WorldWideScience

Sample records for active duty members

  1. Military Considerations in Transsexual Care of the Active Duty Member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folaron, Irene; Lovasz, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Retention standards and policies applied to active duty members in the U.S. military who identify as transgender have recently been in evolution. The Secretary of Defense recently released a new directive allowing transgender members to serve openly with the option to transition gender while in active duty, abrogating the old policy disqualifying transgender members from continued service. There is a reasonable expectation that some may pursue medical and surgical options toward gender transition. The clinical pathway for gender transition relies heavily on Mental Health and Endocrinology services. This article highlights the medical aspects of gender transition and how they can affect readiness and the delivery of military health care. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. 32 CFR 199.16 - Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty... (CHAMPUS) § 199.16 Supplemental Health Care Program for active duty members. (a) Purpose and applicability... the supplemental health care program for active duty members of the uniformed services, the provision...

  3. 2016 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    outstanding research that has had a clear impact on improving policy decisions practice or discourse, either in the public or private sectors .” 6. What...2017 2016 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members 433 | OPA Frequently Asked Questions 2016 Workplace and Gender Relations...OPA), has been conducting surveys of gender issues for the active duty military since 1988. RSSC uses scientific state of the art statistical

  4. An Analysis of Generational Differences Among Active Duty Members

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skibo, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    .... Clearly, these observed differences have implications for managers and leaders. Actions taken by leaders might be misunderstood by junior organizational members, leading to undesirable outcomes...

  5. 2006 Gender Relations of Active-Duty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    training, social retaliation within one’s work setting, and overprotection . Professional and social retaliation might also occur in combination...alone. Six percent indicated they experienced some form of overprotection , such as being smothered or treated like a child. Among men who...alone, professional and social retaliation, or overprotection were not reportable. Figure 32. Percent of Service Members Indicating Negative Responses

  6. Hypertension in a population of active duty service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoley, Brian A; Smith, Nicholas L; Runkle, Guy P

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension is a common condition, but little is known about its prevalence in the Armed Forces. Our purpose was to provide an estimate of the prevalence of hypertension in a large population of US service members. We reviewed the screening records for service members who completed health risk assessments at Fort Lewis in Tacoma, WA, in 2004. The prevalence of hypertension and prehypertension were estimated from single recorded blood pressure readings and subjects' reported use of blood pressure medications. Study subject characteristics associated with hypertension and prehypertension were examined by chi(2) tests and multivariate logistic regression. Thirteen percent of the 15,391 subjects met the study definition for hypertension; 62% met the study definition for prehypertension. Increasing age and body mass index, male sex, black race/ethnicity, and senior rank were associated with hypertension; only body mass index, male sex, and senior rank were associated with prehypertension. Hypertension and prehypertension are more prevalent in the US Armed Forces than has been previously reported, and prehypertension may be more common in the US Armed forces than in the general population. The high prevalence of prehypertension found in this young, fit population suggests a need to better define the risks and benefits associated with the diagnosis and treatment of prehypertension in low-risk populations.

  7. Active-duty military service members' visual representations of PTSD and TBI in masks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Melissa S; Kaimal, Girija; Gonzaga, Adele M L; Myers-Coffman, Katherine A; DeGraba, Thomas J

    2017-12-01

    Active-duty military service members have a significant risk of sustaining physical and psychological trauma resulting in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Within an interdisciplinary treatment approach at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, service members participated in mask making during art therapy sessions. This study presents an analysis of the mask-making experiences of service members (n = 370) with persistent symptoms from combat- and mission-related TBI, PTSD, and other concurrent mood issues. Data sources included mask images and therapist notes collected over a five-year period. The data were coded and analyzed using grounded theory methods. Findings indicated that mask making offered visual representations of the self related to individual personhood, relationships, community, and society. Imagery themes referenced the injury, relational supports/losses, identity transitions/questions, cultural metaphors, existential reflections, and conflicted sense of self. These visual insights provided an increased understanding of the experiences of service members, facilitating their recovery.

  8. Community Reintegration Problems Among Veterans and Active Duty Service Members With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarity, Suzanne; Barnett, Scott D; Lamberty, Greg; Kretzmer, Tracy; Powell-Cope, Gail; Patel, Nitin; Nakase-Richardson, Risa

    To examine community reintegration problems among Veterans and military service members with mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at 1 year postinjury and to identify unique predictors that may contribute to these difficulties. VA Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers. Participants were 154 inpatients enrolled in the VA TBI Model Systems Program with available injury severity data (mild = 28.6%; moderate/severe = 71.4%) and 1-year postinjury outcome data. Prospective, longitudinal cohort. Community reintegration outcomes included independent driving, employability, and general community participation. Additional measures assessed depression, posttraumatic stress, and cognitive and motor functioning. In the mild TBI (mTBI) group, posttraumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms were associated with lower levels of various community reintegration outcomes. In the moderate/severe TBI group, cognition and motor skills were significantly associated with lower levels of community participation, independent driving, and employability. Community reintegration is problematic for Veterans and active duty service members with a history of TBI. Unique comorbidities across injury severity groups inhibit full reintegration into the community. These findings highlight the ongoing rehabilitation needs of persons with TBI, specifically evidence-based mental healthcare, in comprehensive rehabilitation programs consistent with a chronic disease management model.

  9. A multidisciplinary TBI inpatient rehabilitation programme for active duty service members as part of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, S E; Spector, J; Warden, D L; Wilson, B C; Ellis, T E; Bamdad, M J; Salazar, A M

    1999-06-01

    To design and describe an effective rehabilitation programme for use in an ongoing trial on the efficacy of multidisciplinary brain injury rehabilitation for moderately head injury military service members. Treatment arm of a randomized control trial. US military tertiary care hospital inpatient rehabilitation programme. Sixty seven active duty military with moderate to severe TBI who were randomized to the treatment arm of the protocol. Eight week rehabilitation programme combining group and individual therapies with an inpatient milieu-oriented neuropsychological focus. Group therapies included fitness, planning and organization, cognitive skills, work skills, medication, and milieu groups, and community re-entry outings. Individual therapy included neuropsychology, work therapy, occupational therapy, and speech and language pathology. Successful return to work and return to duty. At 1 year follow-up, 64 patients returned to work (96%) and 66% (44/67) returned to duty. The described rehabilitation programme demonstrates one successful effort to rehabilitate active duty military service members with TBI who have the potential to return to duty.

  10. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members (Survey Note No. 2013-002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    Attention – four items regarding unwanted attempts to establish a sexual relationship – Sexual Coercion – four items regarding classic quid pro quo ...of Defense (DoD) continues to emphasize sexual assault and sexual harassment response and prevention in the military. This survey note discusses...assault and sexual harassment in the active duty force. This survey note and accompanying briefing (Appendix) provide information on the prevalence

  11. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Survey Note and Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    items regarding unwanted attempts to establish a sexual relationship – Sexual Coercion – four items regarding classic quid pro quo instances of special...continues to emphasize sexual assault and sexual harassment response and prevention in the military. This survey note discusses findings from the... harassment in the active duty force. This survey note and accompanying briefing (Appendix) provide information on the prevalence rates of sexual

  12. Outcomes from eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in active-duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLay, Robert N; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; Fesperman, Susan F; Delaney, Eileen M; Gerard, Steven K; Roesch, Scott C; Nebeker, Bonnie J; Pandzic, Ines; Vishnyak, Elizabeth A; Johnston, Scott L

    2016-11-01

    Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is one of the therapy interventions recommended by the Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guidelines. However, the literature concerning the effectiveness of this treatment modality in military service members is sparse. This study investigated the efficacy of EMDR in active-duty service members. We conducted an effectiveness study with a record review from active-duty military mental health clinics where clinical outcomes had been monitored over a 10-week period using self-report measures of posttraumatic stress and disability. Symptom scores were examined over time in 331 service members who met presumptive criteria for the disorder on the PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M), who were in psychotherapy, and who received (n = 46) or didn't receive (n = 285) EMDR. Results indicated that patients receiving EMDR had significantly fewer therapy sessions over 10 weeks but had significantly greater gains in their PCL-M scores than did individuals not receiving EMDR. Randomized, controlled trials are still needed, but these findings provide further support for the use of EMDR in service members with PTSD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Effectiveness and Patient Acceptability of Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB) for Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms Among Active Duty Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    you were manic-depressive or had bipolar disorder ?* ○ No ○ Yes 9. Have you received therapy for PTS/PTSD in the past month?* ○ No [Go to Question...Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms among Active Duty Military Members PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Bradford B. Walters, MD, PhD CONTRACTING...of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms among Active Duty Military Members 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  14. Total Artificial Heart Implantation as a Bridge to Heart Transplantation in an Active Duty Service Member With Amyloid Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Michael S; Wessman, Dylan E; McKee, James M; Francisco, Gregory M; Nayak, Keshav R; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac involvement by light-chain (AL) amyloid occurs in up to 50% of patients with primary AL amyloidosis. The prognosis of amyloid heart disease is poor with 1-year survival rates of 35 to 40%. Historically, heart transplantation was considered controversial for patients with AL amyloid cardiomyopathy (CM) given the systemic nature of the disease and poor survival. We present a case report of an active duty service member diagnosed with advanced cardiac amyloid who underwent total artificial heart transplant as a bridge to heart transplant and eventual autologous stem cell transplant. A 47-year-old active duty male initially evaluated for atypical chest pain was found to have severe concentric left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiogram but normal voltage on electrocardiogram. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, laboratory studies, and bone marrow biopsy established the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. At the time of diagnosis, the patient's prognosis was very poor with a median survival of 5 months on the basis of the Mayo Clinic revised prognostic staging system for amyloidosis. The patient developed rapidly progressive left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure leading to cardiac arrest. The patient received a total artificial heart as a bridge to orthotopic heart and kidney transplantation and eventual stem cell transplant. He continues to be in remission and has a fair functional capacity without restriction in activities of daily living or moderate exercise. Amyloid CM is a rare and devastating disease. The natural course of the disease has made heart transplant in these patients controversial. Modern advancements in chemotherapies and advanced heart failure treatments have improved outcomes for select patients with AL amyloid CM undergoing heart transplantation. There is ongoing research seeking improvement in treatment options and outcomes for patients with this deadly disease. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Evaluation of an integrated treatment for active duty service members with comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Kristen H; Glassman, Lisa H; Michael Hunt, W; Otis, Nicholas P; Thomsen, Cynthia J

    2018-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) commonly co-occurs with major depressive disorder (MDD) in both civilian and military/veteran populations. Existing, evidence-based PTSD treatments, such as cognitive processing therapy (CPT), often reduce symptoms of both PTSD and depression; however, findings related to the influence of comorbid MDD on PTSD treatment outcomes are mixed, and few studies use samples of individuals with both conditions. Behavioral activation (BA), an approach that relies on behavioral principles, is an effective treatment for depression. We have integrated BA into CPT (BA+CPT), a more cognitive approach, to address depressive symptoms among active duty service members with both PTSD and comorbid MDD. We describe an ongoing randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of our innovative, integrated BA+CPT intervention, compared with standard CPT, for active duty service members with PTSD and comorbid MDD. We detail the development of this integrated treatment, as well as the design and implementation of the randomized controlled trial, to evaluate its effect on symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Analysis of Alternatives for Reducing Outpatient Military Health Care Costs for Active Duty Members and their Families: Implementing a Recommended Savings Strategy Using Defense Acquisition Principles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaime, Richardo; Rupert, Joshua W

    2007-01-01

    .... In efforts to reduce or contain the costs of the military health care system, this project will propose two cost savings alternatives for providing outpatient care to active duty personnel and their dependents...

  17. The influence of the dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder on treatment efficacy in female veterans and active duty service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Erika J; Lunney, Carole A; Schnurr, Paula P

    2016-01-01

    A dissociative subtype of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was recently added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) and is thought to be associated with poor PTSD treatment response. We used latent growth curve modeling to examine data from a randomized controlled trial of prolonged exposure and present-centered therapy for PTSD in a sample of 284 female veterans and active duty service members with PTSD to test the association between the dissociative subtype and treatment response. Individuals with the dissociative subtype (defined using latent profile analysis) had a flatter slope (p = .008) compared with those with high PTSD symptoms and no dissociation, such that the former group showed, on average, a 9.75 (95% confidence interval [-16.94, -2.57]) lesser decrease in PTSD severity scores on the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (Blake et al., 1995) over the course of the trial. However, this effect was small in magnitude. Dissociative symptoms decreased markedly among those with the subtype, though neither treatment explicitly addressed such symptoms. There were no differences as a function of treatment type. Results raise doubt about the common clinical perception that exposure therapy is not effective or appropriate for individuals who have PTSD and dissociation, and provide empirical support for the use of exposure treatment for individuals with the dissociative subtype of PTSD. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE uniform health maintenance organization (HMO) benefit--Prime enrollment fee exemption for survivors of active duty deceased sponsors and medically retired uniformed services members and their dependents. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This final rule creates an exception to the usual rule that TRICARE Prime enrollment fees are uniform for all retirees and their dependents and responds to public comments received to the proposed rule published in the Federal Register on June 7, 2013. Survivors of Active Duty Deceased Sponsors and Medically Retired Uniformed Services Members and their Dependents are part of the retiree group under TRICARE rules. In acknowledgment and appreciation of the sacrifices of these two beneficiary categories, the Secretary of Defense has elected to exercise his authority under the United States Code to exempt Active Duty Deceased Sponsors and Medically Retired Uniformed Services Members and their Dependents enrolled in TRICARE Prime from paying future increases to the TRICARE Prime annual enrollment fees. The Prime beneficiaries in these categories have made significant sacrifices for our country and are entitled to special recognition and benefits for their sacrifices. Therefore, the beneficiaries in these two TRICARE beneficiary categories who enrolled in TRICARE Prime prior to 10/1/2013, and those since that date, will have their annual enrollment fee frozen at the appropriate fiscal year rate: FY2011 rate $230 per single or $460 per family, FY2012 rate $260 or $520, FY2013 rate $269.38 or $538.56, or the FY2014 rate $273.84 or $547.68. The future beneficiaries added to these categories will have their fee frozen at the rate in effect at the time they are classified in either category and enroll in TRICARE Prime or, if not enrolling, at the rate in effect at the time of enrollment. The fee remains frozen as long as at least one family member remains enrolled in TRICARE Prime and there is not a break in enrollment. The fee charged for the dependent(s) of a Medically Retired Uniformed Services Member would not change if the dependent(s) was later re-classified a Survivor.

  19. Increasing Marital Satisfaction as a Resilience Factor among Active Duty Members and Veterans of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Warren N.; Aguirre, Regina T. P.; Smith-Osborne, Alexa; Granvold, Donald K.

    2012-01-01

    Supportive relationships are protective against a number of prevalent health risks among military populations, including post-traumatic stress disorder. Increasing marital satisfaction and strengthening that relationship is an important avenue for maintaining health among returning service members and their families. The current study builds upon…

  20. The Zero Suicide Program (ZSP) as a Strategy for Reduction and Prevention of Suicides Among Active Duty United States Air Force Members: A Program and Evaluation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    58 D. Budget Proposal……………………………………………………………...59 E. USAF Suicide Data…………………………………………………………..62 F. ZSP Proposed Outline vs . AFSPP... unmarried members (excess relative risk of 18%). Discussion The goals of the AFSPP seems to have been accomplished with the results as outlined in this...95.4% had never experienced combat.16 Unlike their civilian counterparts being married does not appear to have a protective effect on suicidal rates

  1. 77 FR 28763 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ...;Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each #0;week. #0; #0; #0; #0;#0... duty with the intention of conducting a flight, a series of flights, or positioning or ferrying flights, and ends when the aircraft is parked after the last flight and there is no intention for further...

  2. Effectiveness and Patient Acceptability of Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB) for Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms among Active Duty Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    as well as active  engagement through social media channels. We also are exploring the placement of paid  advertisements  in local  newspapers , both...Page 1 of 2 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0015 TITLE: Effectiveness and Patient Acceptability of Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB) for Treatment of...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-2-0015 Effectiveness and Patient Acceptability of Stellate Ganglion Block (SGB) for Treatment of

  3. 7 CFR 3550.158 - Active military duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Active military duty. 3550.158 Section 3550.158... AGRICULTURE DIRECT SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Regular Servicing § 3550.158 Active military duty...-time active military duty after a loan is closed not exceed six percent. Active military duty does not...

  4. 2017 Military Services Gender Relations Focus Groups: Active Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-30

    Office of People Analytics Office of People Analytics (OPA) Defense Research, Surveys, and Statistics Center 4800 Mark Center Drive, Suite 06E22...Relations (2017 MSGR) Focus Groups among active duty members. This is the third6 administration of gender relations focus groups. This introductory ...Enlisted, Male “It is true statistically , a majority of sexual assaults there is alcohol or drugs. In the military, it’s into the alcohol more than

  5. 75 FR 55851 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... logical reasoning and decision-making, including a reduced ability to assess risk or appreciate consequences of actions, Reduced situational awareness, and Low motivation to perform optional activities. A... 55856

  6. 77 FR 329 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... and vigilance, Delayed reactions, Impaired logical reasoning and decision-making, including a reduced... contributed to the pilots' performance and decision- making ability. This conclusion was based on the less... motivation to perform optional activities. A variety of factors contribute to whether an individual...

  7. Return-to-Duty Rates Following Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Performed on Active Duty Military Patients in an Ambulatory Surgery Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Elder; Prada, Stefan; Bereczki, Zoltan; Weiss, Michael; Wade, Chip; Davis, Reginald

    2018-05-21

    Low back pain is a primary health care utilization driver in the US population. Health care evaluation visits for low back pain are as common as medical evaluation for the common cold. Low back pain is the most common reason for reductions in activities of daily living and work activity in the general population. Although these statistics are compelling, in the military population, there is arguably a significantly greater economic impact on the military population, as the cost to train, retain, and deploy a service member is a tremendous cost. The current study retrospectively examines surgical outcomes, return to duty, and patient-centric outcomes among 82 active duty or reserve military patients who underwent an outpatient minimally invasive spine surgery Laminotomy Foraminotomy Decompression for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in an ambulatory surgery center. Overall, our results indicate that within the 82 active duty military service members, 100% of the service members return to duty within 3 mo. Additionally, there was a significant reduction in self-reported pain and disability 12 mo postoperative, whereas the average length of surgery was 62 min with an average estimated blood loss of 30.64 mL. The current study indicates that minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in an ambulatory surgery center setting are an effective option for active duty servicemen to reduce return-to-duty rates and symptomatic back-related pain and disability.

  8. Symptom Reporting Patterns of US Military Service Members with a History of Concussion According to Duty Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lisa H; Cooper, Doug B; Reid, Matthew W; Khokhar, Bilal; Tsagaratos, Jennifer E; Kennedy, Jan E

    2018-03-28

    To compare symptom reporting patterns of service members with a history of concussion based on work status: full duty, limited duty, or in the Medical Evaluation Board (MEB)/disability process. Retrospective analysis of 181 service members with a history of concussion (MEB n = 56; limited duty n = 62; full duty n = 63). Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) Validity-10 cutoff (>22) and Mild Brain Injury Atypical Symptoms Scale (mBIAS) cutoffs (≥10 and ≥8) were used to evaluate potential over-reporting of symptoms. The MEB group displayed significantly higher NSI scores and significantly higher proportion scored above the mBIAS ≥10 cutoff (MEB = 15%; limited duty = 3%; full duty = 5%). Validity-10 cutoff did not distinguish between groups. MEB but not limited duty status was associated with increased risk of over-reporting symptoms in service members with a history of concussion. Results support the use of screening measures for over-reporting in the MEB/disability samples.

  9. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  10. Outcomes of Open Dorsal Wrist Ganglion Excision in Active-Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, George C; Donohue, Michael A; Drake, Matthew L; Ipsen, Derek; Nanos, George P; Tintle, Scott M

    2015-09-01

    To examine the most common presenting complaints of active-duty service members with isolated dorsal wrist ganglions and to determine the rate of return to unrestricted duty after open excision. Surgical records at 2 military facilities were screened to identify male and female active duty service members undergoing isolated open excision of dorsal wrist ganglions from January 1, 2006 to January 1, 2014. Electronic medical records and service disability databases were searched to identify the most common presenting symptoms and to determine whether patients returned to unrestricted active duty after surgery. Postoperative outcomes examined were pain persisting greater than 4 weeks after surgery, stiffness requiring formal occupational therapy treatment, surgical wound complications, and recurrence. A total of 125 active duty military personnel (Army, 54; Navy, 43; and Marine Corps, 28) met criteria for inclusion. Mean follow-up was 45 months. Fifteen percent (8 of 54) of the Army personnel were given permanent waivers from performing push-ups owing to persistent pain and stiffness. Pain persisting greater than 4 weeks after surgery was an independent predictor of eventual need for a permanent push-up waiver. The overall recurrence incidence was 9%. No demographic or perioperative factors were associated with recurrence. Patients whose occupation or activities require forceful wrist extension should be counseled on the considerable risk of residual pain and functional limitations that may occur after open dorsal wrist ganglion excision. Therapeutic IV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A Case of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome in a Healthy Active Duty Marine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Darshan; Portouw, Steven J; Bruner, David I

    2015-10-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome is an uncommon disorder that can lead to small bowel obstructions or perforations. Typical populations include young females with anorexia. However, there have been a few reports of healthy males with acute vomiting reported to have SMA syndrome. Our case report highlights an active duty Marine who developed SMA syndrome and the importance of recognizing this disease given the severity in delay of diagnosis in population of young healthy active duty members. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. SMART Optimization of a Parenting Program for Active Duty Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    child and caregiver outcomes over time, based on a sample of 200 military personnel and their co- parents who have recently or will soon separate from...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0407 TITLE: SMART Optimization of a Parenting Program for Active Duty Families PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Abigail...Optimization of a Parenting Program for Active Duty 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Families 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Abigail

  13. The Burden of Disability among Active Duty Air Force Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    interest to decision makers ( Lauder , Tamara, Baker, et al, 2000). Other items to consider regarding injury risk factors during military training and/or...the literature review reveal that a substantial amount of money is lost to injured men and women during Basic training. In 1995, there were 153,228...of Industrial Ergonomics, 34, 451–457. Lauder , T.D., Baker, S.P., et al (2000). Sports and Physical Training Injury Hospitalizations in the Army

  14. MORE Resiliency in the Rehabilitation of Active Duty Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    leverage the infrastructure of the Maximizing Outpatient Rehabilitation Effectiveness (MORE) study that is currently being conducted at Brooke Army Medical...Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified Unclassified 9 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code ) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8- TABLE OF CONTENTS... infrastructure of the Maximizing Outpatient Rehabilitation Effectiveness (MORE) study that is currently being funded by the Bridging Advanced Developments for

  15. Caring for Active Duty Military Personnel in the Civilian Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzkin, Howard; Noble, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Due to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the unmet medical and psychological needs of military personnel are creating major challenges. Increasingly, active duty military personnel are seeking physical and mental health services from civilian professionals. The Civilian Medical Resources Network attempts to address these unmet needs. Participants in the Network include primary care and mental health practitioners in all regions of the country. Network professionals provide independent assessments, clinical interventions in acute situations, and documentation that assists GIs in obtaining reassignment or discharge. Most clients who use Network services come from low-income backgrounds and manifest psychological rather than physical disorders. Qualitative themes in professional-client encounters have focused on ethical conflicts, the impact of violence without meaning (especially violence against civilians), and perceived problems in military health and mental health policies. Unmet needs of active duty military personnel deserve more concerted attention from medical professionals and policy makers. PMID:21339846

  16. Caring for Active Duty Military Personnel in the Civilian Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylou Noble

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the unmet medical and psychological needs of military personnel are creating major challenges. Increasingly, active duty military personnel are seeking physical and mental health services from civilian professionals. The Civilian Medical Resources Network attempts to address these unmet needs. Participants in the Network include primary care and mental health practitioners in all regions of the country. Network professionals provide independent assessments, clinical interventions in acute situations, and documentation that assists GIs in obtaining reassignment or discharge. Most clients who use Network services come from low-income backgrounds and manifest psychological rather than physical disorders. Qualitative themes in professional-client encounters have focused on ethical conflicts, the impact of violence without meaning (especially violence against civilians, and perceived problems in military health and mental health policies. Unmet needs of active duty military personnel deserve more concerted attention from medical professionals and policy makers.

  17. 77 FR 60133 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... Activities: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... collection requirement concerning Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale. This request for...: Title: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale. OMB Number: 1651-0080. Form Number: None...

  18. 77 FR 73671 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... Activities: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale. This is a proposed extension of an information collection... information collection: Title: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale. OMB Number: 1651-0080. Form...

  19. Perceived deprivation in active duty military nurse anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Julie A; Fallacaro, Michael D; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2009-02-01

    There is a shortage of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs). Relative deprivation is a perception of unfairness due to discrepancies between what one has and what one could or should have that is dependent on feelings (subjective data) and facts (objective data). Feelings of relative deprivation could contribute to the military CRNA shortage. The purposes of this study were to measure relative deprivation in active-duty military CRNAs and explore variables that correlate with relative deprivation. The descriptive, correlational study was conducted using a self-administered survey sent to 435 active-duty Army, Navy, and Air Force CRNAs. Surveys were distributed to subjects by mail and could be answered by mail or by secured website. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of the data revealed a calculated response rate of 57.7%. There was no significant correlation (P pay, promotion opportunity, or scope of practice/autonomy and relative deprivation. Correlations of the psychological factors "wanting" and "deserving" with relative deprivation were significant (P < .001). Further research is indicated to identify definitive factors that can be modified to improve feelings of deprivation as they relate to retention and recruitment of military CRNAs.

  20. Postpartum fatigue in the active-duty military woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychnovsky, Jacqueline D

    2007-01-01

    (a) To describe fatigue levels in military active-duty women, (b) to describe the relationship among selected predictor variables of fatigue, and (c) to examine the relationship between predictor variables, fatigue levels, and performance (as measured by functional status) after childbirth. Based on the Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms, a longitudinal, prospective design. A large military medical facility in the southwest United States. A convenience sample of 109 military active-duty women. Postpartum fatigue. Women were found to be moderately fatigued across time, with no change in fatigue levels from 2 to 6 weeks after delivery. All variables correlated with fatigue during hospitalization and at 2 weeks after delivery, and depression, anxiety, maternal sleep, and functional status correlated with fatigue at 6 weeks after delivery. Regression analyses indicated that maternal anxiety predicted fatigue at 6 weeks after delivery. Over half the women had not regained full functional status when they returned to work, and 40% still displayed symptoms of postpartum depression and anxiety. Military women continue to experiencing postpartum fatigue when they return to the workplace. Future research is needed to examine issues surrounding fatigue and its associated variables during the first year after delivery.

  1. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Barriers and Facilitators of Breasteeding for Primiparous Active Duty Military Mothers: A Qualitative Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bristow, Kristine

    1999-01-01

    .... This descriptive study describes the barriers and facilitators of breastfeeding for primiparous active duty military mothers, from their perspective, using a Husserlian phenomenological approach...

  3. Motivations for Weight Loss Among Active Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclin-Akinyemi, Courtney; Krukowski, Rebecca A; Kocak, Mehmet; Talcott, G Wayne; Beauvais, Alexis; Klesges, Robert C

    2017-09-01

    Rates of overweight and obesity among Active Duty Military Personnel remain high despite fitness test requirements, negative consequences of fitness test failure, and emphasis on weight and appearance standards. Specific motivating factors for weight loss influence weight loss program interest and often differ by gender, race, ethnicity, or age. This study investigates the weight loss motivations endorsed by a diverse population of Active Duty Military Personnel initiating a behavioral weight loss study, to inform the development of future recruitment efforts and program development. Active Duty Military Personnel (n = 248) completed a 16-item questionnaire of weight loss motivations before initiating a behavioral weight loss study. We evaluated endorsement patterns by demographic characteristics (body mass index [BMI], gender, race, ethnicity, age, and military rank). Data collection for this study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgical Center and acknowledged by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Results indicated that improved physical health, improved fitness, improved quality of life, and to live long were endorsed as "very important" motivations by at least three-fourths of the sample. "To pass the fitness test" was endorsed less frequently as a "very important" motivation, by 69% of the sample. A greater proportion of women as compared to men endorsed being very motivated by improving mood/well-being, quality of life, physical mobility, job performance, appearance, and sex life, as well as fitting into clothes. Participants categorized in the "Other" racial group and African Americans more frequently endorsed motivations to improve fitness and physical strength when compared to Caucasians. Moreover, participants in the "Other" race category were significantly more likely to rate their ability to physically defend themselves, improve physical mobility, and improve

  4. Genetics and Other Risk Factors for Past Concussions in Active-Duty Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretsch, Michael N; Silverberg, Noah; Gardner, Andrew J; Panenka, William J; Emmerich, Tanja; Crynen, Gogce; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Chaytow, Helena; Mathura, Venkat; Crawford, Fiona C; Iverson, Grant L

    2017-02-15

    Risk factors for concussion in active-duty military service members are poorly understood. The present study examined the association between self-reported concussion history and genetics (apolipoprotein E [APOE], brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], and D2 dopamine receptor genes [DRD2]), trait personality measures (impulsive-sensation seeking and trait aggression-hostility), and current alcohol use. The sample included 458 soldiers who were preparing to deploy for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom. For those with the BDNF Met/Met genotype, 57.9% (11/19) had a history of one or more prior concussions, compared with 35.6% (154/432) of those with other BDNF genotypes (p = 0.049, odds ratio [OR] = 2.48). APOE and DRD2 genotypes were not associated with risk for past concussions. Those with the BDNF Met/Met genotype also reported greater aggression and hostility personality characteristics. When combined in a predictive model, prior military deployments, being male, and having the BDNF Met/Met genotype were independently associated with increased lifetime history of concussions in active-duty soldiers. Replication in larger independent samples is necessary to have more confidence in both the positive and negative genetic associations reported in this study.

  5. Latent Presentation of Decompression Sickness After Altitude Chamber Training in an Active Duty Flier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, James; Rango, Juan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Biedermann, Shane

    2017-04-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a potential danger and risk for both divers and aircrew alike. DCS is also a potential side effect of altitude (hypobaric) chamber training as well and can present long after training occurs. Literature review shows that altitude chamber induced DCS has approximately a 0.25% incidence. A 32-yr-old, active duty military member developed symptoms of DCS 3 h after his hypobaric chamber training. Unfortunately, he did not seek treatment for DCS until 48 h after the exposure. His initial treatment included ground level oxygen therapy for 30 min at 12 L of oxygen per minute using a nonrebreathing mask. He achieved complete symptom resolution and was returned to duty. However, 12 d after his initial Flight Medicine evaluation, the patient returned complaining of a right temporal headache, multijoint pains, and fatigue. He was treated in the hyperbaric chamber and had complete resolution of symptoms. He was returned to flying status and 5 mo later denied any return of symptoms. Hypobaric chamber familiarity training is a requirement for all military aircrew personnel to allow them assess their ability to identify symptoms of hypoxia. This training method is not only costly to maintain, but it also places aircrew and chamber technicians at risk for potential long-term side effects from failed recompression treatment of DCS. We are presenting a case of recurrent DCS symptoms 12 d after initial ground level oxygen therapy.Gentry J, Rango J, Zhang J, Biedermann S. Latent presentation of decompression sickness after altitude chamber training in an active duty flier. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):427-430.

  6. 75 FR 78726 - Agency Information Collection Activities: North American Free Trade Agreement Duty Deferral

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Activities: North American Free Trade Agreement Duty Deferral AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP... collection requirement concerning the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Duty Deferral. This request...: 1651-0071. Abstract: The provisions of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) were adopted by the...

  7. National Survey of Veterans, Active Duty Service Members, Demobilized National Guard and Reserve Members, Family Members, and Surviving Spouses

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2010 National Survey of Veterans (NSV) is the sixth in a series of comprehensive nationwide surveys designed to help the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) plan...

  8. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Medical Encounters among Active Duty United States Military Personnel and Their Dependents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Rha

    Full Text Available Norovirus is a leading cause of gastroenteritis episodes and outbreaks in US military deployments, but estimates of endemic disease burden among military personnel in garrison are lacking.Diagnostic codes from gastroenteritis-associated medical encounters of active duty military personnel and their beneficiaries from July 1998-June 2011 were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. Using time-series regression models, cause-unspecified encounters were modeled as a function of encounters for specific enteropathogens. Model residuals (representing unexplained encounters were used to estimate norovirus-attributable medical encounters. Incidence rates were calculated using population data for both active duty and beneficiary populations.The estimated annual mean rate of norovirus-associated medically-attended visits among active duty personnel and their beneficiaries was 292 (95% CI: 258 to 326 and 93 (95% CI: 80 to 105 encounters per 10,000 persons, respectively. Rates were highest among beneficiaries <5 years of age with a median annual rate of 435 (range: 318 to 646 encounters per 10,000 children. Norovirus was estimated to cause 31% and 27% of all-cause gastroenteritis encounters in the active duty and beneficiary populations, respectively, with over 60% occurring between November and April. There was no evidence of any lag effect where norovirus disease occurred in one population before the other, or in one beneficiary age group before the others.Norovirus is a major cause of medically-attended gastroenteritis among non-deployed US military active duty members as well as in their beneficiaries.

  9. 38 CFR 17.31 - Duty periods defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Definitions and Active Duty § 17.31 Duty periods defined. Full-time duty as a member of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, Women's Reserve of the Navy and Marine Corps and Women's Reserve of the Coast Guard. [34 FR..., 1996, § 17.31(b)(5) was redesignated as § 17.31. Protection of Patient Rights ...

  10. Distress Levels among Parents of Active Duty Soldiers during Wartime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Bitton

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Military service is a highly stressful period both for the soldiers serving and for their parents. Surprisingly, parents’ experience has been mostly ignored in the research. This study’s goal is to shed light on the experience and distress levels of parents of active duty combat soldiers during Operation Protective Edge, a military operation carried out by the Israel Defense Forces during July and August of 2014.Methods: During the advanced stages of the operation, 69 parents of Israeli male combat soldiers (55 mothers and 14 fathers completed an online survey measuring symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD-Checklist-5 and distress (Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Participants were recruited using a convenience sample, by posting ads on the public Facebook pages of the researchers and of the groups dedicated to parents of Israeli soldiers.Results: Parents’ depression and anxiety symptom levels were higher than depression and anxiety symptom levels of the adult community norms in Israel. General distress rates of parents were similar to those presented by adults in southern Israel who were exposed for 7 years to the ongoing threat of daily rocket fire from Gaza, and higher than rates of a non-threatened Israeli population. Finally, 20.2% of the parents presented PTSD-like symptoms, a higher percentage than the probable PTSD diagnosis rates that were found in the general population in Israel during previous terror waves.Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidence of soldiers’ parents’ distress and indicates the need for a better understanding of the impact of military service on soldiers’ parents.

  11. Reactor physics activities in NEA member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This document is a compilation of National activity reports presented at the thirty-third Meeting of the NEA Committee on Reactor Physics, held at OECD Headquarters, Paris, from 15th - 19th October 1990

  12. Effects of combat deployment on risky and self-destructive behavior among active duty military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Cynthia J; Stander, Valerie A; McWhorter, Stephanie K; Rabenhorst, Mandy M; Milner, Joel S

    2011-10-01

    Although research has documented negative effects of combat deployment on mental health, few studies have examined whether deployment increases risky or self-destructive behavior. The present study addressed this issue. In addition, we examined whether deployment effects on risky behavior varied depending on history of pre-deployment risky behavior, and assessed whether psychiatric conditions mediated effects of deployment on risky behavior. In an anonymous survey, active duty members of the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy (N = 2116) described their deployment experiences and their participation in risky recreational activities, unprotected sex, illegal drug use, self-injurious behavior, and suicide attempts during three time frames (civilian, military pre-deployment, and military post-deployment). Respondents also reported whether they had problems with depression, anxiety, or PTSD during the same three time frames. Results revealed that risky behavior was much more common in civilian than in military life, with personnel who had not deployed, compared to those who had deployed, reporting more risky behavior and more psychiatric problems as civilians. For the current time period, in contrast, personnel who had deployed (versus never deployed) were significantly more likely to report both risky behavior and psychiatric problems. Importantly, deployment was associated with increases in risky behavior only for personnel with a pre-deployment history of engaging in risky behavior. Although psychiatric conditions were associated with higher levels of risky behavior, psychiatric problems did not mediate associations between deployment and risky behavior. Implications for understanding effects of combat deployment on active duty personnel and directions for future research are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effectiveness of a CD-ROM Nutrient Analysis Program on Self-Monitoring Behavior of Active Duty Military Personnel Receiving Nutrition Counseling for Weight Loss

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heetderks-Cox, Jane

    1999-01-01

    ..., restriction from duty-related travel, and even discharge from military service. Less than 3% of total Air Force active duty population are placed on the punitive Active Duty Mandatory Weight Management Program...

  14. Promoting and Supporting Breastfeeding Among Active Duty Women: An Education Module for Health Professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedline, Donna

    2004-01-01

    .... While it is well known that full-time employment decreases the incidence and duration of breastfeeding, active duty women may face additional obstacles such as potential deployment, body weight...

  15. The Active Duty Primigravada's Perception of Prenatal Care in the Military Health Care System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brady, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    .... In this study a qualitative descriptive design using the active duty primigravada as the population of interest was used to explore perceptions of and satisfaction with prenatal care in the military health care system...

  16. Lifetime and current sexual assault and harassment victimization rates of active-duty United States Air Force women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, Deborah J; Daley, James G

    2007-09-01

    From a stratified random sample, 2,018 active-duty United States Air Force women completed a telephone survey dealing with sexual assault and harassment. The lifetime prevalence of rape among Air Force women (28%) was more than twice as high as the prevalence in a national sample (13%). Nearly half of the military sample had been the victims of rape, molestation, or attempted sexual assault. The majority of both initial rapes (75%) and most recent rapes (56%) involved assault by civilians when the victims were civilians. Family members perpetrated 29% of initial rapes and 33% of most recent rapes. Regarding military status of the perpetrator, 14% of first-time victims were raped by a military member, 26% of multiple-time victims were raped by a military member, 31.8% of military women were sexually harassed by a military supervisor or boss, and 26.7% of military women were sexually harassed by a military coworker.

  17. Development of magnetostrictive active members for control of space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Avakian, Kevin M.; Fenn, Ralph C.; Gaffney, Monique S.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Boudreau, Donald J.

    1992-08-01

    The goal of this Phase 2 Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) project was to determine the technical feasibility of developing magnetostrictive active members for use as truss elements in space structures. Active members control elastic vibrations of truss-based space structures and integrate the functions of truss structure element, actively controlled actuator, and sensor. The active members must control structural motion to the sub-micron level and, for many proposed space applications, work at cryogenic temperatures. Under this program both room temperature and cryogenic temperature magnetostrictive active members were designed, fabricated, and tested. The results of these performance tests indicated that room temperature magnetostrictive actuators feature higher strain, stiffness, and force capability with lower amplifier requirements than similarly sized piezoelectric or electrostrictive active members, at the cost of higher mass. Two different cryogenic temperature magnetostrictive materials were tested at liquid nitrogen temperatures, both with larger strain capability than the room temperature magnetostrictive materials. The cryogenic active member development included the design and fabrication of a cryostat that allows operation of the cryogenic active member in a space structure testbed.

  18. Injuries from Participation in Sports, Exercise, and Recreational Activities Among Active Duty Service Members - Analysis of the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ankle brace. (Prepared by Knapik JJ, Spiess A, Darakjy S, Grier T, Manning F, Swedler D, Amoroso P, and Jones BH.) 29. USAPHC. 2011. USAPHC... Spiess A, Grier TL, Lester ME, Sharp MA, Tobler SK, Swedler DI, and Jones BH). 42. Bullock SH, Jones BH, Gilchrist J, and Marshall SW. 2010

  19. Overview of the 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helba, C

    2001-01-01

    ... by: Service, paygrade, gender, race/ethnicity, family type, and spouse employment status. Chapter, Satisfaction with Military Life, focuses on member satisfaction with military life in general and with various specific components of military life...

  20. The Impact of Having Children on Party Member Activism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina

    2014-01-01

    party member survey of 2012, analyses show: First, the cost of having children is more important when explaining more demanding activities than the less demanding activities, and, second, the impact of the cost of having children in the household is larger when including the intensity of participation...

  1. Alcohol Use Among Active Duty Women: Analysis AUDIT Scores From the 2011 Health-Related Behavior Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Diana D; Mattiko, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies document higher substance use among military men after deployment; similar studies focused on military women are limited. This study examines alcohol use of active duty women and deployment factors, social/environmental/attitudinal factors, and psychological/intrapersonal factors. Secondary data analysis of the 2011 Survey of Health-Related Behavior of active duty military personnel was conducted using bivariate statistics and multiple regression analyses with Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores as the dependent variable. Nearly 94% had low risk for alcohol use disorders. Length of combat experience and extent of combat exposure were unrelated to Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores; noncombat deployment was unrelated after controlling for marital status, age of first drink, pay grade, and branch of service. Significant motivators (p risk propensity, lifetime prevalence of suicidal ideation, and depressed mood were significant predictors in the regression model after controlling for covariates. Findings suggest that some active duty women use alcohol to cope with adverse emotional states, whereas others use alcohol consistent with propensity for high-risk behaviors. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Sunburn among active component service members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2002-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Sunburn is caused by acute overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation directly from the sun or from artificial UV sources. Service members are at risk of excessive exposure to sunlight due to the nature of their military duties, which often involve working and training outdoors, and deployment to environments where UV radiation is more intense. From January 2002 through December 2013, a total of 19,172 incident cases of clinically significant sunburn were diagnosed among active component service members. Most of the cases (80.2%) were first degree sunburn. The incidence rates of sunburn diagnoses were higher among females, white non-Hispanics, younger age groups, individuals in the Marine Corps or Army, and among enlisted service members. Additionally, the rate among recruits was more than 3.5 times the rate for non-recruits. Sixty-one percent of all diagnosed cases occurred from May through July. Sunburn cases occurred in all areas of the U.S., particularly near major recruit and combat training locations. Service members are strongly advised to practice sun safety as a part of heat illness prevention, including properly using broad-spectrum sunscreen, finding or constructing shade during work and rest, wearing protective clothing and military combat eye protection items, and avoiding tanning booths and sun lamps.

  3. Staff members' perceptions of an animal-assisted activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbo, Jessica

    2013-07-01

    To examine the perceptions of staff members toward the implementation of an animal-assisted activity (AAA) in an outpatient regional cancer center. Quasi-experimental, post-test design. An adult outpatient regional cancer center in northern California. 34 facility staff members. Self-report questionnaire following four weeks of AAA visitation. Visits took place three times a week for a total of 12 visits. Perceptions of the AAA. Previous perceptions toward AAA influenced the perceptions of the visitation's efficacy. Direct and indirect interaction with the visiting AAA teams was positively associated with perceptions of the AAA. A disagreement occurred that the AAA had caused extra stress or work for staff. Enjoyment of interacting with the dog handler was not significantly different from interacting with the dog; however, it was more positively correlated to acceptance of the AAA. The study provided evidence that the AAA was generally accepted by staff members. Individual staff members' perceptions of dogs and AAAs can influence their receptivity to AAA interventions. Interaction with AAA teams should be voluntary and available for patients and staff members. AAA may be introduced into facilities without creating the perception of extra stress or work for staff members. Providing staff the opportunity to interact with visiting AAA teams may be beneficial for the success of such programs. The human handler in AAA teams may play a vital role in the staff acceptance of such programs.

  4. Workplace victimization risk and protective factors for suicidal behavior among active duty military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Laurel L; Williams, Jason; Lattimore, Pamela K; Morgan, Jessica K; Hopkinson, Susan G; Jenkins, Linda; Cartwright, Joel

    2018-04-22

    Workplace victimization is a potential risk factor for suicidal behaviors (SB) among military personnel that has been largely overlooked. This paper examines both the impact of workplace victimization on reported SB and several potential protective factors associated with such suicidal behaviors in a large sample of active duty soldiers. A case-control study was conducted with 71 soldiers who reported SB in the past 12 months, each matched on sociodemographic characteristics to two others without reported suicidal behaviors. A multiple regression model was estimated to assess the effects of risk and protective factors while controlling for other variables. SB was associated with several aspects of victimization, mental health and substance abuse conditions, pain, impulsivity, stressors, negative life events, work-family conflict, active coping behaviors and positive military-related factors. Controlling for other variables, those with SB were more likely to have sought mental health or substance abuse services, to be depressed, anxious, impulsive, and less resilient than non-SB personnel. Study limitations included the use of retrospective self-report data, absence of some known SB predictors, and a population restricted to active duty Army personnel. SB among active duty personnel is associated with victimization since joining the military and is protected by resiliency. These findings suggest that in addition to the usual mental health factors, these additional predictors should be accounted for in SB intervention and prevention planning for active duty personnel. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Challenges of Measuring a Faculty Member Activity in Medical Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, A; Mojtahedzadeh, R; Emami Razavi, S H

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the features of Mission Based Management is measuring the activities of faculty members and departments and their contributions to the school's mission. As it is important to assess the school's readiness for such a system, in this study we assessed the view points of Tehran Medical School's department chairs about faculty members’ activities. Methods We used focus group technique to identify participants' view points. We divided 30 department chairs into homogenous groups o...

  6. Using a genetic test result in the care of family members: how does the duty of confidentiality apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michael; Lucassen, Anneke

    2018-04-27

    The use of genetic and genomic testing is becoming more widespread in healthcare and more inherited explanations for family history of diseases or conditions are being uncovered. Currently, relevant genetic information is not always used in the care of family members who might benefit from it, because of health professionals' fears of inappropriately breaching another family member's confidence. Such examples are likely to increase as testing possibilities expand. Here we present the case for use of familial information in the care and treatment of family members. We argue that whilst a clinical diagnosis in person A is confidential, the discovery of a familial factor that led to this diagnosis should be available for use in depersonalised form by health professionals to inform the testing and clinical care of other family members. The possibility of such use should be made clear in clinical practice at the time of initial testing, but should not require consent from the person in whom the familial factor was first identified. We call for further debate on these questions in the wake of high profile non-disclosure of genetic information cases, and forthcoming Data Protection legislation changes.

  7. Predictive Duty Cycle Control of Three-Phase Active-Front-End Rectifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhanfeng; Tian, Yanjun; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposed an on-line optimizing duty cycle control approach for three-phase active-front-end rectifiers, aiming to obtain the optimal control actions under different operating conditions. Similar to finite control set model predictive control strategy, a cost function previously...

  8. Predictors of suicidal ideation among active duty military personnel with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Carmen P; Zang, Yinyin; Zandberg, Laurie; Bryan, Craig J; Gay, Natalie; Yarvis, Jeffrey S; Foa, Edna B

    2017-01-15

    Given the alarming rate of military suicides, it is critical to identify the factors that increase risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among active duty military personnel. This study examined a predictive model of suicidal ideation among 366 treatment-seeking active duty military personnel with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following deployments to or near Iraq or Afghanistan. Structural equation modeling was employed to examine the relative contribution of combat exposure, social support, PTSD severity, depressive symptoms, guilt, and trauma-related cognitions on suicidal ideation. The final structural equation model had a highly satisfactory fit [χ 2 (2) =2.023, p=.364; RMSEA =.006; CFI =1; GFI =.998]. PTSD severity had an indirect effect on suicidal ideation via trauma-related cognitions. Depression had a direct positive effect on suicidal ideation; it also had an indirect effect via trauma-related cognitions and interpersonal support. Among participants who had made a previous suicide attempt, only depression symptom severity was significantly linked to suicidal ideation. Data are cross-sectional, precluding causal interpretations. Findings may only generalize to treatment seeking active duty military personnel with PTSD reporting no more than moderate suicidal ideation. These findings suggest that depression and trauma-related cognitions, particularly negative thoughts about the self, play an important role in suicidal ideation among active duty military personnel with PTSD. Negative cognitions about the self and interpersonal support may be important targets for intervention to decrease suicidal ideation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 8 CFR 329.5 - Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Natives of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. 329.5 Section 329.5 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... of the Philippines with active duty service during World War II. (a) A person desiring to naturalize...

  10. Standard of care of erectile dysfunction in U.S. Air Force aircrew and active duty not on flying status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, Justin B

    2014-11-01

    In 2011, over 3,000 active duty U.S. Air Force (USAF) members were prescribed a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI). PDEIs are first-line therapy for treating erectile dysfunction and can have significant side effects that could impact aircrew performance. In total, 200 eligible subject records were randomly sampled from the active duty USAF population of those males filling a prescription for a PDEI in June 2011; 100 of those records were from aviators. The electronic records were reviewed and scored to determine if USAF aeromedical standards for prescribing PDEIs were followed, with a minimum score of 0 for no standards met and a maximum of 3 for all standards met. The average score for both groups was 1, with no significant difference between the group scores. A proper aeromedical disposition was documented in 67% of the aviator records. Although there was no significant difference in standard of care for aviators and nonaviators, the overall documented standard of care was poor. Lack of documentation was the primary reason for the low scores and the low percentage of properly rendered aeromedical dispositions. Proper medical record documentation is important for evaluating quality of care and ensuring compliance with regulations in an Air Force aviator population. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Joseph J.; Trone, Daniel W.; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A.; Austin, Krista G.; Lieberman, Harris R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher. PMID:27735834

  12. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Knapik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women. The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users were coffee (65%, colas (54%, teas (40%, and energy drinks (28%. Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day was higher.

  13. Pathways of Risk and Resilience: Impact of a Family Resilience Program on Active-Duty Military Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, William R; Lester, Patricia; Milburn, Norweeta; Woodward, Kirsten; Stein, Judith

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, studies into the impact of wartime deployment and related adversities on service members and their families have offered empirical support for systemic models of family functioning and a more nuanced understanding of the mechanisms by which stress and trauma reverberate across family and partner relationships. They have also advanced our understanding of the ways in which families may contribute to the resilience of children and parents contending with the stressors of serial deployments and parental physical and psychological injuries. This study is the latest in a series designed to further clarify the systemic functioning of military families and to explicate the role of resilient family processes in reducing symptoms of distress and poor adaptation among family members. Drawing upon the implementation of the Families Overcoming Under Stress (FOCUS) Family Resilience Program at 14 active-duty military installations across the United States, structural equation modeling was conducted with data from 434 marine and navy active-duty families who participated in the FOCUS program. The goal was to better understand the ways in which parental distress reverberates across military family systems and, through longitudinal path analytic modeling, determine the pathways of program impact on parental distress. The findings indicated significant cross-influence of distress between the military and civilian parents within families, families with more distressed military parents were more likely to sustain participation in the program, and reductions in distress among both military and civilian parents were significantly mediated by improvements in resilient family processes. These results are consistent with family systemic and resilient models that support preventive interventions designed to enhance family resilient processes as an important part of comprehensive services for distressed military families. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  14. Rhabdomyolysis in a Sickle Cell Trait Positive Active Duty Male Soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Pulkit; Chavarria, Christopher; Thurlow, John

    2016-01-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis is a complication of sickle cell trait (SCT) likely first reported in the military population over 40 years ago. Although commonly a benign condition, numerous studies and case reports have identified SCT positive patients to be at increased risk for rhabdomyolysis, compartment syndrome and sudden cardiac death. We report a recent case of an SCT positive African American active duty male Soldier who suffered exertional rhabdomyolysis following an Army Physical Fitness Test. His course was complicated by acute renal failure requiring hemodialysis, and he eventually recovered renal function. The diagnosis was significantly delayed despite a typical clinical presentation and available SCT screening results. The case highlights the importance of the recognition of SCT as a risk factor for severe rhabdomyolysis, and suggests more must be done for an effective SCT screening program for the active duty military population.

  15. Structural control by the use of piezoelectric active members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanson, J. L.; Chen, J.-C.

    1987-01-01

    Large Space Structures (LSS) exhibit characteristics which make the LSS control problem different form other control problems. LSS will most likely exhibit low frequency, densely spaced and lightly damped modes. In theory, the number of these modes is infinite. Because these structures are flexible, Vibration Suppression (VS) is an important aspect of LSS operation. In terms of VS, the control actuators should be as low mass as possible, have infinite bandwidth, and be electrically powered. It is proposed that actuators be built into the structure as dual purpose structural elements. A piezoelectric active member is proposed for the control of LSS. Such a device would consist of a piezoelectric actuator and sensor for measuring strain, and screwjack actuator in series for use in quasi-static shape control. An experiment simulates an active member using piezoelectric ceramic thin sheet material on a thin, uniform cantilever beam. The feasibility of using the piezoelectric materials for VS on LSS was demonstrated. Positive positive feedback as a VS control strategy was implemented. Multi-mode VS was achieved with dramatic reduction in dynamic response.

  16. Intensive Cardiorespiratory Exercise (ICE) to Remediate Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Active Duty Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other...and Executive Function, Attention, and Visuospatial Processing abilities (secondary outcomes). AIM 2. Determine the effect of ICE on depressive...Coordination with IACH to hire personnel, identify space, purchase equipment, plan enrollment, and coordinate with IT. • Coordinate with Sites for

  17. April 2006 Status of Forces Survey of Active-Duty Members: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    be gathered on a particular question. For example, AD080SP is a flag variable indicating when respondents had another reason for a physical injury...94. [94---] Collge credits since enlistment 510 COLCREDF* Top coding flag for COLCRED 1028 COLCREDR Rec COLCRED-Lvl col cred since enlisting 256...homew 507 COMPEDSK [92SK-] Use home PC/onlin dstnce ed 508 COMPSPEDSK [93SK-] Sp Use home PC onlin dstnce 509 COLCRED 94. [94---] Collge credits

  18. August 2004 Status of Forces Survey of Active-Duty Members: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    exercising, and self-reported weight (i.e., underweight or overweight ). 11. Compensation—Present versus alternative retirement pay systems; present...South Africa) nmlkjWestern Hemisphere (e.g., Cuba, Honduras, Peru ) nmlkjOther or not sure BACKGROUND INFORMATION Please select from the list...South Africa) nmlkjWestern Hemisphere (e.g., Cuba, Honduras, Peru ) nmlkjOther or not sure TEMPO, READINESS, AND STRESS Please select from

  19. Intensive Cardiorespiratory Exercise (ICE) to Remediate Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Active Duty Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT AEx is a well-documented pathway to health and resilience, especially in ADSM. Regular... physical fitness testing. To monitor safety, AEx dynamics, and adherence throughout the intervention, ADSM will perform monthly a standard US Army...effect of ICE as an intervention. In this clinical trial, ADSM will be randomly assigned to either physical training enhanced with ICE (n=67) or usual

  20. Differences in TRICARE Knowledge from Department of Defense Active Duty Family Member Beneficiaries,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    becomes most important. Lamb (1994) coined the term "promotion mix" (p.494) as a combination of advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and...interests in the health status of their county residents (i.e., personal selling), patient attitudes quickly improved toward the CCMS. Sales promotion , the

  1. 2006 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    f. Get a requested transfer to a different assignment? nmlkj nmlkj nmlkj g. Feel you were overprotected (e.g., smothered or treated like a...child)? nmlkj nmlkj nmlkj ONE SITUATION OF UNWANTED SEXUAL CONTACT What behaviors made you feel overprotected ? ONE SITUATION OF...34 g. Feel you were overprotected (e.g., smothered or treated like a child)? nmlkj nmlkj nmlkj ONE SITUATION OF UNWANTED SEXUAL CONTACT

  2. 2016 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Statistical Methodology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    listed. Service, gender , and paygrade group boundaries were always preserved. OPA selected individuals with equal probability and without replacement...Variable Name Question Type Hostile Work Environment HWE Military Equal Opportunity Gender Discrimination SDISC Military Equal Opportunity Sexual quid...minority 3. CG * Non-minority 2. DoD * Minority 4. CG * Minority DoD x Gender x Pay (CDOD x GENDER x CPAYGRP5) DODGENPAY 1. DOD * Male * E1-E4 11

  3. The Association Between Mental Health and Cigarette Smoking in Active Duty Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    desensitizes these receptors, resulting in the user becoming dependent and eventually addicted to the nicotine (Ref 12). Studies have shown the average...cultural ties between tobacco usage and military service dating back to the early 20th century. Newspaper advertisements depicted and glamorized

  4. 2006 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Report on Scales and Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Originally a 15-item scale, the FS was adapted from an emotions scale by Folkman and Lazarus (1985) and measures the extent individuals assess sexually...152-175. Folkman , S., & Lazarus , R.S. (1985). If it changes it must be a process: Study of emotion and coping during three stages of a college...Questionnaire (SEQ-DoD). Military Psychology, 3, 243-264. Fitzgerald, L. F., Shullman, S., Bailey, N., Richards, M., Swecker, J., Gold, Y ., Ormerod

  5. 2005 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active-Duty Members: Report on Scales and Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    a 15-item scale, the FS was adapted from an emotions scale by Folkman and Lazarus (1985) and measures the extent to which individuals’ appraised...O’Donohue (Eds.), Sexual harassment: Theory, research, and treatment (pp. 5-28). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Folkman , S., & Lazarus , R. S. (1985...holder, The Gallup Organization, 901 F Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20004. 7 T ab le 1 . R el ia bi lit y E st im at es fo r S ca le s C on

  6. 2013 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active Duty Members: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    found. 28 29 References Bastian, L. D., Lancaster, A. R., & Reyst, H. (1996). 1995 Sexual Harassment Survey (Report No. 96-014). Arlington...discrimination? b. Sexual harassment /discrimination? c. Religious harassment /discrimination? d. Other harassment /discrimination...1 2 3 b. Sexual harassment /discrimination? c. Religious harassment /discrimination? d. Other harassment /discrimination

  7. 2015 Focus Groups on Sexual Assualt and Response Among Active Duty Members (2015 FGSAPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    options if you want to ostracize somebody. You can send them off to auxiliary security; people disappear into that and that’s a black hole that just eats ...Sexual harassment creates a climate in which sexual assault happens. E.g., [just because] they bought them dinner or drinks or whatever, [some may

  8. 2006 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Tabulations of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    382 35. Sexual Coercion incident rate: Constructed from Q35k-l and Q35o-p. Sexual Coercion can be defined as classic quid pro quo ...Coercion incident rate: Constructed from Q35k-l and Q35o-p. Sexual Coercion can be defined as classic quid pro quo , instances of special treatment...90 15. To what extent do/would you feel safe during deployments from being sexually harassed at the following times and

  9. 2010 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Overview Report on Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    quid pro quo harassment . Three component measures of sexual harassment are derived from Q30: crude/offensive behavior...in 2010 was lower than in 2006 and 1995 (5% vs. 7% and 8%, respectively). Sexual coercion is defined as classic quid pro quo instances of specific...Unwanted sexual attention includes unwanted attempts to establish a sexual relationship. Sexual coercion includes classic quid pro quo ,

  10. 2010 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. Tabulations of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Sexual Coercion can be defined as classic quid pro quo , instances of special treatment or favoritism conditional...defined as classic quid pro quo , instances of special treatment or favoritism conditional on sexual cooperation. Percentages Percent Responding...marked as happening to you, do you consider to have been sexual harassment ? ........................................... 342 31. Sexual Harassment

  11. Military Personnel: Preliminary Results of DOD's 1999 Survey of Active Duty Members

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ...; in contrast, only 20 percent of dissatisfied personnel indicated they are likely to stay. Pay and job enjoyment were cited as top reasons for both intending to stay and considering leaving the military...

  12. Preventing, Identifying, and Treating Prescription Drug Misuse Among Active-Duty Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Health Affairs, 1985 DoDI 1010.09 DoD Civilian Employee Drug- Free Workplace Program Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, 2012a...refill on the exact day they are due for renewal – showing irritability and visible signs of withdrawal – having slurred speech or mentioning that...OR malaysia  OR AB israel OR AB finland OR bangkock OR bangladesh OR taiwan  NOT rats OR mice OR mouse Sociological Abstracts Limits: 2000-; English

  13. Development of a Multilevel Prevention Program for Improved Relationship Functioning in Active Duty Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    8: 345-79. 7. Bandura A: Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social and Cognitive Theory . Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice Hall, 1986. 8...Some of you may have experienced the end of the romantic relationship you were in prior to your deployment). We’re interested in learning what have...practices and discipline (e.g., what is cor­ rect child behavior, how to respond to misbehavior) and the need to learn how to constructively

  14. 2016 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Overview Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    SARCs (64% for women and 43% for men), a chaplain (63% for women and 43% for men), and SVCs/ VLCs (62% for women 38% for men). Compared to women, men...than half of women indicated they were provided information on their right to consult a Special Victims’ Counsel (SVC)/Victims’ Legal Counsel ( VLC ...strategies to eliminate retaliatory behaviors such as ostracism, presents some challenges to the Department. For example, enacting prohibitions against

  15. Effects of thigh holster use on kinematics and kinetics of active duty police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Louise Bæk; Tranberg, Roy; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2016-08-01

    Body armour, duty belts and belt mounted holsters are standard equipment used by the Swedish police and have been shown to affect performance of police specific tasks, to decrease mobility and to potentially influence back pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects on gait kinematics and kinetics associated with use of an alternate load carriage system incorporating a thigh holster. Kinematic, kinetic and temporospatial data were collected using three dimensional gait analysis. Walking tests were conducted with nineteen active duty police officers under three different load carriage conditions: a) body armour and duty belt, b) load bearing vest, body armour and thigh holster and c) no equipment (control). No significant differences between testing conditions were found for temporospatial parameters. Range of trunk rotation was reduced for both load carriage conditions compared to the control condition (p<0.017). Range of hip rotation was more similar to the control condition when wearing thigh holster rather than the belt mounted hip holster (p<0.017). Moments and powers for both left and right ankles were significantly greater for both of the load carriage conditions compared to the control condition (p<0.017). This study confirms that occupational loads carried by police have a significant effect on gait kinematics and kinetics. Although small differences were observed between the two load carriage conditions investigated in this study, results do not overwhelmingly support selection of one design over the other. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Active Greens : An Analysis of the Determinants of Green Party Members' Activism in Environmental Movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botetzagias, Iosif; van Schuur, Wijbrandt

    This article investigates green party members' activism in the environmental movement and tests how a number of predictors, theoretically suggested in the past yet rarely empirically tested, can account for it. The authors' analysis is based on an extensive data set of members of 15 green parties in

  17. Military Personnel: Medical, Family Support, and Educational Services Are Available for Exceptional Family Members

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crosse, Marcia

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Defense's (DOD) Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) is a mandatory enrollment program for active duty servicemembers who have family members with special medical needs. The Ronald W...

  18. Prevalence of Pain Diagnoses and Burden of Pain Among Active Duty Soldiers, FY2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Sharon; Adams, Rachel Sayko; Ritter, Grant A; Williams, Thomas V; Larson, Mary Jo

    2018-03-14

    Soldiers are at risk for acute and chronic pain due to the mental and physical challenges of military duties and ongoing training for force readiness. With the burden of pain on any individual attributable across pain sources, a broad perspective that goes beyond prior characterizations of pain is important. We aim to further the understanding of pain's effects among non-deployed active duty soldiers and the Military Health System (MHS), by describing prevalence of 10 painful conditions, reported pain levels, duration of pain and impact of pain on military duty limitations. Data are from the MHS Data Repository including outpatient MHS direct care encounters, claims for outpatient purchased care from civilian providers, and vital records, for all soldiers continuously enrolled in TRICARE and not deployed in FY 2012. Ten pain-related diagnostic categories were conceptually derived for this analysis and identified using ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes. We report the FY 2012 prevalence at the soldier-level (N = 297,120) for each pain category as a primary diagnosis, as well as in any diagnostic position, and at the soldier-level for reported pain level, duration, and military duty limitations. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained prior to analyses. Overall, 63% of soldiers had at least one pain diagnosis and 59% had a primary pain diagnosis during FY 2012. Back and neck pain (22%), non-traumatic joint disorders (28%), and other musculoskeletal pain (30%) were the most frequent categories for primary diagnosis. Nearly two-thirds of soldiers had a primary pain diagnosis in more than one category, and 23% in four or more categories. Moderate or severe pain levels were reported at least once during the year by 55% of soldiers who had a primary pain diagnosis. In the subsample of soldiers with primary pain in the first quarter, duration and chronicity of pain diagnoses varied by pain category: the back and neck pain category was the most common for both persistent

  19. Measuring Symptoms of Moral Injury in Veterans and Active Duty Military with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Moral Injury Symptom Scale-Military Version (MISS-M is a 45-item measure of moral injury (MI symptoms designed to use in Veterans and Active Duty Military with PTSD. This paper reviews the psychometric properties of the MISS-M identified in a previous report, discusses the rationale for the development of the scale, and explores its possible clinical and research applications. The MISS-M consists of 10 theoretically grounded subscales that assess the psychological and spiritual/religious symptoms of MI: guilt, shame, betrayal, moral concerns, loss of meaning/purpose, difficulty forgiving, loss of trust, self-condemnation, spiritual/religious struggles, and loss of religious faith/hope. The scale has high internal reliability, high test-retest reliability, and a factor structure that can be replicated. The MISS-M correlates strongly with PTSD severity, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms, indicating convergent validity, and is relatively weakly correlated with social, spiritual, and physical health constructs, suggesting discriminant validity. The MISS-M is the first multidimensional scale that measures both the psychological and spiritual/religious symptoms of MI and is a reliable and valid measure for assessing symptom severity in clinical practice and in conducting research that examines the efficacy of treatments for MI in Veterans and Active Duty Military personnel.

  20. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  1. Rationale for Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy for Moral Injury in Active Duty Military and Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Harold G; Boucher, Nathan A; Oliver, Rev John P; Youssef, Nagy; Mooney, Scott R; Currier, Joseph M; Pearce, Michelle

    2017-02-01

    Wartime experiences have long been known to cause ethical conflict, guilt, self-condemnation, difficulty forgiving, loss of trust, lack of meaning and purpose, and spiritual struggles. "Moral injury" (MI) (also sometimes called "inner conflict") is the term used to capture this emotional, cognitive, and behavioral state. In this article, we provide rationale for developing and testing Spiritually Oriented Cognitive Processing Therapy, a version of standard cognitive processing therapy for the treatment of MI in active duty and veteran service members (SMs) with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms who are spiritual or religious (S/R). Many SMs have S/R beliefs that could increase vulnerability to MI. Because the injury is to deeply held moral standards and ethical values and often adversely affects spiritual beliefs and worldview, we believe that those who are S/R will respond more favorably to a therapy that directly targets this injury from a spiritually oriented perspective. An evidence-based treatment for MI in posttraumatic stress disorder that not only respects but also utilizes SMs' spiritual beliefs/behaviors may open the door to treatment for many S/R military personnel.

  2. Barriers and Facilitators of Mental Health Treatment-Seeking in U.S. Active Duty Soldiers With Sexual Assault Histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzow, Heidi M; Britt, Thomas W; Pury, Cynthia L S; Jennings, Kristen; Cheung, Janelle H; Raymond, Mary Anne

    2015-08-01

    Despite significant mental health needs among sexual assault (SA) victims in the military, little is known about treatment-seeking patterns or factors associated with service use. This study examined service use behavior, barriers, and facilitators of mental health treatment-seeking in an active duty sample of 927 U.S. Army soldiers with mental health problems. SA victims (n = 113) did not differ from non-victims on barriers or facilitators after adjusting for demographic and mental health variables, with stigma rated as the largest barrier. Most SA victims (87.6%) had sought informal support and 59.3% had sought formal treatment. One third of treatment-seekers had dropped out of treatment. Multivariate logistic regression analyses identified several correlates of treatment-seeking among SA victims: Black race (OR = 7.57), SA during the military (OR = 4.34), positive treatment beliefs (OR = 2.22), social support for treatment (OR = 2.14), self-reliance (OR = 0.47), and stigma towards treatment seekers (OR = 0.43). Mental health symptoms were not associated with treatment seeking. Findings suggested that treatment-facilitating interventions should focus on improving recognition of mental health symptoms, altering perceptions related to self-reliance, and reducing stigma. Interventions should also enlist support for treatment-seeking from unit members, leaders, and significant others. © 2015 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  3. 49 CFR 805.735-7 - Outside activities of Members and employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT § 805.735-7 Outside activities of Members and employees. (a) A Member or employee shall not engage in outside employment or other... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outside activities of Members and employees. 805...

  4. Tabulations of Responses from the 1999 Survey of Spouses of Active Duty Personnel. Volume 2. Programs and Services, Employment, Family, Economic Issues, and Background

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deak, Mary

    2001-01-01

    The 1999 Active Duty Surveys (ADS) gather information on current location, spouse's military assignment, military life, programs and services, spouse employment, family information, economic issues, and background...

  5. Stigma, barriers to care, and use of mental health services among active duty and National Guard soldiers after combat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul Y; Thomas, Jeffrey L; Wilk, Joshua E; Castro, Carl A; Hoge, Charles W

    2010-06-01

    This study examined rates of utilization of mental health care among active duty and National Guard soldiers with mental health problems three and 12 months after they returned from combat in Iraq. Stigma and barriers to care were also reported for each component (active duty and National Guard). Cross-sectional, anonymous surveys were administered to 10,386 soldiers across both time points and components. Mean scores from 11 items measuring stigma and barriers to care were computed. Service utilization was assessed by asking soldiers whether they had received services for a mental health problem from a mental health professional, a medical doctor, or the Department of Veterans Affairs in the past month. Risk of mental problems was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire, the PTSD Checklist, and items asking about aggressive behaviors and "stress, emotional, alcohol, or family" problems within the past month. A higher proportion of active duty soldiers than National Guard soldiers reported at least one type of mental health problem at both three months (45% versus 33%) and 12 months (44% versus 35%) postdeployment. Among soldiers with mental health problems, National Guard soldiers reported significantly higher rates of mental health care utilization 12 months after deployment, compared with active duty soldiers (27% versus 13%). Mean stigma scores were higher among active duty soldiers than among National Guard soldiers. Active duty soldiers with a mental health problem had significantly lower rates of service utilization than National Guard soldiers and significantly higher endorsements of stigma. Current and future efforts to improve care for veterans should work toward reducing the stigma of receiving mental health care.

  6. Paper 6: EUROCAT member registries: organization and activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenlees, Ruth; Neville, Amanda; Addor, Marie-Claude

    2011-01-01

    EUROCAT is a network of population-based congenital anomaly registries providing standardized epidemiologic information on congenital anomalies in Europe. There are three types of EUROCAT membership: full, associate, or affiliate. Full member registries send individual records of all congenital a...

  7. Paralysis as a Presenting Symptom of Hyperthyroidism in an Active Duty Soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennette, John; Tauferner, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is an endocrine disorder presenting with proximal motor weakness, typically greatest in the lower extremities, hypokalemia, and signs or laboratory findings consistent with hyperthyroidism. The incidence of TPP is highest in Asian males. This is a case report of a 30-year-old male active duty Soldier who presented to the emergency department complaining of several recent episodes of lower extremity paralysis. The patient underwent a workup which included serum and cerebrospinal fluid studies, and was found to be hypokalemic and hyperthyroid. Following consultation with neurology, the patient was admitted to the medicine service and treated for thyrotoxic periodic paralysis with potassium replacement and treatment of his hyperthyroidism. Since achieving a euthyroid state, he has had no recurrences of TPP. This disease should be considered in patients presenting with symmetric motor weakness and hypokalemia, whether or not symptoms of hyperthyroidism are elicited during the review of systems.

  8. Validity of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task (VRST) in active duty military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christina M; Reger, Greg M; Edwards, Joseph; Rizzo, Albert A; Courtney, Christopher G; Parsons, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    Virtual environments provide the ability to systematically deliver test stimuli in simulated contexts relevant to real world behavior. The current study evaluated the validity of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task (VRST), which presents test stimuli during a virtual reality military convoy with simulated combat threats. Active duty Army personnel (N = 49) took the VRST, a customized version of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM)-Fourth Edition TBI Battery (2007) that included the addition of the ANAM Stroop and Tower tests, and traditional neuropsychological measures, including the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System version of the Color-Word Interference Test. Preliminary convergent and discriminant validity was established, and performance on the VRST was significantly associated with computerized and traditional tests of attention and executive functioning. Valid virtual reality cognitive assessments open new lines of inquiry into the impact of environmental stimuli on performance and offer promise for the future of neuropsychological assessments used with military personnel.

  9. The impact of hearing impairment and noise-induced hearing injury on quality of life in the active-duty military population: challenges to the study of this issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Hasanat; Turner, Caryn A; Wong, Nicole J; Cooper, Sharon P; Betancourt, Jose A; Henry, James; Senchak, Andrew J; Hammill, Tanisha L; Packer, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to 1) summarize the available evidence on the impact of hearing loss on quality of life (QOL) among U.S. active-duty service members, 2) describe the QOL instruments that have been used to quantify the impact of hearing loss on quality of life, 3) examine national population-level secondary databases and report on their utility for studying the impact of hearing loss on QOL among active-duty service members, and 4) provide recommendations for future studies that seek to quantify the impact of hearing loss in this population. There is a lack of literature that addresses the intersection of hearing impairment, the military population, and quality of life measures. For audiological research, U.S. military personnel offer a unique research population, as they are exposed to noise levels and blast environments that are highly unusual in civilian work settings and can serve as a model population for studying the impact on QOL associated with these conditions. Our team recommends conducting a study on the active-duty service member population using a measurement instrument suitable for determining decreases in QOL specifically due to hearing loss.

  10. 29 CFR 2580.412-8 - The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The nature of the duties or activities to which the bonding requirement relates. 2580.412-8 Section 2580.412-8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES Scope and Form of the Bond § 2580.412-8 The nature of...

  11. Theoretical and practical implications on the subjects charged with duties of conducting special investigation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obadă Dumitru

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an endeavor to analyze Moldova’s legal framework aimed at regulating Special investigative activity (SIA in terms of subjects or, in other words, of procedural exponents, invested by a legislator with duties of carrying out SIM. It is also an attempt to reveal the normative inconsistencies specified in the regulatory content of the Criminal Procedural Law, including a verifiable analysis of the legal norms stipulated in the Code of Criminal Procedure, as well as other regulations related to this specific area of state activity specified in the related legislation. Moreover, the author sought to highlight the adverse legal effects that may be generated by the misinterpretation and misapplication of the legal norms related to SIA. While carrying out this study, we have taken into account the practice of law enforcement by state bodies in conducting criminal investigations, as well as the attempt to clarify and define the concept of “carrying out special investigative activity”. The research is also an attempt to clarify the competences of procedural subjects in charge of conducting SIA, as well as their functional interdependence in this activity. Furthermore, the study reasons upon some author’s assertions regarding the legal nature of SIM results from the perspective of the theory of evidence, particularly the admissibility of evidence obtained through SIM, the procedural stage at which the SIM can be performed, the impact of the current normative inadvertences regarding the possibility of taking evidence by means of SIM. The research has also been focused on identifying the prosecutor’s functional characteristics in conducting special investigative activity.

  12. Activity cycles in members of young loose stellar associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Lanza, A. F.; Messina, S.; Spada, F.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Magnetic cycles analogous to the solar cycle have been detected in tens of solar-like stars by analyzing long-term time series of different magnetic activity indexes. The relationship between the cycle properties and global stellar parameters is not fully understood yet. One reason for this is the lack of long-term time series for stars covering a wide range of stellar parameters. Aims: We searched for activity cycles in a sample of 90 young solar-like stars with ages between 4 and 95 Myr with the aim to investigate the properties of activity cycles in this age range. Methods: We measured the length Pcyc of a given cycle by analyzing the long-term time series of three different activity indexes: the period of rotational modulation, the amplitude of the rotational modulation and the median magnitude in the V band. For each star, we also computed the global magnetic activity index ⟨ IQR ⟩ that is proportional to the amplitude of the rotational modulation and can be regarded as a proxy of the mean level of the surface magnetic activity. Results: We detected activity cycles in 67 stars. Secondary cycles were also detected in 32 stars of the sample. The lack of correlation between Pcyc and Prot and the position of our targets in the Pcyc/Prot-Ro-1 diagram suggest that these stars belong to the so-called transitional branch and that the dynamo acting in these stars is different from the solar dynamo and from that acting in the older Mt. Wilson stars. This statement is also supported by the analysis of the butterfly diagrams whose patterns are very different from those seen in the solar case. We computed the Spearman correlation coefficient rS between Pcyc, ⟨ IQR ⟩ and various stellar parameters. We found that Pcyc in our sample is uncorrelated with all the investigated parameters. The ⟨ IQR ⟩ index is positively correlated with the convective turnover timescale, the magnetic diffusivity timescale τdiff, and the dynamo number DN, whereas it is anti

  13. Prevalence and correlates of needle-stick injuries among active duty police officers in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, María Luisa; Beletsky, Leo; Patiño, Efraín; Abramovitz, Daniela; Rocha, Teresita; Arredondo, Jaime; Bañuelos, Arnulfo; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2016-01-01

    Police officers are at an elevated risk for needle-stick injuries (NSI), which pose a serious and costly occupational health risk for HIV and viral hepatitis. However, research on NSIs among police officers is limited, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the legality of syringe possession in Mexico, half of people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana report extrajudicial syringe-related arrests and confiscation by police, which has been associated with needle-sharing and HIV infection. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of NSIs among Tijuana police officers to inform efforts to improve occupational safety and simultaneously reduce HIV risks among police and PWID. Tijuana's Department of Municipal Public Safety (SSPM) is among Mexico's largest. Our binational, multi-sectoral team analyzed de-identified data from SSPM's 2014 anonymous self-administered occupational health survey. The prevalence of NSI and syringe disposal practices was determined. Logistic regression with robust variance estimation via generalized estimating equations identified factors associated with ever having an occupational NSI. Approximately one-quarter of the Tijuana police force was given the occupational health survey (N=503). Respondents were predominantly male (86.5%) and ≤35 years old (42.6%). Nearly one in six officers reported ever having a NSI while working at SSPM (15.3%), of whom 14.3% reported a NSI within the past year. Most participants reported encountering needles/syringes while on duty (n=473, 94%); factors independently associated with elevated odds of NSIs included frequently finding syringes that contain drugs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.98; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.56-5.67) and breaking used needles (AOR: 2.25; 95% CI: 1.29-3.91), while protective factors included being willing to contact emergency services in case of NSIs (AOR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.22-0.69), and wearing needle-stick resistant gloves (AOR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.19-0.91). Tijuana

  14. Correlations of Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, Shift Duty, and Selected Eating Habits among Nurses in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajwal, Ali M

    2015-01-01

    Nurses are the largest group of direct health providers and can serve as role models for their patients. In this cross sectional study we assessed the relationship among physical activity and barriers, shift duty, elevated BMI, and selected eating habits among 362 non-Saudi female nurses in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results showed that 46.7% were either overweight or obese. Marital status, shift duty, education level, and BMI were significant predictors of physical activity. Weather was the most frequently reported barrier to physical activity (88.3%), followed by a lack of transportation (82.6%), and a lack of time (81.3%). Nurses who worked shift duty had significantly (p = 0.004) higher BMIs compared with day shift nurses. Nurses who rarely ate breakfast (p = 0.004) and meals (p = 0.001) and often eat fast food (p = 0.001) were more likely to be overweight or obese. Nurses should be encouraged for a better healthy lifestyles.

  15. A survey of joint activities and travel of household members in the Greater Copenhagen Metropolitan Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Mikkel; Vuk, Goran; Kaplan, Sigal

    2012-01-01

    and family quality time, within a daily schedule. The current study unveils the joint activity and travel patterns of household members in the Copenhagen area, as part of the ACTUM research project, funded by the Danish Strategic Research Council, for the development of a new generation of activity......The traditional approach for modeling transport-related choices in Denmark refers to individual decision makers. However, in daily activities and travel choices individuals function according to the commitments as family members, and thus their choices derive from the welfare needs of other family...... members. A family-based approach enables to capture intra-household interactions and the priorities of household members in scheduling their daily activities, thus adding to the realism and the predictive strength of transport models. Joint activities and travel occur in order to maximize efficiency...

  16. Risk factors for disability discharge in enlisted active duty Army soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Amanda L; Packnett, Elizabeth R; Cowan, David N; Boivin, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    The rate of permanent disability retirement in U.S. Army soldiers and the prevalence of combat-related disabilities have significantly increased over time. Prior research on risk factors associated with disability retirement included soldiers retired prior to conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. To identify risk factors for disability discharge among soldiers enlisted in the U.S. Army during military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. In this case-control study, cases included active duty soldiers evaluated for disability discharge. Controls, randomly selected from soldiers with no history of disability evaluation, were matched to cases based on enlistment year and sex. Conditional logistic regression models calculated odds of disability discharge. Attributable fractions estimated burden of disability for specific pre-existing condition categories. Poisson regression models compared risk of disability discharge related to common disability types by deployment and combat status. Characteristics at military enlistment with increased odds of disability discharge included a pre-existing condition, increased age or body mass index, white race, and being divorced. Musculoskeletal conditions and overweight contributed the largest proportion of disabilities. Deployment was protective against disability discharge or receiving a musculoskeletal-related disability, but significantly increased the risk of disability related to a psychiatric or neurological condition. Soldiers with a pre-existing condition at enlistment, particularly a musculoskeletal condition, had increased odds of disability discharge. Risk of disability was dependent on condition category when stratified by deployment and combat status. Additional research examining conditions during pre-disability hospitalizations could provide insight on specific conditions that commonly lead to disability discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Which Members of the Microbial Communities Are Active? Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brandon E. L.

    only at the early stages of understanding the microbial processes that occur in petroliferous formations and the surrounding subterranean environment. Important first steps in characterising the microbiology of oilfield systems involve identifying the microbial community structure and determining how population diversity changes are affected by the overall geochemical and biological parameters of the system. This is relatively easy to do today by using general 16S rRNA primers for PCR and building clone libraries. For example, previous studies using molecular methods characterised many dominant prokaryotes in petroleum reservoirs (Orphan et al., 2000) and in two Alaskan North Slope oil facilities (Duncan et al., 2009; Pham et al., 2009). However, the problem is that more traditional molecular biology approaches, such as 16S clone libraries, fail to detect large portions of the community perhaps missing up to half of the biodiversity (see Hong et al., 2009) and require significant laboratory time to construct large libraries necessary to increase the probability of detecting the majority of even bacterial biodiversity. In the energy sector, the overarching desire would be to quickly assess the extent of in situ hydrocarbon biodegradation or to disrupt detrimental processes such as biofouling, and in these cases it may not be necessary to identify specific microbial species. Rather, it would be more critical to evaluate metabolic processes or monitor gene products that are implicated in the specific activity of interest. Research goals such as these are well suited for a tailored application of microarray technology.

  18. United States Air Force Analysis Extract. AFSC 4M0X1 Aerospace Physiology (Active Duty)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Perform NCOIC duties during hyperbaric chamber dives 12.50 1.46 .18 76.76 A0004 Maintain hypobaric chamber...during hyperbaric 58.33 1.04 .61 35.39 chamber dives A0003 Maintain hypobaric chamber...8 % 2 % Hyperbaric Chamber Technician 9 % 3 % 6 % 13 % 8 % Hypobaric Chamber Technician

  19. Tabulations of Responses from the 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel: Volume 2 Programs, Services, Family and Individual Information, and Economic Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deak, Mary

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 Active Duty Surveys (ADS) gather information on military assignments, retention issues, personal and military background, preparedness, mobilizations and deployments, family composition, use of military programs and services...

  20. The European Gaucher Alliance: a survey of member patient organisations' activities, healthcare environments and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žnidar, Irena; Collin-Histed, Tanya; Niemeyer, Pascal; Parkkinen, Johanna; Lauridsen, Anne-Grethe; Zariņa, Sandra; Cohen, Yossi; Manuel, Jeremy

    2014-09-02

    The European Gaucher Alliance (EGA) was established in 1994 and constituted in 2008 as an umbrella group supporting patient organisations for Gaucher disease. Every two years, the EGA conducts a questionnaire survey of member associations to help develop its priorities and annual work programme. Results of the latest survey are presented. Between June 2012 and April 2013, the 36 members and associate members of the EGA were asked to complete a questionnaire detailing membership numbers, disease specific treatments used by patients, means of access to treatment, availability of treatment centres and home infusions, sources of support for patients with Gaucher disease, patient organisations' activities, collaborations, funding sources and any issues of concern. Questionnaires completed in 2012 were revised in January 2013 and responses analysed between July and September 2013. Thirty three members returned data on one or more questions. Findings identified inequalities in access to treatment both within and between members' countries. Three of 27 countries, for which data were available, relied totally on humanitarian aid for treatment and 6% of untreated patients in 20 countries were untreated because of funding issues, a situation many feared would worsen with deteriorating economic climates. Access to treatment and reimbursement represented 45% of members' concerns, while 35% related to access to specialist treatment centres, home infusions and doctors with expertise in Gaucher disease. Member associations' main activities centred on patient support (59% of responses) and raising awareness of Gaucher disease and patients' needs amongst the medical community, government and healthcare decision makers and the general public (34% of responses). Twenty one (78% of respondents) indicated they were the only source of help for Gaucher disease patients in their country. For many, activities were constrained by funds; two members had no external funding source. Activities

  1. Effects of thigh holster use on kinematics and kinetics of active duty police officers

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Louise B.; Tranberg, Roy; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Body armour, duty belts and belt mounted holsters are standard equipment used by the Swedish police and have been shown to affect performance of police specific tasks, to decrease mobility and to potentially influence back pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects on gait kinematics and kinetics associated with use of an alternate load carriage system incorporating a thigh holster. Methods: Kinematic, kinetic and temporospatial data were collected using three dimensional g...

  2. Multiple Past Concussions Are Associated with Ongoing Post-Concussive Symptoms but Not Cognitive Impairment in Active-Duty Army Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dretsch, Michael N; Silverberg, Noah D; Iverson, Grant L

    2015-09-01

    The extent to which multiple past concussions are associated with lingering symptoms or mental health problems in military service members is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between lifetime concussion history, cognitive functioning, general health, and psychological health in a large sample of fit-for-duty U.S. Army soldiers preparing for deployment. Data on 458 active-duty soldiers were collected and analyzed. A computerized cognitive screening battery (CNS-Vital Signs(®)) was used to assess complex attention (CA), reaction time (RT), processing speed (PS), cognitive flexibility (CF), and memory. Health questionnaires included the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI), PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M), Zung Depression and Anxiety Scales (ZDS; ZAS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and the Alcohol Use and Dependency Identification Test (AUDIT). Soldiers with a history of multiple concussions (i.e., three or more concussions) had significantly greater post-concussive symptom scores compared with those with zero (d=1.83, large effect), one (d=0.64, medium effect), and two (d=0.64, medium effect) prior concussions. Although the group with three or more concussions also reported more traumatic stress symptoms, the results revealed that traumatic stress was a mediator between concussions and post-concussive symptom severity. There were no significant differences on neurocognitive testing between the number of concussions. These results add to the accumulating evidence suggesting that most individuals recover from one or two prior concussions, but there is a greater risk for ongoing symptoms if one exceeds this number of injuries.

  3. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Duty health physicist program at Byron Nuclear Power Station - a cost-effective way to manage routine plant health physics activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, D.G.; Carey, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Duty Health Physicist Program at Byron Station was established to deal with routine health physics tasks and provide an interface between frontline and upper radiation-chemistry management. The program consists of a weekly rotation of selected members of the health physics staff into the duty health physicist position to handle the assigned duty tasks. The tasks include, but are not limited to, daily isotopic and air sample review, effluent release package review, maximum permissible concentration calculations, dose approvals, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable action review of pending jobs, and general availability to answer questions and address problems in health-physics-related areas of plant operation. The daily attendance of the duty health physicist at the radiation-chemistry and station plan-of-the-day meetings has increased the overall presence and visibility of the health physics program to upper station management and other station departments. Since its inception in July of 1985, the Duty Health Physics Program has been a major contributor to the observed 50% reduction in reportable personnel errors in the radiation-chemistry department

  5. An Uncharacterized Member of the Ribokinase Family in Thermococcus kodakarensis Exhibits myo-Inositol Kinase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaaki; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Yukika; Kuwata, Keiko; Kusaka, Eriko; Fujita, Haruo; Miki, Kunio; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2013-01-01

    Here we performed structural and biochemical analyses on the TK2285 gene product, an uncharacterized protein annotated as a member of the ribokinase family, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. The three-dimensional structure of the TK2285 protein resembled those of previously characterized members of the ribokinase family including ribokinase, adenosine kinase, and phosphofructokinase. Conserved residues characteristic of this protein family were located in a cleft of the TK2285 protein as in other members whose structures have been determined. We thus examined the kinase activity of the TK2285 protein toward various sugars recognized by well characterized ribokinase family members. Although activity with sugar phosphates and nucleosides was not detected, kinase activity was observed toward d-allose, d-lyxose, d-tagatose, d-talose, d-xylose, and d-xylulose. Kinetic analyses with the six sugar substrates revealed high Km values, suggesting that they were not the true physiological substrates. By examining activity toward amino sugars, sugar alcohols, and disaccharides, we found that the TK2285 protein exhibited prominent kinase activity toward myo-inositol. Kinetic analyses with myo-inositol revealed a greater kcat and much lower Km value than those obtained with the monosaccharides, resulting in over a 2,000-fold increase in kcat/Km values. TK2285 homologs are distributed among members of Thermococcales, and in most species, the gene is positioned close to a myo-inositol monophosphate synthase gene. Our results suggest the presence of a novel subfamily of the ribokinase family whose members are present in Archaea and recognize myo-inositol as a substrate. PMID:23737529

  6. Economic Analysis of a Basic Allowance for Health Care for Active Duty and Retired Members of the Armed Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    et al.’s findings indicate that HDHPs may not be as adept at curbing unhealthy lifestyle choices as previously argued by Herzlinger (2004) and...price” for care  The incentive structure might encourage healthier lifestyles , reducing the need for care. (1998, p. 446). There may be potential for...ability to affect behavior has a number of academics believing HDHPs will provide enough incentive to alter peoples’ health and lifestyle choices

  7. A Study to Design a System to Identify Handicapped Family Members of Active Duty Soldiers at Fort Benning, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    2 (June 1975): 341-351. 51 "Consumer Services for Handicapped People at Home." Physiotherapy , March 1981, 77. Feuerstein, et al. "Categories of...improve the level and quality of student and faculty research in the HCA Graduate Program, we are in the process of formalizing a three-way relationship...among our graduate faculty, pre- ceptors and graduate students , and the Health Care Studies Division (HCSD) of the Academy. In this regard, we believe

  8. A Meta-Analysis of the Antecedents of Voluntary Turnover in Studies Involving Active Duty Military Member Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    JoAP 2007 N N The Good, the Bad, and the Unknown About Telecommuting : Meta-Analysis of Psychological Mediators and Individual Consequences Gavin, J...Work, nonwork, & family influences Shalley, C. E., Gilson, L. L., & Blum, T. C. ACMJ 2000 ? N Matching Creativity Requirements and the Work

  9. Military Healthcare Providers' Knowledge and Comfort Regarding the Medical Care of Active Duty Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerucha, Caitlyn M; Runser, Lloyd A; Ee, Juliana S; Hersey, Elizabeth G

    2018-01-01

    This study assessed military healthcare providers' knowledge, clinical practice, and comfort in caring for active duty (AD) lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) patients. Primary care providers at Fort Bragg, North Carolina were surveyed anonymously. The response rate was 28% (n = 40). Almost two-thirds of the respondents felt comfortable discussing sexual health with AD patients, but only 5% inquired about same-sex sexual activity. Slightly less than one-third reported prior training in LGB healthcare topics and nearly four-fifths desired clear guidance from the Department of Defense regarding the process for screening and documentation of AD same-sex sexual activity. The findings highlight providers' need and desire for training in LGB patient care.

  10. Placing a Value on the Health Care Benefit for Active-Duty Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosek, James; Mattock, Michael; Schoenbaum, Michael; Eiseman, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    .... However, military health care benefits are not routinely counted as an element of military compensation in reports given to individual members, nor in comparisons of military versus civilian compensation...

  11. Natural occurrence, biological activities and synthesis of eight-, nine-, and eleven-membered ring lactones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M. C. Ferraz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural occurrence, biological activities and synthetic approaches to natural eight-, nine-, and eleven-membered lactones is reviewed. These medium ring lactones are grouped according to ring size, and their syntheses are discussed. The structures of some natural products early identified as medium-ring lactones were revised after total synthesis.

  12. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  13. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES OF HIP ARTHROSCOPY IN AN ACTIVE DUTY MILITARY POPULATION UTILIZING A CRITERION-BASED EARLY WEIGHT BEARING PROGRESSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, K Aaron; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Evanson, J Richard; Pniewski, Josh; Dickston, Michelle L; Mueller, Terry; Bojescul, John A

    2017-10-01

    Hip arthroscopy allows surgeons to address intra-articular pathology of the hip while avoiding more invasive open surgical dislocation. However the post-operative rehabilitation protocols have varied greatly in the literature, with many having prolonged periods of limited motion and weight bearing. The purpose of this study was to describe a criterion-based early weight bearing protocol following hip arthroscopy and investigate functional outcomes in the subjects who were active duty military. Active duty personnel undergoing hip arthroscopy for symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement were prospectively assessed in a controlled environment for the ability to incorporate early postoperative weight-bearing with the following criteria: no increased pain complaint with weight bearing and normalized gait pattern. Modified Harris Hip (HHS) and Hip Outcome score (HOS) were performed preoperatively and at six months post-op. Participants were progressed with a standard hip arthroscopy protocol. Hip flexion was limited to not exceed 90 degrees for the first three weeks post-op, with progression back to running beginning at three months. Final discharge was dependent upon the ability to run two miles at military specified pace and do a single leg broad jump within six inches of the contralateral leg without an increase in pain. Eleven participants met inclusion criteria over the study period. Crutch use was discontinued at an average of five days following surgery based on established weight bearing criteria. Only one participant required continued crutch use at 15 days. Participants' functional outcome was improved postoperatively, as demonstrated by significant increases in HOS and HHS. At the six month follow up, eight of 11 participants were able to take and complete a full Army Physical Fitness Test. Following completion of the early weight bearing rehabilitation protocol, 81% of participants were able to progress to full weight bearing by four days post

  14. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury: Effect of duty cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MSc Karin J.A. Legemate; MD Christof A. J. Smit; MSc Anja de Koning; PhD Sonja de Groot; MD, PhD Janneke M. Stolwijk-Swuste; PhD Thomas W.H. Janssen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation

  15. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury : Effect of duty cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Christof A. J.; Legemate, Karin J. A.; de Koning, Anja; de Groot, Sonja; Stolwijk-Swuste, Janneke M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation on

  16. Experiencing fan activism: Understanding the power of fan activist organizations through members' narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neta Kligler-Vilenchik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fan activism, forms of civic engagement and political participation growing out of experiences of fandom, is a powerful mode of mobilization, particularly for young people. Building on 40 interviews with members of two organizations representing different configurations of fan activism, this article discusses three emerging elements that are key to the experience of membership in such groups. We suggest that the strength of fan activist groups builds on successfully combining these elements: two that are common to fandom, shared media experiences and a sense of community, and one that is traditionally ascribed to volunteerism and activism, the wish to help.

  17. Integrative Review of Breastfeeding Duration and Influencing Factors Among Women Serving Active Duty in the U.S. Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwell, Andrea L

    To determine what is known about breastfeeding duration among active-duty servicewomen and to identify factors related to military employment that facilitate or inhibit breastfeeding. Literature searches using CINAHL and MEDLINE were conducted with the keywords military and breastfeeding for articles published from January 2000 through May 2016. Abstracts and full-text research articles were retrieved and analyzed that met the inclusion criteria: English language, U.S. active-duty military personnel, peer-reviewed, and identified facilitators and/or barriers to breastfeeding. Eight studies were analyzed for quality and content; analysis was guided by Cooper's five stages of review synthesis processes. Findings indicated that although breastfeeding initiation rates are similar to those for civilians, military women may discontinue sooner. Perception of military work as a barrier is associated with shorter duration, and enlisted personnel were less likely to breastfeed to 12 months than commissioned officers. Military women experienced work-related barriers: lack of proper facilities for pumping, pressures and obligations related to rank, conflicts between mother/soldier demands, physical fitness/weight standards, concerns related to exposure to hazardous material, and prolonged separations from their infants. Most women in the military serve during their childbearing years when they may want to breastfeed. Strategies to promote breastfeeding include advocacy for policy changes, education of servicewomen and supervisors/commanders, and implementation of a breastfeeding class that addresses military-specific factors. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Primary health care utilization prior to suicide: a retrospective case-control study among active-duty military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Eldar; Shelef, Leah; Mann, J John; Portugese, Shirly; Krivoy, Amir; Shoval, Gal; Weiser, Mark; Fruchter, Eyal

    2014-08-01

    About 45% of civilians who died by suicide had contact with a doctor within 1 month of death. Thus, educating primary care physicians (PCP) to detect and mitigate depression is an important suicide-prevention strategy. However, the PCP consulting rate before suicide has not been examined in a military population. We investigated the utilization of primary health care and mental health services by active-duty military personnel suicide cases prior to death in comparison to matched military controls. All suicides (N = 170) were extracted from a cohort of all active-duty Israeli military male personnel between 2002 and 2012. Applying a retrospective, nested case-control design, we compared primary care services utilization by suicide cases with demographic and occupationally matched military controls (N = 500). Whereas 38.3% of suicide cases contacted a PCP within the last month before death, only 27.6% of suicide cases contacted a mental health specialist during their entire service time. The PCP contact rate within 1 month before death or index day did not differ between suicide cases and military controls (38.3% vs. 33.8%, χ²₁ = 1.05, P = .3). More suicide cases contacted a mental health specialist within service time than did military controls (27.6% vs. 13.6%, χ²₁ = 10.85, P = .001). Even though PCP contact rate by military personnel who died by suicide is slightly lower than that reported for civilians who died by suicide prior to their death, it is higher than mental health specialist contact rate and higher than that by age-matched civilians who died by suicide. These results imply that PCPs education is a viable approach to suicide prevention in a military setting. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  19. 24 CFR 960.204 - Denial of admission for criminal activity or drug abuse by household members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... activity or drug abuse by household members. 960.204 Section 960.204 Housing and Urban Development... HOUSING Admission § 960.204 Denial of admission for criminal activity or drug abuse by household members. (a) Required denial of admission—(1) Persons evicted for drug-related criminal activity. The PHA...

  20. 17 CFR 1.59 - Activities of self-regulatory organization employees, governing board members, committee members...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Activities of self-regulatory... COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Miscellaneous § 1.59 Activities of self-regulatory organization employees, governing...) Self-regulatory organization means “self-regulatory organization,” as defined in Commission regulation...

  1. Expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) family members in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharman-Biz, Amirhossein; Gao, Hui; Ghiasvand, Reza; Zhao, Chunyan; Zendehdel, Kazem; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor is believed to be important in tumorigenesis and altered AP-1 activity was associated with cell transformation. We aimed to assess the potential role of AP-1 family members as novel biomarkers in breast cancer. We studied the expression of AP-1 members at the mRNA level in 72 primary breast tumors and 37 adjacent non-tumor tissues and evaluated its correlation with clinicopathological parameters including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu status. Expression levels of Ubiquitin C (UBC) were used for normalization. Protein expression of AP-1 members was assessed using Western blot analysis in a subset of tumors. We used student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, logistic regression and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for statistical analyses. We found significant differences in the expression of AP-1 family members between tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues for all AP-1 family members except Fos B. Fra-1, Fra-2, Jun-B and Jun-D mRNA levels were significantly higher in tumors compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001), whilst c-Fos and c-Jun mRNA levels were significantly lower in tumors compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001). In addition, Jun-B overexpression had outstanding discrimination ability to differentiate tumor tissues from adjacent non-tumor tissues as determined by ROC curve analysis. Moreover, Fra-1 was significantly overexpressed in the tumors biochemically classified as ERα negative (p = 0.012) and PR negative (p = 0.037). Interestingly, Fra-1 expression was significantly higher in triple-negative tumors compared with luminal carcinomas (p = 0.01). Expression levels of Fra-1 and Jun-B might be possible biomarkers for prognosis of breast cancer

  2. Medical education and the ACGME duty hour requirements: assessing the effect of a day float system on educational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roey, Steve

    2006-01-01

    In July 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) instituted new resident work hour mandates, which are being shown to improve resident well-being and patient safety. However, there are limited data on the impact these new mandates may have on educational activities. To assess the impact on educational activities of a day float system created to meet ACGME work hour mandates. The inpatient ward coverage was changed by adding a day float team responsible for new patient admissions in the morning, with the on-call teams starting later and being responsible for new patient admissions thereafter. I surveyed the residents to assess the impact of this new system on educational activities-resident autonomy, attending teaching, conference attendance, resident teaching, self-directed learning, and ability to complete patient care responsibilities. There was no adverse effect of the day float system on educational activities. House staff reported increased autonomy, enhanced teaching from attending physicians, and improved ability to complete patient care responsibilities. Additionally, house staff demonstrated improved compliance with the ACGME mandates. The implementation of a novel day float system for the inpatient medicine ward service improved compliance with ACGME work duty requirements and did not adversely impact educational activities of the residency training program.

  3. Analysis Extract. AFSC 4D0X1 Diet Therapy (Active Duty)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    D0114 Assemble food service equipment 43 19 24 0 22 9 D0115 Clean broilers ...Perform patient carries using hand or litter method 4 7 22 0 8 5 L0335 Prepare equipment for deployments...Equipment use/operate - Broilers Active Active Active Active AD AD

  4. Physical fitness and injury reporting among active duty and National Guard/Reserve women: associations with risk and lifestyle factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazman, Josh B; de la Motte, Sarah; Bramhall, Elizabeth M S; Purvis, Dianna L; Deuster, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    As more women enter the military, it is important to understand how different risks and lifestyle factors influence physical fitness and injury among women in both active duty (AD) and National Guard/Reserve (NG/R). Women in military service are less fit and more likely to suffer musculoskeletal injuries during physical training than men. They also use more medical care during deployment than men. Using data from the Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness Global Assessment Tool 2.0 (GAT 2.0), self-reported health and lifestyle and behavioral risk factors were analyzed in nondeployed Army personnel, with the goals of examining (1) service-component differences across traditional risk and lifestyle factors, and (2) correlates of physical performance and physical activity-related injury. Self-report GAT 2.0 data included health risk factors (overall perceived health, sleep, diet, tobacco and alcohol use), self-reported health metrics (height, weight, Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) scores), and history of physical activity-related injury. The GAT 2.0 was completed by 1,322 AD and 1,033 NG/R women, and APFT data were available for a subsample of 605 AD and 582 NG/R women. Initial analyses of GAT 2.0 data indicated that AD had higher rates of fair/poor perceived health, poor sleep, and unhealthy diet compared to NG/R women. However, AD women had a lower APFT fail rate (8%) than NG (27%) and R (28%). Active duty women were more likely to experience a physical injury in the past 6 months (38%) than NG (19%) and R (22%) women, and more likely to seek medical care than NG/R women. Across all service components, predictive factors for APFT failure included high body mass index (BMI), fair/poor health, and unhealthy diet. Predictive factors for physical injury included high BMI, fair/poor health, and binge drinking. Our analyses suggest that AD women Soldiers are more physically fit than NG/R women Soldiers, which is accompanied by a greater prevalence of physical

  5. Identifying and assessing views among physically-active adult gym members in Israel on dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druker, Inbal; Gesser-Edelsburg, Anat

    2017-01-01

    Sports dietary supplements are available for sale in public places including sports clubs. Although there is uncertainty regarding their safety, many gym members who regularly work out consume them. The present study aimed to identify the approaches and perspectives of the public who work out in gyms and take dietary supplements. It examined how professionals view sports dietary supplement consumption, and how they communicate this issue to gym members. The literature discusses the prevalence of SDS use among athletes, but rarely discusses or compares between the risk perceptions of gym members, trainers, and dietitians, who represent the physically-active general public, regarding SDS. We conducted constructivist qualitative research in semi-structured one-on-one interviews ( n  = 34). We held in-depth interviews ( n  = 20) with a heterogeneous population of adult gym members who take dietary supplements, and ( n  = 14) with dietitians and fitness trainers. The main finding was a gap in risk perception of dietary supplement use between dietitians, gym members and fitness trainers. There was low risk perception among dietary supplements consumers. Trainers believed that benefits of supplement consumption exceeded risk, and therefore they did not convey a message to their clients about risk. In contrast, dietitians interviewed for this study renounced general use of sports dietary supplements and doubted whether trainers had proper nutritional knowledge to support it. Lack of awareness of risks suggests that there is a need for communication on this issue. We recommend that professionals (physicians and dietitians) be present in sports clubs that sell such products in an uncontrolled way.

  6. Attitudes of cancer patients, their family members and health professionals toward active euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuppelomäki, M

    2000-03-01

    This qualitative study describes the attitudes of four groups of people in cancer care toward active euthanasia. Patients (32) with incurable cancer, their family members (13), nurses (13) and physicians (13) participated in the study which was carried out in two central hospitals and in four health centres in Finland. The data was collected by means of focused interviews which were taped, transcribed and then analysed by content analysis. More than half of the participants said that they could ethically justify active euthanasia. Most of these were family members and nurses. The main reasons for their ethical justification were the terminal illness of the patient, the presence of suffering and pain and the patient's own request. Those who could not justify active euthanasia said that one human being has no right to decide death of another. Potential abuse, uncertainty about the finality of the situation, the possibility of effective alleviation of symptoms and the effects which the practice might have on medical staff were also mentioned by this group. The results of this study support the assumption given in the earlier literature that attitudes toward active euthanasia are most positive where terminally ill cancer patients are concerned.

  7. Prolonged electrical stimulation-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation and sitting pressure in spinal cord injury: Effect of duty cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Christof A. J. Smit, MD; Karin J. A. Legemate, MSc; Anja de Koning, MSc; Sonja de Groot, PhD; Janneke M. Stolwijk-Swuste, MD, PhD; Thomas W. J. Janssen, PhD

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are highly prevalent in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES) activates muscles and might reduce risk factors. Our objectives were to study and compare the effects of two duty cycles during 3 h of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring activation on interface pressure distribution in sitting individuals with SCI and study the usability of a newly developed electrode garment (ES shorts). Ten individuals with SCI participated in this study, in which t...

  8. Activating chronic kidney disease patients and family members through the Internet to promote integration of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Trisolini

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the potential role of the Internet as a vehicle for improving integration of care through activating chronic kidney disease patients and their family members. Also, to describe how that potential is being developed through a website sponsored by the Medicare program in the United States. Background: The Internet is expanding at a rapid rate, and health-related websites are one of its most popular features. Efforts to promote integration of care have focused mainly on providers up to now, and more emphasis is needed on the potential roles of patients. Chronically ill patients have particular needs for improved education about their conditions and enhanced involvement in care planning and treatment decisions. Medicare developed the Dialysis Facility Compare website to serve those goals for people with chronic kidney disease. Methods: We conducted qualitative research with 140 chronic kidney disease patients and family members, and 130 renal care professionals to evaluate and improve the Dialysis Facility Compare website. A series of 19 focus groups, 13 triads (small focus groups, and 56 individual interviews were conducted in four regions of the United States and by telephone. Results: We found that the Dialysis Facility Compare website has the potential to improve integration of care for people with chronic kidney disease in at least three ways. First: by expanding the roles of patients as members of the multi-disciplinary team of caregivers treating their disease. Second: through better integration of the informal care provided in the home and community with the formal care provided by health professionals. Third: by improving coordination of between care provided in the pre-dialysis and dialysis phases of the disease. Discussion: We developed recommendations for revising and enhancing the Dialysis Facility Compare website in a number of ways to better promote patient activation and integration of care. The unique features

  9. Experience of Postpartum Active Duty Women in Training for the Fitness Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-10

    too short a time runs the risk of detrimental health effects to the individual and her child . Although six months post childbirth may be enough time...activity level, kinesiophobia, and depressive symptoms. European Spine Journal, 20, 440-448. doi: 10.1007/s00586-010-1487-6 Nelson, A.M. (2003

  10. Eating patterns and leisure-time exercise among active duty military personnel: comparison to the Healthy People objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracey J; Dotson, Laura E; Young, Andrew J; White, Alan; Hadden, Louise; Bathalon, Gaston P; Funderburk, LesLee; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2013-07-01

    To assess whether active duty military personnel meet Healthy People 2010 objectives for physical activity and fruit, vegetable, and whole-grain intake; the relationship of select demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors (eg, smoking), and eating patterns (eg, frequency and location of meals) on achieving diet and exercise-related Healthy People 2010 objectives; and the relationship of eating patterns to self-reported weight gain. Secondary data from 15,747 participants in the 2005 Department of Defense Health Related Behaviors Survey was analyzed. More than 57% of respondents met the Healthy People 2010 guidelines for moderate or vigorous leisure exercise but only 3% reported eating fruit (once), vegetables (3 times), and whole grains (3 times) daily. Individuals who reported gaining weight during the previous year were more likely to skip breakfast and eat at, or from, a restaurant ≥2 times per week compared with those who did not gain weight (Pexercise (OR 0.71). Military personnel who skipped breakfast ≥2 times per week (OR 0.45) or ate at a restaurant/takeout food (OR 0.54) ≥2 times per week were significantly less likely to meet Healthy People 2010 guidelines for food intake (defined as achieving a daily intake of one or more fruits, three or more vegetables, and three or more servings of whole grains) and exercise (OR 0.88 and 0.82, respectively). Although the majority of military personnel met guidelines for physical activity, their intake of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains was suboptimal. Skipping breakfast and eating at, or from, restaurants were risk factors for poor nutrient intake and associated with weight gain. These data suggest that skipping breakfast and eating out deter achieving Healthy People 2010 objectives and provide targets for military programs to promote achieving these objectives. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Active-duty physicians' perceptions and satisfaction with humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions: implications for the field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey J Oravec

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The United States Department of Defense participates in more than 500 missions every year, including humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, as part of medical stability operations. This study assessed perceptions of active-duty physicians regarding these activities and related these findings to the retention and overall satisfaction of healthcare professionals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: An Internet-based survey was developed and validated. Of the 667 physicians who responded to the survey, 47% had participated in at least one mission. On a 7-point, Likert-type response scale, physicians reported favorable overall satisfaction with their participation in these missions (mean = 5.74. Perceived benefit was greatest for the United States (mean = 5.56 and self (mean = 5.39 compared to the target population (mean = 4.82. These perceptions were related to participants' intentions to extend their military medical service (total model R (2 = .37, with the strongest predictors being perceived benefit to self (β = .21, p<.01, the U.S. (β = .19, p<.01, and satisfaction (β = .18, p<.05. In addition, Air Force physicians reported higher levels of satisfaction (mean = 6.10 than either Army (mean = 5.27, Cohen's d = 0.75, p<.001 or Navy (mean = 5.60, Cohen's d = 0.46, p<.01 physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Military physicians are largely satisfied with humanitarian missions, reporting the greatest benefit of such activities for themselves and the United States. Elucidation of factors that may increase the perceived benefit to the target populations is warranted. Satisfaction and perceived benefits of humanitarian missions were positively correlated with intentions to extend time in service. These findings could inform the larger humanitarian community as well as military medical practices for both recruiting and retaining medical professionals.

  12. Blast a Biofilm: A Hands-On Activity for School Children and Members of the Public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Marlow

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are very common in nature and have both detrimental and beneficial effects on everyday life. Practical and hands-on activities have been shown to achieve greater learning and engagement with science by young people (1, 4, 5. We describe an interactive activity, developed to introduce microbes and biofilms to school age children and members of the public. Biofilms are common in nature and, as the favored mode of growth for microbes, biofilms affect many parts ofeveryday life. This hands-on activity highlights the key  concepts of biofilms by allowing participants to first build, then attempt to ‘blast,’ a biofilm, thus enabling the robust nature of biofilms to become apparent. We developed the blast-a-biofilm activity as part of our two-day Magnificent Microbes event, which took place at the Dundee Science Centre-Sensation in May 2010 (6. This public engagement event was run by scientists from the Division of Molecular Microbiology at the University of Dundee. The purpose of the event was to use fun and interesting activities to make both children and adults think about how fascinating microbes are. Additionally, we aimed to develop interactive resources that could be used in future events and learning environments, of which the blast-a-biofilm activity is one such resource. Scientists and policy makers in the UK believe engaging the public with research ensures that the work of universities and research institutes is relevant to society and wider social concerns and can also help scientists actively contribute to positive social change (2. The activity is aimed at junior school age children (9–11 years and adults with little or no knowledge of microbiology. The activity is suitable for use at science festivals, science clubs, and also in the classroom, where it can serve as a tool to enrich and enhance the school curriculum.

  13. 12 CFR 211.4 - Permissible activities and investments of foreign branches of member banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... limited to, nonpayment of taxes, rentals, customs duties, or costs of transport, and loss or... reported); (4) Real estate loans. Take liens or other encumbrances on foreign real estate in connection with its extensions of credit, whether or not of first priority and whether or not the real estate has...

  14. Percutaneous Occlusion of the Left Atrial Appendage with the Watchman Device in an Active Duty Sailor with Atrial Fibrillation and Recurrent Thromboembolism Despite Appropriate Use of Oral Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Justin M; Choi, Anthony J; Oakley, Luke S; Francisco, Gregory M; Nayak, Keshav R

    2018-05-23

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common significant cardiac arrhythmia and is associated with a five-fold increased risk of stroke from thromboembolism. Over 94% of these emboli arise from the left atrial appendage. Systemic embolic phenomena are rare, accounting for less than 1 out of 10 of all embolic events, but have a similar prevention strategy. Anticoagulation significantly reduces the risk of these events, and thus forms the cornerstone of therapy for most patients with atrial fibrillation. Left atrial appendage occlusion with the Watchman device is a recently approved alternative for stroke prevention in selected patients. We present a case of an active duty U.S. Navy sailor at low risk for thromboembolism who nonetheless suffered recurrent thromboembolic events despite appropriate anticoagulation, and thus underwent Watchman implantation. The therapy in this case will ideally provide a lifetime of protection from recurrent systemic embolization while allowing the patient to continue his active duty military career without restriction due to oral anticoagulation.

  15. Stress, mental health, and job performance among active duty military personnel: findings from the 2002 Department of Defense Health-Related Behaviors Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Laurel L; Williams, Thomas V; Kress, Amii M

    2006-09-01

    This study examined the extent to which high levels of occupational and family stress were associated with mental health problems and productivity loss among active duty military personnel. We analyzed data from the 2002 Department of Defense Survey of Health-Related Behaviors among Military Personnel, which provided extensive population-based information on 12,756 active duty personnel in all branches of the military worldwide. Military personnel reported higher levels of stress at work than in their family life. The personnel reporting the highest levels of occupational stress were those 25 or younger, those who were married with spouses not present, and women. Personnel with high levels of stress had significantly higher rates of mental health problems and productivity loss than those with less stress. We recommend that prevention and intervention efforts geared toward personnel reporting the highest levels of stress be given priority for resources in this population.

  16. The incidence of primary hip osteoarthritis in active duty US military servicemembers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Danielle L; Belmont, Philip J; Mountcastle, Sally; Owens, Brett D

    2009-04-15

    Although multiple studies have reported the prevalence of primary hip osteoarthritis (OA), little has been reported on incidence rates of hip OA. We sought to determine the incidence rate and demographic risk factors of hip OA in an ethnically diverse and physically active population of US military servicemembers. A query was performed using the US Defense Medical Epidemiology Database for the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code for hip OA (715.95). Multivariate Poisson regression analysis was used to estimate the rate of hip OA per 100,000 person-years, controlling for sex, race, age, rank, and service. The overall unadjusted incidence rate of hip OA was 35 per 100,000 person-years. Women, compared with men, had a significantly increased adjusted incidence rate ratio for hip OA of 1.87 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.73-2.01). The adjusted incidence rate ratio for black servicemembers when compared with white servicemembers was 1.32 (95% CI 1.23-1.41). The adjusted incidence rate ratio for the > or =40-year-old age group compared with the 20-year-old group was 22.21 (95% CI 17.54-28.14). With junior officers as the referent category, junior enlisted, senior enlisted, and senior officers rank groups had a significantly increased adjusted incidence rate ratio for hip OA. With the Air Force as the referent category, each service had a significantly increased adjusted incidence rate ratio for hip OA. Female sex; black race; age > or =40 years; junior enlisted, senior enlisted, and senior officer rank groups; and military service in the Navy, Army, or Marines were all risk factors for hip OA.

  17. The Role of Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) Family Members in CD30-Positive Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces de los Fayos Alonso, Ines; Lagger, Sabine; Merkel, Olaf; Kenner, Lukas

    2018-01-01

    The Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor (TF) family, composed of a variety of members including c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF, is involved in mediating many biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation and cell death. Since their discovery, the role of AP-1 TFs in cancer development has been extensively analysed. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies have highlighted the complexity of these TFs, mainly due to their cell-type specific homo- or hetero-dimerization resulting in diverse transcriptional response profiles. However, as a result of the increasing knowledge of the role of AP-1 TFs in disease, these TFs are being recognized as promising therapeutic targets for various malignancies. In this review, we focus on the impact of deregulated expression of AP-1 TFs in CD30-positive lymphomas including Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma and Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma. PMID:29597249

  18. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Hygiene-Based Strategies Aimed Toward Prevention of SSTI and MRSA-Associated SSTI Among U.S. Active Duty Army Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-25

    and furuncle”; 681-681.9 “ cellulitis and abscess of finger and toe”; and 682-682.9 “other cellulitis and abscess”. Purulent infection... Cellulitis and abscess” diagnosis with a culture, “abscess” clinical manifestation or an “incision and drainage” procedure with MRSA coverage or...Ambulatory visits and hospitalizations for cellulitis among Active Duty Military Component from 2000 through 2009.Derived from MSMR surveillance

  19. Mediation and Moderation of the Relationship Between Combat Experiences and Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Active Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Marshall; Germain, Anne; Campbell, Justin S

    2017-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a major health concern among the U.S. military population, affecting up to 12% to 24% of veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Sleep disturbances, neuroticism, and childhood trauma have all been associated with the development of PTSD in military populations, especially in relation to combat experiences. The effects of disrupted sleep and post-traumatic stress can affect the physical well-being of soldier and sailors in the field and impact them for years after deployment. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between self-reported measures of combat experiences, PTSD symptoms, sleep, neuroticism, and childhood adversity in an active duty military population. 972 U.S. Navy Sailors serving in Afghanistan were given anonymous surveys that assess scales of combat stressors, PTSD symptoms, sleep problems, neuroticism, adverse child experiences (ACEs), and other covariates. Sleep disturbances were hypothesized as moderators, having an indirect effect on the relationship between combat experiences and PTSD symptoms. Neuroticism scores and ACEs were proposed as moderators of the combat-PTSD symptom relationship. Mediation and moderation models were developed and tested using logistic regressions. Increased number of combat experiences was found to be a significant predictor of PTSD, even when adjusting for all covariates (p moderating factor. These results indicate that the presence of nightmares may partially explain how traumatic combat experiences lead to the development of PTSD. The study also reaffirms neuroticism as risk factor for developing PTSD symptoms. These findings highlight the importance of sleep hygiene and operational stress models in combat situations and may help stress control professionals address risk factors associated with PTSD symptoms. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Environmental approach and gas industry activities: the actions of two AFG members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The members of the French gas association (AFG) are fully aware of the responsibility they have in the domain of sustainable development. For us, it is a global commitment which consists in improving the impact of their activities in their different social, society, economical and environmental aspects. The environmental aspect is of primary importance with the Kyoto protocol and the obligation for France to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. In order to better understand the implications of an environmental approach in the gas industry sector, this paper presents the actions and projects developed by Gaz de France and Total companies for the rational use of energy, the development of renewable energy sources (geothermal, wind and solar energies, hydrogen and fuel cells) and the abatement of the impacts of their activities on the environment: development of high efficiency equipments and appliances, improvement of existing fuels, development of natural gas for vehicles, LPG fuels and bio-fuels, investment in projects of greenhouse effect abatement (carbon prototype stock), reduction of works impact on the environment, geologic sequestration of CO 2 , recycling of coal mine gas, optimum processing of industrial effluents and wastes (development of gas-fueled processes) etc.. (J.S.)

  1. Active animal health surveillance in European Union Member States: gaps and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisdorff, B; Schauer, B; Taylor, N; Rodríguez-Prieto, V; Comin, A; Brouwer, A; Dórea, F; Drewe, J; Hoinville, L; Lindberg, A; Martinez Avilés, M; Martínez-López, B; Peyre, M; Pinto Ferreira, J; Rushton, J; VAN Schaik, G; Stärk, K D C; Staubach, C; Vicente-Rubiano, M; Witteveen, G; Pfeiffer, D; Häsler, B

    2017-03-01

    Animal health surveillance enables the detection and control of animal diseases including zoonoses. Under the EU-FP7 project RISKSUR, a survey was conducted in 11 EU Member States and Switzerland to describe active surveillance components in 2011 managed by the public or private sector and identify gaps and opportunities. Information was collected about hazard, target population, geographical focus, legal obligation, management, surveillance design, risk-based sampling, and multi-hazard surveillance. Two countries were excluded due to incompleteness of data. Most of the 664 components targeted cattle (26·7%), pigs (17·5%) or poultry (16·0%). The most common surveillance objectives were demonstrating freedom from disease (43·8%) and case detection (26·8%). Over half of components applied risk-based sampling (57·1%), but mainly focused on a single population stratum (targeted risk-based) rather than differentiating between risk levels of different strata (stratified risk-based). About a third of components were multi-hazard (37·3%). Both risk-based sampling and multi-hazard surveillance were used more frequently in privately funded components. The study identified several gaps (e.g. lack of systematic documentation, inconsistent application of terminology) and opportunities (e.g. stratified risk-based sampling). The greater flexibility provided by the new EU Animal Health Law means that systematic evaluation of surveillance alternatives will be required to optimize cost-effectiveness.

  2. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and gene structure of a novel member of the dermaseptin B family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Y; Vouille, V; Beven, L; Amiche, M; Wróblewski, H; Delfour, A; Nicolas, P

    1998-03-09

    Dermaseptins are a family of cationic (Lys-rich) antimicrobial peptides that are abundant in the skin secretions of the arboreal frogs Phyllomedusa bicolor and P. sauvagii. In vitro, these peptides are microbicidal against a wide variety of microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, protozoa and fungi. To date, 6 dermaseptin B mature peptides, 24-34 residues long, 2 dermaseptin B cDNAs and 2 gene sequences have been identified in P. bicolor. To assess dermaseptin related genes further, we screened a P. bicolor genomic library with 32P-labeled cDNAs coding either for prepro-dermaseptins B1 or B2 (adenoregulin). A gene sequence was identified that coded a novel dermaseptin B, termed Drg3, which exhibits 23-42% amino acids identities with other members of the family. Analysis of the cDNAs coding precursors for several opioid and antimicrobial peptides originating from the skin of various amphibian species revealed that the 25-residue preproregion of these preproforms are all encoded by conserved nucleotides encompassed by the first coding exon of the Drg3 gene. Synthetic dermaseptin Drg3 exhibited a bactericidal activity towards several species of mollicutes (wall-less eubacteria), firmicutes (Gram-positive eubacteria), and gracilicutes (Gram-negative eubacteria), with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 6.25 to 100 microM. Experiments performed on Acholeplasma laidlawii cells revealed that this peptide is membranotropic and that if efficiently depolarizes the plasma membrane.

  3. 38 CFR 3.6 - Duty periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... arrest, or a cerebrovascular accident which occurred during such training. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 101(24... the preparatory schools of the United States Air Force Academy, the United States Military Academy, or... school without a release from active duty, and for other individuals who have a commitment to active duty...

  4. Organizational Member Involvement in Physical Activity Coalitions across the United States: Development and Testing of a Novel Survey Instrument for Assessing Coalition Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement…

  5. 45 CFR 2520.30 - What capacity-building activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AmeriCorps members perform should enhance the mission, strategy, skills, and culture, as well as systems... that are included in, or consistent with, your Corporation-approved grant application. (b) Examples of...

  6. TRAF Family Member-Associated NF-κB Activator (TANK) Induced by RANKL Negatively Regulates Osteoclasts Survival and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Mengrui Wu, Yiping Wang, Lianfu Deng, Wei Chen, Yi-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the principle bone-resorbing cells. Precise control of balanced osteoclast activity is indispensable for bone homeostasis. Osteoclast activation mediated by RANK-TRAF6 axis has been clearly identified. However, a negative regulation-machinery in osteoclast remains unclear. TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK) is induced by about 10 folds during osteoclastogenesis, according to a genome-wide analysis of gene expression before and after osteoclast maturation...

  7. TRAF Family Member-Associated NF-κB Activator (TANK) Induced by RANKL Negatively Regulates Osteoclasts Survival and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Mengrui; Wang, Yiping; Deng, Lianfu; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the principle bone-resorbing cells. Precise control of balanced osteoclast activity is indispensable for bone homeostasis. Osteoclast activation mediated by RANK-TRAF6 axis has been clearly identified. However, a negative regulation-machinery in osteoclast remains unclear. TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK) is induced by about 10 folds during osteoclastogenesis, according to a genome-wide analysis of gene expression before and after osteoclast maturation, and...

  8. 27 CFR 478.114 - Importation by members of the U.S. Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to the place of residence of any military member of the U.S. Armed Forces who is on active duty... residence; (iii) The country from which the firearm or ammunition is to be imported; (iv) The name and address of the foreign seller and foreign shipper; (v) A description of the firearm or ammunition to be...

  9. Development and localisation of casemix applications for inpatient hospital activity in EU member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, M M

    1999-01-01

    The successful infiltration of casemix techniques across geographical, systemic and cultural boundaries provides an interesting and timely example of the translation of research evidence into health policy development. This paper explores the specifics of this policy development by reviewing the application of casemix techniques within the acute hospital systems of European Union member states. The fact that experimentation with or application of casemix measures can be reported for the majority of European Union member states would suggest that the deployment of these measures can be expected to continue to expand within these health systems into the new millennium.

  10. Healthy Active Duty Military with Lifetime Experience of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Exhibits Subtle Deficits in Sensory Reactivity and Sensory Integration During Static Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, W Geoffrey; Handy, Justin D; Avcu, Pelin; Ortiz, Alejandro; Haran, F Jay; Doria, Michael; Servatius, Richard J

    2018-03-01

    Postural control and stress reactivity were investigated in active duty coast guard personnel to determine whether they are sensitive to lifetime effects of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). A custom-designed and validated virtual reality-based computerized posturography device was used to assess postural stability, whereas emotional reactivity was assessed using the acoustic startle response (ASR), and neurocognitive performance was assessed using the defense-automated neurobehavioral assessment (DANA). It was hypothesized that residual and subtle postural control imbalance and deficits in cognitive and sensory reactivity would be evident in those reporting multiple lifetime mTBI. Active duty military personnel (N = 36; 7 females and 29 males) with no Deployment Limiting Medical Condition were recruited and tested on all assessments. Medical history information provided a history of head injury. Thirty-nine percent of participants reported having a previous mTBI (nine reporting one and five reporting more than one incident). No participant had experienced a head injury within the past year and all were symptom free. A significant effect of number of mTBI was found in the postural assessment (p = 0.002). Lifetime mTBI was associated with suppressed ASR magnitude (p = 0.03) but did not affect neurocognitive performance. The current findings provide new insight into ongoing controversies concerning sensitivity to functional deficits following mTBI and when the window for treatment or restoration ends.

  11. BH3-only protein Bim inhibits activity of antiapoptotic members of Bcl-2 family when expressed in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhásová, Barbora; Mentel, Marek; Bhatia-Kiššová, Ingrid; Zeman, Igor; Kolarov, Jordan; Forte, Michael; Polčic, Peter

    2011-09-02

    Proteins of the Bcl-2 family regulate programmed cell death in mammals by promoting the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in response to various proapoptotic stimuli. The mechanism by which BH3-only members of the family activate multidomain proapoptotic proteins Bax and Bak to form a pore in mitochondrial membranes remains under dispute. We report that cell death promoting activity of BH3-only protein Bim can be reconstituted in yeast when both Bax and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-X(L) are present, suggesting that Bim likely activates Bax indirectly by inhibiting antiapoptotic proteins. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Status of Radon Related Activities in Member States Participating in Technical Cooperation Projects in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-03-01

    This publication summarizes the status of radon programmes at the start of 2014 in the Member States in Europe participating in the IAEA technical cooperation project on establishing enhanced approaches to the control of public exposure to radon. The current status was determined from responses to a questionnaire covering the following elements of a national radon action plan: policies and strategies; radon measurement surveys; establishment of reference levels; managing radon in existing buildings and in future buildings; education and training of professionals; and public awareness initiatives.

  13. 32 CFR 516.71 - Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-record, the Chief, DAJA-LE, will file necessary pleadings and make necessary appearances before the MSPB... appropriate DA personnel are fully apprised of their rights, duties and the nature and basis for an OSC... military members. (7) Ensure that personnel involved are advised of the nature and basis for an OSC...

  14. Nuclear legislation. Analytical study. Regulatory and Institutional framework for nuclear activities in OECD Member countries. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This study is part of a series of analytical studies of the major aspects of nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries and is published in two volumes. This Volume I of the study is a revision and an expansion of a 1969 study concerning the organisation and general regime governing nuclear activities. The national studies were prepared, to the extent possible, following a standard plan for all countries to facilitate information retrieval and comparison. (NEA) [fr

  15. The Role of Natural Support Systems in the Post-deployment Adjustment of Active Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Janet A; Olson, Jonathan; Perkins, Daniel F; Travis, Wendy J; Ormsby, LaJuana

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the relations among three different types of naturally occurring social support (from romantic partners, friends and neighbors, and unit leaders) and three indices of service member well-being (self reports of depressive symptoms, satisfaction with military life, and perceptions of unit readiness) for service members who did and did not report negative experiences associated with military deployment. Data were drawn from the 2011 Community Assessment completed anonymously by more than 63,000 USAF personnel. Regression analyses revealed that higher levels of social support was associated with better outcomes regardless of negative deployment experiences. Evidence of moderation was also noted, with all forms of social support moderating the impact of negative deployment experiences on depressive symptoms and support from unit leaders moderating the impact of negative deployment experience on satisfaction with military life. No moderation was found for perceptions of unit readiness. Subgroup analyses revealed slightly different patterns for male and female service members, with support providing fewer moderation effects for women. These findings may have value for military leaders and mental health professionals working to harness the power of naturally occurring relationships to maximize the positive adjustment of service members and their families. Implications for practices related to re-integration of post-deployment military personnel are discussed.

  16. Is active management of mandatory pension funds in Croatia creating value for second pillar fund members?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar-Pierre Matek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses Croatian mandatory pension funds’ investment returns during the 2005-2014 period using performance attribution methodology. Results from active investment management are compared to a long-term policy return. Such analysis is essential to shed light on the contribution of active portfolio management in the second pillar pension scheme. Evidence suggests that in the period analysed portfolio managers have added value through active management decisions. In addition, we determined the sources of portfolio return by breaking down active return into policy, tactical asset allocation and security selection effect.

  17. Group Member or Outsider: Perceptions of Undergraduates with Disabilities on Leisure Time Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    College provides students with many opportunities to achieve academic success and enrich other aspects of their lives. Participating in campus activities can reduce stress, create social connections, promote healthy active living, and broaden civic engagement (Lindsey & Sessoms, 2006; Watson, Ayers, Zizzi, & Naoi, 2006). Studies noting…

  18. The Willingness of Military Members to Seek Help: The Role of Social Involvement and Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Gary L; Jensen, Todd M; Martin, James A; Mancini, Jay A

    2016-03-01

    Anchored in the social organization theory of action and change, we use data from a large sample of active-duty Air Force members to examine the direct and indirect influence of social involvement and social responsibility on willingness to seek help in times of need via trust in formal systems and informal supports. Group comparisons are conducted between junior male, junior female, senior male, and senior female service members. The key mediational path in the model for all groups is the connection between social involvement and willingness to seek help via trust in formal systems. These results can inform both unit- and community-level interventions intended to increase the likelihood that active-duty AF members will seek help in times of need. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  19. Heavy duty plasma spray gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irons, G.C.; Klein, J.F.; Lander, R.D.; Thompson, H.C.; Trapani, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    A heavy duty plasma spray gun for extended industrial service is disclosed. The gun includes a gas distribution member made of a material having a coefficient of expansion different from that of the parts surrounding it. The gas distribution member is forcibly urged by a resilient member such as a coiled spring against a seal so as to assure the plasma gas is introduced into the gun arc in a manner only defined by the gas distribution member. The gun has liquid cooling for the nozzle (anode) and the cathode. Double seals are provided between the coolant and the arc region and a vent is provided between the seals which provides an indication when a seal has failed. Some parts of the gun are electrically isolated from others by an intermediate member which is formed as a sandwich of two rigid metal face pieces and an insulator disposed between them. The metal face pieces provide a rigid body to attach the remaining parts in proper alignment therewith

  20. A Noise-Insensitive Semi-Active Air Suspension for Heavy-Duty Vehicles with an Integrated Fuzzy-Wheelbase Preview Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengchao Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-active air suspension is increasingly used on heavy-duty vehicles due to its capabilities of consuming less power and low cost and providing better ride quality. In this study, a new low cost but effective approach, fuzzy-wheelbase preview controller with wavelet denoising filter (FPW, is developed for semi-active air suspension system. A semi-active suspension system with a rolling lobe air spring is firstly modeled and a novel front axle vertical acceleration-based road prediction model is constructed. By adopting a sensor on the front axle, the road prediction model can predict more reliable road information for the rear wheel. After filtering useless signal noise, the proposed FPW can generate a noise-insensitive control damping force. Simulation results show that the ride quality, the road holding, the handling capability, the road friendliness, and the comprehensive performance of the semi-active air suspension with FPW outperform those with the traditional active suspension with PID-wheelbase preview controller (APP. It can also be seen that, with the addition of the wavelet filter, the impact of sensor noise on the suspension performance can be minimized.

  1. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active-Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    enhance the validity of their answers. The development of this new approach to measuring sexual assault and sex-based MEO violations was completed...include the buttocks, inner thigh, breast, groin, anus, vagina, penis and testicles. Top-Line Results from the RAND Military Workplace Study 41 12

  2. Expression of ESBL-like activity in infrequently encountered members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Sharon L; Lidgard, Janice A; Cheung, Wendy K W; Obeso, Martha N; Berrada, Zenda L; Janda, J Michael

    2012-03-01

    A collection of 94 unusual members of the Enterobacteriaceae were screened for the presence of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) using the MicroScan ESβL plus dried confirmation panel. Presumptively positive strains were then confirmed for the presence of an ESBL by double disk diffusion, E-test strips (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden) and PCR for SHV, TEM, and CTX-M2 genes. Of the 18 strains initially positive on the ESβL panel only three strains (Leminorella grimontii, Klebsiella ozaenae, and Kluyvera ascorbata) were positive by confirmation methods. These results suggest laboratories should be cautious regarding the methodology employed in screening for the presence of ESBLs in enteric bacteria. However, it should be noted that of the 94 strains, 29 were found to be resistant to two or more of the antibiotics present in the MicroScan ESβL plus panel indicating that there are potential treatment issues with these organisms despite their lack of ESBLs.

  3. Reactor physics activities in NEA member countries October 1990-September 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document is a compilation of National Activity Reports presented at the Thirty-Fourth Meeting of the NEA Committee on Reactor Physics, held at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Wuerenlingen, Switzerland, from 3rd-5th September 1991

  4. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Otto, M.; Naumann, Ch.; Brandt, W.; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 3. ISSN 2223-7747 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Activity regulation * Arabidopsis allene oxide cyclase isoforms * Heteromerization Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Nuclear legislation analytical study. Regulatory and institutional framework for nuclear activities in OECD member countries. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This study is part of a series of analytical studies of the major aspects of nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries and is published in two volumes. This volume II of the study is a revision and an expansion of a 1969 study concerning the organisation and general regime governing nuclear activities. The national studies were prepared, to the extent possible, following a standard plan for all countries to facilitate information retrieval and comparison. This volume also contains tables of international conventions of relevance to the nuclear field. (NEA) [fr

  6. Moving effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder to primary care: A randomized controlled trial with active duty military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette R; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Najera, Elizabeth; Litz, Brett T; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Roache, John D; Hembree, Elizabeth A; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Sonnek, Scott M; Peterson, Alan L

    2017-12-01

    Many military service members with PTSD do not receive evidence-based specialty behavioral health treatment because of perceived barriers and stigma. Behavioral health providers in primary care can deliver brief, effective treatments expanding access and reducing barriers and stigma. The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to determine if a brief cognitive-behavior therapy delivered in primary care using the Primary Care Behavioral Health model would be effective at reducing PTSD and co-occurring symptoms. A total of 67 service members (50 men, 17 women) were randomized to receive a brief, trauma-focused intervention developed for the primary care setting called Prolonged Exposure for Primary Care (PE-PC) or a delayed treatment minimal contact control condition. Inclusion criteria were significant PTSD symptoms following military deployment, medication stability, and interest in receiving treatment for PTSD symptoms in primary care. Exclusion criteria were moderate or greater risk of suicide, severe brain injury, or alcohol/substance use at a level that required immediate treatment. Assessments were completed at baseline, posttreatment/postminimal contact control, and at 8-week and 6-month posttreatment follow-up points. Primary measures were the PTSD Symptom Scale-Interview and the PTSD Checklist-Stressor-Specific. PE-PC resulted in larger reduction in PTSD severity and general distress than the minimal contact control. Delayed treatment evidenced medium to large effects comparable to the immediate intervention group. Treatment benefits persisted through the 6-month follow-up of the study. PE-PC delivered in integrated primary care is effective for the treatment of PTSD and co-occurring symptoms and may help reduce barriers and stigma found in specialty care settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of Healthy Military Service Members in the United States and Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    different based on deployment status and exposure to an austere environment where antimalarial agents with MRSA/MSSA activity are used. However, the...adequate hygiene practices. Further, these deployments are often to geo- graphic regions that require antimalarial chemoprophy- laxis. The use of...genes. Methods Participants Two populations of healthy active duty service members (101 non-deployed personnel in San Antonio, Texas, USA and 100

  8. Supportive Environments for Physical Activity, Community Action and Policy in Eight EU Member States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruetten, Alfred; Frahsa, Annika; Engbers, Luuk

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A multi-level theoretical framework of physical activity (PA) promotion that addresses supportive environments, PA behavior, community action and PA promoting policies is related to research and development in an international comparative study. METHODS: Most-different and most...... on the interplay of environment, PA behavior, community action and policies appears to be working across most different countries. Comprehensive systems of PA infrastructures are interlinked with relatively high levels of PA prevalence. These countries implement comprehensive national policies on PA promotion...... and show a positive perception of related local governments' engagement. Less comprehensive systems of infrastructures interplay with lower levels of PA prevalence, less community action and fewer policies. Differences between similar cases are linked to country-specific contexts. CONCLUSIONS: Framework...

  9. Due diligence duties for an environmental liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebsch, M.

    2000-04-01

    Jurisdiction turned out well to create a basic ruling for due diligence duties. These due diligence duties are high standards for the law of torts (outside of contracts) within the Austrian civil law and represent a liability-extension for the holder of the source of danger. They establish an action for injunction in particular for preventing (further) damages. Therewith due diligence duties get a general sense in the range of a civil law for environmental liability. The responsible holder of a danger zone will therefore influence his way of acting to protect potential victims and the environment. The burden of proof is on the plaintiff (victims) under the Civil Code. Victims have specific sources of danger including high endangering special facilities in their argumentation with the so-called prima-facie-proof or first-appearance-proof. A turning back of the presentation of evidence to the polluter is wrong. The polluter himself has a continuing liability for dangerous activities and his clerks in the case of an extremely high danger of damage. All due diligence duties can be arranged in three areas: in information-, danger-avoidance- and danger-prevention-duties. The determination of range and essence of the duties has to be adjusted to each individual case. The range of the specific danger area is the essential link. The intensity of due diligence duties is increasing with the size of danger in the way of a movable system depending on the protected interest. Due diligence duties have to be kept within reasonable limits with two criterions: necessarity and demand. Proportionality of actions is a third criterion to avoid exaggeration of due diligence duties to obtain an effective protection for victims including the environment. (author)

  10. Neck and shoulder muscle activity and posture among helicopter pilots and crew-members during military helicopter flight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Chreiteh, Shadi Samir

    2016-01-01

    for normalization of EMG (MVE). Neck posture of pilots and crew-members was monitored and pain intensity of neck, shoulder, and back was recorded. Mean muscle activity for UNE was ∼10% MVE and significantly higher than TRA and SCM, and SCM was significantly lower than TRA. There was no significant difference...... between AB-NVG and AB+NVG. Muscle activity in the UNE was significantly higher during SAR+NVG than AB-NVG. Sortie time (%) with non-neutral neck posture for SAR+NVG and AB-NVG was: 80.4%, 74.5% (flexed), 55.5%, 47.9% (rotated), 4.5%, 3.7% (lateral flexed). Neck pain intensity increased significantly from...

  11. The IAEA Activities on Supporting Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals and Capacity Building in Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, M.R.A.; Haji-Saeid, M.; Zaknun, J.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA activities on supporting development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are focused on identified radionuclides that can be produced in large quantities and making use of carrier molecules which can be synthesized locally or procured from commercial sources or already available in MS from other related programs. The main emphasis is on 90 Y and 177 Lu based products, which cover the hard beta energy and soft beta energy range respectively, and also since both these radionuclides can be produced in large quantities with very high specific activity and high radionuclidic purity. The services to MS are provided through implementing Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Cooperation (TC) projects, technical meetings and regional training courses in addition to documenting practically useful technical information related to these products though IAEA publications. The CRP is a group activity in which nearly 15 participants from as many countries come together to work towards an identified objective. Two of the completed CRPs in this area are: (i) Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals (2002-2005) that focussed on the development of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' techniques for evaluating new generation therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; and (ii) Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides (2004-2007) that addressed technologies for 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 188 W/ 188 Re generators and which can be easily adapted by MS. The participants in the CRP on 'Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals' used the somatostatin analogue, DOTATATE as the lead molecule for developing radiopharmaceuticals and testing the efficacy by in vitro biological assays and animal biodistribution studies. A significant outcome of the CRP was that 177 Lu-DOTATATE therapy is now practised in several of the CRP participating countries including Brazil, India, Italy, and Poland. The major outcome of the CRP on 'Development of generator

  12. Impact of childhood maltreatment on physical health-related quality of life in U.S. active duty military personnel and combat veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aversa, Laura H; Lemmer, Jennifer; Nunnink, Sarah; McLay, Robert N; Baker, Dewleen G

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have found an association between childhood maltreatment (CM) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and to a lesser extent have considered whether psychiatric symptoms may explain the relationship. This study aimed to further our understanding of the link between CM and HRQoL by testing whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and physical HRQoL. Mediation models were examined in a sample of male Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) active duty and combat veterans (n=249). PTSD and depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between CM and overall physical HRQoL, as well as participation in daily activities due to physical health, bodily pain, and social functioning. Mediation of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and physical and social functioning by depression and PTSD symptoms may lend support to neurobiological hypotheses that childhood maltreatment sensitizes the nervous system and after repeated trauma may lead to the development of psychiatric symptoms, which have a major impact on morbidity and mortality. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. An experience of science teaching among members for indigenous communities: a need for open activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Helena Sasseron Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This a report of an indigenous teachers' trainning experience undertaken by the São Paulo State Education Secretariat for Terena, Kaingang, Krenak, Guarani e Tupi-Guarani ethnic groups. Bilingual and intercultural teaching is an old demand and has been made obligatory through the I996-Brazilian Education Legislation (LDB. The planning for an Indigenous Teachers Trainning Course started in 1999 and the first course was held in 2002. Sixty Indians graduated the 2,220-hour course - 360h of which were face-to-face teaching -In September 2003. The course was based on themes of interest of the students among which: garbage disposal, biodiversity, life cycles, solar system and electricity. The teaching group faced problemas when it chose to present non Indigenous concepts about the universe and were questioned by the students. They presented their interpretation of scientific concepts. These were the most productive and successful teaching/learning moments as they were dedicated to investigate problems according to the students' own perceptions and value system. The building of concepts and intellectual I development were the highlights of the activities and representative of the Indigenous world vision and their way of building scientific knowledge based on their own culture

  14. Template synthesis and characterization of biologically active transition metal complexes comprising 14-membered tetraazamacrocyclic ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DHARMPAL SINGH

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of complexes of the type [M(C28H24N4X2], whereM = Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II, X = Cl–, NO3–, CH3COO– and (C28H24N4 corresponds to the tetradentate macrocyclic ligand, were synthe¬sized by template condensation of 1,8-diaminonaphthalene and diacetyl in the presence of divalent metal salts in methanolic medium. The complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, conductance and magnetic measurements, as well as by UV/Vis, NMR, IR and MS spectroscopy. The low values of the molar conductance indicate non-electrolyte type of complexes. Based on these spectral data, a distorted octahedral geometry may be proposed for all of these complexes. All the synthesized macrocyclic complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against some pathogenic bacterial strains, viz Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The MIC values shown by the complexes against these bacterial strains were compared with the MIC shown by the standard antibiotics linezolid and cefaclor.

  15. The IAEA Activities on Supporting Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals and Capacity Building in Member States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, M R.A.; Haji-Saeid, M; Zaknun, J; Ramamoorthy, N [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    The IAEA activities on supporting development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are focused on identified radionuclides that can be produced in large quantities and making use of carrier molecules which can be synthesized locally or procured from commercial sources or already available in MS from other related programs. The main emphasis is on {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu based products, which cover the hard beta energy and soft beta energy range respectively, and also since both these radionuclides can be produced in large quantities with very high specific activity and high radionuclidic purity. The services to MS are provided through implementing Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Cooperation (TC) projects, technical meetings and regional training courses in addition to documenting practically useful technical information related to these products though IAEA publications. The CRP is a group activity in which nearly 15 participants from as many countries come together to work towards an identified objective. Two of the completed CRPs in this area are: (i) Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals (2002-2005) that focussed on the development of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' techniques for evaluating new generation therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; and (ii) Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides (2004-2007) that addressed technologies for {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators and which can be easily adapted by MS. The participants in the CRP on 'Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals' used the somatostatin analogue, DOTATATE as the lead molecule for developing radiopharmaceuticals and testing the efficacy by in vitro biological assays and animal biodistribution studies. A significant outcome of the CRP was that {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE therapy is now practised in several of the CRP participating countries including Brazil, India, Italy, and Poland. The major outcome of the CRP

  16. Assessment of Chiropractic Treatment for Low Back Pain, Military Readiness and Smoking Cessation in Military Active Duty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    on activities of daily living, postural/ ergonomic advice; and mobilization. HVLA manipulation involves a single load or impulse “thrust” to body...providers were physician assistants (28%), family practice physicians (18%), physical therapists (16%) or aides (12%), nurse practitioners (9%), or...advice for activities of daily living, postural/ ergonomic advice. Medi- Figure 1. Flow diagram of participant screening, treat- ment allocation, and

  17. Duty periods for establishing eligibility for health care. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its medical regulations concerning eligibility for health care to re-establish the definitions of "active military, naval, or air service,'' "active duty,'' and "active duty for training.'' These definitions were deleted in 1996; however, we believe that all duty periods should be defined in part 17 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) to ensure proper determination of eligibility for VA health care. We are also providing a more complete definition of "inactive duty training.''

  18. Number and Severity of Type 2 Diabetes among Family Members Are Associated with Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Oyare Amuta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AimA binary measurement of type 2 diabetes (T2D has been found not to influence behaviors. We aimed to examine the influence of other measures of family history such as number of relatives, genetic closeness of relatives, and severity of T2D of family members on nutrition and physical activity behaviors among college students.MethodsStudents across four colleges in Texas were sampled. Multiple linear regression models, controlling for covariates, were used to model results. Cross-sectional data were used.ResultsMore number of relatives with T2D was associated with vegetable consumption (β = 0.131, p = 0.007 and exercise (β = 0.129, p = 0.037. Having relatives with severe T2D was associated with vegetable consumption (β = 0.157, p = 0.002 and exercise (β = 106, p = 0.027. Closer genetic relationship with someone with T2D was associated with increased vegetable consumption (β = 0.107, p = 0.023 and exercise (β = 0.096, p = 0.047.ConclusionIt is likely that the severe complications that may accompany the relatives T2D or having an immediate family member living with T2D may in fact motivate other family members without T2D to modify their attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge about T2D, thus encourage health-protective behaviors.

  19. Neck and shoulder muscle activity and posture among helicopter pilots and crew-members during military helicopter flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Chreiteh, Shadi Samir; Olsen, Henrik Baare; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling; Boyle, Eleanor; Søgaard, Karen; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain among helicopter pilots and crew-members is common. This study quantified the physical workload on neck and shoulder muscles using electromyography (EMG) measures during helicopter flight. Nine standardized sorties were performed, encompassing: cruising from location A to location B (AB) and performing search and rescue (SAR). SAR was performed with Night Vision Goggles (NVG), while AB was performed with (AB+NVG) and without NVG (AB-NVG). EMG was recorded for: trapezius (TRA), upper neck extensors (UNE), and sternocleido-mastoid (SCM). Maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) were performed for normalization of EMG (MVE). Neck posture of pilots and crew-members was monitored and pain intensity of neck, shoulder, and back was recorded. Mean muscle activity for UNE was ∼10% MVE and significantly higher than TRA and SCM, and SCM was significantly lower than TRA. There was no significant difference between AB-NVG and AB+NVG. Muscle activity in the UNE was significantly higher during SAR+NVG than AB-NVG. Sortie time (%) with non-neutral neck posture for SAR+NVG and AB-NVG was: 80.4%, 74.5% (flexed), 55.5%, 47.9% (rotated), 4.5%, 3.7% (lateral flexed). Neck pain intensity increased significantly from pre- (0.7±1.3) to post-sortie (1.6±1.9) for pilots (p=0.028). If sustained, UNE activity of ∼10% MVE is high, and implies a risk for neck disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 16654 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ...'' with heat and steam various materials containing carbon, including but not limited to coal (including... removed from the raw material by moderate heat treatment. The activated carbon created by chemical... had adsorbed materials removed from their pore structure after use through the application of heat...

  1. Laterally coupled distributed feedback lasers emitting at 2 μm with quantum dash active region and high-duty-cycle etched semiconductor gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatryfonos, Konstantinos; Saladukha, Dzianis; Merghem, Kamel; Joshi, Siddharth; Lelarge, Francois; Bouchoule, Sophie; Kazazis, Dimitrios; Guilet, Stephane; Le Gratiet, Luc; Ochalski, Tomasz J.; Huyet, Guillaume; Martinez, Anthony; Ramdane, Abderrahim

    2017-02-01

    Single-mode diode lasers on an InP(001) substrate have been developed using InAs/In0.53Ga0.47As quantum dash (Qdash) active regions and etched lateral Bragg gratings. The lasers have been designed to operate at wavelengths near 2 μm and exhibit a threshold current of 65 mA for a 600 μm long cavity, and a room temperature continuous wave output power per facet >5 mW. Using our novel growth approach based on the low ternary In0.53Ga0.47As barriers, we also demonstrate ridge-waveguide lasers emitting up to 2.1 μm and underline the possibilities for further pushing the emission wavelength out towards longer wavelengths with this material system. By introducing experimentally the concept of high-duty-cycle lateral Bragg gratings, a side mode suppression ratio of >37 dB has been achieved, owing to an appreciably increased grating coupling coefficient of κ ˜ 40 cm-1. These laterally coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) lasers combine the advantage of high and well-controlled coupling coefficients achieved in conventional DFB lasers, with the regrowth-free fabrication process of lateral gratings, and exhibit substantially lower optical losses compared to the conventional metal-based LC-DFB lasers.

  2. Pilot study to determine interest of adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel in participation in a weight control program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Asma; Roberts, Susan B; Young, Andrew J; McGraw, Susan; Dallal, Gerard E; Das, Sai Krupa

    2014-03-01

    Adult civilian dependents of active duty military personnel (ADMP) may play a central role in influencing the home food environment and the risk of overweight and obesity in American Warfighters and military families. However, there is no information on whether this group would be receptive to weight control programs. We conducted a survey to determine the level of interest of adult civilian dependents of ADMP in participating in a group weight control program. Subjects were a convenience sample of 191 adult civilian dependents of ADMP (94% women, 6% men) based in Massachusetts and aged 33.8 ± 8.4 years, body mass index 25.5 ± 5.5 kg/m(2). Overall, there was a significant effect of body mass index on interest in program participation (p = 0.004). Eighty five percent of overweight participants and 100% of obese participants reported being Moderately Likely or Very Likely to participate in a provided weight control program. In overweight and obese survey respondents there was no significant effect of ADMP rank on interest in program participation (p = 0.34). These findings suggest that overweight and obese adult civilian dependents of ADMP may be very receptive targets for programs to control overweight and obesity in military families. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Development of FGI-106 as a broad-spectrum therapeutic with activity against members of the family Bunyaviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci R Smith

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Darci R Smith1, Monica Ogg1, Aura Garrison1, Abdul Yunus2, Anna Honko1, Josh Johnson1, Gene Olinger1, Lisa E Hensley1, Michael S Kinch1United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRII D, Fort Detrick, MD, USA; 2Functional Genetics, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, USAAbstract: The family Bunyaviridae is a diverse group of negative-strand RNA viruses that infect a wide range of arthropod vectors and animal hosts. Based on the continuing need for new therapeutics to treat bunyavirus infections, we evaluated the potential efficacy of FGI-106, a small-molecular compound that previously demonstrated activity against different RNA viruses. FGI-106 displayed substantial antiviral activity in cell-based assays of different bunyavirus family members, including Asian and South American hantaviruses (Hantaan virus and Andes virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, and Rift Valley fever virus. The pharmacokinetic profile of FGI-106 revealed sufficient exposure of the drug to critical target organs (lung, liver, kidney, and spleen, which are frequently the sites of bunyavirus replication. Consistent with these findings, FGI-106 treatment delivered via intraperitoneal injection prior to virus exposure was sufficient to delay the onset of Rift Valley fever virus infection in mouse-based models and to enhance survival in the face of an otherwise lethal infection. Altogether, these results suggest a potential opportunity for the use of FGI-106 to treat infections by members of the family Bunyaviridae.Keywords: Rift Valley fever virus, bunyavirus, hantavirus, antiviral, therapeutic

  4. Chest radiography and thoracic computed tomography findings in children who have family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzum, Kazim; Karahan, Okkes I.; Dogan, Sukru; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Topcu, Faik

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The chest radiography and TCT findings in children who had contacted with adult family members with active pulmonary tuberculosis were compared. The contributions of thoracic computed tomography to the diagnosis of tuberculosis were investigated. Methods and material: The children who were 0-16 years old (n=173) and children of families with an adult member which was diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated. The children were considered in two groups based on the absence (n=125) or presence (n=48) of complaints and/or ambiguous symptoms such as lack of appetite, mild cough, sweating, history of lung infection, low body weight and those with suspicious chest radiography findings (12 cases) were included in this study. Asymptomatic patients (n=125) did not undergo TCT. Patients who had positive PPD skin tests only received isoniazid. If the TCT demonstrated enlarged lymph nodes or parenchymal lesions, minimally active pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed and antituberculous treatment was given. Results and discussions: TCT revealed lymph node enlargement or parenchymal lesions in 39 children (81.2%). Of the 12 children whose CXRs revealed suspicious lymph node enlargement and/or infiltration, five had normal findings in TCT whereas the initial findings were confirmed in the remaining seven. These data suggest that there is a correlation between the presence of ambiguous symptoms in exposed children and TCT findings; chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield parallel findings. All the patients who received anti-TB treatment were resolved in the control examinations. Conclusion: In this study there is a correlation between presence of ambiguous symptoms and TCT findings, but the chest radiography and TCT findings do not yield harmony in exposed children with ambiguous symptoms (suspicious tuberculosis cases). These observations should be considered in children with symptoms similar to those of exposed children, but with no definite history of

  5. TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK) induced by RANKL negatively regulates osteoclasts survival and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengrui; Wang, Yiping; Deng, Lianfu; Chen, Wei; Li, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Osteoclasts are the principle bone-resorbing cells. Precise control of balanced osteoclast activity is indispensable for bone homeostasis. Osteoclast activation mediated by RANK-TRAF6 axis has been clearly identified. However, a negative regulation-machinery in osteoclast remains unclear. TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator (TANK) is induced by about 10 folds during osteoclastogenesis, according to a genome-wide analysis of gene expression before and after osteoclast maturation, and confirmed by western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) transduced with lentivirus carrying tank-shRNA were induced to form osteoclast in the presence of RANKL and M-CSF. Tank expression was downregulated by 90% by Tank-shRNA, which is confirmed by western blot. Compared with wild-type (WT) cells, osteoclastogenesis of Tank-silenced BMMs was increased, according to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain on day 5 and day 7. Number of bone resorption pits by Tank-silenced osteoclasts was increased by 176% compared with WT cells, as shown by wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) stain and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) analysis. Survival rate of Tank-silenced mature osteoclast is also increased. However, acid production of Tank-knockdown cells was not changed compared with control cells. IκBα phosphorylation is increased in tank-silenced cells, indicating that TANK may negatively regulate NF-κB activity in osteoclast. In conclusion, Tank, whose expression is increased during osteoclastogenesis, inhibits osteoclast formation, activity and survival, by regulating NF-κB activity and c-FLIP expression. Tank enrolls itself in a negative feedback loop in bone resorption. These results may provide means for therapeutic intervention in diseases of excessive bone resorption.

  6. New 15-membered tetraaza (N4) macrocyclic ligand and its transition metal complexes: Spectral, magnetic, thermal and anticancer activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Boraey, Hanaa A.; EL-Gammal, Ohyla A.

    2015-03-01

    Novel tetraamidemacrocyclic 15-membered ligand [L] i.e. naphthyl-dibenzo[1,5,9,12]tetraazacyclopentadecine-6,10,11,15-tetraoneand its transition metal complexes with Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Ru(III) and Pd(II) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectral, thermal as well as magnetic and molar conductivity measurements. On the basis of analytical, spectral (IR, MS, UV-Vis, 1H NMR and EPR) and thermal studies distorted octahedral or square planar geometry has been proposed for the complexes. The antitumor activity of the synthesized ligand and some complexes against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) and human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (HepG2) has been studied. The complexes (IC50 = 2.27-2.7, 8.33-31.1 μg/mL, respectively) showed potent antitumor activity, towards the former cell lines comparable with their ligand (IC50 = 13, 26 μg/mL, respectively). The results show that the activity of the ligand towards breast cancer cell line becomes more pronounced and significant when coordinated to the metal ion.

  7. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.21 Less than 24-hour duty. An employee who is required to be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Less than 24-hour duty. 785.21 Section 785.21 Labor...

  8. Molecular Docking Analysis of Ginger Active Compound on Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Subfamily V Member 1 (TRPV1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifteen Aprila Fajrin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ginger had been reported to ameliorate painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN in an animal model. Gingerol and shogaol were active compounds of ginger that potentially act on transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1, a key receptor in PDN. This study aims to predict the binding of gingerol and shogaol to TRPV1 using an in silico model. The ligands of the docking study were 3 chemical compounds of each gingerol and shogaol, i.e. 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, 6-gingerol, 8 gingerol and 10-gingerol. Capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, was used as a native ligand. The TRPV1 structure was taken from Protein Data Bank (ID 3J9J. The docking analysis was performed using Autodock Vina. The result showed that among the ginger active compounds, 6-shogaol had the strongest binding energy (-7.10 kcal/mol to TRPV1. The 6-shogaol lacked the potential hydrogen bond to Ile265 of TRPV1 protein, which capsacin had. However, it's binding energy towards TRPV1 was not significantly different compared to capsaicin. Therefore, 6-shogaol had potential to be developed as a treatment for PDN.

  9. Inhibition of transmembrane member 16A calcium-activated chloride channels by natural flavonoids contributes to flavonoid anticancer effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Honglin; Zhang, Huiran; Liu, Yani; Huo, Lifang; Jia, Zhanfeng; Xue, Yucong; Sun, Xiaorun; Zhang, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Natural flavonoids are ubiquitous in dietary plants and vegetables and have been proposed to have antiviral, antioxidant, cardiovascular protective and anticancer effects. Transmembrane member 16A (TMEM16A)-encoded Ca 2+ -activated Cl - channels play a variety of physiological roles in many organs and tissues. Overexpression of TMEM16A is also believed to be associated with cancer progression. Therefore, inhibition of TMEM16A current may be a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, we screened a broad spectrum of flavonoids for their inhibitory activities on TMEM16A currents. A whole-cell patch technique was used to record the currents. The BrdU assay and transwell technique were used to investigate cell proliferation and migration. At a concentration of 100 μM, 10 of 20 compounds caused significant (>50%) inhibition of TMEM16A currents. The four most potent compounds - luteolin, galangin, quercetin and fisetin - had IC 50 values ranging from 4.5 to 15 μM). To examine the physiological relevance of these findings, we also studied the effects of these flavonoids on endogenous TMEM16A currents in addition to cell proliferation and migration in LA795 cancer cells. Among the flavonoids tested, we detected a highly significant correlation between TMEM16A current inhibition and cell proliferation or reduction of migration. This study demonstrates that flavonoids inhibit TMEM16A currents and suggests that flavonoids could have anticancer effects via this mechanism. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Propionibacterium acnes overabundance and natural killer group 2 member D system activation in corpus-dominant lymphocytic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalban-Arques, Ana; Wurm, Philipp; Trajanoski, Slave; Schauer, Silvia; Kienesberger, Sabine; Halwachs, Bettina; Högenauer, Christoph; Langner, Cord; Gorkiewicz, Gregor

    2016-12-01

    Corpus-dominant lymphocytic gastritis (LyG) is characterized by CD8 + T-cell infiltration of the stomach epithelium by a so far uncharacterized mechanism. Although Helicobacter pylori is typically undetectable in LyG, patients respond to H. pylori antibiotic eradication therapy, suggesting a non-H. pylori microbial trigger for the disease. Comparative microbiota analysis of specimens from LyG, H. pylori gastritis and healthy controls precluded involvement of H. pylori in LyG but identified Propionibacterium acnes as a possible disease trigger. In addition, the natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) system and the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-15 are significantly upregulated in the gastric mucosa of LyG patients, and gastric epithelial cells respond to microbe-derived stimuli, including live P. acnes and the microbial products short-chain fatty acids, with induction of NKG2D ligands. In contrast, H. pylori infection does not activate or even repress NKG2D ligands. Together, our findings identify P. acnes as a possible causative agent for LyG, which is dependent on the NKG2D system and IL-15 activation. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Solute carrier protein family 11 member 1 (Slc11a1) activation efficiently inhibits Leishmania donovani survival in host macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nisha; Gedda, Mallikarjuna Rao; Tiwari, Neeraj; Singh, Suya P; Bajpai, Surabhi; Singh, Rakesh K

    2017-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar), a life threatening disease caused by L. donovani , is a latent threat to more than 147 million people living in disease endemic South East Asia region of the Indian subcontinent. The therapeutic option to control leishmanial infections are very limited, and at present comprise only two drugs, an antifungal amphotericin B and an antitumor miltefosine, which are also highly vulnerable for parasitic resistance. Therefore, identification and development of alternate control measures is an exigent requirement to control leishmanial infections. In this study, we report that functionally induced expression of solute carrier protein family 11 member 1 ( Slc11a1), a transmembrane divalent cationic transporter recruited on the surface of phagolysosomes after phagocytosis of parasites, effectively inhibits Leishmania donovani growth in host macrophages. Further, the increased Slc11a1 functionality also resulted in increased production of NOx, TNF-α and IL-12 by activated macrophages. The findings of this study signify the importance of interplay between Slc11a1 expression and macrophages activation that can be effectively used to control of Leishmania growth and survival.

  12. Determining your duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, J

    1989-04-01

    This issue's discussion has two goals. First, we shall examine the reasons clinical personnel gravitate to the Kantian concept of duty. Second, we shall examine a technique used within Kantian theory that will help you decide when an ethical dilemma obligates you to act regardless of the consequences.

  13. The Duty to Recognize Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2012-01-01

    On Taylor and Honneth's theories of recognition and whether one can derive a "duty to recognize Culture" from these......On Taylor and Honneth's theories of recognition and whether one can derive a "duty to recognize Culture" from these...

  14. 19 CFR 122.75b - Electronic manifest requirement for crew members and non-crew members onboard commercial aircraft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic manifest requirement for crew members... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Documents Required for Clearance and Permission To Depart; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial...

  15. Guilt, censure, and concealment of active smoking status among cancer patients and family members after diagnosis: a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Wook; Park, Jong Hyock; Kim, So Young; Park, Eal Whan; Yang, Hyung Kook; Ahn, Eunmi; Park, Seon Mee; Lee, Young Joon; Lim, Myong Cheol; Seo, Hong Gwan

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to identify the prevalence of feelings of guilt, censure, and concealment of smoking status among cancer patients and their family members who continued to smoke after the patient's diagnosis. Among 990 patient-family member dyads, 45 patients and 173 family members who continued to smoke for at least 1 month after the patients' diagnoses were administered questions examining feelings of guilt, censure, and smoking concealment. Most patients who continued to smoke reported experiencing feelings of guilt toward their families (75.6%) and censure from their family members (77.8%), and many concealed their smoking from their family members (44.4%) or healthcare professionals (46.7%). Family members who continued to smoke also reported feelings of guilt with respect to the patient (63.6%) and that the patient was critical of them (68.9%), and many concealed their smoking from the patient (28.5%) or healthcare professionals (9.3%). Patients' feeling of guilt was associated with concealment of smoking from family members (55.9% vs. 10.0%) or health care professionals (55.9% vs. 20.0%). Family members who reported feeling guilty (36.5% vs. 16.3%) or censured (34.5% vs. 16.7%) were more likely to conceal smoking from patients. Many patients and family members continue to smoke following cancer diagnosis, and the majority of them experience feelings of guilt and censure, which can lead to the concealment of smoking status from families or health care professionals. Feelings of guilt, censure, and concealment of smoking should be considered in the development and implementation of smoking cessation programs for cancer patients and family members. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Military service absences and family members' mental health: A timeline followback assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Aubrey J; Margolin, Gayla

    2015-08-01

    Although military service, and particularly absence due to deployment, has been linked to risk for depression and anxiety among some spouses and children of active duty service members, there is limited research to explain the heterogeneity in family members' reactions to military service stressors. The current investigation introduces the Timeline Followback Military Family Interview (TFMFI) as a clinically useful strategy to collect detailed time-linked information about the service member's absences. Two dimensions of parent absence--the extent to which absences coincide with important family events and cumulative time absent--were tested as potential risks to family members' mental health. Data from 70 mother-adolescent pairs revealed that the number of important family events missed by the service member was linked to elevated youth symptoms of depression, even when accounting for the number of deployments and cumulative duration of the service member's absence. However, youth who reported more frequent contact with the service member during absences were buffered from the effects of extensive absence. Mothers' symptoms were associated with the cumulative duration of the service members' time away, but not with family events missed by the service member. These results identify circumstances that increase the risk for mental health symptoms associated with military family life. The TFMFI provides an interview-based strategy for clinicians wishing to understand military family members' lived experience during periods of service-member absence. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Analysis of the active site mechanism of Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I: a member of the phospholipase D superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Stefan; Comeaux, Evan Q.; Jafari, Nauzanene; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W.; van Waardenburg, Robert C.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) is a member of the phospholipase D superfamily and hydrolyzes 3′phospho-DNA adducts via two conserved catalytic histidines, one acting as the lead nucleophile and the second as a general acid/base. Substitution of the second histidine specifically to arginine contributes to the neurodegenerative disease SCAN1. We investigated the catalytic role of this histidine in the yeast protein (His432) using a combination of X-ray crystallography, biochemistry, yeast genetics and theoretical chemistry. The structures of wild type Tdp1 and His432Arg both show a phosphorylated form of the nucleophilic histidine that is not observed in the structure of His432Asn. The phosphohistidine is stabilized in the His432Arg structure by the guanidinium group that also restricts access of a nucleophilic water molecule to the Tdp1-DNA intermediate. Biochemical analyses confirm that His432Arg forms an observable and unique Tdp1-DNA adduct during catalysis. Substitution of His432 by Lys does not affect catalytic activity or yeast phenotype, but substitution with Asn, Gln, Leu, Ala, Ser and Thr all result in severely compromised enzymes and Top1-camptothecin dependent lethality. Surprisingly, His432Asn did not show a stable covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate which suggests another catalytic defect. Theoretical calculations revealed that the defect resides in the nucleophilic histidine and that the pKa of this histidine is crucially dependent upon the second histidine and the incoming phosphate of the substrate. This represents a unique example of substrate-activated catalysis that applies to the entire phospholipase D superfamily. PMID:22155078

  18. Status of nuclear data needed for radiation therapy and existing data development activities in Member States. Summary report of a consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherov, N.P.

    1997-01-01

    The present report contains the summary of the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on the ''Status of nuclear data needed for radiation therapy and existing data development activities in Member States'' held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 9-11 December 1996. The present activities on nuclear data for radiotherapy are summarized in Member States, the present status of nuclear data for photon, neutron and proton therapy is reviewed and topics which are not presently covered by other institutions are identified. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  19. Characterization of active members in C and N cycles in the subsurface environment of the Witwatersrand Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, M. R.; Lau, C. M.; Tetteh, G.; Snyder, L.; Kieft, T. L.; Lollar, B. S.; Li, L.; Maphanga, S.; van Heerden, E.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    methanotrophs were found three times more than Type I methanotrophs. A pmoA gene sequence represents 42% of the library matches only and is identical to a putative protein sequence annotated on Ca. D. audaxviator genome, but further analysis is required to validate its candidature of methanotrophy. The cluster of mcrA gene sequences is related to a novel group of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME) defined by environmental sequences. 2011 July samples from the same borehole revealed an absence of Firmicutes. Two β-Proteobacterial sequences dominated the bacterial 16S rDNA clone library, accounting for 54% and 25%. The first 16S rRNA clone library for the region confirmed a complete lack of Firmicutes with active Proteobacteria (71% α-, 17% β- and 6% γ-Proteobacteria). Only 3% of the active community is confidently inferred as methylotrophs while 22% belongs to N2 fixer Rhizobium sp. which has been demonstrated to stimulate methanotrophic growth and 28% is related to Polymorphum gilvum, which is known for n-alkane degradation. Active members responsible for CH4 metabolism will be supported by presenting the results of archaeal 16S rRNA, pmoA, mcrA and nitrogenase gene diversities. The lack of Firmicutes in July samples could be attributed to collection methods: different filter membrane, faster flowrate but shorter sampling duration, and less total volume of water filtered.

  20. Vigorous physical activity impairs myocardial function in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and in mutation positive family members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saberniak, Jørg; Hasselberg, Nina E; Borgquist, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    patients and 45 mutation-positive family members. Athletes were defined as subjects with ≥4 h vigorous exercise/week [≥1440 metabolic equivalents (METs × minutes/week)] during a minimum of 6 years. Athlete definition was fulfilled in 37/110 (34%) subjects. We assessed right ventricular (RV) and left...

  1. Battery Ownership Model - Medium Duty HEV Battery Leasing & Standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Ken; Smith, Kandler; Cosgrove, Jon; Prohaska, Robert; Pesaran, Ahmad; Paul, James; Wiseman, Marc

    2015-12-01

    Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, this milestone report focuses on the economics of leasing versus owning batteries for medium-duty hybrid electric vehicles as well as various battery standardization scenarios. The work described in this report was performed by members of the Energy Storage Team and the Vehicle Simulation Team in NREL's Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center along with members of the Vehicles Analysis Team at Ricardo.

  2. Climate Change and Individual Duties

    OpenAIRE

    Augustin Fragnière

    2016-01-01

    Tackling climate change has often been considered the responsibility of national governments. But do individuals also have a duty to act in the face of this problem? In particular do they have a duty to adopt a greener lifestyle or to press their government to act? This review critically examines the arguments provided for and against such duties in the relevant philosophic literature. It first discusses the problem of causal inefficacy—namely the fact that individual greenhouse gas emissions...

  3. General regulatory guide for the operator staff on duty, II-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This, second chapter of regulations includes the rights and duties of the operator's staff: head of the team, operator on duty, mechanic of the system, electrician, reactor mechanic, operation dosimetryst on duty. Procedures and obligations are described for each individual staff member on duty during preparations for reactor start-up, regular operation at nominal power, approach to preset power level, change of the operating regime without shutdown, approach to a certain power level of the xenon poisoned core, stop reactor operation and bringing the reactor into shutdown state [sr

  4. [The Royal College of Medicine, the apothecaries and the unlawful pharmaceutical activity of members of clergy, in Lorraine in the second part of the XVIIIth century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrude, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Every regular text relative to pharmaceutical activities is very precise about the prohibition of "public" exercise of pharmacy, and generally all medical activity, by members of clergy. However, the examination of archives demonstrates that violations of the law are constant, in spite of judicial procedures and sentences. Secular clergy is certainly very implicated, but its activity of preparation and distribution of drugs seems to be relatively discreet. Oppositely, the members of regular clergy open almost community pharmacies in towns and are competitors with apothecaries. Among them, in Lorraine, the most important are Jesuits and sisters in charge of charity houses and hospitals. Jesuits have no diplomas but their installations are very correctly organized. On the contrary, sisters are often poorly proper in pharmacy and their dispensaries appear to be badly managed with drugs of mediocre quality and poorly stored.

  5. Regulatory Inspection of Nuclear Power Plants in NEA Member Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Based on the replies to a questionnaire, this report gives a description and comparative evaluation of the regulatory inspection activities in several NEA Member countries. The questionnaire which was circulated to all Member countries requested details on the organisation, system, scope and objectives of nuclear regulatory inspection and the effort required throughout all stages of the life of a nuclear plant including the use of independent bodies or consultants. Additional information was requested on the documentation concerned with regulatory inspections, incident and accident reporting procedures, and the duties, powers and bases for recruitment of regulatory personnel with the object of covering all related aspects. However, because of the differences in national practices and perhaps in the interpretation of the questionnaire, it proved to be extremely difficult to make an evaluation and comparison of inspection activities and effort involved in these Member countries. This report, which includes a section on the nuclear power programme in Member countries, should therefore only be regarded as an initial review but it provides a useful contribution to the exchange of experience and views on regulatory inspection practices

  6. Resident duty hours in Canada: a survey and national statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Mark F; Shrichand, Pankaj; Maniate, Jerry M

    2014-01-01

    Physicians in general, and residents in particular, are adapting to duty schedules in which they have fewer continuous work hours; however, there are no Canadian guidelines on duty hours restrictions. To better inform resident duty hour policy in Canada, we set out to prepare a set of recommendations that would draw upon evidence reported in the literature and reflect the experiences of resident members of the Canadian Association of Internes and Residents (CAIR). A survey was prepared and distributed electronically to all resident members of CAIR. A total of 1796 eligible residents participated in the survey. Of those who responded, 38% (601) reported that they felt they could safely provide care for up to 16 continuous hours, and 20% (315) said that 12 continuous hours was the maximum period during which they could safely provide care (n=1592). Eighty-two percent (1316) reported their perception that the quality of care they had provided suffered because of the number of consecutive hours worked (n=1598). Only 52% (830) had received training in handover (n=1594); those who had received such training reported that it was commonly provided through informal modelling. On the basis of these data and the existing literature, CAIR recommends that resident duty hours be managed in a way that does not endanger the health of residents or patients; does not impair education; is flexible; and does not violate ethical or legal standards. Further, residents should be formally trained in handover skills and alternative duty hour models.

  7. 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook. Appendix G: Frequency and Percentage Distributions for Variables in the Survey Analysis Files

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wright, Laverne

    2000-01-01

    ... A) was administered from August 1999 through December 1999, It was fielded to a nonproportional stratified, single stage random sample of 66,040 DoD Service members DoD and the Coast Guard, The (weighted...

  8. Fitness for duty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.; Matney, C.

    1991-01-01

    A Fitness For Duty training program was developed to satisfy the requirements of the NRC, 10 CFR 26, 10 CFR 707 and to meet requirements at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Interactive videodisc technology was selected as the training medium using the TenCore authoring language. Computer-based training was chosen because of the large number of trainees, the advantages of the reduced overall cost, and the increased trainee retention of course material compared to traditional instruction. The resulting training program utilizes extensive role playing exercises in which employees and supervisors are exposed to real life situations. Extensive interactions by the trainees are required in that they must answer questions concerning the behav ior of individuals, random and for-cause drug testing, and the employee assistance program. Feedback is given in each case. Emphasis is placed on recognition of deteriorating job performance

  9. Analyzing the environmental and resource pressures from European energy activity: A comparative study of EU member states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Álvarez, María Teresa; Moreno, Blanca; Soares, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable development and environmental protection are key concepts in the European energy policy. The Europe 2020 Strategy establishes the necessity of reducing environmental pressure and resource consumption to increase sustainable development in the EU. In this context, the aim of this paper is to develop an Environmental and Resource Pressure Aggregated Index that considers these two dimensions. This index provides information about the achievement of the targets in the member states as well as the achieved effects of the environmental policies on energy policy and sustainable development. Therefore, it would help policy-makers to plan future policy actions. The results show that, among EU countries, Portugal, Latvia, Italy, Austria and France have low environmental and resource pressure. Recommendations are made for member states with the worst results (Estonia, Poland, Cyprus, Czech Republic and Luxembourg) in order to improve their actions in climate change and energy policy. - Highlights: • An aggregated index about environmental protection in energy policy is obtained. • It aggregates environmental and resource pressures dimensions. • Portugal, Latvia, Italy, Austria and France have the best results. • Reinforcing policies are necessary in Estonia, Poland, Cyprus and Czech Republic.

  10. Prediction for the high-level alpha-active waste to be generated by nuclear power stations in the Member States of the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, E.

    1977-04-01

    Starting with a forecast for the nuclear power generating capacity to be installed in the Member States of the European Communities before the end of this century, a prediction is made of the annual production of high-level alpha-active waste from reprocessing plants and the corresponding accumulation up to the year 2000. The isotopic composition of the alpha-active waste from individual reactor types was calculated and an estimation of the influence of recycling plutonium through light water reactors on the produced quantity of higher actinides is made

  11. Getting from A to B-exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Mos, Iris; Lenselink, Eelke B

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight...... into the structure-function relationship of ADGRs using the family member ADGR subfamily G member 4 (ADGRG4)/GPR112 as a model receptor. In a bioinformatics approach, we compared conserved, functional elements of the well-characterized class A and class B1 secretin-like G protein-coupled receptors with the ADGRs. We...... identified several potential equivalent motifs and subjected those to mutational analysis. The importance of the mutated residues was evaluated by examining their effect on the high constitutive activity of the N-terminally truncated ADGRG4/GPR112 in a 1-receptor-1-G protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  12. Skin peptide tyrosine-tyrosine, a member of the pancreatic polypeptide family: isolation, structure, synthesis, and endocrine activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, A; Chartrel, N; Vaudry, H; Nicolas, P

    1994-10-25

    Pancreatic polypeptide, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), and neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY), three members of a family of structurally related peptides, are mainly expressed in the endocrine pancreas, in endocrine cells of the gut, and in the brain, respectively. In the present study, we have isolated a peptide of the pancreatic polypeptide family from the skin of the South American arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. The primary structure of the peptide was established as Tyr-Pro-Pro-Lys-Pro-Glu-Ser-Pro-Gly-Glu10-Asp-Ala-Ser-Pro-Glu-Glu- Met-Asn- Lys-Tyr20-Leu-Thr-Ala-Leu-Arg-His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu30-Val-Thr- Arg-Gln-Arg-Tyr-NH2 . This unusual peptide, named skin peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (SPYY), exhibits 94% similarity with PYY from the frog Rana ridibunda. A synthetic replicate of SPYY inhibits melanotropin release from perifused frog neurointermediate lobes in very much the same way as NPY. These results demonstrate the occurrence of a PYY-like peptide in frog skin. Our data also suggest the existence of a pituitary-skin regulatory loop in amphibians.

  13. The Commander's Wellness Program: Assessing the Association Between Health Measures and Physical Fitness Assessment Scores, Fitness Assessment Exemptions, and Duration of Limited Duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvaryanas, Col Anthony P; Greenwell, Brandon; Vicen, Gloria J; Maupin, Genny M

    2018-03-26

    Air Force Medical Service health promotions staff have identified a set of evidenced-based interventions targeting tobacco use, sleep habits, obesity/healthy weight, and physical activity that could be integrated, packaged, and deployed as a Commander's Wellness Program. The premise of the program is that improvements in the aforementioned aspects of the health of unit members will directly benefit commanders in terms of members' fitness assessment scores and the duration of periods of limited duty. The purpose of this study is to validate the Commander's Wellness Program assumption that body mass index (BMI), physical activity habits, tobacco use, sleep, and nutritional habits are associated with physical fitness assessment scores, fitness assessment exemptions, and aggregate days of limited duty in the population of active duty U.S. Air Force personnel. This study used a cross-sectional analysis of active duty U.S. Air Force personnel with an Air Force Web-based Health Assessment and fitness assessment data during fiscal year 2013. Predictor variables included age, BMI, gender, physical activity level (moderate physical activity, vigorous activity, and muscle activity), tobacco use, sleep, and dietary habits (consumption of a variety of foods, daily servings of fruits and vegetables, consumption of high-fiber foods, and consumption of high-fat foods). Nonparametric methods were used for the exploratory analysis and parametric methods were used for model building and statistical inference. The study population comprised 221,239 participants. Increasing BMI and tobacco use were negatively associated with the outcome of composite fitness score. Increasing BMI and tobacco use and decreasing sleep were associated with an increased likelihood for the outcome of fitness assessment exemption status. Increasing BMI and tobacco use and decreasing composite fitness score and sleep were associated with an increased likelihood for the outcome of limited duty status, whereas

  14. Melanoma Incidence Rates in Active Duty Military Personnel Compared With a Population-Based Registry in the United States, 2000-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    to include two or more itipatient and outpatient prirnary diagnosis and kept other aspects of the algorithm the same, and found the overall mela - noma...17 population. Military service members are represented by a range of race and ethnic combinations, with a spectrum of skin mela - nin content. The

  15. Conducting an Introductory Biology Course in an Active Learning Classroom: A Case Study of an Experienced Faculty Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, David; Guzey, S. Selcen

    2014-01-01

    A case study is described that examines the beliefs and practices of a university instructor who teaches regularly in an active learning classroom. His perspective provides insights into the pedagogical practices that drive his success in these learning spaces.

  16. Biochemical Properties of a New Cold-Active Mono- and Diacylglycerol Lipase from Marine Member Janibacter sp. Strain HTCC2649

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongjuan Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mono- and di-acylglycerol lipase has been applied to industrial usage in oil modification for its special substrate selectivity. Until now, the reported mono- and di-acylglycerol lipases from microorganism are limited, and there is no report on the mono- and di-acylglycerol lipase from bacteria. A predicted lipase (named MAJ1 from marine Janibacter sp. strain HTCC2649 was purified and biochemical characterized. MAJ1 was clustered in the family I.7 of esterase/lipase. The optimum activity of the purified MAJ1 occurred at pH 7.0 and 30 °C. The enzyme retained 50% of the optimum activity at 5 °C, indicating that MAJ1 is a cold-active lipase. The enzyme activity was stable in the presence of various metal ions, and inhibited in EDTA. MAJ1 was resistant to detergents. MAJ1 preferentially hydrolyzed mono- and di-acylglycerols, but did not show activity to triacylglycerols of camellia oil substrates. Further, MAJ1 is low homologous to that of the reported fungal diacylglycerol lipases, including Malassezia globosa lipase 1 (SMG1, Penicillium camembertii lipase U-150 (PCL, and Aspergillus oryzae lipase (AOL. Thus, we identified a novel cold-active bacterial lipase with a sn-1/3 preference towards mono- and di-acylglycerides for the first time. Moreover, it has the potential, in oil modification, for special substrate selectivity.

  17. EPA Nonregulatory Nonroad Duty Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA nonregulatory, nonroad duty cycles for equipment such as agricultural tractors, backhoe loaders,crawlers tractors, excavators, arc welding skid steer loaders, and wheel loaders. Also,test procedures, laboratory methods, and emissions for this equipmen

  18. PLE-wu, a new member of piggyBac transposon family from insect, is active in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2014-10-01

    piggyBac, a highly active transposon in insect and mammalian cells, is a very useful tool in genome manipulation. A new piggyBac-like element (PLE), named PLE-wu, was identified from a mutant baculovirus cultured in sf9 insect cells. This new transposon is 2931 bp in length and encodes two active forms of transposase, a 708-amino acid-long transposase and a short 576-residue-long transposase translated from a downstream in-frame initiation codon. PLE-wu has asymmetric terminal structures, containing 6-bp inverted terminal repeats, 32-bp imperfect inverted and direct sub-terminal repeats. Similar to piggyBac, PLE-wu exhibits traceless excision activity in both insect and mammalian cells, restoring the original TTAA target sequence upon excision. It also retains the insertion activity in mammalian cells with a plasmid to chromosome transposition rate about 10-fold higher than random integration. Plasmid rescue assays revealed that the TTAA target sequence was duplicated at the junctions of the insertion site. Deletion of the terminal sequences including the sub-terminal repeats decreased the transposition activity of the 708-residue-long transposase, while the transposition activity of the short form of transposase was not affected. With its low sequence similarity to piggyBac, PLE-wu will contribute to the understanding the mechanism of PLE transposition, as well as design of new transposon systems with higher activity. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The duty health physicist program at Byron Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, D.G.; Carey, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Duty Health Physicist Program at Byron Station was established to deal with routine health physics tasks and provide an interface between frontline and upper radiation-chemistry management. The program consists of a weekly rotation of selected members of the health physics staff into the duty health physicist position to handle the assigned duty tasks. The tasks include, but are not limited to, daily isotopic and air sample review, effluent release package review, maximum permissible concentration calculations, dose approvals, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable action review of pending jobs, and general availability to answer questions and address problems in health-physics-related areas of plant operation. The daily attendance of the duty health physicist at the radiation-chemistry and station plan-of-the-day meetings has increased the overall presence and visibility of the health physics program to upper station management and other station departments. Since its inception in July of 1985, the Duty Health Physics Program has been a major contributor to the observed 50% reduction in reportable personnel errors in the radiation-chemistry department (based on personnel-error-related deviation reports and license event reports generated on the radiation-chemistry department at Byron Station). Although difficulty to quantify, other important benefits of this program are also discussed in this paper

  20. The Impact of Multiple Concussions on Emotional Distress, Post-Concussive Symptoms, and Neurocognitive Functioning in Active Duty United States Marines Independent of Combat Exposure or Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Bleiberg, Joseph; Tsao, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether the lingering effects of concussion on emotional, physical, and cognitive symptoms is because of the effects of brain trauma or purely to emotional factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. This study examines the independent effects of concussion on persistent symptoms. The Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment, a clinical decision support tool, was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning in 646 United States Marines, all of whom were fit for duty. Marines were assessed for concussion history, post-concussive symptoms, emotional distress, neurocognitive functioning, and deployment history. Results showed that a recent concussion or ever having experienced a concussion was associated with an increase in emotional distress, but not with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) or neurocognitive functioning. Having had multiple lifetime concussions, however, was associated with greater emotional distress, PPCS, and reduced neurocognitive functioning that needs attention and rapid discrimination, but not for memory-based tasks. These results are independent of deployment history, combat exposure, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Results supported earlier findings that a previous concussion is not generally associated with post-concussive symptoms independent of covariates. In contrast with other studies that failed to find a unique contribution for concussion to PPCS, however, evidence of recent and multiple concussion was seen across a range of emotional distress, post-concussive symptoms, and neurocognitive functioning in this study population. Results are discussed in terms of implications for assessing concussion on return from combat. PMID:25003552

  1. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  2. Swimming upstream: faculty and staff members from urban middle schools in low-income communities describe their experience implementing nutrition and physical activity initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Katherine W; Patel, Aarti; Prokop, Lisa A; Austin, S Bryn

    2006-04-01

    Addressing childhood overweight has become a top priority in the United States. Modification of school policies and practices has been used in an attempt to address the overweight epidemic among children and adolescents. Culturally diverse urban schools in low-income communities attempting to improve nutrition and increase physical activity may face unique challenges in the school environment. A better understanding is needed about school environments and how they may affect the implementation, efficacy, and sustainability of initiatives designed to improve nutrition and physical activity. We carried out a qualitative study in five urban middle schools in low-income communities that had recently implemented Planet Health, a nutrition and physical activity intervention, to assess which aspects of the schools' physical, social, and policy environments were facilitating or impeding the implementation of health promotion initiatives. Thirty-five faculty and staff members participated. We conducted one focus group per school, with an average of seven participants per group. We analyzed focus group transcripts using the thematic analysis technique to identify key concepts, categories, and themes. Teachers and staff members in our study identified many school-related environmental barriers to successful implementation of nutrition and physical activity initiatives in their schools. School personnel recommended that classroom-based nutrition interventions such as Planet Health be coordinated with school food services so that the healthy messages taught in the classroom are reinforced by the availability of healthy, culturally appropriate cafeteria food. They identified household food insufficiency and overly restrictive eligibility criteria of the federally subsidized meal program as critical barriers to healthy nutritional behaviors. They also identified weight-related teasing and bullying and unhealthy weight-control behaviors as challenges to promotion of healthy

  3. Radiological surveillance of members of the public during earthmoving activities in the area of the Ciemat mound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, A.; Yague, L.; Navarro, N.; Gasco, C.; Ortiz, M. T.; Quinones, J.

    2013-01-01

    In the year 2012 was undertaken excavation and earthwork of the mound. The lands of this area contained remains sterile uranium mining and therefore concentrations of natural radionuclides higher than natural radioactive background activity. In order to assess the radiological impact on the public, was a theoretical evaluation of the dose inhaled that would get a person who remained in the vicinity during the making of the work. (Author)

  4. Arsenic absorption by members of the Brassicacea family, analysed by neutron activation, k0-method - preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, George; Matos, Ludmila Vieira da Silva; Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Ferreira, Alexandre Santos Martorano; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia

    2009-01-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Thailand and the United States of America and also in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities has been contributing to aggravate natural contamination. Brassicacea is a plant family with edible species (arugula, cabbage, cauliflower, cress, kale, mustard, radish), ornamental ones (alysssum, field pennycress, ornamental cabbages and kales) and some species are known as metal and metalloid accumulators (Indian mustard, field pennycress), like chromium, nickel, and arsenic. The present work aimed at studying other taxa of the Brassicaceae family to verify their capability in absorbing arsenic, under controlled conditions, for possible utilisation in remediation activities. The analytical method chosen was neutron activation analysis, k 0 method, a routine technique at CDTN, and also very appropriate for arsenic studies. To avoid possible interference from solid substrates, like sand or vermiculite, attempts were carried out to keep the specimens in 1/4 Murashige and Skoog basal salt solution (M and S). Growth was stumped, plants withered and perished, showing that modifications in M and S had to be done. The addition of nickel and silicon allowed normal growth of the plant specimens, for periods longer than usually achieved (more than two months); yielding samples large enough for further studies with other techniques, like ICP-MS, and other targets, like speciation studies. The results of arsenic absorption are presented here and the need of nickel and silicon in the composition of M and S is discussed. (author)

  5. Arsenic absorption by members of the Brassicacea family, analysed by neutron activation, k{sub 0}-method - preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, George; Matos, Ludmila Vieira da Silva; Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Ferreira, Alexandre Santos Martorano; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: george@cdtn.br, e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Thailand and the United States of America and also in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities has been contributing to aggravate natural contamination. Brassicacea is a plant family with edible species (arugula, cabbage, cauliflower, cress, kale, mustard, radish), ornamental ones (alysssum, field pennycress, ornamental cabbages and kales) and some species are known as metal and metalloid accumulators (Indian mustard, field pennycress), like chromium, nickel, and arsenic. The present work aimed at studying other taxa of the Brassicaceae family to verify their capability in absorbing arsenic, under controlled conditions, for possible utilisation in remediation activities. The analytical method chosen was neutron activation analysis, k{sub 0} method, a routine technique at CDTN, and also very appropriate for arsenic studies. To avoid possible interference from solid substrates, like sand or vermiculite, attempts were carried out to keep the specimens in 1/4 Murashige and Skoog basal salt solution (M and S). Growth was stumped, plants withered and perished, showing that modifications in M and S had to be done. The addition of nickel and silicon allowed normal growth of the plant specimens, for periods longer than usually achieved (more than two months); yielding samples large enough for further studies with other techniques, like ICP-MS, and other targets, like speciation studies. The results of arsenic absorption are presented here and the need of nickel and silicon in the composition of M and S is discussed. (author)

  6. Levels of {sup 131}I Activity in Patients to Enable Hospital Discharge, Based on External Exposure of Family Members of the Patient in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, K.; Nishizawa, K.; Koga, S.; Orito, T

    1999-07-01

    The activity levels for discharge from hospital of patients treated with {sup 131}I in Japan are described. The level was determined by considering the public annual dose limit in Japan of 1 mSv and the possible exposure of family members with whom the patients were in daily contact. All analyses are based on a partner, where both the partner and the children will be subject to exposure. The external exposure was calculated by using the data on the distance between the patient and family members, the length of the time spent at each distance, and each member's age. It was assumed that the mother must continue to take responsibility for care of children during the period that she is radioactive. The conclusions of this work are that a maximum residual {sup 131}I radioactivity of <97 MBq, with a distance from the patient in bed greater than 50 cm and the ages of patient's children all over 1 year, will be required to ensure that the maximum dose to any contact will not exceed 1 mSv. More than 50 cm distance suggests either an unmarried housewife or the partner sleeping in an adjacent room or twin beds. No restriction is needed in respect of external exposure for patients with residual radioactivity of 42 MBq, although levels lower than this may be required where there is a risk of contamination, e.g. due to urinary incontinence. This conflicts with recommended activity levels for discharge (ICRP 25) of 560 MBq (for a dose limit of 5 mSv). The findings of this work are only directly relevant for the age range under 55 years. No account was taken in this paper of internal exposure from internal pathways. (author)

  7. Levels of 131I Activity in Patients to Enable Hospital Discharge, Based on External Exposure of Family Members of the Patient in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshida, K.; Nishizawa, K.; Koga, S.; Orito, T.

    1999-01-01

    The activity levels for discharge from hospital of patients treated with 131 I in Japan are described. The level was determined by considering the public annual dose limit in Japan of 1 mSv and the possible exposure of family members with whom the patients were in daily contact. All analyses are based on a partner, where both the partner and the children will be subject to exposure. The external exposure was calculated by using the data on the distance between the patient and family members, the length of the time spent at each distance, and each member's age. It was assumed that the mother must continue to take responsibility for care of children during the period that she is radioactive. The conclusions of this work are that a maximum residual 131 I radioactivity of <97 MBq, with a distance from the patient in bed greater than 50 cm and the ages of patient's children all over 1 year, will be required to ensure that the maximum dose to any contact will not exceed 1 mSv. More than 50 cm distance suggests either an unmarried housewife or the partner sleeping in an adjacent room or twin beds. No restriction is needed in respect of external exposure for patients with residual radioactivity of 42 MBq, although levels lower than this may be required where there is a risk of contamination, e.g. due to urinary incontinence. This conflicts with recommended activity levels for discharge (ICRP 25) of 560 MBq (for a dose limit of 5 mSv). The findings of this work are only directly relevant for the age range under 55 years. No account was taken in this paper of internal exposure from internal pathways. (author)

  8. Opportunities for Promoting Physical Activity in Rural Communities by Understanding the Interests and Values of Community Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Physical activity (PA has well-established health benefits, but most Americans do not meet national guidelines. In southeastern Missouri, trails have been developed to increase rates of PA. Although this has had success, broad-scale interventions will be needed to improve rates further. In this study, we surveyed residents of southeastern Missouri to identify ways to improve rates of PA. Methods. We conducted a telephone survey in 2015 of adults (n=524 from eight rural Missouri towns that had walking trails, regarding their activities and interests. Findings. Forty percent of respondents reported both walking and meeting PA recommendations, 29% reported walking but not meeting PA recommendations, and the remainder did not walk or did not answer. Respondents who used the trails were significantly more likely to meet PA recommendations (odds ratio = 2.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.7, 4.5. Certain values and interests that may encourage PA or draw people to trails were common. Conclusions. The group that walked but did not meet PA recommendations would be the ideal group to target for intervention, which could focus on their reported values and interests (e.g., personal relationships, being outdoors. Use of walking trails was associated with meeting PA recommendations.

  9. Opportunities for Promoting Physical Activity in Rural Communities by Understanding the Interests and Values of Community Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Thomas; Eyler, Amy A; Tabak, Rachel G; Valko, Cheryl; Brownson, Ross C

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) has well-established health benefits, but most Americans do not meet national guidelines. In southeastern Missouri, trails have been developed to increase rates of PA. Although this has had success, broad-scale interventions will be needed to improve rates further. In this study, we surveyed residents of southeastern Missouri to identify ways to improve rates of PA. We conducted a telephone survey in 2015 of adults ( n = 524) from eight rural Missouri towns that had walking trails, regarding their activities and interests. Forty percent of respondents reported both walking and meeting PA recommendations, 29% reported walking but not meeting PA recommendations, and the remainder did not walk or did not answer. Respondents who used the trails were significantly more likely to meet PA recommendations (odds ratio = 2.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.7, 4.5). Certain values and interests that may encourage PA or draw people to trails were common. The group that walked but did not meet PA recommendations would be the ideal group to target for intervention, which could focus on their reported values and interests (e.g., personal relationships, being outdoors). Use of walking trails was associated with meeting PA recommendations.

  10. Phospholipase D family member 4, a transmembrane glycoprotein with no phospholipase D activity, expression in spleen and early postnatal microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumio Yoshikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phospholipase D (PLD catalyzes conversion of phosphatidylcholine into choline and phosphatidic acid, leading to a variety of intracellular signal transduction events. Two classical PLDs, PLD1 and PLD2, contain phosphatidylinositide-binding PX and PH domains and two conserved His-x-Lys-(x(4-Asp (HKD motifs, which are critical for PLD activity. PLD4 officially belongs to the PLD family, because it possesses two HKD motifs. However, it lacks PX and PH domains and has a putative transmembrane domain instead. Nevertheless, little is known regarding expression, structure, and function of PLD4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PLD4 was analyzed in terms of expression, structure, and function. Expression was analyzed in developing mouse brains and non-neuronal tissues using microarray, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and immunocytochemistry. Structure was evaluated using bioinformatics analysis of protein domains, biochemical analyses of transmembrane property, and enzymatic deglycosylation. PLD activity was examined by choline release and transphosphatidylation assays. Results demonstrated low to modest, but characteristic, PLD4 mRNA expression in a subset of cells preferentially localized around white matter regions, including the corpus callosum and cerebellar white matter, during the first postnatal week. These PLD4 mRNA-expressing cells were identified as Iba1-positive microglia. In non-neuronal tissues, PLD4 mRNA expression was widespread, but predominantly distributed in the spleen. Intense PLD4 expression was detected around the marginal zone of the splenic red pulp, and splenic PLD4 protein recovered from subcellular membrane fractions was highly N-glycosylated. PLD4 was heterologously expressed in cell lines and localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Moreover, heterologously expressed PLD4 proteins did not exhibit PLD enzymatic activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results showed that PLD4 is a non

  11. Past Childhood Abuse and Present Alcohol Use as Risk Factors for Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempt in United States Military Active Duty Personnel, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    ethnicity and rank (enlisted vs . officer), which approximate socioeconomic status in military populations. Marital status was also included, as it often...Compared with controls, cases were more likely to be young (age 25 or younger), unmarried , and female enlisted members whose race/ethnicity was either...90.39 18,349 77.29 5,977 81.04 Officer 519 13.15 8,861 9.61 5,391 22.71 4,182 18.96 Marital Status Married 1,911 48.43 3,408

  12. PROVISION OF THE DUTY SERVICE IN GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iztok Takač

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duty service of gyecology and obstetrics in Slovenia is organized on the regional basis and consists of ten regional hospitals, two hospitals for gynecology and obstetrics and two university clinical centres. Methods: Heads of hospitals where duty service is performed, have answered the questionnaires about the doctors who perform duty service. Results: Specialists and trainees in gynecology and obstetrics perform duty service on 21 posts and on 6 on-call posts. In Slovenia there are 287 active specialists in gynecology and obstetrics. 139 (48.4% among them are active on the primary level (outpatient clinics and 148 (51.6% in the hospitals and both clinical centres. Among hospital gynecologists and obstetricians 54 (36.5% of them are older than 55 years. Conclusions: Duty service of gyecology and obstetrics in Slovenia does not meet legislation criteria regard- ing doctors’ work time. Adequate changes for increasing the number of available doctors for duty service are proposed.

  13. Supervision Duty of School Principals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kürşat YILMAZ

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Supervision by school administrators is becoming more and more important. The change in the roles ofschool administrators has a great effect on that increase. At present, school administrators are consideredmore than as technical directors, but as instructional leaders. This increased the importance of schooladministrators’ expected supervision acts. In this respect, the aim of this study is to make a conceptualanalysis about school administrators’ supervision duties. For this reason, a literature review related withsupervision and contemporary supervision approaches was done, and the official documents concerningsupervision were examined. As a result, it can be said that school administrators’ supervision duties havebecome very important. And these duties must certainly be carried out by school administrators.

  14. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Philippines. XRF activities at Analytical Measurements Research Group, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabroa, Corazon B.; Castaneda, Soledad S.; Almoneda, Rosalina V.; Sucgang, Raymond J.; Racho, Joseph Michael D.; Morco, Ryan P.; Cuyco, Danilo; Jimenez, Gloria; Santos, Flora L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: XRF analysis and activities of the Analytical Measurements Research (AMR) Group (see Fig.1) of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) focus on both research and analytical services. Air pollution research, in particular source apportionment studies, requires multi-elemental data for a substantial number of samples. In the PNRI, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) has been used as an effective tool for providing such multi-elemental data. With the latest acquisition of the Panalytical Epsilon 5 (E5) EDXRF system, the process of quantification has become easier and faster with the auto-quantify method. Other research involvements of the group are in the analysis of samples in relation to mineral explorations and the elemental characterization of water in support for isotope hydrology research. The AMR group, as part of its function to provide analytical services, offers qualitative or semi quantitative analysis of solid samples using the auto quantify method, quantitative analysis of environmental samples using the emission-transmission method and quantitative analysis of air particulate matter collected on filters. Telephone wire materials sold in junkshops (alleged to have been pilfered from installed telephone lines of a major telecommunications company in the country) and materials being assessed in relation to patent claims are other examples of samples submitted for analytical services. As mentioned, a useful feature of the E5 system is the use of the auto-quantify (AQ) method. Calibration lines used for this type of application are obtained using the fundamental parameter (FP) model. For AQ applications, accurate results are obtained for samples prepared as fused glass beads in which the whole matrix is known. However, only qualitative or semi quantitative analysis can be applied for other types of solid samples. The AQ method was adapted for the multi-elemental analysis of air particulates using the MicroMatter standards to set

  15. Evaluation of Faculty Members by Students in Birjand University of Medicine, 2003-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ziaie

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Evaluation of faculty members is a kind of educational evaluation to determine success of faculty members in reaching the educational goals. Regarding the controversy about the validity of this kind of evaluation, this study was done to examine faculty members and students view point about content and implementation of evaluation of faculty members by students and feedback of the results in the second term of academic year 2003-4 in Birjand University of Medicine.Methods: All faculty members and students participated in this descriptive study. Their opinions were studied using two questionnaires for students and faculty members separately, whose content validity were confirmed after a survey from specialists and pilot study and reliability of results werestudied through calculating Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for internal consistency .Data were analyzed through calculating frequencies and K2-test, α=0.05.Results: Of all faculty members, 95% ( 30 from clinical and 30 from non clinical departments were aware of having been evaluated by students, 81.7% of them recognize educational development center of the University as the responsible body for evaluation. 91.7% of them received the feedback of the evaluation results. 45% of them agreed that announcement of evaluation results was helpful to improve teaching. 40% believed that questionnaires were responded without dutifulness andcarefulness by students.Conclusion: The aim of teaching evaluation is to improve teaching by faculty members. But it seems that many faculty members do not regard this evaluation tool so valid for measuring their teaching activities. The inappropriateness of most of the questionnaires, unfair judgment of student, and careless selection of the sample of students who answer the questionnaires are major issues for further development.Key words: EVALUATION, FACULTY MEMBER, STUDENT, MEDICAL UNIVERSITY OF BIRJAND

  16. An Analysis of Personal Technology Use by Service Members and Military Behavioral Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Stewart, Amanda; Smolenski, Derek J; Reger, Greg M; Bush, Nigel; Workman, Don E

    2016-07-01

    Personal technology use is ubiquitous in the United States today and technology, in general, continues to change the face of health care. However, little is known about the personal technology use of military service members and the behavioral health care providers that treat them. This study reports the technology use of 1,101 active duty service members and 45 behavioral health care providers at a large military installation. Participants reported Internet usage; ownership of smartphones, tablets, and e-readers; usage of mobile applications (apps); and basic demographic information. Compared with providers, service members reported higher rates of smartphone ownership, were more likely to own Android smartphones than iPhones, and spent more time gaming. Both groups spent a comparable amount of time using social media. With the exception of gaming, however, differences between service members and providers were not statistically significant when demographics were matched and controlled. Among service members, younger respondents (18-34) were statistically more likely than older respondents (35-58) to own smartphones, spend time gaming, and engage in social media. Our findings can help inform provider's technology-based education and intervention of their patients and guide the development of new technologies to support the psychological health of service members. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  17. Decreased activation of placental mTOR family members is associated with the induction of intrauterine growth restriction by secondhand smoke in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Camilo; Lewis, Josh; Jordan, Clinton; Mejia, Juan; Ogden, Connor; Monson, Troy; Winden, Duane; Watson, Marc; Reynolds, Paul R; Arroyo, Juan A

    2017-02-01

    Cigarette smoke is known to be a risk for the development of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Our objective was to assess the effects of secondhand smoke (SHS) during pregnancy and to what extent it regulates the activation of mTOR family members and murine trophoblast invasion. Mice were treated to SHS for 4 days. Placental and fetal weights were recorded at the time of necropsy. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the level of placental trophoblast invasion. Western blots were utilized to assess the activation of caspase 3, XIAP, mTOR, p70 and 4EBP1 in treated and control placental lysates. As compared to controls, treated animals showed: (1) decreased placental (1.4-fold) and fetal (2.3-fold) weights (p smoke extract (CSE). Similar to primary smoking, SHS may induce IUGR via decreased activation of the mTOR family of proteins in the placenta. Increased activation of the placental XIAP protein could be a survival mechanism for abnormal trophoblast cells during SHS exposure. Further, CSE reduced trophoblast invasion, suggesting a direct causative effect of smoke on susceptible trophoblast cells involved in IUGR progression. These results provide important insight into the physiological consequences of SHS exposure and smoke-mediated placental disease.

  18. Both ATLAS members and the team engaged in transport and reception, of the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter, will not forget installation of the first active piece of the detector!

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Both ATLAS members and the team engaged in transport and reception, of the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter, will not forget installation of the first active piece of the detector!

  19. The attitudes and activities of pastors and faith leaders in Zimbabwe on the use of family planning methods among their members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Alikali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Faith leaders are important gatekeepers in disseminating reproductive health messages and influencing positive behaviour change within communities. Faith leaders are seen as the most powerful, visible, and reachable form of authority, even trusted more than governments or non-profit organizations. In addition to providing counsel and advice aimed at enhancing health and wellbeing of the worshippers, faith leaders also play an important role in advocating and influencing what is taught in schools and what services are provided in healthcare facilities. Because of this influence, faith leaders often have an unparalleled opportunity—indeed, a moral obligation—to prioritize conversations about family planning, advocating, and closing the contraception gap.The overall objective of this study was to ascertain the attitude and activities of pastors and faith leaders in Zimbabwe on the use of family planning methods among their members. The result revealed that some faith leaders believed that spreading information about family planning education was the responsibility of the government and tended to avoid such responsibility. However, through training on family planning advocacy, much can be achieved. Methods: Qualitative study methods were used to better understand the attitude and activities of pastors and faith leaders in Zimbabwe on the use of family planning methods among their members. The participants of this survey were drawn from 8 of 10 provinces in Zimbabwe, which include: Bulawayo, Harare, Manicaland, Mashonaland Central, Mashonaland East, Mashonaland West, Masvingo, and Matabeleland North.Paper-based questionnaires were answered by 24 pastors and 26 faith leaders in Zimbabwe (Table 1 through personal face-to-face meetings, while interviews were conducted with a select few pastors and faith leaders. The samples were drawn from randomly selected churches in Zimbabwe. Data was analysed using Epi info 7 and Microsoft Excel

  20. A study on the effect of the innovation management on entrepreneurial activities in Iran and the state-members of GEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Arab

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid technological changes in recent decades have created tremendous motivations among entrepreneurs to offer value added products and services. The complicated relationships between technology and innovation have caused to create the innovation management. Therefore, the key prominence of innovation in global village is to design new plans to manage and improve the innovation so that they could continue aiming at their superior national-organizational goals along with their growth and improvement path within their strategic plans. Many countries are interested in comparing themselves with other societies for enhancing their entrepreneurial awareness in an approximate rate and exploit their successful and positively affecting on development of the entrepreneurship innovation-management experiences and policies. In this research, the impact of each determinant of innovation management influencing on entrepreneurial activities in Iran and the members of Global Entrepreneurship Monitor between 2008 and 2011 is studied and evaluated using the structural equations.

  1. Iron Status of Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    ready force Deploy with and care for the warrior Care for all entrusted to our care Nursing Competencies and Practice: Patient outcomes...duties, physical activities, iron intake through diet ). This additional information would improve the ability to determine factors associated with

  2. Improving Acceptance, Integration and Health among LGBT Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    these stressors on LGBT service members is poorly understood, with very little data available on the unique physical and mental health needs of these...Bullying • Overall health • Healthcare utilization • Lost duty days • Sick call visits • Physical health symptoms • Sexual/gender identity disclosure...Award Numbers: W81XWH-15-1-0699 Title: Improving Acceptance, Integration and Health among LGBT Service Members Principal Investigators: Jeremy

  3. Activities and prevalence of proteobacteria members colonizing Echinacea purpurea fully account for in vitro macrophage activation exhibited by extracts of this botanical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidence supports the theory that bacterial communities colonizing Echinacea purpurea contribute to the innate immune enhancing activity of this botanical. Previously we reported that only about half of the variation in in vitro monocyte stimulating activity exhibited by E. purpurea extracts could ...

  4. Negative regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity by macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) family members in non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephanie E; Rendon, Beatriz E; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Mitchell, Robert A

    2012-11-02

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a nutrient- and metabolic stress-sensing enzyme activated by the tumor suppressor kinase, LKB1. Because macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and its functional homolog, d-dopachrome tautomerase (d-DT), have protumorigenic functions in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) but have AMPK-activating properties in nonmalignant cell types, we set out to investigate this apparent paradox. Our data now suggest that, in contrast to MIF and d-DTs AMPK-activating properties in nontransformed cells, MIF and d-DT act cooperatively to inhibit steady-state phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in LKB1 wild type and LKB1 mutant human NSCLC cell lines. Our data further indicate that MIF and d-DT, acting through their shared cell surface receptor, CD74, antagonize NSCLC AMPK activation by maintaining glucose uptake, ATP production, and redox balance, resulting in reduced Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase β-dependent AMPK activation. Combined, these studies indicate that MIF and d-DT cooperate to inhibit AMPK activation in an LKB1-independent manner.

  5. Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.63) is Palau which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 2 March 2007. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 144 Member States became Members [fr

  6. Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.63) is Palau which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 2 March 2007. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 144 Member States became Members [es

  7. RAFTK, a novel member of the focal adhesion kinase family, is phosphorylated and associates with signaling molecules upon activation of mature T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, R K; Hatch, W C; Avraham, H; Ona, M A; Druker, B; Avraham, S; Groopman, J E

    1997-03-17

    The related adhesion focal tyrosine kinase (RAFTK), a recently discovered member of the focal adhesion kinase family, has previously been reported to participate in signal transduction in neuronal cells, megakaryocytes, and B lymphocytes. We have found that RAFTK is constitutively expressed in human T cells and is rapidly phosphorylated upon the activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). This activation also results in an increase in the autophosphorylation and kinase activity of RAFTK. After its stimulation, there was an increase in the association of the src cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Fyn and the adapter protein Grb2. This association was mediated through the SH2 domains of Fyn and Grb2. RAFTK also co-immunoprecipitates with the SH2 domain of Lck and with the cytoskeletal protein paxillin through its COOH-terminal proline-rich domain. The tyrosine phosphorylation of RAFTK after T cell receptor-mediated stimulation was reduced by the pretreatment of cells with cytochalasin D, suggesting the role of the cytoskeleton in this process. These observations indicate that RAFTK participates in T cell receptor signaling and may act to link signals from the cell surface to the cytoskeleton and thereby affect the host immune response.

  8. 40 CFR 94.105 - Duty cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duty cycles. 94.105 Section 94.105... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Test Procedures § 94.105 Duty cycles. (a) Overview. For....8(e), engines shall be tested using the appropriate duty cycles described in this section. (b...

  9. 25 CFR 122.6 - Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee. 122.6 Section 122.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.6 Duties of the Osage Tribal Education Committee. (a) For...

  10. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Top-Line Estimates for Active-Duty Coast Guard Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    comprehension of the survey questions, and in turn to enhance the validity of their answers. The development of this new approach to measuring sexual assault...that will be released later. 10 Private areas were defined to include the buttocks, inner thigh, breast, groin, anus, vagina, penis , and testicles. 11

  11. SPECIFIC DEONTOLOGICAL/ETHICAL REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE INVOLVEMENT, DUTIES AND THE ACTIVE ROLE OF CERTAIN CATEGORIES OF CIVIL SERVANTS REGARDING THE PROTECTION OF FAMILY RELATIONSHIP AGAINST PARENTAL ALIENATION SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Elena Matic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to analyze the manner in which the parental alienation syndrome (acknowledged as a form of severe psychological abuse against children by the Directive No. 2/2016 for recognition of parental alienation phenomenon is identified, prevented and treated and by Romanian state authorities.The parental alienation syndrome emerged and started to spread in Romanian society due to the increasing rate of divorce and the larger number of single parent families. According to the definition found in the first article of the Directive no. 2/2016, this form of abuse consists of the "systematic denigration work of one parent by the other parent, with the intention of ali enating the child from the other parent." In the article, we will analyze the legal and deontological duties of officials from the Child Welfare and Protection which operates locally and, also, how the civil courts exercise their active role in solving the cases in which is claimed the existence of this form of severe psychological abuse. We will also describe specific cases. From our point of view, the formal recognition ofthe parental alienation is a progress in the actual achievement of the welfare and best interests of children in Romanian society. This matter must be treated seriously as the emotional abuse committed against minors impede their harmonious and balanced development, with dramatic effects on medium and long term.

  12. Duties to kin through a tragi-comic lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Grant; Hankey, Robin

    2014-06-01

    Euripides' Alcestis (1959) raises the issue of ethical duties within families and exposes the romantic postures and rhetoric that can dominate such discussions. Should anybody be asked to sacrifice themselves or even undergo significant health risks for members of their own family? (An issue that is also relevant in considering our duties to future generations in terms of the earth we leave to them.) The issue that is dramatized to a heroic level in Alcestis arises in live organ and tissue donation within a family and challenges the idea that families should be trusted to sort out solutions that they can all live with. Alcestis intensifies the debate because the sacrifice of one life for another is its topic but, in doing so, it exposes many traps lying in wait for ethicists and medical jurists who boldly enter such debates (where emotions create shifting ground on which angels fear to tread).

  13. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  14. 34 CFR 200.59 - Duties of paraprofessionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Conducting parent involvement activities. (5) Providing instructional support in a library or media center... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duties of paraprofessionals. 200.59 Section 200.59 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY...

  15. Academic Entrepreneurship and Traditional Academic Duties: Synergy or Rivalry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Muthu

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of academic entrepreneurship on traditional academic duties carried out in a resource-constrained environment, particularly focusing on whether there is synergy or rivalry between these two activities. Using qualitative evidence, we discover that there are funding, resource, knowledge and skill and networking…

  16. 75 FR 9874 - Initiation of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ..., including, but not limited to, changes to corporate structure, acquisitions of new companies or facilities... subject to government control and, thus, should be assigned a single antidumping duty deposit rate. It is... from government control of its export activities to be entitled to a separate rate, the Department...

  17. Operation Duties on the F-15B Research Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Samson S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation entails what I have done this past summer for my Co-op tour in the Operations Engineering Branch. Activities included supporting the F-15B Research Testbed, supporting the incoming F-15D models, design work, and other operations engineering duties.

  18. On pandemics and the duty to care: whose duty? who cares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Carly; Tracy, C Shawn; Bensimon, Cécile M; Bernstein, Mark; Hawryluck, Laura; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Upshur, Ross EG

    2006-01-01

    Background As a number of commentators have noted, SARS exposed the vulnerabilities of our health care systems and governance structures. Health care professionals (HCPs) and hospital systems that bore the brunt of the SARS outbreak continue to struggle with the aftermath of the crisis. Indeed, HCPs – both in clinical care and in public health – were severely tested by SARS. Unprecedented demands were placed on their skills and expertise, and their personal commitment to their profession was severely tried. Many were exposed to serious risk of morbidity and mortality, as evidenced by the World Health Organization figures showing that approximately 30% of reported cases were among HCPs, some of whom died from the infection. Despite this challenge, professional codes of ethics are silent on the issue of duty to care during communicable disease outbreaks, thus providing no guidance on what is expected of HCPs or how they ought to approach their duty to care in the face of risk. Discussion In the aftermath of SARS and with the spectre of a pandemic avian influenza, it is imperative that we (re)consider the obligations of HCPs for patients with severe infectious diseases, particularly diseases that pose risks to those providing care. It is of pressing importance that organizations representing HCPs give clear indication of what standard of care is expected of their members in the event of a pandemic. In this paper, we address the issue of special obligations of HCPs during an infectious disease outbreak. We argue that there is a pressing need to clarify the rights and responsibilities of HCPs in the current context of pandemic flu preparedness, and that these rights and responsibilities ought to be codified in professional codes of ethics. Finally, we present a brief historical accounting of the treatment of the duty to care in professional health care codes of ethics. Summary An honest and critical examination of the role of HCPs during communicable disease

  19. An evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and practice of institutional ethics committee members from eastern India regarding ethics committee functioning and pharmacovigilance activities conducted during clinical trials: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrojyoti Bhowmick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of study: The vital responsibility of Institutional Ethics Committee (IEC members is to ensure the safety of the subjects participating in clinical trials. Hence, it is essential for IEC members to be aware of the common pharmacovigilance strategies followed during clinical trials. However, the information about the knowledge, attitude, and practice of IEC members regarding the pharmacovigilance activities followed during clinical trials is scarce worldwide, especially in India. Hence, this cross-sectional study was designed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of IEC members of 10 hospitals of Kolkata, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study using a self-administered, validated questionnaire was conducted among 10 hospitals (five government and five corporate hospitals in Kolkata conducting active clinical research and having functional Ethics Committees (ECs in the month of September-November, 2012. An IEC approval was taken for this study. Two reminders were given to all EC members through telephone/e-mail for completion and returning of the forms. The filled in forms were returned to their respective Member Secretaries, from whom authors′ collected the forms. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 software and MS-Excel 2007. Categorical data were analyzed using Chi-square test and a P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of the 100 distributed questionnaires, 40 were returned of which 10 were not filled properly. Overall awareness regarding different pharmacovigilance terminologies and activities among EC members from nonmedical background (71.43% was found to be more than that of the medical members (68.75%, though the figure was not statistically significant. Majority of the members (75% felt that EC should decide compensation in case of a serious adverse event. Conclusion: The present study signifies that there is a low level of awareness in IEC members of Kolkata regarding

  20. The PR-1 domain accounts for the anti-angiogenic activity of a cysteine-rich secretory protein member from the buccal glands of Lampetra japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dandan; Wang, Hongyan; Zhou, Rong; Jiang, Qi; Xiao, Rong

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that cysteine-rich buccal gland protein (CRBGP) from buccal glands of Lampetra japonica could suppress angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane models. As CRBGP is composed of a pathogenesis-related group 1 (PR-1) domain and a cysteine-rich domain (CRD), which domain accounts for the effects of CRBGP on anti-angiogenesis? In the present study, recombinant PR-1 and CRD (rL-PR-1 and rL-CRD) were obtained. MTT assays showed rL-PR-1 inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs significantly in a dose-dependent manner with an IC 50 of 2μM, while rL-CRD had no obviously inhibitory effect on the proliferation of HUVECs, suggested that PR-1 is the main function domain on the anti-angiogenic activity of CRBGP. Similar to CRBGP, rL-PR-1 induced apoptosis in HUVECs in a mitochondrial-dependent pathway by affecting the level of BAX, BCL2 and caspase 3. Also, the cytotoxic property of rL-PR-1 might be one of the factors which suppressed the proliferation of HUVECs. Furthermore, rL-PR-1 blocked the adhesion, migration, invasion and tube formation of HUVECs by disturbing the cytoskeleton arrangement and down-regulating the level of matrix metallo-peptidase 2. In summary, rL-PR-1 has the anti-angiogenic activity which would provide the information on the functions and mechanisms of cysteine-rich secretory protein family members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Court of Justice of the European Communities ruling of September 22, 1988 - Rs 187/87: Radioactive effluents, EURATOM, Court of Justice of the EC - ruling concerning Art. 37 EURATOM Treaty (EAGV), nuclear power plants, member states - duties according to Art. 37 EAGV, radioactive effluents - approval of a plan of discharge according to Art. 37 EAGV, decision of the Commission concerning Art. 37 EAGV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Headnote: Article 37 of the treaty of March 25, 1957, establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) is to be interpreted as follows: General information regarding a plan for the discharge of radioactive material must be submitted to the Commission of the European Communities prior to the approval of such discharges by the authorities in charge in the respective member country. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Personal technology use by U.S. military service members and veterans: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nigel E; Wheeler, William M

    2015-04-01

    Although personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, computers, and tablets, increasingly are being leveraged as vehicles for health in the civilian world, almost nothing is known about personal technology use in the U.S. military. In 2012 we conducted a unique survey of personal technologies used by U.S. military service members. However, with the rapidly growing sophistication of personal technology and changes in consumer habits, that knowledge must be continuously updated to be useful. Accordingly, we recently surveyed new samples of active duty service members, National Guard and Reserve, and veterans. We collected data by online surveys in 2013 from 239 active, inactive, and former service members. Online surveys were completed in-person via laptop computers at a large military installation and remotely via Web-based surveys posted on the Army Knowledge Online Web site and on a Defense Center Facebook social media channel. We measured high rates of personal technology use by service members at home across popular electronic media. The most dramatic change since our earlier survey was the tremendous increase in mobile phone use at home for a wide variety of purposes. Participants also reported moderate non-work uses of computers and tablets while on recent deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan, but almost no mobile phone use, ostensibly because of military restrictions in the war zone. These latest results will enable researchers and technology developers target their efforts on the most promising and popular technologies for psychological health in the military.

  3. ADMINISTRATIVE CIRCULAR NO. 20 USE OF PRIVATE VEHICLES FOR OFFICIAL DUTY - INSURANCE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division - Tel. 73634

    2002-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 20 on the use of private vehicles for official duty is shortly to be revised with a view to making certain procedures more flexible. CERN no longer requires members of the personnel to take out optional private insurances (insurance for official journeys, legal assistance insurance) in the case of duty travel for the Organization, since the associated risks are covered by CERN's own insurance. Pending the above mentioned revision, members of the personnel may continue to use their private vehicles for official duty in accordance with the others provisions laid down in the Circular Reminder: Owners of private vehicles must of course be insured by the normal compulsory car insurance required by the laws of the Host States when driving on and off the CERN sites.

  4. 78 FR 19191 - Request for Nominations of Members to Serve on the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... pleasure of the Secretary of Commerce. 2. Members are nominated by the Department of Commerce, in...., Senior Advisor Performing the Duties of the Director, Bureau of the Census. [FR Doc. 2013-07344 Filed 3...

  5. Astronaut Norman Thagard rests on middeck while other team is on duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Astronaut Norman E. Thagard, mission specialist for the 'silver' team, rests on the middeck while the 'gold' team is on duty in the science module. Don L. Lind, left, 'gold' team member, meanwhile participates in autogenic feedback training (AFT), designed to help flight crewmembers overcome the effects of zero-gravity adaptation.

  6. CJEU rules on use of standards in imposing information duties on life insurance companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mańko, R.

    2015-01-01

    The EU Directive applicable to life insurance sets out what kind of information insurance companies must give to policyholders. It also allows Member States to impose broader information duties, provided that the information is necessary for the policyholder to understand the contract. In its ruling

  7. 33 CFR 5.29 - Assignment to duty on a motorboat, yacht, aircraft, or radio station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., yacht, aircraft, or radio station. 5.29 Section 5.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.29 Assignment to duty on a motorboat, yacht, aircraft, or radio station. No member of the Auxiliary shall be placed in charge of a motorboat, yacht...

  8. 76 FR 68137 - Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Bags From Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import..., the Department of Commerce (the Department) published Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bags From Thailand... 351.224(c) from the Polyethylene Retail Carrier Bag Committee and its individual members, Hilex Poly...

  9. The p21-activated kinase (PAK family member PakD is required for chemorepulsion and proliferation inhibition by autocrine signals in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Phillips

    Full Text Available In Dictyostelium discoideum, the secreted proteins AprA and CfaD function as reporters of cell density and regulate cell number by inhibiting proliferation at high cell densities. AprA also functions to disperse groups of cells at high density by acting as a chemorepellent. However, the signal transduction pathways associated with AprA and CfaD are not clear, and little is known about how AprA affects the cytoskeleton to regulate cell movement. We found that the p21-activated kinase (PAK family member PakD is required for both the proliferation-inhibiting activity of AprA and CfaD and the chemorepellent activity of AprA. Similar to cells lacking AprA or CfaD, cells lacking PakD proliferate to a higher cell density than wild-type cells. Recombinant AprA and CfaD inhibit the proliferation of wild-type cells but not cells lacking PakD. Like AprA and CfaD, PakD affects proliferation but does not significantly affect growth (the accumulation of mass on a per-nucleus basis. In contrast to wild-type cells, cells lacking PakD are not repelled from a source of AprA, and colonies of cells lacking PakD expand at a slower rate than wild-type cells, indicating that PakD is required for AprA-mediated chemorepulsion. A PakD-GFP fusion protein localizes to an intracellular punctum that is not the nucleus or centrosome, and PakD-GFP is also occasionally observed at the rear cortex of moving cells. Vegetative cells lacking PakD show excessive actin-based filopodia-like structures, suggesting that PakD affects actin dynamics, consistent with previously characterized roles of PAK proteins in actin regulation. Together, our results implicate PakD in AprA/CfaD signaling and show that a PAK protein is required for proper chemorepulsive cell movement in Dictyostelium.

  10. The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family member PakD is required for chemorepulsion and proliferation inhibition by autocrine signals in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan E; Gomer, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, the secreted proteins AprA and CfaD function as reporters of cell density and regulate cell number by inhibiting proliferation at high cell densities. AprA also functions to disperse groups of cells at high density by acting as a chemorepellent. However, the signal transduction pathways associated with AprA and CfaD are not clear, and little is known about how AprA affects the cytoskeleton to regulate cell movement. We found that the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family member PakD is required for both the proliferation-inhibiting activity of AprA and CfaD and the chemorepellent activity of AprA. Similar to cells lacking AprA or CfaD, cells lacking PakD proliferate to a higher cell density than wild-type cells. Recombinant AprA and CfaD inhibit the proliferation of wild-type cells but not cells lacking PakD. Like AprA and CfaD, PakD affects proliferation but does not significantly affect growth (the accumulation of mass) on a per-nucleus basis. In contrast to wild-type cells, cells lacking PakD are not repelled from a source of AprA, and colonies of cells lacking PakD expand at a slower rate than wild-type cells, indicating that PakD is required for AprA-mediated chemorepulsion. A PakD-GFP fusion protein localizes to an intracellular punctum that is not the nucleus or centrosome, and PakD-GFP is also occasionally observed at the rear cortex of moving cells. Vegetative cells lacking PakD show excessive actin-based filopodia-like structures, suggesting that PakD affects actin dynamics, consistent with previously characterized roles of PAK proteins in actin regulation. Together, our results implicate PakD in AprA/CfaD signaling and show that a PAK protein is required for proper chemorepulsive cell movement in Dictyostelium.

  11. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Cuba. Activities in Centre for Technological Applications and Nuclear Development (CEADEN)[X-ray Fluorescence in the IAEA and its Member States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla-Alvarez, Roman [Centre for Technological Applications and Nuclear Development, CEADEN, Havana (Cuba)

    2007-08-15

    the detection limits. The development of a compact design holder for secondary target excitation (X-PRISM) and its combination with a digital signal processing spectrometer (DSP) allowed achieving a significant improvement in the instrumental sensitivity. This configuration has been successfully implemented in three laboratories of the IAEA Member States: CNEA Paraguay, OBIMAR (Puerto Quetzal, Guatemala) and CEAC (Cienfuegos, Cuba) in frame of various IAEA technical co-operation projects.

  12. Individual rights versus societal duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, E

    1999-10-29

    In 'bioethics', the rights to self-determination and to informed consent of the patient are prerequisites to every medical decision: paternalism is no longer a justifiable attitude. Hence, it seems that compulsory vaccination is an unacceptable praxis. Even John Stuart Mill. however, took into account other values: e.g. the duty not to harm others. This article is dedicated to the analysis of the historical development of these values and to their relevance for the ethics of vaccination. The acceptability of coercion is upheld, but no clear-cut answers are given in general: in every case the pros and cons of coercion are to be weighed carefully against each other.

  13. Evaluation of radiological medical practice during night duty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasu, J.P.; Rocher, L.; Miquel, A.; Rondeau, Y.; Blery, M.; Nguyen, D.T.; Spira, A.; Livartowski, J.; Ellrodt, A.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the radiological activity during night duty, in a University Hospital, during 100 days, the radiological activity has been evaluated from examinations requiring radiologist (including US and CT, special X-ray examinations). The urgent nature and the agreement between the suspected disease and the final diagnose have been compared with the level of the clinician (medical student, resident, senior). 981 radiological examinations were performed on an emergency basis. In 39%, the examination was urgent or very urgent and for 61% little urgent or non-urgent. The level of the clinician was correlated with the degree of emergency evaluated by the radiologist and with the agreement between suspected disease and the final diagnose (p<0.0001). During night duty, the medical activity in radiology is not justified only be emergency, but also the continuous hospital activities. Better formation of the physician is required to limit the number of examinations. (authors)

  14. Mental Health Concerns: Veterans & Active Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dialing 1-800-273-8255 and pressing 1. Mental Health Concerns There are three primary mental health concerns ... care or call 911. How Will Asking for Mental Health Treatment Affect My Career? Military personnel have always ...

  15. Banking and Financial Services Series. Duty Task List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for five occupations in the banking and financial services series. Each occupation is divided into seven or eight duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been…

  16. 19 CFR 159.38 - Rates for estimated duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) LIQUIDATION OF DUTIES Conversion of Foreign Currency § 159.38 Rates for estimated duties. For purposes of calculating estimated duties, the port director shall use the rate or rates... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rates for estimated duties. 159.38 Section 159.38...

  17. Duty Hour Reporting: Conflicting Values in Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John M; Loo, Lawrence K; Giang, Dan W

    2015-09-01

    Duty hour limits challenge professional values, sometimes forcing residents to choose between patient care and regulatory compliance. This may affect truthfulness in duty hour reporting. We assessed residents' reasons for falsifying duty hour reports. We surveyed residents in 1 sponsoring institution to explore the reasons for noncompliance, frequency of violations, falsification of reports, and the residents' awareness of the option to extend hours to care for a single patient. The analysis used descriptive statistics. Linear regression was used to explore falsification of duty hour reports by year of training. The response rate was 88% (572 of 650). Primary reasons for duty hour violations were number of patients (19%) and individual patient acuity/complexity (19%). Junior residents were significantly more likely to falsify duty hours (R = -0.966). Of 124 residents who acknowledged falsification, 51 (41%) identified the primary reason as concern that the program will be in jeopardy of violating the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hour limits followed by fear of punishment (34, 27%). This accounted for more than two-thirds of the primary reasons for falsification. Residents' falsification of duty hour data appears to be motivated by concerns about adverse actions from the ACGME, and fear they might be punished. To foster professionalism, we recommend that sponsoring institutions educate residents about professionalism in duty hour reporting. The ACGME should also convey the message that duty hour limits be applied in a no-blame systems-based approach, and allow junior residents to extend duty hours for the care of individual patients.

  18. Duty to disclose in medical genetics: a legal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelias, M Z

    1991-06-01

    As technical knowledge and public information in medical genetics continue to expand, the geneticist may expect to be held responsible for informing patients and clients about new developments in research and diagnosis. The long legal evolution of the physician's duty to disclose, and more recent findings of a physician's duty to recall former patients to inform them about newly discovered risks of treatment, indicate that medical geneticists may have a duty to disclose both current and future information about conditions that are or could be inherited. Recent case law supports findings of professional liability for both present and future disclosure, even in the absence of an active physician-patient relationship. The requirement of candid and complete disclosure will affect the counseling approach in testing for deleterious genes and in providing medical treatment for minors with hereditary diseases. Finding a duty to recall may impose further professional burdens on the geneticist to reach beyond the immediate counseling arena and to recontact patients, perhaps years after their initial visit to genetics clinic.

  19. Separately removable tubes in heavy duty heat exchanger assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neudeck, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    The invention is directed to removable heat exchanger tube assemblies in heavy duty equipment radiators in which the tubes are each separately removable if they become defective in service. An inwardly facing annular ledge or abutment is molded into the inside diameter of each upper and lower sealing member to receive the respective ends of the tubes and prevent vertical movement of the tubes in service. A flange or shoulder is also provided on the lower portions of each tube and engages the inside of the lower sealing member to further restrain downward movement of the tubes in service. Each tube may be removed by pushing the tube upwardly to overcome the upper ledge abutment and thereby lift the tube free of the lower seal. Each tube may then be removed sidewise from the radiator. Variations of the removable sealing arrangement can be made and are described herein

  20. 7 CFR 1250.336 - Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., education, or promotion programs, advertising agencies, public relations firms, public or private research... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Egg Research and Promotion Order Egg Board § 1250.336 Duties. The Board shall have the following duties: (a) To...

  1. Forgiveness and the Limits of Duty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archer, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Can there be a duty to forgive those who have wronged us? According to a popular view amongst philosophers working on forgiveness the answer is no. Forgiveness, it is claimed, is always elective. This view is rejected by Gamlund (2010a; 2010b) who argues that duties to forgive do exist and then

  2. Heavy-Duty Diesel Fuel Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's heavy-duty diesel fuel analysis program sought to quantify the hydrocarbon, NOx, and PM emission effects of diesel fuel parameters (such as cetane number, aromatics content, and fuel density) on various nonroad and highway heavy-duty diesel engines.

  3. Determination of the duty cycle of WLAN for realistic radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Wout; Pareit, Daan; Vermeeren, Günter; Naudts, Dries; Verloock, Leen; Martens, Luc; Moerman, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) are commonly deployed in various environments. The WLAN data packets are not transmitted continuously but often worst-case exposure of WLAN is assessed, assuming 100% activity and leading to huge overestimations. Actual duty cycles of WLAN are thus of importance for time-averaging of exposure when checking compliance with international guidelines on limiting adverse health effects. In this paper, duty cycles of WLAN using Wi-Fi technology are determined for exposure assessment on large scale at 179 locations for different environments and activities (file transfer, video streaming, audio, surfing on the internet, etc.). The median duty cycle equals 1.4% and the 95th percentile is 10.4% (standard deviation SD = 6.4%). Largest duty cycles are observed in urban and industrial environments. For actual applications, the theoretical upper limit for the WLAN duty cycle is 69.8% and 94.7% for maximum and minimum physical data rate, respectively. For lower data rates, higher duty cycles will occur. Although counterintuitive at first sight, poor WLAN connections result in higher possible exposures. File transfer at maximum data rate results in median duty cycles of 47.6% (SD = 16%), while it results in median values of 91.5% (SD = 18%) at minimum data rate. Surfing and audio streaming are less intensively using the wireless medium and therefore have median duty cycles lower than 3.2% (SD = 0.5-7.5%). For a specific example, overestimations up to a factor 8 for electric fields occur, when considering 100% activity compared to realistic duty cycles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic control of clock duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoxin (Inventor); Roper, Weston (Inventor); Seefeldt, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In general, this disclosure is directed to a duty cycle correction (DCC) circuit that adjusts a falling edge of a clock signal to achieve a desired duty cycle. In some examples, the DCC circuit may generate a pulse in response to a falling edge of an input clock signal, delay the pulse based on a control voltage, adjust the falling edge of the input clock signal based on the delayed pulse to produce an output clock signal, and adjust the control voltage based on the difference between a duty cycle of the output clock signal and a desired duty cycle. Since the DCC circuit adjusts the falling edge of the clock cycle to achieve a desired duty cycle, the DCC may be incorporated into existing PLL control loops that adjust the rising edge of a clock signal without interfering with the operation of such PLL control loops.

  5. Theory of Right – Duty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Elsan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying the history of philosophic thoughts, one finds out that more attention has been paid to “right” than its opposite term, “duty”. However, this issue has little been under discussion that if a single person comes to be subject to right and duty simultaneously or if ‘right’ is the only way to carry out duty, then how we can analyze the relations between right – duty holder and those who claim he is under obligation. The theory of right – duty tries to analyze this situation giving answers to the questions arise in this area. The impact of this theory on the responsibility of the government vis-à-vis the citizens is going to be under discussion too. مطالعه در تاریخ اندیشه‌های فلسفی بیانگر آن است که به «حق» بیش از واژة مقابل آن، یعنی «تکلیف»، توجه شده است. با این حال، این مسئله چندان مورد بحث نبوده که اگر عنوان حق و تکلیف, هم‌زمان در شخصی واحد جمع شود، یا اینکه حق تنها وسیلة انجام تکلیف باشد، آن‌گاه رابطة دارندة حق‌ـ تکلیف و مدعیان تعهد چنین شخصی را چگونه باید تحلیل کرد. «تئوری حق‌ـ تکلیف»، به دنبال تحلیل این وضعیت و پاسخ به مسائلی است که در این زمینه مطرح می‌شوند. اثر این تئوری در مسئولیت دولت در قبال شهروندان نیز موضوع بحث خواهد بود.

  6. Relationships between diagnoses of sexually transmitted infections and urinary tract infections among male service members diagnosed with urethritis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A previous MSMR report found that 42.8% of all incident (first-time) urinary tract infections (UTIs) in males, but only 0.4% of such UTIs in females, were diagnosed as "urethritis, unspecified" (ICD-9: 597.80). This study explored the possibility that many of the diagnoses of urethritis in males represented sexually transmitted infections (STIs), even though ICD-9: 597.80 is explicitly reserved for cases of urethritis that are deemed to not be sexually transmitted. Examined were relationships between diagnoses of urethritis, diagnoses of STIs, and recurrent diagnoses of UTIs. Male service members who received a diagnosis of "urethritis, unspecified" (ICD-9: 597.80) had an increased risk of a subsequent UTI diagnosis, especially of "urethritis, unspecified," compared to all male service members. Most service members who were diagnosed with "urethritis, unspecified" had no documented diagnoses of an STI in their Military Health System health records; however, recurrent UTIs were more common among service members who did have documented STIs. The most commonly diagnosed STIs in this study were "other non-gonococcal urethritis" (which includes that caused by Chlamydia trachomatis) and gonorrhea.

  7. In the line of duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, K

    1991-12-01

    In light of recent events that have raised ethical and legal dilemmas in the health care field, the author explains that nurses now have a duty to participate in the debate over these issues and to educate the public. The author, a staff nurse in the Abbott-Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis, explains that the city has recently witnessed a series of events with ethical overtones that have captured national attention. In one case, the hospital sought judicial guidance on whether an 87-year-old comatose women--dependent on a ventilator for over a year--should continue to receive the costly and labor-intensive care simply because the family desired it. Although the hospital argued that continuing to provide care would only prolong a futile life, the court ruled that only the family could make the decision of whether or not to continue care. Coincidentally, around the same time as the court case, Minneapolis hosted the International Special Olympics, and event that brought together individuals with mental and physical disabilities for athletic competition. The event illustrated that there is no consensus on the definition of a futile life. In one other event that captured national headlines, 2 physicians admitted that they had continued to practice medicine despite knowing that they were infected with the AIDS virus. These disclosures heightened the debate over mandatory HIV testing for health care workers--especially for health care workers who perform invasive procedures. This debate has raised a number of issues: confidentiality, the safety of patients, as well as the safety of health care workers. The author explains that such issues of life and death are often drowned in emotionalism and public hysteria. Nurses have a duty to see that the public is educated.

  8. Momasi Model in Need Assessment of Faculty Members of Alborz University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Esmaelzadeh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The first step in developing human resources to improve the performance of universities is to indentify accurate educational needs. Models may draw on a number of theories to help understand a particular problem in a certain setting or context. Momasi model is an integrated of the existing models in educational needs assessment field which has sufficient comprehensiveness of data collection. the aim of this study was application of Momasi model in need assessment of faculty members in seven areas duties. Methods: This study is a cross- sectional study which was formed based on Momasi model between34 faculty members of Alborz university. Results: Different areas of educational needs were respectively prioritized as: personal development, research, administrative and executive activities, education, health services and health promotion, and specialized activities outside the university. The most mean and standard deviation belong to area of research, The first priority in the area of research was the publications in English, in personal development area: familiarity with SPSS software ,and the area of education it was creativity nurture. Conclusion: Based on assessment results, research area in this needs assessment study has the most important priority and frequency. Therefore it is recommended that data gathered in research area section put in first priority for empowering for faculty members Of Alborz University.

  9. [Staff Satisfaction within Duty Hour Models: Longitudinal Survey on Suitability and Legal Conformity at a Surgical Maximum Care Department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelotz, C; Koplin, G; Pascher, A; Lohmann, R; Köhler, A; Pratschke, J; Haase, O

    2017-12-01

    Background Between the conflicting requirements of clinic organisation, the European Working Time Directive, patient safety, an increasing lack of junior staff, and competitiveness, the development of ideal duty hour models is vital to ensure maximum quality of care within the legal requirements. To achieve this, it is useful to evaluate the actual effects of duty hour models on staff satisfaction. Materials and Methods After the traditional 24-hour duty shift was given up in a surgical maximum care centre in 2007, an 18-hour duty shift was implemented, followed by a 12-hour shift in 2008, to improve handovers and reduce loss of information. The effects on work organisation, quality of life and salary were analysed in an anonymous survey in 2008. The staff survey was repeated in 2014. Results With a response rate of 95% of questionnaires in 2008 and a 93% response rate in 2014, the 12-hour duty model received negative ratings due to its high duty frequency and subsequent social strain. Also the physical strain and chronic tiredness were rated as most severe in the 12-hour rota. The 18-hour duty shift was the model of choice amongst staff. The 24-hour duty model was rated as the best compromise between the requirements of work organisation and staff satisfaction, and therefore this duty model was adapted accordingly in 2015. Conclusion The essential basis of a surgical department is a duty hour model suited to the requirements of work organisation, the Working Time Directive and the needs of the surgical staff. A 12-hour duty model can be ideal for work organisation, but only if augmented with an adequate number of staff members, the implementation of this model is possible without the frequency of 12-hour shifts being too high associated with strain on surgical staff and a perceived deterioration of quality of life. A staff survey should be performed on a regular basis to assess the actual effects of duty hour models and enable further optimisation. The much

  10. Finding Street Gang Members on Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Balasuriya, Lakshika; Wijeratne, Sanjaya; Doran, Derek; Sheth, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Most street gang members use Twitter to intimidate others, to present outrageous images and statements to the world, and to share recent illegal activities. Their tweets may thus be useful to law enforcement agencies to discover clues about recent crimes or to anticipate ones that may occur. Finding these posts, however, requires a method to discover gang member Twitter profiles. This is a challenging task since gang members represent a very small population of the 320 million Twitter users. ...

  11. Crossing borders: extraterritorial application of Australian directors’ duties

    OpenAIRE

    McKeown, Peter Julian Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Australian corporations operate in an increasingly international environment. It has intuitive appeal that Australian law should regulate the conduct of directors of Australian corporations even if it occurs outside Australia. This however can create tension with the competing rights of the foreign state in whose territory this conduct occurs to regulate such conduct. This thesis examines two questions. Firstly, does Australian law governing directors’ duties in fact apply to activities of a ...

  12. New offer for our members

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Evolution 2, your specialist for Outdoor Adventures Be it for a ski lesson, a parachute jump or for a mountain bike descent, come live an unforgettable experience with our outdoor specialists. Benefit from a 10 % discount on all activities: Offer is open to SA members and their family members living in the same household, upon presentation of the membership card. Offer available for all bookings made between 1 June 2018 and 30 May 2019. Offer available on all the Evoltion2 sites. A wide range of summer and winter activities. More information on http://evolution2.com/ Contact and reservation : +33 (0)4.50.02.63.35 management@evolution2.com

  13. Regulatory inspection of nuclear power plants in NEA member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronow, W.S.; Ilani, O.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing use of nuclear power and public interest in the safety controls led to the proposal by the sub-Committe on Licensing of the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations for a specialist meeting on regulatory inspection practices. This report which was prepared at the request of the sub-Committee to assist in the exchange of views and experience at the meeting reviews the response to a questionnaire on the systems employed, the scope and objectives and the effort involved in regulatory inspection throughout all stages of the life of a nuclear power plant. Other aspects of regulatory inspection activities are discussed including documentation, procedures for changes in technical specification and modifications to plant, powers and duties of regulatory inspection personnel and actions to be taken in the event of an accident or emergency. The report concludes with some comments on those aspects of regulatory inspection practices where further information and an exchange of experience might prove to be beneficial to Member countries. (author)

  14. Severe Neuropsychiatric Reaction in a Deployed Military Member after Prophylactic Mefloquine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan L. Peterson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of military personnel who have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan have reported a number of combat-related psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and traumatic brain injury. This case report involves a 27-year-old male active-duty US military service member who developed severe depression, psychotic hallucinations, and neuropsychological sequelae following the prophylactic use of the antimalarial medication mefloquine hydrochloride. The patient had a recent history of depression and was taking antidepressant medications at the time of his deployment to the Middle East. Psychiatrists and other health care providers should be aware of the possible neuropsychiatric side effects of mefloquine in deployed military personnel and should consider the use of other medications for malaria prophylaxis in those individuals who may be at increased risk for side effects.

  15. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durbin, N.; Moore, C.; Grant, T.; Fleming, T.; Hunt, P.; Martin, R.; Murphy, S.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Bittner, A.; Bramwell, A.; Macaulay, J.; Olson, J.; Terrill, E.; Toquam, J.

    1991-09-01

    This report presents an overview of the NRC licensees' implementation of the FFD program during the first full year of the program's operation and provides new information on a variety of FFD technical issues. The purpose of this document is to contribute to appropriate changes to the rule, to the inspection process, and to other NRC activities. It describes the characteristics of licensee programs, discusses the results of NRC inspections, updates technical information covered in previous reports, and identifies lessons learned during the first year. Overall, the experience of the first full year of licensees' FFD program operations indicates that licensees have functioning fitness for duty programs devoted to the NRC rule's performance objectives of achieving drug-free workplaces in which nuclear power plant personnel are not impaired as they perform their duties. 96 refs., 14 tabs

  16. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, N.; Moore, C.; Grant, T.; Fleming, T.; Hunt, P.; Martin, R.; Murphy, S.; Hauth, J.; Wilson, R.; Bittner, A.; Bramwell, A.; Macaulay, J.; Olson, J.; Terrill, E.; Toquam, J. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01

    This report presents an overview of the NRC licensees' implementation of the FFD program during the first full year of the program's operation and provides new information on a variety of FFD technical issues. The purpose of this document is to contribute to appropriate changes to the rule, to the inspection process, and to other NRC activities. It describes the characteristics of licensee programs, discusses the results of NRC inspections, updates technical information covered in previous reports, and identifies lessons learned during the first year. Overall, the experience of the first full year of licensees' FFD program operations indicates that licensees have functioning fitness for duty programs devoted to the NRC rule's performance objectives of achieving drug-free workplaces in which nuclear power plant personnel are not impaired as they perform their duties. 96 refs., 14 tabs.

  17. Powers and Duties of Corporate Affairs Commission

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mofasony

    POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE CORPORATE AFFAIRS. COMMISSION ... The Registrar-General is the Chief Executive of the Commission and is saddled .... Federal Board of Inland Revenue Department of the Ministry of Finance v). Register ...

  18. State duties of protection and fundamental rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Starck

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Duties of protection are duties of the state to protect certain legal interests of its citizens. They cover the interests of life, health, freedom and property and also protect some other interests and certain constitutionally recognised institutions. State duties of protection must be considered in connection with fundamental rights. The foundations of modern constitutionalism and attendant procedures are essential to develop guidelines for a constructive critique of the jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court. This is done with reference to the recent history of France, Germany and England. The historical excursus reveals that a single theory underlies the variety of constitutional states. The development of the constitutional state gave rise to the significance of the preservation of freedom through the maintenance of law and the separation of powers. This has given rise to various legal devices, based also in part on experience with moderate rule and earlier theories of the imperium limitatum.A textual analysis of the German Basic Law is undertaken to determine whether and how the duties of protection are expressly created. Furthermore, the duties that have been discovered in the Basic Law by the Federal Constitutional Court are considered. These duties include the protection of human life and health, personal freedom, the right to autonomous development of one's personality, freedom of science, research and teaching, marriage and the family, children, mothers, professional freedom, property and the protection of German nationals against foreign states. Finally the justification of such duties and the constitutional control of the manner of protection are considered.In a final section a critique of relevant constitutional jurisprudence is undertaken. It is argued that claims to protection cannot be directly binding law. They presuppose legislation. If statutory protection is connected with infringements of third-party fundamental rights

  19. Childhood adverse life events, disordered eating, and body mass index in US Military service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalar, Jennifer L; Barmine, Marissa; Druskin, Lindsay; Olsen, Cara H; Quinlan, Jeffrey; Sbrocco, Tracy; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian

    2018-03-02

    US service members appear to be at high-risk for disordered eating. Further, the military is experiencing unprecedented prevalence of overweight and obesity. US service members also report a high prevalence of childhood adverse life event (ALE) exposure. Despite consistent links between early adversity with eating disorders and obesity, there is a dearth of research examining the association between ALE exposure and disordered eating and weight in military personnel. An online survey study was conducted in active duty personnel to examine childhood ALE history using the Life Stressor Checklist - Revised, disordered eating using the Eating Disorder Examination - Questionnaire total score, and self-reported body mass index (BMI, kg/m 2 ). Among 179 respondents, multiple indices of childhood ALE were positively associated with disordered eating. Traumatic childhood ALE and subjective impact of childhood ALE were associated with higher BMI and these associations were mediated by disordered eating. Findings support evaluating childhood ALE exposure among service members with disordered eating and weight concerns. Moreover, findings support the need for prospective research to elucidate these relationships. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Natural Motives and the Motive of Duty: Hume and Kant on Our Duties to Others

    OpenAIRE

    Korsgaard, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Hume and Kant disagree about the motives involved in the performance of our duties to others. Hume thinks that natural virtues such as benevolence are best performed from “natural” motives, but that there are no natural motives for the performance of the “artificial” virtues, such as justice and fidelity to promises, which are performed from a sense of duty. Kant thinks all duties should be done from the motive of duty. In this paper, I examine the roots of the disagreement. If by a natural m...

  1. 19 CFR 141.1 - Liability of importer for duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Customs by the broker. (c) Claim against estate of importer. The claim of the Government for unpaid duties... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liability of importer for duties. 141.1 Section 141.1 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT...

  2. 19 CFR 151.22 - Estimated duties on raw sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estimated duties on raw sugar. 151.22 Section 151... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.22 Estimated duties on raw sugar. Estimated duties shall be taken on raw sugar, as defined...

  3. Heavy-Duty Vehicle Thermal Management | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavy-Duty Vehicle Thermal Management Heavy-Duty Vehicle Thermal Management Infrared image of a control materials and equipment on heavy-duty vehicles. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL Illustration of a Ray David, NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers are assisting heavy-duty

  4. 19 CFR 12.62 - Enforcement; duties of Customs officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement; duties of Customs officers. 12.62 Section 12.62 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...; duties of Customs officers. (a) In accordance with the authority contained in sections 10 and 12 of the...

  5. 19 CFR 10.625 - Refunds of excess customs duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refunds of excess customs duties. 10.625 Section 10.625 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... and Apparel Goods § 10.625 Refunds of excess customs duties. (a) Applicability. Section 205 of the...

  6. Towards a Duty of Care for Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, G.; Curtis, A.; Allan, C.

    2010-04-01

    The decline in biodiversity is a worldwide phenomenon, with current rates of species extinction more dramatic than any previously recorded. Habitat loss has been identified as the major cause of biodiversity decline. In this article we suggest that a statutory duty of care would complement the current mix of policy options for biodiversity conservation. Obstacles hindering the introduction of a statutory duty of care include linguistic ambiguity about the terms ‘duty of care’ and ‘stewardship’ and how they are applied in a natural resource management context, and the absence of a mechanism to guide its implementation. Drawing on international literature and key informant interviews we have articulated characteristics of duty of care to reduce linguistic ambiguity, and developed a framework for implementing a duty of care for biodiversity at the regional scale. The framework draws on key elements of the common law ‘duty of care’, the concepts of ‘taking reasonable care’ and ‘avoiding foreseeable harm’, in its logic. Core elements of the framework include desired outcomes for biodiversity, supported by current recommended practices. The focus on outcomes provides opportunities for the development of innovative management practices. The framework incorporates multiple pathways for the redress of non-compliance including tiered negative sanctions, and positive measures to encourage compliance. Importantly, the framework addresses the need for change and adaptation that is a necessary part of biodiversity management.

  7. Glued structural members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell C. Moody; Jen Y. Liu

    1999-01-01

    Glued structural members are manufactured in a variety of configurations. Structural composite lumber (SCL) products consist of small pieces of wood glued together into sizes common for solid-sawn lumber. Glued-laminated timber (glulam) is an engineered stress-rated product that consists of two or more layers of lumber in which the grain of all layers is oriented...

  8. CERN welcomes new members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Lithuania is on course to become an associate member of CERN, pending final approval by the Lithuanian parliament. Associate membership will allow representatives of the Baltic nation to take part in meetings of the CERN Council, which oversees the Geneva-based physics lab.

  9. DUBNA: Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The political upheaval in what was the Soviet Union was reflected in an Extraordinary Plenipotentiaries Committee of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Member States, held in Dubna, near Moscow, on 10-13 December, with representatives of eleven sovereign republics of the former Soviet State taking part

  10. 75 FR 43933 - Request for nominations for members to serve on National Institute of Standards and Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... duties. Selection of ISPAB members will not be limited to individuals who are nominated. Nominations that.... Selection of MEP Advisory Board members will not be limited to individuals who are nominated. Nominations... in its official role as the private sector policy advisor of the Institute is concerned. Each such...

  11. Team Members | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Team Members The Foregut Team includes experts in the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases listed below. Our clinical experience and active research offers patients the highest quality care in the setting of groundbreaking clinical trials.

  12. Design of a continuous duty cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgley, D.W.

    1985-05-01

    A continuous duty cryopump system was designed and developed that comprises a self-contained cryopump for installation into a vacuum chamber, and a microprocessor controller for automatic operation. This deuterium pump has two units in a single housing, arranged so that one is pumping while the other is being regenerated. Liquid helium-cooled, finned sections in each unit pump deuterium by condensation, and a third pump integral within the cryopump housing collects the regenerated gas. A microprocessor unit controls distribution of liquid and gaseous helium, used for conditioning the pumping units, and operates remote actuators for the regeneration. Software provides fully automatic, timed sequencing of the repetitive cryopump events which include: cooldown of the pumping units, opening of the louvers isolating the unit from the vacuum chamber, closing of the louvers, and warming up of the unit for regeneration. Default values in the software can be reprogrammed by the operator through the keyboard in response to prompts displayed on the computer. An override allows the operator to control the cryopump manually by activating switches on a control panel. Interlocks to prevent cryogen lockup are included in the software

  13. Ascofuranone stimulates expression of adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor through the modulation of mitogen activated protein kinase family members in 3T3-L1, murine pre-adipocyte cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Young-Chae, E-mail: ycchang@cu.ac.kr [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu 705-718 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Ji, E-mail: hjcho.dr@gmail.com [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu 705-718 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascofuranone increases expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitors for MEK and JNK increased the expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ascofuranone significantly suppressed phosho-ERK, while increasing phospho-p38. -- Abstract: Ascofuranone, an isoprenoid antibiotic, was originally isolated as a hypolipidemic substance from a culture broth of the phytopathogenic fungus, Ascochyta visiae. Adiponectin is mainly synthesized by adipocytes. It relieves insulin resistance by decreasing the plasma triglycerides and improving glucose uptake, and has anti-atherogenic properties. Here, we found that ascofuranone increases expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma}, a major transcription factor for adiponectin, in 3T3-L1, murine pre-adipocytes cell line, without promoting accumulation of lipid droplets. Ascofuranone induced expression of adiponectin, and increases the promoter activity of adiponectin and PPRE, PPAR response element, as comparably as a PPAR{gamma} agonist, rosiglitazone, that stimulates lipid accumulation in the preadipocyte cell line. Moreover, inhibitors for MEK and JNK, like ascofuranone, considerably increased the expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma}, while a p38 inhibitor significantly suppressed. Ascofuranone significantly suppressed ERK phosphorylation, while increasing p38 phosphorylation, during adipocyte differentiation program. These results suggest that ascofuranone regulates the expression of adiponectin and PPAR{gamma} through the modulation of MAP kinase family members.

  14. Ascofuranone stimulates expression of adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor through the modulation of mitogen activated protein kinase family members in 3T3-L1, murine pre-adipocyte cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Young-Chae; Cho, Hyun-Ji

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ascofuranone increases expression of adiponectin and PPARγ. ► Inhibitors for MEK and JNK increased the expression of adiponectin and PPARγ. ► Ascofuranone significantly suppressed phosho-ERK, while increasing phospho-p38. -- Abstract: Ascofuranone, an isoprenoid antibiotic, was originally isolated as a hypolipidemic substance from a culture broth of the phytopathogenic fungus, Ascochyta visiae. Adiponectin is mainly synthesized by adipocytes. It relieves insulin resistance by decreasing the plasma triglycerides and improving glucose uptake, and has anti-atherogenic properties. Here, we found that ascofuranone increases expression of adiponectin and PPARγ, a major transcription factor for adiponectin, in 3T3-L1, murine pre-adipocytes cell line, without promoting accumulation of lipid droplets. Ascofuranone induced expression of adiponectin, and increases the promoter activity of adiponectin and PPRE, PPAR response element, as comparably as a PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone, that stimulates lipid accumulation in the preadipocyte cell line. Moreover, inhibitors for MEK and JNK, like ascofuranone, considerably increased the expression of adiponectin and PPARγ, while a p38 inhibitor significantly suppressed. Ascofuranone significantly suppressed ERK phosphorylation, while increasing p38 phosphorylation, during adipocyte differentiation program. These results suggest that ascofuranone regulates the expression of adiponectin and PPARγ through the modulation of MAP kinase family members.

  15. ARTISTIC ACTIVITY AMONG THE ELDERLY AS A FORM OF LIFELONG LEARNING, BASED UPON THE OPINIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WROCŁAW’S UNIVERSITY OF THE THIRD AGE HANDICRAFT GROUP MEMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Działa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the topic of creativity and artistic activity among elderly people in the context of claims related to the idea of lifelong learning. It discusses the phenomenon of creativity and how senior citizens can benefit from it. The artistic activity of people in the age of late adulthood is also discussed in that context. In the last part of the text, theoretical claims are collated with what the artistic groups’ elderly members themselves said during a focus group interview

  16. Evaluation of activities promoting fruits and vegetables consumption in 8 countries members of the Global Alliance for Promoting Fruit and Vegetable Consumption “5 a day” – AIAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Moñino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article compiles practices promoting fruits and vegetables consumption launched by eight members of AIAM5 - Global Alliance for Promoting Fruits and Vegetables Consumption “5 a day”, with the aim of identifying best practices in the approaching strategies, programs and activities to encourage fruits and vegetables consumption. Material and Methods: A questionnaire designed to categorize and identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, cost-effectiveness, feasibility and practices with the greatest potential to adapt to national health promoting policies, was used. Questionnaires from eight countries from AIAM5 were evaluated: Mexico, Chile, Costa Rica, Venezuela, Colombia, Bolivia, Nicaragua and Spain. Results: One of the greatest strengths of the organizations of AIAM5 is the prestige and the professional, technical and academic knowledge that back up their activities. One evident weakness of their strategies is the lack of measuring practices of the impact of the implemented activities, and the evaluation of their cost-effectiveness. It was also observed that some of the entities that carry out the programs “5 a day” are conceived as social enterprises with diverse types of partners and allies. Conclusions: It is recommended that AIAM5 members should make an effort to measure the impact of their activities and interventions by setting quantifiable goals, and using indicators to assess the degree of achievement of the activities carried out. It is also recommended to exploit the niche of opportunities provided by the Corporate Social Responsibility to help them achieve their objectives of promoting fruits and vegetables consumption.

  17. Supporting Members and Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.

  18. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Summer is coming, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 25 € instead of 31 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your Staff Association member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.  

  19. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 24 € instead of 30 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  20. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Summer is coming, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 24 € instead of 30 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children under 100 cm. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  1. [Comment on] BOSP members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The new Board on Ocean Science and Policy (BOSP) (Eos, June 7, 1983, p. 402) met for the first time on May 4. John B. Slaughter, former director of the National Science Foundation and now chancellor of the University of Maryland in College Park, is the board's chairman. Other board members are D. James Baker, Jr. (University of Washington, Seattle); Kirk Bryan (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University); John P. Craven (University of Hawaii); Charles L. Drake (Dartmouth College); Paul M. Fye (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Edward D. Goldberg (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); G. Ross Heath (Oregon State University); Judith T. Kildow (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); John A. Knauss (University of Rhode Island); James J. McCarthy (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University); H. William Menard (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); C. Barry Raleigh (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Roger Revelle (University of California, San Diego); David A. Ross (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Brian J. Rothschild (University of Maryland); William M. Sackett (University of South Florida); John H. Steele (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Carl Wunsch (MIT). Wallace Broecker (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), an original board member, resigned after the first meeting. Broecker told Eos that combining the science and policy boards resulted in a new board whose mission is too broad. A new board member will be appointed in Broecker's place

  2. Reminder concerning vaccinations prior to departure on duty travel

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    For many years the Medical Service has administered vaccination to any member of the personnel going on duty travel to countries with an endemic risk of disease. An appointment must be made with the medical secretariat (73186) a minimum of one month before departure. The doctors will write you a prescription for the vaccines and medicines at the time of the appointment. The vaccines and medicines will be reimbursed by your health insurance and the remaining balance by the relevant CERN Department. During the appointment you will be provided with documentation on the risks and the preventive measures to be taken. This service is offered to you but is not compulsory and you remain entirely free to choose your doctor. Please do not forget to bring your vaccination card to the appointment.

  3. An upstream open reading frame represses expression of Lc, a member of the R/B family of maize transcriptional activators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiani, R.D. Jr.; Wessler, S.R. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The R/B genes of maize encode a family of basic helix-loop-helix proteins that determine where and when the anthocyanin-pigment pathway will be expressed in the plant. Previous studies showed that allelic diversity among family members reflects differences in gene expression, specifically in transcription initiation. The authors present evidence that the R gene Lc is under translational control. They demonstrate that the 235-nt transcript leader of Lc represses expression 25- to 30-fold in an in vivo assay. Repression is mediated by the presence in cis of a 38-codon upstream open reading frame. Furthermore, the coding capacity of the upstream open reading frame influences the magnitude of repression. It is proposed that translational control does not contribute to tissue specificity but prevents overexpression of the Lc protein. The diversity of promoter and 5' untranslated leader sequences among the R/B genes provides an opportunity to study the coevolution of transcriptional and translational mechanisms of gene regulation. 36 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) 4 from rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is a novel member inducing ROS accumulation and cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liang, E-mail: 18710470987@163.com; Ye, Chaofei, E-mail: yechaofei001@163.com; Zhao, Rui, E-mail: 571828628@qq.com; Li, Xin, E-mail: 1458272138@qq.com; Liu, Wu-zhen, E-mail: happywuzhenliu@163.com; Wu, Feifei, E-mail: 283915941@qq.com; Yan, Jingli, E-mail: yanjingli512@163.com; Jiang, Yuan-Qing, E-mail: jiangyq@nwafu.edu.cn; Yang, Bo, E-mail: yangwl@nwafu.edu.cn

    2015-11-27

    MAPKKK is the largest family of MAPK cascade, which is known to play important roles in plant growth, development and immune responses. So far, only a few have been functionally characterized even in the model plant, Arabidopsis due to the potential functional redundancy of MAPKKK. We previously identified and cloned a few MAPKKK family genes from rapeseed. In this study, BnaMAPKKK4 was characterized as a member in eliciting accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death. This is accompanied with accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), anthocyanin as well as nuclear DNA fragmentation. The transcript abundance of a series of ROS accumulation, cell death, and defense response related genes were up-regulated by the expression of MAPKKK4. Further investigation identified BnaMAPKKK4 elicited ROS through the downstream MPK3. These results indicate that BnaMAPKKK4 and its downstream components function in the ROS-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Expression of rapeseed MAPKKK4 induced ROS accumulation and cell death in leaves. • Cell death induced by MAPKKK4 is associated with membrane lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. • MAPKKK4 interacts with MKK5 and MPK3. • MAPKKK4-induced ROS accumulation and cell death require downstream WIPK and SIPK. • MAPKKK4 is a novel MAPKKK modulating ROS accumulation and cell death.

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) 4 from rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is a novel member inducing ROS accumulation and cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Liang; Ye, Chaofei; Zhao, Rui; Li, Xin; Liu, Wu-zhen; Wu, Feifei; Yan, Jingli; Jiang, Yuan-Qing; Yang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    MAPKKK is the largest family of MAPK cascade, which is known to play important roles in plant growth, development and immune responses. So far, only a few have been functionally characterized even in the model plant, Arabidopsis due to the potential functional redundancy of MAPKKK. We previously identified and cloned a few MAPKKK family genes from rapeseed. In this study, BnaMAPKKK4 was characterized as a member in eliciting accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death. This is accompanied with accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), anthocyanin as well as nuclear DNA fragmentation. The transcript abundance of a series of ROS accumulation, cell death, and defense response related genes were up-regulated by the expression of MAPKKK4. Further investigation identified BnaMAPKKK4 elicited ROS through the downstream MPK3. These results indicate that BnaMAPKKK4 and its downstream components function in the ROS-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Expression of rapeseed MAPKKK4 induced ROS accumulation and cell death in leaves. • Cell death induced by MAPKKK4 is associated with membrane lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation. • MAPKKK4 interacts with MKK5 and MPK3. • MAPKKK4-induced ROS accumulation and cell death require downstream WIPK and SIPK. • MAPKKK4 is a novel MAPKKK modulating ROS accumulation and cell death.

  6. Isolation, structure, synthesis, and activity of a new member of the calcitonin gene-related peptide family from frog skin and molecular cloning of its precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seon, A A; Pierre, T N; Redeker, V; Lacombe, C; Delfour, A; Nicolas, P; Amiche, M

    2000-02-25

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide has been extracted from the skin exudate of a single living specimen of the frog Phyllomedusa bicolor and purified to homogeneity by a two-step protocol. A total volume of 250 microl of exudate yielded 380 microg of purified peptide. Mass spectrometric analysis and gas phase sequencing of the purified peptide as well as chemical synthesis and cDNA analysis were consistent with the structure SCDTSTCATQRLADFLSRSGGIGSPDFVPTDVSANSF amide and the presence of a disulfide bridge linking Cys(2) and Cys(7). The skin peptide, named skin calcitonin gene-related peptide, differs significantly from all other members of the calcitonin gene-related peptide family of peptides at nine positions but binds with high affinity to calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in the rat brain and acts as an agonist in the rat vas deferens bioassay with potencies equal to those of human CGRP. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction coupled with cDNA cloning and sequencing demonstrated that skin calcitonin gene-related peptide isolated in the skin is identical to that present in the frog's central and enteric nervous systems. These data, which indicate for the first time the existence of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the frog skin, add further support to the brain-skin-gut triangle hypothesis as a useful tool in the identification and/or isolation of mammalian peptides that are present in the brain and other tissues in only minute quantities.

  7. Fitness for duty - a regulator's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.H.; Hall, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Fitness for duty is a legal, moral, emotional, and political issue. It is therefore that type of issue that one would expect industry to run from, opting instead for government intervention and prescriptive regulations. This would allow the industry to hide behind the shield of doing what is necessary to comply. But fitness for duty is also a rational business issue. It involves getting a reasonable return on the investment in the people who are necessary to run the nuclear industry. It is within this context that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has exercised its discretion to not undertake new rule making, instead giving the industry the mandate of pursuing this issue. The NRC has deferred rule making as long as the industry programs are effective in producing the desired results. The NRC has also retained the right to follow up on operational events and to evaluate the effectiveness of the programs in place. The industry, under the leadership of NUMARC, has risen to this challenge and has adopted the August 1985 Edison Electric Institute (EEI) fitness-for-duty program guidelines for implementation by all utilities. In evaluating the effectiveness of programs, the NRC is conducting inspections at some utilities. These inspections have confirmed that the EEI guidelines are being used as the basis for fitness-for-duty programs. Even though the nuclear industry has taken a generally strong stand on fitness for duty and has adopted reasonable guidelines for its assurance, there still remain several challenges

  8. 20 CFR 404.1330 - Who is a member of a uniformed service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or Air Force, when ordered to annual training duty for at least 14 days and while performing official... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is a member of a uniformed service. 404.1330 Section 404.1330 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND...

  9. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.63) is Palau which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 2 March 2007. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 144 Member States became Members

  10. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.67) is Cambodia which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 November 2009. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 151 Member States became Members

  11. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.64) is Nepal which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 8 July 2008. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 145 Member States became Members

  12. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.61) are Belize, Mozambique and Malawi, which deposited their Instruments of Acceptance of the Statute on 31 March 2006, 18 September 2006 and 2 October 2006 respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 142 Member States became Members

  13. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.66) are Bahrain, Burundi, Congo and Lesotho which deposited their Instruments of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 June 2009, 24 June 2009, 15 July 2009 and 13 July 2009, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 150 Member States became Members

  14. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.62) is Montenegro which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 30 October 2006. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 143 Member States became Members

  15. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.66) are Bahrain, Burundi, Congo and Lesotho which deposited their Instruments of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 June 2009, 24 June 2009, 15 July 2009 and 13 July 2009, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 150 Member States became Members [ru

  16. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.67) is Cambodia which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 November 2009. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 151 Member States became Members [fr

  17. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.61) are Belize, Mozambique and Malawi, which deposited their Instruments of Acceptance of the Statute on 31 March 2006, 18 September 2006 and 2 October 2006 respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 142 Member States became Members [fr

  18. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.66) are Bahrain, Burundi, Congo and Lesotho which deposited their Instruments of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 June 2009, 24 June 2009, 15 July 2009 and 13 July 2009, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 150 Member States became Members [fr

  19. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.65) is the Sultanate of Oman which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 5 February 2009. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 146 Member States became Members [fr

  20. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.59) is the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, which deposited the instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 23 November 2004. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 138 Member States became Members

  1. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.66) are Bahrain, Burundi, Congo and Lesotho which deposited their Instruments of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 June 2009, 24 June 2009, 15 July 2009 and 13 July 2009, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 150 Member States became Members [es

  2. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.67) is Cambodia which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 November 2009. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 151 Member States became Members [es

  3. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.60) is Chad, which deposited the instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 2 November 2005. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 139 Member States became Members

  4. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.65) is the Sultanate of Oman which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 5 February 2009. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 146 Member States became Members [es

  5. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.58) is Kyrgyzstan, which deposited the instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 10 September 2003. The list shows the dates on which the present 137 Member States became Members

  6. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.65) is the Sultanate of Oman which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 5 February 2009. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 146 Member States became Members

  7. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.67) is Cambodia which deposited its Instrument of Acceptance of the Statute on 23 November 2009. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 151 Member States became Members [ru

  8. Effect of doxorubicin, oxaliplatin, and methotrexate administration on the transcriptional activity of BCL-2 family gene members in stomach cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florou, Dimitra; Patsis, Christos; Ardavanis, Alexandros; Scorilas, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Defective apoptosis comprises the main reason for tumor aggressiveness and chemotherapy tolerance in solid neoplasias. Among the BCL-2 family members, whose mRNA or protein expression varies considerably in different human malignancies, BCL2L12 is the one for which we have recently shown its propitious prognostic value in gastric cancer. The purpose of the current work was to investigate the expression behavior of BCL2L12, BAX, and BCL-2 in human stomach adenocarcinoma cells following their exposure to anti-tumor substances. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and trypan blue methods assessed the impact of doxorubicin, oxaliplatin and methotrexate on AGS cells' viability and growth. Following isolation from cells, total RNA was reverse-transcribed to cDNA. Quantification of target genes' expression was performed with real-time PCR using SYBR Green detection system. The relative changes in their mRNA levels between drug-exposed and untreated cells were calculated with the comparative Ct method (2(-ddCt)). All three drugs, as a result of their administration to AGS cancer cells for particular time intervals, provoked substantial fluctuations in the transcriptional levels of the apoptosis-related genes studied. While BAX was principally upregulated, striking similar were the notable changes regarding BCL-2 and BCL2L12 expression in our cellular system. Our findings indicate the growth suppressive effects of doxorubicin, oxaliplatin and methotrexate treatment on stomach carcinoma cells and the implication of BCL2L12, BAX, and BCL-2 expression profiles in the molecular signaling pathways triggered by chemotherapy.

  9. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  10. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21,50 € instead of 27 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12:00 p.m. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  11. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 23 € instead of 29 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 6 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12:00 p.m. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 33 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 33 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  12. Cryogenic support member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R.C.; Gonczy, J.D.; Nicol, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is described for restraining a cryogenic system comprising; a rod having a depression at a first end. The rod is made of non-metallic material. The non-metallic material has an effectively low thermal conductivity; a metallic plug; and a metallic sleeve. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod and assembled thereto such that the plug is disposed inside the depression of the rod. The sleeve is disposed over the depression in the rod and the rod is clamped therebetween. The shrink-fit clamping the rod is generated between the metallic plug and the metallic sleeve

  13. Law enforcement duties and sudden cardiac death among police officers in United States: case distribution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvarigou, Vasileia; Farioli, Andrea; Korre, Maria; Sato, Sho; Dahabreh, Issa J; Kales, Stefanos N

    2014-11-18

    To assess the association between risk of sudden cardiac death and stressful law enforcement duties compared with routine/non-emergency duties. Case distribution study (case series with survey information on referent exposures). United States law enforcement. Summaries of deaths of over 4500 US police officers provided by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund and the Officer Down Memorial Page from 1984 to 2010. Observed and expected sudden cardiac death counts and relative risks for sudden cardiac death events during specific strenuous duties versus routine/non-emergency activities. Independent estimates of the proportion of time that police officers spend across various law enforcement duties obtained from surveys of police chiefs and front line officers. Impact of varying exposure assessments, covariates, and missing cases in sensitivity and stability analyses. 441 sudden cardiac deaths were observed during the study period. Sudden cardiac death was associated with restraints/altercations (25%, n=108), physical training (20%, n=88), pursuits of suspects (12%, n=53), medical/rescue operations (8%, n=34), routine duties (23%, n=101), and other activities (11%, n=57). Compared with routine/non-emergency activities, the risk of sudden cardiac death was 34-69 times higher during restraints/altercations, 32-51 times higher during pursuits, 20-23 times higher during physical training, and 6-9 times higher during medical/rescue operations. Results were robust to all sensitivity and stability analyses. Stressful law enforcement duties are associated with a risk of sudden cardiac death that is markedly higher than the risk during routine/non-emergency duties. Restraints/altercations and pursuits are associated with the greatest risk. Our findings have public health implications and suggest that primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention efforts are needed among law enforcement officers. © Varvarigou et al 2014.

  14. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  15. Thermal effects in concrete members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    When subjected to temperature changes and restrained from free movement, a member develops stresses. Restrained members are sometimes assumed to act independently of other members. A method of analysis and design for thermal stresses in such members is provided. The method of analysis, based on the ultimate strength concept, greatly reduces the computational efforts for determining thermal effects in concrete members. Available charts and tables and the recommendations given herein simplify the design. (Auth.)

  16. The inhibitory effect of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G) and its family members on the activity of cellular microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G or APOBEC3G) and its fellow cytidine deaminase family members are potent restrictive factors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and many other retroviruses. However, the cellular function of APOBEC3G remains to be further clarified. It has been reported that APOBEC3s can restrict the mobility of endogenous retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons, suggesting that they can maintain stability in host genomes. However, APOBEC3G is normally cytoplasmic. Further studies have demonstrated that it is associated with an RNase-sensitive high molecular mass (HMM) and located in processing bodies (P-bodies) of replicating T-cells, indicating that the major cellular function of APOBEC3G seems to be related to P-body-related RNA processing and metabolism. As the function of P-body is closely related to miRNA activity, APOBEC3G could affect the miRNA function. Recent studies have demonstrated that APOBEC3G and its family members counteract miRNA-mediated repression of protein translation. Further, APOBEC3G enhances the association of miRNA-targeted mRNA with polysomes, and facilitates the dissociation of miRNA-targeted mRNA from P-bodies. As such, APOBEC3G regulate the activity of cellular miRNAs. Whether this function is related to its potent antiviral activity remains to be further determined.

  17. Light duty utility arm walkdown report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalley, J.L.

    1998-09-25

    This document is a report of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) drawing walkdown. The purpose of this walkdown was to validate the essential configuration of the LDUA in preparation of deploying the equipment in a Hanford waste tank. The LDUA system has, over the course of its development, caused the generation of a considerable number of design drawings. The number of drawings is estimated to be well over 1,000. A large number consist of vendor type drawings, furnished by both Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and SPAR Aerospace Limited (SPAR). A smaller number, approximately 200, are H-6 type drawing sheets in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) document control system. A preliminary inspection of the drawings showed that the physical configuration of the LDUA did not match the documented configuration. As a result of these findings, a scoping walkdown of 20 critical drawing sheets was performed to determine if a problem existed in configuration management of the LDUA system. The results of this activity showed that 18 of the 20 drawing sheets were found to contain errors or omissions of varying concern. Given this, Characterization Engineering determined that a walkdown of the drawings necessary and sufficient to enable safe operation and maintenance of the LDUA should be performed. A review team was assembled to perform a review of all of the drawings and determine the set which would need to be verified through an engineering walkdown. The team determined that approximately 150 H-6 type drawing sheets would need to be verified, 12 SPAR/PNNL drawing sheets would need to be verified and converted to H-6 drawings, and three to six new drawings would be created (see Appendix A). This report documents the results of that walkdown.

  18. Light duty utility arm walkdown report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalley, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This document is a report of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) drawing walkdown. The purpose of this walkdown was to validate the essential configuration of the LDUA in preparation of deploying the equipment in a Hanford waste tank. The LDUA system has, over the course of its development, caused the generation of a considerable number of design drawings. The number of drawings is estimated to be well over 1,000. A large number consist of vendor type drawings, furnished by both Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and SPAR Aerospace Limited (SPAR). A smaller number, approximately 200, are H-6 type drawing sheets in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) document control system. A preliminary inspection of the drawings showed that the physical configuration of the LDUA did not match the documented configuration. As a result of these findings, a scoping walkdown of 20 critical drawing sheets was performed to determine if a problem existed in configuration management of the LDUA system. The results of this activity showed that 18 of the 20 drawing sheets were found to contain errors or omissions of varying concern. Given this, Characterization Engineering determined that a walkdown of the drawings necessary and sufficient to enable safe operation and maintenance of the LDUA should be performed. A review team was assembled to perform a review of all of the drawings and determine the set which would need to be verified through an engineering walkdown. The team determined that approximately 150 H-6 type drawing sheets would need to be verified, 12 SPAR/PNNL drawing sheets would need to be verified and converted to H-6 drawings, and three to six new drawings would be created (see Appendix A). This report documents the results of that walkdown

  19. Swimming Upstream: Faculty and Staff Members From Urban Middle Schools in Low-Income Communities Describe Their Experience Implementing Nutrition and Physical Activity Initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Bryn Austin, S; Bauer, Katherine W; Patel, Aarti; Prokop, Lisa A

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Addressing childhood overweight has become a top priority in the United States. Modification of school policies and practices has been used in an attempt to address the overweight epidemic among children and adolescents. Culturally diverse urban schools in low-income communities attempting to improve nutrition and increase physical activity may face unique challenges in the school environment. A better understanding is needed about school environments and how they may affect the...

  20. HTLV-1 infection is associated with a history of active tuberculosis among family members of HTLV-1-infected patients in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, K; González, E; Schrooten, W; Vanham, G; Gotuzzo, E

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the association between human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) and a lifetime history of active tuberculosis (TB) among relatives of HTLV-1-infected patients. We reviewed clinical charts of all relatives of HTLV-1-infected index cases who attended our institute in Lima from 1990-2004. The data of 1233 relatives was analysed; 394 (32.0%) were HTLV-1 positive. Eighty-one subjects (6.6%) had a history of active TB, including 45/394 (11.4%) HTLV-1-positive and 36/839 (4.3%) HTLV-1-negative relatives (Phistory: HTLV-1 infection (adjusted OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.6-3.9), age (adjusted OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5 per 10-year age increase) and relation to the index case (adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.1, for siblings vs. spouses of index cases). In conclusion, HTLV-1 infection may increase the susceptibility to active TB. In populations where both infections are frequent, such an association could affect the dynamics of TB.

  1. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    The Courir shops propose the following offer: 15% discount on all articles (not on sales) in the Courir shops (Val Thoiry, Annemasse and Neydens) and 5% discount on sales upon presentation of your Staff Association membership card and an identity card before payment. Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 €. Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Bonus! Free for children under 5.

  2. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    La banque LCL propose aux membres de l’Association du personnel les avantages suivants : – Un barème Privilège sur le Prêt immobilier – Des avantages tarifaires sur l’épargne, notamment l’assurance-vie. – Un taux préférentiel de prêt à la consommation. En outre, jusqu’au 30 septembre 2013, elle offre 50€ à tous les nouveaux clients, membres de l'Association du personnel. Summer is here, enjoy our offers for the aquatic parcs! Tickets "Zone terrestre" : 21 € instead of de 26 €. Access to Aqualibi : 5 euros instead of 8 euros on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Free car park. * * * * * * * Full day ticket: – Children : 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF &...

  3. Offers for our members

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    The warm weather arrives, it's time to take advantage of our offers Walibi and Aquapark! Walibi : Tickets "Zone terrestre": 21 € instead of 26 € Access to Aqualibi: 5 € instead of 8 € on presentation of your SA member ticket. Free for children (3-11 years old) before 12 h 00. Free for children under 3, with limited access to the attractions. Car park free. * * * * * Aquaparc : Half-day ticket (5 hours): – Children: 26 CHF instead of 35 CHF – Adults : 32 CHF instead of 43 CHF Day ticket: – Children: 30 CHF instead of 39 CHF – Adults : 36 CHF instead of 49 CHF Free for children under 5.

  4. Higher Education: More Information Could Help Education Determine the Extent to Which Eligible Servicemembers Serving on Active Duty Benefited from Relief Provided by Lenders and Schools. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-07-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    2006-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001, over 1.3 million members of the armed forces have been deployed in service to the United States. Congress enacted the Higher Education Relief Opportunities for Students (HEROES) Act to recognize the needs of those servicemembers who are deployed in the midst of pursuing postsecondary education or repaying student loans.…

  5. Spectroscopic studies and antibacterial activities of some new 16-membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes derived from thiocarbohydrazide and pentane-2,4-dione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D. P.; Kumar, Krishan; Chopra, Rimpi Mehani ne'e.

    2011-02-01

    A series of macrocyclic complexes of the type [M(C 12H 20N 8S 2)X 2]; where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II); X = Cl -, NO 3-, CH 3COO - has been synthesized by template condensation of thiocarbohydrazide and pentane-2,4-dione in the presence of divalent metal salts in methanolic medium. The complexes have been characterized with the help of elemental analyses, conductance measurements, magnetic measurements, electronic, NMR, IR, EPR and MS spectral studies. The low value of molar conductance indicates them to be non-electrolytes. On the basis of various studies a distorted octahedral geometry may be proposed for all of these complexes. These metal complexes were also tested for their in vitro antibacterial activities against some Gram-positive bacterial strains, i.e., Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus and two Gram-negative bacterial strains, i.e., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida. The results obtained were compared with standard antibiotics, Chloramphenicol and Streptomycin and found that some of the synthesized complexes show good antibacterial activities as compared to the standard antibiotics.

  6. Expression patterns of signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family members in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage analysis studies (GWAS) studies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) identified the 1q23 region on human chromosome 1, containing the Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family (SLAMF) cluster of genes, as a lupus susceptibility locus. The SLAMF molecules (SLAMF1-7) are immunoregulatory receptors expressed predominantly on hematopoietic cells. Activation of cells of the adaptive immune system is aberrant in SLE and dysregulated expression of certain SLAMF molecules has been reported. We examined the expression of SLAMF1-7 on peripheral blood T cells, B cells, monocytes, and their respective differentiated subsets, in patients with SLE and healthy controls in a systematic manner. SLAMF1 levels were increased on both T cell and B cells and their differentiated subpopulations in patients with SLE. SLAMF2 was increased on SLE CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The frequency of SLAMF4+ and SLAMF7+ central memory and effector memory CD8+ T cells was reduced in SLE patients. Naïve CD4+ and CD8+ SLE T cells showed a slight increase in SLAMF3 levels. No differences were seen in the expression of SLAMF5 and SLAMF6 among SLE patients and healthy controls. Overall, the expression of various SLAMF receptors is dysregulated in SLE and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Duties of care on the Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.; van Engers, T.; Wiersma, C.; Jasserand, C.; Abel, W.

    2011-01-01

    Internet Service Providers currently find themselves in the spotlight, both in a national and international context, with regard to their relationship both with governments and other private parties, on for example questions of (civil) liability. The paper focuses on duties of care as concerns the

  8. 7 CFR 1220.212 - Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... administrative functions as it may deem necessary and define the duties and determine the compensation of each... information, and industry information programs contemplated therein. (g) To maintain such books and records... accounting with respect to the receipt and disbursement of all funds entrusted to it. (h) With the approval...

  9. 7 CFR 1210.328 - Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., advertising or promotion, and the payment of the costs thereof with funds received pursuant to this Plan; (e... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan National Watermelon Promotion Board § 1210.328 Duties. The...

  10. 29 CFR 541.700 - Primary duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other types of duties; the amount of time spent performing exempt work; the employee's relative freedom... employees for the kind of nonexempt work performed by the employee. (b) The amount of time spent performing.... Thus, employees who spend more than 50 percent of their time performing exempt work will generally...

  11. NGO Duties in Relation to Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philips, J.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298979446

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the moral duties that human rights NGOs, such as Amnesty International, and development NGOs, such as Oxfam, have in relation to human rights – especially in relation to the human right to a decent standard of living. The mentioned NGOs are powerful new agents on the global

  12. Light Duty Truck Characteristics, Historical Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    The report is a collection of data concerning physical, operating, performance, and market characteristics of light duty trucks for the model years 1972 and 1975 thru 1977. The data is stored on tape in DOT/TSC DEC System 10 computer system. Informat...

  13. 7 CFR 915.29 - Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... duties of such officers; (b) To appoint such employees, agents, and representatives as it may deem... of growers or groups of growers as may be deemed necessary and to pay the travel expenses incurred by... the committee shall not pay the travel expenses of more than three such representatives in connection...

  14. Light duty utility arm software requirements specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    This document defines the software requirements for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. It is intended to be used to guide the design of the application software, to be a basis for assessing the application software design, and to establish what is to be tested in the finished application software product

  15. 7 CFR 1209.39 - Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duties. 1209.39 Section 1209.39 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... statements to be prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles and to be audited by an...

  16. 7 CFR 1215.30 - Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duties. 1215.30 Section 1215.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... statements to be prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles and to be audited by an...

  17. Light Duty Utility Arm Software Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    This plan describes how validation testing of the software will be implemented for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm System (LDUA). The purpose of LDUA software validation testing is to demonstrate and document that the LDUA software meets its software requirements specification

  18. Light duty utility arm startup plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    This plan details the methods and procedures necessary to ensure a safe transition in the operation of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. The steps identified here outline the work scope and identify responsibilities to complete startup, and turnover of the LDUA to Characterization Project Operations (CPO)

  19. Cultural Safety and the Duty of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Leon C.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the notion of cultural safety in relation to the duty of care mandate assigned to child welfare workers when the state intervenes in family life, focusing on the vulnerabilities of rural and indigenous youth in New Zealand to cultural racism. Asserts that child welfare professionals have a professional obligation to enhance their cultural…

  20. 7 CFR 993.36 - Duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., which are necessary in connection with the performance of its official duties; (d) To select, from among... of its anticipated expenditures and the recommended rate of assessment for the ensuing crop year, and... submit to the Secretary quarterly statements of the financial operations of the committee, exclusive of...

  1. Private duty home care: what it means to real people across the nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Private duty home care is growing rapidly to accommodate the needs of more and more seniors, disabled persons, and those with chronic conditions as these populations themselves are fast expanding and projected to continue to do so in the coming years and decades. The services that private duty/privately paid home care providers deliver each day to individuals across the United States can be absolutely essential to allowing them to remain in their own homes and communities leading as active and healthy lives as possible and continuing to contribute in the work force and to society as they are able. Requirements vary from state to state, and while most private duty agencies provide nonmedical companionship, homemaker, and personal care services--often described as assistance with activities of daily living--some incorporate licensed medical care as well.

  2. 76 FR 44574 - Antidumping Duty Investigation and Countervailing Duty Investigation of Hard Red Spring Wheat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Investigation and Countervailing Duty Investigation of Hard Red Spring Wheat From Canada: Notice of Court... of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (``CAFC''), in Canadian Wheat Board v. United States, 2010-1083 (Fed. [[Page 44575

  3. Performance concerns for high duty fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, V.J.; Gutierrez, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the goals of the nuclear industry is to achieve economic performance such that nuclear power plants are competitive in a de-regulated market. The manner in which nuclear fuel is designed and operated lies at the heart of economic viability. In this sense reliability, operating flexibility and low costs are the three major requirements of the NPP today. The translation of these three requirements to the design is part of our work. The challenge today is to produce a fuel design which will operate with long operating cycles, high discharge burnup, power up-rating and while still maintaining all design and safety margins. European Fuel Group (EFG) understands that to achieve the required performance high duty/energy fuel designs are needed. The concerns for high duty design includes, among other items, core design methods, advanced Safety Analysis methodologies, performance models, advanced material and operational strategies. The operational aspects require the trade-off and evaluation of various parameters including coolant chemistry control, material corrosion, boiling duty, boron level impacts, etc. In this environment MAEF is the design that EFG is now offering based on ZIRLO alloy and a robust skeleton. This new design is able to achieve 70 GWd/tU and Lead Test Programs are being executed to demonstrate this capability. A number of performance issues which have been a concern with current designs have been resolved such as cladding corrosion and incomplete RCCA insertion (IRI). As the core duty becomes more aggressive other new issues need to be addressed such as Axial Offset Anomaly. These new issues are being addressed by combination of the new design in concert with advanced methodologies to meet the demanding needs of NPP. The ability and strategy to meet high duty core requirements, flexibility of operation and maintain acceptable balance of all technical issues is the discussion in this paper. (authors)

  4. Setting standards for planning off duty and audit of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Linda; Minchin, Anne; Pickard, Jane

    The off duty or rostering system is an important part of managing any ward or department. This article looks at the issues that need to be considered when drawing up and managing off duty. It recommends standards for off-duty planning and shares the results of an audit carried out against some of these standards in one NHS trust.

  5. 32 CFR 935.21 - Civil rights, powers, and duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Civil Law § 935.21 Civil rights, powers, and duties. In any case in... the laws of the United States or this part, the civil rights, powers, and duties as they obtain under... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civil rights, powers, and duties. 935.21 Section...

  6. Light-Duty Vehicle Thermal Management | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light-Duty Vehicle Thermal Management Light-Duty Vehicle Thermal Management Image of a semi improving the thermal efficiency of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) while maintaining the thermal comfort that utility vehicles, vans, and light trucks in use on U.S. roads, and the average American drives 11,300

  7. Chemistry, Courtrooms, and Common Sense. Part I: Negligence and Duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, J. Ric

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are concepts involved in legal liability for laboratory accidents. The focus of this article is on negligence, duty, and responsibility issues. Highlighted are the basis of a lawsuit, negligent tort, duty and breech of duty, and cause and harm. Thirty-one cases are cited. (CW)

  8. 46 CFR 111.25-15 - Duty cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Duty cycle. 111.25-15 Section 111.25-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motors § 111.25-15 Duty cycle. Each motor must be rated for continuous duty, except a motor for an...

  9. 40 CFR 1033.530 - Duty cycles and calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duty cycles and calculations. 1033.530... CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM LOCOMOTIVES Test Procedures § 1033.530 Duty cycles and calculations. This section describes how to apply the duty cycle to measured emission rates to calculate cycle...

  10. Antidumping duties, undertakings and foreign direct investment in the EU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderbos, R.A.; Vandenbussche, H.; Veugelers, R.

    2004-01-01

    We study the effects of EU antidumping policy when foreign firms can ‘jump’ antidumping duties through foreign direct investment (FDI) in the EU. We show that duty jumping or duty pre-empting FDI occurs if the EU administration has broader objectives than protecting EU industry's profitability and

  11. 20 CFR 702.402 - Employer's duty to furnish; duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Care and Supervision § 702.402 Employer's duty to furnish; duration. It is the duty of the employer to furnish appropriate medical care (as defined in § 702.401(a)) for the employee's injury, and for such... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employer's duty to furnish; duration. 702.402...

  12. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The document lists the 135 Member States of the Agency as of 19 March 2003. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/56) is the Republic of Honduras. The dates on which the present 135 Member States became Members are given in an Attachment. It also shows the States whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  13. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document lists the 130 Member States of the Agency as of 1 December 1999. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/52) is Angola. The dates on which the present 130 Member States became Members, and the state Honduras) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute are given in an Attachment

  14. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.55) is the Republic of Botswana, which deposited the instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 20 March 2002. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 134 Member States became Members. It also shows the State whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference, but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  15. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The document lists the 132 Member States of the Agency as of 1 June 2001. The new Members since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/53) are Central African Republic and Azerbaijan. The dates on which the present 132 Member States became Members are given in an Attachment. It also shows the States whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  16. 78 FR 79662 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... Secretary, for Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Operations, through Melissa Skinner, Director, Office III... Duty Operations, through Melissa Skinner, Director, Office III Antidumping and Countervailing Duty..., Deputy Assistant Secretary, for Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Operations, through Melissa Skinner...

  17. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.69) is the Commonwealth of Dominica, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 17 February 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 153 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government

  18. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.70) is Papua New Guinea, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 April 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 154 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government

  19. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.69) is the Commonwealth of Dominica, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 17 February 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 153 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [es

  20. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.74) is Swaziland, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 15 February 2013. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 159 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government

  1. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.71) is Rwanda, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 September 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 155 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government

  2. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.68) is the Lao People's Democratic Republic which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 November 2011. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 152 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statue with the depositary Government [fr

  3. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.73) is Trinidad and Tobago, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 9 November 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 158 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [fr

  4. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.70) is Papua New Guinea, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 April 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 154 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [ru

  5. Family members' experiences of autopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppewal, F; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Background. The experiences of family members will teach us how to handle an autopsy, the ultimate quality assessment tool. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine surviving family members' experience of autopsy. Method. Seven GPs were asked to approach surviving family members of

  6. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.76) is Brunei Darussalam, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 18 February 2014. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 162 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [fr

  7. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.70) is Papua New Guinea, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 April 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 154 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [fr

  8. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.71) is Rwanda, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 September 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 155 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [fr

  9. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.69) is the Commonwealth of Dominica, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 17 February 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 153 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [fr

  10. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 42nd revision of INFCIRC/2 lists the 113 Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency as of 1 January 1993. It includes Slovenia as a new Member State as of 21 September 1992, Cambodia replaces the former name ''Democratic Kampuchea'' and Czechoslovakia was deleted as it ceased to be a member of the Agency as of 1 January 1993 (INFCIRC/417)

  11. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.68) is the Lao People's Democratic Republic which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 November 2011. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 152 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statue with the depositary Government [es

  12. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.73) is Trinidad and Tobago, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 9 November 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 158 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [es

  13. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.70) is Papua New Guinea, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 April 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 154 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [es

  14. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.71) is Rwanda, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 September 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 155 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [es

  15. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.76) is Brunei Darussalam, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 18 February 2014. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 162 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [es

  16. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.72) are Fiji and Togo, which deposited their instruments of acceptance of the Statute on 2 November 2012 and 1 November 2012, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 157 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government

  17. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.76) is Brunei Darussalam, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 18 February 2014. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 162 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government

  18. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.73) is Trinidad and Tobago, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 9 November 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 158 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government

  19. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.68) is the Lao People's Democratic Republic which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 November 2011. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 152 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statue with the depositary Government

  20. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.71) is Rwanda, which deposited its instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 4 September 2012. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 155 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [ru

  1. Personal resilience and coping Part II: Identifying resilience and coping among U.S. military service members and veterans with implications for work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Valerie; Liu, Baoxia

    2016-05-27

    U.S. military personnel face challenging situations including frequent deployments, family separations, and exposure to war. Identifying coping strategies used by the most resilient service members and veterans could positively influence military resiliency training programs. The purposes of this paper are to investigate the relationship between coping and resilience among U.S. military active service members and veterans, to identify the coping strategies used by those considered most resilient, and to discuss coping and resilience as they relate to the workplace. U.S. military active service members and veterans (N = 191) completed a demographic survey and two self-report questionnaires: The 14-Item Resilience Scale [1] and the Brief COPE [2]. Active duty service members had higher resilience scores than veterans (p  0.05). Active service members' resilience was predicted by their use of positive reframing and less use of self-blame as coping strategies, accounting for 52.3% of the variance (R2 = 0.523, F(2, 60) = 32.92, p = 0.000). Veterans' resilience was predicted by longer time-in-service, greater use of humor, and less use of self-blame as coping strategies, explaining 44.8% of the variance (R2 = 0.448, F(3, 116) = 31.408, p = 0.000). This research identifies the positive coping strategies, and least-used negative coping strategies, of the U.S. service members and veterans in our study population with higher resilience scores. Incorporating this information into military- or veteran-based resilience training is likely to increase training effectiveness.

  2. Inhibition of TRPA1 channel activity in sensory neurons by the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family member, artemin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shenglan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transient receptor potential (TRP channel subtype A1 (TRPA1 is known to be expressed on sensory neurons and respond to changes in temperature, pH and local application of certain noxious chemicals such as allyl isothiocyanate (AITC. Artemin is a neuronal survival and differentiation factor and belongs to the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF family. Both TRPA1 and artemin have been reported to be involved in pathological pain initiation and maintenance. In the present study, using whole-cell patch clamp recording technique, in situ hybridization and behavioral analyses, we examined the functional interaction between TRPA1 and artemin. Results We found that 85.8 ± 1.9% of TRPA1-expressing neurons also expressed GDNF family receptor alpha 3 (GFR α3, and 87.5 ± 4.1% of GFRα3-expressing neurons were TRPA1-positive. In whole-cell patch clamp analysis, a short-term treatment of 100 ng/ml artemin significantly suppressed the AITC-induced TRPA1 currents. A concentration-response curve of AITC resulting from the effect of artemin showed that this inhibition did not change EC50 but did lower the AITC-induced maximum response. In addition, pre-treatment of artemin significantly suppressed the number of paw lifts induced by intraplantar injection of AITC, as well as the formalin-induced pain behaviors. Conclusions These findings that a short-term application of artemin inhibits the TRPA1 channel's activity and the sequential pain behaviors suggest a role of artemin in regulation of sensory neurons.

  3. Women in Physics in Estonia: Many Duties, One Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasik, Helle

    2009-04-01

    In Estonia, women and men have equal legal rights. Women are expected to earn their living like men—and unlike men, to be the main (often the only) caregiver for the children. In the family women do most of the unpaid work, spending twice the amount of time on household duties as men. Laws about public preschool child care and child support obligations for noncustodial parents exist, but these laws are not always realized in practice. A generous policy of benefits for children under 1.5 years provides some relief for mothers. It is a challenge to balance a woman's traditional load of unpaid duties with the high demands of a science career. As in many other countries, with every step up the academic ladder the underrepresentation of women in science becomes more evident. Physics and engineering are perceived as male areas and women active in these areas are often treated as exceptions. Most obstacles met by women in science are difficult to recognize and neutralize because they are deeply informal. Activities for "gender and science" that exceed the limits of sociological study have no long tradition here and are yet finding their place in Estonian society.

  4. Variations in the incidence and burden of illnesses and injuries among non-retiree service members in the earliest, middle, and last 6 months of their careers, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uptegraft, Colby C; Stahlman, Shauna

    2018-06-01

    This report uses routinely collected data in the Defense Medical Surveillance System (DMSS) to characterize the incidence and burden of medical conditions throughout the careers of service members separating from the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces between 1 October 2014 and 30 September 2015. Three surveillance periods between 30 September 2000 and 30 September 2015 were defined by each individual's time in service: early (first 6 months), middle (middle 6 months), and late (last 6 months). Overall, separating service members were most often aged 25-34 years (59.4%), male (84.0%), non-Hispanic white (64.0%), junior enlisted (52.4%), in the Marine Corps (33.1%), serving in a repair/engineering occupation (33.0%), and had never deployed (52.5%). The top five burden of disease categories across surveillance periods by sex were remarkably similar, including mental health disorders, which exhibited similar upward trends across the three surveillance periods (males: 1.3%, 17.0%, and 35.6%; females: 1.8%, 15.1%, and 32.4%, respectively). The most common diagnoses exhibiting upward, downward, or bimodal trends by incidence rate differences were mental health disorders, respiratory infections/diseases, and musculoskeletal diseases, respectively.

  5. Master plan nurse duty roster using the 0-1 goal programming technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Wan Rosmanira; Jenal, Ruzzakiah

    2013-04-01

    The scheduling of nurses is particularly challenging because of the nature of the work which is around the clock. In addition, inefficient duty roster can have an effect on the nurses well being as well as their job satisfaction. In nurse scheduling problem (NSP), nurses are generally allocated to periods of work over a specified time horizon. A typical length of the schedule varies from a few weeks to a month. The schedule will be consistently rebuilt after the specified time period and will result in a time-consuming task for the administrative staff involved. Moreover, the task becomes overwhelming when the staff needs to consider the previous duty rosters in order to maintain the quality of schedules. Therefore, this study suggests the development of a master plan for a nurse duty roster for approximately one year. The master plan starts with the development of a blue print for the nurse duty roster using a 0-1 goal programming technique. The appropriate working period for this blue print is formulated based on the number of night shifts and the number of required nurses for night shift per schedule. Subsequently, the blue print is repeated to complete the annual nurse duty roster. These newly developed procedures were then tested on several data sets. The test results found that the master plan has successfully distributed the annual workload evenly among nurses. In addition, the master plan allows nurses to arrange their career and social activities in advance.

  6. Electrofishing power requirements in relation to duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L.E.; Dolan, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Under controlled laboratory conditions we measured the electrical peak power required to immobilize (i.e., narcotize or tetanize) fish of various species and sizes with duty cycles (i.e., percentage of time a field is energized) ranging from 1.5% to 100%. Electrofishing effectiveness was closely associated with duty cycle. Duty cycles of 10-50% required the least peak power to immobilize fish; peak power requirements increased gradually above 50% duty cycle and sharply below 10%. Small duty cycles can increase field strength by making possible higher instantaneous peak voltages that allow the threshold power needed to immobilize fish to radiate farther away from the electrodes. Therefore, operating within the 10-50% range of duty cycles would allow a larger radius of immobilization action than operating with higher duty cycles. This 10-50% range of duty cycles also coincided with some of the highest margins of difference between the electrical power required to narcotize and that required to tetanize fish. This observation is worthy of note because proper use of duty cycle could help reduce the mortality associated with tetany documented by some authors. Although electrofishing with intermediate duty cycles can potentially increase effectiveness of electrofishing, our results suggest that immobilization response is not fully accounted for by duty cycle because of a potential interaction between pulse frequency and duration that requires further investigation.

  7. 21st Century Professional Skill Training Programs for Faculty Members--A Comparative Study between Virginia Tech University, American University & King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Majed, Asma; Al-Kathiri, Fatima; Al-Ajmi, Sara; Al-Hamlan, Suad

    2017-01-01

    The 21st century faculty member is expected to teach, engage the learner, absorb new discoveries and rely on different knowledge in the execution of duties. This calls for up-to-date skills for instruction, assessment, and identification of opportunities by faculty members to promote learning. This paper investigates the prospects of promoting…

  8. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, A. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Patel, D. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bertram, K. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  9. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-03-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  10. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 86 - Tables for Production Compliance Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Heavy-Duty Vehicles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables for Production Compliance Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Heavy-Duty Vehicles, Including Light-Duty Trucks XII Appendix XII to... Appendix XII to Part 86—Tables for Production Compliance Auditing of Heavy-Duty Engines and Heavy-Duty...

  12. 78 FR 53128 - Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... changes, including, but not limited to, changes to corporate structure, acquisitions of new companies or... government control and, thus, should be assigned a single antidumping duty deposit rate. It is the Department... government control of its export activities to be entitled to a separate rate, the Department analyzes each...

  13. 75 FR 77831 - Lightweight Thermal Paper From Germany: Notice of Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-14

    ..., (2) thermal active coating, (3) top coating, (4) basis weight, (5) maximum optical density units, (6...) of the Act. Citing Stainless Steel Bar from India,\\6\\ and Gray Portland Cement and Clinker From... Cement and Clinker From Mexico; Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 58 FR 25803...

  14. Cost-effective energy management for hybrid electric heavy-duty truck including battery aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, H.T.; Bosch, van den P.P.J.; Kessels, J.T.B.A.; Huisman, R.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Battery temperature has large impact on battery power capability and battery life time. In Hybrid Electric Heavy-duty trucks (HEVs), the high-voltage battery is normally equipped with an active Battery Thermal Management System (BTMS) guaranteeing a desired battery life time. Since the BTMS can

  15. Analysis of Fixed Duty Cycle Hysteretic Flyback Converter for Firing Set Applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, Thomas Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This paper analyzes several performance aspects of the fixed-duty-cycle, hysteretic flyback converter topology typically used in firing sets. Topologies with and without active pulse-by-pulse current limiting are considered, and closed-form expressions in terms of basic operating parameters are derived.

  16. Clinical negligence and duty of candour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekar, Vinita; Singh, Mark; Shekar, Kishore; Brennan, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The Department of Health is considering imposing a legal duty of candour on health care providers to ensure that an apology and explanation are given to patients when errors occur during medical treatment. This aims to improve quality of care and reduce adverse events during medical treatment. We present the current system of clinical negligence and the future of medical ethics. We discuss relevant cases with regard to duty of candour, and highlight the existence of serious imbalances in which patients' rights and corresponding ethical duties of professionals predominate over the responsibilities of patients themselves. It is known that most adverse events arise because of multiple factors for which no individual should be blamed. To improve healthcare services there is a need for a system in which lessons can be learnt from mistakes, and services can be improved in the interest of patient safety, and for transparency in the broad principles on which the decisions are based within which clinical performance is supervised and monitored. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nurse IOM members' contributions to the Institute of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Margaret; Holzemer, William L; Larson, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is the largest health care profession, and Institute of Medicine (IOM) nurse members have the potential to contribute to health policy through IOM activities. We studied reported activities of IOM nurse members. To describe activities of IOM nurse members within the IOM. An e-mail survey was conducted that asked nurse IOM members to assess self-reported IOM activities. Of 57 members, 47 had functioning e-mail addresses, and 33 usable responses were received. The survey consisted of 9 questions dealing with roles and responsibilities undertaken in the previous 5 years. Data analyses were descriptive. The data suggest that nurses have made considerable contributions to the IOM and their participation seems to be as high, or higher, than other disciplines. In an era of health care reform, there is additional opportunity for nurse IOM members to enhance their work in the IOM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transparency, Trust and Security: An Evaluation of the Insurer's Precontractual Duties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daleen Millard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transparency in insurance law attaches to the rights and duties of the parties, the relationships between insurers, insurance intermediaries such as agents and brokers, insurance supervisory law and insurance dispute resolution procedures. Regarding the rights and duties of the insurer and the prospective policyholder, it requires insurers to disclose precontractual information in a timely manner that is clear, understandable, legible and unambiguous. Transparency as a value is incredibly important in insurance contracts. This contribution focuses exclusively on the insurer's duty of disclosure during precontractual negotiations. Although the insured's duty of disclosure has enjoyed more attention in the past, the duty clearly applies to the insurance proposer as well as the insurer. The purpose of this contribution is to evaluate the nature and extent of the insurer's transparency duties as informed by both common and statutory laws. The insurer's duty is derived primarily from the statutory rights of access to information in accordance with the provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa and the Promotion of Access to Information Act. It is furthermore supported by specific insurance consumer protection law found in the detailed provisions on mandatory disclosures in the Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services Act, the Long-term Insurance Act, the Short-term Insurance Act and, finally, the Policyholder Protection Rules issued in accordance with these acts. Strict rules on advertising can be found in the General Code of Conduct issued under the FAIS Act. The Act furthermore specifically targets the activities of insurance intermediaries in precontractual disclosures. The fact that insurance products and services have been exempted from the scope of the Consumer Protection Act from 28 February 2014 should not diminish the insured's right to rely on universal consumer protection principles as envisaged by South African

  19. A Member of the p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Family Is Responsible for Transcriptional Induction of Dopa decarboxylase in the Epidermis of Drosophila melanogaster during the Innate Immune Response▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Monica M.; Primrose, David A.; Hodgetts, Ross B.

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila innate immunity is controlled primarily by the activation of IMD (immune deficiency) or Toll signaling leading to the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). IMD signaling also activates the JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) cascade, which is responsible for immune induction of non-antimicrobial peptide immune gene transcription though the transcription factor AP-1. Transcription of the Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) gene is induced in response to gram-negative and gram-positive septic injury, but not aseptic wounding. Transcription is induced throughout the epidermis and not specifically at the site of infection. Ddc transcripts are detectible within 2 h and remain high for several hours following infection with either gram-negative or gram-positive bacteria. Using Ddc-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs, we show that a conserved consensus AP-1 binding site upstream of the Ddc transcription start site is required for induction. However, neither the Toll, IMD, nor JNK pathway is involved. Rather, Ddc transcription depends on a previously uncharacterized member of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase family, p38c. We propose that the involvement of DDC in a new pathway involved in Drosophila immunity increases the levels of dopamine, which is metabolized to produce reactive quinones that exert an antimicrobial effect on invading bacteria. PMID:18519585

  20. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.72) are Fiji and Togo, which deposited their instruments of acceptance of the Statute on 2 November 2012 and 1 November 2012, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 157 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [ru

  1. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.72) are Fiji and Togo, which deposited their instruments of acceptance of the Statute on 2 November 2012 and 1 November 2012, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 157 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [fr

  2. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document lists the 129 Member States of the Agency as of 1 June 1999. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/51) is Benin. The dates on which the present 129 states became Members, and the state (Honduras) whose application for membership of the Agency has been recommended by the Board of Governors to be considered at the 43rd session of the General Conference are given in an Attachment

  3. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.72) are Fiji and Togo, which deposited their instruments of acceptance of the Statute on 2 November 2012 and 1 November 2012, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 157 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [es

  4. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The new member since the last list of Member States of the Agency was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.44) is Yemen. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the 122 States became members of the Agency, as well as the State whose application for membership of the Agency was approved by the General Conference, but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  5. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.75) are San Marino and the Bahamas, which deposited their instruments of acceptance of the Statute on 25 November 2013 and 7 January 2014, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 161 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [es

  6. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The new members since the last list of Member States of the Agency was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.42) are: Armenia, Coratia, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, the Marshall Islands, the Slovak Republic and Uzbekistan. The Attachment to the circular shows the dates on which the 120 States became members of the Agency, as well as those States whose application for membership of the Agency was approved by the General Conference, but who have not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  7. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document lists the 128 Member States of the Agency as of 18 September 1998. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/50) is Burkina Faso. In an attachment the dates on which the present 128 states became Members, and the state (Benin) whose application for membership of the Agency has been recommended by the Board of Governors to be considered at the 42nd session of the General Conference are given

  8. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.75) are San Marino and the Bahamas, which deposited their instruments of acceptance of the Statute on 25 November 2013 and 7 January 2014, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 161 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government

  9. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-13

    The new member since the last list of Member States of the Agency was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.44) is Yemen. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the 122 States became members of the Agency, as well as the State whose application for membership of the Agency was approved by the General Conference, but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute.

  10. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document lists the 127 Member States of the Agency as of 1 January 1998. The new Members since the last issue of of the list (INFCIRC/2/49) are Malta and the Republic of Moldova. In an attachment are given the dates on which the present 127 states become Members, the state (Burkina Faso) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  11. The members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-15

    The document lists the 127 Member States of the Agency as of 1 January 1998. The new Members since the last issue of of the list (INFCIRC/2/49) are Malta and the Republic of Moldova. In an attachment are given the dates on which the present 127 states become Members, the state (Burkina Faso) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute.

  12. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-18

    The document lists the 128 Member States of the Agency as of 18 September 1998. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/50) is Burkina Faso. In an attachment the dates on which the present 128 states became Members, and the state (Benin) whose application for membership of the Agency has been recommended by the Board of Governors to be considered at the 42nd session of the General Conference are given

  13. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-16

    The document lists the 129 Member States of the Agency as of 1 June 1999. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/51) is Benin. The dates on which the present 129 states became Members, and the state (Honduras) whose application for membership of the Agency has been recommended by the Board of Governors to be considered at the 43rd session of the General Conference are given in an Attachment.

  14. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.75) are San Marino and the Bahamas, which deposited their instruments of acceptance of the Statute on 25 November 2013 and 7 January 2014, respectively. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 161 Member States deposited instruments of ratification or acceptance of the Statute with the depositary Government [fr

  15. The Community Balance and Mobility Scale: A Pilot Study Detecting Impairments in Military Service Members With Comorbid Mild TBI and Psychological Health Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Marcy M; Williams, Kathy; Kodosky, Paula N; Dretsch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To compare the capacity of the Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CB&M) to identify balance and mobility deficits in Service Members (SMs) with mild traumatic brain injury and comorbid psychological health conditions (mTBI/PH) to other commonly used balance assessments. A clinical research institute that provides a 4-week, outpatient, interdisciplinary program for active-duty SMs with mTBI/PH. A nonrandomized, cross-sectional design that compared multiple measures between 2 groups-active duty SMs with (n = 8) and without (n = 8) the dual diagnosis of mTBI/PH. Gait speed, Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC), Functional Gait Assessment (FGA), and CB&M to assess functional balance among the community-dwelling, TBI population. Across all measures, the mTBI/PH group performed significantly worse (P ≤ .01) with the exception of the FGA. The abilities of all objective measures to distinguish participants with mTBI/PH from healthy controls ranged from fair to excellent (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.66-0.94). However, the CB&M showed the largest group differences in effect size (d = 2.6) and had the highest discriminate ability (AUC = 0.98; sensitivity 100%; specificity 88%). The CB&M appears to have higher sensitivity and specificity than other measures of balance in SMs with mTBI/PH. A higher cut score for the CB&M is needed for this population.

  16. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The new Members since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.54) are the Republic of Tajikistan, which deposited the instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 10 September 2001 and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, which deposited the instrument of acceptance of the Statute on 31 October 2001. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 133 Member States became Members. It also shows the States whose applications for membership of the Agency have been approved by the General Conference, but which have not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  17. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The document lists the 124 Member States of the Agency as of 1 September 1996. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/Rev.47) is Georgia. In an attachment are given the dates on which the 124 Member States became Members, the State (Latvia) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the State (Republic of Moldova) whose application for membership has been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference

  18. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.46) is Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 123 Member States became Members. It also shows the States whose applications for membership of the Agency have been approved by the General Conference but which have not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the State whose application for membership has been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference

  19. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    No new Member has joined the Agency since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.45). The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 122 Member States became Members. It also shows the State whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the States whose applications for membership have been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference

  20. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The document lists the 136 Member States of the Agency as of 6 May 2003. The new Members since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/57) are Eritrea and the Republic of Seychelles. Cambodia withdrew from the Agency with effect from 26 March 2003. The dates on which the present 136 Member States became Members are given in an Attachment. It also shows the States whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  1. The members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-10

    The document lists the 124 Member States of the Agency as of 1 September 1996. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/Rev.47) is Georgia. In an attachment are given the dates on which the 124 Member States became Members, the State (Latvia) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the State (Republic of Moldova) whose application for membership has been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference.

  2. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-11

    No new Member has joined the Agency since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.45). The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 122 Member States became Members. It also shows the State whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the States whose applications for membership have been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference.

  3. The members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-26

    The new Member since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.46) is Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 123 Member States became Members. It also shows the States whose applications for membership of the Agency have been approved by the General Conference but which have not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the State whose application for membership has been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference.

  4. Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle Duty Cycles for Electric Powertrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Kenneth; Bennion, Kevin; Miller, Eric; Prohaska, Bob

    2016-03-02

    NREL's Fleet Test and Evaluation group has extensive in-use vehicle data demonstrating the importance of understanding the vocational duty cycle for appropriate sizing of electric vehicle (EV) and power electronics components for medium- and heavy-duty EV applications. This presentation includes an overview of recent EV fleet evaluation projects that have valuable in-use data that can be leveraged for sub-system research, analysis, and validation. Peak power and power distribution data from in-field EVs are presented for four different vocations, including class 3 delivery vans, class 6 delivery trucks, class 8 transit buses, and class 8 port drayage trucks, demonstrating the impacts of duty cycle on performance requirements.

  5. A call of duty in hard times: Duty to vote and the Spanish Economic Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Galais

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although scarce, the literature addressing the effects of the economy on voter turnout and political attitudes has yielded mixed results. By using individual, longitudinal data from Spain—a country devastated by the Great Recession—our study illuminates how the latest economic crisis has impacted citizens’ perceptions of voting. We analyze how economic conditions and perceptions of the economy have transformed the belief that voting is a civic duty, which is one of the strongest attitudinal predictors of turnout. Our results suggest that hard times slightly weaken citizens’ sense of civic duty, particularly among the youngest. However, the adverse effects of the economic crisis are compensated by the positive effects of the electoral context, and as a consequence there is no aggregate decline in civic duty during the period examined (2010–2012.

  6. Stratigraphy, artefact industries and hominid associations for Sterkfontein, member 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuman, K; Clarke, R J

    2000-06-01

    A revised stratigraphy for the early hominid site of Sterkfontein (Gauteng Province, South Africa) reveals a complex distribution of infills in the main excavation area between 2.8 and 1.4 m.y.a, as well as deposits dating to the mid to late Pleistocene. New research now shows that the Member 4 australopithecine breccia (2.8-2.6 Ma) extends further west than was previously thought, while a late phase of Member 4 is recognized in a southern area. The artefact-bearing breccias were defined sedimentologically as Member 5, but one supposed part of these younger breccias, the StW 53 infill, lacks in situ stone tools, although it does appear to post-date 2.6 Ma when artefacts first appear in the archaeological record. The StW 53 hominid, previously referred to Homo habilis, is here argued to be Australopithecus. The first artefact-bearing breccia of Member 5 is the Oldowan Infill, estimated at 2-1.7 Ma. It occupies a restricted distribution in Member 5 east and contains an expedient, flake-based tool industry associated with a few fossils of Paranthropos robustus. An enlarged cave opening subsequently admitted one or more Early Acheulean infills associated in Member 5 west with Homo ergaster. The artefacts attest to a larger site accumulation between ca. 1.7 and 1.4 Ma, with more intensive use of quartzite over quartz and a subtle but important shift to large flakes and heavier-duty tools. The available information on palaeoenvironments is summarized, showing an overall change from tropical to sub-tropical gallery forest, forest fringe and woodland conditions in Member 4 to more open woodland and grassland habitats in the later units, but with suggestions of a wet localized topography in the Paranthropus -bearing Oldowan Infill. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Leading Millennials Motivating And Leading Millennial Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-20

    the first to experience a divorce rate that peaked in the 80’s at 50% of all 7 marriages in the United States. When they entered into the job ...aircraft. LTC MacGregor also commanded an active duty National Guard Recruiting and Retention Battalion for 2 years. Following her commands she served...recession in the early 90’s while simultaneously competing for jobs against Boomers with much more experience. The Generation X cohort was born

  8. [A case study on duty of care in professional nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Man; Liao, Chi-Chun

    2013-08-01

    Nurses are expected to discharge their duty of care effectively and professionally to prevent medical negligence. Only three articles have previously focused on medical negligence. Duty of care and medical negligence in nursing are topics that have been neglected in Taiwan. (1) Classify the duty of care of professional nurses; (2) Investigate the facts and disputes in the current case; (3) Clarify the legal issues involved with regard to duty-of-care violations in the current case; (4) Explore the causal relationships in a legal context between nurses' duty-of-care violations and patient harm / injury. Literature analysis and a case study are used to analyze Supreme Court Verdict No.5550 (2010). Duty of care for nursing professionals may be classified into seven broad categories. Each category has its distinct correlatives. In nursing practice, every nursing behavior has a corresponding duty. In this case, the case study nurse did not discharge her obstetric professional duty and failed to inform the doctor in a timely manner. Negligence resulted in prenatal death and the case study nurse was found guilty. In order to prevent committing a crime, nurses should gain a better understanding of their duty of care and adequately discharge these duties in daily practice.

  9. 40 CFR 86.1818-12 - Greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Greenhouse gas emission standards for... Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1818-12 Greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty... group of six greenhouse gases: Carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons...

  10. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials delivered by Members up to 30 June 1969 in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  11. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to 30 June 1975, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  12. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to 31 March 1974, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  13. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to the end of 1970, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  14. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to the end of 1972, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  15. Materials Delivered by Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-01-01

    In this document the Director General is reporting to the Members of the Agency, under Article IX. G of the Statute, the quantities of materials which Members had delivered up to the end of 1971, in compliance with requests the Agency had made under Article IX. D

  16. Working with Difficult Group Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes types of group members who are challenging in group settings including entitled, manipulative, and character-disordered clients. Provides suggestions for working with these group members, either as isolated cases or as homogenous populations, emphasizing the protection of other clients' rights. Includes 31 references. (Author/CRR)

  17. ADA members weigh in on critical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Karen; Ruesch, Jon D; Mikkelsen, Matthew C; Wagner, Karen Schaid

    2003-01-01

    Science, new technology, patient care, dental reimbursement and government regulations all affect today's dental practitioners. To find out more about how such challenges may affect current private practitioners, the American Dental Association conducted the 2000 Membership Needs and Opinions Survey. A questionnaire was sent to 6,310 ADA members in January 2000 with follow-up mailings in February, March and April 2000. Data collection was completed in July 2000. The survey included questions on critical professional issues, and on perceptions of the ADA and ADA priorities. A total of 3,558 completed surveys were received for an adjusted response rate of 59.5 percent. Members rated the identified issues' level of importance to them. The top three issues included "maintaining my ability to recommend the treatment option I feel is most appropriate for my patients," "receiving fair reimbursement for the dental services I provide," and "protecting myself, my staff and my patients from communicable diseases." New dentists found other items to be more significant to them compared with members overall. Although ADA members as a whole had similar views on critical issues facing dentistry and ADA priorities, there were significant differences regarding some issues. New dentists were far more concerned about securing funds for their practice and paying off debt than were all ADA members. Minority dentists expressed greater levels of concern about certain issues than did all ADA members. When planning and implementing ADA activities, the Association should continue to take into account members' relative rankings of professional issues and note issues of special interest to selected membership subgroups.

  18. 77 FR 40332 - Request for Nominations for Members To Serve on National Institute of Standards and Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... duties. Selection of ISPAB members will not be limited to individuals who are nominated. Nominations that... to individuals who are nominated. Nominations that are received and meet the requirements will be... policy advisor of NIST is concerned. Each such report shall identify areas of program emphasis for NIST...

  19. 20 CFR 404.1019 - Work as a member of a uniformed service of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Force Reserve Officers Training Corps, when ordered to annual training duty for 14 days or more... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Work as a member of a uniformed service of the United States. 404.1019 Section 404.1019 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION...

  20. Light Duty Utility Arm System applications for tank waste remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carteret, B.A.

    1994-10-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System is being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Technology Development (OTD, EM-50) to obtain information about the conditions and contents of the DOE's underground storage tanks. Many of these tanks are deteriorating and contain hazardous, radioactive waste generated over the past 50 years as a result of defense materials production at a member of DOE sites. Stabilization and remediation of these waste tanks is a high priority for the DOE's environmental restoration program. The LDUA System will provide the capability to obtain vital data needed to develop safe and cost-effective tank remediation plans, to respond to ongoing questions about tank integrity and leakage, and to quickly investigate tank events that raise safety concerns. In-tank demonstrations of the LDUA System are planned for three DOE sites in 1996 and 1997: Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper provides a general description of the system design and discusses a number of planned applications of this technology to support the DOE's environmental restoration program, as well as potential applications in other areas. Supporting papers by other authors provide additional in-depth technical information on specific areas of the system design