2, bleed-ing from anastomotic vessels (n = 1, multiple cavernous hemangiomas (n = 1 and bleeding ectopic jejunal varices (n = 1. Agreement between capsule endoscopy and intraoperative enteroscopy was 70%. Endoscopic and/or surgical treatment was used in 77.8% of the patients with a positive finding on intraoperative enteroscopy, with a rebleeding rate of 21.4% in a mean 21-month follow-up period. Procedure-related mortality and postoperative complications have been 5 and 21%, respectively. Conclusions: intraoperative enteroscopy remains a valuable tool in selected patients with obscure GI bleeding, achieving a high diagnostic yield and allowing an endoscopic and/or surgical treatment in most of them. However, as an invasive procedure with relevant mortality and morbidity, a precise indication for its use is indispensable.

  6. Intractable Hematuria After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation: Can Lessons Learned from Gastrointestinal Bleeding Be Applied?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Andre Y; Zhao, Lee; Reyentovich, Alex; Deanda, Abe; Balsam, Leora B

    2016-01-01

    Patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) are at increased risk of bleeding. We reviewed our institutional experience with bleeding in the urinary tract after CF-LVAD implantation and quantified the impact on hospital resource utilization in comparison with bleeding in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the most commonly reported mucosal site of bleeding after LVAD implantation. Records were retrospectively reviewed for patients undergoing CF-LVAD implantation at our institution between October 2011 and April 2015. Major adverse events of gross hematuria and GI bleeding were identified, and patient demographics and hospital course were reviewed. Gross hematuria occurred in 3 of the 35 patients (8.6%) and in 5.1% of all hospitalizations for CF-LVAD patients. Severe hematuria occurred after traumatic urethral catheterization, urinary retention, or urologic surgery. Hospitalization for hematuria was six times less likely than hospitalization for GI bleeding; however, hematuria hospitalizations lasted 3.2 times longer than GI bleeding hospitalizations (17.0 vs. 5.3 days). Late recurrent gross hematuria occurred in all cases, with rehospitalization occurring after 109 ± 53 days. In conclusion, gross hematuria is an infrequent but morbid bleeding complication in CF-LVAD patients. Strategies to avoid this complication include strict avoidance of traumatic urethral catheterization and urinary retention in high-risk patients.

  7. Multidetector CT angiography in acute gastrointestinal bleeding: why, when, and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffroy, Yann; Rodallec, Mathieu H; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Jullès, Marie-Christine; Fullès, Marie-Christine; Ridereau-Zins, Catherine; Zins, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains an important cause of emergency hospital admissions, with substantial related morbidity and mortality. Bleeding may relate to the upper or lower GI tract, with the dividing anatomic landmark between these two regions being the ligament of Treitz. The widespread availability of endoscopic equipment has had an important effect on the rapid identification and treatment of the bleeding source. However, the choice of upper or lower GI endoscopy is largely dictated by the clinical presentation, which in many cases proves misleading. Furthermore, there remains a large group of patients with negative endoscopic results or failed endoscopy, in whom additional techniques are required to identify the source of GI bleeding. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) with its speed, resolution, multiplanar techniques, and angiographic capabilities allows excellent visualization of both the small and large bowel. Multiphasic multidetector CT allows direct demonstration of bleeding into the bowel and is helpful in the acute setting for visualization of the bleeding source and its characterization. Thus, multidetector CT angiography provides a time-efficient method for directing and planning therapy for patients with acute GI bleeding. The additional information provided by multidetector CT angiography before attempts at therapeutic angiographic procedures leads to faster selective catheterization of bleeding vessels, thereby facilitating embolization. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.313105206/-/DC1.

  8. Gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a continuous-flow biventricular assist device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raymond V Mirasol; Jason J Tholany; Hasini Reddy; Billie S Fyfe-Kirschner; Christina L Cheng; Issam F Moubarak; John L Nosher

    2016-01-01

    The association between continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices(CF-LVADs)and gastrointestinal(GI)bleeding from angiodysplasia is well recognized.However,the association between continuous-flow biventricular assist devices(CF-BIVADs)and bleeding angiodysplasia is less understood.We report a case of GI bleeding from a patient with a CF-BIVAD.The location of GI bleeding was identified by nuclear red blood cell bleeding scan.The vascular malformation leading to the bleed was identified and localized on angiography and then by pathology.The intensity of bleeding,reflected by number of units of packed red blood cells needed for normalization of hemoglobin,as well as the time to onset of bleeding after transplantation,are similar to that seen in the literature for CF-LVADs and pulsatile BIVADs.While angiography only detected a dilated late draining vein,pathology demonstrated the presence of both arterial and venous dilation in the submucosa,vascular abnormalities characteristic of a late arteriovenous malformation.

  9. Upper gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding treated with various endoscopic modalities: Case reports and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Choi, Sung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Chang Hwan; Rew, Jong Sun; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Hee Joon; Han, Mingui; Cho, Kyu Man

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic variceal bleeding is a rare (2-5%) but fatal gastrointestinal bleed in patients with portal hypertension. Patients with ectopic variceal bleeding manifest melena, hematochezia, or hematemesis, which require urgent managements. Definitive therapeutic modalities of ectopic varices are not yet standardized because of low incidence. Various therapeutic modalities have been applied on the basis of the experiences of experts or availability of facilities, with varying results. We have encountered eight cases of gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding in five patients in the last five years. All patients were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis presenting melena or hematemesis. All patients were treated with various endoscopic modalities (endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in five cases, endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) in two cases, hemoclipping in one case). Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved without radiologic interventions in all cases. EVO and EVL each caused one case of portal biliopathy, and EVL induced ulcer bleeding in one case. EVO generally accomplished better results of variceal obturations than EVL or hemoclipping, without serious adverse events. EVO may be an effective modality for control of ectopic variceal bleeding without radiologic intervention or surgery.

  10. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding etiology score for predicting variceal and non-variceal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Supot Pongprasobchai; Sireethorn Nimitvilai; Jaroon Chasawat; Sathaporn Manatsathit

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify clinical parameters, and develop an Upper Gastrointesinal Bleeding (UGIB) Etiology Score for predicting the types of UGIB and validate the score.METHODS: Patients with UGIB who underwent endoscopy within 72 h were enrolled. Clinical and basic laboratory parameters were prospectively collected.Predictive factors for the types of UGIB were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses and were used to generate the UGIB Etiology Score. The best cutoff of the score was defined from the receiver operating curve and prospectively validated in another set of patients with UGIB.RESULTS: Among 261 patients with UGIB, 47 (18%) had variceal and 214 (82%) had non-variceal bleeding.Univariate analysis identified 27 distinct parameters significantly associated with the types of UGIB. Logistic regression analysis identified only 3 independent factors for predicting variceal bleeding;previous diagnosis of cirrhosis or signs of chronic liver disease (OR 22.4, 95% CI 8.3-60.4, P < 0.001), red vomitus (OR4.6, 95% CI 1.8-11.9, P = 0.02), and red nasogastric (NG) aspirate (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.3-8.3, P = 0.011).The UGIB Etiology Score was calculated from (3.1 x previous diagnosis of cirrhosis or signs of chronic liver disease) + (1.5 × red vornitus) + (1.2 × red NG aspirate), when 1 and 0 are used for the presence and absence of each factor, respectively. Using a cutoff ≥ 3.1, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) in predicting variceal bleeding were 85%, 81%,82%, 50%, and 96%, respectively. The score was prospectively validated in another set of 195 UGIB cases (46 variceal and 149 non-variceal bleeding). The PPV and NPV of a score ≥3.1 for variceal bleeding were 79% and 97%, respectively.CONCLUSION: The UGIB Etiology Score, composed of 3 parameters, using a cutoff ≥ 3.1 accurately predicted variceal bleeding and may help to guide the choice of initial therapy for UGIB before endoscopy.

  11. Using Hemospray Improves the Cost-effectiveness Ratio in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Nonvariceal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkun, Alan N; Adam, Viviane; Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Martel, Myriam

    2016-10-04

    We compared the cost-effectiveness of traditional recommended endoscopic hemostatic therapies and Hemospray alone or in combination when treating nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). Hemospray (TC-325) is a novel endoscopic hemostatic powder, achieving hemostasis through adherence to actively bleeding biological surfaces. A decision tree of patients with NVUGIB assessed 4 possible treatment strategies: traditional therapy alone (T), Hemospray alone (H), traditional therapy completed by Hemospray if needed (T+H), or Hemospray completed by traditional therapy if needed (H+T). Using published probabilities, effectiveness was the likelihood of avoiding rebleeding over 30 days. Costs in 2014 US$ were based on the US National Inpatient Sample. A third-party payer perspective was adopted. Sensitivity and subgroup analyses were performed. For all patients, T+H was more efficacious (97% avoiding rebleeding) and less expensive (average cost per patient of US$9150) than all other approaches. The second most cost-effective approach was H+T (5.57% less effective and US$635 more per patient). Sensitivity analyses showed T+H followed by a strategy of H+T remained more cost-effective than H or T alone when varying all probability assumptions across plausible ranges. Subgroup analysis showed that the inclusion of H (especially alone) was least adapted for ulcers and was more cost-effective when treating lesions at low risk of delayed rebleeding. Hemospray improves the effectiveness of traditional hemostasis, being less costly in most NVUGIB patient populations. A Hemospray first approach is most cost-effective for nonulcer bleeding lesions at low risk of delayed hemorrhage.

  12. [Safely restarting antithrombotic treatment after a gastrointestinal bleed: evidence or gut feeling?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, H Bart

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage recommend restarting anticoagulant therapy after treatment of the haemorrhage in patients with an indication for anticoagulation, such as atrial fibrillation. This recommendation is based on findings in retrospective observational studies, and probably also on common sense: if the cause of the haemorrhage has been treated, the chance of a life-threatening second gastrointestinal haemorrhage when anticoagulation is restarted is likely to be smaller than the chance of a serious thromboembolic complication if anticoagulation is stopped indefinitely. A new, large observational study in patients with atrial fibrillation who had a gastrointestinal bleed while receiving antithrombotic treatment suggests that a restart of oral anticoagulation is associated with a lower risk of death and thromboembolic complications than not resuming anticoagulation, and that the risk of a recurrent bleed is slight. Unfortunately, methodological limitations inherent to most observational studies limit the usefulness of the findings to individual patient cases.

  13. Brunner's Gland Adenoma - A Rare Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Case Report and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorleto, Michele; Timmer-Stranghöner, Annette; Wuttig, Helge; Engelhard, Oliver; Gartung, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Brunner's gland adenoma is an extremely rare benign small bowel neoplasm, often discovered incidentally during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or radiological diagnostics. In few cases, it tends to cause gastrointestinal hemorrhage or intestinal obstruction. We report here our experience with a 47-year-old woman with a Brunner's gland adenoma of more than 6 cm in size, located in the first part of the duodenum and causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Initially, we performed a partial endoscopic resection using endoloop and snare alternatively to prevent severe bleeding. A rest endoscopic polypectomy with the submucosal dissection technique was planned. However, on request of the patient, an elective surgical duodenotomy with submucosal resection of the remaining small duodenal tumor was performed. To better define the patient's characteristics and treatment options of such lesions, we performed a systematic review of the available literature in PubMed. Recently, an endoscopic removal is being increasingly practiced and is considered as a safe treatment modality of such lesions.

  14. Brunner's Gland Adenoma – A Rare Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Case Report and Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorleto, Michele; Timmer-Stranghöner, Annette; Wuttig, Helge; Engelhard, Oliver; Gartung, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Brunner's gland adenoma is an extremely rare benign small bowel neoplasm, often discovered incidentally during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or radiological diagnostics. In few cases, it tends to cause gastrointestinal hemorrhage or intestinal obstruction. We report here our experience with a 47-year-old woman with a Brunner's gland adenoma of more than 6 cm in size, located in the first part of the duodenum and causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Initially, we performed a partial endoscopic resection using endoloop and snare alternatively to prevent severe bleeding. A rest endoscopic polypectomy with the submucosal dissection technique was planned. However, on request of the patient, an elective surgical duodenotomy with submucosal resection of the remaining small duodenal tumor was performed. To better define the patient's characteristics and treatment options of such lesions, we performed a systematic review of the available literature in PubMed. Recently, an endoscopic removal is being increasingly practiced and is considered as a safe treatment modality of such lesions. PMID:28203131

  15. Risk factors of postoperative upper gastrointestinal bleeding following colorectal resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Carmichael, Joseph C; Stamos, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    There is limited data regarding the risk factors of postoperative upper GI bleeding (UGIB) in patients undergoing colorectal resection. We sought to identify risk factors of UGIB after colorectal resection. The NIS database was used to evaluate all patients who had colorectal resection complicated by UGIB between 2002 and 2010. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed to quantify the association of preoperative variables with postoperative UGIB. We sampled a total of 2,514,228 patients undergoing colorectal resection, of which, 12,925 (0.5%) suffered a postoperative UGIB. The mortality of patients who had UGIB was significantly greater than patients without UGIB (14.9 vs. 4.7%; OR, 3.57; CI, 3.40-3.75; P bleeding is a mortality predictors of patients (OR, 1.71; CI, 1.49-1.97; P < 0.01). Postoperative UGIB occurs in less than 1 % of colorectal resections. However, patients suffering from postoperative UGIB are over three times more likely to die. Chronic peptic ulcer disease and emergency admission are respectively the strongest predictors of postoperative UGIB.

  16. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in severely burned patients: a case-control study to assess risk factors, causes, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jin; Koh, Dong Hee; Park, Se Woo; Park, Sun Man; Choi, Min Ho; Jang, Hyun Joo; Kae, Sea Hyub; Lee, Jin; Byun, Hyun Woo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the risk factors, causes, and outcome of clinically important upper gastrointestinal bleeding that occurs in severely burned patients. The charts of all patients admitted to the burn intensive care unit were analyzed retrospectively over a 4-year period (from January 2006 to December 2009). Cases consisted of burned patients who developed upper gastrointestinal bleeding more than 24 hours after admission to the burn intensive care unit. Controls were a set of patients, in the burn intensive care unit, without upper gastrointestinal bleeding matched with cases for age and gender. Cases and controls were compared with respect to the risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and outcomes. During the study period, clinically important upper gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in 20 patients out of all 964 patients. The most common cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was duodenal ulcer (11 of 20 cases, 55%). In the multivariate analysis, mechanical ventilation (p = 0.044) and coagulopathy (p = 0.035) were found to be the independent predictors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in severely burned patients. Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage tends to occur more frequently after having prolonged mechanical ventilation and coagulopathy.

  17. ENDOSCOPIC FINDINGS OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING IN PATIENTS WITH LIVER CIRROSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadayat, Rania; Jehangiri, Attique-ur-Rehman; Gul, Rahid; Khan, Adil Naseer; Said, Khalid; Gandapur, Asadullah

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical emergency. A common risk factor of upper GI bleeding is cirrhosis of liver, which can lead to variceal haemorrhage. 30-40% of cirrhotic patients who bleed may have non-variceal upper GI bleeding and it is frequently caused by peptic ulcers, portal gastropathy, Mallory-Weiss tear, and gastroduodenal erosions. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings among patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding with liver cirrhosis. This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in Gastroenterology & Hepatology Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from February 2012 to June 2013. 252 patients diagnosed with cirrhosis, presenting with upper GI bleed, age 50 years of either gender, and were included in the study. Non-probability consecutive sampling was used, Endoscopy was performed on each patient and the findings documented. The mean age was 57.84 +/- 6.29 years. There were 158 (62.7%) males and 94 (37.3%) females. The most common endoscopic finding was oesophageal varices (92.9%, n=234) followed by portal hypertensive gastropathy (38.9%, n=98) with almost equal distribution among males and females. Gastric varices were found in 33.3% of patients (n=84). Among other non-variceal lesions, peptic ulcer disease was seen in 26 patients (10.3%) while gastric erosions were found in 8 patients (3.2%). In patients with acute upper GI bleeding and liver cirrhosis, the most common endoscopic finding is oesophageal varices, with a substantially higher value in our part of the country, apart from other non-variceal causes.

  18. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-03-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent.

  19. Clinical Scoring Systems in Predicting the Outcome of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding; a Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanieh Ebrahimi Bakhtavar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of the outcome and severity of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB has significant importance in patient care, disposition, and determining the need for emergent endoscopy. Recent international recommendations endorse using scoring systems for management of non-variceal UGIB patients. To date, different scoring systems have been developed for predicting the risk of 30-day mortality and re-bleeding. We have discussed the screening performance characteristics of Baylor bleeding score, the Rockall risk scoring score, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center predictive index, Glasgow Blatchford score, T-score, and AIMS65 systems, in the present review.Based on the results of this survey, there are only 3 clinical decision rules that can predict the outcome of UGIB patients, independent from endoscopy. Among these, only Glasgow Blatchford score was highly sensitive for predicting the risk of 30-day mortality and re-bleeding, simultaneously. 

  20. A rare cause for severe recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding in a 12 year old patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belsha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cause for severe, recurrent lower gastrointestinal (LGI bleeding in children can usually be diagnosed readily by means of the commonly used investigative/diagnostic techniques such as colonoscopy, laparoscopy ± laparotomy. Occasionally less commonly used investigations may be necessary to look for more elusive causes of LGI bleeding such as capsule endoscopy, angiography, technetium-99m (99m Tc-labeled red blood cell (RBC scintigraphy, cross-sectional imaging such as CT/MRI (including angiography and laparotomy combined with on-table small bowel enteroscopy. We report a case of severe, recurrent LGI bleeding that had occurred over several years, where the cause remained elusive despite numerous investigations and interventions. The etiology of this was eventually found to be a gastric duplication cyst infiltrating into adjacent transverse colon and causing bleeding from peptic ulceration in the colon. The process by which this diagnosis was made and the lessons learned are discussed.

  1. Hepatic artery aneurysm: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Madeleine; Phillips, Rosemary; Aldin, Zaid; Ghosh, Deb

    2017-08-24

    An 86-year-old woman presented to hospital with melaena. This was her third presentation with the same symptom. There was no obvious source of bleeding on her oesophagogastroduodenoscopy; however, it did show a previously clipped Dieulafoy lesion. CT angiography showed an aneurysm arising from the hepatic artery. Selective coeliac artery angiogram showed aneurysmal dilatation of the distal part of the coeliac trunk and confirmed the presence of the common hepatic artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was coiled by the interventional radiologist. Final angiogram showed good flow through the hepatic artery with obliteration of the inferior patch. The procedure was uncomplicated and the patient was discharged shortly afterwards. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. A therapeutic dose of ketoprofen causes acute gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-11-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine.

  3. Diagnostic performance of CT angiography in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hang; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of computed tomography angiography (CTA) in identifying the cause of bleeding and to determine the clinical features associated with a positive test result of CTA in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We included 111 consecutive patients (61 men and 50 women; mean age: 63.4 years; range: 28-89 years) who visited emergency department with overt GI bleeding. They underwent CTA as a first-line diagnostic modality from July through December 2010. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the CTA images and determined the presence of any definite or potential bleeding focus by consensus. An independent assessor determined the cause of bleeding based on other diagnostic studies and/or clinical follow-up. The diagnostic performance of CTA and clinical characteristics associated with positive CTA results were analyzed. To identify a definite or potential bleeding focus, the diagnostic yield of CTA was 61.3% (68 of 111). The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were 84.8% (67 of 79), 96.9% (31 of 32), 98.5% (67 of 68), and 72.1% (31 of 43), respectively. Positive CTA results were associated with the presence of massive bleeding (p = 0.001, odds ratio: 11.506). Computed tomography angiography as a first-line diagnostic modality in patients presenting with overt GI bleeding showed a fairly high accuracy. It could identify definite or potential bleeding focus with a moderate diagnostic yield and a high PPV. CTA is particularly useful in patients with massive bleeding.

  4. Laboratory test variables useful for distinguishing upper from lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2015-05-28

    To distinguish upper from lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Patient records between April 2011 and March 2014 were analyzed retrospectively (3296 upper endoscopy, and 1520 colonoscopy). Seventy-six patients had upper GI bleeding (Upper group) and 65 had lower GI bleeding (Lower group). Variables were compared between the groups using one-way analysis of variance. Logistic regression was performed to identify variables significantly associated with the diagnosis of upper vs lower GI bleeding. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the threshold value that could distinguish upper from lower GI bleeding. Hemoglobin (P = 0.023), total protein (P = 0.0002), and lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.009) were significantly lower in the Upper group than in the Lower group. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) was higher in the Upper group than in the Lower group (P = 0.0065). Logistic regression analysis revealed that BUN was most strongly associated with the diagnosis of upper vs lower GI bleeding. ROC analysis revealed a threshold BUN value of 21.0 mg/dL, with a specificity of 93.0%. The threshold BUN value for distinguishing upper from lower GI bleeding was 21.0 mg/dL.

  5. Management of variceal and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Isabelle; Ribeiro, Suzane

    2014-09-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage remains the most common medical emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis can be grouped into two categories: the first includes lesions that arise by virtue of portal hypertension, namely gastroesophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy; and the second includes lesions seen in the general population (peptic ulcer, erosive gastritis, reflux esophagitis, Mallory-Weiss syndrome, tumors, etc.). Emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the standard procedure recommended for both diagnosis and treatment of UGIB. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is band ligation of varices. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the same time as endoscopy. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is less frequent, usually chronic and treatment options include β-blocker therapy, injection therapy and interventional radiology. The standard of care of UGIB in patients with cirrhosis includes careful resuscitation, preferably in an intensive care setting, medical and endoscopic therapy, early consideration for placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and, sometimes, surgical therapy or hepatic transplant.

  6. Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Caused by Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

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    O. Telci Caklili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a life-threatening emergency which needs urgent intervention. Hematological malignancies are very rare causes of this type of bleeding and they usually originate from duodenum. In this case we present a gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL causing massive upper gastrointestinal system bleeding. A 77-year-old male patient was admitted to emergency clinic with hematemesis and hematochezia. In physical examination patient was pale and sweaty; his vitals were unstable with a heart rate of 110 per minute and a blood pressure of 90/50 mmHg. His hemoglobin level was found 7.5 g/dL and he was transfused with one unit of packed red blood cells. After his vitals were normalized, gastroscopy was performed showing mosaic pattern in corpus and antrum mucosa and multiple ulcers in various sizes, largest being approximately 2 cm in diameter, higher than mucosa covered with exude mostly on corpus and large curvature. Biopsy results were reported as DLBCL. Gastric mucosa is involved in most of the DLBCL cases. Although not listed as a common cause of massive gastrointestinal bleeding DLBCL can cause life-threatening situations mostly because of its malignant nature.

  7. Endoscopic findings in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients at Lacor hospital, northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alema, O N; Martin, D O; Okello, T R

    2012-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common emergency medical condition that may require hospitalization and resuscitation, and results in high patient morbidity. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the preferred investigative procedure for UGIB because of its accuracy, low rate of complication, and its potential for therapeutic interventions. To determine the endoscopic findings in patients presenting with UGIB and its frequency among these patients according to gender and age in Lacor hospital, northern Uganda. The study was carried out at Lacor hospital, located at northern part of Uganda. The record of 224 patients who underwent endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a period of 5 years between January 2006 and December 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 224 patients had endoscopy for UGIB which consisted of 113 (50.4%) males and 111 (49.6%) females, and the mean age was 42 years ± SD 15.88. The commonest cause of UGIB was esophagealvarices consisting of 40.6%, followed by esophagitis (14.7%), gastritis (12.6%) and peptic ulcer disease (duodenal and gastric ulcers) was 6.2%. The malignant conditions (gastric and esophageal cancers) contributed to 2.6%. Other less frequent causes of UGIB were hiatus hernia (1.8), duodenitis (0.9%), others-gastric polyp (0.4%). Normal endoscopic finding was 16.1% in patients who had UGIB. Esophageal varices are the commonest cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this environment as compared to the west which is mainly peptic ulcer disease.

  8. Duodenal plexiform fibromyxoma as a cause of obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moris, Demetrios; Spanou, Evangelia; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Dimitrokallis, Nikolaos; Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Felekouras, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    We are reporting the first-to our knowledge-case of duodenal Plexiform Fibromyxoma causing obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Plexiform fibromyxoma triggered recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding episodes in a 63-year-old man who remained undiagnosed, despite multiple hospitalizations, extensive diagnostic workups and surgical interventions (including gastrectomies), for almost 17 years. During hospitalization for the last bleeding episode, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an intestinal hemorrhagic nodule. The lesion was deemed unresectable by endoscopic means. An abdominal computerized tomography disclosed no further lesions and surgery was decided. The lesion at operation was found near the edge of the duodenal stump and treated with pancreas-preserving duodenectomy (1st and 2nd portion). Postoperative recovery was mainly uneventful and a 20-month follow-up finds the patient in good health with no need for blood transfusions.Plexiform fibromyxomas stand for a rare and widely unknown mesenchymal entity. Despite the fact that they closely resemble other gastrointestinal tumors, they distinctly vary in clinical management as well as the histopathology. Clinical awareness and further research are compulsory to elucidate its clinical course and prognosis.

  9. Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhotic patients in Nile Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Mamdouh Ahmed; Tawfik, Mohamed Abd El-Raouf; El-Sawy, Abd Allah Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) in cirrhotic patients occurs mainly from esophageal and gastric varices; however, quite a large number of cirrhotic patients bleed from other sources as well. The aim of the present work is to determine the prevalence of non-variceal UGIB as well as its different causes among the cirrhotic portal hypertensive patients in Nile Delta. Emergency upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy for AUGIB was done in 650 patients. Out of these patients, 550 (84.6%) patients who were proved to have cirrhosis were the subject of the present study. From all cirrhotic portal hypertensive patients, 415 (75.5%) bled from variceal sources (esophageal and gastric) while 135 (24.5%) of them bled from non-variceal sources. Among variceal sources of bleeding, esophageal varices were much more common than gastric varices. Peptic ulcer was the most common non-variceal source of bleeding. Non-variceal bleeding in cirrhosis was not frequent, and sources included peptic ulcer, portal hypertensive gastropathy, and erosive disease of the stomach and duodenum.

  10. Antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2015-06-09

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. People with liver disease frequently have haemostatic abnormalities such as hyperfibrinolysis. Therefore, antifibrinolytic amino acids have been proposed to be used as supplementary interventions alongside any of the primary treatments for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. This is an update of this Cochrane review. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Controlled Trials Register (February 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2 of 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to February 2015), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to February 2015), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to February 2015), LILACS (1982 to February 2015), World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal (accessed 26 February 2015), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (accessed 26 February 2015). We scrutinised the reference lists of the retrieved publications. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. Observational studies for assessment of harms. We planned to summarise data from randomised clinical trials using standard Cochrane methodologies and assessed according to the GRADE approach. We found no randomised clinical trials assessing antifibrinolytic amino acids for treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We did not identify quasi-randomised, historically controlled, or observational studies in which we could assess harms. This updated Cochrane review identified no randomised clinical trials assessing the benefits and harms of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or

  11. Tranexamic acid in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: an evidence-based case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atikah, Nur; Singh, Gurmeet; Maulahela, Hasan; Cahyanur, Rahmat

    2015-04-01

    to review the effectiveness of tranexamic acid therapy which has been proposed to reduce bleeding and in turn lower mortality rate. following literature searching based on our clinical question on Cochrane Library, PubMed, Clinical Key, EBSCO, Science Direct and Proquest, one systematic review that includes seven randomized controlled trials is obtained. The article meets validity and relevance criteria. the systematic review found that there is no any clear evidence between intervention and control groups in term of mortality. the use of tranexamic acid to reduce mortality in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding is not recommended.

  12. Endoscopic management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Naoki; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-03-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is one of the most common reasons for hospitalization and a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recently developed endoscopic devices and supporting apparatuses can achieve endoscopic hemostasis with greater safety and efficiency. With these advancements in technology and technique, gastroenterologists should have no concerns regarding the management of acute upper GI bleeding, provided that they are well prepared and trained. However, when endoscopic hemostasis fails, endoscopy should not be continued. Rather, endoscopists should refer patients to radiologists and surgeons without any delay for evaluation regarding the appropriateness of emergency interventional radiology or surgery.

  13. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Timing of Endoscopy and Ways to Improve Endoscopic Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamaysi, Iyad; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy is the cornerstone of diagnosis and management of patients presenting with acute UGI bleeding. Once hemodynamically resuscitated, early endoscopy (performed within 24 hours of patient presentation) ensures accurate identification of the bleeding source, facilitates risk stratification based on endoscopic stigmata, and allows endotherapy to be delivered where indicated. Moreover, the preendoscopy use of a prokinetic agent (eg, i.v. erythromycin), especially in patients with a suspected high probability of having blood or clots in the stomach before undergoing endoscopy, may result in improved endoscopic visualization, a higher diagnostic yield, and less need for repeat endoscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. National variation in transfusion strategies in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin Julia; Svenningsen, Peter Olsen; Fabricius, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An optimal transfusion strategy for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) has yet to be established. The national guidelines contain recommendations for patients with life-threating bleeding in general, but no specific recommendations for patients with UGIB. We...... hypothesised that there are variations in transfusion strategies for patients with UGIB across the Danish regions. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, register-based, analysis on transfusions given to all patients with non-variceal UGIB in Denmark in 2011-2013. We compared the results from the five regions...

  15. Isolated Splenic Vein Thrombosis: 8-Year-Old Boy with Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Hypersplenism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Mazdaee, Behnaz; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Ravari, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    We present an 8-year-old boy who was referred to our center with the complaint of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with hypersplenism and progressive esophageal varices. Performing a computerized tomography (CT) scan, we discovered a suspicious finding in the venography phase in favor of thrombosis in the splenic vein. Once complementary examinations were done and due to recurrent bleeding and band ligation failure, the patient underwent splenectomy. And during the one-year follow-up obvious improvement of the esophageal varices was observed in endoscopy.

  16. Tips and Tricks on How to Optimally Manage Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Michael W; Ginsberg, Gregory G

    2015-07-01

    Effective endoscopic therapy for upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding has been shown to reduce rebleeding, need for surgery, and mortality. Effective endoscopic management of acute upper GI bleeding can be challenging and worrying. This article provides advice that is complementary to the in-depth reviews that accompany it in this issue. Topics include initial management, resuscitation, when and where to scope, benefits and limitations of devices, device selection based on lesion characteristics, improving visualization to localize the lesion, and tips on how to reduce the endoscopist's trepidation about managing these cases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. National variation in transfusion strategies in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinthorsdottir, Kristin J; Svenningsen, Peter; Fabricius, Rasmus;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An optimal transfusion strategy for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) has yet to be established. The national guidelines contain recommendations for patients with life-threating bleeding in general, but no specific recommendations for patients with UGIB. We...... in Denmark in order to discover regional differences. RESULTS: A total of 5,292 admissions with treatment for non-variceal UGIB were identified, and analysis was made for the total group and a massive transfusions group (330 admissions). In the Capital Region, transfusion of platelets was more likely than...

  18. Isolated Splenic Vein Thrombosis: 8-Year-Old Boy with Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Hypersplenism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Kiani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an 8-year-old boy who was referred to our center with the complaint of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with hypersplenism and progressive esophageal varices. Performing a computerized tomography (CT scan, we discovered a suspicious finding in the venography phase in favor of thrombosis in the splenic vein. Once complementary examinations were done and due to recurrent bleeding and band ligation failure, the patient underwent splenectomy. And during the one-year follow-up obvious improvement of the esophageal varices was observed in endoscopy.

  19. Evaluation of /sup 99m/Tc labeled red blood cell scintigraphy for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markisz, J.A.; Front, D.; Royal, H.D.; Sacks, B.; Parker, J.A.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1982-08-01

    /sup 99m/Tc labeled red blood cell scintigraphy was performed upon 39 patients with clinical evidence for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding from an unknown source. Seventeen of 39 patients (44%) had a scan became positive 6 or more h after injection, consistent with intermittent bleeding, in 8 of 17 patients (47%). In the 11 patients in whom the bleeding site was definitely identified by arteriography, surgery, or colonoscopy, scintigraphy correctly localized the bleeding site in 10 of 11 patients (91%). Four of 11 patients (36%) had an active bleeding site identified by arteriography. Ten of 17 patients (58%) with a positive scan required either gelfoam embolization (4 patients) or surgery (6 patients) to control the bleeding, whereas only 1 of 22 patients (5%) required surgery when the scan was negative. Six deaths occurred in the scan-positive patients compared with no deaths in the scan-negative patients. None of the 8 patients who had arteriography and no active bleeding site by scintigraphy had arteriographically demonstrable active bleeding. Scintigraphy provides a reliable noninvasive test to screen patients in whom arteriography is being considered to localize active bleeding sites. If the arteriogram is negative, the scintigraphic findings alone may guide the surgical or arteriographic intervention. In addition, scintigraphy identifies two patient populations which have considerably different morbidity and mortality.

  20. Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Tertiary Care Centre of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, M S; Kc, S; Mandal, A K; Poudyal, N S; Shrestha, R; Paudel, B N; Chaudhary, S

    2017-01-01

    AUGIB is characterized by hematemesis or melena or both. Peptic ulcers and variceal bleed account for majority of cases. Use of proton pump inhibitors in current era is associated with a gradual reduction in burden of peptic ulcer disease. We conducted this study to look into the cause of AUGIB in our community. We studied 100 patients in one year period who presented to us with hematemesis or melena. The study was conducted in department of Gastroenterology, Bir hospital, Kathmandu. We identified the culprit lesions by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The average age of patients with AUGIB was 51.6 years with 59 (59%) males. Duodenal ulcers are most common 29 (29%), followed by varices 23 (23%) and gastric ulcers 14 (14%). More than one lesion was identified in 38 (38%) patients. Patients with variceal bleed were more likely to present with hematemesis alone as compared to those with ulcer bleed (P=0.005). Variceal bleed patients presented earlier to the hospital (P=0.005), had lower MAP at presentation (P=0.0002), had lower hemoglobin level (P=0.0001) and higher serum creatinine level at presentation (P=0.001). Patients with variceal bleed were more likely to have consumed alcohol 20 (86.9%) and patients with ulcer bleed were more likely to be smokers 29 (67.4%) or consume tobacco 14 (32.5%) (P=0.006). Ulcer related bleeding is still the most common cause of AUGIB. Many patients with AUGIB have more than one lesions identified during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

  1. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and gastrointestinal bleeding: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Carvajal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day. RESULTS: 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.96 or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2.

  3. Upper gastrointestinal bleed associated with cholinesterase inhibitor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Khoon-Sheng; Loke, Yoon; Southgate, Jo

    2015-09-29

    An 86-year-old man was admitted with a 3-day history of melaena and syncope. He was haemodynamically compromised and anaemic on presentation. His only medical history was mild Alzheimer's disease diagnosed 6 months prior. For this, he was on donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI), with a recent dose increase 3 months earlier. After fluid resuscitation with packed red cells, an endoscopy was performed, which showed an acute duodenal ulcer. This was treated with a high-dose proton pump inhibitor. The patient recovered well and was discharged on donepezil with the addition of a gastro-protective proton pump inhibitor. In view of other absent risk factors of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage, donepezil was the likely causative agent. ChEIs are associated with frequent side effects and increased hospitalisation due to central and peripheral increase in acetylcholine. With this case report, we review the literature of side effects related to ChEIs, where the mechanisms of action, complications and appropriate management are discussed. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) diagnostic algorithm for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: eight burning questions from everyday clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Marmo, Riccardo; Petracchini, Massimo; de Franchis, Roberto; Pennazio, Marco

    2013-03-01

    The diagnosis and management of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding are often long and challenging processes. Over the last 10 years the introduction in clinical practice of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures (i.e. Capsule Endoscopy, Computed Tomographic Enterography, Magnetic Resonance Enterography, and Device Assisted Enteroscopy) has revolutionized the diagnostic/therapeutic work-up of these patients. Based on evidence published in the last 10 years, international scientific societies have proposed new practice guidelines for the management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, which include these techniques. However, although these algorithms (the most recent ones are endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - ASGE) allow the management of the large majority of patients, some issues still remain unsolved. The present paper reports the results of the discussion, based on the literature published up to September 2011, among a panel of experts and gastroenterologists, working with Capsule Endoscopy and with Device Assisted Enteroscopy, attending the 6th annual meeting of the Italian Club for Capsule Endoscopy and Enteroscopy. Eight unresolved issues were selected: each of them is presented as a "Burning question" and the "Answer" is the strategy proposed to manage it, according to both the available evidence and the discussion among participants.

  5. Angiodysplasia in gaint diverticulum of transverse duodenum causing massive gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Pil Yeob; Lee, Sang Wook; Kwon, Jae Soo; Sung, Young Soon; Rho, Myoung Ho; Hwon, Oh Joon [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-01

    The incidence of duodenal diverticulum found incidentally during upper gastrointestinal roentgenographic examination varies between 2% and 5%. The majority of cases occur along the medial aspect of the second portion of the duodenum, within 2.5 cm of the ampulla of Vater. The majority of duodenal diverticual are asymptomatic, but in some cases, complications such as diverticulitis, hemorrhage, perforation, and fistula formation occur in the third and fourth portions of the duodenum. We describe a case of giant diverticulum of the transverse duodenum, revealed by UGI and angiography, massive gastrointestinal bleeding in a 80-year-old patient.=20.

  6. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding from an Ampullary Tumour in a Patient with a Remote History of Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Diagnostic Conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda M Janzen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis of renal cell carcinoma to the ampulla of Vater is a rare occurrence. The outlined case, which presented as an upper gastrointestinal bleed, is only the eighth such reported case in the English-language literature. This case is the longest reported time interval between surgical nephrectomy to presentation with ampullary metastasis at 17.5 years. The ampullary source of bleeding in this case was initially obscure and missed by conventional gastroscopy. Diagnosis was made with a side-viewing endoscope, emphasizing the usefulness of this instrument in the investigation of active bleeding from a small bowel source.

  7. Unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed, when OGD could be fatal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khehra, Raman; Agrawal, Satyanisth; Aoun, Elie; Midian, Robin

    2015-10-05

    A 57-year-old man presented with chest pain, dyspnoea and coffee grounds emesis. He was haemodynamically stable without significant drop in haemoglobin. He suddenly developed cardiac arrest with wide complex tachycardia and became comatose. CT scan of the head revealed pneumocephalus and multiple infarcts. Given the recent history of radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation, atrio-oesophageal fistula (AOF) was suspected. CT angiography of the thorax showed a 5 mm diverticulum on the posterior wall of the left atrium, also raising suspicion for AOF. The patient was taken to the operating room. An AOF was found and repaired. He did not have any further gastrointestinal bleeding. There was no neurological recovery at day 11 and life support was withdrawn per his family's request. This case highlights the importance of obtaining history of recent cardiac procedures in patients presenting with an upper gastrointestinal bleed. An oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in this patient could have been instantaneously deadly. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding

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    MK Roy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available “Haemosuccus pancreaticus” is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.

  9. Mortality with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation: effects of time and NSAID use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry Sheena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some people who suffer an upper gastrointestinal bleed or perforation die. The mortality rate was estimated at 12% in studies published before 1997, but a systematic survey of more recent data is needed. Better treatment is likely to have reduced mortality. An estimate of mortality is helpful in explaining to patients the risks of therapy, especially with NSAIDs. Methods A systematic review of studies published before 1997, and between 1997 and 2008. Any study architecture was acceptable if it reported on cases who died from any cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed or perforation. Analyses were conducted separately for all cases, and those prescribed NSAID or aspirin. Results Information was available for 61,067 cases (81% published since 1997 of whom 5,001 died. The mortality rate in all cases fell significantly, from 11.6% (95% confidence interval, 11.0 to 12.2 in pre-1997 studies to 7.4% (7.2 to 7.6 in those published since 1997. In 5,526 patients taking NSAID or aspirin, mortality increased, from 14.7% (13.6 to 15.8 before 1997 to 20.9% (18.8 to 22.9 since 1997. Conclusion Upper gastrointestinal bleed or perforation still carries a finite risk of death. Differences in study architecture, population characteristics, risk factors, definition of mortality, and reporting of outcomes impose limitations on interpreting effect size. Data published since 1997 suggest that mortality in patients suffering from an upper gastrointestinal bleed or perforation has fallen to 1 in 13 overall, but remains higher at about 1 in 5 in those exposed to NSAID or aspirin.

  10. Outcomes and Role of Urgent Endoscopy in High-Risk Patients With Acute Nonvariceal Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soo-Han; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Kim, Youn-Jung; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Kim, Won Young; Lee, Jae Ho; Lim, Kyoung Soo

    2017-06-19

    We investigated clinical outcomes in high-risk patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), and determined if urgent endoscopy is effective. Consecutive patients with a Glasgow-Blatchford score greater than 7 who underwent endoscopy for acute nonvariceal UGIB at the emergency department from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2014, were included. Urgent (nonvariceal UGIB. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Continuing challenges in the diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veronica; Baptista; Neil; Marya; Anupam; Singh; Abbas; Rupawala; Bilal; Gondal; David; Cave

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding(OGIB) have changed dramatically since the introduction of video capsule endoscopy(VCE) followed by deep enteroscopy and other imaging technologies in the last decade. Significant advances have been made, yet there remains room for improvement in our diagnostic yield and treatment capabilities for recurrent OGIB. In this review, we will summarize the latest technologies for the diagnosis of OGIB, limitations of VCE, technological enhancement in VCE, and different management options for OGIB.

  12. Concurrent amoebic and histoplasma colitis:A rare cause of massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng; Soon; Koh; April; Camilla; Roslani; Kumar; Vasudeavan; Vimal; Mohd; Shariman; Ramasamy; Umasangar; Rajkumar; Lewellyn

    2010-01-01

    Infective colitis can be a cause of massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding requiring acute surgical intervention. Causative organisms include entamoeba and histoplasma species. However, concurrent colonic infection with both these organisms is very rare, and the in vivo consequences are not known. A 58-year-old male presented initially to the physicians with pyrexia of unknown origin and bloody diarrhea. Amoebic colitis was diagnosed based on biopsies, and he was treated with metronidazole. Five days later...

  13. Duodenal Lipomatosis as a Curious Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed: A Report with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirpe, Dinesh; Wani, Majid; Tiwari, Priyanka; Ramaswamy, Palaniswamy Kalipatti; Kumar, Reddy Prasanna

    2016-05-01

    Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Duodenal lipomas are incidental and mostly asymptomatic. Tumours may produce symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort or cause bleeding due to ulceration or intestinal obstruction due to intussusception. We describe a 45-year-old man presenting in emergency with 3 days history of melena with normal gastroduodenoscopy and contrast enhanced computed tomography revealing multiple polypoid lesion in duodenum and proximal jejunum suggestive of lipoma. Due to ongoing bleed, he underwent laparotomy with duodenectomy and uneventful postoperative recovery. Our review of cases published in last 67 years indicate that duodenal lipomas are rare to occur but commonly found in second part, they may be seen in third and fourth part of duodenum which may be missed on endoscopy. They can be multiple and may present as severe UGI bleeding which could be managed surgically. Though CT is diagnostic, histopathology confirms the diagnosis which shows lipomatous lesion composed of mature adipose arranged in lobules.

  14. Fatal upper gastrointestinal bleed arising from duodenal varices secondary to undiagnosed portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, John V; Steensma, Elizabeth A; Burke, Leandra H; Bartholomew, David M

    2013-08-16

    Duodenal varices are an unexpected source of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage associated with high mortality. The prevalence of ectopic variceal bleeding accounts for 2-5% of all variceal bleeding; of this, only 17% occurs in the duodenum. Diagnosis is difficult, and insufficient evidence exists to demonstrate the best treatment option when haemorrhage occurs. We report the case of a 69-year-old man with a history of chronic alcoholism who presented to the emergency department (ED) with nausea, vomiting and several episodes of haematochezia. Diagnostic workup in the ED included CT with multiplanar reconstruction, which revealed a network of large tortuous blood vessels running near the second portion of the duodenum between the inferior vena cava and portal vein. The patient was emergently treated with endoscopic therapy and clipping of the vessel. This failed, and he was subsequently taken to the operating room for suture ligation of the bleeding duodenal varices.

  15. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm following laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay D Mate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysm of hepatic artery is a rare but known complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC. Such pseudoaneurysms may bleed in biliary tree, upper gastrointestinal (GI tract or peritoneal cavity leading to life-threatening internal haemorrhage. It is very rare for them to present as lower GI bleeding. We report an unusual case of Right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm developed following LC, which ruptured into hepatic flexure of colon resulting in catastrophic lower GI bleeding. This was associated with partial celiac artery occlusion due to thrombosis. Due to failure of therapeutic embolisation, the patient was subjected to exploratory laparotomy to control haemorrhage. Postoperatively, patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 10. A strong index of suspicion is necessary for early diagnosis of such condition and to limit resultant morbidity. Angioembolisation is the first-line treatment and surgery is indicated in selected cases.

  16. Management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: current policies and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holster, Ingrid Lisanne; Kuipers, Ernst Johan

    2012-03-21

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a gastroenterological emergency with a mortality of 6%-13%. The vast majority of these bleeds are due to peptic ulcers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and Helicobacter pylori are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopy has become the mainstay for diagnosis and treatment of acute UGIB, and is recommended within 24 h of presentation. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration before endoscopy can downstage the bleeding lesion and reduce the need for endoscopic therapy, but has no effect on rebleeding, mortality and need for surgery. Endoscopic therapy should be undertaken for ulcers with high-risk stigmata, to reduce the risk of rebleeding. This can be done with a variety of modalities. High-dose PPI administration after endoscopy can prevent rebleeding and reduce the need for further intervention and mortality, particularly in patients with high-risk stigmata.

  17. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: difficulties in comparing CT enterography and video capsule endoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP 2, Department of Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965-Paris 7 ' ' Angiogenese et recherche translationnelle' ' , Paris (France); Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Paris (France)

    2012-06-15

    A paper reports the results of a retrospective study that was designed to evaluate the potential role of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) in elucidating the cause of bleeding in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) for whom CT enterography was negative. The authors highlight the limitations of dual-phase CT enterography for the detection of flat lesions of the small bowel such as ulcers, angiodysplasias or arteriovenous malformations, and confirm the superiority of VCE for the detection of this category of lesions. This commentary discusses some of the issues raised. Key Points circle Video capsule endoscopy surpasses CT enterography in detecting flat small bowel lesions. circle Retrospective VCE and CT enterography findings in obscure bleeding need further evaluation. circle A fair and unbiased comparison of the two investigations is still needed. (orig.)

  18. Management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Current policies and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingrid Lisanne Holster; Ernst Johan Kuipers

    2012-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a gastroenterological emergency with a mortality of 6%-13%.The vast majority of these bleeds are due to peptic ulcers.Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and Helicobacter pylori are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.Endoscopy has become the mainstay for diagnosis and treatment of acute UGIB,and is recommended within 24 h of presentation.Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration before endoscopy can downstage the bleeding lesion and reduce the need for endoscopic therapy,but has no effect on rebleeding,mortality and need for surgery.Endoscopic therapy should be undertaken for ulcers with high-risk stigmata,to reduce the risk of rebleeding.This can be done with a variety of modalities.High-dose PPI administration after endoscopy can prevent rebleeding and reduce the need for further intervention and mortality,particularly in patients with high-risk stigmata.

  19. Gastric Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Gastrointestinal Bleeding After Liver Transplant: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Zhang, W H; Meng, F P; Ma, X M; Shen, L J; Jin, B; Li, H W; Han, J; Zhou, G D; Liu, S H

    2015-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma is very rare. This is the first report of post-transplantation gastric metastasis. A 43-year-old man with a history of hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the right anterior segment of the liver received an orthotopic liver transplant. Three months after the transplantation, pulmonary metastasis was found by chest computed tomography, and he received 1 course of gamma knife treatment. He complained of melena with anemia 17 months post liver transplantation. Abdominal CT scan showed new occupying lesions in the liver and a mass in the stomach and around the spleen with embolus in the splenic vein. Endoscopy revealed a large irregular cauliflower-like mass in fundus with ulceration and bleeding on the surface. He received symptomatic treatment, but died of cancer-related bleeding 4 months later. GI bleeding may due to gastric metastasis after liver transplantation.

  20. Diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding by multi-slice CT angiography: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bosheng; Yang, Jushun; Xiao, Jing; Gu, Jinhua; Chen, Feixiang; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Chengjin; Qian, Junbo; Gong, Shenchu

    2017-08-01

    To estimate the diagnostic value of multi-slice spiral CT angiography (CTA) in lower gastrointestinal bleeding by a meta-analysis. The relevant clinical studies on the diagnostic value of CTA were searched on PubMed, Embase and other electronic documents databases with the deadline of 2016 September. Language was limited to English. A diagnostic meta-analysis was performed by using Meta-DiSc software. The effect sizes included sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The Cochran-Q test and I(2) statistic based on χ(2) test were used for estimation of the heterogeneity. Meta-regression was performed to explore the source of heterogeneity. SROC curve was established. A total of 14 articles including 549 patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding were enrolled in the meta-analysis. The combined PLR, NLR and DOR were respectively 8.149, 0.158 and 56.213. There were significant heterogeneities in all estimations but we could not find the sources by meta-regression based on study design, study location, CT slices and sample size. The AUC and Q index under the fixed effect model was respectively 0.9463 and 0.8856. The multi-slice CTA has high diagnostic value for lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Diffuse Skin Thickening as Kaposi Sarcoma Clinical Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querido, Sara; Sousa, Henrique Silva; Pereira, Tiago Assis; Birne, Rita; Matias, Patrícia; Jorge, Cristina; Weigert, André; Adragão, Teresa; Bruges, Margarida; Machado, Domingos

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old African patient received a kidney from a deceased donor with 4 HLA mismatches in April 2013. He received immunosuppression with basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone. Immediate diuresis and a good allograft function were soon observed. Six months later, the serum creatinine level increased to 2.6 mg/dL. A renal allograft biopsy revealed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy grade II. Toxicity of calcineurin inhibitor was assumed and, after a switch for everolimus, renal function improved. However, since March 2014, renal function progressively deteriorated. A second allograft biopsy showed no new lesions. Two months later, the patient was admitted due to anuria, haematochezia with anaemia, requiring 5 units of packed red blood cells, and diffuse skin thickening. Colonoscopy showed haemorrhagic patches in the colon and the rectum; histology diagnosis was Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed cutaneous involvement of KS. Rapid clinical deterioration culminated in death in June 2014. This case is unusual as less than 20 cases of KS with gross gastrointestinal bleeding have been reported and only 6 cases had the referred bleeding originating in the lower gastrointestinal tract. So, KS should be considered in differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding in some kidney transplant patients. PMID:26783491

  2. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary comparison of 64-section CT enteroclysis with video capsule endoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalife, Samer; Vahedi, Kouroche; Dray, Xavier; Marteau, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Digestive Diseases, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Soyer, Philippe; Hamzi, Lounis; Place, Vinciane; Boudiaf, Mourad [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Alatawi, Abdullah [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Digestive Diseases, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Universite Diderot-Paris 7, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris Cedex 10 (France)

    2011-01-15

    To retrospectively compare the diagnostic capabilities of 64-section CT enteroclysis with those of video capsule endoscopy (VCE) to elucidate the cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Thirty-two patients who had 64-section CT enteroclysis and VCE because of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were included. Imaging findings were compared with those obtained at double balloon endoscopy, surgery and histopathological analysis, which were used as a standard of reference. Concordant findings were found in 22 patients (22/32; 69%), including normal findings (n = 13), tumours (n = 7), lymphangiectasia (n = 1) and inflammation (n = 1), and discrepancies in 10 patients (10/32; 31%), including ulcers (n = 3), angioectasias (n = 2), tumours (n = 2) and normal findings (n = 3). No statistical difference in the proportions of abnormal findings between 64-section CT enteroclysis (11/32; 34%) and VCE (17/32, 53%) (P = 0.207) was found. However, 64-section CT enteroclysis helped identify tumours not detected at VCE (n = 2) and definitely excluded suspected tumours (n = 3) because of bulges at VCE. Conversely, VCE showed ulcers (n = 3) and angioectasias (n = 2) which were not visible at 64-section CT enteroclysis. Our results suggest that 64-section CT enteroclysis and VCE have similar overall diagnostic yields in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the two techniques are complementary in this specific population. (orig.)

  3. MiroCam capsule for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: a prospective, single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussetto, Alessandro; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Dari, Silvia; Gasperoni, Stefano; Cantoni, Franco; Brancaccio, Mario L; Triossi, Omero; Casetti, Tino

    2013-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is an established tool for the evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding but published literature is mostly limited to PillCam SB (Given Imaging, Israel). The aims of this study were to determine the findings, the diagnostic yield and the rebleeding rate in a series of patients with overt or occult obscure gastrointestinal bleeding studied with MiroCam(Intromedic, Seoul, Korea) capsule endoscopy. Data of 118 patients who underwent capsule endoscopy for overt or occult obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were prospectively collected between March 2009 and March 2011. Evaluation of the entire small bowel (completion rate) was achieved in 96% of cases. Relevant lesions occurred in 58% of patients. Angiodysplasias was the most common finding. Six patients (9% of the positive findings) had a non-small-bowel lesion detected by capsule. The yield of capsule endoscopy in the overt group was greater than in the occult group but without achieving a significant difference (61% vs. 54%, p>0.05). Rebleeding rate was lower in patients with a negative examination (6%) than in patients with a positive one (17%) (p=0.03). Capsule retention was registered in 3 of 118 patients (2.5%). MiroCam capsule endoscopy is a safe and effective tool for exploring small bowel with a high completion rate. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Incidence and risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deerojanawong, Jitladda; Peongsujarit, Danayawan; Vivatvakin, Boosba; Prapphal, Nuanchan

    2009-01-01

    To identify the incidence and factors related to upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding in children requiring mechanical ventilation for longer than 48 hrs. Prospective analytic study. Ten-bed-pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care University Hospital. A total of 110 patients requiring mechanical ventilation for longer than 48 hrs from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. UGI bleeding was defined by evidence of blood in nasogastric aspirates, hematemesis, or melena within 5 days of pediatric intensive care unit admission. We prospectively collected data on patient demographics, admission diagnosis, operative status, and pediatric risk of mortality score. UGI bleeding and the potential risk factors including organ failure, coagulopathy, maximum ventilator setting, enteral feeding, stress ulcer prophylaxis as well as sedation were daily monitored. Of the 110 patients who required mechanical ventilation for >48 hrs, the incidence of UGI bleeding was 51.8%, in which 3.6% of the cases presented with clinically significant bleeding (shock, requiring blood transfusion and/or surgery). Significant risk factors were thrombocytopenia, prolonged partial thromboplastin time, organ failure, high pressure ventilator setting >/=25 cm H2O, and pediatric risk of mortality score >/= 10 using univariate analysis. However, the independent factors of UGI bleeding in the multivariate analysis were organ failure (relative risk = 2.85, 95% confidence interval 1.18-6.92) and high pressure ventilator setting >/=25 cm H2O (relative risk = 3.73, 95% confidence interval 1.59-8.72). The incidence of UGI bleeding is high in children requiring mechanical ventilation. Organ failure and high pressure ventilator setting are significant risk factors for UGI bleeding.

  5. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: the usefulness of rotational angiography after endoscopic marking with a metallic clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Soo; Kwak, Hyo-Sung; Chung, Gyung-Ho

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to assess the usefulness of rotational angiography after endoscopic marking with a metallic clip in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients with no extravasation of contrast medium on conventional angiography. In 16 patients (mean age, 59.4 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (13 gastric ulcers, 2 duodenal ulcers, 1 malignant ulcer), a metallic clip was placed via gastroscopy and this had been preceded by routine endoscopic treatment. The metallic clip was placed in the fibrous edge of the ulcer adjacent to the bleeding point. All patients had negative results from their angiographic studies. To localize the bleeding focus, rotational angiography and high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip were used. Of the 16 patients, seven (44%) had positive results after high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip and they underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with microcoils. Nine patients without extravasation of contrast medium underwent TAE with microcoils as close as possible to the clip. The bleeding was stopped initially in all patients after treatment of the feeding artery. Two patients experienced a repeat episode of bleeding two days later. Of the two patients, one had subtle oozing from the ulcer margin and that patient underwent endoscopic treatment. One patient with malignant ulcer died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation one month after embolization. Complete clinical success was achieved in 14 of 16 (88%) patients. Delayed bleeding or major/minor complications were not noted. Rotational angiography after marking with a metallic clip helps to localize accurately the bleeding focus and thus to embolize the vessel correctly.

  6. ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Bhinder, Nimarta; Kim, David H; Holly, Brian P; Johnson, Pamela T; Hanley, Michael; Carucci, Laura R; Cash, Brooks D; Chandra, Ankur; Gage, Kenneth L; Lambert, Drew L; Levy, Angela D; Oliva, Isabel B; Peterson, Christine M; Strax, Richard; Rybicki, Frank J; Dill, Karin E

    2017-05-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality with mortality rates as high as 14%. This document addresses the indications for imaging UGIB that is nonvariceal and unrelated to portal hypertension. The four variants are derived with respect to upper endoscopy. For the first three, it is presumed that upper endoscopy has been performed, with three potential initial outcomes: endoscopy reveals arterial bleeding source, endoscopy confirms UGIB without a clear source, and negative endoscopy. The fourth variant, "postsurgical and traumatic causes of UGIB; endoscopy contraindicated" is considered separately because upper endoscopy is not performed. When endoscopy identifies the presence and location of bleeding but bleeding cannot be controlled endoscopically, catheter-based arteriography with treatment is an appropriate next study. CT angiography (CTA) is comparable with angiography as a diagnostic next step. If endoscopy demonstrates a bleed but the endoscopist cannot identify the bleeding source, angiography or CTA can be typically performed and both are considered appropriate. In the event of an obscure UGIB, angiography and CTA have been shown to be equivalent in identifying the bleeding source; CT enterography may be an alternative to CTA to find an intermittent bleeding source. In the postoperative or traumatic setting when endoscopy is contraindicated, primary angiography, CTA, and CT with intravenous contrast are considered appropriate. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to

  7. Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: the Usefulness of Rotational Angiography after Endoscopic Marking with a Metallic Clip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Soo; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    We wanted to assess the usefulness of rotational angiography after endoscopic marking with a metallic clip in upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients with no extravasation of contrast medium on conventional angiography. In 16 patients (mean age, 59.4 years) with acute bleeding ulcers (13 gastric ulcers, 2 duodenal ulcers, 1 malignant ulcer), a metallic clip was placed via gastroscopy and this had been preceded by routine endoscopic treatment. The metallic clip was placed in the fibrous edge of the ulcer adjacent to the bleeding point. All patients had negative results from their angiographic studies. To localize the bleeding focus, rotational angiography and high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip were used. Of the 16 patients, seven (44%) had positive results after high pressure angiography as close as possible to the clip and they underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with microcoils. Nine patients without extravasation of contrast medium underwent TAE with microcoils as close as possible to the clip. The bleeding was stopped initially in all patients after treatment of the feeding artery. Two patients experienced a repeat episode of bleeding two days later. Of the two patients, one had subtle oozing from the ulcer margin and that patient underwent endoscopic treatment. One patient with malignant ulcer died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation one month after embolization. Complete clinical success was achieved in 14 of 16 (88%) patients. Delayed bleeding or major/minor complications were not noted. Rotational angiography after marking with a metallic clip helps to localize accurately the bleeding focus and thus to embolize the vessel correctly.

  8. Primary aortojejunal fistula: a rare cause for massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulasir, Sylvester; Khorfan, Rhami; Harsant, Christina; Anderson, Harry Linne

    2017-04-26

    A 68-year-old man presented to the emergency department with haematemesis and shock. Upper endoscopy and selective angiography could not identify the source of bleeding. He underwent selective embolisation of the gastroduodenal artery. The patient then had a period of about 24 hours with relative haemodynamic stability before having another episode of massive upper gastrointestinal bleed. A second attempt to embolise the common hepatic artery and distal coeliac axis was unsuccessful. Hence, he was urgently taken to the operating room for exploratory laparotomy. The source of bleeding could not be identified in the operating room. The patient went into cardiac arrest and expired. Autopsy revealed a fistula between proximal jejunum and a previously unknown abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We present an entity that has only been described a few times in the literature while highlighting the importance of having a broad differential with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, especially when the source is not clearly evident. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: predictors of risk in a mixed patient group including variceal and nonvariceal haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiff, Conor; Shields, William; Cretu, Ion; Mahmud, Nasir; McKiernan, Susan; Norris, Suzanne; Silke, Bernard; Reynolds, John V; O'Toole, Dermot

    2012-02-01

    Effective management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) relies on the application of clinical risk scores. The validation of risk scores has to date focused mainly on nonvariceal UGIB groups. We aimed to evaluate our clinical and endoscopic management of UGIB, and to validate existing risk scores for a mixed patient population with a high percentage of variceal bleeds. Analysis included UGIB patients presenting consecutively to a tertiary referral university hospital. All patients had been admitted by our emergency department and had undergone upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Clinical, biochemical and endoscopic data were recorded. Clinical and complete Rockall and Blatchford risk scores were calculated for all patients and statistical analysis was carried out by a multiple logistical regression model. A total of 21% of patients had variceal bleeds. There was considerable heterogeneity between groups with the variceal group having more comorbidities (P=0.003), lower haemoglobin (P=0.003) and lower systolic blood pressure (P=0.013) at presentation. This translated to higher risk scores (Pbleeding or mortality. However, no patient with a Blatchford score of 0 had an adverse clinical outcome. Postendoscopic Rockall score can be used as a predictor of outcome for mixed UGIB groups. Although Blatchford score did not predict outcome in our study, at a 0 level it does appear to be a safe triage tool for pre-endoscopic identification of patients with variceal bleeds, even where there is no known history of liver disease.

  10. Angiogenesis and vascular malformations: Antiangiogenic drugs for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with angiodysplasias and Osler's disease (hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia) is clinically challenging.Frequently, vascular malformations occur as multiple disseminated lesions, making local treatment an unfavorable choice or impossible. After local therapy,lesions often recur at other sites of the intestine.However, as there are few therapeutic alternatives,repeated endoscopic coagulations or surgical resections are still performed to prevent recurrent bleeding.Hormonal therapy has been employed for more than 50 years but has recently been shown to be ineffective.Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are required.Understanding of the pathophysiology of angiogenesis and vascular malformations has recently substantially increased. Currently, multiple inhibitors of angiogenesis are under development for treatment of malignant diseases. Experimental and clinical data suggest that antiangiogenic substances, which were originally developed for treatment of malignant diseases, may also represent long-awaited specific drugs for the treatment of vascular malformations. However, antiangiogenics display significantly different actions and side-effects.Although antiangiogenics like thalidomide seem to inhibit gastrointestinal bleeding, other substances like bevacizumab can cause mucosal bleeding. Therefore differential and cautious evaluation of this therapeutic strategy is necessary.

  11. Predictors of a variceal source among patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Ahmad; Almadi, Majid; Barkun, Alan; Martel, Myriam

    2012-04-01

    Patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require an early, tailored approach best guided by knowledge of the bleeding lesion, especially a variceal versus a nonvariceal source. To identify, by investigating a large national registry, variables that would be predictive of a variceal origin of UGIB using clinical parameters before endoscopic evaluation. A retrospective study was conducted in 21 Canadian hospitals during the period from January 2004 until the end of May 2005. Consecutive charts for hospitalized patients with a primary or secondary discharge diagnosis of UGIB were reviewed. Data regarding demographics, including historical, physical examination, initial laboratory investigations, endoscopic and pharmacological therapies administered, as well as clinical outcomes, were collected. Multivariable logistic regression modelling was performed to identify clinical predictors of a variceal source of bleeding. The patient population included 2020 patients (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Overall, 215 (10.6%) were found to be bleeding from upper gastrointestinal varices. Among 26 patient characteristics, variables predicting a variceal source of bleeding included history of liver disease (OR 6.36 [95% CI 3.59 to 11.3]), excessive alcohol use (OR 2.28 [95% CI 1.37 to 3.77]), hematemesis (OR 2.65 [95% CI 1.61 to 4.36]), hematochezia (OR 3.02 [95% CI 1.46 to 6.22]) and stigmata of chronic liver disease (OR 2.49 [95% CI 1.46 to 4.25]). Patients treated with antithrombotic therapy were more likely to experience other causes of hemorrhage (OR 0.44 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.78]). Presenting historical and physical examination data, and initial laboratory tests carry significant predictive ability in discriminating variceal versus nonvariceal sources of bleeding.

  12. Incidence, Management, and Risk Factors for Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rencuzogullari, A; Binboga, S; Aytac, E; Rabets, J; Stocchi, L; Ozuner, G

    2017-04-01

    There are limited convincing data regarding management and outcomes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGB) in renal transplant recipients (RTR). The aim of this study was to evaluate incidence, management strategies, and risk factors associated with LGB in RTR. Between January 2004 and December 2013, RTR with LGB were analyzed. LGB was defined as having clinical evidence of hemorrhage after upper gastrointestinal etiology was ruled out. There were 1578 RTR with a mean age of 50 ± 14 years at the time of transplantation. Mean follow-up time after transplantation was 57 ± 45 months. Forty-five (2.9%) patients had a documented site of LGB. The most common causes of bleeding were colitis and angiodysplasia (n = 17). Mean time to LGB after transplantation was 43 ± 36 months. Twelve patients with LGB required intervention. Three underwent colectomy, endoscopic treatment was utilized in 8, and 1 patient had angiographic embolization to control bleeding. Recurrent LGB developed in 11 patients of 42 patients who did not have surgery at the time of index bleeding. Surgical (n = 1) or endoscopic intervention (n = 4) was required in 5 of recurrent bleeders. LGB was more commonly seen in RTRs who had development of a nonfunctioning kidney (P bleeding episode) compared with those who did not have a LGB (P = .001). We did not observe any increased risk of LGB bleeding among patients who were receiving anticoagulant or anti-aggregant treatment agents (P = .76). Nonfunctioning kidney after transplant is a risk factor for LGB. Overall mortality rates increased after LGB in RTR. Strategies aiming to prolong transplanted kidney function may reduce the incidence of LGB and improve life expectancy in RTR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors of a variceal source among patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

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    Alharbi, Ahmad; Almadi, Majid; Barkun, Alan; Martel, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require an early, tailored approach best guided by knowledge of the bleeding lesion, especially a variceal versus a nonvariceal source. OBJECTIVE: To identify, by investigating a large national registry, variables that would be predictive of a variceal origin of UGIB using clinical parameters before endoscopic evaluation. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in 21 Canadian hospitals during the period from January 2004 until the end of May 2005. Consecutive charts for hospitalized patients with a primary or secondary discharge diagnosis of UGIB were reviewed. Data regarding demographics, including historical, physical examination, initial laboratory investigations, endoscopic and pharmacological therapies administered, as well as clinical outcomes, were collected. Multivariable logistic regression modelling was performed to identify clinical predictors of a variceal source of bleeding. RESULTS: The patient population included 2020 patients (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Overall, 215 (10.6%) were found to be bleeding from upper gastrointestinal varices. Among 26 patient characteristics, variables predicting a variceal source of bleeding included history of liver disease (OR 6.36 [95% CI 3.59 to 11.3]), excessive alcohol use (OR 2.28 [95% CI 1.37 to 3.77]), hematemesis (OR 2.65 [95% CI 1.61 to 4.36]), hematochezia (OR 3.02 [95% CI 1.46 to 6.22]) and stigmata of chronic liver disease (OR 2.49 [95% CI 1.46 to 4.25]). Patients treated with antithrombotic therapy were more likely to experience other causes of hemorrhage (OR 0.44 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.78]). CONCLUSION: Presenting historical and physical examination data, and initial laboratory tests carry significant predictive ability in discriminating variceal versus nonvariceal sources of bleeding. PMID:22506257

  14. Incidence and Clinical Features of Peptic Ulcer Disease In Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: -Experience of Moroccan University Hospital Unit-

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    Y. Cherradi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD has been recognized as the leading cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB. This study aims to report general features of bleeding peptic ulcers in patients who benefit of urgent endoscopy in our department after an acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Results: A total of 1809 patients were explored for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in our unit since 2003 to 2008. Gastroduodenal peptic ulcers were the most frequent diagnosed etiology. They present 38% of all reported causes of bleeding (n=527 (table I. 25% were located at duodenal mucosa (n= 347 and 13% were gastric ulcers (n=180. No esophageal ulcers were reported. Incidence of both duodenal and gastric ulcers decreases during the last years. Conclusion: In our department, incidence of bleeding peptic ulcer disease is decreasing but they continue to be the first cause of AUGIB.

  15. C-reactive protein as a prognostic indicator for rebleeding in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

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    Lee, Han Hee; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Soon-Wook; Kang, Seung Hun; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lee, Bo-In; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2015-05-01

    In patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, rebleeding after an initial treatment is observed in 10-20% and is associated with mortality. To investigate whether the initial serum C-reactive protein level could predict the risk of rebleeding in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This was a retrospective study using prospectively collected data for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Initial clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and C-reactive protein levels were compared between those with and without 30-day rebleeding. A total of 453 patients were included (mean age, 62 years; male, 70.9%). The incidence of 30-day rebleeding was 15.9%. The mean serum C-reactive protein level was significantly higher in these patients than in those without rebleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding, indicating a possible role as a useful screening indicator for predicting the risk of rebleeding. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors of Early Rebleeding after Endoscopic Therapy in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to High-Risk Lesions

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    Davide Maggio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In an era of increasingly shortened admissions, data regarding predictors of early rebleeding among patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB exhibiting high-risk stigmata (HRS having undergone endoscopic hemostasis are lacking.

  17. Antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulants are not associated with worse outcome following nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teles Sampaio, Elvira; Maia, Luís; Salgueiro, Paulo; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding emerges as a major complication of using antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulants and represents a clinical challenge in patients undergoing these therapies. Aim...

  18. Adherence to Guidelines: A National Audit of the Management of Acute upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding. The REASON Registry

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    Yidan Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess process of care in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB using a national cohort, and to identify predictors of adherence to ‘best practice’ standards.

  19. A Canadian Clinical Practice Algorithm for the Management of Patients with Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    Alan Barkun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To use current evidence-based recommendations to provide a user-friendly clinical algorithm for the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, adapted to the Canadian environment.

  20. Description of Prescribing Practices in Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Receiving Intravenous Proton-Pump Inhibitors: A Multicentre Evaluation

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    Robert Enns

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intravenous forms of proton pump inhibitors (IV PPI are routinely used for patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, but a significant concern for their inappropriate use has been suggested.

  1. Ankaferd Blood Stopper for Controlling Gastrointestinal Bleeding due to Distinct Benign Lesions Refractory to Conventional Antihemorrhagic Measures

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    Mevlut Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the hemostatic efficacy of the Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS, Ankaferd Health Products Ltd, Turkey hemostatic agent for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding associated with various benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures.

  2. Life-threatening gastrointestinal system bleeding in Hodgkin disease: multidetector CT findings and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Erhan; Türkbey, Bariş; Cil, Barbaros Erhan; Canyiğit, Murat; Dündar, Ziya; Balkanci, Ferhun

    2007-06-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding is a life-threatening condition. Immediate determination of the origin of the bleeding is crucial, since hemostatic management must be initiated as rapidly as possible. Colonoscopy, radionuclide studies, and conventional angiography are considered the most important methods for assessing the origin of the bleeding. There are few published reports about the feasibility of computed tomography (CT) in acute GIS bleeding. We present multidetector CT (MDCT) findings in a case of Hodgkin disease status one month post-chemotherapy (CHOP protocol; cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) that presented with acute lower GIS bleeding.

  3. Isolated hepatic artery injury in blunt abdominal trauma presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding: treatment with transcatheter embolisation.

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    Taslakian, Bedros; Ghaith, Ola; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2012-11-15

    Liver injury in blunt abdominal trauma is common. However, not often does blunt trauma cause injury to the anatomical structures of the porta hepatis. Isolated injury of the hepatic artery has been rarely reported in the literature. Such injury may be lethal and requires immediate diagnosis and management. This report describes an unusual case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in hepatic and gastroduodenal artery dissection, with pseudoaneurysm formation complicated by active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The injury was managed by transcatheter embolisation. Awareness of this diagnosis should facilitate management of similar trauma cases.

  4. Modified Glasgow-Blatchford Bleeding Score as an Alternative Predictors of Severity for Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    Taufiq Abdullah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB is a frequent cause of emergency hospital admissions. Despite the dependency of most risk scoring systems for this disorder, the Glasgow-Blatchford bleeding score (GBS is based on simple variables. This research intended for investigate the accuracy of a modified GBS (mGBS to predict the severity of non-variceal UGIB. METHODS: Study conducted in Emergency Department of Dr. Saiful Anwar Hospital, Malang, from November 2012 to April 2013. Endoscopy performed between 12-24 hours after the patient stabilized. Sixty patients diagnosed were included. The accuracy of the mGBS in predicting the severity of non-variceal UGIB was compared with the full GBS using receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. The severity based on high risk in mGBS score compared by Forrest classification. RESULTS: For prediction of the severity of non-variceal UGIB, the GBS (AUC 0.947, 95% CI 0.87-1.03 had a slightly than the mGBS (AUC 0.943, 95% CI 0.86-1.02, p<0.01. Compared to the GBS, the mGBS was more specific (63% and 97%, respectively but less sensitive (96% and 84%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The mGBS is an alternative diagnostic tool in predicting the severity of non-variceal UGIB. KEYWORDS: non variceal-UGIB, GBS, modified GBS

  5. Postoperative gastrointestinal bleeding in orthognathic surgery patients: its estimated prevalence and possible association to known risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, James B; Keller, Eugene E; Grothe, Rayna M

    2014-10-01

    To assess the prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in patients after orthognathic surgery and its relation to known risk factors. With institutional review board approval, a single-center case series was conducted with data collected retrospectively from orthognathic surgical patients' medical records from 1990 to 2010. All patients were treated by 1 primary surgeon, were limited to 21 years or younger at the time of surgery, and had no coagulopathy. The authors' hypothesis was that patients concurrently exposed to mechanical ventilation and dual anti-inflammatory drugs in the postoperative period would be at a greater risk for clinically significant GI bleeding according to the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists guideline compared with those exposed to fewer risk factors. Its prevalence and relation to known risk factors were analyzed. In total 498 orthognathic cases consisting of 220 male patients (median age, 17 yr; age range, 3 to 21 yr) and 262 female patients (median age, 17 yr; age range, 10 to 21 yr) were reviewed. Of 17 patients admitted to intensive care unit level of care postoperatively, 4 patients were exposed to concomitant administration of ketorolac and steroids while being mechanically ventilated. Two of these 4 patients developed esophagogastroduodenoscopy-confirmed upper GI bleeding (UGIB). There was no incidence of UGIB in patients not exposed to all 3 risk factors concurrently. Postoperative GI bleeding complication is rare in orthognathic surgical patients, with an estimated prevalence of 0.4%. Based on these observations, orthognathic surgical patients who require mechanical ventilation and are receiving anti-inflammatory medications may have an increased risk of GI bleeding. In the absence of active bleeding from the surgical site, persistent decrease in hemoglobin concentration should alert one to consider the possibility of UGIB. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by

  6. Antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulants are not associated with worse outcome following nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles-Sampaio, Elvira; Maia, Luís; Salgueiro, Paulo; Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Pedroto, Isabel

    2016-11-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding emerges as a major complication of using antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulants and represents a clinical challenge in patients undergoing these therapies. To characterize patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding related to antithrombotics and their management, and to determine clinical predictors of adverse outcomes. Retrospective cohort of adults who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from 2010 to 2012. The outcomes were compared between patients exposed and not exposed to antithrombotics. Five hundred and forty-eight patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (67% men; mean age 66.5 ± 16.4 years) were included, of which 43% received antithrombotics. Most patients had comorbidities. Peptic ulcer was the main diagnosis and endoscopic therapy was performed in 46% of cases. The 30-day mortality rate was 7.7% (n = 42), and 36% were bleeding-related. The recurrence rate was 9% and 14% of patients with initial endoscopic treatment needed endoscopic retreatment. There were no significant differences between the exposed and non-exposed groups in most outcomes. Co-morbidities, hemodynamic instability, high Rockall score, low hemoglobin (7.76 ± 2.72 g/dL) and higher international normalized ratio (1.63 ± 1.13) were associated significantly with mortality in a univariate analysis. Adverse outcomes were not associated with antithrombotic use. The management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a challenge to clinical performance optimization and clinical cooperation.

  7. Antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulants are not associated with worse outcome following nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

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    Elvira Manuela Costa Moreira Teles-Sampaio

    Full Text Available Background: Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding emerges as a major complication of using antiplatelet agents and/or anticoagulants and represents a clinical challenge in patients undergoing these therapies. Aim: To characterize patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding related to antithrombotics and their management, and to determine clinical predictors of adverse outcomes. Methods: Retrospective cohort of adults who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding from 2010 to 2012. The outcomes were compared between patients exposed and not exposed to antithrombotics. Results: Five hundred and forty-eight patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (67% men; mean age 66.5 ± 16.4 years were included, of which 43% received antithrombotics. Most patients had comorbidities. Peptic ulcer was the main diagnosis and endoscopic therapy was performed in 46% of cases. The 30-day mortality rate was 7.7% (n = 42, and 36% were bleeding-related. The recurrence rate was 9% and 14% of patients with initial endoscopic treatment needed endoscopic retreatment. There were no significant differences between the exposed and non-exposed groups in most outcomes. Co-morbidities, hemodynamic instability, high Rockall score, low hemoglobin (7.76 ± 2.72 g/dL and higher international normalized ratio (1.63 ± 1.13 were associated significantly with mortality in a univariate analysis. Conclusions: Adverse outcomes were not associated with antithrombotic use. The management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding constitutes a challenge to clinical performance optimization and clinical cooperation.

  8. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel pathology: comparison between wireless capsule endoscopy and multidetector-row CT enteroclysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippone, Antonella; Cianci, Roberta; Milano, Angelo; Valeriano, Sergio; Di Mizio, Veronica; Storto, Maria Luigia

    2008-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as bleeding of unknown origin, that persists or recurs after negative conventional barium contrast studies and upper and lower tract endoscopy. The causes of such a bleeding frequently arise in the small bowel, and they are represented by mucosal vascular abnormalities, neoplasms and other conditions such as Crohn's disease, Meckel's diverticulum, and vasculitis. Conventional barium contrast studies and push enteroscopy allow only a limited small bowel examination; moreover, intraoperative endoscopy may be inconclusive, since the small bowel is difficult to evaluate given its length and tortuous course. In the same way, angiographic diagnosis is stricktly related to the activity rate of hemorrhage. Wireless capsule endoscopy and multidetector-row CT enteroclysis are two recently developed minimally invasive techniques that may provide a complete small bowel examination, the first offering a direct visualization of the mucosal aspect, the second allowing evaluation of mural and extramural pathologies. This review is an update of the technique and clinical application of capsule endoscopy and multidetector-row CT enteroclysis in patients suffering from obscure small bowel bleeding.

  9. Iatrogenic Complications in Five Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding due to Ambient Air: Case Series and Literature Review

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    Christine N. Manser

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing use of carbon dioxide for endoscopies during the last years, ambient air is still used. The amount of air depends on several factors such as examination time, presumable diameter of the endoscope channel and of course active use of air by the operator. Although endoscopic complications due to ambient air in the gastrointestinal (GI tract are a rare observation and mostly described in the colon, we report five cases in the upper GI tract due to insufflating large amounts of air through the endoscopes. All 5 patients needed an emergency upper endoscopy for acute presumed upper GI bleeding. In two cases both esophageal variceal bleeding and ulcer bleeding were detected; the fifth case presented with a bleeding due to gastric cancer. Due to insufflation of inadequate amounts of air through the endoscope channel, all patients deteriorated in circulation and ventilation. Two rumenocenteses and consecutively three laparotomies had to be performed in three patients. In the other two, gastroscopies had to be stopped for an emergency computed tomography. All critical incidents were believed to be a consequence of a long-lasting examination with use of too much air. Therefore in emergency situations, endoscopies should be performed with either submersion, low air flow pumps or even better by the use of carbon dioxide.

  10. Analysis of risk factor and clinical characteristics of angiodysplasia presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Bum; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Seok Jong; Sung, Hea Jung; Woo, Seokyung; Kim, Hyo Suk; Jeong, Yeon Oh; Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Yeon-Ji

    2016-07-01

    Angiodysplasia is important in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), but the clinical features and outcomes associated with UGIB from angiodysplasia have not been characterized. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of angiodysplasia presented as UGIB. Between January 2004 and December 2013, a consecutive series of patients admitted with UGIB were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-five patients with bleeding from angiodysplasia were enrolled. We compared them with an asymptomatic control group (incidental finding of angiodysplasia in health screening, n = 58) and bleeding control group (simultaneous finding of angiodysplasia and peptic ulcer bleeding, n = 28). When patients with UGIB from angiodysplasia were compared with the asymptomatic control group, more frequent rates of nonantral location and large sized lesion (≥ 1 cm) were evident in multivariate analysis. When these patients were compared with the bleeding control group, they were older (mean age: 67.94 ± 9.16 years vs.55.07 ± 13.29 years, p = 0.03) and received less transfusions (p = 0.03). They also had more frequent rate of recurrence (40.0% vs. 20.7%, p = 0.02). Non-antral location and large lesions (≥ 1 cm) could be risk factors of UGIB of angiodysplasia. UGIB due to angiodysplasia was more common in older patients. Transfusion requirement would be less and a tendency of clinical recurrence might be apparent.

  11. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Japanese Patients Prescribed Antithrombotic Drugs: Differences in Trends over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Shimoda, Ryo; Higuchi, Toru; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2014-06-01

    We studied the features of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients taking antithrombotic drugs. The records of 430 patients taking antithrombotic drugs who underwent emergency endoscopy for UGIB in Saga Medical School Hospital between 2002 and 2011 were studied. We also compared the characteristics of our cohort of 11,919 patients prescribed antithrombotic drugs in our hospital between 2002 and 2011. UBGI patients of variceal bleeding were not included in this study. 186 patients presented with UGIB in the first period (2002-2006) and 244 in the second period (2007-2011). The proportion of patients infected with Helicobacter pylori was lower in the second period, while the proportion taking antithrombotic drugs rose significantly. Peptic ulcer disease was responsible for the majority of bleeding episodes; however, bleeding from other sources is increasing. In the whole cohort, the risk of UGIB was 1.08%; however, of the 31.8% who also took an acid-secretion inhibitor only 18 (0.28%) developed bleeding. In contrast, 102 (1.87%) of those not taking an acid-secretion inhibitor developed UGIB, a statistically significant difference. Risk of UGIB in Japanese patients taking antithrombotics was 1.01% and the incidence is increasing. Acid-secretion inhibitors reduced the risk of antithrombotic drug-related UGIB.

  12. Review article: hyperammonaemic and catabolic consequences of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Damink, S W M; Dejong, C H C; Jalan, R

    2009-04-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding in patients with cirrhosis of the liver induces hyperammonaemia and leads to a catabolic cascade that precipitates life-threatening complications. The haemoglobin molecule is unique because it lacks the essential amino acid isoleucine and contains high amounts of leucine and valine. UGI bleed therefore presents the gut with protein of very low biologic value, which may be the stimulus to induce net catabolism. To describe the hyperammonaemic and catabolic consequences of UGI bleeding in cirrhosis. A semi-structured literature search was performed using PubMed and article references. It has recently been proven that ('simulation of ') a UGI bleed in patients with cirrhosis leads to impaired protein synthesis that can be restored by intravenous infusion of isoleucine. This may have therapeutic implications for the function of rapidly dividing cells and short half-life proteins such as clotting factors. Renal and small bowel ammoniagenesis were shown to be the most prominent causes for the hyperammonaemia that resulted from a UGI bleed. This provides an explanation for the therapeutic failure of the current clinical therapies that are aimed at large bowel-derived ammonia production. Isoleucine infusion did not diminish renal ammoniagenesis. New pharmacological therapies to diminish postbleeding hyperammonaemia should target the altered inter-organ ammonia metabolism and promote ammonia excretion and/or increase the excretion of precursors of ammoniagenesis, e.g. l-ornithine-phenylacetate.

  13. Decreasing trend of upper gastrointestinal bleeding mortality risk over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taefi, Amir; Cho, Won Kyoo; Nouraie, Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) causes over $1 billion in medical expenses annually. The purpose of this study was to examine changes of UGIB mortality risks and trends over the last three decades. We analyzed the National Hospital Discharge Sample from 1979 to 2009. Patients with primary ICD-9 code representing a diagnosis of UGIB were included. The UGIB mortality risks and trends in each decade by anatomical sites, bleeding causes, comorbidities, and other important variables were analyzed. UGIB mortality risk decreased by 35.4 % from 4.8 % in the first decade to 3.1 % in the third decade (P risk factors in all decades. Most significant decreases were observed in patients over 65 years and during the first day of admission. Gastric (P bleedings showed significant decreasing mortality risk trends. Duodenal bleeding mortality risk was stable in three decades. Mortality risk declined significantly among patients with renal failure (from 50.0 to 4.0 %) and heart failure (from 17.9 to 5.2 %; both P risks, especially of the first hospital day and geriatric patients, significantly decreased over the last three decades, presumably from recent advances in emergency medical care. Mortality risk of gastric, but not duodenal, bleeding had the most significant reduction. Critical care improvements in patients with various comorbidities may explain significant UGIB mortality risk reductions. This study provides invaluable insight into the causes and trends of UGIB mortality risks for future studies.

  14. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: risk factors for mortality in two urban centres in Latin America.

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    Morales Uribe, C H; Sierra Sierra, S; Hernández Hernández, A M; Arango Durango, A F; López, G A

    2011-01-01

    To describe the experience with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in two major Latin American hospitals; presenting its main causes, treatment, and prognosis, while exploring some risk factors associated with death. Prospective cohort study. Four hundred and sixty four patients were admitted into any of the 2 hospitals and were at least 15 years of age. Some variables demographics, clinics and treatment were studied. The association between those variables and the death were explored. Mean age was 57.9 years; the men:women ratio was 1.4:1. Three hundred and fifty nine patients (77.3%) presented as outpatients and 105 patients (22.6%) were inpatients presenting with UGIB. 71.6% of patients had an upper GI endoscopy within 24 hours. The main causes of bleeding were peptic ulcer (190 patients, 41%), erosive disease (162 patients, 34.9%) and variceal bleeding (47 patients, 10.1%). Forty four patients died (9.5%). Bleeding as an inpatient has a higher mortality risk than does bleeding as an outpatient (RR 2.4 IC 95% 1.2-4.6). An increasing number of comorbidities such as those described in the Rockall Score are also associated with a higher risk of dying (RR 2.5 IC 95% 1.1-5.4). UGIB as an inpatient and the presence of comorbidities should alert the clinician in identifying patients at higher risk of a fatal outcome, these patients should have a more aggressive management and be entitled to an early intervention.

  15. Erythromycin infusion prior to endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hee Kyong; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Seo, Dong Woo; Lim, Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yong; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2017-03-28

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of erythromycin infusion and gastric lavage in order to improve the quality of visualization during emergency upper endoscopy. We performed a prospective randomized pilot study. Patients presented with hematemesis or melena within 12 hours and were randomly assigned to the erythromycin group (intravenous infusion of erythromycin), gastric lavage group (nasogastric tube placement with gastric lavage), or erythromycin + gastric lavage group (both erythromycin infusion and gastric lavage). The primary outcome was satisfactory visualization. Secondary outcomes included identification of a bleeding source, the success rate of hemostasis, duration of endoscopy, complications related to erythromycin infusion or gastric lavage, number of transfused blood units, rebleeding rate, and bleeding-related mortality. A total of 43 patients were randomly assigned: 14 patients in the erythromycin group; 15 patients in the gastric lavage group; and 14 patients in the erythromycin + gastric lavage group. Overall satisfactory visualization was achieved in 81% of patients: 92.8% in the erythromycin group; 60.0% in the gastric lavage group; and 92.9% in the erythromycin + gastric lavage group, respectively (p = 0.055). The identification of a bleeding source was possible in all cases. The success rate of hemostasis, duration of endoscopy, and number of transfused blood units did not significantly differ between groups. There were no complications. Rebleeding occurred in three patients (7.0%). Bleeding-related mortality was not reported. Intravenous erythromycin infusion prior to emergency endoscopy for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding seems to provide satisfactory endoscopic visualization.

  16. Usefulness of CT angiography in diagnosing acute gastrointestinal bleeding: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Rong; Yin, Yan; Qu, Xin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. METHODS: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cancerlit, Cochrane Library database, Sciencedirect, Springerlink and Scopus, from January 1995 to December 2009, were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of CT angiography in diagnosing acute GI bleeding. Studies were included if they compared CT angiography to a reference standard of upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, angiography or surgery in the diagnosis of acute GI bleeding. Meta-analysis methods were used to pool sensitivity and specificity and to construct summary receiver-operating characteristic. RESULTS: A total of 9 studies with 198 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Data were used to form 2 × 2 tables. CT angiography showed pooled sensitivity of 89% (95% CI: 82%-94%) and specificity of 85% (95% CI: 74%-92%), without showing significant heterogeneity (χ2 = 12.5, P = 0.13) and (χ2 = 22.95, P = 0.003), respectively. Summary receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.9297. CONCLUSION: CT angiography is an accurate, cost-effective tool in the diagnosis of acute GI bleeding and can show the precise location of bleeding, thereby directing further management. PMID:20712058

  17. Suspected blood indicator in capsule endoscopy: a valuable tool for gastrointestinal bleeding diagnosis

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    Pedro BOAL CARVALHO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Small bowel bleeding is a leading indication for small bowel capsule endoscopy. The Suspected Blood Indicator (SBI is a software feature directed to automatically detect bleeding lesions during small bowel capsule endoscopy. OBJECTIVE We aimed to assess SBI diagnostic accuracy for small bowel haemorrhage or potentially bleeding lesions during small bowel capsule endoscopy for small bowel bleeding. Methods - Single-centre retrospective study including 281 consecutive small bowel capsule endoscopy performed for small bowel bleeding during 6 years. The investigators marked lesions with high bleeding potential (P2, such as angioectasias, ulcers and tumours, as well as active bleeding during regular small bowel capsule endoscopy viewing with PillCam SB2(r. All small bowel capsule endoscopy were independently reviewed by another central reader using SBI. RESULTS Among the 281 patients, 29 (10.3% presented with active haemorrhage while 81 (28.9% presented with a P2 lesion. The most frequently observed P2 lesions were angioectasias (52, ulcers (15, polyps (7 and ulcerated neoplasias (7. SBI showed a 96.6% (28/29 sensitivity for active small bowel bleeding, with a 97.7% negative predictive value. Regarding P2 lesions, the SBI displayed an overall sensitivity of 39.5%, being highest for ulcerated neoplasias (100%, but significantly lower for angioectasias (38.5% or ulcers (20.0%. CONCLUSION Although SBI sensitivity for the automatic detection of potentially bleeding lesions was low, it effectively detected active small bowel bleeding with very high sensitivity and negative predictive value.

  18. Upper Gastrointestinal System Bleeding Associated with Mallory-Weiss Syndrome in a Patient with Prosthetic Mitral Valve Using Warfarin Sodium

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    Banu Şahin Yıldız

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mallory-Weiss syndrome refers to bleeding from tears in the mucosa at the junction of the stomach and esophagus. Bleeding has been recognised as the major treatment-limiting complication in patients with prosthetic mitral valve using anticoagulant treatment. We report that upper gastrointestinal system bleeding associated with Mallory-Weiss syndrome in patient with prosthetic mitral valve using warfarin sodium.

  19. The critical role of CT angiography in the detection and management of lower gastro-intestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Lower gastro-intestinal bleeding (LGIB) is defined as a bleeding site localised in the colon or anorectum. (1) In the past, the diagnosis of LGIB has been a serious challenge for the radiology department because of its possible intermittent character, making it difficult to pinpoint the bleeding site. Patients with a LGIB will typically have undergone a long diagnostic work-up before they end up on the interventional radiology department.The development of multi-detector computed tomography (...

  20. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Portugal: a multicentric retrospective study in twelve Portuguese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Alves, Carlos C; Neto, Rosa; Arroja, Bruno; Vidal, Rosário; Macedo, Guilherme; Nunes, Ana A; Rego, Ana; Carvalho, Joao; Banhudo, António; Curado, António; Lima, Paula N; Baranda, Joao; Ribeiro, Filipe

    2012-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is associated with important mortality. More information is needed in order to improve NVUGIB management. The aims of this study were: (a) characterizing Portuguese patients and clinical approaches used in NVUGIB, (b) comparing management used in Portugal with management globally used in European countries, (c) identify factors associated with management options, and (d) identify factors associated with adverse outcome. ENERGiB was an observational, retrospective cohort study, on NVUGIB with endoscopic evaluation, carried across Europe. This study focuses on Portuguese patients of the ENERGiB study. Patients were managed according to routine care. Later, data were collected from files. Multivariate/univariate analyses were conducted on predictive factors of poor outcome and clinical decisions. Patients (n=404) were mostly men (66.8%), mean age 68, with co-morbidities (72%), frequently on NSAIDs/aspirin. Most were assisted by general medical (57.8%) or surgical team (20.6%), only 19.4% by gastroenterology/GI-bleeding team. PPI was largely used. Gastric/duodenal ulcers, erosive gastritis and esophagitis were the main bleeding causes. 10% had bleeding persistence/recurrence. Death occurred in 24 patients, 20 from a non-bleeding related cause. Poor outcomes were related with age >65, co-morbidities, fresh blood haematemesis, shock/syncope, bleeding through previous nasogastric tube, massive fluid replacement or transfusions besides erythrocytes. This study contributed to characterization of Portuguese patients and NVUGIB episodes in real clinical setting and identified factors associated with a poor outcome. It also identified differences, especially in the organization of GI bleeding teams, which might help us to improve the management of these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  1. Continued Antiplatelet Therapy and Risk of Bleeding in Gastrointestinal Procedures: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiao; Baillargeon, Jacques G; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Management of perioperative antiplatelet medications in gastrointestinal (GI) surgery is challenging. The risk of intraoperative and postoperative bleeding is associated with perioperative use of antiplatelet medication. However, cessation of these drugs may be unsafe for patients who are required to maintain antiplatelet use due to cardiovascular conditions. The objective of this systematic review was to compare the risk of intraoperative or postoperative bleeding among patients who had GI surgery while on continuous antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, clopidogrel, or dual therapy) with the risk among those not taking continuous antiplatelet medication. We reviewed articles published between January 2000 and July 2015 from the Medline Ovid and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases. Studies involving any GI procedures were included if the articles met our inclusion criteria (listed in Methods). The following key words were used for the search: clopidogrel, Plavix, aspirin, antiplatelet, bleeding, hemorrhage, and digestive system surgical procedures. Quality of the studies was assessed, depending on their study design, using the Newcastle-Ottawa score or the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. Twenty-two studies were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. Five showed that the risk of intraoperative bleeding or postoperative bleeding among patients who had GI surgery while on continuous antiplatelet therapy was higher compared that for those not on continuous therapy. The remaining 17 studies reported that there was no statistically significant difference in the risks of bleeding between the continuous antiplatelet therapy group and the group without continuous antiplatelet therapy. The risk of bleeding associated with GI procedures in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy was not significantly higher than in patients with no antiplatelet or interrupted antiplatelet therapy. Copyright © 2016 American

  2. Thrombin in combination with intensive nursing in treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Xiang, M L; Liu, Y M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding, a commonly seen pediatric emergency, needs timely symptomatic treatment to avoid a worse outcome. To discuss the clinical effect of thrombin treatment in combination with intensive nursing on pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding, this study analyzed 128 children who were treated in the second ward of the Children’s Internal Medical Department in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University between February 2012 and December 2014. The patients were divided into two groups, an experimental group and a control group. Besides thrombin, the experimental group was given intensive nursing, consisting of regular nursing and targeted nursing, while the control group was given regular nursing only. Clinical indexes of the two groups, such as effective rate, nursing satisfaction and side effect rate, were compared. Relevant clinical indexes such as duration of hospital stay, time to stopping of bleeding and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) score, as well as overall satisfaction level of the observation group were all better than those of the control group and differences between the two groups had statistical significance (P less than 0.05). Furthermore, difference of overall effective rate between the experimental group (90.63%) and the control group (68.75%) was significant. Difference of incidence of side effects between the two groups was statistically significant. Thus thrombin treatment in combination with intensive nursing proved to have a remarkable clinical effect and high safety level in treating pediatric upper gastrointestinal bleeding and, moreover, it shortens treatment time and enhances the patients’ quality of life.

  3. [AIMS65 score validation for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the National Hospital Cayetano Heredia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Sánchez, Víctor; Bravo Paredes, Eduar Alban; Pinto Valdivia, José Luis; Valenzuela Granados, Vanessa; Espinoza-Rios, Jorge Luis

    2015-01-01

    To validate the score AIMS65 in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, in terms of mortality and rebleeding a 30-day event. Patients included were those with higher age to 18 years attending the Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia during the period May 2013 to December 2014, by upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Data were analyzed using ROC curve (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and the area was obtained under the curve (AUC) to properly qualify the score AIMS65. 209 patients were included, 66.03% were male, with an average age of 58.02 years. The mortality rate was 7.65%, the multiorgan failure the most common cause of death. Plus 3.82% of the patients had recurrent bleeding and 11% required a transfusion of more than 2 units of blood. When analyzing the ROC curve with AIMS65 and mortality score a value of 0.9122 is reported; identifying it as cutoff greater than or equal to 3 value in the score AIMS65 to discriminate patients at high risk of death, likewise the ROC curve was analyzed for recurrence of bleeding with a value of 0.6266 and the need to Transfusion of packed red blood cells over two a value of 0.7421. And it was determined the average hospital stay with a value of 4.8 days, however, no correlation was found with the score AIMS65. AIMS65 score is a good predictor of mortality, and is useful for predicting the need for transfusion of more than 2 globular packages. However it is not a good predictor for recurrence of bleeding, or hospital stay.

  4. Aspirin Has a Protective Effect Against Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbeh, Antonios; Tamim, Hani M; Abu Daya, Hussein; Abou Mrad, Rachel; Badreddine, Rami J; Eloubeidi, Mohamad A; Rockey, Don C; Barada, Kassem

    2015-07-01

    To determine the effect of aspirin and anticoagulants on clinical outcomes and cause of in-hospital death in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). Patients were identified from a tertiary center database that included all patients with UGIB. Clinical outcomes including (1) in-hospital mortality, (2) severe bleeding, (3) rebleeding, (4) in-hospital complications, and (5) length of hospital stay were examined in patients taking (a) aspirin only, (b) anticoagulants only, and (c) no antithrombotics. Of 717 patients with NVUGIB, 56 % (402) were taking at least one antithrombotic agent. Seventy-eight (11 %) patients died in hospital, and 310 (43 %) had severe bleeding (BP 120 b/min, Hb 3 units). On multivariate analysis, being on aspirin was protective against in-hospital mortality [OR 0.26 (0.13-0.53)], rebleeding [OR 0.31 (0.17-0.59)], and predictive of a shorter hospital stay (coefficient = -4.2 days; 95 % CI -8.7, 0.3). Similarly, being on nonaspirin antiplatelets was protective against in-hospital mortality (P = 0.03). However, being on anticoagulants was predictive of in-hospital complications [OR 2.0 (1.20-3.35)] and severe bleeding [OR 1.69 (1.02-2.82)]. Compared to those not taking any antithrombotics, patients who bled on aspirin were less likely to die in hospital of uncontrolled gastrointestinal bleeding (3.6 vs 0 %, P ≤ 0.01) and systemic cancer (4.9 vs 0 %, P ≤ 0.002), but equally likely to die of cardiovascular/thromboembolic disease, sepsis, and multiorgan failure. Patients who present with NVUGIB on aspirin had reduced in-hospital mortality and fewer adverse outcomes, while those on anticoagulants had increased in-hospital complications.

  5. Evaluation of stress hormones in traumatic brain injury patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biteghe-Bi-Nzeng Alain-Pascal; WEI Hui-jie; CHEN Xin; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the local risk factors of traumatic brain injury(TBI)patients developing gastrointestinal(GI)bleeding during the early hospitalization in neurosurgery intensive care unit(NICU).Method:From September 2005 to February 2006,41 patients admitted to NICU and 13 healthy volunteers were involved in our study.Blood samples at 24 hours,2-3 days and 5-7 days were obtained from each patient via arterial line at 8 a.m.to measure the concentrations of serum adrenocorticotropic hormone(ACTH),total cortisol and gastrin.The collected serum was immersed in an ice bath and tested by the Immulite 1000 systems.Data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5.Results:Within 24 hours following TBI,the concentrations of total cortisol,ACTH and gastrin increased proportionally to the severity of injury,especially significant in the experimental group(P<0.05).The concentrations of ACTH and gastrin were higher in the GI bleeding positive group than in the GI bleeding negative group,(F=1.413,P=0.253)for ACTH and(F=9.371,P=0.006)for gastrin.GI bleeding had a positive correlation with gastrin concentration(r=0.312,P<0.05)and a negative correlation with serum hemoglobin(Hb)(r=-0.420,P<0.01).The clinical incidence of GI bleeding was 24.39%(10/41)in the experimental group.Within 24 hours,GI bleeding had a strong correlation with gastrin concentration(OR=26.643,P<0.05)and hematocrit(Hct)(OR=5.385,P<0.05).High ACTH concentration(>100 pg/ml)increased the frequency of GI bleeding.For patients with severe TBI and treated with routine antacids,the incidence of GI bleeding was 40.91%(9/22)and the mortality rate was 20%(2/10).Conclusions:Low Glasgow coma scale scores,low Hb,high concentrations of gastrin and ACTH(>100 pg/ml)are risk factors and can be predictive values for post-traumatic GI bleeding.Severe TBI patients have high risks of GI bleeding with high mortality.

  6. The vital threat of an upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Risk factor analysis of 121 consecutive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Schemmer; Frank Decker; Genevieve Dei-Anane; Volkmar Henschel; Klaus Buhl; Christian Herfarth; Stefan Riedl

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the importance in predicting patients risk of mortality due to upper gastrointestinal (UGI)bleeding under today's therapeutic regimen.METHODS: From 1998 to 2001, 121 patients with the diagnosis of UGI bleeding were treated in our hospital.Based on the patients' data, a retrospective multivariate data analysis with initially more than 270 single factors was performed. Subsequently, the following potential risk factors underwent a logistic regression analysis:age, gender, initial hemoglobin, coumarines, liver cirrhosis, prothrombin time (PT), gastric ulcer (small curvature), duodenal ulcer (bulbus back wall), Forrest classification, vascular stump, variceal bleeding, MalloryWeiss syndrome, RBC substitution, recurrent bleeding,conservative and surgical therapy.RESULTS: Seventy male (58%) and 51 female (42%)patients with a median age of 70 (range: 21-96) years were treated. Their in-hospital mortality was 14%. While 12% (11/91) of the patients died after conservative therapy, 20% (6/30) died after undergoing surgical therapy. UGI bleeding occurred due to duodenal ulcer (n = 36; 30%), gastric ulcer (n = 35; 29%), esophageal varicosis (n = 12; 10%), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (n = 8; 7%), erosive lesions of the mucosa (n = 20;17%), cancer (n = 5; 4%), coagulopathy (n = 4; 3%),lymphoma (n = 2; 2%), benign tumor (n = 2; 2%)and unknown reason (n = 1; 1%). A logistic regression analysis of all aforementioned factors revealed that liver cirrhosis and duodenal ulcer (bulbus back wall)were associated risk factors for a fatal course after UGI bleeding. Prior to endoscopy, only liver cirrhosis was an assessable risk factor. Thereafter, liver cirrhosis,the location of a bleeding ulcer (bulbus back wall) and patients' gender (male) were of prognostic importance for the clinical outcome (mortality) of patients with a bleeding ulcer.CONCLUSION: Most prognostic parameters used in clinical routine today are not reliable enough in predicting a patient's vital threat posed by

  7. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the jejunum presenting as obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a history of gliosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso Puentes, Nidia; Jimenez-Alfaro Larrazabal, Carmen; García Higuera, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel malignant tumors are rare and sarcomatoid carcinomas have rarely been reported at this site. We report a 56-year-old woman, with history of an excised gliosarcoma, who presented with recurrent obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. She underwent endoscopy and colonoscopy, which failed to identify the cause of the bleeding. The abdominal computed tomography scan located a tumor in the small bowel. Pathology revealed a jejunal sarcomatoid carcinoma. She developed tumor recurrence and multiple liver metastases shortly after surgery. Immunohistochemistry is required for accurate diagnosis. Sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, which is associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:24759341

  8. Risk of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, or anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; Arguedas, Yolanda; García, Santiago; Bujanda, Luis; Calvet, Xavier; Ponce, Julio; Perez-Aísa, Ángeles; Castro, Manuel; Muñoz, Maria; Sostres, Carlos; García-Rodríguez, Luis A

    2015-05-01

    Treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or low-dose aspirin is associated with increased risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. There is little evidence on the risk of lower gastrointestinal bleeding with NSAIDs, antiplatelet agents (APAs), or anticoagulants. We aimed to quantify the relative risk (RR) of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with use of NSAIDs, APAs, or anticoagulants. We performed a case-control study that used data collected from consecutive patients hospitalized for gastrointestinal bleeding (563 upper, mean age, 63.6 ± 16.7 years and 415 lower, mean age, 70.8 ± 13.8 years), confirmed by endoscopy or other diagnostic procedures. Unhospitalized patients were used as controls (n = 1008) and matched for age, hospital, and month of admission. Drug use was considered current when taken within 7 days or less before hospitalization. RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression analysis. Use of anticoagulants, low-dose aspirin, and other drugs (non-aspirin-APA, 82.3% thienopiridines) was associated with upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; the risk was 2-fold higher for anticoagulants (RR, 4.2; 95% CI, 2.9-6.2) than for low-dose aspirin (RR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.3) or other non-aspirin-APA drugs (RR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6). NSAID use was also associated with increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and greater for upper (RR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.0-3.5) than lower gastrointestinal bleeding (RR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.9). Use of proton pump inhibitors was associated with reduced risk of upper, but not lower, gastrointestinal bleeding. Anticoagulants, low-dose aspirin, NSAIDs, and other non-aspirin-APA drugs are associated with increased risk of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Use of anticoagulants appears to be the strongest risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Alcohol Abuse Increases Rebleeding Risk and Mortality in Patients with Non-variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkkäinen, Jussi M; Miilunpohja, Sami; Rantanen, Tuomo; Koskela, Jenni M; Jyrkkä, Johanna; Hartikainen, Juha; Paajanen, Hannu

    2015-12-01

    No current data are available on rebleeding and mortality risk in patients who use alcohol excessively and are admitted for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). This information could help in planning interventions and follow-up protocols for these patients. This study provides contemporary data on the long-term outcome after first-time NVUGIB in alcohol abusers (AAs) compared to non-abusers (NAs). Consecutive patients hospitalized for their first acute gastrointestinal bleeding from 2009 through 2011 were retrospectively recorded and categorized as AA or NA. Risk factors for one-year mortality and rebleeding were identified, and patients were further monitored for long-term mortality until 2015. Alcohol abuse was identified in 19.7% of patients with NVUGIB (n = 518). The one-year rebleeding rate was 16.7% in AAs versus 9.1% in NAs (P = 0.027). Alcohol abuse was associated with a twofold increase in rebleeding risk (P = 0.025); the risk especially increased 6 months after the initial bleeding. The study groups did not differ significantly in 30-day (6.0%) or one-year mortality rates (20.5%). However, there was a tendency for higher overall mortality in AAs than NAs after adjustment of comorbidities. AAs with NVUGIB are at high risk of rebleeding, and mortality is increased in AA patients. A close follow-up strategy and long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy are recommended for AA patients with peptic ulcer or esophagitis.

  10. Stroke and recurrent haemorrhage associated with antithrombotic treatment after gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Olesen, Jonas B.

    2015-01-01

    agent (0.76, 0.68 to 0.86), and oral anticoagulation plus an antiplatelet agent (0.41, 0.32 to 0.52), and a reduced risk of thromboembolism was found in association with restart of oral anticoagulation (0.41, 0.31 to 0.54), an antiplatelet agent (0.76, 0.61 to 0.95), and oral anticoagulation plus...... an antiplatelet agent (0.54, 0.36 to 0.82). Restarting oral anticoagulation alone was the only regimen with an increased risk of major bleeding (1.37, 1.06 to 1.77) compared with non-resumption of treatment; however, the difference in risk of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding was not significant between......-2012) included all patients with atrial fibrillation discharged from hospital after gastrointestinal bleeding while receiving antithrombotic treatment. Restarted treatment regimens were single or combined antithrombotic drugs with oral anticoagulation and antiplatelets. Follow-up started 90 days after discharge...

  11. Cyanoacrylate spray as treatment in difficult-to-manage gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liz; Toapanta-Yanchapaxi; Norberto; Chavez-Tapia; Félix; Téllez-ávila

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can be a life-treating event that is managed with standard endoscopic therapy in the majority of cases. However, up to 5%-10% of patients may have persistent bleeding that does not respond to conventional measures. Several endoscopic treatment techniques have been proposed as strategies to control such cases, such as epinephrine injection, hemoclips or argon plasma coagulation, but there are certain clinical scenarios where it is difficult to achieve hemostasis even though adequate use of the available resources is made. Reasons for these failures can be associated with the lesion features, such as extent or location. The use of long-standing techniques in nontraditional scenarios, such as with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices sclerosis, has been reported with favorable results. Although new products such as TC-325 or Ankaferd Blood Stopper hemosprays may be useful, their formulations are not available worldwide. Here we present two clinical cases with very different scenarios of gastrointestinal bleeding, where the use of cyanoac-rylate in spray had favorable results in uncommon indications. Cyanoacrylate used as a spray is a technique that can be used as an alternative method in emergent settings.

  12. Durable survival after chemotherapy in a HIV patient with Burkitt's lymphoma presenting with massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Man F; Chan, Hay N; Pang, Chun Y; Lai, Ho K; Ha, Chung Y; Ng, Celia; Ho, Rita; Wong, Cheuk K; Yeung, Yiu M; Yip, Sze F

    2016-07-01

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon presentation of Burkitt's lymphoma in a patient with HIV/AIDS, and is seldom reported in the literature. A 39-year-old man who has sex with men presented with abdominal pain and massive haematemesis and a rapid drop in haemoglobin level to 4.8 g/dL. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a large blood clot in the stomach, and an emergency laparotomy was performed because of unstable haemodynamics. This showed active bleeding from multiple tumours in the fundus and body of the stomach. The patient underwent gastrectomy and gastric biopsy confirmed Burkitt's lymphoma. Further tests showed lymphoma involvement in bone marrow and central nervous system. The patient tested positive for HIV, and had a CD4 count of 212 cells/mm(3) and viral load of 18,000 copies/mL at diagnosis. He was commenced on a chemotherapy regimen of CODOX-M/IVAC, and highly active antiretroviral therapy consisting of indinavir, stavudine and lamivudine. The major side effect was peripheral neuropathy. Infective complications during chemotherapy were controlled by broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-fungal agents. Complete remission of the lymphoma was achieved after the chemotherapy and remission was maintained for more than 14 years. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Application of endoscopic hemoclips for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Fatih; Çakır, Murat; Baran, Maşallah; Duygulu, Şengül; Aydoğdu, Sema

    2014-04-01

    Data about the efficiency and outcome of therapeutic endoscopic techniques in children with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) are scarce. We aimed to analyze our experience with endoscopic hemoclip application in children with non-variceal UGB. During a 3-year period, a total of 1715 endoscopies were performed in our pediatric endoscopy unit; 182 (10.6%) of them were performed for UGB to 158 patients. Fifty-six of them had emergent endoscopy. Among them, 15 cases with nonvariceal UGB were only given endoscopic hemoclips. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings at initial admission; endoscopic appearance of bleeding lesions; and outcome of hemoclip application were recorded from the hospital files and endoscopy records. Ten patients (66.6%) had gastric ulcer, 3 (20%) had duodenal ulcer, 1 (6.7%) had Dieulafoy lesion, and 1 (6.7%) had bleeding at the post-polypectomy site. Initial homeostasis after hemoclip application was achieved in all patients (100%). Rebleeding was seen in only one patient (6.5%) with a Dieulafoy lesion, who needed hemoclip application for a second time, and the bleeding was controlled successfully. Permanent hemostasis was 100%. The median number of hemoclips used per case and per application was 3.4 and 3.2, respectively. None of the patients experienced any complication related to hemoclip application. Median duration of hospitalization was 6 days. On follow-up, none of the patients received surgical therapy, and 30-d mortality related to bleeding was 0%. The use of hemoclips for nonvariceal UGB in children is an effective modality to control bleeding without any complications in children.

  14. Is Endoscopic Therapy Safe for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Anticoagulated Patients With Supratherapeutic International Normalized Ratios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Choong Nam; Chung, Hyun Soo; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Ha Yan; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in anticoagulated patients with supratherapeutic international normalized ratios (INRs) presents a challenge. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety of endoscopic therapy for UGIB in anticoagulated patients with supratherapeutic INR in terms of rebleeding and therapeutic outcomes. One hundred ninety-two anticoagulated patients who underwent endoscopic treatment for UGIB were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the occurrence of rebleeding within 30 days of the initial therapeutic endoscopy: no-rebleeding group (n = 168) and rebleeding group (n = 24). The overall rebleeding rate was 12.5%. Bleeding from gastric cancer and bleeding at the duodenum were significantly related to rebleeding in a univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis determined that presenting symptoms other than melena (hematemesis, hematochezia, or others) (odds ratio, 3.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-10.76) and bleeding from gastric cancer (odds ratio, 6.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-29.25) were significant factors predictive of rebleeding. Supratherapeutic INR at the time of endoscopic therapy was not significantly associated with rebleeding in either univariate or multivariate analysis. Significant differences in bleeding-related mortality, additional intervention to control bleeding, length of hospital stay, and transfusion requirements were revealed between the rebleeding and no-rebleeding groups. There were no significant differences in therapeutic outcomes between patients with INR within the therapeutic range and those with supratherapeutic INR. Supratherapeutic INR at the time of endoscopic therapy did not change rebleeding and therapeutic outcomes. Thus, we should consider endoscopic therapy for UGIB in anticoagulated patients, irrespective of INR at the time of endoscopic therapy.

  15. Predictors of positive endoscopic findings in hospitalized patients with occult gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Sengupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anemia with occult gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB is a common reason for inpatient gastroenterology consultation and endoscopy. However, the utility of inpatient endoscopy in this setting is unclear. The aim of this paper is to determine variables that predict positive endoscopic examinations for inpatients presenting with anemia and OGIB. We performed a prospective observational study of consecutive hospitalized patients between March 2013 and April 2014 with anemia and OGIB. For patients undergoing inpatient endoscopic evaluation, logistic regression was used to determine which variables were associated with detecting etiology of OGIB. An occult bleeding score (OBS was created using receiver operating characteristics and area under the curve (AUC analysis to predict detection of bleeding source and need for endoscopic intervention. Of the 74 patients identified, 55 (74% underwent endoscopic evaluation, of whom 28 patients had a source of OGIB identified. Patients with malignancy (OR 7.25, 95%CI 1.06-144 were more likely to have a bleeding source identified on endoscopy, whereas patients with higher admission hemoglobin levels were less likely to have a detected source (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.41-0.86. The OBS was constructed by assigning a point each for malignancy and admission hemoglobin <8.2 g/dL. The OBS predicted detection of etiology of bleeding and endoscopic intervention with an AUC of 0.79 and 0.75. The yield of endoscopy in determining a bleeding source in patients with OGIB is significant particularly in patients with malignancy or a low hemoglobin level. A simple score can assist in determining whether inpatient endoscopy is warranted in this population.

  16. Multi-detector CT angiography for lower gastrointestinal bleeding: Can it select patients for endovascular intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, P T; Ganeshan, A; Anthony, S; Uberoi, R

    2010-02-01

    This is a retrospective review of the results at our institution of using multi-detector CT angiography (CTA) to localise lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We hypothesised that in our patient population: (i) CTA was unlikely to demonstrate bleeding in patients who were haemodynamically stable; (ii) in haemodynamically unstable patients in whom CTA was undertaken, the results could be used to select patients who would benefit from catheter angiography; and (iii) in haemodynamically unstable patients in whom CTA was undertaken, a subgroup of patients could be identified who would benefit from primary surgical treatment, avoiding invasive angiography completely. A retrospective review was conducted of the clinical records of all patients undergoing CTA for lower GI haemorrhage at our institution between 1 January 2005 and 30 June 2007. Out of the 20 patients examined, 10 had positive CTAs demonstrating the bleeding site. Nine were haemodynamically unstable at the time of the study. Four patients with positive CT angiograms were able to be treated directly with surgery and avoided invasive angiography. Ten patients had negative CTAs. Four of these were haemodynamically unstable, six haemodynamically stable. Only one required intervention to secure haemostasis, the rest stopped spontaneously. No haemodynamically stable patient who had a negative CTA required intervention. CTA is a useful non-invasive technique for localising the site of lower GI bleeding. In our patient population, in the absence of haemodynamic instability, the diagnostic yield of CTA was low and bleeding was likely to stop spontaneously. In haemodynamically unstable patients, a positive CTA allowed patients to be triaged to surgery or angiography, whereas there was a strong association between a negative CTA and spontaneous cessation of bleeding.

  17. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Chinese Children: A Multicenter 10-Year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Wang, Baoxiang; Yuan, Lan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Xinqiong; Xiao, Yuan; Mei, Hong; Xu, Chundi

    2016-08-01

    Objective This study aims to analyze the clinical and endoscopic presentations of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in the Chinese children. Methods A 10-year retrospective study was made on children with UGIB and undertaken esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) from 4 tertiary referral centers in China. Results Of the 1218 children studied, the bleeding source was found in 76.4%. Erosive gastritis was the most common endoscopic finding (33.5%), followed by duodenal ulcer (23.2%). The proportion of erosive gastritis decreased with age (correlation coefficient = -0.787), and duodenal ulcer increased with age (correlation coefficient = 0.958). The bleeding source was more likely to be determined in children having EGDs within 48 hours (80.6% vs 67.9%). Conclusions In Chinese children with UGIB, erosive gastritis and duodenal ulcer were the leading causes, and their proportions varied with age. EGDs performed within 48 hours may improve the possibility of finding the source of bleeding. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Initial assessment and management of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Emily D; Travis, Anne C; Saltzman, John R

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a substantial clinical and economic burden, with an estimated mortality rate between 3% and 15%. The initial management starts with hemodynamic assessment and resuscitation. Blood transfusions may be needed in patients with low hemoglobin levels or massive bleeding, and patients who are anticoagulated may require administration of fresh frozen plasma. Patients with significant bleeding should be started on a proton-pump inhibitor infusion, and if there is concern for variceal bleeding, an octreotide infusion. Patients with UGIB should be stratified into low-risk and high-risk categories using validated risk scores. The use of these risk scores can aid in separating low-risk patients who are suitable for outpatient management or early discharge following endoscopy from patients who are at increased risk for needing endoscopic intervention, rebleeding, and death. Upper endoscopy after adequate resuscitation is required for most patients and should be performed within 24 hours of presentation. Key to improving outcomes is appropriate initial management of patients presenting with UGIB.

  19. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding - risk factors and the value of emergency endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchowski, Pawel; Dabrowiecki, Stanislaw; Szczesny, Wojciech; Szmytkowski, Jakub

    2013-10-31

    Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding (UGIB) remains a valid issue of modern medicine. The mortality and recurrence rates remain high and have not decreased as expected over the past decades. to assess the treatment outcomes of nonvariceal UGIB depending on the timing of endoscopy (urgent vs. elective) and to perform an analysis of risk factors for death in patients with nonvariceal UGIB. Comparative evaluation of treatment outcomes in two groups of patients. Group A consisted of patients undergoing elective endoscopy (n = 187). Group B consisted of patients undergoing emergency endoscopy (n = 295). Moreover, the influence of selected factors on the risk of death and bleeding recurrence was analyzed in the combined population of the two groups. This was done by constructing a logistic regression model and testing dependence hypotheses. In group A the mortality rate was 9.1%, and the recurrence rate was 18.2%. In group B the values were 6.8% and 12.2%, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found (p = NS). In group B the number of surgical interventions, blood transfusions and intensive care admissions was significantly lower (p bleeding from a malignant lesion, recurrent bleeding and the need for surgery (p < 0.05). The use of emergency endoscopy improves the treatment outcomes in patients with UGIB, although no statistically significant decrease in the mortality and recurrence rates could be observed.

  20. An obscure cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small bowel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn L. Gorski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the small intestine is a rare condition. It usually results in gastrointestinal bleeding and it could happen many years after the diagnosis with renal cell cancer. Treatment includes surgery as well as targeted agents such as tyrosine kinases. We report here the case of an 82-year-old man with a past medical history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma and right nephrectomy 6 years earlier, who presented with recurrent episodes of syncope and black stools. He underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD and colonoscopy without evident source of bleeding. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE showed three bleeding lesions in the jejunum and ileum. Push enteroscopy revealed a proximal jejunum bleeding mass that was suspicious for malignancy. Histopathology demonstrated poorly differentiated carcinoma. Given the patient’s history of high-grade renal cell carcinoma, and similarity of histologic changes to the old renal cell cancer specimen, metastatic renal cell carcinoma was felt to be the responsible etiology.

  1. UPPER GASTRO-INTESTINAL BLEEDING IN THE YOUNG - GASTRIC GIST TUMOR OR PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Atolagbe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available GIST tumors is very unusual in the young and middle aged and a high index of suspicion is needed for the diagnosis in young patients who present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Appropriate imaging such as a Computed tomographic scan (CT scan may identify this tumor which may easily be misdiagnosed as a bleeding Peptic Ulcer Disease in the young. We present a case of a healthy 38 year old man with no alcohol use who presented with epigastric pain and melena and subsequent torrential bleeding uncontrolled during endoscopy necessitating an emergency exploratory laparotomy by the general surgery team. The bleeding intraluminal component of the tumor with gross splenic and pancreatic involvement was identified and surgical management consisted of a wedge resection of the greater curvature of the stomach incorporating the tumor and the spleen with successful dissection of the tumor off the tail of the pancreas. Histology was positive for C-KIT and DOG-1 markers. Postoperative course was uneventful and he is presently on Imatinib Mesylate.

  2. 消化道出血概述%Overview of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文忠

    2015-01-01

    消化道出血是急诊科和消化科常见的临床病况之一。急性大量出血可危及生命,慢性失血可产生贫血症状,部分消化道出血是一些严重疾病,包括胃肠道恶性肿瘤的临床表现。熟悉和掌握消化道出血的临床表现、分类和处理原则,将有助于提高其预防和治疗水平。%Gastrointestinal(GI)bleeding is one of the commonly seen clinical problems in departments of emergency and gastroenterology. Acute massive bleeding may be life-threatening,and chronic blood loss can present symptoms of anemia. GI bleeding is the clinical manifestation of some serious diseases,including GI malignancies. Familiar with and mastering the clinical manifestations,classification and principles of management of GI bleeding will help to improve its prevention and treatment.

  3. Role of interventional radiology in the management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Raja S; Choi, Hyung Won; Mouser, Hans C; Narsinh, Kazim H; McCammack, Kevin C; Treesit, Tharintorn; Kinney, Thomas B

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) can lead to significant morbidity and mortality without appropriate treatment. There are numerous causes of acute GIB including but not limited to infection, vascular anomalies, inflammatory diseases, trauma, and malignancy. The diagnostic and therapeutic approach of GIB depends on its location, severity, and etiology. The role of interventional radiology becomes vital in patients whose GIB remains resistant to medical and endoscopic treatment. Radiology offers diagnostic imaging studies and endovascular therapeutic interventions that can be performed promptly and effectively with successful outcomes. Computed tomography angiography and nuclear scintigraphy can localize the source of bleeding and provide essential information for the interventional radiologist to guide therapeutic management with endovascular angiography and transcatheter embolization. This review article provides insight into the essential role of Interventional Radiology in the management of acute GIB. PMID:24778770

  4. Gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-induced vitamin K deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhie, Azadeh; Desai, Hem; King, Skye; Parsa, Nour Alhoda

    2016-06-06

    There is a well-known association between vitamin K deficiency and haemorrhagic events including gastrointestinal bleeding. There is also a well-known association between both poor dietary intake of vitamin K and chronic antibiotic use and the development of vitamin K deficiency. Although the medical literature notes that cephalosporin antibiotics have a propensity to cause vitamin K deficiency due to the molecular structure of the medications and their ability to suppress the synthesis of clotting factors, there are other antibiotics that have also been implicated in the development of vitamin K deficiency. There are very few reports of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole causing vitamin K deficiency and further leading to bleeding episodes. We present such a case and discuss the risk factors leading to such complications.

  5. Is urgent CT angiography necessary in cases of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, A Martín; Rodríguez, L Fernández; de Gracia, M Martí

    2017-01-06

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding usually presents as hematochezia, rectal bleeding or melena and represents 1-2% of the medical appointments in the Emergency Services. Mortality reaches the 30-40% and it is highly related with the severity and associated comorbidity. Most clinical practice guidelines include colonoscopy at some point in the diagnostic and therapeutic process (urgent for severe cases and ambulatory for mild ones) and look for predictors of severity. In the last years, there have been numerous studies where is clear the relevance and complementarity of advanced diagnostic imaging techniques, gradually incorporated as an alternative or second step in severe cases. Therefore, we have made a review of current scientific evidence to establish a clinical prediction rule for optimal indication of CT angiography in these patients. However, future studies providing greater robustness and level of evidence are necessary.

  6. Retroperitoneal Leiomyosarcoma Presenting as Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic G. Ventura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first known case of a retroperitoneal leiomyosarcoma that presented with an endoscopically defined source of gastrointestinal bleeding in the colon. A 68-year-old male with a history of diverticulosis, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia who complained of a 3-month history of abdominal pain, nausea, and intermittent hematochezia presented for evaluation of large volume hematochezia and lightheadedness. Colonoscopy revealed left-sided diverticulosis and rectal varices without stigmata of recent bleed. CT scan showed a 26 × 20 × 13 cm heterogeneous retroperitoneal mass and multiple hypodense hepatic lesions. Liver biopsy revealed leiomyosarcoma. In summary, although surgery is the mainstay of treatment, resectability has not improved significantly. Early recognition and aggressive surgery are keys to long-term survival.

  7. Prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding due to stress ulceration: a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, K B; Wagstaff, M J D; Greenwood, J E

    2012-03-01

    Our objective was to audit our current stress ulcer prophylaxis protocol (routine prescription of ranitidine and early enteral feeding) by identifying whether routine prescription of histamine-2 receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors as prophylaxis against stress-related mucosal disease and subsequent upper gastrointestinal bleeding is supported in the literature. We also aimed to ascertain what literature evidence supports the role of early enteral feeding as an adjunctive prophylactic therapy, as well as to search for burn-patient specific evidence, since burn patients are at high risk for developing this condition, with the aim of changing our practice. PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles, yielding seven randomised controlled trials comparing histamine-2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors in the prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with stress-related mucosal disease and three separate meta-analyses. Despite level 1 clinical evidence, no significant difference in efficacy between histamine-2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitor treatment groups was demonstrated. No significant difference was demonstrated in the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia between the two drugs given in this indication. However, enteral feeding was found to be safe and effective in preventing clinically significant upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients able to tolerate feeds demonstrated no additional benefit with concomitant pharmacological prophylactic therapy. Since all burn patients at the Royal Adelaide Hospital are fed from very early in their admission, the literature suggests that we, like our intensive care unit colleagues, should abolish our reliance on pharmacological prophylaxis, the routine prescription of which is not supported by the evidence.

  8. [Clinical value of endoscopic hemostasis in acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jia-ying; Ding, Shi-gang; Wang, Ye; Zhou, Li-ya

    2012-08-18

    To evaluate the clinical value of endoscopic hemostasis in acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This was a retrospective study of 223 patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and receiving endoscopic treatment who were admitted to Peking University Third Hospital between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2009. Endoscopic diagnosis, lesion location, lesion size and stigmata of recent hemorrhage were recorded. Stigmata of recent hemorrhage was evaluated by Forrest classification. All the patients were scored by Rockall for rehemorrhage and death risk. Endoscopic treatment comprised medicine aspersing, injection, thermocoagulation, clips and combination therapy. Hemorrhagic lesions of Forrest Ia-IIb were selected for endoscopic treatment, in which 214 patients(96.0%,214/223) underwent first endoscopic hemostasis successfully, while rehemorrhage occurred in 34 patients(15.2%,34/223). The first hemostatic achievement rate was 80.7%(180/223). And 17 patients received surgery or died because of endoscopic treatment failure. Total effective rate of endoscopic treatment was 92.4%(206/223). The total effective rates of Rockall high-risk group, moderate-risk group and low-risk group were 80%(40/50),95.7%(156/163) and 100%(10/10) respectively. The effective rates of epinephrine injection and combination therapy were 92.6%(137/148) and 77.6%(38/49) respectively. The rehemorrgagic rates of epinephrine injection and combination therapy were 14.2%(21/148) and 18.4%(9/49) respectively. The proportion of combination therapy in the second attempt at endoscopic therapy was 65.0%(13/20), and the achievement rate was 61.5%(8/13). Endoscopic hemostatic therapy is the preferred emergency treatment in acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic treatment should be used for emorrhagic lesions of Forrest Ia-IIb. Endoscopic therapy could be completely hemostatic in Rockall low-risk group. Rockall score directly influences endoscopic

  9. Prevalence and outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of, risk factors for, and prognostic importance of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients. METHODS: We included adults without GI bleeding who were acutely admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU...... bleeding occurred in 2.6 % (95 % confidence interval 1.6-3.6 %) of patients. The following variables at ICU admission were independently associated with clinically important GI bleeding: three or more co-existing diseases (odds ratio 8.9, 2.7-28.8), co-existing liver disease (7.6, 3.3-17.6), use of renal...

  10. Reduced hemoglobin and increased C-reactive protein are associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Togawa, Akira; Shirai, Yoshinori; Ichiki, Noboru; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Sueishi, Makoto

    2014-02-07

    To investigate the early upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (endoscopy) significantly reduces mortality resulting from upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Upper GI bleeding was defined as 1a, 1b, 2a, and 2b according to the Forrest classification. The hemoglobin (Hb), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were examined at around the day of endoscopy and 3 mo prior to endoscopy. The rate of change was calculated as follows: (the result of blood examination on the day of endoscopy - the results of blood examination 3 mo prior to endoscopy)/(results of blood examination 3 mo prior to endoscopy). Receiver operating characteristic curves were created to determine threshold values. Seventy-nine men and 77 women were enrolled. There were 17 patients with upper GI bleeding: 12 with a gastric ulcer, 3 with a duodenal ulcer, 1 with an acute gastric mucosal lesion, and 1 with gastric cancer. The area under the curve (AUC), threshold, sensitivity, and specificity of Hb around the day of endoscopy were 0.902, 11.7 g/dL, 94.1%, and 77.1%, respectively, while those of CRP were 0.722, 0.5 mg/dL, 70.5%, and 73%, respectively. The AUC, threshold, sensitivity, and specificity of the rate of change of Hb were 0.851, -21.3%, 76.4%, and 82.6%, respectively, while those of CRP were 0.901, 100%, 100%, and 82.5%, respectively. Predictors for upper GI bleeding were Hb 21.3% and an increase in the CRP > 100%, 3 mo before endoscopy.

  11. Unusual Complication of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome: Spontaneous Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding with Hypovolemic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Hsiung Ko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric artery (SMA syndrome is an unusual form of duodenal obstruction. Complications of SMA syndrome may sometimes develop and are usually associated with marked gastric dilatation, although most complications can be corrected by supportive treatment. In this article, we report a case of severe SMA syndrome with hypovolemic shock in a 24-year-old man. Multidetector-row computed tomography with reconstructed images was performed to establish the diagnosis. Spontaneous gastrointestinal bleeding is an extremely uncommon complication of SMA syndrome, and emergent surgical intervention was unavoidable in our patient. To our knowledge, no other such case has been reported in the English-language literature.

  12. New insights on an old medical emergency: non-portal hypertension related upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Cúrdia-Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB is a potentially life-threatening condition and the most common medical emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Despite being one of the most antique medical problems, recent studies have been slowly changing the management of these patients, which should nowadays include not only initial resuscitation, but also risk stratification, pre-endoscopic therapy, endoscopy treatment, and post-procedure care. The aim of this paper is to review the extended approach to the patient with non-portal hypertension related UGIB.

  13. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Emergent Management of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Patel, Jay; Kang, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require inpatient admission annually in the United States. When medical management and endoscopic therapy are inadequate, endovascular intervention can be lifesaving. These emergent situations highlight the importance of immediate competence of the interventional radiologist in the preangiographic evaluation as well as the endovascular treatment of UGIB. We describe a case of UGIB managed with endovascular embolization and detail the angiographic techniques used. The case description is followed by a detailed discussion of the treatment approach to UGIB, with attention to both nonvariceal and variceal algorithms. PMID:23997408

  14. Retrograde jejunoduodenogastric intussusception due to a replacement percutaneous gastrostomy tube presenting as upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube complications can be serious or life threatening.Retrograde intussusception is a very rare complication of PEG tubes with only 9 cases reported in the literature.We describe a case of retrograde intussusception,associated with the use of a Foley catheter as a replacement gastrostomy tube, presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of PEG-related retrograde intussusception successfully managed in a non-surgical manner. Retrograde intussusception likely occurred due to migration of the replacement tube with resultant securing and invagination of the proximal jejunum when the gastrostomy tube was anchored to the abdominal wall.

  15. Cecal Schwannoma: A Rare Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Young Woman with Review of Literature

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    Kalyan Kanneganti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Occurrence of these tumors is more common in the stomach than in the large intestine. These tumors usually present as polypoidal intraluminal lesions and based on their location can present with rectal bleeding, colonic obstruction, and abdominal pain or defecation disorders. We present a case of a thirty-five-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain and melena. Patient was diagnosed with a nonobstructing superficially ulcerated mass in the cecum on colonoscopy and required right hemicolectomy. A very rare pathological diagnosis of cecal schwannoma was made postoperatively.

  16. Use of CT enterography for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James S; Ryan, Mark L; Fields, Jonathan M; Neville, Holly L; Perez, Eduardo A; Sola, Juan E

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) represents a significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for any physician. While CT enterography (CTE) has been applied in adults with occult LGIB, its use in children has been limited to evaluation of Crohn's disease. We reviewed 6 patients ages 4-15 who underwent CTE for LGIB at a tertiary pediatric institution. In sum, CTE appears to be a valuable tool for localizing the source of LGIB prior to surgical or endoscopic intervention. However, rapid lesion identification must be weighed against the increased radiation exposure and patient discomfort due to bowel distention associated with this diagnostic technique.

  17. Ileal angiodysplasia causing chronic, occult gastrointestinal bleeding in a 14-year-old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jackson Murphy

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy revealed intra-abdominal adhesions and no clear vascular malformation. Initial careful visual and manual examination of the bowel after conversion to laparotomy failed to identify the lesion. On-table retrograde enteroscopy demonstrated a small, pulsatile lesion without ulceration or adherent clot in the mucosa of the proximal ileum. With endoscopic transillumination, a cluster of serpiginous vessels could be seen within the wall of the small bowel. The lesion was resected and pathology was consistent with angiodysplasia. Angiodysplasia is a rare cause of occult, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding in children. A multidisciplinary approach optimizes the likelihood of therapeutic success.

  18. Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula presenting as gastrointestinal bleeding: case report and literature review

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    Chong Wang

    Full Text Available Superior mesenteric arteriovenous fistula (SMAVF is a rare vascular disorder usually following penetrating abdominal trauma or gastrointestinal surgery. Percutaneous endovascular treatment such as embolization, has been widely used to treat this disease. We report a patient, who was presented with melena at the onset of his symptoms, then an acute hematemesis in shock. A SMAVF was diagnosed on an angiogram after a large mesenteric vein was seen on CT. The patient had a successful emergency endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL to stop bleeding. Then the patient received fistula embolization with covered stent.

  19. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed as a Manifestation of Poorly Differentiated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Richa; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Gautam, Arun; Karagozian, Raffi

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) metastasis from primary lung cancer is a rare clinical finding. Lung cancer most often metastasizes to the brain, bone, liver, and adrenal glands; with gastrointestinal involvement being very rare. We report a case of a 39-year-old female with a diagnosis of poorly differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) of the lung presenting with dizziness and melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed a bleeding mass in the stomach. Final biopsy report and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of the specimen were consistent with SCC lung metastasis. While it is imperative to have a high clinical suspicion for GI metastasis in patients with primary lung cancer presenting with GI symptoms, it may be challenging to establish diagnosis. Endoscopy along with pathology and immunohistochemistry play a crucial role in differentiating primary GI malignancies from metastasis.

  20. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in elderly people: Clinical outcomes and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, José A; Monreal-Robles, Roberto; García-Compean, Diego; Paz-Delgadillo, Jonathan; Wah-Suárez, Martín; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor J

    2017-04-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics, outcomes and prognostic factors in elderly patients (aged 75 years and elder) with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Consecutive patients admitted with acute nonvariceal UGIB who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were prospectively recruited and subdivided into two age-based groups, elderly (aged ≥75 years) and younger patients (23.5 g/L at admission presented a low mortality (negative predictive value 97.3%). Clinical evolution and mortality do not differ between the elderly and younger patients with acute nonvariceal UGIB. Serum albumin level at admission is a prognostic marker for mortality in elder patients. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. A massive bleeding from a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of a Meckel’s diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabowski Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastro intestinal tract, present in about 2% of population. Case Outline. The article presents the case of a 44-year-old otherwise healthy man with anemia, who was diagnosed lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An abdominal CT scan revealed a clearly demarcated solid tumor in hypogastric region, measuring 65 Ч 45 mm. A laparotomy through lower midline incision was performed. A surgical resection of a lesion of a Meckel’s diverticulum was carried out and a final diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor was made. The patient made an uneventful recovery. Conclusion. The preoperative diagnosis of a complicated Meckel’s diverticulum may be challenging. CT is usually an adequate method to diagnose tumors arising from Meckel’s diverticulum.

  2. Physical activity benefits and risks on the gastrointestinal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donald

    2011-12-01

    This review evaluates the current understanding of the benefits and risks of physical activity and exercise on the gastrointestinal system. A significant portion of endurance athletes are affected by gastrointestinal symptoms, but most symptoms are transient and do not have long-term consequences. Conversely, physical activity may have a protective effect on the gastrointestinal system. There is convincing evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of colon cancer. The evidence is less convincing for gastric and pancreatic cancers, gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cholelithiasis, diverticular disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and constipation. Physical activity may reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding and inflammatory bowel disease, although this has not been proven unequivocally. This article provides a critical review of the evidence-based literature concerning exercise and physical activity effects on the gastrointestinal system and provides physicians with a better understanding of the evidence behind exercise prescriptions for patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Well-designed prospective randomized trials evaluating the risks and benefits of exercise and physical activity on gastrointestinal disorders are recommended for future research.

  3. Predicting the Occurrence of Hypotension in Stable Patients With Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Point-of-Care Lactate Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Byuk Sung; Kim, Won Young; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

    2015-11-01

    It is difficult to assess risk in normotensive patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the initial lactate value can predict the in-hospital occurrence of hypotension in stable patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Retrospective, observational, single-center study. Emergency department of a tertiary-care, university-affiliated hospital during a 5-year period. Medical records of 3,489 patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding who were normotensive at presentation to the emergency department. We analyzed the ability of point-of-care testing of lactate at emergency department admission to predict hypotension development (defined as systolic blood pressure upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 157 patients experienced hypotension within 24 hours. Lactate was independently associated with hypotension development (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4-1.7), and the risk of hypotension significantly increased as the lactate increased from 2.5-4.9 mmol/L (odds ratio, 2.2) to 5.0-7.4 mmol/L (odds ratio, 4.0) and to greater than or equal to 7.5 mmol/L (odds ratio, 39.2) (pupper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, subsequently, prospective validate research will be required to clarify this.

  4. Transcatheter arterial embolization for endoscopically unmanageable non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Hee; Park, Jae Myung; Chun, Ho Jong; Oh, Jung Suk; Ahn, Hyo Jun; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2015-07-01

    Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) is a therapeutic option for endoscopically unmanageable upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We aimed to assess the efficacy and clinical outcomes of TAE for acute non-variceal upper GI bleeding and to identify predictors of recurrent bleeding within 30 days. Visceral angiography was performed in 66 patients (42 men, 24 women; mean age, 60.3 ± 12.7 years) who experienced acute non-variceal upper GI bleeding that failed to be controlled by endoscopy during a 7-year period. Clinical information was reviewed retrospectively. Outcomes included technical success rates, complications, and 30-day rebleeding and mortality rates. TAE was feasible in 59 patients. The technical success rate was 98%. Rebleeding within 30 days was observed in 47% after an initial TAE and was managed with re-embolization in 8, by endoscopic intervention in 5, by surgery in 2, and by conservative care in 12 patients. The 30-day overall mortality rate was 42.4%. In the case of initial endoscopic hemostasis failure (n = 34), 31 patients underwent angiographic embolization, which was successful in 30 patients (96.8%). Rebleeding occurred in 15 patients (50%), mainly because of malignancy. Two factors were independent predictors of rebleeding within 30 days by multivariate analysis: coagulopathy (odds ratio [OR] = 4.37; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-15.29; p = 0.021) and embolization in ≥2 territories (OR = 4.93; 95% CI: 1.43-17.04; p = 0.012). Catheterization-related complications included hepatic artery dissection and splenic embolization. TAE controlled acute non-variceal upper GI bleeding effectively. TAE may be considered when endoscopic therapy is unavailable or unsuccessful. Correction of coagulopathy before TAE is recommended.

  5. Prospective comparison of three risk scoring systems in non-variceal and variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanapirom, Kessarin; Ridtitid, Wiriyaporn; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Thungsuk, Rattikorn; Noophun, Phadet; Wongjitrat, Chatchawan; Luangjaru, Somchai; Vedkijkul, Padet; Lertkupinit, Comson; Poonsab, Swangphong; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Hansomburana, Piyathida; Pornthisarn, Bubpha; Thongbai, Thirada; Mahachai, Varocha; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat

    2016-04-01

    Data regarding the efficacy of the Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS), full Rockall score (FRS) and pre-endoscopic Rockall scores (PRS) in comparing non-variceal and variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) are limited. Our aim was to determine the performance of these three risk scores in predicting the need for treatment, mortality, and re-bleeding among patients with non-variceal and variceal UGIB. During January, 2010 and September, 2011, patients with UGIB from 11 hospitals were prospectively enrolled. The GBS, FRS, and PRS were calculated. Discriminative ability for each score was assessed using the receiver operated characteristics curve (ROC) analysis. A total of 981 patients presented with acute UGIB, 225 patients (22.9%) had variceal UGIB. The areas under the ROC (AUC) of the GBS, FRS, and PRS for predicting the need for treatment were 0.77, 0.69, and 0.61 in non-variceal versus 0.66, 0.66, and 0.59 in variceal UGIB. The AUC for predicting mortality and re-bleeding during admission were 0.66, 0.80, and 0.76 in non-variceal versus 0.63, 0.57, and 0.63 in variceal UGIB. AUC score was not statistically significant for predicting need for therapy and clinical outcome in variceal UGIB. The GBS ≤ 2 and FRS ≤ 1 identified low-risk non-variceal UGIB patients for death and re-bleeding during hospitalization. In contrast to non-variceal UGIB, the GBS, FRS, and PRS were not precise scores for assessing the need for therapy, mortality, and re-bleeding during admission in variceal UGIB. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@126.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology (China)

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  7. Pharmaco-induced vasospasm therapy for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Huei-Lung, E-mail: hlliang@vghks.gov.tw [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chia-Ling [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu [Department of Radiology, Yuan' s General Hospital, Kaohsiung. Taiwan (China); Lin, Yih-Huie; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Pan, Huay-Ben [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To report a novel technique and preliminary clinical outcomes in managing lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB). Materials and methods: Eighteen LGIB patients (11 men and 7 women, mean age: 66.2 years) were treated with artificially induced vasospasm therapy by semi-selective catheterization technique. Epinephrine bolus injection was used to initiate the vascular spasm, and followed by a small dose vasopressin infusion (3–5 units/h) for 3 h. The technical success, clinical success, recurrent bleeding and major complications of this study were evaluated and reported. Results: Sixteen bleeders were in the superior mesenteric artery and 2 in the inferior mesenteric artery. All patients achieved successful immediate hemostasis. Early recurrent bleeding (<30 days) was found in 4 patients with local and new-foci re-bleeding in 2 (11.1%) each. Repeated vasospasm therapy was given to 3 patients, with clinical success in 2. Technical success for the 21 bleeding episodes was 100%. Lesion-based and patient-based primary and overall clinical successes were achieved in 89.4% (17/19) and 77.7% (14/18), and 94.7% (18/19) and 88.8% (16/18), respectively. None of our patients had complications of bowel ischemia or other major procedure-related complications. The one year survival of our patients was 72.2 ± 10.6%. Conclusions: Pharmaco-induced vasospasm therapy seems to be a safe and effective method to treat LGIB from our small patient-cohort study. Further evaluation with large series study is warranted. Considering the advanced age and complex medical problems of these patients, this treatment may be considered as an alternative approach for interventional radiologists in management of LGIB.

  8. The role of computerized tomography in the evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding following negative or failed endoscopy: A review of current status

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains an important cause for emergency hospital admission with a significant related morbidity and mortality. Bleeding may relate to the upper or lower gastrointestinal tracts and clinical history and examination may guide investigations to the more likely source of bleeding. The now widespread availability of endoscopic equipment has made a huge impact on the rapid identification of the bleeding source. However, there remains a large group of patients with negativ...

  9. Successful Endoscopic Hemostasis Is a Protective Factor for Rebleeding and Mortality in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong Jae; Cha, Jae Myung; Park, Jae Hyun; Jeon, Jung Won; Shin, Hyun Phil; Joo, Kwang Ro; Lee, Joung Il

    2016-07-01

    Rebleeding and mortality rates remain high in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To identify clinical and endoscopic risk factors for rebleeding and mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This study was performed in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding who underwent upper endoscopic procedures between July 2006 and February 2013. Clinical and endoscopic characteristics were compared among patients with and without rebleeding and mortality. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for rebleeding and mortality. After excluding 64 patients, data for 689 patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding were analyzed. Peptic ulcer (62.6 %) was by far the most common source of bleeding. Endoscopic intervention was performed within 24 h in 99.0 % of patients, and successful endoscopic hemostasis was possible in 80.7 % of patients. The 30-day rebleeding rate was 13.1 % (n = 93). Unsuccessful endoscopic hemostasis was found to be the only independent risk factor for rebleeding (odds ratio 79.6; 95 % confidence interval 37.8-167.6; p = 0.000). The overall 30-day mortality rate was 3.2 % (n = 23). Unsuccessful endoscopic hemostasis (odds ratio 4.9; 95 % confidence interval 1.7-13.9; p = 0.003) was also associated with increased 30-day mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Successful endoscopic hemostasis is an independent protective factor for both rebleeding and mortality in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  10. [The usefulness of the Baylor score in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a hospital in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Paredes, Eduar Alban; Guzmán Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos López, Roxana Consuelo; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Corzo Maldonado, Manuel Alejandro; Huerta Mercado-Tenorio, Jorge; Surco Ochoa, Yolanda; Zegarra Chang, Arturo; Prochazka Zárate, Ricardo; Piscoya Rivera, Alejandro; Pinto Valdivia, José; De los Ríos Senmache, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of the Baylor score in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) due to peptic ulcer, in terms of mortality and recurrent bleeding at 30 days follow-up. This study has collected information prospectively into a registration form from medical histories. Patients included were those who came to the "Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia", Lima, Peru, in the period between June 2009 and May 2011, with UGB due to peptic ulcer demonstrated by endoscopy. The data was analyzed with the ROC curve (Receiver Operating Characteristic). We included 181 from 380 patients with UGB (47.63%), 74% were male, mean age 56 years old; 20 patients died during follow-up: 8 due to gastrointestinal bleeding and 12 from other causes, 10 patients had recurrence of bleeding during a 30 days follow-up. When performing the analysis of the ROC curve with the Baylor score and mortality, it was reported IC 95% value of 0.89 (0.83-0.95), with recurrence of bleeding an IC 95% value of 0.81 (0.68-0.93) and need for transfusion of over two globular packages an IC 95% value of 0.79 (0.70-0.86). Baylor score is a good predictor of mortality and recurrence of bleeding during the first 30 days after a first episode of an upper gastrointestinal bleeding and an acceptable predictor of the need to transfuse more than two globular packages during hospitalization.

  11. Emergency arterial embolization of upper gastrointestinal and jejunal tumors: An analysis of 12 patients with severe bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandrino, F; Tettoni, S M; Gallesio, I; Summa, M

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy of emergency percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization in patients with severe bleeding due to upper gastrointestinal or jejunal tumor. Twelve patients (7 men, 5 women; mean age, 74 years±14 (SD); range: 54-86 years) with severe bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract, with failed endoscopic treatment not eligible for emergency surgery were treated by emergency percutaneous transcatheter arterial embolization. The bleeding cause was gastric tumor in 7 patients, duodenal tumor in 4 patients and jejunal tumor in one patient. Procedure details and follow-up were reviewed. Twelve embolization procedures were performed using various embolic agents. Embolization was achieved and bleeding was stopped in all patients. Five patients underwent surgery within the 30 days following embolization. In the remaining 7 patients, no bleeding occurred at 1 month follow-up in 6 patients and bleeding recurred in one patient at 1 month. In this later patient, endoscopic treatment was successful. The results of our study suggest that transcatheter arterial embolization is safe and effective in patients with severe arterial bleeding due to upper gastrointestinal or jejunal tumor. In some patients, transcatheter arterial embolization can be used as a bridge to surgery. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictive factors of mortality within 30 days in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Min, Bo Ram; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2016-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common medical emergency that can be life threatening. This study evaluated predictive factors of 30-day mortality in patients with this condition. A prospective observational study was conducted at a single hospital between April 2010 and November 2012, and 336 patients with symptoms and signs of gastrointestinal bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Clinical characteristics and endoscopic findings were reviewed to identify potential factors associated with 30-day mortality. Overall, 184 patients were included in the study (men, 79.3%; mean age, 59.81 years), and 16 patients died within 30 days (8.7%). Multivariate analyses revealed that comorbidity of diabetes mellitus (DM) or metastatic malignancy, age ≥ 65 years, and hypotension (systolic pressure < 90 mmHg) during hospitalization were significant predictive factors of 30-day mortality. Comorbidity of DM or metastatic malignancy, age ≥ 65 years, and hemodynamic instability during hospitalization were predictors of 30-day mortality in patients with NVUGIB. These results will help guide the management of patients with this condition.

  13. Pharmacologic options in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: focus on the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyaw, Moe Htet; Chan, Francis Ka Leung

    2014-05-01

    Despite the major advances in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease, its complication in the elderly has increased. This is because of the increasing use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and the high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The presentation of peptic ulcers in the elderly patients can be subtle, and late presentation with upper gastrointestinal bleeding of peptic ulcers is not uncommon in the elderly population. The aim of this article is to review the current treatment options for upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and to discuss the place of drug therapy in both the acute and ongoing management of individual patients. Its focus will be on the benefits and risks of each option in the elderly. There is significant evidence to suggest that anti-secretory medications are useful in the treatment of peptic ulcers and associated complications in the elderly. Although a large number of studies have reported potential adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors, this evidence comes from retrospective observational studies, and such reports should be regarded with caution, and randomized controlled studies are required to confirm or refute these results. Nonetheless, it will be important to practice the appropriate use of acid suppression therapy, and identify which patients will gain maximum benefit from proton pump inhibitor therapy.

  14. Primary aortoesophageal fistula: a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Ineida Morais Gomes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially life-threateningemergency, especially in the elderly. This condition accounts for approximately1% of all emergency room admissions. Among the causes of such bleedingis aortoesophageal fistula, a dreaded but apparently rare condition, firstrecognized in 1818. The great majority of cases are of primary aortoesophagealfistula, caused by atheromatous aortic aneurysms or, less frequently, bypenetrating aortic ulcer. The clinical presentation of aortoesophageal fistulais typically characterized by the so-called Chiari’s triad, consisting of thoracicpain followed by herald bleeding, a variable, short symptom-free interval,and fatal exsanguinating hemorrhage. The prognosis is poor, the in-hospitalmortality rate being 60%. Conservative treatment does not prolong survival,and the in-hospital mortality rate is 40% for patients submitted to conventionalsurgical treatment. Here, we report the case of a 93-year-old woman whopresented to the emergency room with a history of hematemesis. The patientwas first submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, the findings of whichwere suggestive of aortoesophageal fistula. The diagnosis was confirmedby multidetector computed tomography of the chest. Surgery was indicated.However, on the way to the operating room, the patient presented with massivebleeding and went into cardiac arrest, which resulted in her death.

  15. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitors With Reduced Risk of Warfarin-Related Serious Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Wayne A; Chung, Cecilia P; Murray, Katherine T; Smalley, Walter E; Daugherty, James R; Dupont, William D; Stein, C Michael

    2016-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might reduce the risk of serious warfarin-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding, but the evidence of their efficacy for this indication is limited. A gastroprotective effect of PPIs would be particularly important for patients who take warfarin with antiplatelet drugs or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which further increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. This retrospective cohort study of patients beginning warfarin treatment in Tennessee Medicaid and the 5% National Medicare Sample identified 97,430 new episodes of warfarin treatment with 75,720 person-years of follow-up. The study end points were hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleeding potentially preventable by PPIs and for bleeding at other sites. Patients who took warfarin without PPI co-therapy had 119 hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 10,000 person-years of treatment. The risk decreased by 24% among patients who received PPI co-therapy (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63-0.91). There was no significant reduction in the risk of other gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.94-1.22) or non-gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.84-1.15) in this group. Among patients concurrently using antiplatelet drugs or NSAIDs, those without PPI co-therapy had 284 upper gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations per 10,000 person-years of warfarin treatment. The risk decreased by 45% (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.39-0.77) with PPI co-therapy. PPI co-therapy had no significant protective effect for warfarin patients not using antiplatelet drugs or NSAIDs (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.06). Findings were similar in both study populations. In an analysis of patients beginning warfarin treatment in Tennessee Medicaid and the 5% National Medicare Sample, PPI co-therapy was associated with reduced risk of warfarin-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding; the

  16. Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Gastric Amyloidosis in a Patient with Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

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    Mihajlo Gjeorgjievski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a common complication of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM, and multiple myeloma (MM. This proteinaceous material can be deposited intercellularly in any organ system, including the gastrointestinal (GI tract. In the GI tract, amyloidosis affects the duodenum most commonly, followed by the stomach and colorectum. Gastric amyloidosis causes symptoms of nausea, vomiting, early satiety, abdominal pain, and GI bleeding. A case of upper GI bleeding from gastric amyloidosis is presented in a patient with SMM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD revealed a gastric mass. Endoscopic biopsies revealed amyloid deposition in the lamina propria, consistent with gastric amyloidosis. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry performed on peptides extracted from Congo red-positive microdissected areas of paraffin-embedded stomach specimens revealed a peptide profile consistent with AL- (lambda- type amyloidosis. Based on this and multiple other case reports, we recommend that patients with GI bleeding and MGUS, SMM, or MM undergo EGD and pathologic examination of endoscopic biopsies of identified lesions using Congo red stains for amyloidosis for early diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Clinical outcome of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding after hours: the role of urgent endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Dong-Won; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Sang Hyub; Shin, Cheol Min; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical role of urgent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB) performed by experienced endoscopists after hours. A retrospective analysis was performed for consecutively collected data of patients with ANVUGIB between January 2009 and December 2010. A total of 158 patients visited the emergency unit for ANVUGIB after hours. Among them, 60 underwent urgent EGD (within 8 hours) and 98 underwent early EGD (8 to 24 hours) by experienced endoscopists. The frequencies of hemodynamic instability, fresh blood aspirate on the nasogastric tube, and high-risk endoscopic findings were significantly higher in the urgent EGD group. Primary hemostasis was achieved in all except two patients. There were nine cases of recurrent bleeding, and 30-day mortality occurred in three patients. There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, and 30-day mortality. In a multiple linear regression analysis, urgent EGD significantly reduced the hospital stay compared with early EGD. In patients with a high clinical Rockall score (more than 3), urgent EGD tended to decrease the hospital stay, although this was not statistically significant (7.7 days vs. 12.0 days, p > 0.05). Urgent EGD after hours by experienced endoscopists had an excellent endoscopic success rate. However, clinical outcomes were not significantly different between the urgent and early EGD groups.

  18. Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Duodenal Metastasis of Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H.F. Chan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute upper gastrointestinal (UGI bleeding is a common problem in our clinical practice and is often due to peptic ulcer diseases. Occasionally, malignancy may be implicated in these situations. Here we report a rare case of UGI bleeding secondary to metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder. A 62-year-old man with a history of stage IIIb TCC of the urinary bladder presented with hematemesis. Endoscopy showed a large tumor in the second stage of the duodenum that occupied 40% of the duodenal circumference, over 7 cm in length. Biopsies revealed a poorly differentiated malignant neoplasm consistent with metastasis from urothelial carcinoma that was identical to the previous surgical specimen of the urinary bladder. He was treated with supportive therapy and intravenous proton pump inhibitor and was discharged home 2 weeks later. Two weeks after discharge, the patient returned to the hospital with a painful swelling of the floor of his mouth. Biopsy again showed the same cancer type. He had unremitting bleeding from his mouth requiring multiple transfusions and a course of palliative radiation therapy. He progressively deteriorated in his cardiopulmonary and neurological functions and expired with cardiopulmonary arrest one month later.

  19. Predictors for identification of stigmata of recent hemorrhage on colonic diverticula in lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Ryota; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Aoki, Tomonori; Shimbo, Takuro; Tanaka, Shohei; Sekine, Katsunori; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Chizu; Yanase, Mikio; Akiyama, Junichi; Mizokami, Masashi; Uemura, Naomi

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors for the identification of stigmata of recent hemorrhage (SRH) on colonic diverticula. Several factors influence the identification of SRH in the diagnosis of colonic diverticular bleeding. A total of 396 patients hospitalized for lower gastrointestinal bleeding were analyzed. Comorbidities, medications, timing of colonoscopy [48 h], preparation, expert colonoscopist, use of a cap, use of a water-jet scope, total colonoscopy, and procedure time (over 60 min) were assessed. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Two hundred fifteen patients were diagnosed with colonic diverticular bleeding and 37 (17%) were identified with SRH. Urgent colonoscopy (OR, 8.4; 95% CI, 2.3-30; P48 hours groups (1.0%, P<0.01), showing a tendency to decrease with time (P<0.01 for trend). Factors of urgent colonoscopy, expert colonoscopist, use of a cap, and use of water-jet scope are useful for identifying SRH diverticula.

  20. In the workup of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleed, does 64-slice MDCT have a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose was to prospectively determine the sensitivity of 64-slice MDCT in detecting and diagnosing the cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleed (OGIB. Materials and Methods: Our study included 50 patients (male 30, female 20 in the age range of 3-82 years (average age: 58.52 years who were referred to our radiology department as part of their workup for clinically evident gastrointestinal (GI bleed or as part of workup for anemia (with and without positive fecal occult blood test. All patients underwent conventional upper endoscopy and colonoscopy before undergoing CT scan. Following a noncontrast scan, all patients underwent triple-phase contrast CT scan using a 64-slice CT scan system. The diagnostic performance of 64-slice MDCT was compared to the results of capsule endoscopy, 99m-technetium-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy (99mTc-RBC scintigraphy, digital subtraction angiography, and surgery whenever available. Results: CT scan showed positive findings in 32 of 50 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of MDCT for detection of bleed were 72.2%, 42.8%, 81.2%, and 44.4%, respectively. Capsule endoscopy was done in 15 patients and was positive in 10 patients; it had a sensitivity of 71.4%. Eleven patients had undergone 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy prior to CT scan, and the result was positive in seven patients (sensitivity 70%. Digital subtraction angiography was performed in only eight patients and among them all except one patient showed findings consistent with the lesions detected on MDCT. Conclusion: MDCT is a sensitive and noninvasive tool that allows rapid detection and localization of OGIB. It can be used as the first-line investigation in patients with negative endoscopy and colonoscopy studies. MDCT and capsule endoscopy have complementary roles in the evaluation of OGIB.

  1. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: incidence, etiology and outcomes in a population-based setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hreinsson, Jóhann P.; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos; Gudmundsson, Sveinn

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The authors aimed to investigate the incidence and outcomes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) and to examine the role of drugs potentially associated with AUGIB. Methods. The study was prospective, population-based and consisted of all patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE), during the year of 2010 at the National University Hospital of Iceland. Drug intake of NSAIDs, low-dose aspirin (LDA), warfarin, SSRIs and bisphosphonates prior to GIB was prospectively registered and also checked in a Pharmaceutical Database covering all prescriptions in Iceland. An age- and gender-matched control group consisted of patients who underwent UGE during the study period and were without GIB. Results. A total of 1731 patients underwent 2058 UGEs. Overall, 156 patients had AUGIB. The crude incidence for AUGIB was 87/100,000 inhabitants per year. The most common etiologies were duodenal (21%) and gastric ulcers (15%). Use of LDA (40% vs. 30%), NSAIDs (20% vs. 8%), warfarin (15% vs. 7%), combination of NSAIDs + LDA (8% vs. 1%) and SSRIs + LDA (8% vs. 3%) were significantly more common among bleeders than non-bleeders. Three patients (1.9%) had emergency surgery and two patients died of AUGIB. Independent predictors of clinically significant bleeding were gastric ulcer (OR 6.6, p = 0.012) and NSAIDs (OR 6.6, p = 0.004). Conclusions. LDA, NSAIDs and warfarin play an important role in AUGIB etiology and particularly combinations of drugs. Gastric ulcer and NSAIDs were independent predictors of severe bleeding. Mortality and the need for surgery during hospitalization was low in this population-based setting. PMID:23356751

  2. Red blood cell transfusion is associated with increased rebleeding in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restellini, S; Kherad, O; Jairath, V; Martel, M; Barkun, A N

    2013-02-01

    There exists considerable practice variation and little evidence to guide red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB). Studies in other critically ill cohorts suggest associations between transfusions and adverse patient outcomes. To characterise any possible clinically-relevant association between RBC transfusion following NVUGIB with rebleeding and mortality. Observational study utilising the Canadian Registry of patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Endoscopy (RUGBE). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine and quantify independent associations between RBC transfusion and clinical outcomes. Overall, 1677 patients were included (66.2 ± 16.8 years, 61.7% male, 2.5 ± 1.7 comorbid conditions, initial haemoglobin, 96.8 ± 27.2 g/L); 53.7% received RBC transfusions (2.9 ± 1.6 units of blood), 31.6% had haemodynamic instability, 5.1% fresh blood on rectal examination and 8.6% in the nasogastric tube aspirate. Endoscopic haemostasis was performed in 35.2%. Overall rebleeding (defined as continuous bleeding, rebleeding or surgery) and mortality rates were 17.9% and 5.4%, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, transfusion of RBC within 24 h of presentation was significantly and independently associated with an increased risk of rebleeding (OR: 1.0, 95% CI: 0.6-1.8), but not death (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 0.94-2.23). This study suggests an association between RBC transfusion following NVUGIB and subsequent rebleeding, after appropriate and extensive adjustment for confounding. Prospective randomised trial evidence is needed to identify the most efficacious and cost-effective transfusional strategies in these patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. A review of duodenal metastases from squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix presenting as an upper gastrointestinal bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthan, Rani; Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Diudea, Dana; Kanthan, Selliah

    2011-09-29

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to duodenal metastases is extremely uncommon. Extra-pelvic spread of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix to the small bowel is rare with only 6 reported cases in the English literature since 1981(PubMed, Medline).We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding two years after the diagnosis of SCC of the cervix. At esophagogastroduodenoscopy, there was a stricture in the second part of the duodenum which was biopsied for a suspected neoplastic lesion. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination showed a malignant lesion with characteristics identical to her original tumor in the cervix confirming the duodenal metastases.The clinical presentation of a 'malignant' upper-gastrointestinal bleed due to duodenal metastases from SCC of the cervix is unusual. Awareness of such infrequent patterns of metastases in cervical cancer confirmed by histopathological diagnosis is important for best practice therapeutic decisions in these patients.

  4. A review of duodenal metastases from squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix presenting as an upper gastrointestinal bleed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diudea Dana

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to duodenal metastases is extremely uncommon. Extra-pelvic spread of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the cervix to the small bowel is rare with only 6 reported cases in the English literature since 1981(PubMed, Medline. We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding two years after the diagnosis of SCC of the cervix. At esophagogastroduodenoscopy, there was a stricture in the second part of the duodenum which was biopsied for a suspected neoplastic lesion. Histologic and immunohistochemical examination showed a malignant lesion with characteristics identical to her original tumor in the cervix confirming the duodenal metastases. The clinical presentation of a 'malignant' upper-gastrointestinal bleed due to duodenal metastases from SCC of the cervix is unusual. Awareness of such infrequent patterns of metastases in cervical cancer confirmed by histopathological diagnosis is important for best practice therapeutic decisions in these patients.

  5. Early esophagogastroduodenoscopy is associated with better Outcomes in upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a nationwide study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sushil K.; Anugwom, Chimaobi; Campbell, James; Wadhwa, Vaibhav; Gupta, Nancy; Lopez, Rocio; Shergill, Sukhman; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims We analyzed NIS (National Inpatient Sample) database from 2007 – 2013 to determine if early esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (24 hours) for upper gastrointestinal bleeding improved the outcomes in terms of mortality, length of stay and costs. Patients and methods Patients were classified as having upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage by querying all diagnostic codes for the ICD-9-CM codes corresponding to upper gastrointestinal bleeding. For these patients, performance of EGD during admission was determined by querying all procedural codes for the ICD-9-CM codes corresponding to EGD; early EGD was defined as having EGD performed within 24 hours of admission and late EGD was defined as having EGD performed after 24 hours of admission. Results A total of 1,789,532 subjects with UGIH were identified. Subjects who had an early EGD were less likely to have hypovolemia, acute renal failure and acute respiratory failure. On multivariable analysis, we found that subjects without EGD were 3 times more likely to die during the admission than those with early EGD. In addition, those with late EGD had 50 % higher odds of dying than those with an early EGD. Also, after adjusting for all factors in the model, hospital stay was on average 3 and 3.7 days longer for subjects with no or late EGD, respectively, then for subjects with early EGD. Conclusion Early EGD (within 24 hours) is associated with lower in-hospital mortality, morbidity, shorter length of stay and lower total hospital costs. PMID:28512647

  6. A case of mediastinal fibrosis due to radiotherapy and 'downhill' esophageal varices: a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Bulent; Abut, Evren

    2015-04-01

    'Downhill' varices are located in the proximal part of the esophagus. Their etiology differs from the distal types, with most of them usually being related to superior vena cava obstruction. Although bleeding due to 'downhill' varices is very rare, it can be life-threatening. Here, we present a case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to mediastinal fibrosis associated with chest radiotherapy for seminoma metastasis sixteen years previously, which was successfully treated conservatively.

  7. Risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients referred to the Shohada Ashayer Khoramabad in 2011: Short Communication

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    Koorush Ghanadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency that often leads to hospitalization. In the present cross-sectional study conducted during 2011, all patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bIeeding living in Khorramabad city referring to the specialized Shohada Ashayer hospital, after being matched with a control group for age and sex, were assessed. Endoscopic findings, demographic data, and clinical characteristics were collected using a questionnaire. Out of 62 patients, 67.7% were males. Mean age of the patients was 54. 5±12.1 yrs. The most frequent gastrointestinal bleeding was found in 60-79 year olds (35.5%. The ratio of gastrointestinal bleeding in regular NSAID consumption was 3.8 (CI=1.3-4.8. Hematemesis (62.9% was the most common primary presentation. The most common prevalent underlying disease predisposing bleeding in these patients was cirrhosis (61.5% and the main causes of bleeding were digestive ulcers (42.7%.

  8. Pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding: Perspectives from the Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Claudio; Oliva, Salvatore; Martellossi, Stefano; Miele, Erasmo; Arrigo, Serena; Graziani, Maria Giovanna; Cardile, Sabrina; Gaiani, Federica; de’Angelis, Gian Luigi; Torroni, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    There are many causes of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in children, and this condition is not rare, having a reported incidence of 6.4%. Causes vary with age, but show considerable overlap; moreover, while many of the causes in the pediatric population are similar to those in adults, some lesions are unique to children. The diagnostic approach for pediatric GIB includes definition of the etiology, localization of the bleeding site and determination of the severity of bleeding; timely and accurate diagnosis is necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality. To assist medical care providers in the evaluation and management of children with GIB, the “Gastro-Ped Bleed Team” of the Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SIGENP) carried out a systematic search on MEDLINE via PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) to identify all articles published in English from January 1990 to 2016; the following key words were used to conduct the electronic search: “upper GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “lower GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “obscure GIB” and “pediatric” [all fields]; “GIB” and “endoscopy” [all fields]; “GIB” and “therapy” [all fields]. The identified publications included articles describing randomized controlled trials, reviews, case reports, cohort studies, case-control studies and observational studies. References from the pertinent articles were also reviewed. This paper expresses a position statement of SIGENP that can have an immediate impact on clinical practice and for which sufficient evidence is not available in literature. The experts participating in this effort were selected according to their expertise and professional qualifications. PMID:28293079

  9. Prediction of esophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage in patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockey, Don C; Elliott, Alan; Lyles, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), identifying those with esophageal variceal hemorrhage prior to endoscopy would be clinically useful. This retrospective study of a large cohort of patients with UGIB used logistic regression analyses to evaluate the platelet count, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to platelet ratio index (APRI), AST to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AAR) and Lok index (all non-invasive blood markers) as predictors of variceal bleeding in (1) all patients with UGIB and (2) patients with cirrhosis and UGIB. 2233 patients admitted for UGIB were identified; 1034 patients had cirrhosis (46%) and of these, 555 patients (54%) had acute UGIB due to esophageal varices. In all patients with UGIB, the platelet count (cut-off 122,000/mm(3)), APRI (cut-off 5.1), AAR (cut-off 2.8) and Lok index (cut-off 0.9) had area under the curve (AUC)s of 0.80 0.82, 0.64, and 0.80, respectively, for predicting the presence of varices prior to endoscopy. To predict varices as the culprit of bleeding, the platelet count (cut-off 69,000), APRI (cut-off 2.6), AAR (cut-off 2.5) and Lok Index (0.90) had AUCs of 0.76, 0.77, 0.57 and 0.73, respectively. Finally, in patients with cirrhosis and UGIB, logistic regression was unable to identify optimal cut-off values useful for predicting varices as the culprit bleeding lesion for any of the non-invasive markers studied. For all patients with UGIB, non-invasive markers appear to differentiate patients with varices from those without varices and to identify those with a variceal culprit lesion. However, these markers could not distinguish between a variceal culprit and other lesions in patients with cirrhosis. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  10. Pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding: Perspectives from the Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Claudio; Oliva, Salvatore; Martellossi, Stefano; Miele, Erasmo; Arrigo, Serena; Graziani, Maria Giovanna; Cardile, Sabrina; Gaiani, Federica; de'Angelis, Gian Luigi; Torroni, Filippo

    2017-02-28

    There are many causes of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in children, and this condition is not rare, having a reported incidence of 6.4%. Causes vary with age, but show considerable overlap; moreover, while many of the causes in the pediatric population are similar to those in adults, some lesions are unique to children. The diagnostic approach for pediatric GIB includes definition of the etiology, localization of the bleeding site and determination of the severity of bleeding; timely and accurate diagnosis is necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality. To assist medical care providers in the evaluation and management of children with GIB, the "Gastro-Ped Bleed Team" of the Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SIGENP) carried out a systematic search on MEDLINE via PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) to identify all articles published in English from January 1990 to 2016; the following key words were used to conduct the electronic search: "upper GIB" and "pediatric" [all fields]; "lower GIB" and "pediatric" [all fields]; "obscure GIB" and "pediatric" [all fields]; "GIB" and "endoscopy" [all fields]; "GIB" and "therapy" [all fields]. The identified publications included articles describing randomized controlled trials, reviews, case reports, cohort studies, case-control studies and observational studies. References from the pertinent articles were also reviewed. This paper expresses a position statement of SIGENP that can have an immediate impact on clinical practice and for which sufficient evidence is not available in literature. The experts participating in this effort were selected according to their expertise and professional qualifications.

  11. Surgical management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding:still a major challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czymek, Ralf; Großmann, Anja; Roblick, Uwe; Schmidt, Andreas; Fischer, Frank; Bruch, Hans-Peter; Hildebrand, Philipp

    2012-05-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) that cannot be managed with conservative interventional techniques is a life-threatening condition. This study assesses patient outcome and the role of different risk factors. We retrospectively analyzed data from 91 patients (58 men, 33 women) admitted between 2000 and 2009 and who underwent surgery for UGIB requiring transfusion. Mean patient age was 67.4 years. Overall mortality was 34.1%. Causes of bleeding were duodenal ulcer in 57 patients (62.6%) and gastric ulcer in 25 (27.5%). A median number of 21 blood units (range 6-120) were transfused. Surgical treatment consisted of non-resective surgery (52.7%), Billroth II (31.9%), Billroth I (4.4%) or gastric wedge resection (4.4%). The use of anticoagulants (p=0.040), a need for postoperative ventilation (p=0.007) and an intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay >7 days (p=0.004) were identified as significant risk factors for mortality. Transfusions of more than 10 units of blood (p=0.013), the need for further surgery (p=0.021), a prolonged ICU length of stay (p=0.000) and recurrent bleeding (p=0.029) we identified as significant risk factors for postoperative complications (such as pneumonia, sepsis, re-bleeding and anastomotic leakage). Over the past decade, mortality has not decreased in patients requiring surgery for acute UGIB despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances, explained by the fact that these cases represent a negative selection of patients after unsuccessful conservative treatment as well as by the rising age of the population and associated increases in comorbidity. Resective surgery, a need for postoperative ventilation and a prolonged ICU length of stay should be added to the list of significant risk factors for mortality.

  12. The role of rapid endoscopy for high-risk patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targownik, Laura E; Murthy, Sanjay; Keyvani, Leila; Leeson, Shauna

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Performance of endoscopy within 24 h is recommended for patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB). It is unknown whether performing endoscopy early within this 24 h window is beneficial for clinically high-risk patients. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed to identify patients presenting to two tertiary care centres with ANVUGIB and either systolic blood pressure lower than 100 mmHg or heart rate greater than 100 beats/min on presentation between 1999 and 2004. Patients receiving endoscopy within 6 h (rapid endoscopy [RE]) were compared with patients undergoing endoscopy between 6 h and 24 h (early endoscopy [EE]). The primary outcome measure was the development of any adverse bleeding outcome (rebleeding, surgery for control of bleeding, in-hospital mortality or readmission within 30 days for ANVUGIB). RESULTS: There were 169 patients who met the entry criteria (77 RE patients and 92 EE patients). There was no significant difference in the development of any adverse bleeding outcomes between RE and EE patients (25% RE versus 23% EE, difference between groups 2%, 95% CI −9% to 13%). Transfusion requirements and length of hospital stay also did not differ between the comparator groups. RE was not associated with fewer adverse outcomes, even after adjusting for confounders. CONCLUSION: For clinically high-risk ANVUGIB patients, performing endoscopy within 6 h of presentation is no more effective than performing endoscopy between 6 h and 24 h after presentation. The role of RE in high-risk ANVUGIB patients requires further delineation in a prospective fashion. PMID:17637943

  13. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior rectal artery with recurrent lower gastrointestinal and pelvic extraperitoneal bleeding: Importance of pretreatment recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Joon; Seo, Jung Wook; Kim, You Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior rectal artery is a rare cause of massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding. We reported a case of a 43-year-old male patient with pseudoaneurysm following a penetrating perineal wound. The patient had repeat massive lower gastrointestinal and pelvic extraperitoneal bleeding and was diagnosed as traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior rectal artery. To our knowledge, there are three case reports of traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior rectal artery treated by embolization. However, spontaneous regression occurred in the study subject after surgical hematoma removal, without any further pseudoaneurysm resection.

  14. Endoscopic resection of an ampullary carcinoid presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding: A case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nooman Gilani; Francisco C Ramirez

    2007-01-01

    Ampullary carcinoid is a rare tumor that can present with gastrointestinal bleeding, obstructive jaundice or pancreatitis. Some of these tumors are associated with Von Recklinghausen disease. The usual surgical options are a biliary-enteric anastomosis, Whipple procedure or rarely a local resection. The mean survival dges not appear to be much different after a pancreaticoduodenectomy versus local surgical excision.We report a very rare case of a non-metastatic ampullary carcinoid causing upper gastrointestinal bleeding, which was managed by endoscopic ampullectomy.

  15. Torrential upper gastrointestinal bleeding from ‘downhill’ oesophageal varices complicating long term central venous access for total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eu Jin; Stella, Damien L; Russell, David M

    2010-01-01

    Oesophageal varices usually develop in the setting of portal hypertension secondary to chronic liver disease. However, superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction can result in ‘downhill’ varices forming in the upper oesophagus. A case of torrential upper gastrointestinal bleeding from SVC obstruction due to chronic central venous access for home total parenteral nutrition is described. It is suggested that in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding in the setting of SVC obstruction, ‘downhill’ varices should be suspected. The current literature is discussed regarding management of such varices. It is recommended that endoscopic variceal surveillance be carried out in patients with known SVC obstruction. PMID:28839559

  16. Defining upper gastrointestinal bleeding from linked primary and secondary care data and the effect on occurrence and 28 day mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care records from the UK have frequently been used to identify episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in studies of drug toxicity because of their comprehensive population coverage and longitudinal recording of prescriptions and diagnoses. Recent linkage within England of primary and secondary care data has augmented this data but the timing and coding of concurrent events, and how the definition of events in linked data effects occurrence and 28 day mortality is not known. Methods We used the recently linked English Hospital Episodes Statistics and General Practice Research Database, 1997–2010, to define events by; a specific upper gastrointestinal bleed code in either dataset, a specific bleed code in both datasets, or a less specific but plausible code from the linked dataset. Results This approach resulted in 81% of secondary care defined bleeds having a corresponding plausible code within 2 months in primary care. However only 62% of primary care defined bleeds had a corresponding plausible HES admission within 2 months. The more restrictive and specific case definitions excluded severe events and almost halved the 28 day case fatality when compared to broader and more sensitive definitions. Conclusions Restrictive definitions of gastrointestinal bleeding in linked datasets fail to capture the full heterogeneity in coding possible following complex clinical events. Conversely too broad a definition in primary care introduces events not severe enough to warrant hospital admission. Ignoring these issues may unwittingly introduce selection bias into a study’s results. PMID:23148590

  17. Defining upper gastrointestinal bleeding from linked primary and secondary care data and the effect on occurrence and 28 day mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Colin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care records from the UK have frequently been used to identify episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in studies of drug toxicity because of their comprehensive population coverage and longitudinal recording of prescriptions and diagnoses. Recent linkage within England of primary and secondary care data has augmented this data but the timing and coding of concurrent events, and how the definition of events in linked data effects occurrence and 28 day mortality is not known. Methods We used the recently linked English Hospital Episodes Statistics and General Practice Research Database, 1997–2010, to define events by; a specific upper gastrointestinal bleed code in either dataset, a specific bleed code in both datasets, or a less specific but plausible code from the linked dataset. Results This approach resulted in 81% of secondary care defined bleeds having a corresponding plausible code within 2 months in primary care. However only 62% of primary care defined bleeds had a corresponding plausible HES admission within 2 months. The more restrictive and specific case definitions excluded severe events and almost halved the 28 day case fatality when compared to broader and more sensitive definitions. Conclusions Restrictive definitions of gastrointestinal bleeding in linked datasets fail to capture the full heterogeneity in coding possible following complex clinical events. Conversely too broad a definition in primary care introduces events not severe enough to warrant hospital admission. Ignoring these issues may unwittingly introduce selection bias into a study’s results.

  18. Bleeding after expandable nitinol stent placement in patients with esophageal and upper gastrointestinal obstruction: incidence, management, and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Jin; Song, Ho-Young; Nam, Deok Ho; Ko, Heung Kyu; Park, Jung-Hoon; Na, Han Kyu; Lee, Jong Jin; Kang, Min Kyoung

    2014-11-01

    Placement of self-expandable nitinol stents is useful for the treatment of esophageal and upper gastrointestinal (GI) obstruction. However, complications such as stent migration, tumor overgrowth, and bleeding occur. Although stent migration and tumor overgrowth are well documented in previous studies, the occurrence of bleeding has not been fully evaluated. To evaluate the incidence, management strategies, and predictors of bleeding after placement of self-expandable nitinol stents in patients with esophageal and upper GI obstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and results of computed tomography and endoscopy of 1485 consecutive patients with esophageal and upper GI obstructions who underwent fluoroscopically guided stent placement. Bleeding occurred in 25 of 1485 (1.7%) patients 0 to 348 days after stent placement. Early stent-related bleeding occurred in 10 patients (40%) and angiographic embolization was used for 5/10. Late bleeding occurred in 15 patients (60%) and endoscopic hemostasis was used for 7/15. Twenty-two of 25 (88%) patients with bleeding had received prior radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Bleeding is a rare complication after placement of expandable nitinol stents in patients with esophageal and upper GI obstruction, but patients with early bleeding may require embolization for control. Care must be exercised on placing stents in patients who have received prior radiotherapy or chemotherapy. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. A novel approach to assess the spontaneous gastrointestinal bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents using Apc(min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huijun; Shang, Jin; Keohane, CarolAnn; Wang, Min; Li, Qiu; Ni, Weihua; O'Neill, Kim; Chintala, Madhu

    2014-06-01

    Assessment of the bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents is usually performed in healthy animals with some form of vascular injury to peripheral organs to induce bleeding. However, bleeding observed in patients with currently marketed antithrombotic drugs is typically spontaneous in nature such as intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which happens most frequently on top of preexisting pathologies such as GI ulcerations and polyps. Apc(min/+) mice are reported to develop multiple adenomas through the entire intestinal tract and display progressive anaemia.In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Apc(min/+) mice as a model for assessing spontaneous GI bleeding with antithrombotic agents. Apc(min/+) mice exhibited progressive blood loss starting at the age of nine weeks. Despite the increase in bleeding, Apc(min/+) mice were in a hypercoagulable state and displayed an age-dependent increase in thrombin generation and circulating fibrinogen as well as a significant decrease in clotting times. We evaluated the effect of warfarin, dabigatran etexilate, apixaban and clopidogrel in this model by administering them in diet or in the drinking water to mice for 1-4 weeks. All of these marketed drugs significantly increased GI bleeding in Apc(min/+) mice, but not in wild-type mice. Although different exposure profiles of these antithrombotic agents make it challenging to compare the bleeding risk of compounds, our results indicate that the Apc(min/+) mouse may be a sensitive preclinical model for assessing the spontaneous GI bleeding risk of novel antithrombotic agents.

  20. Validation study in four health-care databases: upper gastrointestinal bleeding misclassification affects precision but not magnitude of drug-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkhoff, Vera E; Coloma, Preciosa M; Masclee, Gwen M C; Gini, Rosa; Innocenti, Francesco; Lapi, Francesco; Molokhia, Mariam; Mosseveld, Mees; Nielsson, Malene Schou; Schuemie, Martijn; Thiessard, Frantz; van der Lei, Johan; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Trifirò, Gianluca

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of disease codes and free text in identifying upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) from electronic health-care records (EHRs). We conducted a validation study in four European electronic health-care record (EHR) databases such as Integrated Primary Care Information (IPCI), Health Search/CSD Patient Database (HSD), ARS, and Aarhus, in which we identified UGIB cases using free text or disease codes: (1) International Classification of Disease (ICD)-9 (HSD, ARS); (2) ICD-10 (Aarhus); and (3) International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC) (IPCI). From each database, we randomly selected and manually reviewed 200 cases to calculate positive predictive values (PPVs). We employed different case definitions to assess the effect of outcome misclassification on estimation of risk of drug-related UGIB. PPV was 22% [95% confidence interval (CI): 16, 28] and 21% (95% CI: 16, 28) in IPCI for free text and ICPC codes, respectively. PPV was 91% (95% CI: 86, 95) for ICD-9 codes and 47% (95% CI: 35, 59) for free text in HSD. PPV for ICD-9 codes in ARS was 72% (95% CI: 65, 78) and 77% (95% CI: 69, 83) for ICD-10 codes (Aarhus). More specific definitions did not have significant impact on risk estimation of drug-related UGIB, except for wider CIs. ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 disease codes have good PPV in identifying UGIB from EHR; less granular terminology (ICPC) may require additional strategies. Use of more specific UGIB definitions affects precision, but not magnitude, of risk estimates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.