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Sample records for active contour models

  1. Measurement of laser welding pool geometry using a closed convex active contour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Rui; Zhang, Pu; Duan, Aiqing; Xiao, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computer vision method to measure geometric parameters of the weld pool in a deep penetration CO 2 laser welding system. Accurate measurement was achieved by removing a huge amount of interference caused by spatter, arc light and plasma to extract the true weld pool contour. This paper introduces a closed convex active contour (CCAC) model derived from the active contour model (snake model), which is a more robust high-level vision method than the traditional low-level vision methods. We made an improvement by integrating an active contour with the information that the weld pool contour is almost a closed convex curve. An effective thresholding method and an improved greedy algorithm are also given to complement the CCAC model. These influences can be effectively removed by using the CCAC model to acquire and measure the weld pool contour accurately and relatively fast. (paper)

  2. An improved active contour model for glacial lake extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H.; Chen, F.; Zhang, M.

    2017-12-01

    Active contour model is a widely used method in visual tracking and image segmentation. Under the driven of objective function, the initial curve defined in active contour model will evolve to a stable condition - a desired result in given image. As a typical region-based active contour model, C-V model has a good effect on weak boundaries detection and anti noise ability which shows great potential in glacial lake extraction. Glacial lake is a sensitive indicator for reflecting global climate change, therefore accurate delineate glacial lake boundaries is essential to evaluate hydrologic environment and living environment. However, the current method in glacial lake extraction mainly contains water index method and recognition classification method are diffcult to directly applied in large scale glacial lake extraction due to the diversity of glacial lakes and masses impacted factors in the image, such as image noise, shadows, snow and ice, etc. Regarding the abovementioned advantanges of C-V model and diffcults in glacial lake extraction, we introduce the signed pressure force function to improve the C-V model for adapting to processing of glacial lake extraction. To inspect the effect of glacial lake extraction results, three typical glacial lake development sites were selected, include Altai mountains, Centre Himalayas, South-eastern Tibet, and Landsat8 OLI imagery was conducted as experiment data source, Google earth imagery as reference data for varifying the results. The experiment consequence suggests that improved active contour model we proposed can effectively discriminate the glacial lakes from complex backgound with a higher Kappa Coefficient - 0.895, especially in some small glacial lakes which belongs to weak information in the image. Our finding provide a new approach to improved accuracy under the condition of large proportion of small glacial lakes and the possibility for automated glacial lake mapping in large-scale area.

  3. Gallbladder shape extraction from ultrasound images using active contour models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciecholewski, Marcin; Chochołowicz, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Gallbladder function is routinely assessed using ultrasonographic (USG) examinations. In clinical practice, doctors very often analyse the gallbladder shape when diagnosing selected disorders, e.g. if there are turns or folds of the gallbladder, so extracting its shape from USG images using supporting software can simplify a diagnosis that is often difficult to make. The paper describes two active contour models: the edge-based model and the region-based model making use of a morphological approach, both designed for extracting the gallbladder shape from USG images. The active contour models were applied to USG images without lesions and to those showing specific disease units, namely, anatomical changes like folds and turns of the gallbladder as well as polyps and gallstones. This paper also presents modifications of the edge-based model, such as the method for removing self-crossings and loops or the method of dampening the inflation force which moves nodes if they approach the edge being determined. The user is also able to add a fragment of the approximated edge beyond which neither active contour model will move if this edge is incomplete in the USG image. The modifications of the edge-based model presented here allow more precise results to be obtained when extracting the shape of the gallbladder from USG images than if the morphological model is used. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MRI segmentation by active contours model, 3D reconstruction, and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Hernandez, Juan M.; Velasquez-Aguilar, J. Guadalupe

    2005-02-01

    The advances in 3D data modelling methods are becoming increasingly popular in the areas of biology, chemistry and medical applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) technique has progressed at a spectacular rate over the past few years, its uses have been spread over many applications throughout the body in both anatomical and functional investigations. In this paper we present the application of Zernike polynomials for 3D mesh model of the head using the contour acquired of cross-sectional slices by active contour model extraction and we propose the visualization with OpenGL 3D Graphics of the 2D-3D (slice-surface) information for the diagnostic aid in medical applications.

  5. An automated approach for segmentation of intravascular ultrasound images based on parametric active contour models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vard, Alireza; Jamshidi, Kamal; Movahhedinia, Naser

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fully automated approach to detect the intima and media-adventitia borders in intravascular ultrasound images based on parametric active contour models. To detect the intima border, we compute a new image feature applying a combination of short-term autocorrelations calculated for the contour pixels. These feature values are employed to define an energy function of the active contour called normalized cumulative short-term autocorrelation. Exploiting this energy function, the intima border is separated accurately from the blood region contaminated by high speckle noise. To extract media-adventitia boundary, we define a new form of energy function based on edge, texture and spring forces for the active contour. Utilizing this active contour, the media-adventitia border is identified correctly even in presence of branch openings and calcifications. Experimental results indicate accuracy of the proposed methods. In addition, statistical analysis demonstrates high conformity between manual tracing and the results obtained by the proposed approaches.

  6. A Waterline Extraction Method from Remote Sensing Image Based on Quad-tree and Multiple Active Contour Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Jintao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available After the characteristics of geodesic active contour model (GAC, Chan-Vese model(CV and local binary fitting model(LBF are analyzed, and the active contour model based on regions and edges is combined with image segmentation method based on quad-tree, a waterline extraction method based on quad-tree and multiple active contour model is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the method provides an initial contour according to quad-tree segmentation. Secondly, a new signed pressure force(SPF function based on global image statistics information of CV model and local image statistics information of LBF model has been defined, and then ,the edge stopping function(ESF is replaced by the proposed SPF function, which solves the problem such as evolution stopped in advance and excessive evolution. Finally, the selective binary and Gaussian filtering level set method is used to avoid reinitializing and regularization to improve the evolution efficiency. The experimental results show that this method can effectively extract the weak edges and serious concave edges, and owns some properties such as sub-pixel accuracy, high efficiency and reliability for waterline extraction.

  7. Automatic Image Segmentation Using Active Contours with Univariate Marginal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cruz-Aceves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel automatic image segmentation method based on the theory of active contour models and estimation of distribution algorithms. The proposed method uses the univariate marginal distribution model to infer statistical dependencies between the control points on different active contours. These contours have been generated through an alignment process of reference shape priors, in order to increase the exploration and exploitation capabilities regarding different interactive segmentation techniques. This proposed method is applied in the segmentation of the hollow core in microscopic images of photonic crystal fibers and it is also used to segment the human heart and ventricular areas from datasets of computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, respectively. Moreover, to evaluate the performance of the medical image segmentations compared to regions outlined by experts, a set of similarity measures has been adopted. The experimental results suggest that the proposed image segmentation method outperforms the traditional active contour model and the interactive Tseng method in terms of segmentation accuracy and stability.

  8. NSCT BASED LOCAL ENHANCEMENT FOR ACTIVE CONTOUR BASED IMAGE SEGMENTATION APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren Mewada

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of cross-disciplinary nature, Active Contour modeling techniques have been utilized extensively for the image segmentation. In traditional active contour based segmentation techniques based on level set methods, the energy functions are defined based on the intensity gradient. This makes them highly sensitive to the situation where the underlying image content is characterized by image nonhomogeneities due to illumination and contrast condition. This is the most difficult problem to make them as fully automatic image segmentation techniques. This paper introduces one of the approaches based on image enhancement to this problem. The enhanced image is obtained using NonSubsampled Contourlet Transform, which improves the edges strengths in the direction where the illumination is not proper and then active contour model based on level set technique is utilized to segment the object. Experiment results demonstrate that proposed method can be utilized along with existing active contour model based segmentation method under situation characterized by intensity non-homogeneity to make them fully automatic.

  9. A Nonparametric Shape Prior Constrained Active Contour Model for Segmentation of Coronaries in CTA Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a nonparametric shape constrained algorithm for segmentation of coronary arteries in computed tomography images within the framework of active contours. An adaptive scale selection scheme, based on the global histogram information of the image data, is employed to determine the appropriate window size for each point on the active contour, which improves the performance of the active contour model in the low contrast local image regions. The possible leakage, which cannot be identified by using intensity features alone, is reduced through the application of the proposed shape constraint, where the shape of circular sampled intensity profile is used to evaluate the likelihood of current segmentation being considered vascular structures. Experiments on both synthetic and clinical datasets have demonstrated the efficiency and robustness of the proposed method. The results on clinical datasets have shown that the proposed approach is capable of extracting more detailed coronary vessels with subvoxel accuracy.

  10. Gallbladder Boundary Segmentation from Ultrasound Images Using Active Contour Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciecholewski, Marcin

    Extracting the shape of the gallbladder from an ultrasonography (US) image allows superfluous information which is immaterial in the diagnostic process to be eliminated. In this project an active contour model was used to extract the shape of the gallbladder, both for cases free of lesions, and for those showing specific disease units, namely: lithiasis, polyps and changes in the shape of the organ, such as folds or turns of the gallbladder. The approximate shape of the gallbladder was found by applying the motion equation model. The tests conducted have shown that for the 220 US images of the gallbladder, the area error rate (AER) amounted to 18.15%.

  11. Efficient and Enhanced Diffusion of Vector Field for Active Contour Model

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guoqi; Sun, Lin; Liu, Shangwang

    2015-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF) is an important external force field for active contour models. Various vector fields based on GVF have been proposed. However, these vector fields are obtained with many iterations and have difficulty in capturing the whole image area. On the other hand, the ability to converge to deep and complex concavity with these vector fields is also needed to improve. In this paper, by analyzing the diffusion equation of GVF, a normalized set is defined and a dynamically nor...

  12. TWO NOVEL ACM (ACTIVE CONTOUR MODEL) METHODS FOR INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND IMAGE SEGMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chi Hau; Potdat, Labhesh; Chittineni, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    One of the attractive image segmentation methods is the Active Contour Model (ACM) which has been widely used in medical imaging as it always produces sub-regions with continuous boundaries. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is a catheter based medical imaging technique which is used for quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic disease. Two methods of ACM realizations are presented in this paper. The gradient descent flow based on minimizing energy functional can be used for segmentation of IVUS images. However this local operation alone may not be adequate to work with the complex IVUS images. The first method presented consists of basically combining the local geodesic active contours and global region-based active contours. The advantage of combining the local and global operations is to allow curves deforming under the energy to find only significant local minima and delineate object borders despite noise, poor edge information and heterogeneous intensity profiles. Results for this algorithm are compared to standard techniques to demonstrate the method's robustness and accuracy. In the second method, the energy function is appropriately modified and minimized using a Hopfield neural network. Proper modifications in the definition of the bias of the neurons have been introduced to incorporate image characteristics. The method overcomes distortions in the expected image pattern, such as due to the presence of calcium, and employs a specialized structure of the neural network and boundary correction schemes which are based on a priori knowledge about the vessel geometry. The presented method is very fast and has been evaluated using sequences of IVUS frames.

  13. On the Relationship between Variational Level Set-Based and SOM-Based Active Contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsamea, Mohammed M.; Gnecco, Giorgio; Gaber, Mohamed Medhat; Elyan, Eyad

    2015-01-01

    Most Active Contour Models (ACMs) deal with the image segmentation problem as a functional optimization problem, as they work on dividing an image into several regions by optimizing a suitable functional. Among ACMs, variational level set methods have been used to build an active contour with the aim of modeling arbitrarily complex shapes. Moreover, they can handle also topological changes of the contours. Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) have attracted the attention of many computer vision scientists, particularly in modeling an active contour based on the idea of utilizing the prototypes (weights) of a SOM to control the evolution of the contour. SOM-based models have been proposed in general with the aim of exploiting the specific ability of SOMs to learn the edge-map information via their topology preservation property and overcoming some drawbacks of other ACMs, such as trapping into local minima of the image energy functional to be minimized in such models. In this survey, we illustrate the main concepts of variational level set-based ACMs, SOM-based ACMs, and their relationship and review in a comprehensive fashion the development of their state-of-the-art models from a machine learning perspective, with a focus on their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:25960736

  14. Global regularizing flows with topology preservation for active contours and polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh; Yezzi, Anthony

    2007-03-01

    Active contour and active polygon models have been used widely for image segmentation. In some applications, the topology of the object(s) to be detected from an image is known a priori, despite a complex unknown geometry, and it is important that the active contour or polygon maintain the desired topology. In this work, we construct a novel geometric flow that can be added to image-based evolutions of active contours and polygons in order to preserve the topology of the initial contour or polygon. We emphasize that, unlike other methods for topology preservation, the proposed geometric flow continually adjusts the geometry of the original evolution in a gradual and graceful manner so as to prevent a topology change long before the curve or polygon becomes close to topology change. The flow also serves as a global regularity term for the evolving contour, and has smoothness properties similar to curvature flow. These properties of gradually adjusting the original flow and global regularization prevent geometrical inaccuracies common with simple discrete topology preservation schemes. The proposed topology preserving geometric flow is the gradient flow arising from an energy that is based on electrostatic principles. The evolution of a single point on the contour depends on all other points of the contour, which is different from traditional curve evolutions in the computer vision literature.

  15. Efficient Active Contour and K-Means Algorithms in Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Rommelse

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss a classic clustering algorithm that can be used to segment images and a recently developed active contour image segmentation model. We propose integrating aspects of the classic algorithm to improve the active contour model. For the resulting CVK and B-means segmentation algorithms we examine methods to decrease the size of the image domain. The CVK method has been implemented to run on parallel and distributed computers. By changing the order of updating the pixels, it was possible to replace synchronous communication with asynchronous communication and subsequently the parallel efficiency is improved.

  16. Active contour-based visual tracking by integrating colors, shapes, and motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Zhou, Xue; Li, Wei; Luo, Wenhan; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Maybank, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for active contour-based visual tracking using level sets. The main components of our framework include contour-based tracking initialization, color-based contour evolution, adaptive shape-based contour evolution for non-periodic motions, dynamic shape-based contour evolution for periodic motions, and the handling of abrupt motions. For the initialization of contour-based tracking, we develop an optical flow-based algorithm for automatically initializing contours at the first frame. For the color-based contour evolution, Markov random field theory is used to measure correlations between values of neighboring pixels for posterior probability estimation. For adaptive shape-based contour evolution, the global shape information and the local color information are combined to hierarchically evolve the contour, and a flexible shape updating model is constructed. For the dynamic shape-based contour evolution, a shape mode transition matrix is learnt to characterize the temporal correlations of object shapes. For the handling of abrupt motions, particle swarm optimization is adopted to capture the global motion which is applied to the contour in the current frame to produce an initial contour in the next frame.

  17. The Development of Skull Prosthesis Through Active Contour Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Cheng, Chen-Yang; Lin, Yu-Cheng

    2017-09-09

    Skull defects result in brain infection and inadequate brain protection and pose a general danger to patient health. To avoid these situations and prevent re-injury, a prosthesis must be constructed and grafted onto the deficient region. With the development of rapid customization through additive manufacturing and 3D printing technology, skull prostheses can be fabricated accurately and efficiently prior to cranioplasty. However, an unfitted skull prosthesis made with a metal implant can cause repeated infection, potentially necessitating secondary surgery. This paper presents a method of creating suitably geometric graphics of skull defects to be applied in skull repair through active contour models. These models can be adjusted in each computed tomography slice according to the graphic features, and the curves representing the skull defect can be modeled. The generated graphics can adequately mimic the natural curvature of the complete skull. This method will enable clinical surgeons to rapidly implant customized prostheses, which is of particular importance in emergency surgery. The findings of this research can help surgeons provide patients with skull defects with treatment of the highest quality.

  18. Multiple Active Contours Guided by Differential Evolution for Medical Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Aceves, I.; Avina-Cervantes, J. G.; Lopez-Hernandez, J. M.; Rostro-Gonzalez, H.; Garcia-Capulin, C. H.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Guzman-Cabrera, R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new image segmentation method based on multiple active contours guided by differential evolution, called MACDE. The segmentation method uses differential evolution over a polar coordinate system to increase the exploration and exploitation capabilities regarding the classical active contour model. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a set of synthetic images with complex objects, Gaussian noise, and deep concavities is introduced. Subsequently, MACDE is applied on datasets of sequential computed tomography and magnetic resonance images which contain the human heart and the human left ventricle, respectively. Finally, to obtain a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the medical image segmentations compared to regions outlined by experts, a set of distance and similarity metrics has been adopted. According to the experimental results, MACDE outperforms the classical active contour model and the interactive Tseng method in terms of efficiency and robustness for obtaining the optimal control points and attains a high accuracy segmentation. PMID:23983809

  19. Multiple Active Contours Guided by Differential Evolution for Medical Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cruz-Aceves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new image segmentation method based on multiple active contours guided by differential evolution, called MACDE. The segmentation method uses differential evolution over a polar coordinate system to increase the exploration and exploitation capabilities regarding the classical active contour model. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a set of synthetic images with complex objects, Gaussian noise, and deep concavities is introduced. Subsequently, MACDE is applied on datasets of sequential computed tomography and magnetic resonance images which contain the human heart and the human left ventricle, respectively. Finally, to obtain a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the medical image segmentations compared to regions outlined by experts, a set of distance and similarity metrics has been adopted. According to the experimental results, MACDE outperforms the classical active contour model and the interactive Tseng method in terms of efficiency and robustness for obtaining the optimal control points and attains a high accuracy segmentation.

  20. Pulmonary parenchyma segmentation in thin CT image sequences with spectral clustering and geodesic active contour model based on similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nana; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Juanjuan; Zhao, Huilan; Qiang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    While the popular thin layer scanning technology of spiral CT has helped to improve diagnoses of lung diseases, the large volumes of scanning images produced by the technology also dramatically increase the load of physicians in lesion detection. Computer-aided diagnosis techniques like lesions segmentation in thin CT sequences have been developed to address this issue, but it remains a challenge to achieve high segmentation efficiency and accuracy without much involvement of human manual intervention. In this paper, we present our research on automated segmentation of lung parenchyma with an improved geodesic active contour model that is geodesic active contour model based on similarity (GACBS). Combining spectral clustering algorithm based on Nystrom (SCN) with GACBS, this algorithm first extracts key image slices, then uses these slices to generate an initial contour of pulmonary parenchyma of un-segmented slices with an interpolation algorithm, and finally segments lung parenchyma of un-segmented slices. Experimental results show that the segmentation results generated by our method are close to what manual segmentation can produce, with an average volume overlap ratio of 91.48%.

  1. Human body contour data based activity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myagmarbayar, Nergui; Yuki, Yoshida; Imamoglu, Nevrez; Gonzalez, Jose; Otake, Mihoko; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    This research work is aimed to develop autonomous bio-monitoring mobile robots, which are capable of tracking and measuring patients' motions, recognizing the patients' behavior based on observation data, and providing calling for medical personnel in emergency situations in home environment. The robots to be developed will bring about cost-effective, safe and easier at-home rehabilitation to most motor-function impaired patients (MIPs). In our previous research, a full framework was established towards this research goal. In this research, we aimed at improving the human activity recognition by using contour data of the tracked human subject extracted from the depth images as the signal source, instead of the lower limb joint angle data used in the previous research, which are more likely to be affected by the motion of the robot and human subjects. Several geometric parameters, such as, the ratio of height to weight of the tracked human subject, and distance (pixels) between centroid points of upper and lower parts of human body, were calculated from the contour data, and used as the features for the activity recognition. A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed to classify different human activities from the features. Experimental results showed that the human activity recognition could be achieved with a high correct rate.

  2. Multiple Active Contours Driven by Particle Swarm Optimization for Cardiac Medical Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Aceves, I.; Aviña-Cervantes, J. G.; López-Hernández, J. M.; González-Reyna, S. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel image segmentation method based on multiple active contours driven by particle swarm optimization (MACPSO). The proposed method uses particle swarm optimization over a polar coordinate system to increase the energy-minimizing capability with respect to the traditional active contour model. In the first stage, to evaluate the robustness of the proposed method, a set of synthetic images containing objects with several concavities and Gaussian noise is presented. Subsequently, MACPSO is used to segment the human heart and the human left ventricle from datasets of sequential computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, respectively. Finally, to assess the performance of the medical image segmentations with respect to regions outlined by experts and by the graph cut method objectively and quantifiably, a set of distance and similarity metrics has been adopted. The experimental results demonstrate that MACPSO outperforms the traditional active contour model in terms of segmentation accuracy and stability. PMID:23762177

  3. Towards Stabilizing Parametric Active Contours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao; Fan, Zhun; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2014-01-01

    Numerical instability often occurs in evolving of parametric active contours. This is mainly due to the undesired change of parametrization during evolution. In this paper, we propose a new tangential diffusion term to compensate this undesired change. As a result, the parametrization will converge...

  4. Method of segmenting inferior horns of lateral ventricles using active contour models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Masumi; Koyama, Shuji; Kodera, Yoshie

    2007-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that the measurement of regional atrophy in the structure of the medial temporal lobe is a promising way to discriminate Alzheimer-type dementia patients from healthy control subjects. There are some reports that the inferior horns of the lateral ventricles are expanded by atrophying the structure of the medial temporal lobe. We developed a technique to automatically detect the region of the inferior horns of the lateral ventricles by gray-level thresholding and morphological processing. However, there were some incorrect regions in this method. Accordingly, we proposed a technique for which active contour models (ACM) were used. Our ACM incorporates the improved edge-based image and the external constraint to improve convergence and to reduce its dependence on initial estimation. In this study, we present the details of an algorithm that traces the contours of the inferior horns of the lateral ventricles and its performance relative to manual methods. The average degree of correspondence between the extract region and manual trace was measured in 30 inferior horns of 15 subjects. The average degree of correspondence of the proposed method was about 4% higher than that of the conventional method. These results suggest that the proposed method is more accurate than the conventional method. (author)

  5. Generic and robust method for automatic segmentation of PET images using an active contour model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Mingzan [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Although positron emission tomography (PET) images have shown potential to improve the accuracy of targeting in radiation therapy planning and assessment of response to treatment, the boundaries of tumors are not easily distinguishable from surrounding normal tissue owing to the low spatial resolution and inherent noisy characteristics of PET images. The objective of this study is to develop a generic and robust method for automatic delineation of tumor volumes using an active contour model and to evaluate its performance using phantom and clinical studies. Methods: MASAC, a method for automatic segmentation using an active contour model, incorporates the histogram fuzzy C-means clustering, and localized and textural information to constrain the active contour to detect boundaries in an accurate and robust manner. Moreover, the lattice Boltzmann method is used as an alternative approach for solving the level set equation to make it faster and suitable for parallel programming. Twenty simulated phantom studies and 16 clinical studies, including six cases of pharyngolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and ten cases of nonsmall cell lung cancer, were included to evaluate its performance. Besides, the proposed method was also compared with the contourlet-based active contour algorithm (CAC) and Schaefer’s thresholding method (ST). The relative volume error (RE), Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and classification error (CE) metrics were used to analyze the results quantitatively. Results: For the simulated phantom studies (PSs), MASAC and CAC provide similar segmentations of the different lesions, while ST fails to achieve reliable results. For the clinical datasets (2 cases with connected high-uptake regions excluded) (CSs), CAC provides for the lowest mean RE (−8.38% ± 27.49%), while MASAC achieves the best mean DSC (0.71 ± 0.09) and mean CE (53.92% ± 12.65%), respectively. MASAC could reliably quantify different types of lesions assessed in this work

  6. From Inpainting to Active Contours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauze, Francois Bernard; Nielsen, Mads

    2008-01-01

    state equation). The contour evolution is implemented in the framework of level sets. Finally, the proposed method is validated on various examples. We focus among others in the segmentation of calcified plaques observed in radiographs from human lumbar aortic regions. Keywords  Segmentation - Inpainting - Active...

  7. Segmentation of lung fields using Chan-Vese active contour model in chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Kiwon

    2011-03-01

    A CAD tool for chest radiographs consists of several procedures and the very first step is segmentation of lung fields. We develop a novel methodology for segmentation of lung fields in chest radiographs that can satisfy the following two requirements. First, we aim to develop a segmentation method that does not need a training stage with manual estimation of anatomical features in a large training dataset of images. Secondly, for the ease of implementation, it is desirable to apply a well established model that is widely used for various image-partitioning practices. The Chan-Vese active contour model, which is based on Mumford-Shah functional in the level set framework, is applied for segmentation of lung fields. With the use of this model, segmentation of lung fields can be carried out without detailed prior knowledge on the radiographic anatomy of the chest, yet in some chest radiographs, the trachea regions are unfavorably segmented out in addition to the lung field contours. To eliminate artifacts from the trachea, we locate the upper end of the trachea, find a vertical center line of the trachea and delineate it, and then brighten the trachea region to make it less distinctive. The segmentation process is finalized by subsequent morphological operations. We randomly select 30 images from the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology image database to test the proposed methodology and the results are shown. We hope our segmentation technique can help to promote of CAD tools, especially for emerging chest radiographic imaging techniques such as dual energy radiography and chest tomosynthesis.

  8. Automatic media-adventitia IVUS image segmentation based on sparse representation framework and dynamic directional active contour model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Fahimeh Sadat; Setarehdan, Seyed Kamaledin; Norouzi, Somayye

    2017-10-01

    Segmentation of the arterial wall boundaries from intravascular ultrasound images is an important image processing task in order to quantify arterial wall characteristics such as shape, area, thickness and eccentricity. Since manual segmentation of these boundaries is a laborious and time consuming procedure, many researchers attempted to develop (semi-) automatic segmentation techniques as a powerful tool for educational and clinical purposes in the past but as yet there is no any clinically approved method in the market. This paper presents a deterministic-statistical strategy for automatic media-adventitia border detection by a fourfold algorithm. First, a smoothed initial contour is extracted based on the classification in the sparse representation framework which is combined with the dynamic directional convolution vector field. Next, an active contour model is utilized for the propagation of the initial contour toward the interested borders. Finally, the extracted contour is refined in the leakage, side branch openings and calcification regions based on the image texture patterns. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by comparing the results to those manually traced borders by an expert on 312 different IVUS images obtained from four different patients. The statistical analysis of the results demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed method in the media-adventitia border detection with enough consistency in the leakage and calcification regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using an active contour method to detect bilge dumps from SAR imagery

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mdakane, Lizwe W

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An automatic approach to detect bilge dumping in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images over Southern African oceans is proposed. The approach uses a threshold-based algorithm and a region-based active contour model (ACM) algorithm to achieve...

  10. Object segmentation using graph cuts and active contours in a pyramidal framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subudhi, Priyambada; Mukhopadhyay, Susanta

    2018-03-01

    Graph cuts and active contours are two very popular interactive object segmentation techniques in the field of computer vision and image processing. However, both these approaches have their own well-known limitations. Graph cut methods perform efficiently giving global optimal segmentation result for smaller images. However, for larger images, huge graphs need to be constructed which not only takes an unacceptable amount of memory but also increases the time required for segmentation to a great extent. On the other hand, in case of active contours, initial contour selection plays an important role in the accuracy of the segmentation. So a proper selection of initial contour may improve the complexity as well as the accuracy of the result. In this paper, we have tried to combine these two approaches to overcome their above-mentioned drawbacks and develop a fast technique of object segmentation. Here, we have used a pyramidal framework and applied the mincut/maxflow algorithm on the lowest resolution image with the least number of seed points possible which will be very fast due to the smaller size of the image. Then, the obtained segmentation contour is super-sampled and and worked as the initial contour for the next higher resolution image. As the initial contour is very close to the actual contour, so fewer number of iterations will be required for the convergence of the contour. The process is repeated for all the high-resolution images and experimental results show that our approach is faster as well as memory efficient as compare to both graph cut or active contour segmentation alone.

  11. Implicit Active Contours Driven by Local and Global Image Fitting Energy for Image Segmentation and Target Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosheng Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel active contour model in a variational level set formulation for image segmentation and target localization. We combine a local image fitting term and a global image fitting term to drive the contour evolution. Our model can efficiently segment the images with intensity inhomogeneity with the contour starting anywhere in the image. In its numerical implementation, an efficient numerical schema is used to ensure sufficient numerical accuracy. We validated its effectiveness in numerous synthetic images and real images, and the promising experimental results show its advantages in terms of accuracy, efficiency, and robustness.

  12. Statistical Modeling Approach to Quantitative Analysis of Interobserver Variability in Breast Contouring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinzhong, E-mail: jyang4@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A.; Reed, Valerie K.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Lifei; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To develop a new approach for interobserver variability analysis. Methods and Materials: Eight radiation oncologists specializing in breast cancer radiation therapy delineated a patient's left breast “from scratch” and from a template that was generated using deformable image registration. Three of the radiation oncologists had previously received training in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group consensus contouring for breast cancer atlas. The simultaneous truth and performance level estimation algorithm was applied to the 8 contours delineated “from scratch” to produce a group consensus contour. Individual Jaccard scores were fitted to a beta distribution model. We also applied this analysis to 2 or more patients, which were contoured by 9 breast radiation oncologists from 8 institutions. Results: The beta distribution model had a mean of 86.2%, standard deviation (SD) of ±5.9%, a skewness of −0.7, and excess kurtosis of 0.55, exemplifying broad interobserver variability. The 3 RTOG-trained physicians had higher agreement scores than average, indicating that their contours were close to the group consensus contour. One physician had high sensitivity but lower specificity than the others, which implies that this physician tended to contour a structure larger than those of the others. Two other physicians had low sensitivity but specificity similar to the others, which implies that they tended to contour a structure smaller than the others. With this information, they could adjust their contouring practice to be more consistent with others if desired. When contouring from the template, the beta distribution model had a mean of 92.3%, SD ± 3.4%, skewness of −0.79, and excess kurtosis of 0.83, which indicated a much better consistency among individual contours. Similar results were obtained for the analysis of 2 additional patients. Conclusions: The proposed statistical approach was able to measure interobserver variability quantitatively

  13. A 3-Step Algorithm Using Region-Based Active Contours for Video Objects Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Jehan-Besson

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a 3-step algorithm for the automatic detection of moving objects in video sequences using region-based active contours. First, we introduce a very full general framework for region-based active contours with a new Eulerian method to compute the evolution equation of the active contour from a criterion including both region-based and boundary-based terms. This framework can be easily adapted to various applications, thanks to the introduction of functions named descriptors of the different regions. With this new Eulerian method based on shape optimization principles, we can easily take into account the case of descriptors depending upon features globally attached to the regions. Second, we propose a 3-step algorithm for detection of moving objects, with a static or a mobile camera, using region-based active contours. The basic idea is to hierarchically associate temporal and spatial information. The active contour evolves with successively three sets of descriptors: a temporal one, and then two spatial ones. The third spatial descriptor takes advantage of the segmentation of the image in intensity homogeneous regions. User interaction is reduced to the choice of a few parameters at the beginning of the process. Some experimental results are supplied.

  14. Quantification of left ventricular volumes from cardiac cine MRI using active contour model combined with gradient vector flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanki, Nobuyoshi; Murase, Kenya; Kumashiro, Masayuki; Momoi, Risa; Yang, Xiaomei; Tabuchi, Takashi; Nagayama, Masako; Watanabe, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of combining the active contour model with gradient vector flow (Snakes-GVF) to estimate left ventricular (LV) volumes from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI data were acquired from 27 patients, including 14 adults (9 men, 5 women, 55.0±23.3 years) and 13 children (10 boys, 3 girls, 2.7±2.1 years) using Gyroscan Intera (1.5 Tesla, Philips Medical Systems). LV volumes were calculated by adding the areas surrounded by the contour extracted by Snakes-GVF and compared with volumes estimated by manual tracing. Those estimated by Snakes-GVF [y (mL)] correlated well with those estimated by manual tracing [x (mL)]. In adult cases, the regression equation and correlation coefficient were y=1.008x-0.517 and 0.996, respectively. In pediatric cases, they were y=1.174x-2.542 and 0.992, respectively. In conclusion, Snakes-GVF is a powerful and useful tool for quantifying LV volumes using cardiac MRI. (author)

  15. Universality in the merging dynamics of parametric active contours: a study in MRI based lung segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K; Ray, Nilanjan; Acton, Scott T

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of lung ventilation is one of the most reliable techniques in diagnosing pulmonary diseases. The time-consuming and bias-prone traditional methods using hyperpolarized H 3 He and 1 H magnetic resonance imageries have recently been improved by an automated technique based on 'multiple active contour evolution'. This method involves a simultaneous evolution of multiple initial conditions, called 'snakes', eventually leading to their 'merging' and is entirely independent of the shapes and sizes of snakes or other parametric details. The objective of this paper is to show, through a theoretical analysis, that the functional dynamics of merging as depicted in the active contour method has a direct analogue in statistical physics and this explains its 'universality'. We show that the multiple active contour method has an universal scaling behaviour akin to that of classical nucleation in two spatial dimensions. We prove our point by comparing the numerically evaluated exponents with an equivalent thermodynamic model

  16. Brain MRI Tumor Detection using Active Contour Model and Local Image Fitting Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important issue in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here an automatic brain tumor detection method is introduced that uses T1-weighted images and K. Zhang et. al.'s active contour model driven by local image fitting (LIF) energy. Local image fitting energy obtains the local image information, which enables the algorithm to segment images with intensity inhomogeneities. Advantage of this method is that the LIF energy functional has less computational complexity than the local binary fitting (LBF) energy functional; moreover, it maintains the sub-pixel accuracy and boundary regularization properties. In Zhang's algorithm, a new level set method based on Gaussian filtering is used to implement the variational formulation, which is not only vigorous to prevent the energy functional from being trapped into local minimum, but also effective in keeping the level set function regular. Experiments show that the proposed method achieves high accuracy brain tumor segmentation results.

  17. Ingenious Snake: An Adaptive Multi-Class Contours Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baolin; Zhou, Shoujun

    2018-04-01

    Active contour model (ACM) plays an important role in computer vision and medical image application. The traditional ACMs were used to extract single-class of object contours. While, simultaneous extraction of multi-class of interesting contours (i.e., various contours with closed- or open-ended) have not been solved so far. Therefore, a novel ACM model named “Ingenious Snake” is proposed to adaptively extract these interesting contours. In the first place, the ridge-points are extracted based on the local phase measurement of gradient vector flow field; the consequential ridgelines initialization are automated with high speed. Secondly, the contours’ deformation and evolvement are implemented with the ingenious snake. In the experiments, the result from initialization, deformation and evolvement are compared with the existing methods. The quantitative evaluation of the structure extraction is satisfying with respect of effectiveness and accuracy.

  18. A new background distribution-based active contour model for three-dimensional lesion segmentation in breast DCE-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Yiping; Qiu, Tianshuang [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Zuowei, E-mail: liuhui@dlut.edu.cn [Second Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116027 (China); Zhang, Lina [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116027 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computerized semiautomatic segmentation method for accurate extraction of three-dimensional lesions from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) of the breast. Methods: The authors propose a new background distribution-based active contour model using level set (BDACMLS) to segment lesions in breast DCE-MRIs. The method starts with manual selection of a region of interest (ROI) that contains the entire lesion in a single slice where the lesion is enhanced. Then the lesion volume from the volume data of interest, which is captured automatically, is separated. The core idea of BDACMLS is a new signed pressure function which is based solely on the intensity distribution combined with pathophysiological basis. To compare the algorithm results, two experienced radiologists delineated all lesions jointly to obtain the ground truth. In addition, results generated by other different methods based on level set (LS) are also compared with the authors’ method. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated by several region-based metrics such as the overlap ratio. Results: Forty-two studies with 46 lesions that contain 29 benign and 17 malignant lesions are evaluated. The dataset includes various typical pathologies of the breast such as invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinomain situ, scar carcinoma, phyllodes tumor, breast cysts, fibroadenoma, etc. The overlap ratio for BDACMLS with respect to manual segmentation is 79.55% ± 12.60% (mean ± s.d.). Conclusions: A new active contour model method has been developed and shown to successfully segment breast DCE-MRI three-dimensional lesions. The results from this model correspond more closely to manual segmentation, solve the weak-edge-passed problem, and improve the robustness in segmenting different lesions.

  19. The relative pose estimation of aircraft based on contour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tai; Sun, Xiangyi

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a relative pose estimation approach based on object contour model. The first step is to obtain a two-dimensional (2D) projection of three-dimensional (3D)-model-based target, which will be divided into 40 forms by clustering and LDA analysis. Then we proceed by extracting the target contour in each image and computing their Pseudo-Zernike Moments (PZM), thus a model library is constructed in an offline mode. Next, we spot a projection contour that resembles the target silhouette most in the present image from the model library with reference of PZM; then similarity transformation parameters are generated as the shape context is applied to match the silhouette sampling location, from which the identification parameters of target can be further derived. Identification parameters are converted to relative pose parameters, in the premise that these values are the initial result calculated via iterative refinement algorithm, as the relative pose parameter is in the neighborhood of actual ones. At last, Distance Image Iterative Least Squares (DI-ILS) is employed to acquire the ultimate relative pose parameters.

  20. Segmentation of breast ultrasound images based on active contours using neutrosophic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfollahi, Mahsa; Gity, Masoumeh; Ye, Jing Yong; Mahlooji Far, A

    2018-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging is an effective approach for diagnosing breast cancer, but it is highly operator-dependent. Recent advances in computer-aided diagnosis have suggested that it can assist physicians in diagnosis. Definition of the region of interest before computer analysis is still needed. Since manual outlining of the tumor contour is tedious and time-consuming for a physician, developing an automatic segmentation method is important for clinical application. The present paper represents a novel method to segment breast ultrasound images. It utilizes a combination of region-based active contour and neutrosophic theory to overcome the natural properties of ultrasound images including speckle noise and tissue-related textures. First, due to inherent speckle noise and low contrast of these images, we have utilized a non-local means filter and fuzzy logic method for denoising and image enhancement, respectively. This paper presents an improved weighted region-scalable active contour to segment breast ultrasound images using a new feature derived from neutrosophic theory. This method has been applied to 36 breast ultrasound images. It generates true-positive and false-positive results, and similarity of 95%, 6%, and 90%, respectively. The purposed method indicates clear advantages over other conventional methods of active contour segmentation, i.e., region-scalable fitting energy and weighted region-scalable fitting energy.

  1. Fairfax County Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — This layer contains contours that were derived from the digital terrain model made up of irregularly spaced mass points and breaklines. The contours are 5 foot...

  2. The Main Cognitive Model of Visual Recognition: Contour Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, YongHong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we will study the following pattern recognition problem: Every pattern is a 3-dimensional graph, its surface can be split up into some regions, every region is composed of the pixels with the approximately same colour value and the approximately same depth value that is distance to eyes, and there may also be some contours, e.g., literal contours, on a surface of every pattern. For this problem we reveal the inherent laws. Moreover, we establish a cognitive model to reflect the...

  3. Fast Graph Partitioning Active Contours for Image Segmentation Using Histograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath SumitK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a method to improve the accuracy and speed, as well as significantly reduce the memory requirements, for the recently proposed Graph Partitioning Active Contours (GPACs algorithm for image segmentation in the work of Sumengen and Manjunath (2006. Instead of computing an approximate but still expensive dissimilarity matrix of quadratic size, , for a 2D image of size and regular image tiles of size , we use fixed length histograms and an intensity-based symmetric-centrosymmetric extensor matrix to jointly compute terms associated with the complete dissimilarity matrix. This computationally efficient reformulation of GPAC using a very small memory footprint offers two distinct advantages over the original implementation. It speeds up convergence of the evolving active contour and seamlessly extends performance of GPAC to multidimensional images.

  4. Inner and outer coronary vessel wall segmentation from CCTA using an active contour model with machine learning-based 3D voxel context-aware image force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Udhayaraj; Wels, Michael; Rempfler, Markus; Grosskopf, Stefan; Suehling, Michael; Menze, Bjoern H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated approach to coronary vessel segmentation, which involves calcification or soft plaque delineation in addition to accurate lumen delineation, from 3D Cardiac Computed Tomography Angiography data. Adequately virtualizing the coronary lumen plays a crucial role for simulating blood ow by means of fluid dynamics while additionally identifying the outer vessel wall in the case of arteriosclerosis is a prerequisite for further plaque compartment analysis. Our method is a hybrid approach complementing Active Contour Model-based segmentation with an external image force that relies on a Random Forest Regression model generated off-line. The regression model provides a strong estimate of the distance to the true vessel surface for every surface candidate point taking into account 3D wavelet-encoded contextual image features, which are aligned with the current surface hypothesis. The associated external image force is integrated in the objective function of the active contour model, such that the overall segmentation approach benefits from the advantages associated with snakes and from the ones associated with machine learning-based regression alike. This yields an integrated approach achieving competitive results on a publicly available benchmark data collection (Rotterdam segmentation challenge).

  5. Lung segmentation from HRCT using united geometric active contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwei; Li, Chuanfu; Xiong, Jin; Feng, Huanqing

    2007-12-01

    Accurate lung segmentation from high resolution CT images is a challenging task due to various detail tracheal structures, missing boundary segments and complex lung anatomy. One popular method is based on gray-level threshold, however its results are usually rough. A united geometric active contours model based on level set is proposed for lung segmentation in this paper. Particularly, this method combines local boundary information and region statistical-based model synchronously: 1) Boundary term ensures the integrality of lung tissue.2) Region term makes the level set function evolve with global characteristic and independent on initial settings. A penalizing energy term is introduced into the model, which forces the level set function evolving without re-initialization. The method is found to be much more efficient in lung segmentation than other methods that are only based on boundary or region. Results are shown by 3D lung surface reconstruction, which indicates that the method will play an important role in the design of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system.

  6. Juxta-Vascular Pulmonary Nodule Segmentation in PET-CT Imaging Based on an LBF Active Contour Model with Information Entropy and Joint Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Hao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate segmentation of pulmonary nodules is an important preprocessing step in computer-aided diagnoses of lung cancers. However, the existing segmentation methods may cause the problem of edge leakage and cannot segment juxta-vascular pulmonary nodules accurately. To address this problem, a novel automatic segmentation method based on an LBF active contour model with information entropy and joint vector is proposed in this paper. Our method extracts the interest area of pulmonary nodules by a standard uptake value (SUV in Positron Emission Tomography (PET images, and automatic threshold iteration is used to construct an initial contour roughly. The SUV information entropy and the gray-value joint vector of Positron Emission Tomography–Computed Tomography (PET-CT images are calculated to drive the evolution of contour curve. At the edge of pulmonary nodules, evolution will be stopped and accurate results of pulmonary nodule segmentation can be obtained. Experimental results show that our method can achieve 92.35% average dice similarity coefficient, 2.19 mm Hausdorff distance, and 3.33% false positive with the manual segmentation results. Compared with the existing methods, our proposed method that segments juxta-vascular pulmonary nodules in PET-CT images is more accurate and efficient.

  7. Synchronous activity in cat visual cortex encodes collinear and cocircular contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonds, Jason M; Zhou, Zhiyi; Bernard, Melanie R; Bonds, A B

    2006-04-01

    We explored how contour information in primary visual cortex might be embedded in the simultaneous activity of multiple cells recorded with a 100-electrode array. Synchronous activity in cat visual cortex was more selective and predictable in discriminating between drifting grating and concentric ring stimuli than changes in firing rate. Synchrony was found even between cells with wholly different orientation preferences when their receptive fields were circularly aligned, and membership in synchronous groups was orientation and curvature dependent. The existence of synchrony between cocircular cells reinforces its role as a general mechanism for contour integration and shape detection as predicted by association field concepts. Our data suggest that cortical synchrony results from common and synchronous input from earlier visual areas and that it could serve to shape extrastriate response selectivity.

  8. Comparative study on the performance of textural image features for active contour segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona

    2012-07-01

    We present a computerized method for the semi-automatic detection of contours in ultrasound images. The novelty of our study is the introduction of a fast and efficient image function relating to parametric active contour models. This new function is a combination of the gray-level information and first-order statistical features, called standard deviation parameters. In a comprehensive study, the developed algorithm and the efficiency of segmentation were first tested for synthetic images. Tests were also performed on breast and liver ultrasound images. The proposed method was compared with the watershed approach to show its efficiency. The performance of the segmentation was estimated using the area error rate. Using the standard deviation textural feature and a 5×5 kernel, our curve evolution was able to produce results close to the minimal area error rate (namely 8.88% for breast images and 10.82% for liver images). The image resolution was evaluated using the contrast-to-gradient method. The experiments showed promising segmentation results.

  9. AN IMPROVED SNAKE MODEL FOR REFINEMENT OF LIDAR-DERIVED BUILDING ROOF CONTOURS USING AERIAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Building roof contours are considered as very important geometric data, which have been widely applied in many fields, including but not limited to urban planning, land investigation, change detection and military reconnaissance. Currently, the demand on building contours at a finer scale (especially in urban areas has been raised in a growing number of studies such as urban environment quality assessment, urban sprawl monitoring and urban air pollution modelling. LiDAR is known as an effective means of acquiring 3D roof points with high elevation accuracy. However, the precision of the building contour obtained from LiDAR data is restricted by its relatively low scanning resolution. With the use of the texture information from high-resolution imagery, the precision can be improved. In this study, an improved snake model is proposed to refine the initial building contours extracted from LiDAR. First, an improved snake model is constructed with the constraints of the deviation angle, image gradient, and area. Then, the nodes of the contour are moved in a certain range to find the best optimized result using greedy algorithm. Considering both precision and efficiency, the candidate shift positions of the contour nodes are constrained, and the searching strategy for the candidate nodes is explicitly designed. The experiments on three datasets indicate that the proposed method for building contour refinement is effective and feasible. The average quality index is improved from 91.66% to 93.34%. The statistics of the evaluation results for every single building demonstrated that 77.0% of the total number of contours is updated with higher quality index.

  10. Automated contouring error detection based on supervised geometric attribute distribution models for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Dolly, Steven; Kavanaugh, James; Harold Li, H.; Altman, Michael; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade L.; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: One of the most critical steps in radiation therapy treatment is accurate tumor and critical organ-at-risk (OAR) contouring. Both manual and automated contouring processes are prone to errors and to a large degree of inter- and intraobserver variability. These are often due to the limitations of imaging techniques in visualizing human anatomy as well as to inherent anatomical variability among individuals. Physicians/physicists have to reverify all the radiation therapy contours of every patient before using them for treatment planning, which is tedious, laborious, and still not an error-free process. In this study, the authors developed a general strategy based on novel geometric attribute distribution (GAD) models to automatically detect radiation therapy OAR contouring errors and facilitate the current clinical workflow. Methods: Considering the radiation therapy structures’ geometric attributes (centroid, volume, and shape), the spatial relationship of neighboring structures, as well as anatomical similarity of individual contours among patients, the authors established GAD models to characterize the interstructural centroid and volume variations, and the intrastructural shape variations of each individual structure. The GAD models are scalable and deformable, and constrained by their respective principal attribute variations calculated from training sets with verified OAR contours. A new iterative weighted GAD model-fitting algorithm was developed for contouring error detection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed in a unique way to optimize the model parameters to satisfy clinical requirements. A total of forty-four head-and-neck patient cases, each of which includes nine critical OAR contours, were utilized to demonstrate the proposed strategy. Twenty-nine out of these forty-four patient cases were utilized to train the inter- and intrastructural GAD models. These training data and the remaining fifteen testing data sets

  11. Automated contouring error detection based on supervised geometric attribute distribution models for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Dolly, Steven; Kavanaugh, James; Harold Li, H.; Altman, Michael; Gay, Hiram; Thorstad, Wade L.; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua; Anastasio, Mark A.; Low, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: One of the most critical steps in radiation therapy treatment is accurate tumor and critical organ-at-risk (OAR) contouring. Both manual and automated contouring processes are prone to errors and to a large degree of inter- and intraobserver variability. These are often due to the limitations of imaging techniques in visualizing human anatomy as well as to inherent anatomical variability among individuals. Physicians/physicists have to reverify all the radiation therapy contours of every patient before using them for treatment planning, which is tedious, laborious, and still not an error-free process. In this study, the authors developed a general strategy based on novel geometric attribute distribution (GAD) models to automatically detect radiation therapy OAR contouring errors and facilitate the current clinical workflow. Methods: Considering the radiation therapy structures’ geometric attributes (centroid, volume, and shape), the spatial relationship of neighboring structures, as well as anatomical similarity of individual contours among patients, the authors established GAD models to characterize the interstructural centroid and volume variations, and the intrastructural shape variations of each individual structure. The GAD models are scalable and deformable, and constrained by their respective principal attribute variations calculated from training sets with verified OAR contours. A new iterative weighted GAD model-fitting algorithm was developed for contouring error detection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed in a unique way to optimize the model parameters to satisfy clinical requirements. A total of forty-four head-and-neck patient cases, each of which includes nine critical OAR contours, were utilized to demonstrate the proposed strategy. Twenty-nine out of these forty-four patient cases were utilized to train the inter- and intrastructural GAD models. These training data and the remaining fifteen testing data sets

  12. Directional harmonic theory: a computational Gestalt model to account for illusory contour and vertex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehar, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Visual illusions and perceptual grouping phenomena offer an invaluable tool for probing the computational mechanism of low-level visual processing. Some illusions, like the Kanizsa figure, reveal illusory contours that form edges collinear with the inducing stimulus. This kind of illusory contour has been modeled by neural network models by way of cells equipped with elongated spatial receptive fields designed to detect and complete the collinear alignment. There are, however, other illusory groupings which are not so easy to account for in neural network terms. The Ehrenstein illusion exhibits an illusory contour that forms a contour orthogonal to the stimulus instead of collinear with it. Other perceptual grouping effects reveal illusory contours that exhibit a sharp corner or vertex, and still others take the form of vertices defined by the intersection of three, four, or more illusory contours that meet at a point. A direct extension of the collinear completion models to account for these phenomena tends towards a combinatorial explosion, because it would suggest cells with specialized receptive fields configured to perform each of those completion types, each of which would have to be replicated at every location and every orientation across the visual field. These phenomena therefore challenge the adequacy of the neural network approach to account for these diverse perceptual phenomena. I have proposed elsewhere an alternative paradigm of neurocomputation in the harmonic resonance theory (Lehar 1999, see website), whereby pattern recognition and completion are performed by spatial standing waves across the neural substrate. The standing waves perform a computational function analogous to that of the spatial receptive fields of the neural network approach, except that, unlike that paradigm, a single resonance mechanism performs a function equivalent to a whole array of spatial receptive fields of different spatial configurations and of different orientations

  13. Data integrity systems for organ contours in radiation therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Veeraj P; Lakshminarayanan, Pranav; Moore, Joseph; Tran, Phuoc T; Quon, Harry; Deville, Curtiland; McNutt, Todd R

    2018-06-12

    The purpose of this research is to develop effective data integrity models for contoured anatomy in a radiotherapy workflow for both real-time and retrospective analysis. Within this study, two classes of contour integrity models were developed: data driven models and contiguousness models. The data driven models aim to highlight contours which deviate from a gross set of contours from similar disease sites and encompass the following regions of interest (ROI): bladder, femoral heads, spinal cord, and rectum. The contiguousness models, which individually analyze the geometry of contours to detect possible errors, are applied across many different ROI's and are divided into two metrics: Extent and Region Growing over volume. After analysis, we found that 70% of detected bladder contours were verified as suspicious. The spinal cord and rectum models verified that 73% and 80% of contours were suspicious respectively. The contiguousness models were the most accurate models and the Region Growing model was the most accurate submodel. 100% of the detected noncontiguous contours were verified as suspicious, but in the cases of spinal cord, femoral heads, bladder, and rectum, the Region Growing model detected additional two to five suspicious contours that the Extent model failed to detect. When conducting a blind review to detect false negatives, it was found that all the data driven models failed to detect all suspicious contours. The Region Growing contiguousness model produced zero false negatives in all regions of interest other than prostate. With regards to runtime, the contiguousness via extent model took an average of 0.2 s per contour. On the other hand, the region growing method had a longer runtime which was dependent on the number of voxels in the contour. Both contiguousness models have potential for real-time use in clinical radiotherapy while the data driven models are better suited for retrospective use. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical

  14. Interactive 3D segmentation using connected orthogonal contours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, P. W.; Dercksen, V. J.; Post, F. H.; Vossepoel, A. M.; Streekstra, G. J.; Vos, F. M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for interactive segmentation that is based on cross-sectional design and 3D modelling. The method represents a 3D model by a set of connected contours that are planar and orthogonal. Planar contours overlayed on image data are easily manipulated and linked contours

  15. A new preprocessing parameter estimation based on geodesic active contour model for automatic vestibular neuritis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Slama, Amine; Mouelhi, Aymen; Sahli, Hanene; Manoubi, Sondes; Mbarek, Chiraz; Trabelsi, Hedi; Fnaiech, Farhat; Sayadi, Mounir

    2017-07-01

    The diagnostic of the vestibular neuritis (VN) presents many difficulties to traditional assessment methods This paper deals with a fully automatic VN diagnostic system based on nystagmus parameter estimation using a pupil detection algorithm. A geodesic active contour model is implemented to find an accurate segmentation region of the pupil. Hence, the novelty of the proposed algorithm is to speed up the standard segmentation by using a specific mask located on the region of interest. This allows a drastically computing time reduction and a great performance and accuracy of the obtained results. After using this fast segmentation algorithm, the obtained estimated parameters are represented in temporal and frequency settings. A useful principal component analysis (PCA) selection procedure is then applied to obtain a reduced number of estimated parameters which are used to train a multi neural network (MNN). Experimental results on 90 eye movement videos show the effectiveness and the accuracy of the proposed estimation algorithm versus previous work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lymph node segmentation by dynamic programming and active contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Lu, Lin; Bonde, Apurva; Wang, Deling; Qi, Jing; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Zhao, Binsheng

    2018-03-03

    Enlarged lymph nodes are indicators of cancer staging, and the change in their size is a reflection of treatment response. Automatic lymph node segmentation is challenging, as the boundary can be unclear and the surrounding structures complex. This work communicates a new three-dimensional algorithm for the segmentation of enlarged lymph nodes. The algorithm requires a user to draw a region of interest (ROI) enclosing the lymph node. Rays are cast from the center of the ROI, and the intersections of the rays and the boundary of the lymph node form a triangle mesh. The intersection points are determined by dynamic programming. The triangle mesh initializes an active contour which evolves to low-energy boundary. Three radiologists independently delineated the contours of 54 lesions from 48 patients. Dice coefficient was used to evaluate the algorithm's performance. The mean Dice coefficient between computer and the majority vote results was 83.2%. The mean Dice coefficients between the three radiologists' manual segmentations were 84.6%, 86.2%, and 88.3%. The performance of this segmentation algorithm suggests its potential clinical value for quantifying enlarged lymph nodes. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Highway extraction from high resolution aerial photography using a geometric active contour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xutong

    Highway extraction and vehicle detection are two of the most important steps in traffic-flow analysis from multi-frame aerial photographs. The traditional method of deriving traffic flow trajectories relies on manual vehicle counting from a sequence of aerial photographs, which is tedious and time-consuming. This research presents a new framework for semi-automatic highway extraction. The basis of the new framework is an improved geometric active contour (GAC) model. This novel model seeks to minimize an objective function that transforms a problem of propagation of regular curves into an optimization problem. The implementation of curve propagation is based on level set theory. By using an implicit representation of a two-dimensional curve, a level set approach can be used to deal with topological changes naturally, and the output is unaffected by different initial positions of the curve. However, the original GAC model, on which the new model is based, only incorporates boundary information into the curve propagation process. An error-producing phenomenon called leakage is inevitable wherever there is an uncertain weak edge. In this research, region-based information is added as a constraint into the original GAC model, thereby, giving this proposed method the ability of integrating both boundary and region-based information during the curve propagation. Adding the region-based constraint eliminates the leakage problem. This dissertation applies the proposed augmented GAC model to the problem of highway extraction from high-resolution aerial photography. First, an optimized stopping criterion is designed and used in the implementation of the GAC model. It effectively saves processing time and computations. Second, a seed point propagation framework is designed and implemented. This framework incorporates highway extraction, tracking, and linking into one procedure. A seed point is usually placed at an end node of highway segments close to the boundary of the

  18. Detection of left ventricular epi- and endocardial borders using coupled active contours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Breeuwer, M.

    2003-01-01

    Active contours are a popular method for extraction of object boundaries in medical images. However, they may fail to give correct results if there are other edges in the neighbourhood. To handle and even exploit a geometrical relation between neighbouring boundaries, we propose to use a set of

  19. Novel active contour model based on multi-variate local Gaussian distribution for local segmentation of MR brain images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiang; Li, Honglun; Fan, Baode; Wu, Shuanhu; Xu, Jindong

    2017-12-01

    Active contour model (ACM) has been one of the most widely utilized methods in magnetic resonance (MR) brain image segmentation because of its ability of capturing topology changes. However, most of the existing ACMs only consider single-slice information in MR brain image data, i.e., the information used in ACMs based segmentation method is extracted only from one slice of MR brain image, which cannot take full advantage of the adjacent slice images' information, and cannot satisfy the local segmentation of MR brain images. In this paper, a novel ACM is proposed to solve the problem discussed above, which is based on multi-variate local Gaussian distribution and combines the adjacent slice images' information in MR brain image data to satisfy segmentation. The segmentation is finally achieved through maximizing the likelihood estimation. Experiments demonstrate the advantages of the proposed ACM over the single-slice ACM in local segmentation of MR brain image series.

  20. Segmentation of solid subregion of high grade gliomas in MRI images based on active contour model (ACM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, P.; Win, M. T.; Wong, J. H. D.; Abdullah, N. A.; Ramli, N.

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are tumours arising from the interstitial tissue of the brain which are heterogeneous, infiltrative and possess ill-defined borders. Tumour subregions (e.g. solid enhancing part, edema and necrosis) are often used for tumour characterisation. Tumour demarcation into substructures facilitates glioma staging and provides essential information. Manual segmentation had several drawbacks that include laborious, time consuming, subjected to intra and inter-rater variability and hindered by diversity in the appearance of tumour tissues. In this work, active contour model (ACM) was used to segment the solid enhancing subregion of the tumour. 2D brain image acquisition data using 3T MRI fast spoiled gradient echo sequence in post gadolinium of four histologically proven high-grade glioma patients were obtained. Preprocessing of the images which includes subtraction and skull stripping were performed and then followed by ACM segmentation. The results of the automatic segmentation method were compared against the manual delineation of the tumour by a trainee radiologist. Both results were further validated by an experienced neuroradiologist and a brief quantitative evaluations (pixel area and difference ratio) were performed. Preliminary results of the clinical data showed the potential of ACM model in the application of fast and large scale tumour segmentation in medical imaging.

  1. Segmentation of solid subregion of high grade gliomas in MRI images based on active contour model (ACM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seow, P; Win, M T; Wong, J H D; Ramli, N; Abdullah, N A

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are tumours arising from the interstitial tissue of the brain which are heterogeneous, infiltrative and possess ill-defined borders. Tumour subregions (e.g. solid enhancing part, edema and necrosis) are often used for tumour characterisation. Tumour demarcation into substructures facilitates glioma staging and provides essential information. Manual segmentation had several drawbacks that include laborious, time consuming, subjected to intra and inter-rater variability and hindered by diversity in the appearance of tumour tissues. In this work, active contour model (ACM) was used to segment the solid enhancing subregion of the tumour. 2D brain image acquisition data using 3T MRI fast spoiled gradient echo sequence in post gadolinium of four histologically proven high-grade glioma patients were obtained. Preprocessing of the images which includes subtraction and skull stripping were performed and then followed by ACM segmentation. The results of the automatic segmentation method were compared against the manual delineation of the tumour by a trainee radiologist. Both results were further validated by an experienced neuroradiologist and a brief quantitative evaluations (pixel area and difference ratio) were performed. Preliminary results of the clinical data showed the potential of ACM model in the application of fast and large scale tumour segmentation in medical imaging. (paper)

  2. Contouring variability of human- and deformable-generated contours in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, Stephen J; Wen, Ning; Kim, Jinkoo; Liu, Chang; Pradhan, Deepak; Aref, Ibrahim; Cattaneo, Richard II; Vance, Sean; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J; Elshaikh, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate contouring variability of human-and deformable-generated contours on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT for ten patients with low-or intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For each patient in this study, five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate, bladder, and rectum, on one PCT dataset and five CBCT datasets. Consensus contours were generated using the STAPLE method in the CERR software package. Observer contours were compared to consensus contour, and contour metrics (Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, Contour Distance, Center-of-Mass [COM] Deviation) were calculated. In addition, the first day CBCT was registered to subsequent CBCT fractions (CBCTn: CBCT2–CBCT5) via B-spline Deformable Image Registration (DIR). Contours were transferred from CBCT1 to CBCTn via the deformation field, and contour metrics were calculated through comparison with consensus contours generated from human contour set. The average contour metrics for prostate contours on PCT and CBCT were as follows: Dice coefficient—0.892 (PCT), 0.872 (CBCT-Human), 0.824 (CBCT-Deformed); Hausdorff distance—4.75 mm (PCT), 5.22 mm (CBCT-Human), 5.94 mm (CBCT-Deformed); Contour Distance (overall contour)—1.41 mm (PCT), 1.66 mm (CBCT-Human), 2.30 mm (CBCT-Deformed); COM Deviation—2.01 mm (PCT), 2.78 mm (CBCT-Human), 3.45 mm (CBCT-Deformed). For human contours on PCT and CBCT, the difference in average Dice coefficient between PCT and CBCT (approx. 2%) and Hausdorff distance (approx. 0.5 mm) was small compared to the variation between observers for each patient (standard deviation in Dice coefficient of 5% and Hausdorff distance of 2.0 mm). However, additional contouring variation was found for the deformable-generated contours (approximately 5.0% decrease in Dice coefficient and 0.7 mm increase in Hausdorff distance relative to human-generated contours on CBCT). Though deformable contours provide a reasonable starting point for contouring

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, Ted W.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, H.-P.; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Bogot, Naama; Zhou Chuan

    2006-01-01

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (A z ) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  4. The Development of Contour Interpolation: Evidence from Subjective Contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Bat-Sheva; Maurer, Daphne; Lewis, Terri L.

    2010-01-01

    Adults are skilled at perceiving subjective contours in regions without any local image information (e.g., [Ginsburg, 1975] and [Kanizsa, 1976]). Here we examined the development of this skill and the effect thereon of the support ratio (i.e., the ratio of the physically specified contours to the total contour length). Children (6-, 9-, and…

  5. Statistical region based active contour using a fractional entropy descriptor: Application to nuclei cell segmentation in confocal \\ud microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Histace, A; Meziou, B J; Matuszewski, Bogdan; Precioso, F; Murphy, M F; Carreiras, F

    2013-01-01

    We propose an unsupervised statistical region based active contour approach integrating an original fractional entropy measure for image segmentation with a particular application to single channel actin tagged fluorescence confocal microscopy image segmentation. Following description of statistical based active contour segmentation and the mathematical definition of the proposed fractional entropy descriptor, we demonstrate comparative segmentation results between the proposed approach and s...

  6. Automated segmentation of ultrasonic breast lesions using statistical texture classification and active contour based on probability distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Cheng, H D; Huang, Jianhua; Tian, Jiawei; Liu, Jiafeng; Tang, Xianglong

    2009-08-01

    Because of its complicated structure, low signal/noise ratio, low contrast and blurry boundaries, fully automated segmentation of a breast ultrasound (BUS) image is a difficult task. In this paper, a novel segmentation method for BUS images without human intervention is proposed. Unlike most published approaches, the proposed method handles the segmentation problem by using a two-step strategy: ROI generation and ROI segmentation. First, a well-trained texture classifier categorizes the tissues into different classes, and the background knowledge rules are used for selecting the regions of interest (ROIs) from them. Second, a novel probability distance-based active contour model is applied for segmenting the ROIs and finding the accurate positions of the breast tumors. The active contour model combines both global statistical information and local edge information, using a level set approach. The proposed segmentation method was performed on 103 BUS images (48 benign and 55 malignant). To validate the performance, the results were compared with the corresponding tumor regions marked by an experienced radiologist. Three error metrics, true-positive ratio (TP), false-negative ratio (FN) and false-positive ratio (FP) were used for measuring the performance of the proposed method. The final results (TP = 91.31%, FN = 8.69% and FP = 7.26%) demonstrate that the proposed method can segment BUS images efficiently, quickly and automatically.

  7. An Automatic Segmentation Method Combining an Active Contour Model and a Classification Technique for Detecting Polycomb-group Proteinsin High-Throughput Microscopy Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoretti, Francesco; Cesarini, Elisa; Lanzuolo, Chiara; Oliva, Gennaro; Antonelli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The large amount of data generated in biological experiments that rely on advanced microscopy can be handled only with automated image analysis. Most analyses require a reliable cell image segmentation eventually capable of detecting subcellular structures.We present an automatic segmentation method to detect Polycomb group (PcG) proteins areas isolated from nuclei regions in high-resolution fluorescent cell image stacks. It combines two segmentation algorithms that use an active contour model and a classification technique serving as a tool to better understand the subcellular three-dimensional distribution of PcG proteins in live cell image sequences. We obtained accurate results throughout several cell image datasets, coming from different cell types and corresponding to different fluorescent labels, without requiring elaborate adjustments to each dataset.

  8. Contour Propagation Using Feature-Based Deformable Registration for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhan Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate target delineation of CT image is a critical step in radiotherapy treatment planning. This paper describes a novel strategy for automatic contour propagation, based on deformable registration, for CT images of lung cancer. The proposed strategy starts with a manual-delineated contour in one slice of a 3D CT image. By means of feature-based deformable registration, the initial contour in other slices of the image can be propagated automatically, and then refined by active contour approach. Three algorithms are employed in the strategy: the Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF, Thin-Plate Spline (TPS, and an adapted active contour (Snake, used to refine and modify the initial contours. Five pulmonary cancer cases with about 400 slices and 1000 contours have been used to verify the proposed strategy. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed strategy can improve the segmentation performance in the pulmonary CT images. Jaccard similarity (JS mean is about 0.88 and the maximum of Hausdorff distance (HD is about 90%. In addition, delineation time has been considerably reduced. The proposed feature-based deformable registration method in the automatic contour propagation improves the delineation efficiency significantly.

  9. Male Body Contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Babu; Keaney, Terrence; Rossi, Anthony M

    2015-09-01

    Men are increasingly turning to dermatologists and plastic surgeons to request procedures that correct or enhance physical features. With the advent of this emerging new patient population, alterations in preexisting aesthetic techniques, gender-specific uses of existing devices and overall approaches need to be revisited and adapted to obtain results that are suitable for the male patient. Recently, body contouring has become one of the most sought out procedures by men. Although the majority of clinical studies involving body contouring esthetics are performed with female patients, gains from such studies can be extrapolated to men. Body contouring can be broadly classified as non-invasive or invasive, depending on the modality used. Non-invasive contouring is most frequently performed with devices that target subcutaneous adipose with focused electrical or thermal energy, including low-level laser, cryolipolysis, ultrasonography, and radiofrequency. Invasive body contouring modalities useful for male body contouring include liposuction, pectoral and abdominal wall etching, jawline fillers, synthetic deoxycholic acid injections, and solid silicone implants. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to the unique aspects, strategies, and modalities used in aesthetic body contouring for the male patient.

  10. The role of shape complexity in the detection of closed contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The detection of contours in noise has been extensively studied, but the detection of closed contours, such as the boundaries of whole objects, has received relatively little attention. Closed contours pose substantial challenges not present in the simple (open) case, because they form the outlines of whole shapes and thus take on a range of potentially important configural properties. In this paper we consider the detection of closed contours in noise as a probabilistic decision problem. Previous work on open contours suggests that contour complexity, quantified as the negative log probability (Description Length, DL) of the contour under a suitably chosen statistical model, impairs contour detectability; more complex (statistically surprising) contours are harder to detect. In this study we extended this result to closed contours, developing a suitable probabilistic model of whole shapes that gives rise to several distinct though interrelated measures of shape complexity. We asked subjects to detect either natural shapes (Exp. 1) or experimentally manipulated shapes (Exp. 2) embedded in noise fields. We found systematic effects of global shape complexity on detection performance, demonstrating how aspects of global shape and form influence the basic process of object detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Shape reconstruction from apparent contours theory and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Bellettini, Giovanni; Paolini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by a variational model concerning the depth of the objects in a picture and the problem of hidden and illusory contours, this book investigates one of the central problems of computer vision: the topological and algorithmic reconstruction of a smooth three dimensional scene starting from the visible part of an apparent contour. The authors focus their attention on the manipulation of apparent contours using a finite set of elementary moves, which correspond to diffeomorphic deformations of three dimensional scenes. A large part of the book is devoted to the algorithmic part, with implementations, experiments, and computed examples. The book is intended also as a user's guide to the software code appcontour, written for the manipulation of apparent contours and their invariants. This book is addressed to theoretical and applied scientists working in the field of mathematical models of image segmentation.

  12. A new template matching method based on contour information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huiying; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Qingxiao; Li, Sicong

    2014-11-01

    Template matching is a significant approach in machine vision due to its effectiveness and robustness. However, most of the template matching methods are so time consuming that they can't be used to many real time applications. The closed contour matching method is a popular kind of template matching methods. This paper presents a new closed contour template matching method which is suitable for two dimensional objects. Coarse-to-fine searching strategy is used to improve the matching efficiency and a partial computation elimination scheme is proposed to further speed up the searching process. The method consists of offline model construction and online matching. In the process of model construction, triples and distance image are obtained from the template image. A certain number of triples which are composed by three points are created from the contour information that is extracted from the template image. The rule to select the three points is that the template contour is divided equally into three parts by these points. The distance image is obtained here by distance transform. Each point on the distance image represents the nearest distance between current point and the points on the template contour. During the process of matching, triples of the searching image are created with the same rule as the triples of the model. Through the similarity that is invariant to rotation, translation and scaling between triangles, the triples corresponding to the triples of the model are found. Then we can obtain the initial RST (rotation, translation and scaling) parameters mapping the searching contour to the template contour. In order to speed up the searching process, the points on the searching contour are sampled to reduce the number of the triples. To verify the RST parameters, the searching contour is projected into the distance image, and the mean distance can be computed rapidly by simple operations of addition and multiplication. In the fine searching process

  13. Spiral Light Beams and Contour Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishkin, Sergey A.; Kotova, Svetlana P.; Volostnikov, Vladimir G.

    Spiral beams of light are characterized by their ability to remain structurally unchanged at propagation. They may have the shape of any closed curve. In the present paper a new approach is proposed within the framework of the contour analysis based on a close cooperation of modern coherent optics, theory of functions and numerical methods. An algorithm for comparing contours is presented and theoretically justified, which allows convincing of whether two contours are similar or not to within the scale factor and/or rotation. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed approach are considered; the results of numerical modeling are presented.

  14. A cardiac contouring atlas for radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duane, Frances; Aznar, Marianne C; Bartlett, Freddie

    2017-01-01

    defined from cardiology models and agreed by two cardiologists. Reference atlas contours were delineated and written guidelines prepared. Six radiation oncologists tested the atlas. Spatial variation was assessed using the DICE similarity coefficient (DSC) and the directed Hausdorff average distance (d→H,avg......-observer contour separation (mean d→H,avg) was 1.5-2.2mm for left ventricular segments and 1.3-5.1mm for coronary artery segments. This spatial variation resulted in

  15. A Neurocomputational Account of the Role of Contour Facilitation in Brightness Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen eDomijan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel filling-in model is proposed in order to account for challenging brightness illusions where inducing background elements are spatially separated from gray target such as dungeon, cube and grating illusion, bull's eye and ring patterns. The model implements simple idea that neural response to low-contrast contour is enhanced (facilitated by the presence of collinear or parallel high-contrast contour in the wider neighborhood. Contour facilitation is achieved via dendritic inhibition which enables computation of maximum function among inputs to the node. Recurrent application of maximum function leads to the propagation of neural signal along collinear or parallel contour segments. When strong global contour signal is accompanied with weak local contour signal at the same location, conditions are met to produce brightness assimilation within filling-in network. Computer simulations showed that the model correctly predicts brightness appearance in all of the above mentioned illusions as well as in White's effect, Benary's cross, Todorović's illusion, checkerboard contrast, contrast-contrast illusion and various variations on the White's effect. The proposed model offer new insights on how geometric factors (contour colinearity or parallelism jointly with contrast magnitude contribute to the brightness perception.

  16. Optical Character Recognition Using Active Contour Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Oudah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Document analysis of images snapped by camera is a growing challenge. These photos are often poor-quality compound images, composed of various objects and text; this makes automatic analysis complicated. OCR is one of the image processing techniques which is used to perform automatic identification of texts. Existing image processing techniques need to manage many parameters in order to clearly recognize the text in such pictures. Segmentation is regarded one of these essential parameters. This paper discusses the accuracy of segmentation process and its effect over the recognition process. According to the proposed method, the images were firstly filtered using the wiener filter then the active contour algorithm could be applied in the segmentation process. The Tesseract OCR Engine was selected in order to evaluate the performance and identification accuracy of the proposed method. The results showed that a more accurate segmentation process shall lead to a more accurate recognition results. The rate of recognition accuracy was 0.95 for the proposed algorithm compared with 0.85 for the Tesseract OCR Engine.

  17. Visualization of Uncertain Contour Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Contour trees can represent the topology of large volume data sets in a relatively compact, discrete data structure. However, the resulting trees often contain many thousands of nodes; thus, many graph drawing techniques fail to produce satisfactory results. Therefore, several visualization methods...... were proposed recently for the visualization of contour trees. Unfortunately, none of these techniques is able to handle uncertain contour trees although any uncertainty of the volume data inevitably results in partially uncertain contour trees. In this work, we visualize uncertain contour trees...... by combining the contour trees of two morphologically filtered versions of a volume data set, which represent the range of uncertainty. These two contour trees are combined and visualized within a single image such that a range of potential contour trees is represented by the resulting visualization. Thus...

  18. Digital elevation model production from scanned topographic contour maps via thin plate spline interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soycan, Arzu; Soycan, Metin

    2009-01-01

    GIS (Geographical Information System) is one of the most striking innovation for mapping applications supplied by the developing computer and software technology to users. GIS is a very effective tool which can show visually combination of the geographical and non-geographical data by recording these to allow interpretations and analysis. DEM (Digital Elevation Model) is an inalienable component of the GIS. The existing TM (Topographic Map) can be used as the main data source for generating DEM by amanual digitizing or vectorization process for the contours polylines. The aim of this study is to examine the DEM accuracies, which were obtained by TMs, as depending on the number of sampling points and grid size. For these purposes, the contours of the several 1/1000 scaled scanned topographical maps were vectorized. The different DEMs of relevant area have been created by using several datasets with different numbers of sampling points. We focused on the DEM creation from contour lines using gridding with RBF (Radial Basis Function) interpolation techniques, namely TPS as the surface fitting model. The solution algorithm and a short review of the mathematical model of TPS (Thin Plate Spline) interpolation techniques are given. In the test study, results of the application and the obtained accuracies are drawn and discussed. The initial object of this research is to discuss the requirement of DEM in GIS, urban planning, surveying engineering and the other applications with high accuracy (a few deci meters). (author)

  19. Neuronal oscillations form parietal/frontal networks during contour integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Marta; Plöchl, Michael; Vicente, Raul; Pipa, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    The ability to integrate visual features into a global coherent percept that can be further categorized and manipulated are fundamental abilities of the neural system. While the processing of visual information involves activation of early visual cortices, the recruitment of parietal and frontal cortices has been shown to be crucial for perceptual processes. Yet is it not clear how both cortical and long-range oscillatory activity leads to the integration of visual features into a coherent percept. Here, we will investigate perceptual grouping through the analysis of a contour categorization task, where the local elements that form contour must be linked into a coherent structure, which is then further processed and manipulated to perform the categorization task. The contour formation in our visual stimulus is a dynamic process where, for the first time, visual perception of contours is disentangled from the onset of visual stimulation or from motor preparation, cognitive processes that until now have been behaviorally attached to perceptual processes. Our main finding is that, while local and long-range synchronization at several frequencies seem to be an ongoing phenomena, categorization of a contour could only be predicted through local oscillatory activity within parietal/frontal sources, which in turn, would synchronize at gamma (>30 Hz) frequency. Simultaneously, fronto-parietal beta (13-30 Hz) phase locking forms a network spanning across neural sources that are not category specific. Both long range networks, i.e., the gamma network that is category specific, and the beta network that is not category specific, are functionally distinct but spatially overlapping. Altogether, we show that a critical mechanism underlying contour categorization involves oscillatory activity within parietal/frontal cortices, as well as its synchronization across distal cortical sites.

  20. Automatic transfer function generation using contour tree controlled residue flow model and color harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianlong; Takatsuka, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Transfer functions facilitate the volumetric data visualization by assigning optical properties to various data features and scalar values. Automation of transfer function specifications still remains a challenge in volume rendering. This paper presents an approach for automating transfer function generations by utilizing topological attributes derived from the contour tree of a volume. The contour tree acts as a visual index to volume segments, and captures associated topological attributes involved in volumetric data. A residue flow model based on Darcy's Law is employed to control distributions of opacity between branches of the contour tree. Topological attributes are also used to control color selection in a perceptual color space and create harmonic color transfer functions. The generated transfer functions can depict inclusion relationship between structures and maximize opacity and color differences between them. The proposed approach allows efficient automation of transfer function generations, and exploration on the data to be carried out based on controlling of opacity residue flow rate instead of complex low-level transfer function parameter adjustments. Experiments on various data sets demonstrate the practical use of our approach in transfer function generations.

  1. A Combined Random Forests and Active Contour Model Approach for Fully Automatic Segmentation of the Left Atrium in Volumetric MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of the left atrium (LA from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI datasets is of great importance for image guided atrial fibrillation ablation, LA fibrosis quantification, and cardiac biophysical modelling. However, automated LA segmentation from cardiac MRI is challenging due to limited image resolution, considerable variability in anatomical structures across subjects, and dynamic motion of the heart. In this work, we propose a combined random forests (RFs and active contour model (ACM approach for fully automatic segmentation of the LA from cardiac volumetric MRI. Specifically, we employ the RFs within an autocontext scheme to effectively integrate contextual and appearance information from multisource images together for LA shape inferring. The inferred shape is then incorporated into a volume-scalable ACM for further improving the segmentation accuracy. We validated the proposed method on the cardiac volumetric MRI datasets from the STACOM 2013 and HVSMR 2016 databases and showed that it outperforms other latest automated LA segmentation methods. Validation metrics, average Dice coefficient (DC and average surface-to-surface distance (S2S, were computed as 0.9227±0.0598 and 1.14±1.205 mm, versus those of 0.6222–0.878 and 1.34–8.72 mm, obtained by other methods, respectively.

  2. People detection in crowded scenes using active contour models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidla, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The detection of pedestrians in real-world scenes is a daunting task, especially in crowded situations. Our experience over the last years has shown that active shape models (ASM) can contribute significantly to a robust pedestrian detection system. The paper starts with an overview of shape model approaches, it then explains our approach which builds on top of Eigenshape models which have been trained using real-world data. These models are placed over candidate regions and matched to image gradients using a scoring function which integrates i) point distribution, ii) local gradient orientations iii) local image gradient strengths. A matching and shape model update process is iteratively applied in order to fit the flexible models to the local image content. The weights of the scoring function have a significant impact on the ASM performance. We analyze different settings of scoring weights for gradient magnitude, relative orientation differences, distance between model and gradient in an experiment which uses real-world data. Although for only one pedestrian model in an image computation time is low, the number of necessary processing cycles which is needed to track many people in crowded scenes can become the bottleneck in a real-time application. We describe the measures which have been taken in order to improve the speed of the ASM implementation and make it real-time capable.

  3. A Voronoi interior adjacency-based approach for generating a contour tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Qiao, Chaofei; Zhao, Renliang

    2004-05-01

    A contour tree is a good graphical tool for representing the spatial relations of contour lines and has found many applications in map generalization, map annotation, terrain analysis, etc. A new approach for generating contour trees by introducing a Voronoi-based interior adjacency set concept is proposed in this paper. The immediate interior adjacency set is employed to identify all of the children contours of each contour without contour elevations. It has advantages over existing methods such as the point-in-polygon method and the region growing-based method. This new approach can be used for spatial data mining and knowledge discovering, such as the automatic extraction of terrain features and construction of multi-resolution digital elevation model.

  4. Active Contour Driven by Local Region Statistics and Maximum A Posteriori Probability for Medical Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel active contour model in a variational level set formulation for simultaneous segmentation and bias field estimation of medical images. An energy function is formulated based on improved Kullback-Leibler distance (KLD with likelihood ratio. According to the additive model of images with intensity inhomogeneity, we characterize the statistics of image intensities belonging to each different object in local regions as Gaussian distributions with different means and variances. Then, we use the Gaussian distribution with bias field as a local region descriptor in level set formulation for segmentation and bias field correction of the images with inhomogeneous intensities. Therefore, image segmentation and bias field estimation are simultaneously achieved by minimizing the level set formulation. Experimental results demonstrate desirable performance of the proposed method for different medical images with weak boundaries and noise.

  5. Entanglement contour perspective for "strong area-law violation" in a disordered long-range hopping model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nilanjan; Sharma, Auditya

    2018-03-01

    We numerically investigate the link between the delocalization-localization transition and entanglement in a disordered long-range hopping model of spinless fermions by studying various static and dynamical quantities. This includes the inverse participation ratio, level statistics, entanglement entropy, and number fluctuations in the subsystem along with quench and wave-packet dynamics. Finite systems show delocalized, quasilocalized, and localized phases. The delocalized phase shows strong area-law violation, whereas the (quasi)localized phase adheres to (for large subsystems) the strict area law. The idea of "entanglement contour" nicely explains the violation of area law and its relationship with "fluctuation contour" reveals a signature at the transition point. The relationship between entanglement entropy and number fluctuations in the subsystem also carries signatures for the transition in the model. Results from the Aubry-Andre-Harper model are compared in this context. The propagation of charge and entanglement are contrasted by studying quench and wave-packet dynamics at the single-particle and many-particle levels.

  6. CONTOUR investigation launched

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    On 27 August, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe appointed a team to investigate the apparent loss of the Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft, which stopped communicating with the mission control operations on 15 August.On that date, CONTOUR failed to communicate following the firing of its main engine that would take it out of its orbit around the Earth. Shortly afterwards, the mission team received telescope images from several observatories showing two objects traveling along the spacecraft's predicted path. Those objects could be CONTOUR, and part of the spacecraft that may have separated from it when the spacecraft's solid rocket motor fired.

  7. (Con)fusing contours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, R.J. van; Wit, T.C.J. de; Koning, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    We have created patterns in which illusory Kanizsa squares are positioned on top of a background grid of bars. When the illusory contours and physical contours are misaligned, the resulting percept appears to be rather confusing (van Lier et al, 2004 Perception 33 Supplement, 77). Observers often

  8. Analysis of contour images using optics of spiral beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volostnikov, V. G.; Kishkin, S. A.; Kotova, S. P.

    2018-03-01

    An approach is outlined to the recognition of contour images using computer technology based on coherent optics principles. A mathematical description of the recognition process algorithm and the results of numerical modelling are presented. The developed approach to the recognition of contour images using optics of spiral beams is described and justified.

  9. New Region-Scalable Discriminant and Fitting Energy Functional for Driving Geometric Active Contours in Medical Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuchu Wang

    2014-01-01

    that uses region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional for handling the intensity inhomogeneity and weak boundary problems in medical image segmentation. The region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional is defined to capture the image intensity characteristics in local and global regions for driving the evolution of active contour. The discriminant term in the model aims at separating background and foreground in scalable regions while the fitting term tends to fit the intensity in these regions. This model is then transformed into a variational level set formulation with a level set regularization term for accurate computation. The new model utilizes intensity information in the local and global regions as much as possible; so it not only handles better intensity inhomogeneity, but also allows more robustness to noise and more flexible initialization in comparison to the original global region and regional-scalable based models. Experimental results for synthetic and real medical image segmentation show the advantages of the proposed method in terms of accuracy and robustness.

  10. High Resolution Elevation Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This dataset contains contours generated from high resolution data sources such as LiDAR. Generally speaking this data is 2 foot or less contour interval.

  11. Computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in CT by means of geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Epstein, Mark L.; Obajuluwa, Ademola M.; Xu Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Computerized liver extraction from hepatic CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in hepatic CT. Methods: The authors developed a computerized liver extraction scheme based on geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set contour evolution. First, an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to portal-venous-phase CT images for noise reduction while preserving the liver structure, followed by a scale-specific gradient magnitude filter to enhance the liver boundaries. Then, a nonlinear grayscale converter enhanced the contrast of the liver parenchyma. By using the liver-parenchyma-enhanced image as a speed function, a fast-marching level-set algorithm generated an initial contour that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic active contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour evolution refined the initial contour to define the liver boundaries more precisely. The liver volume was then calculated using these refined boundaries. Hepatic CT scans of 15 prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multidetector CT system. The liver volumes extracted by the computerized scheme were compared to those traced manually by a radiologist, used as ''gold standard.''Results: The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1504 cc, whereas the mean gold standard manual volume was 1457 cc, resulting in a mean absolute difference of 105 cc (7.2%). The computer-estimated liver volumetrics agreed excellently with the gold-standard manual volumetrics (intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (F=0.77; p(F{<=}f)=0.32). The average accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and percent volume error were 98.4%, 91.1%, 99.1%, and 7.2%, respectively. Computerized CT liver volumetry would require substantially less

  12. Computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in CT by means of geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Epstein, Mark L.; Obajuluwa, Ademola M.; Xu Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Computerized liver extraction from hepatic CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided measurement of liver volumes in hepatic CT. Methods: The authors developed a computerized liver extraction scheme based on geodesic active contour segmentation coupled with level-set contour evolution. First, an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to portal-venous-phase CT images for noise reduction while preserving the liver structure, followed by a scale-specific gradient magnitude filter to enhance the liver boundaries. Then, a nonlinear grayscale converter enhanced the contrast of the liver parenchyma. By using the liver-parenchyma-enhanced image as a speed function, a fast-marching level-set algorithm generated an initial contour that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic active contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour evolution refined the initial contour to define the liver boundaries more precisely. The liver volume was then calculated using these refined boundaries. Hepatic CT scans of 15 prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multidetector CT system. The liver volumes extracted by the computerized scheme were compared to those traced manually by a radiologist, used as ''gold standard.''Results: The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1504 cc, whereas the mean gold standard manual volume was 1457 cc, resulting in a mean absolute difference of 105 cc (7.2%). The computer-estimated liver volumetrics agreed excellently with the gold-standard manual volumetrics (intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (F=0.77; p(F≤f)=0.32). The average accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and percent volume error were 98.4%, 91.1%, 99.1%, and 7.2%, respectively. Computerized CT liver volumetry would require substantially less completion time

  13. Tagged Vector Contour (TVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Tagged Vector Contour (TVC) dataset consists of digitized contours from the 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle maps. Coverage for the state is incomplete....

  14. Analysis of a planetary gear modelled with a contour graph considering the decision making complexity of game-tree structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deptuła Adam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis and synthesis of mechanisms is one of the fundamental tasks of engineering. Mechanisms can suffer from errors due to versatile reasons. Graph-based methods of analysis and synthesis of planetary gears constitute an alternative method for checking their correctness. Previous applications of the graph theory concerned modelling gears for dynamic analysis, kinematic analysis, synthesis, structural analysis, gearshift optimization and automatic design based on so-called graph grammars. Some tasks may be performed only with the methods resulting from the graph theory, e.g. enumeration of structural solutions. The contour plot method consists in distinguishing a series of consecutive rigid units of the analysed mechanism, forming a closed loop (so-called contour. At a later stage, it is possible to analyze the obtained contour graph as a directed graph of dependence. This work presents an example of the application of game-tree structures in describing the contour graph of a planetary gear. In addition, complex parametric tree structures are included.

  15. Ocean Sediment Thickness Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean sediment thickness contours in 200 meter intervals for water depths ranging from 0 - 18,000 meters. These contours were derived from a global sediment...

  16. Non-Rigid Contour-Based Registration of Cell Nuclei in 2-D Live Cell Microscopy Images Using a Dynamic Elasticity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dmitry V; Peterlik, Igor; Tektonidis, Marco; Rohr, Karl; Matula, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of the pure motion of subnuclear structures without influence of the cell nucleus motion and deformation is essential in live cell imaging. In this paper, we propose a 2-D contour-based image registration approach for compensation of nucleus motion and deformation in fluorescence microscopy time-lapse sequences. The proposed approach extends our previous approach, which uses a static elasticity model to register cell images. Compared with that scheme, the new approach employs a dynamic elasticity model for the forward simulation of nucleus motion and deformation based on the motion of its contours. The contour matching process is embedded as a constraint into the system of equations describing the elastic behavior of the nucleus. This results in better performance in terms of the registration accuracy. Our approach was successfully applied to real live cell microscopy image sequences of different types of cells including image data that was specifically designed and acquired for evaluation of cell image registration methods. An experimental comparison with the existing contour-based registration methods and an intensity-based registration method has been performed. We also studied the dependence of the results on the choice of method parameters.

  17. SU-C-BRB-05: Determining the Adequacy of Auto-Contouring Via Probabilistic Assessment of Ensuing Treatment Plan Metrics in Comparison with Manual Contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourzadeh, H; Watkins, W; Siebers, J; Ahmad, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if auto-contour and manual-contour—based plans differ when evaluated with respect to probabilistic coverage metrics and biological model endpoints for prostate IMRT. Methods: Manual and auto-contours were created for 149 CT image sets acquired from 16 unique prostate patients. A single physician manually contoured all images. Auto-contouring was completed utilizing Pinnacle’s Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE). For each CT, three different 78 Gy/39 fraction 7-beam IMRT plans are created; PD with drawn ROIs, PAS with auto-contoured ROIs, and PM with auto-contoured OARs with the manually drawn target. For each plan, 1000 virtual treatment simulations with different sampled systematic errors for each simulation and a different sampled random error for each fraction were performed using our in-house GPU-accelerated robustness analyzer tool which reports the statistical probability of achieving dose-volume metrics, NTCP, TCP, and the probability of achieving the optimization criteria for both auto-contoured (AS) and manually drawn (D) ROIs. Metrics are reported for all possible cross-evaluation pairs of ROI types (AS,D) and planning scenarios (PD,PAS,PM). Bhattacharyya coefficient (BC) is calculated to measure the PDF similarities for the dose-volume metric, NTCP, TCP, and objectives with respect to the manually drawn contour evaluated on base plan (D-PD). Results: We observe high BC values (BC≥0.94) for all OAR objectives. BC values of max dose objective on CTV also signify high resemblance (BC≥0.93) between the distributions. On the other hand, BC values for CTV’s D95 and Dmin objectives are small for AS-PM, AS-PD. NTCP distributions are similar across all evaluation pairs, while TCP distributions of AS-PM, AS-PD sustain variations up to %6 compared to other evaluated pairs. Conclusion: No significant probabilistic differences are observed in the metrics when auto-contoured OARs are used. The prostate auto-contour needs

  18. SU-C-BRB-05: Determining the Adequacy of Auto-Contouring Via Probabilistic Assessment of Ensuing Treatment Plan Metrics in Comparison with Manual Contours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nourzadeh, H; Watkins, W; Siebers, J; Ahmad, M [University of Virginia Health Systems, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if auto-contour and manual-contour—based plans differ when evaluated with respect to probabilistic coverage metrics and biological model endpoints for prostate IMRT. Methods: Manual and auto-contours were created for 149 CT image sets acquired from 16 unique prostate patients. A single physician manually contoured all images. Auto-contouring was completed utilizing Pinnacle’s Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE). For each CT, three different 78 Gy/39 fraction 7-beam IMRT plans are created; PD with drawn ROIs, PAS with auto-contoured ROIs, and PM with auto-contoured OARs with the manually drawn target. For each plan, 1000 virtual treatment simulations with different sampled systematic errors for each simulation and a different sampled random error for each fraction were performed using our in-house GPU-accelerated robustness analyzer tool which reports the statistical probability of achieving dose-volume metrics, NTCP, TCP, and the probability of achieving the optimization criteria for both auto-contoured (AS) and manually drawn (D) ROIs. Metrics are reported for all possible cross-evaluation pairs of ROI types (AS,D) and planning scenarios (PD,PAS,PM). Bhattacharyya coefficient (BC) is calculated to measure the PDF similarities for the dose-volume metric, NTCP, TCP, and objectives with respect to the manually drawn contour evaluated on base plan (D-PD). Results: We observe high BC values (BC≥0.94) for all OAR objectives. BC values of max dose objective on CTV also signify high resemblance (BC≥0.93) between the distributions. On the other hand, BC values for CTV’s D95 and Dmin objectives are small for AS-PM, AS-PD. NTCP distributions are similar across all evaluation pairs, while TCP distributions of AS-PM, AS-PD sustain variations up to %6 compared to other evaluated pairs. Conclusion: No significant probabilistic differences are observed in the metrics when auto-contoured OARs are used. The prostate auto-contour needs

  19. Automated consensus contour building for prostate MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalvati, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Inter-observer variability is the lack of agreement among clinicians in contouring a given organ or tumour in a medical image. The variability in medical image contouring is a source of uncertainty in radiation treatment planning. Consensus contour of a given case, which was proposed to reduce the variability, is generated by combining the manually generated contours of several clinicians. However, having access to several clinicians (e.g., radiation oncologists) to generate a consensus contour for one patient is costly. This paper presents an algorithm that automatically generates a consensus contour for a given case using the atlases of different clinicians. The algorithm was applied to prostate MR images of 15 patients manually contoured by 5 clinicians. The automatic consensus contours were compared to manual consensus contours where a median Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 88% was achieved.

  20. Pitch contour impairment in congenital amusia: New insights from the Self-paced Audio-visual Contour Task (SACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuejing; Sun, Yanan; Ho, Hao Tam; Thompson, William Forde

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with congenital amusia usually exhibit impairments in melodic contour processing when asked to compare pairs of melodies that may or may not be identical to one another. However, it is unclear whether the impairment observed in contour processing is caused by an impairment of pitch discrimination, or is a consequence of poor pitch memory. To help resolve this ambiguity, we designed a novel Self-paced Audio-visual Contour Task (SACT) that evaluates sensitivity to contour while placing minimal burden on memory. In this task, participants control the pace of an auditory contour that is simultaneously accompanied by a visual contour, and they are asked to judge whether the two contours are congruent or incongruent. In Experiment 1, melodic contours varying in pitch were presented with a series of dots that varied in spatial height. Amusics exhibited reduced sensitivity to audio-visual congruency in comparison to control participants. To exclude the possibility that the impairment arises from a general deficit in cross-modal mapping, Experiment 2 examined sensitivity to cross-modal mapping for two other auditory dimensions: timbral brightness and loudness. Amusics and controls were significantly more sensitive to large than small contour changes, and to changes in loudness than changes in timbre. However, there were no group differences in cross-modal mapping, suggesting that individuals with congenital amusia can comprehend spatial representations of acoustic information. Taken together, the findings indicate that pitch contour processing in congenital amusia remains impaired even when pitch memory is relatively unburdened.

  1. MAP Estimation of Chin and Cheek Contours in Video Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampmann Markus

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for the estimation of chin and cheek contours in video sequences is proposed. This algorithm exploits a priori knowledge about shape and position of chin and cheek contours in images. Exploiting knowledge about the shape, a parametric 2D model representing chin and cheek contours is introduced. Exploiting knowledge about the position, a MAP estimator is developed taking into account the observed luminance gradient as well as a priori probabilities of chin and cheek contours positions. The proposed algorithm was tested with head and shoulder video sequences (image resolution CIF. In nearly 70% of all investigated video frames, a subjectively error free estimation could be achieved. The 2D estimate error is measured as on average between 2.4 and .

  2. Boosting Active Contours for Weld Pool Visual Tracking in Automatic Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jinchao; Fan, Zhun; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the shape of the non-rigid molten metal during welding, so-called weld pool visual sensing, is one of the central tasks for automating arc welding processes. It is challenging due to the strong interference of the high-intensity arc light and spatters as well as the lack of robust...... approaches to detect and represent the shape of the nonrigid weld pool. We propose a solution using active contours including an prior for the weld pool boundary composition. Also, we apply Adaboost to select a small set of features that captures the relevant information. The proposed method is applied...... to weld pool tracking and the presented results verified its feasibility....

  3. Pitch contour impairment in congenital amusia: New insights from the Self-paced Audio-visual Contour Task (SACT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejing Lu

    Full Text Available Individuals with congenital amusia usually exhibit impairments in melodic contour processing when asked to compare pairs of melodies that may or may not be identical to one another. However, it is unclear whether the impairment observed in contour processing is caused by an impairment of pitch discrimination, or is a consequence of poor pitch memory. To help resolve this ambiguity, we designed a novel Self-paced Audio-visual Contour Task (SACT that evaluates sensitivity to contour while placing minimal burden on memory. In this task, participants control the pace of an auditory contour that is simultaneously accompanied by a visual contour, and they are asked to judge whether the two contours are congruent or incongruent. In Experiment 1, melodic contours varying in pitch were presented with a series of dots that varied in spatial height. Amusics exhibited reduced sensitivity to audio-visual congruency in comparison to control participants. To exclude the possibility that the impairment arises from a general deficit in cross-modal mapping, Experiment 2 examined sensitivity to cross-modal mapping for two other auditory dimensions: timbral brightness and loudness. Amusics and controls were significantly more sensitive to large than small contour changes, and to changes in loudness than changes in timbre. However, there were no group differences in cross-modal mapping, suggesting that individuals with congenital amusia can comprehend spatial representations of acoustic information. Taken together, the findings indicate that pitch contour processing in congenital amusia remains impaired even when pitch memory is relatively unburdened.

  4. Digital extraction of interference fringe contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastin, G.A.; Ghiglia, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic techniques for extracting interferogram contours have been discussed. The first is a global contour extracton technique based on the fast Fourier transform. The second extracts individual contours with a thinning algorithm using logical neighborhood transformations

  5. Image Interpolation with Geometric Contour Stencils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Getreuer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the image interpolation problem where given an image vm,n with uniformly-sampled pixels vm,n and point spread function h, the goal is to find function u(x,y satisfying vm,n = (h*u(m,n for all m,n in Z. This article improves upon the IPOL article Image Interpolation with Contour Stencils. In the previous work, contour stencils are used to estimate the image contours locally as short line segments. This article begins with a continuous formulation of total variation integrated over a collection of curves and defines contour stencils as a consistent discretization. This discretization is more reliable than the previous approach and can effectively distinguish contours that are locally shaped like lines, curves, corners, and circles. These improved contour stencils sense more of the geometry in the image. Interpolation is performed using an extension of the method described in the previous article. Using the improved contour stencils, there is an increase in image quality while maintaining similar computational efficiency.

  6. Spectrally accurate contour dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Buskirk, R.D.; Marcus, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    We present an exponentially accurate boundary integral method for calculation the equilibria and dynamics of piece-wise constant distributions of potential vorticity. The method represents contours of potential vorticity as a spectral sum and solves the Biot-Savart equation for the velocity by spectrally evaluating a desingularized contour integral. We use the technique in both an initial-value code and a newton continuation method. Our methods are tested by comparing the numerical solutions with known analytic results, and it is shown that for the same amount of computational work our spectral methods are more accurate than other contour dynamics methods currently in use

  7. The influence of automation on tumor contouring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aselmaa, A.; van Herk, Marcel; Song, Y.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Laprie, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Fully or semi-automatic contouring tools are increasingly being used in the tumor contouring task for radiotherapy. While the fully automatic contouring tools have not reached sufficient efficiency, the semi-automatic contouring tools balance more effectively between the human interaction and

  8. Enhancement of Afterimage Colors by Surrounding Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Sato

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Presenting luminance contours surrounding the adapted areas in test phase enhances color afterimages in both duration and color appearance. The presence of surrounding contour is crucial to some color phenomenon such as van Lier's afterimage, but the contour-effect itself has not been seriously examined. In this paper, we compared the contour-effect to color afterimages and to actually colored patches to examine the nature of color information subserving color-aftereffect. In the experiment, observers were adapted for 1 sec to a small colored square (red, green, yellow, or blue presented on a gray background. Then, a test field either with or without surrounding contour was presented. Observers matched the color of a test-patch located near the afterimage to the color of afterimage. It was found that the saturation of negative afterimage was almost doubled by the presence of surrounding contours. There was no effect of luminance contrast or polarity of contours. In contrast, no enhancement of saturation by surrounding contours was observed for actually colored patches even though the colors of patches were equalized to that of afterimage without contours. This dissociation in the contour-effect demonstrates the crucial difference between the color information for aftereffects and for ordinary bottom-up color perception.

  9. Active contour based segmentation of resected livers in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelmann, Simon; Oyarzun Laura, Cristina; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The majority of state of the art segmentation algorithms are able to give proper results in healthy organs but not in pathological ones. However, many clinical applications require an accurate segmentation of pathological organs. The determination of the target boundaries for radiotherapy or liver volumetry calculations are examples of this. Volumetry measurements are of special interest after tumor resection for follow up of liver regrow. The segmentation of resected livers presents additional challenges that were not addressed by state of the art algorithms. This paper presents a snakes based algorithm specially developed for the segmentation of resected livers. The algorithm is enhanced with a novel dynamic smoothing technique that allows the active contour to propagate with different speeds depending on the intensities visible in its neighborhood. The algorithm is evaluated in 6 clinical CT images as well as 18 artificial datasets generated from additional clinical CT images.

  10. Automatic liver contouring for radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dengwang; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    To develop automatic and efficient liver contouring software for planning 3D-CT and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) for application in clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems.The algorithm comprises three steps for overcoming the challenge of similar intensities between the liver region and its surrounding tissues. First, the total variation model with the L1 norm (TV-L1), which has the characteristic of multi-scale decomposition and an edge-preserving property, is used for removing the surrounding muscles and tissues. Second, an improved level set model that contains both global and local energy functions is utilized to extract liver contour information sequentially. In the global energy function, the local correlation coefficient (LCC) is constructed based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix both of the initial liver region and the background region. The LCC can calculate the correlation of a pixel with the foreground and background regions, respectively. The LCC is combined with intensity distribution models to classify pixels during the evolutionary process of the level set based method. The obtained liver contour is used as the candidate liver region for the following step. In the third step, voxel-based texture characterization is employed for refining the liver region and obtaining the final liver contours.The proposed method was validated based on the planning CT images of a group of 25 patients undergoing radiation therapy treatment planning. These included ten lung cancer patients with normal appearing livers and ten patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The method was also tested on abdominal 4D-CT images of a group of five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastases. The false positive volume percentage, the false negative volume percentage, and the dice similarity coefficient between liver contours obtained by a developed algorithm and a current standard delineated by the expert group

  11. 3D Filament Network Segmentation with Multiple Active Contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and microtubules. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we developed a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D TIRF Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

  12. Anatomical contouring variability in thoracic organs at risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, Ross, E-mail: rmccall86@gmail.com [Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI (United States); MacLennan, Grayden; Taylor, Matthew; Lenards, Nishele [Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Lemons, Jeffrey [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Hunzeker, Ashley [Medical Dosimetry Program, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether contouring thoracic organs at risk was consistent among medical dosimetrists and to identify how trends in dosimetrist's education and experience affected contouring accuracy. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to contextualize the raw data that were obtained. A total of 3 different computed tomography (CT) data sets were provided to medical dosimetrists (N = 13) across 5 different institutions. The medical dosimetrists were directed to contour the lungs, heart, spinal cord, and esophagus. The medical dosimetrists were instructed to contour in line with their institutional standards and were allowed to use any contouring tool or technique that they would traditionally use. The contours from each medical dosimetrist were evaluated against “gold standard” contours drawn and validated by 2 radiation oncology physicians. The dosimetrist-derived contours were evaluated against the gold standard using both a Dice coefficient method and a penalty-based metric scoring system. A short survey was also completed by each medical dosimetrist to evaluate their individual contouring experience. There was no significant variation in the contouring consistency of the lungs and spinal cord. Intradosimetrist contouring was consistent for those who contoured the esophagus and heart correctly; however, medical dosimetrists with a poor metric score showed erratic and inconsistent methods of contouring.

  13. A recurrent neural model for proto-object based contour integration and figure-ground segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Brian; Niebur, Ernst

    2017-12-01

    Visual processing of objects makes use of both feedforward and feedback streams of information. However, the nature of feedback signals is largely unknown, as is the identity of the neuronal populations in lower visual areas that receive them. Here, we develop a recurrent neural model to address these questions in the context of contour integration and figure-ground segregation. A key feature of our model is the use of grouping neurons whose activity represents tentative objects ("proto-objects") based on the integration of local feature information. Grouping neurons receive input from an organized set of local feature neurons, and project modulatory feedback to those same neurons. Additionally, inhibition at both the local feature level and the object representation level biases the interpretation of the visual scene in agreement with principles from Gestalt psychology. Our model explains several sets of neurophysiological results (Zhou et al. Journal of Neuroscience, 20(17), 6594-6611 2000; Qiu et al. Nature Neuroscience, 10(11), 1492-1499 2007; Chen et al. Neuron, 82(3), 682-694 2014), and makes testable predictions about the influence of neuronal feedback and attentional selection on neural responses across different visual areas. Our model also provides a framework for understanding how object-based attention is able to select both objects and the features associated with them.

  14. Auto-propagation of contours for adaptive prostate radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Ming; Xie Yaoqin; Xing Lei

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an effective technique to automatically propagate contours from planning CT to cone beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate CBCT-guided prostate adaptive radiation therapy. Different from other disease sites, such as the lungs, the contour mapping here is complicated by two factors: (i) the physical one-to-one correspondence may not exist due to the insertion or removal of some image contents within the region of interest (ROI); and (ii) reduced contrast to noise ratio of the CBCT images due to increased scatter. To overcome these issues, we investigate a strategy of excluding the regions with variable contents by a careful design of a narrow shell signifying the contour of an ROI. For rectum, for example, a narrow shell with the delineated contours as its interior surface was constructed to avoid the adverse influence of the day-to-day content change inside the rectum on the contour mapping. The corresponding contours in the CBCT were found by warping the narrow shell through the use of BSpline deformable model. Both digital phantom experiments and clinical case testing were carried out to validate the proposed ROI mapping method. It was found that the approach was able to reliably warp the constructed narrow band with an accuracy better than 1.3 mm. For all five clinical cases enrolled in this study, the method yielded satisfactory results even when there were significant rectal content changes between the planning CT and CBCT scans. The overlapped area of the auto-mapped contours over 90% to the manually drawn contours is readily achievable. The proposed approach permits us to take advantage of the regional calculation algorithm yet avoiding the nuisance of rectum/bladder filling and provide a useful tool for adaptive radiotherapy of prostate in the future

  15. Auto-propagation of contours for adaptive prostate radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ming; Xie, Yaoqin; Xing, Lei

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an effective technique to automatically propagate contours from planning CT to cone beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate CBCT-guided prostate adaptive radiation therapy. Different from other disease sites, such as the lungs, the contour mapping here is complicated by two factors: (i) the physical one-to-one correspondence may not exist due to the insertion or removal of some image contents within the region of interest (ROI); and (ii) reduced contrast to noise ratio of the CBCT images due to increased scatter. To overcome these issues, we investigate a strategy of excluding the regions with variable contents by a careful design of a narrow shell signifying the contour of an ROI. For rectum, for example, a narrow shell with the delineated contours as its interior surface was constructed to avoid the adverse influence of the day-to-day content change inside the rectum on the contour mapping. The corresponding contours in the CBCT were found by warping the narrow shell through the use of BSpline deformable model. Both digital phantom experiments and clinical case testing were carried out to validate the proposed ROI mapping method. It was found that the approach was able to reliably warp the constructed narrow band with an accuracy better than 1.3 mm. For all five clinical cases enrolled in this study, the method yielded satisfactory results even when there were significant rectal content changes between the planning CT and CBCT scans. The overlapped area of the auto-mapped contours over 90% to the manually drawn contours is readily achievable. The proposed approach permits us to take advantage of the regional calculation algorithm yet avoiding the nuisance of rectum/bladder filling and provide a useful tool for adaptive radiotherapy of prostate in the future.

  16. Auto-propagation of contours for adaptive prostate radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao Ming; Xie Yaoqin; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States)], E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu

    2008-09-07

    The purpose of this work is to develop an effective technique to automatically propagate contours from planning CT to cone beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate CBCT-guided prostate adaptive radiation therapy. Different from other disease sites, such as the lungs, the contour mapping here is complicated by two factors: (i) the physical one-to-one correspondence may not exist due to the insertion or removal of some image contents within the region of interest (ROI); and (ii) reduced contrast to noise ratio of the CBCT images due to increased scatter. To overcome these issues, we investigate a strategy of excluding the regions with variable contents by a careful design of a narrow shell signifying the contour of an ROI. For rectum, for example, a narrow shell with the delineated contours as its interior surface was constructed to avoid the adverse influence of the day-to-day content change inside the rectum on the contour mapping. The corresponding contours in the CBCT were found by warping the narrow shell through the use of BSpline deformable model. Both digital phantom experiments and clinical case testing were carried out to validate the proposed ROI mapping method. It was found that the approach was able to reliably warp the constructed narrow band with an accuracy better than 1.3 mm. For all five clinical cases enrolled in this study, the method yielded satisfactory results even when there were significant rectal content changes between the planning CT and CBCT scans. The overlapped area of the auto-mapped contours over 90% to the manually drawn contours is readily achievable. The proposed approach permits us to take advantage of the regional calculation algorithm yet avoiding the nuisance of rectum/bladder filling and provide a useful tool for adaptive radiotherapy of prostate in the future.

  17. An improved spatial contour tree constructed method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Ling; Guilbert, Eric; Long, Yi

    2018-05-01

    Contours are important data to delineate the landform on a map. A contour tree provides an object-oriented description of landforms and can be used to enrich the topological information. The traditional contour tree is used to store topological relationships between contours in a hierarchical structure and allows for the identification of eminences and depressions as sets of nested contours. This research proposes an improved contour tree so-called spatial contour tree that contains not only the topological but also the geometric information. It can be regarded as a terrain skeleton in 3-dimention, and it is established based on the spatial nodes of contours which have the latitude, longitude and elevation information. The spatial contour tree is built by connecting spatial nodes from low to high elevation for a positive landform, and from high to low elevation for a negative landform to form a hierarchical structure. The connection between two spatial nodes can provide the real distance and direction as a Euclidean vector in 3-dimention. In this paper, the construction method is tested in the experiment, and the results are discussed. The proposed hierarchical structure is in 3-demintion and can show the skeleton inside a terrain. The structure, where all nodes have geo-information, can be used to distinguish different landforms and applied for contour generalization with consideration of geographic characteristics.

  18. Fourier Descriptor Analysis and Unification of Voice Range Profile Contours: Method and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Peter; Ternstrom, Sten; Lamarche, Anick

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a method for unified description, statistical modeling, and comparison of voice range profile (VRP) contours, even from diverse sources. Method: A morphologic modeling technique, which is based on Fourier descriptors (FDs), is applied to the VRP contour. The technique, which essentially involves resampling of the curve of the…

  19. Automatic re-contouring in 4D radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H; Chen, Quan; Chen, Ming-Li; Ruchala, Kenneth J

    2006-01-01

    Delineating regions of interest (ROIs) on each phase of four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) images is an essential step for 4D radiotherapy. The requirement of manual phase-by-phase contouring prohibits the routine use of 4D radiotherapy. This paper develops an automatic re-contouring algorithm that combines techniques of deformable registration and surface construction. ROIs are manually contoured slice-by-slice in the reference phase image. A reference surface is constructed based on these reference contours using a triangulated surface construction technique. The deformable registration technique provides the voxel-to-voxel mapping between the reference phase and the test phase. The vertices of the reference surface are displaced in accordance with the deformation map, resulting in a deformed surface. The new contours are reconstructed by cutting the deformed surface slice-by-slice along the transversal, sagittal or coronal direction. Since both the inputs and outputs of our automatic re-contouring algorithm are contours, it is relatively easy to cope with any treatment planning system. We tested our automatic re-contouring algorithm using a deformable phantom and 4D CT images of six lung cancer patients. The proposed algorithm is validated by visual inspections and quantitative comparisons of the automatic re-contours with both the gold standard segmentations and the manual contours. Based on the automatic delineated ROIs, changes of tumour and sensitive structures during respiration are quantitatively analysed. This algorithm could also be used to re-contour daily images for treatment evaluation and adaptive radiotherapy

  20. Dynamic contour tonometry: presentation of a new tonometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanngiesser, Hartmut E; Kniestedt, Christoph; Robert, Yves C A

    2005-10-01

    With tonometers currently in use intraocular pressure is indirectly determined by measuring a physical quantity related to a specified deformation of the cornea. We present a new principle of direct, continuous, and transcorneal intraocular pressure measurement, describe its theoretical foundation, and evaluate its application on the basis of an in vitro model. On a living human eye an optimized pressure-sensitive contact surface was determined by performing pressure measurements with differently shaped tonometer heads. Based on these results and on the theoretical model, a Dynamic Contour Tonometer was constructed and validated on eye bank bulbi against a manometric reference pressure. A concave contact surface with a radius of curvature of 10.5 mm creates a distribution of forces between the central contour matching area of the tip and the cornea that equals the forces generated by the internal pressure of the eye. A sensor integrated into the surface having the same contour measures the intraocular pressure closely to the manometric reference pressure in human cadaver eyes. The accuracy of the tonometer appears to be unaffected by variations in corneal properties. Dynamic Contour Tonometry eliminates most of the systematic errors arising from individual changes of corneal properties that adversely influence all types of applanation tonometers. The advantage of measuring the true pressure in combination with the capability of registering dynamic pressure fluctuations discloses new tonometric opportunities to diagnose and classify different types of glaucoma.

  1. Drawing Contour Trees in the Plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, C; Schneider, D; Carr, Hamish; Scheuermann, G

    2011-11-01

    The contour tree compactly describes scalar field topology. From the viewpoint of graph drawing, it is a tree with attributes at vertices and optionally on edges. Standard tree drawing algorithms emphasize structural properties of the tree and neglect the attributes. Applying known techniques to convey this information proves hard and sometimes even impossible. We present several adaptions of popular graph drawing approaches to the problem of contour tree drawing and evaluate them. We identify five esthetic criteria for drawing contour trees and present a novel algorithm for drawing contour trees in the plane that satisfies four of these criteria. Our implementation is fast and effective for contour tree sizes usually used in interactive systems (around 100 branches) and also produces readable pictures for larger trees, as is shown for an 800 branch example.

  2. Visualizing Contour Trees within Histograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Many of the topological features of the isosurfaces of a scalar volume field can be compactly represented by its contour tree. Unfortunately, the contour trees of most real-world volume data sets are too complex to be visualized by dot-and-line diagrams. Therefore, we propose a new visualization...... that is suitable for large contour trees and efficiently conveys the topological structure of the most important isosurface components. This visualization is integrated into a histogram of the volume data; thus, it offers strictly more information than a traditional histogram. We present algorithms...... to automatically compute the graph layout and to calculate appropriate approximations of the contour tree and the surface area of the relevant isosurface components. The benefits of this new visualization are demonstrated with the help of several publicly available volume data sets....

  3. Orientation-crowding within contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, James C; Dakin, Steven C

    2013-07-15

    We examined how crowding (the breakdown of object recognition in the periphery caused by interference from "clutter") depends on the global arrangement of target and distracting flanker elements. Specifically we probed orientation discrimination using a near-vertical target Gabor flanked by two vertical distractor Gabors (one above and one below the target). By applying variable (opposite-sign) horizontal offsets to the positions of the two flankers we arranged the elements so that on some trials they formed contours with the target and on others they did not. While the presence of flankers generally elevated orientation discrimination thresholds for the target we observe maximal crowding not when flanker and targets were co-aligned but when a small spatial offset was applied to flanker location, so that contours formed between flanker and targets only when the target orientation was cued. We also report that observers' orientation judgments are biased, with target orientation appearing either attracted or repulsed by the global/contour orientation. A second experiment reveals that the sign of this effect is dependent both on observer and on eccentricity. In general, the magnitude of repulsion is reduced with eccentricity but whether this becomes attraction (of element orientation to contour orientation) is dependent on observer. We note however that across observers and eccentricities, the magnitude of repulsion correlates positively with the amount of release from crowding observed with co-aligned targets and flankers, supporting the notion of fluctuating bias as the basis for elevated crowding within contours.

  4. Development of a contour meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrada C, F.A.; Sanz, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetric calculation in patients that receive radiotherapy treatment it requires the one knowledge of the geometry of some anatomical portions, which differs from a patient to another. Making reference to the specific case of mammary neoplasia, one of the measurements that is carried out on the patient is the acquisition of the contour of the breast, which is determined from a point marked on the breastbone until another point marked on the lateral of the thorax, below the armpit, with the patient located in the irradiation position. This measurement is carried out with the help of a mechanical contour meter that is a device conformed by a series of wires with a polymeric coating, which support on the breast of the patient and it reproduces its form. Then it is transported in the more careful possible form on a paper and the contour is traced with a tracer one. The geometric error associated to this procedure is of ±1 cm, which is sensitive of being reduced. The present work finds its motivation in the patient's radiological protection radiotherapy. The maximum error in dose allowed in radiotherapeutic treatments is 5%. It would be increase the precision and with it to optimize the treatment received by the patient, reducing the error in the acquisition process of the mammary contour. With this objective, a digital device is designed whose operation is based in the application of a spatial transformation on a picture of the mammary contour, which corrects the geometric distortion introduced in the process of the photographic acquisition. An algorithm that allows to obtain a front image (without distortion) of the plane of the contour was developed. A software tool especially developed carries out the processing of the digital images. The maximum geometric error detected in the validation process is 2 mm located on a small portion of the contour. (Author)

  5. Modeling of Electromagnetic Fields in Parallel-Plane Structures: A Unified Contour-Integral Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stumpf

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A unified reciprocity-based modeling approach for analyzing electromagnetic fields in dispersive parallel-plane structures of arbitrary shape is described. It is shown that the use of the reciprocity theorem of the time-convolution type leads to a global contour-integral interaction quantity from which novel both time- and frequency-domain numerical schemes can be arrived at. Applications of the numerical method concerning the time-domain radiated interference and susceptibility of parallel-plane structures are discussed and illustrated on numerical examples.

  6. On a program manifold's stability of one contour automatic control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumatov, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Methodology of analysis of stability is expounded to the one contour systems automatic control feedback in the presence of non-linearities. The methodology is based on the use of the simplest mathematical models of the nonlinear controllable systems. Stability of program manifolds of one contour automatic control systems is investigated. The sufficient conditions of program manifold's absolute stability of one contour automatic control systems are obtained. The Hurwitz's angle of absolute stability was determined. The sufficient conditions of program manifold's absolute stability of control systems by the course of plane in the mode of autopilot are obtained by means Lyapunov's second method.

  7. A Method for Denoising Image Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu COSMA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The edge detection techniques have to compromise between sensitivity and noise. In order for the main contours to be uninterrupted, the level of sensitivity has to be raised, which however has the negative effect of producing a multitude of insignificant contours (noise. This article proposes a method of removing this noise, which acts directly on the binary representation of the image contours.

  8. Development of a CONTOUR-METER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrada Contardi, F.A.

    2004-01-01

    Dose calculation in patients undergoing radiotherapy treatments requires the knowledge of their anatomical geometry.Making reference to the specific case of breast cancer, one of the measurement that are made on the patients is the acquisition of the breast's contour, determined in an axial plane from a point marked on the breastbone until another point marked on the thorax side under the armpit.This measurement is normally made with a mechanic contour-meter: a device formed by a series of plastic-covered wires designed to be applied on the patient's skin copying the breast contour after it deformation.The geometrical error associated with this procedure is ± 1 cm. The precision of the dose calculation could be increased acquiring a breast contour more accurate.This objective was achieved developing a method based on breast images from a digital camera.The algorithms to obtain an axial-plane image of the contour from digital photographs taken from arbitrary positions were developed.A geometric transformation is applied to the photograph to correct for perspective distortions, obtaining a frontal - undistorted image (axial-plane image).A software tool to make all the image processing was developed under MatLab.The maximum geometrical error detected during the validation of the process was 2 mm [es

  9. SU-G-BRA-10: Marker Free Lung Tumor Motion Tracking by An Active Contour Model On Cone Beam CT Projections for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, M; Yuan, Y; Lo, Y; Wei, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel strategy to extract the lung tumor motion from cone beam CT (CBCT) projections by an active contour model with interpolated respiration learned from diaphragm motion. Methods: Tumor tracking on CBCT projections was accomplished with the templates derived from planning CT (pCT). There are three major steps in the proposed algorithm: 1) The pCT was modified to form two CT sets: a tumor removed pCT and a tumor only pCT, the respective digitally reconstructed radiographs DRRtr and DRRto following the same geometry of the CBCT projections were generated correspondingly. 2) The DRRtr was rigidly registered with the CBCT projections on the frame-by-frame basis. Difference images between CBCT projections and the registered DRRtr were generated where the tumor visibility was appreciably enhanced. 3) An active contour method was applied to track the tumor motion on the tumor enhanced projections with DRRto as templates to initialize the tumor tracking while the respiratory motion was compensated for by interpolating the diaphragm motion estimated by our novel constrained linear regression approach. CBCT and pCT from five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy were included in addition to scans from a Quasar phantom programmed with known motion. Manual tumor tracking was performed on CBCT projections and was compared to the automatic tracking to evaluate the algorithm accuracy. Results: The phantom study showed that the error between the automatic tracking and the ground truth was within 0.2mm. For the patients the discrepancy between the calculation and the manual tracking was between 1.4 and 2.2 mm depending on the location and shape of the lung tumor. Similar patterns were observed in the frequency domain. Conclusion: The new algorithm demonstrated the feasibility to track the lung tumor from noisy CBCT projections, providing a potential solution to better motion management for lung radiation therapy.

  10. SU-G-BRA-10: Marker Free Lung Tumor Motion Tracking by An Active Contour Model On Cone Beam CT Projections for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, M; Yuan, Y; Lo, Y [The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Wei, J [City College of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel strategy to extract the lung tumor motion from cone beam CT (CBCT) projections by an active contour model with interpolated respiration learned from diaphragm motion. Methods: Tumor tracking on CBCT projections was accomplished with the templates derived from planning CT (pCT). There are three major steps in the proposed algorithm: 1) The pCT was modified to form two CT sets: a tumor removed pCT and a tumor only pCT, the respective digitally reconstructed radiographs DRRtr and DRRto following the same geometry of the CBCT projections were generated correspondingly. 2) The DRRtr was rigidly registered with the CBCT projections on the frame-by-frame basis. Difference images between CBCT projections and the registered DRRtr were generated where the tumor visibility was appreciably enhanced. 3) An active contour method was applied to track the tumor motion on the tumor enhanced projections with DRRto as templates to initialize the tumor tracking while the respiratory motion was compensated for by interpolating the diaphragm motion estimated by our novel constrained linear regression approach. CBCT and pCT from five patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy were included in addition to scans from a Quasar phantom programmed with known motion. Manual tumor tracking was performed on CBCT projections and was compared to the automatic tracking to evaluate the algorithm accuracy. Results: The phantom study showed that the error between the automatic tracking and the ground truth was within 0.2mm. For the patients the discrepancy between the calculation and the manual tracking was between 1.4 and 2.2 mm depending on the location and shape of the lung tumor. Similar patterns were observed in the frequency domain. Conclusion: The new algorithm demonstrated the feasibility to track the lung tumor from noisy CBCT projections, providing a potential solution to better motion management for lung radiation therapy.

  11. Effects of background and contour luminance on the hue and brightness of the Watercolor effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, Peggy; Dojat, Michel; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Devinck, Frédéric

    2018-03-01

    Conjoint measurement was used to investigate the joint influences of the luminance of the background and the inner contour on hue- and brightness filling-in for a stimulus configuration generating a water-color effect (WCE), i.e., a wiggly bi-chromatic contour enclosing a region with the lower luminance component on the exterior. Two stimuli with the background and inner contour luminances covarying independently were successively presented, and in separate experiments, the observer judged which member of the pair's interior regions contained a stronger hue or was brighter. Braided-contour control stimuli that generated little or no perceptual filling-in were also used to assess whether observers were judging the interior regions and not the contours themselves. Three nested models of the contributions of the background and inner contour to the judgments were fit to the data by maximum likelihood and evaluated by likelihood ratio tests. Both stimulus components contributed to both the hue and brightness of the interior region with increasing luminance of the inner contour generating an assimilative filling-in for the hue judgments but a contrast effect for the brightness judgments. Control analyses showed negligible effects for the order of the luminance of the background or inner contour on the judgments. An additive contribution of both components was rejected in favor of a saturated model in which the responses depended on the levels of both stimulus components. For the hue judgments, increased background luminance led to greater hue filling-in at higher luminances of the interior contour. For the brightness judgments, the higher background luminance generated less brightness filling-in at higher luminances of the interior contour. The results indicate different effects of the inner contour and background on the induction of the brightness and coloration percepts of the WCE, suggesting that they are mediated by different mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier

  12. Contours - MO 2012 Greene County 5ft Contours (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — 5ft cartographic contour file for Greene County, Missouri. This file was created using the elevation data from the 2011 LiDAR flight. It includes indexes for 10, 25,...

  13. Differential contribution of early visual areas to the perceptual process of contour processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schira, Mark M; Fahle, Manfred; Donner, Tobias H; Kraft, Antje; Brandt, Stephan A

    2004-04-01

    We investigated contour processing and figure-ground detection within human retinotopic areas using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 6 healthy and naïve subjects. A figure (6 degrees side length) was created by a 2nd-order texture contour. An independent and demanding foveal letter-discrimination task prevented subjects from noticing this more peripheral contour stimulus. The contour subdivided our stimulus into a figure and a ground. Using localizers and retinotopic mapping stimuli we were able to subdivide each early visual area into 3 eccentricity regions corresponding to 1) the central figure, 2) the area along the contour, and 3) the background. In these subregions we investigated the hemodynamic responses to our stimuli and compared responses with or without the contour defining the figure. No contour-related blood oxygenation level-dependent modulation in early visual areas V1, V3, VP, and MT+ was found. Significant signal modulation in the contour subregions of V2v, V2d, V3a, and LO occurred. This activation pattern was different from comparable studies, which might be attributable to the letter-discrimination task reducing confounding attentional modulation. In V3a, but not in any other retinotopic area, signal modulation corresponding to the central figure could be detected. Such contextual modulation will be discussed in light of the recurrent processing hypothesis and the role of visual awareness.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of the Effect of Proximal Contour of Class II Composite Restorations on Stress Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Abachizadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of proximal contour of class II composite restorations placed with straight or contoured matrix band using composite resins with different modulus of elasticity on stress distribution by finite element method. Methods: In order to evaluate the stress distribution of class II composite restorations using finite element method, upper right first molar and second premolar were modeled. Proximal boxes were designed and restored with universal Z250 and packable P60 composite resins (3M ESPE using two matrix systems: flat Tofflemire matrix and precurved sectional matrix. Finally models were evaluated under loads of 200 and 400 Newton at 90 degrees angle and the results were graphically illustrated in the form of Von Misses stresses. Results: In general the stress obtained under 400 Newton load was significantly greater than the stress of models under 200 Newton load. Von Misses stress distribution pattern of two different Z250 and P60 composites were very similar in all modes of loading and proximal contour. In all analyzed models there was a significant difference between models restored with Tofflemire matrix with flat contour and models restored with sectional matrix with curved contour. This difference was greater in first molar than second premolar. Conclusion: Use of a contoured matrix band results in less stress in class II composite resin restorations.

  15. Collinear facilitation and contour integration in autism: evidence for atypical visual integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachim, Stephen; Warren, Paul A; McLoughlin, Niall; Gowen, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, atypical communication and a restricted repertoire of interests and activities. Altered sensory and perceptual experiences are also common, and a notable perceptual difference between individuals with ASD and controls is their superior performance in visual tasks where it may be beneficial to ignore global context. This superiority may be the result of atypical integrative processing. To explore this claim we investigated visual integration in adults with ASD (diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome) using two psychophysical tasks thought to rely on integrative processing-collinear facilitation and contour integration. We measured collinear facilitation at different flanker orientation offsets and contour integration for both open and closed contours. Our results indicate that compared to matched controls, ASD participants show (i) reduced collinear facilitation, despite equivalent performance without flankers; and (ii) less benefit from closed contours in contour integration. These results indicate weaker visuospatial integration in adults with ASD and suggest that further studies using these types of paradigms would provide knowledge on how contextual processing is altered in ASD.

  16. Collinear facilitation and contour integration in autism: evidence for atypical visual integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eJachim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, atypical communication and a restricted repertoire of interests and activities. Altered sensory and perceptual experiences are also common, and a notable perceptual difference between individuals with ASD and controls is their superior performance in visual tasks where it may be beneficial to ignore global context. This superiority may be the result of atypical integrative processing. To explore this claim we investigated visual integration in adults with ASD (diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome using two psychophysical tasks thought to rely on integrative processing - collinear facilitation and contour integration. We measured collinear facilitation at different flanker orientation offsets and contour integration for both open and closed contours. Our results indicate that compared to matched controls, ASD participants show (i reduced collinear facilitation, despite equivalent performance without flankers and (ii less benefit from closed contours in contour integration. These results indicate weaker visuospatial integration in adults with ASD and suggest that further studies using these types of paradigms would provide knowledge on how contextual processing is altered in ASD.

  17. SU-F-T-405: Development of a Rapid Cardiac Contouring Tool Using Landmark-Driven Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Mosher, E; Lee, C; Lee, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to develop a tool to rapidly delineate cardiac substructures for use in dosimetry for large-scale clinical trial or epidemiological investigations. The goal is to produce a system that can semi-automatically delineate nine cardiac structures to a reasonable accuracy within a couple of minutes. Methods: The cardiac contouring tool employs a Most Similar Atlas method, where a selection criterion is used to pre-select the most similar model to the patient from a library of pre-defined atlases. Sixty contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans (30 male and 30 female) were manually contoured to serve as the atlas library. For each CTA 12 structures were delineated. Kabsch algorithm was used to compute the optimum rotation and translation matrices between the patient and atlas. Minimum root mean squared distance between the patient and atlas after transformation was used to select the most-similar atlas. An initial study using 10 CTA sets was performed to assess system feasibility. Leave-one patient out method was performed, and fit criteria were calculated to evaluate the fit accuracy compared to manual contours. Results: For the pilot study, mean dice indices of .895 were achieved for the whole heart, .867 for the ventricles, and .802 for the atria. In addition, mean distance was measured via the chord length distribution (CLD) between ground truth and the atlas structures for the four coronary arteries. The mean CLD for all coronary arteries was below 14mm, with the left circumflex artery showing the best agreement (7.08mm). Conclusion: The cardiac contouring tool is able to delineate cardiac structures with reasonable accuracy in less than 90 seconds. Pilot data indicates that the system is able to delineate the whole heart and ventricles within a reasonable accuracy using even a limited library. We are extending the atlas sets to 60 adult males and females in total.

  18. SU-F-T-405: Development of a Rapid Cardiac Contouring Tool Using Landmark-Driven Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Mosher, E; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to develop a tool to rapidly delineate cardiac substructures for use in dosimetry for large-scale clinical trial or epidemiological investigations. The goal is to produce a system that can semi-automatically delineate nine cardiac structures to a reasonable accuracy within a couple of minutes. Methods: The cardiac contouring tool employs a Most Similar Atlas method, where a selection criterion is used to pre-select the most similar model to the patient from a library of pre-defined atlases. Sixty contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans (30 male and 30 female) were manually contoured to serve as the atlas library. For each CTA 12 structures were delineated. Kabsch algorithm was used to compute the optimum rotation and translation matrices between the patient and atlas. Minimum root mean squared distance between the patient and atlas after transformation was used to select the most-similar atlas. An initial study using 10 CTA sets was performed to assess system feasibility. Leave-one patient out method was performed, and fit criteria were calculated to evaluate the fit accuracy compared to manual contours. Results: For the pilot study, mean dice indices of .895 were achieved for the whole heart, .867 for the ventricles, and .802 for the atria. In addition, mean distance was measured via the chord length distribution (CLD) between ground truth and the atlas structures for the four coronary arteries. The mean CLD for all coronary arteries was below 14mm, with the left circumflex artery showing the best agreement (7.08mm). Conclusion: The cardiac contouring tool is able to delineate cardiac structures with reasonable accuracy in less than 90 seconds. Pilot data indicates that the system is able to delineate the whole heart and ventricles within a reasonable accuracy using even a limited library. We are extending the atlas sets to 60 adult males and females in total.

  19. Integrating multiscale polar active contours and region growing for microcalcifications segmentation in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikidis, N S; Karahaliou, A; Skiadopoulos, S; Panagiotakis, G; Costaridou, L; Likaki, E

    2009-01-01

    Morphology of individual microcalcifications is an important clinical factor in microcalcification clusters diagnosis. Accurate segmentation remains a difficult task due to microcalcifications small size, low contrast, fuzzy nature and low distinguishability from surrounding tissue. A novel application of active rays (polar transformed active contours) on B-spline wavelet representation is employed, to provide initial estimates of microcalcification boundary. Then, a region growing method is used with pixel aggregation constrained by the microcalcification boundary estimates, to obtain the final microcalcification boundary. The method was tested on dataset of 49 microcalcification clusters (30 benign, 19 malignant), originating from the DDSM database. An observer study was conducted to evaluate segmentation accuracy of the proposed method, on a 5-point rating scale (from 5:excellent to 1:very poor). The average accuracy rating was 3.98±0.81 when multiscale active rays were combined to region growing and 2.93±0.92 when combined to linear polynomial fitting, while the difference in rating of segmentation accuracy was statistically significant (p < 0.05).

  20. B-Spline Active Contour with Handling of Topology Changes for Fast Video Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Precioso

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with video segmentation for MPEG-4 and MPEG-7 applications. Region-based active contour is a powerful technique for segmentation. However most of these methods are implemented using level sets. Although level-set methods provide accurate segmentation, they suffer from large computational cost. We propose to use a regular B-spline parametric method to provide a fast and accurate segmentation. Our B-spline interpolation is based on a fixed number of points 2j depending on the level of the desired details. Through this spatial multiresolution approach, the computational cost of the segmentation is reduced. We introduce a length penalty. This results in improving both smoothness and accuracy. Then we show some experiments on real-video sequences.

  1. Pancreatic gross tumor volume contouring on computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Results of an international contouring conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A; Heerkens, Hanne D; Paulson, Eric S; Meijer, Gert J; Kotte, Alexis N; Knechtges, Paul; Parikh, Parag J; Bassetti, Michael F; Lee, Percy; Aitken, Katharine L; Palta, Manisha; Myrehaug, Sten; Koay, Eugene J; Portelance, Lorraine; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Erickson, Beth A

    Accurate identification of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma is challenging. We sought to understand differences in GTV delineation using pancreatic computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twelve attending radiation oncologists were convened for an international contouring symposium. All participants had a clinical and research interest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. CT and MRI scans from 3 pancreatic cases were used for contouring. CT and MRI GTVs were analyzed and compared. Interobserver variability was compared using Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdorff distances, and Jaccard indices. Mann-Whitney tests were used to check for significant differences. Consensus contours on CT and MRI scans and constructed count maps were used to visualize the agreement. Agreement regarding the optimal method to determine GTV definition using MRI was reached. Six contour sets (3 from CT and 3 from MRI) were obtained and compared for each observer, totaling 72 contour sets. The mean volume of contours on CT was significantly larger at 57.48 mL compared with a mean of 45.76 mL on MRI, P = .011. The standard deviation obtained from the CT contours was significantly larger than the standard deviation from the MRI contours (P = .027). The mean DSC was 0.73 for the CT and 0.72 for the MRI (P = .889). The conformity index measurement was similar for CT and MRI (P = .58). Count maps were created to highlight differences in the contours from CT and MRI. Using MRI as a primary image set to define a pancreatic adenocarcinoma GTV resulted in smaller contours compared with CT. No differences in DSC or the conformity index were seen between MRI and CT. A stepwise method is recommended as an approach to contour a pancreatic GTV using MRI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M., E-mail: sehgalc@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Section of Vascular Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  3. CT liver volumetry using geodesic active contour segmentation with a level-set algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Epstein, Mark L.; Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Obajuluwa, Ademola; Xu, Jianwu; Hori, Masatoshi; Baron, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Automatic liver segmentation on CT images is challenging because the liver often abuts other organs of a similar density. Our purpose was to develop an accurate automated liver segmentation scheme for measuring liver volumes. We developed an automated volumetry scheme for the liver in CT based on a 5 step schema. First, an anisotropic smoothing filter was applied to portal-venous phase CT images to remove noise while preserving the liver structure, followed by an edge enhancer to enhance the liver boundary. By using the boundary-enhanced image as a speed function, a fastmarching algorithm generated an initial surface that roughly estimated the liver shape. A geodesic-active-contour segmentation algorithm coupled with level-set contour-evolution refined the initial surface so as to more precisely fit the liver boundary. The liver volume was calculated based on the refined liver surface. Hepatic CT scans of eighteen prospective liver donors were obtained under a liver transplant protocol with a multi-detector CT system. Automated liver volumes obtained were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as "gold standard." The mean liver volume obtained with our scheme was 1,520 cc, whereas the mean manual volume was 1,486 cc, with the mean absolute difference of 104 cc (7.0%). CT liver volumetrics based on an automated scheme agreed excellently with "goldstandard" manual volumetrics (intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.95) with no statistically significant difference (p(F<=f)=0.32), and required substantially less completion time. Our automated scheme provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring liver volumes.

  4. Surface filling-in and contour interpolation contribute independently to Kanizsa figure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyi; Glasauer, Stefan; Müller, Hermann J; Conci, Markus

    2018-04-30

    To explore mechanisms of object integration, the present experiments examined how completion of illusory contours and surfaces modulates the sensitivity of localizing a target probe. Observers had to judge whether a briefly presented dot probe was located inside or outside the region demarcated by inducer elements that grouped to form variants of an illusory, Kanizsa-type figure. From the resulting psychometric functions, we determined observers' discrimination thresholds as a sensitivity measure. Experiment 1 showed that sensitivity was systematically modulated by the amount of surface and contour completion afforded by a given configuration. Experiments 2 and 3 presented stimulus variants that induced an (occluded) object without clearly defined bounding contours, which gave rise to a relative sensitivity increase for surface variations on their own. Experiments 4 and 5 were performed to rule out that these performance modulations were simply attributable to variable distances between critical local inducers or to costs in processing an interrupted contour. Collectively, the findings provide evidence for a dissociation between surface and contour processing, supporting a model of object integration in which completion is instantiated by feedforward processing that independently renders surface filling-in and contour interpolation and a feedback loop that integrates these outputs into a complete whole. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Impact of contour on aesthetic judgments and approach-avoidance decisions in architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Oshin; Navarrete, Gorka; Chatterjee, Anjan; Fich, Lars Brorson; Leder, Helmut; Modroño, Cristián; Nadal, Marcos; Rostrup, Nicolai; Skov, Martin

    2013-01-01

    On average, we urban dwellers spend about 90% of our time indoors, and share the intuition that the physical features of the places we live and work in influence how we feel and act. However, there is surprisingly little research on how architecture impacts behavior, much less on how it influences brain function. To begin closing this gap, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging study to examine how systematic variation in contour impacts aesthetic judgments and approach-avoidance decisions, outcome measures of interest to both architects and users of spaces alike. As predicted, participants were more likely to judge spaces as beautiful if they were curvilinear than rectilinear. Neuroanatomically, when contemplating beauty, curvilinear contour activated the anterior cingulate cortex exclusively, a region strongly responsive to the reward properties and emotional salience of objects. Complementing this finding, pleasantness—the valence dimension of the affect circumplex—accounted for nearly 60% of the variance in beauty ratings. Furthermore, activation in a distributed brain network known to underlie the aesthetic evaluation of different types of visual stimuli covaried with beauty ratings. In contrast, contour did not affect approach-avoidance decisions, although curvilinear spaces activated the visual cortex. The results suggest that the well-established effect of contour on aesthetic preference can be extended to architecture. Furthermore, the combination of our behavioral and neural evidence underscores the role of emotion in our preference for curvilinear objects in this domain. PMID:23754408

  6. On a program manifold’s stability of one contour automatic control systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumatov S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Methodology of analysis of stability is expounded to the one contour systems automatic control feedback in the presence of non-linearities. The methodology is based on the use of the simplest mathematical models of the nonlinear controllable systems. Stability of program manifolds of one contour automatic control systems is investigated. The sufficient conditions of program manifold’s absolute stability of one contour automatic control systems are obtained. The Hurwitz’s angle of absolute stability was determined. The sufficient conditions of program manifold’s absolute stability of control systems by the course of plane in the mode of autopilot are obtained by means Lyapunov’s second method.

  7. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC): application to breast lesion segmentation on DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, Shannon C.; Xu, Jun; Rosen, Mark; Karthigeyan, Sudha; Englander, Sarah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Spectral embedding (SE), a graph-based manifold learning method, has previously been shown to be useful in high dimensional data classification. In this work, we present a novel SE based active contour (SEAC) segmentation scheme and demonstrate its applications in lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhance magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this work, we employ SE on DCE-MRI on a per voxel basis to embed the high dimensional time series intensity vector into a reduced dimensional space, where the reduced embedding space is characterized by the principal eigenvectors. The orthogonal eigenvector-based data representation allows for computation of strong tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space and also yields improved region statistics that serve as optimal stopping criteria for SEAC. We demonstrate both analytically and empirically that the tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space are stronger than the corresponding gradients in the original grayscale intensity space. On a total of 50 breast DCE-MRI studies, SEAC yielded a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 3.2+/-2.1 pixels and mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.74+/-0.13 compared to manual ground truth segmentation. An active contour in conjunction with fuzzy c-means (FCM+AC), a commonly used segmentation method for breast DCE-MRI, produced a corresponding MAD of 7.2+/-7.4 pixels and mean DSC of 0.58+/-0.32. In conjunction with a set of 6 quantitative morphological features automatically extracted from the SEAC derived lesion boundary, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.73, for discriminating between 10 benign and 30 malignant lesions; the corresponding SVM classifier with the FCM+AC derived morphological features yielded an AUC of 0.65.

  8. A cognitive evaluation procedure for contour based shape descriptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Anarta; Petkov, Nicolai

    2005-01-01

    Present image processing algorithms are unable to extract a neat and closed contour of an object of interest from a natural image. Advanced contour detection algorithms extract the contour of an object of interest from a natural scene with a side effect of depletion of the contour. Hence in order to

  9. Modeling perceptual grouping and figure-ground segregation by means of active reentrant connections.

    OpenAIRE

    Sporns, O; Tononi, G; Edelman, G M

    1991-01-01

    The segmentation of visual scenes is a fundamental process of early vision, but the underlying neural mechanisms are still largely unknown. Theoretical considerations as well as neurophysiological findings point to the importance in such processes of temporal correlations in neuronal activity. In a previous model, we showed that reentrant signaling among rhythmically active neuronal groups can correlate responses along spatially extended contours. We now have modified and extended this model ...

  10. Impact of region contouring variability on image-based focal therapy evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Eli; Donaldson, Ian A.; Shah, Taimur T.; Hu, Yipeng; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Barratt, Dean C.

    2016-03-01

    Motivation: Focal therapy is an emerging low-morbidity treatment option for low-intermediate risk prostate cancer; however, challenges remain in accurately delivering treatment to specified targets and determining treatment success. Registered multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MPMRI) acquired before and after treatment can support focal therapy evaluation and optimization; however, contouring variability, when defining the prostate, the clinical target volume (CTV) and the ablation region in images, reduces the precision of quantitative image-based focal therapy evaluation metrics. To inform the interpretation and clarify the limitations of such metrics, we investigated inter-observer contouring variability and its impact on four metrics. Methods: Pre-therapy and 2-week-post-therapy standard-of-care MPMRI were acquired from 5 focal cryotherapy patients. Two clinicians independently contoured, on each slice, the prostate (pre- and post-treatment) and the dominant index lesion CTV (pre-treatment) in the T2-weighted MRI, and the ablated region (post-treatment) in the dynamic-contrast- enhanced MRI. For each combination of clinician contours, post-treatment images were registered to pre-treatment images using a 3D biomechanical-model-based registration of prostate surfaces, and four metrics were computed: the proportion of the target tissue region that was ablated and the target:ablated region volume ratio for each of two targets (the CTV and an expanded planning target volume). Variance components analysis was used to measure the contribution of each type of contour to the variance in the therapy evaluation metrics. Conclusions: 14-23% of evaluation metric variance was attributable to contouring variability (including 6-12% from ablation region contouring); reducing this variability could improve the precision of focal therapy evaluation metrics.

  11. Fully automated MR liver volumetry using watershed segmentation coupled with active contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hieu Trung; Le-Trong, Ngoc; Bao, Pham The; Oto, Aytek; Suzuki, Kenji

    2017-02-01

    Our purpose is to develop a fully automated scheme for liver volume measurement in abdominal MR images, without requiring any user input or interaction. The proposed scheme is fully automatic for liver volumetry from 3D abdominal MR images, and it consists of three main stages: preprocessing, rough liver shape generation, and liver extraction. The preprocessing stage reduced noise and enhanced the liver boundaries in 3D abdominal MR images. The rough liver shape was revealed fully automatically by using the watershed segmentation, thresholding transform, morphological operations, and statistical properties of the liver. An active contour model was applied to refine the rough liver shape to precisely obtain the liver boundaries. The liver volumes calculated by the proposed scheme were compared to the "gold standard" references which were estimated by an expert abdominal radiologist. The liver volumes computed by using our developed scheme excellently agreed (Intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.94) with the "gold standard" manual volumes by the radiologist in the evaluation with 27 cases from multiple medical centers. The running time was 8.4 min per case on average. We developed a fully automated liver volumetry scheme in MR, which does not require any interaction by users. It was evaluated with cases from multiple medical centers. The liver volumetry performance of our developed system was comparable to that of the gold standard manual volumetry, and it saved radiologists' time for manual liver volumetry of 24.7 min per case.

  12. A Biologically Motivated Multiresolution Approach to Contour Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Neri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard edge detectors react to all local luminance changes, irrespective of whether they are due to the contours of the objects represented in a scene or due to natural textures like grass, foliage, water, and so forth. Moreover, edges due to texture are often stronger than edges due to object contours. This implies that further processing is needed to discriminate object contours from texture edges. In this paper, we propose a biologically motivated multiresolution contour detection method using Bayesian denoising and a surround inhibition technique. Specifically, the proposed approach deploys computation of the gradient at different resolutions, followed by Bayesian denoising of the edge image. Then, a biologically motivated surround inhibition step is applied in order to suppress edges that are due to texture. We propose an improvement of the surround suppression used in previous works. Finally, a contour-oriented binarization algorithm is used, relying on the observation that object contours lead to long connected components rather than to short rods obtained from textures. Experimental results show that our contour detection method outperforms standard edge detectors as well as other methods that deploy inhibition.

  13. The equivalent internal orientation and position noise for contour integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Alex S; Fu, Minnie; Farivar, Reza; Hess, Robert F

    2017-10-12

    Contour integration is the joining-up of local responses to parts of a contour into a continuous percept. In typical studies observers detect contours formed of discrete wavelets, presented against a background of random wavelets. This measures performance for detecting contours in the limiting external noise that background provides. Our novel task measures contour integration without requiring any background noise. This allowed us to perform noise-masking experiments using orientation and position noise. From these we measure the equivalent internal noise for contour integration. We found an orientation noise of 6° and position noise of 3 arcmin. Orientation noise was 2.6x higher in contour integration compared to an orientation discrimination control task. Comparing against a position discrimination task found position noise in contours to be 2.4x lower. This suggests contour integration involves intermediate processing that enhances the quality of element position representation at the expense of element orientation. Efficiency relative to the ideal observer was lower for the contour tasks (36% in orientation noise, 21% in position noise) compared to the controls (54% and 57%).

  14. Active contour modes Crisp: new technique for segmentation of the lungs in CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboucas Filho, Pedro Pedrosa; Cortez, Paulo Cesar; Holanda, Marcelo Alcantara

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new active contour model (ACM), called ACM Crisp, and evaluates the segmentation of lungs in computed tomography (CT) images. An ACM draws a curve around or within the object of interest. This curve changes its shape, when some energy acts on it and moves towards the edges of the object. This process is performed by successive iterations of minimization of a given energy, associated with the curve. The ACMs described in the literature have limitations when used for segmentations of CT lung images. The ACM Crisp model overcomes these limitations, since it proposes automatic initiation and new external energy based on rules and radiological pulmonary densities. The paper compares other ACMs with the proposed method, which is shown to be superior. In order to validate the algorithm a medical expert in the field of Pulmonology of the Walter Cantidio University Hospital from the Federal University of Ceara carried out a qualitative analysis. In these analyses 100 CT lung images were used. The segmentation efficiency was evaluated into 5 categories with the following results for the ACM Crisp: 73% excellent, without errors, 20% acceptable, with small errors, and 7% reasonable, with large errors, 0% poor, covering only a small part of the lung, and 0% very bad, making a totally incorrect segmentation. In conclusion the ACM Crisp is considered a useful algorithm to segment CT lung images, and with potential to integrate medical diagnosis systems. (author)

  15. Image Interpolation with Contour Stencils

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Getreuer

    2011-01-01

    Image interpolation is the problem of increasing the resolution of an image. Linear methods must compromise between artifacts like jagged edges, blurring, and overshoot (halo) artifacts. More recent works consider nonlinear methods to improve interpolation of edges and textures. In this paper we apply contour stencils for estimating the image contours based on total variation along curves and then use this estimation to construct a fast edge-adaptive interpolation.

  16. Contour plotting programs for printer and Calcomp plotter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moller, P.

    1980-07-01

    Contour plotting programs for plotting contour diagrams on printers or Calcomp plotters are described. The subroutines also exist in versions that are useful for the special application of finding minima and saddlepoints of nuclear potential energy surfaces generated by the subroutine PETR3 of another program package. For the general user, however, the most interesting aspect of the plotting package is probably the possibility of generating printer contour plots. The plotting of printer contour plots is a very fast and convenient way of displaying two-dimensional functions. 3 figures

  17. GPU based contouring method on grid DEM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liheng; Wan, Gang; Li, Feng; Chen, Xiaohui; Du, Wenlong

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a novel method to generate contour lines from grid DEM data based on the programmable GPU pipeline. The previous contouring approaches often use CPU to construct a finite element mesh from the raw DEM data, and then extract contour segments from the elements. They also need a tracing or sorting strategy to generate the final continuous contours. These approaches can be heavily CPU-costing and time-consuming. Meanwhile the generated contours would be unsmooth if the raw data is sparsely distributed. Unlike the CPU approaches, we employ the GPU's vertex shader to generate a triangular mesh with arbitrary user-defined density, in which the height of each vertex is calculated through a third-order Cardinal spline function. Then in the same frame, segments are extracted from the triangles by the geometry shader, and translated to the CPU-side with an internal order in the GPU's transform feedback stage. Finally we propose a "Grid Sorting" algorithm to achieve the continuous contour lines by travelling the segments only once. Our method makes use of multiple stages of GPU pipeline for computation, which can generate smooth contour lines, and is significantly faster than the previous CPU approaches. The algorithm can be easily implemented with OpenGL 3.3 API or higher on consumer-level PCs.

  18. Noninvasive Body Contouring: A Male Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Heidi; Wu, Douglas C; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2018-01-01

    Noninvasive body contouring is an attractive therapeutic modality to enhance the ideal male physique. Men place higher value on enhancing a well-defined, strong, masculine jawline and developing a V-shaped taper through the upper body. An understanding of the body contour men strive for allows the treating physician to focus on areas that are of most concern to men, thus enhancing patient experience and satisfaction. This article discusses noninvasive body contouring techniques, taking into account the unique aesthetic concerns of the male patient by combining an analysis of the existing literature with our own clinical experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Contour Shape of Nervous System Electromagnetic Stimulation Coils on the Induced Electrical Field Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daskalov Ivan K

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electromagnetic stimulation of the nervous system has the advantage of reduced discomfort in activating nerves. For brain structures stimulation, it has become a clinically accepted modality. Coil designs usually consider factors such as optimization of induced power, focussing, field shape etc. In this study we are attempting to find the effect of the coil contour shape on the electrical field distribution for magnetic stimulation. Method and results We use the maximum of the induced electric field stimulation in the region of interest as the optimization criterion. This choice required the application of the calculus of variation, with the contour perimeter taken as a pre-set condition. Four types of coils are studied and compared: circular, square, triangular and an 'optimally' shaped contour. The latter yields higher values of the induced electrical field in depths up to about 30 mm, but for depths around 100 mm, the circular shape has a slight advantage. The validity of the model results was checked by experimental measurements in a tank with saline solution, where differences of about 12% were found. In view the accuracy limitations of the computational and measurement methods used, such differences are considered acceptable. Conclusion We applied an optimization approach, using the calculus of variation, which allows to obtain a coil contour shape corresponding to a selected criterion. In this case, the optimal contour showed higher intensities for a longer line along the depth-axis. The method allows modifying the induced field structure and focussing the field to a selected zone or line.

  20. After massive weight loss: patients' expectations of body contouring surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzinger, Hugo B; Abayev, Sara; Pittermann, Anna; Karle, Birgit; Bohdjalian, Arthur; Langer, Felix B; Prager, Gerhard; Frey, Manfred

    2012-04-01

    Massive weight loss following bariatric surgery leads to excess skin with functional and aesthetic impairments. Surplus skin can then contribute to problems with additional weight loss or gain. The aims of the current study were to evaluate the frequency of massive soft tissue development in gastric bypass patients, to determine whether males and females experience similar post-bypass body changes, and to learn about the expectations and impairments related to body contouring surgery. A questionnaire addressing information on the satisfaction of body image, quality of life, and expectation of body contouring surgery following massive weight loss was mailed to 425 patients who had undergone gastric bypass surgery between 2003 and 2009. Of these 425 individuals, 252 (59%) patients completed the survey. Ninety percent of women and 88% of men surveyed rated their appearance following massive weight loss as satisfactory, good, or very good. However, 96% of all patients developed surplus skin, which caused intertriginous dermatitis and itching. In addition, patients reported problems with physical activity (playing sports) and finding clothing that fit appropriately. Moreover, 75% of female and 68% of male patients reported desiring body contouring surgery. The most important expectation of body contouring surgery was improved appearance, followed by improved self-confidence and quality of life. Surplus skin resulting from gastric bypass surgery is a common issue that causes functional and aesthetic impairments in patients. Consequently, this increases the desire for body contouring surgery with high expectations for the aesthetic outcome as well as improved life satisfaction.

  1. Summing over Feynman histories by functional contour integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, J.C.; Wright, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors show how complex paths can be consistently introduced into sums for Feynman histories by using the notion of functional contour integration. For a kappa-dimensional system specified by a potential with suitable analyticity properties, each coordinate axis is replaced by a copy of the complex plane, and at each instant of time a contour is chosen in each plane. This map from the time axis into the set of complex contours defines a functional contour. The family of contours labelled by time generates a (kappa+1)-dimensional submanifold of the (2kappa+1)-dimensional space defined by the cartesian product of the time axis and the coordinate planes. The complex Feynman paths lie on this submanifold. An application of this idea to systems described by absorptive potentials yields a simple derivation of the correct WKB result in terms of a complex path that extremalises the action. The method can also be applied to spherically symmetric potentials by using a partial wave expansion and restricting the contours appropriately. (author)

  2. Common Visual Preference for Curved Contours in Humans and Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar, Enric; Gómez-Puerto, Gerardo; Call, Josep; Nadal, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Among the visual preferences that guide many everyday activities and decisions, from consumer choices to social judgment, preference for curved over sharp-angled contours is commonly thought to have played an adaptive role throughout human evolution, favoring the avoidance of potentially harmful objects. However, because nonhuman primates also exhibit preferences for certain visual qualities, it is conceivable that humans' preference for curved contours is grounded on perceptual and cognitive mechanisms shared with extant nonhuman primate species. Here we aimed to determine whether nonhuman great apes and humans share a visual preference for curved over sharp-angled contours using a 2-alternative forced choice experimental paradigm under comparable conditions. Our results revealed that the human group and the great ape group indeed share a common preference for curved over sharp-angled contours, but that they differ in the manner and magnitude with which this preference is expressed behaviorally. These results suggest that humans' visual preference for curved objects evolved from earlier primate species' visual preferences, and that during this process it became stronger, but also more susceptible to the influence of higher cognitive processes and preference for other visual features.

  3. Combining prior day contours to improve automated prostate segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godley, Andrew; Sheplan Olsen, Lawrence J.; Stephans, Kevin; Zhao Anzi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of automatically segmented prostate, rectum, and bladder contours required for online adaptive therapy. The contouring accuracy on the current image guidance [image guided radiation therapy (IGRT)] scan is improved by combining contours from earlier IGRT scans via the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm. Methods: Six IGRT prostate patients treated with daily kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) had their original plan CT and nine CBCTs contoured by the same physician. Three types of automated contours were produced for analysis. (1) Plan: By deformably registering the plan CT to each CBCT and then using the resulting deformation field to morph the plan contours to match the CBCT anatomy. (2) Previous: The contour set drawn by the physician on the previous day CBCT is similarly deformed to match the current CBCT anatomy. (3) STAPLE: The contours drawn by the physician, on each prior CBCT and the plan CT, are deformed to match the CBCT anatomy to produce multiple contour sets. These sets are combined using the STAPLE algorithm into one optimal set. Results: Compared to plan and previous, STAPLE improved the average Dice's coefficient (DC) with the original physician drawn CBCT contours to a DC as follows: Bladder: 0.81 ± 0.13, 0.91 ± 0.06, and 0.92 ± 0.06; Prostate: 0.75 ± 0.08, 0.82 ± 0.05, and 0.84 ± 0.05; and Rectum: 0.79 ± 0.06, 0.81 ± 0.06, and 0.85 ± 0.04, respectively. The STAPLE results are within intraobserver consistency, determined by the physician blindly recontouring a subset of CBCTs. Comparing plans recalculated using the physician and STAPLE contours showed an average disagreement less than 1% for prostate D98 and mean dose, and 5% and 3% for bladder and rectum mean dose, respectively. One scan takes an average of 19 s to contour. Using five scans plus STAPLE takes less than 110 s on a 288 core graphics processor unit. Conclusions: Combining the plan and all prior days via

  4. Variation in contour and cancer of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Hong; Hwang, Seon Moon; Yoon, Kwon Ha

    1999-01-01

    There were four types of stomach contour included eutonic, hypotonic, steerhorn, and cascade. The aim of this study is to clarify relationship between incidence of stomach cancer and contour variation of the stomach. Double- contrast upper gastrointestinal study was performed in 1,546 patients, who had dyspepsia or other gastrointestinal tract symptoms. The radiographs were classified into the four types including eutonic, hypotonic, steerhorn, and cascade according to stomach contour in relation to body build. We also reviewed pathologic reports on endoscopic biopsy or surgical specimen. We studied the presence of relationship between incidence of stomach cancer and variation of stomach contour. We also examined the incidence of gastritis and gastric ulcer to the stomach contour variation. Of total 1,546 patients, eutonic stomach were 438(28.3%), hypotonic 911(58.9%), steerhorn 102(6.5%) and cascade 95(6.2%). Stomach cancer was found in 139(31.7%) of 438 eutonic stomachs, in 135(14.8%) of 911 hypotonic, in 42(41.2%) of 102 steerhorn, and in 24(36.9%) of 95 cascade (P=0.001). In hypotonic stomach, the incidence of stomach cancer was lower compared to the other three types significantly (p<0.05). Gastritis or gastric ulcer was found in 146(33.3%) of eutonic stomach, in 293(32.1%) of hypotonic, in 36(35.2%) of steerhorn, and in 26(27.3%) of cascade (p=0.640). In conclusion, gastric contour variation seems to be a factor affecting development of stomach cancer. The patients with hypotonic stomach may have lower incidence of stomach cancer than that of the other types. There was no relationship between the contour and gastric ulcer

  5. Variation in contour and cancer of stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Hong; Hwang, Seon Moon [Asan Medical Center, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kwon Ha [College of Medicine, Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    There were four types of stomach contour included eutonic, hypotonic, steerhorn, and cascade. The aim of this study is to clarify relationship between incidence of stomach cancer and contour variation of the stomach. Double- contrast upper gastrointestinal study was performed in 1,546 patients, who had dyspepsia or other gastrointestinal tract symptoms. The radiographs were classified into the four types including eutonic, hypotonic, steerhorn, and cascade according to stomach contour in relation to body build. We also reviewed pathologic reports on endoscopic biopsy or surgical specimen. We studied the presence of relationship between incidence of stomach cancer and variation of stomach contour. We also examined the incidence of gastritis and gastric ulcer to the stomach contour variation. Of total 1,546 patients, eutonic stomach were 438(28.3%), hypotonic 911(58.9%), steerhorn 102(6.5%) and cascade 95(6.2%). Stomach cancer was found in 139(31.7%) of 438 eutonic stomachs, in 135(14.8%) of 911 hypotonic, in 42(41.2%) of 102 steerhorn, and in 24(36.9%) of 95 cascade (P=0.001). In hypotonic stomach, the incidence of stomach cancer was lower compared to the other three types significantly (p<0.05). Gastritis or gastric ulcer was found in 146(33.3%) of eutonic stomach, in 293(32.1%) of hypotonic, in 36(35.2%) of steerhorn, and in 26(27.3%) of cascade (p=0.640). In conclusion, gastric contour variation seems to be a factor affecting development of stomach cancer. The patients with hypotonic stomach may have lower incidence of stomach cancer than that of the other types. There was no relationship between the contour and gastric ulcer.

  6. TU-C-17A-03: An Integrated Contour Evaluation Software Tool Using Supervised Pattern Recognition for Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Tan, J; Kavanaugh, J; Dolly, S; Gay, H; Thorstad, W; Anastasio, M; Altman, M; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) contours delineated either manually or semiautomatically require verification before clinical usage. Manual evaluation is very time consuming. A new integrated software tool using supervised pattern contour recognition was thus developed to facilitate this process. Methods: The contouring tool was developed using an object-oriented programming language C# and application programming interfaces, e.g. visualization toolkit (VTK). The C# language served as the tool design basis. The Accord.Net scientific computing libraries were utilized for the required statistical data processing and pattern recognition, while the VTK was used to build and render 3-D mesh models from critical RT structures in real-time and 360° visualization. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for system self-updating geometry variations of normal structures based on physician-approved RT contours as a training dataset. The inhouse design of supervised PCA-based contour recognition method was used for automatically evaluating contour normality/abnormality. The function for reporting the contour evaluation results was implemented by using C# and Windows Form Designer. Results: The software input was RT simulation images and RT structures from commercial clinical treatment planning systems. Several abilities were demonstrated: automatic assessment of RT contours, file loading/saving of various modality medical images and RT contours, and generation/visualization of 3-D images and anatomical models. Moreover, it supported the 360° rendering of the RT structures in a multi-slice view, which allows physicians to visually check and edit abnormally contoured structures. Conclusion: This new software integrates the supervised learning framework with image processing and graphical visualization modules for RT contour verification. This tool has great potential for facilitating treatment planning with the assistance of an automatic contour evaluation module in avoiding

  7. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP1-02: Fully Automatic Verification of Automatically Contoured Normal Tissues in the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarroll, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UT Health Science Center, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Beadle, B; Yang, J; Zhang, L; Kisling, K; Balter, P; Stingo, F; Nelson, C; Followill, D; Court, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mejia, M [University of Santo Tomas Hospital, Manila, Metro Manila (Philippines)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate and validate the use of an independent deformable-based contouring algorithm for automatic verification of auto-contoured structures in the head and neck towards fully automated treatment planning. Methods: Two independent automatic contouring algorithms [(1) Eclipse’s Smart Segmentation followed by pixel-wise majority voting, (2) an in-house multi-atlas based method] were used to create contours of 6 normal structures of 10 head-and-neck patients. After rating by a radiation oncologist, the higher performing algorithm was selected as the primary contouring method, the other used for automatic verification of the primary. To determine the ability of the verification algorithm to detect incorrect contours, contours from the primary method were shifted from 0.5 to 2cm. Using a logit model the structure-specific minimum detectable shift was identified. The models were then applied to a set of twenty different patients and the sensitivity and specificity of the models verified. Results: Per physician rating, the multi-atlas method (4.8/5 point scale, with 3 rated as generally acceptable for planning purposes) was selected as primary and the Eclipse-based method (3.5/5) for verification. Mean distance to agreement and true positive rate were selected as covariates in an optimized logit model. These models, when applied to a group of twenty different patients, indicated that shifts could be detected at 0.5cm (brain), 0.75cm (mandible, cord), 1cm (brainstem, cochlea), or 1.25cm (parotid), with sensitivity and specificity greater than 0.95. If sensitivity and specificity constraints are reduced to 0.9, detectable shifts of mandible and brainstem were reduced by 0.25cm. These shifts represent additional safety margins which might be considered if auto-contours are used for automatic treatment planning without physician review. Conclusion: Automatically contoured structures can be automatically verified. This fully automated process could be used to

  8. Low level constraints on dynamic contour path integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Hall

    Full Text Available Contour integration is a fundamental visual process. The constraints on integrating discrete contour elements and the associated neural mechanisms have typically been investigated using static contour paths. However, in our dynamic natural environment objects and scenes vary over space and time. With the aim of investigating the parameters affecting spatiotemporal contour path integration, we measured human contrast detection performance of a briefly presented foveal target embedded in dynamic collinear stimulus sequences (comprising five short 'predictor' bars appearing consecutively towards the fovea, followed by the 'target' bar in four experiments. The data showed that participants' target detection performance was relatively unchanged when individual contour elements were separated by up to 2° spatial gap or 200 ms temporal gap. Randomising the luminance contrast or colour of the predictors, on the other hand, had similar detrimental effect on grouping dynamic contour path and subsequent target detection performance. Randomising the orientation of the predictors reduced target detection performance greater than introducing misalignment relative to the contour path. The results suggest that the visual system integrates dynamic path elements to bias target detection even when the continuity of path is disrupted in terms of spatial (2°, temporal (200 ms, colour (over 10 colours and luminance (-25% to 25% information. We discuss how the findings can be largely reconciled within the functioning of V1 horizontal connections.

  9. Spatial profile of contours inducing long-range color assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinck, Frédéric; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2006-01-01

    Color induction was measured using a matching method for two spatial patterns, each composed of double contours. In one pattern (the standard), the contours had sharp edges to induce the Watercolor Effect (WCE); in the other, the two contours had a spatial taper so that the overall profile produced a sawtooth edge, or ramped stimulus. These patterns were chosen based on our previous study demonstrating that the strength of the chromatic WCE depends on a luminance difference between the two contours. Low-pass chromatic mechanisms, unlike bandpass luminance mechanisms, may be expected to be insensitive to the difference between the two spatial profiles. The strength of the watercolor spreading was similar for the two patterns at narrow widths of the contour possibly because of chromatic aberration, but with wider contours, the standard stimulus produced stronger assimilation than the ramped stimulus. This research suggests that luminance-dependent chromatic mechanisms mediate the WCE and that these mechanisms are sensitive to differences in the two spatial profiles of the pattern contours only when they are wide.

  10. SU-F-J-72: A Clinical Usable Integrated Contouring Quality Evaluation Software for Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, S; Dolly, S; Cai, B; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce the Auto Contour Evaluation (ACE) software, which is the clinical usable, user friendly, efficient and all-in-one toolbox for automatically identify common contouring errors in radiotherapy treatment planning using supervised machine learning techniques. Methods: ACE is developed with C# using Microsoft .Net framework and Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) for elegant GUI design and smooth GUI transition animations through the integration of graphics engines and high dots per inch (DPI) settings on modern high resolution monitors. The industrial standard software design pattern, Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) pattern, is chosen to be the major architecture of ACE for neat coding structure, deep modularization, easy maintainability and seamless communication with other clinical software. ACE consists of 1) a patient data importing module integrated with clinical patient database server, 2) a 2D DICOM image and RT structure simultaneously displaying module, 3) a 3D RT structure visualization module using Visualization Toolkit or VTK library and 4) a contour evaluation module using supervised pattern recognition algorithms to detect contouring errors and display detection results. ACE relies on supervised learning algorithms to handle all image processing and data processing jobs. Implementations of related algorithms are powered by Accord.Net scientific computing library for better efficiency and effectiveness. Results: ACE can take patient’s CT images and RT structures from commercial treatment planning software via direct user input or from patients’ database. All functionalities including 2D and 3D image visualization and RT contours error detection have been demonstrated with real clinical patient cases. Conclusion: ACE implements supervised learning algorithms and combines image processing and graphical visualization modules for RT contours verification. ACE has great potential for automated radiotherapy contouring quality verification

  11. SU-F-J-72: A Clinical Usable Integrated Contouring Quality Evaluation Software for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S; Dolly, S; Cai, B; Mutic, S; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce the Auto Contour Evaluation (ACE) software, which is the clinical usable, user friendly, efficient and all-in-one toolbox for automatically identify common contouring errors in radiotherapy treatment planning using supervised machine learning techniques. Methods: ACE is developed with C# using Microsoft .Net framework and Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) for elegant GUI design and smooth GUI transition animations through the integration of graphics engines and high dots per inch (DPI) settings on modern high resolution monitors. The industrial standard software design pattern, Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) pattern, is chosen to be the major architecture of ACE for neat coding structure, deep modularization, easy maintainability and seamless communication with other clinical software. ACE consists of 1) a patient data importing module integrated with clinical patient database server, 2) a 2D DICOM image and RT structure simultaneously displaying module, 3) a 3D RT structure visualization module using Visualization Toolkit or VTK library and 4) a contour evaluation module using supervised pattern recognition algorithms to detect contouring errors and display detection results. ACE relies on supervised learning algorithms to handle all image processing and data processing jobs. Implementations of related algorithms are powered by Accord.Net scientific computing library for better efficiency and effectiveness. Results: ACE can take patient’s CT images and RT structures from commercial treatment planning software via direct user input or from patients’ database. All functionalities including 2D and 3D image visualization and RT contours error detection have been demonstrated with real clinical patient cases. Conclusion: ACE implements supervised learning algorithms and combines image processing and graphical visualization modules for RT contours verification. ACE has great potential for automated radiotherapy contouring quality verification

  12. Prediction of the Velocity Contours in Triangular Channel with Non-uniform Roughness Distributions by Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bardestani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Triangular channels have different applications in many water and wastewater engineering problems. For this purpose investigating hydraulic characteristics of flow in these sections has great importance. Researchers have presented different prediction methods for the velocity contours in prismatic sections. Most proposed methods are not able to consider the effect of walls roughness, the roughness distribution and secondary flows. However, due to complexity and nonlinearity of velocity contours in open channel flow, there is no simple relationship that can be fully able to exactly draw the velocity contours. In this paper an efficient approach for modeling velocity contours in triangular open channels with non-uniform roughness distributions by Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS has been suggested. For training and testing model, the experimental data including 1703 data in triangular channels with geometric symmetry and non-uniform roughness distributions have been used. Comparing experimental results with predicted values by model indicates that ANFIS model is capable to be used in simulation of local velocity and determining velocity contours and the independent evaluation showed that the calculated values of discharge and depth-averaged velocity from model information are precisely in conformity with experimental values.

  13. Roentgenological differential diagnosis of the psoas contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voran, G.; Pfab, R.; Hess, F.

    1984-01-01

    The assessment of the psoas border contour in the X-ray photo of the abdomen is important for differential diagnostic considerations. For the separation of fallacious psoas configurations which are similar to the well defined pathological form changes, a regular supine position of the patient was chosen, and the psoas examined without and with muscle tension. The whole visible psoas muscle system did not show any unilateral bulging of the border silhouette during muscle action. Isolated tension of the left psoas muscle induced a distinct deviation of both border contours to the left side, too. There was a clear tendency of a more distinct psoas border contour and of augmented opacity of the muscle over its whole length under muscle tension. Changes similar to the bulging border contour of a psoas abscess were not produced by muscular action. (orig.) [de

  14. [Development of a Software for Automatically Generated Contours in Eclipse TPS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhao; Hu, Jinyou; Zou, Lian; Zhang, Weisha; Zou, Yuxin; Luo, Kelin; Liu, Xiangxiang; Yu, Luxin

    2015-03-01

    The automatic generation of planning targets and auxiliary contours have achieved in Eclipse TPS 11.0. The scripting language autohotkey was used to develop a software for automatically generated contours in Eclipse TPS. This software is named Contour Auto Margin (CAM), which is composed of operational functions of contours, script generated visualization and script file operations. RESULTS Ten cases in different cancers have separately selected, in Eclipse TPS 11.0 scripts generated by the software could not only automatically generate contours but also do contour post-processing. For different cancers, there was no difference between automatically generated contours and manually created contours. The CAM is a user-friendly and powerful software, and can automatically generated contours fast in Eclipse TPS 11.0. With the help of CAM, it greatly save plan preparation time and improve working efficiency of radiation therapy physicists.

  15. Incomplete contour representations and shape descriptors : ICR test studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Anarta; Petkov, Nicolai; Gregorio, MD; DiMaio,; Frucci, M; Musio, C

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by psychophysical studies of the human cognitive abilities we propose a novel aspect and a method for performance evaluation of contour based shape recognition algorithms regarding their robustness to incompleteness of contours. We use complete contour representations of objects as a

  16. Towards molecular design using 2D-molecular contour maps obtained from PLS regression coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Cleber N.; Barigye, Stephen J.; Freitas, Matheus P.

    2017-12-01

    The multivariate image analysis descriptors used in quantitative structure-activity relationships are direct representations of chemical structures as they are simply numerical decodifications of pixels forming the 2D chemical images. These MDs have found great utility in the modeling of diverse properties of organic molecules. Given the multicollinearity and high dimensionality of the data matrices generated with the MIA-QSAR approach, modeling techniques that involve the projection of the data space onto orthogonal components e.g. Partial Least Squares (PLS) have been generally used. However, the chemical interpretation of the PLS-based MIA-QSAR models, in terms of the structural moieties affecting the modeled bioactivity has not been straightforward. This work describes the 2D-contour maps based on the PLS regression coefficients, as a means of assessing the relevance of single MIA predictors to the response variable, and thus allowing for the structural, electronic and physicochemical interpretation of the MIA-QSAR models. A sample study to demonstrate the utility of the 2D-contour maps to design novel drug-like molecules is performed using a dataset of some anti-HIV-1 2-amino-6-arylsulfonylbenzonitriles and derivatives, and the inferences obtained are consistent with other reports in the literature. In addition, the different schemes for encoding atomic properties in molecules are discussed and evaluated.

  17. Invariance Signatures: Characterizing contours by their departures from invariance

    OpenAIRE

    Squire, David; Caelli, Terry M.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a new invariant feature of two-dimensional contours is reported: the Invariance Signature. The Invariance Signature is a measure of the degree to which a contour is invariant under a variety of transformations, derived from the theory of Lie transformation groups. It is shown that the Invariance Signature is itself invariant under shift, rotation and scaling of the contour. Since it is derived from local properties of the contour, it is well-suited to a neural network implement...

  18. Contributions of contour frequency, amplitude, and luminance to the watercolor effect estimated by conjoint measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, Peggy; Devinck, Frédéric; Dojat, Michel; Knoblauch, Kenneth

    2014-04-10

    The watercolor effect is a long-range, assimilative, filling-in phenomenon induced by a pair of distant, wavy contours of different chromaticities. Here, we measured joint influences of the contour frequency and amplitude and the luminance of the interior contour on the strength of the effect. Contour pairs, each enclosing a circular region, were presented with two of the dimensions varying independently across trials (luminance/frequency, luminance/amplitude, frequency/amplitude) in a conjoint measurement paradigm (Luce & Tukey, 1964). In each trial, observers judged which of the stimuli evoked the strongest fill-in color. Control stimuli were identical except that the contours were intertwined and generated little filling-in. Perceptual scales were estimated by a maximum likelihood method (Ho, Landy, & Maloney, 2008). An additive model accounted for the joint contributions of any pair of dimensions. As shown previously using difference scaling (Devinck & Knoblauch, 2012), the strength increases with luminance of the interior contour. The strength of the phenomenon was nearly independent of the amplitude of modulation of the contour but increased with its frequency up to an asymptotic level. On average, the strength of the effect was similar along a given dimension regardless of the other dimension with which it was paired, demonstrating consistency of the underlying estimated perceptual scales.

  19. Cheap contouring of costly functions: the Pilot Approximation Trajectory algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huttunen, Janne M J; Stark, Philip B

    2012-01-01

    The Pilot Approximation Trajectory (PAT) contour algorithm can find the contour of a function accurately when it is not practical to evaluate the function on a grid dense enough to use a standard contour algorithm, for instance, when evaluating the function involves conducting a physical experiment or a computationally intensive simulation. PAT relies on an inexpensive pilot approximation to the function, such as interpolating from a sparse grid of inexact values, or solving a partial differential equation (PDE) numerically using a coarse discretization. For each level of interest, the location and ‘trajectory’ of an approximate contour of this pilot function are used to decide where to evaluate the original function to find points on its contour. Those points are joined by line segments to form the PAT approximation of the contour of the original function. Approximating a contour numerically amounts to estimating a lower level set of the function, the set of points on which the function does not exceed the contour level. The area of the symmetric difference between the true lower level set and the estimated lower level set measures the accuracy of the contour. PAT measures its own accuracy by finding an upper confidence bound for this area. In examples, PAT can estimate a contour more accurately than standard algorithms, using far fewer function evaluations than standard algorithms require. We illustrate PAT by constructing a confidence set for viscosity and thermal conductivity of a flowing gas from simulated noisy temperature measurements, a problem in which each evaluation of the function to be contoured requires solving a different set of coupled nonlinear PDEs. (paper)

  20. VT 10 ft Contour Lines generated from bare earth lidar - Chittenden

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) ElevationContours_CN10T (10ft contours) was extracted from ElevationContours_CN2T (2ft contours), which was generated by USGS from the 2004...

  1. Contour adaptation reduces the spreading of edge induced colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coia, Andrew J; Crognale, Michael A

    2017-04-25

    Brief exposure to flickering achromatic outlines of an area causes a reduction in the brightness contrast of the surface inside the area. This contour adaptation to achromatic contours does not reduce surface contrast when the surface is chromatic (the saturation or colorimetric purity of the surface is maintained). In addition to reducing the brightness of physical luminance contrast, contour adaptation also reduces (or even reverses) the illusory brightness contrast seen in the Craik-O'Brien-Cornsweet illusion, in which two physically identical grey areas appear different brightness because of a sharp luminance edge separating them. Chromatic color spreading illusions also occur with chromatic inducing edges, and an unanswered question is whether contour adaptation can reduce the perceived contrast of illusory color spreading from edges, even though it cannot reduce the perceived contrast of physical surface color. The current studies use a color spreading illusion known as the watercolor effect in order to test whether illusory color spreading is affected by contour adaptation. The general findings of physical achromatic contrast being reduced and chromatic contrast being robust to contour adaptation were replicated. However, both illusory brightness and color were reduced by contour adaptation, even when the illusion edges only differed in chromatic contrast with each other and the background. Additional studies adapting to chromatic contours showed opposite effects on illusory color contrast than achromatic adaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Kepler Planet Detection Metrics: Per-Target Detection Contours for Data Release 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher J.; Catanzarite, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    A necessary input to planet occurrence calculations is an accurate model for the pipeline completeness (Burke et al., 2015). This document describes the use of the Kepler planet occurrence rate products in order to calculate a per-target detection contour for the measured Data Release 25 (DR25) pipeline performance. A per-target detection contour measures for a given combination of orbital period, Porb, and planet radius, Rp, what fraction of transit signals are recoverable by the Kepler pipeline (Twicken et al., 2016; Jenkins et al., 2017). The steps for calculating a detection contour follow the procedure outlined in Burke et al. (2015), but have been updated to provide improved accuracy enabled by the substantially larger database of transit injection and recovery tests that were performed on the final version (i.e., SOC 9.3) of the Kepler pipeline (Christiansen, 2017; Burke Catanzarite, 2017a). In the following sections, we describe the main inputs to the per-target detection contour and provide a worked example of the python software released with this document (Kepler Planet Occurrence Rate Tools KeplerPORTs)1 that illustrates the generation of a detection contour in practice. As background material for this document and its nomenclature, we recommend the reader be familiar with the previous method of calculating a detection contour (Section 2 of Burke et al.,2015), input parameters relevant for describing the data quantity and quality of Kepler targets (Burke Catanzarite, 2017b), and the extensive new transit injection and recovery tests of the Kepler pipeline (Christiansen et al., 2016; Burke Catanzarite, 2017a; Christiansen, 2017).

  3. TH-A-9A-01: Active Optical Flow Model: Predicting Voxel-Level Dose Prediction in Spine SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J; Wu, Q.J.; Yin, F; Kirkpatrick, J; Cabrera, A [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Ge, Y [University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To predict voxel-level dose distribution and enable effective evaluation of cord dose sparing in spine SBRT. Methods: We present an active optical flow model (AOFM) to statistically describe cord dose variations and train a predictive model to represent correlations between AOFM and PTV contours. Thirty clinically accepted spine SBRT plans are evenly divided into training and testing datasets. The development of predictive model consists of 1) collecting a sequence of dose maps including PTV and OAR (spinal cord) as well as a set of associated PTV contours adjacent to OAR from the training dataset, 2) classifying data into five groups based on PTV's locations relative to OAR, two “Top”s, “Left”, “Right”, and “Bottom”, 3) randomly selecting a dose map as the reference in each group and applying rigid registration and optical flow deformation to match all other maps to the reference, 4) building AOFM by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA), 5) applying another PCA to features of PTV and OAR contours to generate an active shape model (ASM), and 6) computing a linear regression model of correlations between AOFM and ASM.When predicting dose distribution of a new case in the testing dataset, the PTV is first assigned to a group based on its contour characteristics. Contour features are then transformed into ASM's principal coordinates of the selected group. Finally, voxel-level dose distribution is determined by mapping from the ASM space to the AOFM space using the predictive model. Results: The DVHs predicted by the AOFM-based model and those in clinical plans are comparable in training and testing datasets. At 2% volume the dose difference between predicted and clinical plans is 4.2±4.4% and 3.3±3.5% in the training and testing datasets, respectively. Conclusion: The AOFM is effective in predicting voxel-level dose distribution for spine SBRT. Partially supported by NIH

  4. TH-A-9A-01: Active Optical Flow Model: Predicting Voxel-Level Dose Prediction in Spine SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J; Wu, Q.J.; Yin, F; Kirkpatrick, J; Cabrera, A; Ge, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To predict voxel-level dose distribution and enable effective evaluation of cord dose sparing in spine SBRT. Methods: We present an active optical flow model (AOFM) to statistically describe cord dose variations and train a predictive model to represent correlations between AOFM and PTV contours. Thirty clinically accepted spine SBRT plans are evenly divided into training and testing datasets. The development of predictive model consists of 1) collecting a sequence of dose maps including PTV and OAR (spinal cord) as well as a set of associated PTV contours adjacent to OAR from the training dataset, 2) classifying data into five groups based on PTV's locations relative to OAR, two “Top”s, “Left”, “Right”, and “Bottom”, 3) randomly selecting a dose map as the reference in each group and applying rigid registration and optical flow deformation to match all other maps to the reference, 4) building AOFM by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA), 5) applying another PCA to features of PTV and OAR contours to generate an active shape model (ASM), and 6) computing a linear regression model of correlations between AOFM and ASM.When predicting dose distribution of a new case in the testing dataset, the PTV is first assigned to a group based on its contour characteristics. Contour features are then transformed into ASM's principal coordinates of the selected group. Finally, voxel-level dose distribution is determined by mapping from the ASM space to the AOFM space using the predictive model. Results: The DVHs predicted by the AOFM-based model and those in clinical plans are comparable in training and testing datasets. At 2% volume the dose difference between predicted and clinical plans is 4.2±4.4% and 3.3±3.5% in the training and testing datasets, respectively. Conclusion: The AOFM is effective in predicting voxel-level dose distribution for spine SBRT. Partially supported by NIH

  5. Perceptual representation and effectiveness of local figure-ground cues in natural contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Ko; Matsuoka, Shouhei; Kurematsu, Ken; Hatori, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    A contour shape strongly influences the perceptual segregation of a figure from the ground. We investigated the contribution of local contour shape to figure-ground segregation. Although previous studies have reported local contour features that evoke figure-ground perception, they were often image features and not necessarily perceptual features. First, we examined whether contour features, specifically, convexity, closure, and symmetry, underlie the perceptual representation of natural contour shapes. We performed similarity tests between local contours, and examined the contribution of the contour features to the perceptual similarities between the contours. The local contours were sampled from natural contours so that their distribution was uniform in the space composed of the three contour features. This sampling ensured the equal appearance frequency of the factors and a wide variety of contour shapes including those comprised of contradictory factors that induce figure in the opposite directions. This sampling from natural contours is advantageous in order to randomly pickup a variety of contours that satisfy a wide range of cue combinations. Multidimensional scaling analyses showed that the combinations of convexity, closure, and symmetry contribute to perceptual similarity, thus they are perceptual quantities. Second, we examined whether the three features contribute to local figure-ground perception. We performed psychophysical experiments to judge the direction of the figure along the local contours, and examined the contribution of the features to the figure-ground judgment. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that closure was a significant factor, but that convexity and symmetry were not. These results indicate that closure is dominant in the local figure-ground perception with natural contours when the other cues coexist with equal probability including contradictory cases.

  6. Perceptual representation and effectiveness of local figure–ground cues in natural contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Ko; Matsuoka, Shouhei; Kurematsu, Ken; Hatori, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    A contour shape strongly influences the perceptual segregation of a figure from the ground. We investigated the contribution of local contour shape to figure–ground segregation. Although previous studies have reported local contour features that evoke figure–ground perception, they were often image features and not necessarily perceptual features. First, we examined whether contour features, specifically, convexity, closure, and symmetry, underlie the perceptual representation of natural contour shapes. We performed similarity tests between local contours, and examined the contribution of the contour features to the perceptual similarities between the contours. The local contours were sampled from natural contours so that their distribution was uniform in the space composed of the three contour features. This sampling ensured the equal appearance frequency of the factors and a wide variety of contour shapes including those comprised of contradictory factors that induce figure in the opposite directions. This sampling from natural contours is advantageous in order to randomly pickup a variety of contours that satisfy a wide range of cue combinations. Multidimensional scaling analyses showed that the combinations of convexity, closure, and symmetry contribute to perceptual similarity, thus they are perceptual quantities. Second, we examined whether the three features contribute to local figure–ground perception. We performed psychophysical experiments to judge the direction of the figure along the local contours, and examined the contribution of the features to the figure–ground judgment. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that closure was a significant factor, but that convexity and symmetry were not. These results indicate that closure is dominant in the local figure–ground perception with natural contours when the other cues coexist with equal probability including contradictory cases. PMID:26579057

  7. Perceptual Representation and Effectiveness of Local Figure-Ground Cues in Natural Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko eSakai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A contour shape strongly influences the perceptual segregation of a figure from the ground. We investigated the contribution of local contour shape to figure-ground segregation. Although previous studies have reported local contour features that evoke figure-ground perception, they were often image features and not necessarily perceptual features. First, we examined whether contour features, specifically, convexity, closure, and symmetry, underlie the perceptual representation of natural contour shapes. We performed similarity tests between local contours, and examined the contribution of the contour features to the perceptual similarities between the contours. The local contours were sampled from natural contours so that their distribution was uniform in the space composed of the three contour features. This sampling ensured the equal appearance frequency of the factors and a wide variety of contour shapes including those comprised of contradictory factors that induce figure in the opposite directions. This sampling from natural contours is advantageous in order to randomly pickup a variety of contours that satisfy a wide range of cue combinations. Multidimensional scaling analyses showed that the combinations of convexity, closure, and symmetry contribute to perceptual similarity, thus they are perceptual quantities. Second, we examined whether the three features contribute to local figure-ground perception. We performed psychophysical experiments to judge the direction of the figure along the local contours, and examined the contribution of the features to the figure-ground judgment. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that closure was a significant factor, but that convexity and symmetry were not. These results indicate that closure is dominant in the local figure-ground perception with natural contours when the other cues coexist with equal probability including contradictory cases.

  8. Hand-Geometry Recognition Based on Contour Parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Bazen, A.M.; Booij, W.D.T.; Hendrikse, A.J.; Jain, A.K.; Ratha, N.K.

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of a new method of hand-geometry recognition based on parameters derived from the contour of the hand. The contour is completely determined by the black-and-white image of the hand and can be derived from it by means of simple image-processing techniques. It

  9. Prostate Contouring Variation: Can It Be Fixed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoo, Eric L.H.; Schick, Karlissa; Plank, Ashley W.; Poulsen, Michael; Wong, Winnie W.G.; Middleton, Mark; Martin, Jarad M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether an education program on CT and MRI prostate anatomy would reduce inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variation among experienced radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Three patient CT and MRI datasets were selected. Five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate for each patient on CT first, then MRI, and again between 2 and 4 weeks later. Three education sessions were then conducted. The same contouring process was then repeated with the same datasets and oncologists. The observer variation was assessed according to changes in the ratio of the encompassing volume to intersecting volume (volume ratio [VR]), across sets of target volumes. Results: For interobserver variation, there was a 15% reduction in mean VR with CT, from 2.74 to 2.33, and a 40% reduction in mean VR with MRI, from 2.38 to 1.41 after education. A similar trend was found for intraobserver variation, with a mean VR reduction for CT and MRI of 9% (from 1.51 to 1.38) and 16% (from 1.37 to 1.15), respectively. Conclusion: A well-structured education program has reduced both inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variations. The impact was greater on MRI than on CT. With the ongoing incorporation of new technologies into routine practice, education programs for target contouring should be incorporated as part of the continuing medical education of radiation oncologists.

  10. Dynamic identification of plasma magnetic contour in fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettini, P.; Trevisan, F.; Cavinato, M.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a method to identify the plasma magnetic contour in fusion machines, when eddy currents are present in the conducting structures surrounding the plasma. The approach presented is based on the integration of an electromagnetic model of the plasma with a lumped parameters model of the conducting structures around the plasma. This approach has been validated against experimental data from RFX, a reversed field pinch machine. (author)

  11. Clinical evaluation of atlas and deep learning based automatic contouring for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustberg, Tim; van Soest, Johan; Gooding, Mark; Peressutti, Devis; Aljabar, Paul; van der Stoep, Judith; van Elmpt, Wouter; Dekker, Andre

    2018-02-01

    Contouring of organs at risk (OARs) is an important but time consuming part of radiotherapy treatment planning. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using institutional created software-generated contouring will save time if used as a starting point for manual OAR contouring for lung cancer patients. Twenty CT scans of stage I-III NSCLC patients were used to compare user adjusted contours after an atlas-based and deep learning contour, against manual delineation. The lungs, esophagus, spinal cord, heart and mediastinum were contoured for this study. The time to perform the manual tasks was recorded. With a median time of 20 min for manual contouring, the total median time saved was 7.8 min when using atlas-based contouring and 10 min for deep learning contouring. Both atlas based and deep learning adjustment times were significantly lower than manual contouring time for all OARs except for the left lung and esophagus of the atlas based contouring. User adjustment of software generated contours is a viable strategy to reduce contouring time of OARs for lung radiotherapy while conforming to local clinical standards. In addition, deep learning contouring shows promising results compared to existing solutions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  14. Figure-ground segregation at contours: a neural mechanism in the visual cortex of the alert monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, R; van der Zwan, R; Peterhans, E

    1997-06-01

    An important task of vision is the segregation of figure and ground in situations of spatial occlusion. Psychophysical evidence suggests that the depth order at contours is defined early in visual processing. We have analysed this process in the visual cortex of the alert monkey. The animals were trained on a visual fixation task which reinforced foveal viewing. During periods of active visual fixation, we recorded the responses of single neurons in striate and prestriate cortex (areas V1, V2, and V3/V3A). The stimuli mimicked situations of spatial occlusion, usually a uniform light (or dark) rectangle overlaying a grating texture of opposite contrast. The direction of figure and ground at the borders of these rectangles was defined by the direction of the terminating grating lines (occlusion cues). Neuronal responses were analysed with respect to figure-ground direction and contrast polarity at such contours. Striate neurons often failed to respond to such stimuli, or were selective for contrast polarity; others were non-selective. Some neurons preferred a certain combination of figure-ground direction and contrast polarity. These neurons were rare both in striate and prestriate cortex. The majority of neurons signalled figure-ground direction independent of contrast polarity. These neurons were only found in prestriate cortex. We explain these responses in terms of a model which also explains neuronal signals of illusory contours. These results suggest that occlusion cues are used at an early level of processing to segregate figure and ground at contours.

  15. Area of isodensity contours in Gaussian and non-Gaussian fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryden, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    The area of isodensity contours in a smoothed density field can be measured by the contour-crossing statistic N1, the number of times per unit length that a line drawn through the density field pierces an isodensity contour. The contour-crossing statistic distinguishes between Gaussian and non-Gaussian fields and provides a measure of the effective slope of the power spectrum. The statistic is easy to apply and can be used on pencil beams and slices as well as on a three-dimensional field. 10 references

  16. Model cortical association fields account for the time course and dependence on target complexity of human contour perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadas Gintautas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Can lateral connectivity in the primary visual cortex account for the time dependence and intrinsic task difficulty of human contour detection? To answer this question, we created a synthetic image set that prevents sole reliance on either low-level visual features or high-level context for the detection of target objects. Rendered images consist of smoothly varying, globally aligned contour fragments (amoebas distributed among groups of randomly rotated fragments (clutter. The time course and accuracy of amoeba detection by humans was measured using a two-alternative forced choice protocol with self-reported confidence and variable image presentation time (20-200 ms, followed by an image mask optimized so as to interrupt visual processing. Measured psychometric functions were well fit by sigmoidal functions with exponential time constants of 30-91 ms, depending on amoeba complexity. Key aspects of the psychophysical experiments were accounted for by a computational network model, in which simulated responses across retinotopic arrays of orientation-selective elements were modulated by cortical association fields, represented as multiplicative kernels computed from the differences in pairwise edge statistics between target and distractor images. Comparing the experimental and the computational results suggests that each iteration of the lateral interactions takes at least [Formula: see text] ms of cortical processing time. Our results provide evidence that cortical association fields between orientation selective elements in early visual areas can account for important temporal and task-dependent aspects of the psychometric curves characterizing human contour perception, with the remaining discrepancies postulated to arise from the influence of higher cortical areas.

  17. Edge and line oriented contour detection : State of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papari, Giuseppe; Petkov, Nicolai

    We present an overview of various edge and line oriented approaches to contour detection that have been proposed in the last two decades. By edge and line oriented we mean methods that do not rely on segmentation. Distinction is made between edges and contours. Contour detectors are divided in local

  18. Design optimization of highly asymmetrical layouts by 2D contour metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C. M.; Lo, Fred; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2018-03-01

    As design pitch shrinks to the resolution limit of up-to-date optical lithography technology, the Critical Dimension (CD) variation tolerance has been dramatically decreased for ensuring the functionality of device. One of critical challenges associates with the narrower CD tolerance for whole chip area is the proximity effect control on asymmetrical layout environments. To fulfill the tight CD control of complex features, the Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscope (CD-SEM) based measurement results for qualifying process window and establishing the Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) model become insufficient, thus 2D contour extraction technique [1-5] has been an increasingly important approach for complementing the insufficiencies of traditional CD measurement algorithm. To alleviate the long cycle time and high cost penalties for product verification, manufacturing requirements are better to be well handled at design stage to improve the quality and yield of ICs. In this work, in-house 2D contour extraction platform was established for layout design optimization of 39nm half-pitch Self-Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) process layer. Combining with the adoption of Process Variation Band Index (PVBI), the contour extraction platform enables layout optimization speedup as comparing to traditional methods. The capabilities of identifying and handling lithography hotspots in complex layout environments of 2D contour extraction platform allow process window aware layout optimization to meet the manufacturing requirements.

  19. Language-dependent changes in pitch-relevant neural activity in the auditory cortex reflect differential weighting of temporal attributes of pitch contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Xu, Yi; Suresh, Chandan H.

    2016-01-01

    There remains a gap in our knowledge base about neural representation of pitch attributes that occur between onset and offset of dynamic, curvilinear pitch contours. The aim is to evaluate how language experience shapes processing of pitch contours as reflected in the amplitude of cortical pitch-specific response components. Responses were elicited from three nonspeech, bidirectional (falling-rising) pitch contours representative of Mandarin Tone 2 varying in location of the turning point with fixed onset and offset. At the frontocentral Fz electrode site, Na–Pb and Pb–Nb amplitude of the Chinese group was larger than the English group for pitch contours exhibiting later location of the turning point relative to the one with the earliest location. Chinese listeners’ amplitude was also greater than that of English in response to those same pitch contours with later turning points. At lateral temporal sites (T7/T8), Na–Pb amplitude was larger in Chinese listeners relative to English over the right temporal site. In addition, Pb–Nb amplitude of the Chinese group showed a rightward asymmetry. The pitch contour with its turning point located about halfway of total duration evoked a rightward asymmetry regardless of group. These findings suggest that neural mechanisms processing pitch in the right auditory cortex reflect experience-dependent modulation of sensitivity to weighted integration of changes in acceleration rates of rising and falling sections and the location of the turning point. PMID:28713201

  20. An investigation into positron emission tomography contouring methods across two treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Tony; Som, Seu; Sathiakumar, Chithradevi; Holloway, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to provide additional information regarding patient tumor location, size, and staging for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes. This additional information reduces interobserver variability and produces more consistent contouring. It is well recognized that different contouring methodology for PET data results in different contoured volumes. The goal of this study was to compare the difference in PET contouring methods for 2 different treatment planning systems using a phantom dataset and a series of patient datasets. Contouring methodology was compared on the ADAC Pinnacle Treatment Planning System and the CMS XiO Treatment Planning System. Contours were completed on the phantom and patient datasets using a number of PET contouring methods—the standardized uptake value 2.5 method, 30%, 40%, and 50% of the maximum uptake method and the signal to background ratio method. Differences of >15% were observed for PET-contoured volumes between the different treatment planning systems for the same data and the same PET contouring methodology. Contoured volume differences between treatment planning systems were caused by differences in data formatting and display and the different contouring tools available. Differences in treatment planning system as well as contouring methodology should be considered carefully in dose-volume contouring and reporting, especially between centers that may use different treatment planning systems or those that have several different treatment planning systems

  1. Implementing contour bank farming practices into the J2000 model to improve hydrological and erosion modelling in semi-arid Western Cape Province of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steudel, T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contour bank farming is a well-known agricultural management technique in areas which are characterised by intensive and erosive rainfalls. Contour banks are designed to reduce the flow velocity of overland flow and to intercept water before...

  2. The psychological impact of body contouring surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen Lorenzen, Mike; Poulsen, Lotte; Poulsen, Signe

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Body contouring surgery is associated with changes in body image and identity. The primary aim of the study was to investigate a multidisciplinary assessment of potential psychological challenges before and after body contouring surgery. METHODS: Eight pre- and post-operative patients...... relevant codes had been extracted. RESULTS: A total of seven psychological themes were iden- tified, indicating that surgery alone cannot improve the pa- tients’ psychological difficulties and that psychological care and management of the expected discomfort and body im- age is of considerable importance...... in providing continuity of care. CONCLUSIONS: The reported quality of life is of consider- able importance to patients undergoing body contouring surgery after massive weight loss. Our findings may provide useful information for surgeons and healthcare profes- sionals allowing them to develop patient education...

  3. Contouring algorithm for two dimensional data- an application to airborne surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryakumar, N.V.; Rohatgi, Savita; Raghuwanshi, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes in general the contouring algorithm for two dimensional projection of aeroradiometric data and considers not only irregularly spaced flight lines but also solves the other problems related to voluminous data acquired during the airborne surveys. Several simple logics have been described for drawing the contours using scan method and taking care of annotations, identification marking, geographical locations, map size, contour density for visual distinctness and many such problems which may arise during contouring. The present paper also discusses various possibilities of contour line segments in the mini-grid and the criterion for selection of suitable segments has been described in detail. A novel approach to avoid the crossing of contours or missing data is also briefly discussed. The simplicity of the algorithm is mentioned for its ready implementation or any computer/plotter. (author). 8 refs., 8 figs

  4. Visual search of illusory contours: Shape and orientation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Vasilije

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Illusory contours are specific class of visual stimuli that represent stimuli configurations perceived as integral irrespective of the fact that they are given in fragmented uncompleted wholes. Due to their specific features, illusory contours gained much attention in last decade representing prototype of stimuli used in investigations focused on binding problem. On the other side, investigations of illusory contours are related to problem of the level of their visual processing. Neurophysiologic studies show that processing of illusory contours proceed relatively early, on the V2 level, on the other hand most of experimental studies claim that illusory contours are perceived with engagement of visual attention, binding their elements to whole percept. This research is focused on two experiments in which visual search of illusory contours are based on shape and orientation. The main experimental procedure evolved the task proposed by Bravo and Nakayama where instead of detection, subjects were performing identification of one among two possible targets. In the first experiment subjects detected the presence of illusory square or illusory triangle, while in the second experiment subject were detecting two different orientations of illusory triangle. The results are interpreted in terms of visual search and feature integration theory. Beside the type of visual search task, search type proved to be dependent of specific features of illusory shapes which further complicate theoretical interpretation of the level of their perception.

  5. Holographic Moire Contouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, C. A.; Sainov, Ventseslav; Simova, Eli

    1990-04-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental results on holographic moire contouring (HMC) of difussely reflecting objects are presented. The sensitivity and application constraints of the method are discussed. A high signal-to-noise ratio and contrast of the fringes is achieved through the use of high quality silver halide holographic plates HP-650. A good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is observed.

  6. ROADS CENTRE-AXIS EXTRACTION IN AIRBORNE SAR IMAGES: AN APPROACH BASED ON ACTIVE CONTOUR MODEL WITH THE USE OF SEMI-AUTOMATIC SEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Lotte

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research works dealing with computational methods for roads extraction have considerably increased in the latest two decades. This procedure is usually performed on optical or microwave sensors (radar imagery. Radar images offer advantages when compared to optical ones, for they allow the acquisition of scenes regardless of atmospheric and illumination conditions, besides the possibility of surveying regions where the terrain is hidden by the vegetation canopy, among others. The cartographic mapping based on these images is often manually accomplished, requiring considerable time and effort from the human interpreter. Maps for detecting new roads or updating the existing roads network are among the most important cartographic products to date. There are currently many studies involving the extraction of roads by means of automatic or semi-automatic approaches. Each of them presents different solutions for different problems, making this task a scientific issue still open. One of the preliminary steps for roads extraction can be the seeding of points belonging to roads, what can be done using different methods with diverse levels of automation. The identified seed points are interpolated to form the initial road network, and are hence used as an input for an extraction method properly speaking. The present work introduces an innovative hybrid method for the extraction of roads centre-axis in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR airborne image. Initially, candidate points are fully automatically seeded using Self-Organizing Maps (SOM, followed by a pruning process based on specific metrics. The centre-axis are then detected by an open-curve active contour model (snakes. The obtained results were evaluated as to their quality with respect to completeness, correctness and redundancy.

  7. A review of methods of analysis in contouring studies for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, Michael G.; Holloway, Lois C.; Metcalfe, Peter E.; Vial, Philip J.; Vinod, Shalini K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Inter-observer variability in anatomical contouring is the biggest contributor to uncertainty in radiation treatment planning. Contouring studies are frequently performed to investigate the differences between multiple contours on common datasets. There is, however, no widely accepted method for contour comparisons. The purpose of this study is to review the literature on contouring studies in the context of radiation oncology, with particular consideration of the contouring comparison methods they employ. A literature search, not limited by date, was conducted using Medline and Google Scholar with key words; contour, variation, delineation, inter/intra observer, uncertainty and trial dummy-run. This review includes a description of the contouring processes and contour comparison metrics used. The use of different processes and metrics according to tumour site and other factors were also investigated with limitations described. A total of 69 relevant studies were identified. The most common tumour sites were prostate (26), lung (10), head and neck cancers (8) and breast (7).The most common metric of comparison was volume used 59 times, followed by dimension and shape used 36 times, and centre of volume used 19 times. Of all 69 publications, 67 used a combination of metrics and two used only one metric for comparison. No clear relationships between tumour site or any other factors that may in Auence the contouring process and the metrics used to compare contours were observed from the literature. Further studies are needed to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each metric in various situations.

  8. Subsidence Contours for South Louisiana; UTM 15N NAD83; LRA (2005); [subsidence_contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The GIS data shapefile represents average subsidence contour intervals (0.02 cm/year over 10,000 years) for Coastal LA derived from the following: Kulp, M.A., 2000,...

  9. Experimental results showing the internal three-component velocity field and outlet temperature contours for a model gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. All rights reserved ISABE-2011-1129 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS SHOWING THE INTERNAL THREE-COMPONENT VELOCITY FIELD AND OUTLET TEMPERATURE CONTOURS FOR A MODEL GAS TURBINE COMBUSTOR BC Meyers*, GC... identifier c Position identifier F Fuel i Index L (Combustor) Liner OP Orifice plate Introduction There are often inconsistencies when comparing experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for gas turbine combustors [1...

  10. Brightness/darkness induction and the genesis of a contour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRoncato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual contours often result from the integration or interpolation of fragmented edges.The strength of the completion increases when the edges share the same contrast polarity (CP. Here we demonstrate that the appearance in the perceptual field of this integrated unit, or contour of invariant CP, is concomitant with a vivid brightness alteration of the surfaces at its opposite sides. To observe this effect requires some stratagems because the formation in the visual field of a contour of invariant CP normally engenders the formation of a second contour and then the rise of two streams of induction signals that interfere in different ways. Particular configurations have been introduced that allow us to observe the induction effects of one contour taken in isolation. I documented these effects by phenomenological observations and psychophysical measurement of the brightness alteration in relation to luminance contrast. When the edges of the same CP complete to form a contour, the background of homogeneous luminance appears to dim at one side and to brighten at the opposite side (in accord with the CP. The strength of the phenomenon is proportional to the local luminance contrast. This effect weakens or nulls when the contour of the invariant CP separates surfaces filled with different grey shades.These conflicting results stimulate a deeper exploration of the induction phenomena and their role in the computation of brightness contrast. An alternative perspective is offered to account for some brightness illusions and their relation to the phenomenal transparency. The main assumption asserts that, when in the same region induction signals of opposite CP overlap, the filling-in are blocked unless the image is stratified into different layers, one for each signal of the same polarity. Phenomenological observations document this solution by the visual system

  11. Color contributes to object-contour perception in natural scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thorsten; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2017-03-01

    The magnitudes of chromatic and achromatic edge contrast are statistically independent and thus provide independent information, which can be used for object-contour perception. However, it is unclear if and how much object-contour perception benefits from chromatic edge contrast. To address this question, we investigated how well human-marked object contours can be predicted from achromatic and chromatic edge contrast. We used four data sets of human-marked object contours with a total of 824 images. We converted the images to the Derrington-Krauskopf-Lennie color space to separate chromatic from achromatic information in a physiologically meaningful way. Edges were detected in the three dimensions of the color space (one achromatic and two chromatic) and compared to human-marked object contours using receiver operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis for a threshold-independent evaluation. Performance was quantified by the difference of the area under the ROC curves (ΔAUC). Results were consistent across different data sets and edge-detection methods. If chromatic edges were used in addition to achromatic edges, predictions were better for 83% of the images, with a prediction advantage of 3.5% ΔAUC, averaged across all data sets and edge detectors. For some images the prediction advantage was considerably higher, up to 52% ΔAUC. Interestingly, if achromatic edges were used in addition to chromatic edges, the average prediction advantage was smaller (2.4% ΔAUC). We interpret our results such that chromatic information is important for object-contour perception.

  12. Parallel peak pruning for scalable SMP contour tree computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Hamish A. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Weber, Gunther H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Sewell, Christopher M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahrens, James P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-09

    As data sets grow to exascale, automated data analysis and visualisation are increasingly important, to intermediate human understanding and to reduce demands on disk storage via in situ analysis. Trends in architecture of high performance computing systems necessitate analysis algorithms to make effective use of combinations of massively multicore and distributed systems. One of the principal analytic tools is the contour tree, which analyses relationships between contours to identify features of more than local importance. Unfortunately, the predominant algorithms for computing the contour tree are explicitly serial, and founded on serial metaphors, which has limited the scalability of this form of analysis. While there is some work on distributed contour tree computation, and separately on hybrid GPU-CPU computation, there is no efficient algorithm with strong formal guarantees on performance allied with fast practical performance. Here in this paper, we report the first shared SMP algorithm for fully parallel contour tree computation, withfor-mal guarantees of O(lgnlgt) parallel steps and O(n lgn) work, and implementations with up to 10x parallel speed up in OpenMP and up to 50x speed up in NVIDIA Thrust.

  13. Deformation of contour and Hawking temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Chikun; Jing Jiliang

    2010-01-01

    It was found that, in an isotropic coordinate system, the tunneling approach brings a factor of 1/2 for the Hawking temperature of a Schwarzschild black hole. In this paper, we address this kind of problem by studying the relation between the Hawking temperature and the deformation of the integral contour for the scalar and Dirac particles tunneling. We find that the correct Hawking temperature can be obtained exactly as long as the integral contour deformed corresponding to the radial coordinate transform if the transformation is a non-regular or zero function at the event horizon.

  14. Color and Contour Based Identification of Stem of Coconut Bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan Megalingam, Rajesh; Manoharan, Sakthiprasad K.; Reddy, Rajesh G.; Sriteja, Gone; Kashyap, Ashwin

    2017-08-01

    Vision is the key component of Artificial Intelligence and Automated Robotics. Sensors or Cameras are the sight organs for a robot. Only through this, they are able to locate themselves or identify the shape of a regular or an irregular object. This paper presents the method of Identification of an object based on color and contour recognition using a camera through digital image processing techniques for robotic applications. In order to identify the contour, shape matching technique is used, which takes the input data from the database provided, and uses it to identify the contour by checking for shape match. The shape match is based on the idea of iterating through each contour of the threshold image. The color is identified on HSV Scale, by approximating the desired range of values from the database. HSV data along with iteration is used for identifying a quadrilateral, which is our required contour. This algorithm could also be used in a non-deterministic plane, which only uses HSV values exclusively.

  15. Some distinguishing characteristics of contour and texture phenomena in images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of generalized contour/texture discrimination techniques is a central element necessary for machine vision recognition and interpretation of arbitrary images. Here, the visual perception of texture, selected studies of texture analysis in machine vision, and diverse small samples of contour and texture are all used to provide insights into the fundamental characteristics of contour and texture. From these, an experimental discrimination scheme is developed and tested on a battery of natural images. The visual perception of texture defined fine texture as a subclass which is interpreted as shading and is distinct from coarse figural similarity textures. Also, perception defined the smallest scale for contour/texture discrimination as eight to nine visual acuity units. Three contour/texture discrimination parameters were found to be moderately successful for this scale discrimination: (1) lightness change in a blurred version of the image, (2) change in lightness change in the original image, and (3) percent change in edge counts relative to local maximum.

  16. Automatic programming of grinding robot restoration of contours

    OpenAIRE

    Are Willersrud; Fred Godtliebsen; Trygve Thomessen

    1995-01-01

    A new programming method has been developed for grinding robots. Instead of using the conventional jog-and-teach method, the workpiece contour is automatically tracked by the robot. During the tracking, the robot position is stored in the robot control system every 8th millisecond. After filtering and reducing this contour data, a robot program is automatically generated.

  17. Perceptual representation and effectiveness of local figure?ground cues in natural contours

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Ko; Matsuoka, Shouhei; Kurematsu, Ken; Hatori, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    A contour shape strongly influences the perceptual segregation of a figure from the ground. We investigated the contribution of local contour shape to figure–ground segregation. Although previous studies have reported local contour features that evoke figure–ground perception, they were often image features and not necessarily perceptual features. First, we examined whether contour features, specifically, convexity, closure, and symmetry, underlie the perceptual representation of natural cont...

  18. CT urography: segmentation of urinary bladder using CLASS with local contour refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M; Cohan, Richard H; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a computerized system for bladder segmentation on CT urography (CTU), as a critical component for computer-aided detection of bladder cancer. The presence of regions filled with intravenous contrast and without contrast presents a challenge for bladder segmentation. Previously, we proposed a conjoint level set analysis and segmentation system (CLASS). In case the bladder is partially filled with contrast, CLASS segments the non-contrast (NC) region and the contrast-filled (C) region separately and automatically conjoins the NC and C region contours; however, inaccuracies in the NC and C region contours may cause the conjoint contour to exclude portions of the bladder. To alleviate this problem, we implemented a local contour refinement (LCR) method that exploits model-guided refinement (MGR) and energy-driven wavefront propagation (EDWP). MGR propagates the C region contours if the level set propagation in the C region stops prematurely due to substantial non-uniformity of the contrast. EDWP with regularized energies further propagates the conjoint contours to the correct bladder boundary. EDWP uses changes in energies, smoothness criteria of the contour, and previous slice contour to determine when to stop the propagation, following decision rules derived from training. A data set of 173 cases was collected for this study: 81 cases in the training set (42 lesions, 21 wall thickenings, 18 normal bladders) and 92 cases in the test set (43 lesions, 36 wall thickenings, 13 normal bladders). For all cases, 3D hand segmented contours were obtained as reference standard and used for the evaluation of the computerized segmentation accuracy. For CLASS with LCR, the average volume intersection ratio, average volume error, absolute average volume error, average minimum distance and Jaccard index were 84.2 ± 11.4%, 8.2 ± 17.4%, 13.0 ± 14.1%, 3.5 ± 1.9 mm, 78.8 ± 11.6%, respectively, for the training set and 78.0 ± 14.7%, 16.4 ± 16.9%, 18.2 ± 15

  19. SU-E-J-129: Atlas Development for Cardiac Automatic Contouring Using Multi-Atlas Segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, R; Yang, J; Pan, T; Milgrom, S; Pinnix, C; Shi, A; Yang, J; Liu, Y; Nguyen, Q; Gomez, D; Dabaja, B; Balter, P; Court, L; Liao, Z

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a set of atlases for automatic contouring of cardiac structures to determine heart radiation dose and the associated toxicity. Methods: Six thoracic cancer patients with both contrast and non-contrast CT images were acquired for this study. Eight radiation oncologists manually and independently delineated cardiac contours on the non-contrast CT by referring to the fused contrast CT and following the RTOG 1106 atlas contouring guideline. Fifteen regions of interest (ROIs) were delineated, including heart, four chambers, four coronary arteries, pulmonary artery and vein, inferior and superior vena cava, and ascending and descending aorta. Individual expert contours were fused using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm for each ROI and each patient. The fused contours became atlases for an in-house multi-atlas segmentation. Using leave-one-out test, we generated auto-segmented contours for each ROI and each patient. The auto-segmented contours were compared with the fused contours using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean surface distance (MSD). Results: Inter-observer variability was not obvious for heart, chambers, and aorta but was large for other structures that were not clearly distinguishable on CT image. The average DSC between individual expert contours and the fused contours were less than 50% for coronary arteries and pulmonary vein, and the average MSD were greater than 4.0 mm. The largest MSD of expert contours deviating from the fused contours was 2.5 cm. The mean DSC and MSD of auto-segmented contours were within one standard deviation of expert contouring variability except the right coronary artery. The coronary arteries, vena cava, and pulmonary vein had DSC<70% and MSD>3.0 mm. Conclusion: A set of cardiac atlases was created for cardiac automatic contouring, the accuracy of which was comparable to the variability in expert contouring. However, substantial modification may need

  20. Consensus Recommendations for Radiation Therapy Contouring and Treatment of Vulvar Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, David K., E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); King, Bronwyn [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Epworth Radiation Oncology, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Barkati, Maroie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Beriwal, Sushil [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Eifel, Patricia [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erickson, Beth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Proedtert and Medical College Clinical Cancer Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Fyles, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Goulart, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Harkenrider, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Koh, Wui-Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Lim, Karen [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre, Radiation Oncology Unit, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Petersen, Ivy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [Radiation Oncology Department, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); and others

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a radiation therapy (RT) contouring atlas and recommendations for women with postoperative and locally advanced vulvar carcinoma. Methods and Materials: An international committee of 35 expert gynecologic radiation oncologists completed a survey of the treatment of vulvar carcinoma. An initial set of recommendations for contouring was discussed and generated by consensus. Two cases, 1 locally advanced and 1 postoperative, were contoured by 14 physicians. Contours were compared and analyzed using an expectation-maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), and a 95% confidence interval contour was developed. The level of agreement among contours was assessed using a kappa statistic. STAPLE contours underwent full committee editing to generate the final atlas consensus contours. Results: Analysis of the 14 contours showed substantial agreement, with kappa statistics of 0.69 and 0.64 for cases 1 and 2, respectively. There was high specificity for both cases (≥99%) and only moderate sensitivity of 71.3% and 64.9% for cases 1 and 2, respectively. Expert review and discussion generated consensus recommendations for contouring target volumes and treatment for postoperative and locally advanced vulvar cancer. Conclusions: These consensus recommendations for contouring and treatment of vulvar cancer identified areas of complexity and controversy. Given the lack of clinical research evidence in vulvar cancer radiation therapy, the committee advocates a conservative and consistent approach using standardized recommendations.

  1. Consensus Recommendations for Radiation Therapy Contouring and Treatment of Vulvar Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, David K.; King, Bronwyn; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Barkati, Maroie; Beriwal, Sushil; Eifel, Patricia; Erickson, Beth; Fyles, Anthony; Goulart, Jennifer; Harkenrider, Matthew; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann; Koh, Wui-Jin; Lim, Karen; Petersen, Ivy; Portelance, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a radiation therapy (RT) contouring atlas and recommendations for women with postoperative and locally advanced vulvar carcinoma. Methods and Materials: An international committee of 35 expert gynecologic radiation oncologists completed a survey of the treatment of vulvar carcinoma. An initial set of recommendations for contouring was discussed and generated by consensus. Two cases, 1 locally advanced and 1 postoperative, were contoured by 14 physicians. Contours were compared and analyzed using an expectation-maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), and a 95% confidence interval contour was developed. The level of agreement among contours was assessed using a kappa statistic. STAPLE contours underwent full committee editing to generate the final atlas consensus contours. Results: Analysis of the 14 contours showed substantial agreement, with kappa statistics of 0.69 and 0.64 for cases 1 and 2, respectively. There was high specificity for both cases (≥99%) and only moderate sensitivity of 71.3% and 64.9% for cases 1 and 2, respectively. Expert review and discussion generated consensus recommendations for contouring target volumes and treatment for postoperative and locally advanced vulvar cancer. Conclusions: These consensus recommendations for contouring and treatment of vulvar cancer identified areas of complexity and controversy. Given the lack of clinical research evidence in vulvar cancer radiation therapy, the committee advocates a conservative and consistent approach using standardized recommendations.

  2. Automatic programming of grinding robot restoration of contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Are Willersrud

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available A new programming method has been developed for grinding robots. Instead of using the conventional jog-and-teach method, the workpiece contour is automatically tracked by the robot. During the tracking, the robot position is stored in the robot control system every 8th millisecond. After filtering and reducing this contour data, a robot program is automatically generated.

  3. Novel real-time tumor-contouring method using deep learning to prevent mistracking in X-ray fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Tokui, Aoi; Sakae, Takeji

    2018-03-01

    Robustness to obstacles is the most important factor necessary to achieve accurate tumor tracking without fiducial markers. Some high-density structures, such as bone, are enhanced on X-ray fluoroscopic images, which cause tumor mistracking. Tumor tracking should be performed by controlling "importance recognition": the understanding that soft-tissue is an important tracking feature and bone structure is unimportant. We propose a new real-time tumor-contouring method that uses deep learning with importance recognition control. The novelty of the proposed method is the combination of the devised random overlay method and supervised deep learning to induce the recognition of structures in tumor contouring as important or unimportant. This method can be used for tumor contouring because it uses deep learning to perform image segmentation. Our results from a simulated fluoroscopy model showed accurate tracking of a low-visibility tumor with an error of approximately 1 mm, even if enhanced bone structure acted as an obstacle. A high similarity of approximately 0.95 on the Jaccard index was observed between the segmented and ground truth tumor regions. A short processing time of 25 ms was achieved. The results of this simulated fluoroscopy model support the feasibility of robust real-time tumor contouring with fluoroscopy. Further studies using clinical fluoroscopy are highly anticipated.

  4. Semi-automated contour recognition using DICOMautomaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, H; Duzenli, C; Wu, J; Moiseenko, V; Lee, R; Gill, B; Thomas, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A system has been developed which recognizes and classifies Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine contour data with minimal human intervention. It allows researchers to overcome obstacles which tax analysis and mining systems, including inconsistent naming conventions and differences in data age or resolution. Methods: Lexicographic and geometric analysis is used for recognition. Well-known lexicographic methods implemented include Levenshtein-Damerau, bag-of-characters, Double Metaphone, Soundex, and (word and character)-N-grams. Geometrical implementations include 3D Fourier Descriptors, probability spheres, boolean overlap, simple feature comparison (e.g. eccentricity, volume) and rule-based techniques. Both analyses implement custom, domain-specific modules (e.g. emphasis differentiating left/right organ variants). Contour labels from 60 head and neck patients are used for cross-validation. Results: Mixed-lexicographical methods show an effective improvement in more than 10% of recognition attempts compared with a pure Levenshtein-Damerau approach when withholding 70% of the lexicon. Domain-specific and geometrical techniques further boost performance. Conclusions: DICOMautomaton allows users to recognize contours semi-automatically. As usage increases and the lexicon is filled with additional structures, performance improves, increasing the overall utility of the system.

  5. Technology assessment of automated atlas based segmentation in prostate bed contouring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sexton Tracy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate bed (PB contouring is time consuming and associated with inter-observer variability. We evaluated an automated atlas-based segmentation (AABS engine in its potential to reduce contouring time and inter-observer variability. Methods An atlas builder (AB manually contoured the prostate bed, rectum, left femoral head (LFH, right femoral head (RFH, bladder, and penile bulb of 75 post-prostatectomy cases to create an atlas according to the recent RTOG guidelines. 5 other Radiation Oncologists (RO and the AABS contoured 5 new cases. A STAPLE contour for each of the 5 patients was generated. All contours were anonymized and sent back to the 5 RO to be edited as clinically necessary. All contouring times were recorded. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC was used to evaluate the unedited- and edited- AABS and inter-observer variability among the RO. Descriptive statistics, paired t-tests and a Pearson correlation were performed. ANOVA analysis using logit transformations of DSC values was calculated to assess inter-observer variability. Results The mean time for manual contours and AABS was 17.5- and 14.1 minutes respectively (p = 0.003. The DSC results (mean, SD for the comparison of the unedited-AABS versus STAPLE contours for the PB (0.48, 0.17, bladder (0.67, 0.19, LFH (0.92, 0.01, RFH (0.92, 0.01, penile bulb (0.33, 0.25 and rectum (0.59, 0.11. The DSC results (mean, SD for the comparison of the edited-AABS versus STAPLE contours for the PB (0.67, 0.19, bladder (0.88, 0.13, LFH (0.93, 0.01, RFH (0.92, 0.01, penile bulb (0.54, 0.21 and rectum (0.78, 0.12. The DSC results (mean, SD for the comparison of the edited-AABS versus the expert panel for the PB (0.47, 0.16, bladder (0.67, 0.18, LFH (0.83, 0.18, RFH (0.83, 0.17, penile bulb (0.31, 0.23 and rectum (0.58, 0.09. The DSC results (mean, SD for the comparison of the STAPLE contours and the 5 RO are PB (0.78, 0.15, bladder (0.96, 0.02, left femoral head (0.87, 0

  6. Automatic Construction by Contour Crafting Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khorramshahi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Contour Crafting is a novel technology in construction industry based on 3D printing that uses robotics to construct free form building structures by repeatedly laying down layers of material such as concrete. It is actually an approach to scale up automatic fabrication from building small industrial parts to constructing buildings. However, there are little information about contour crafting (CC in current use; present paper aims to describe the operational steps of creating a whole building by the machine reviewing relevant literature. Furthermore, it will represent the advantages of CC usage compared to traditional construction methods, as well as its applicability in construction industry.

  7. TU-C-17A-04: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - A Supervised Framework for Automatic Contour Assessment for Radiotherapy Planning of Head- Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Kavanaugh, J; Tan, J; Dolly, S; Gay, H; Thorstad, W; Anastasio, M; Altman, M; Mutic, S; Li, H [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Precise contour delineation of tumor targets and critical structures from CT simulations is essential for accurate radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. However, manual and automatic delineation processes can be error prone due to limitations in imaging techniques and individual anatomic variability. Tedious and laborious manual verification is hence needed. This study develops a general framework for automatically assessing RT contours for head-neck cancer patients using geometric attribute distribution models (GADMs). Methods: Geometric attributes (centroid and volume) were computed from physician-approved RT contours of 29 head-neck patients. Considering anatomical correlation between neighboring structures, the GADM for each attribute was trained to characterize intra- and interpatient structure variations using principal component analysis. Each trained GADM was scalable and deformable, but constrained by the principal attribute variations of the training contours. A new hierarchical model adaptation algorithm was utilized to assess the RT contour correctness for a given patient. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to evaluate and tune system parameters for the training models. Results: Experiments utilizing training and non-training data sets with simulated contouring errors were conducted to validate the framework performance. Promising assessment results of contour normality/abnormality for the training contour-based data were achieved with excellent accuracy (0.99), precision (0.99), recall (0.83), and F-score (0.97), while corresponding values of 0.84, 0.96, 0.83, and 0.9 were achieved for the non-training data. Furthermore, the areas under the ROC curves were above 0.9, validating the accuracy of this test. Conclusion: The proposed framework can reliably identify contour normality/abnormality based upon intra- and inter-structure constraints derived from clinically-approved contours. It also allows physicians to

  8. Computer assisted holographic moire contouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical analyses and experimental results on holographic moire contouring on diffusely reflecting objects are presented. The sensitivity and limitations of the method are discussed. Particular emphasis is put on computer-assisted data retrieval, processing, and recording.

  9. Active contour segmentation in dynamic medical imaging: application to nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debreuve, Eric

    2000-01-01

    In emission imaging, nuclear medicine provides functional information about the organ of interest. In transmission imaging, it provides anatomical information whose goal may be the correction of physical phenomena that corrupt emission images. With both emission and transmission images, it is useful to know how to extract, either automatically or semi-automatically, the organs of interest and the body outline in the case of a large field of view. This is the aim of segmentation. We developed two active contour segmentation methods. They were implemented using level sets. The key point is the evolution velocity definition. First, we were interested in static transmission imaging of the thorax. The evolution velocity was heuristically defined and depended only on the acquired projections. The segmented transmission map was computed w/o reconstruction and could be advantageously used for attenuation correction. Then, we studied the segmentation of cardiac gated sequences. The developed space-time segmentation method results from the minimization of a variational criterion which takes into account the whole sequence. The computed segmentation could be used for calculating physiological parameters. As an illustration, we computed the ejection fraction. Finally, we exploited some level set properties to develop a non-rigid, non-parametric, and geometric registration method. We applied it for kinetic compensation of cardiac gated sequences. The registered images were then added together providing an image with noise characteristics similar to a cardiac static image but w/o motion-induced blurring. (author)

  10. SU-E-J-108: Solving the Chinese Postman Problem for Effective Contour Deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J; Zhang, L; Balter, P; Court, L [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhang, Y; Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a practical approach for accurate contour deformation when deformable image registration (DIR) is used for atlas-based segmentation or contour propagation in image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: A contour deformation approach was developed on the basis of 3D mesh operations. The 2D contours represented by a series of points in each slice were first converted to a 3D triangular mesh, which was deformed by the deformation vectors resulting from DIR. A set of parallel 2D planes then cut through the deformed 3D mesh, generating unordered points and line segments, which should be reorganized into a set of 2D contour points. It was realized that the reorganization problem was equivalent to solving the Chinese Postman Problem (CPP) by traversing a graph built from the unordered points with the least cost. Alternatively, deformation could be applied to a binary mask converted from the original contours. The deformed binary mask was then converted back into contours at the CT slice locations. We performed a qualitative comparison to validate the mesh-based approach against the image-based approach. Results: The DIR could considerably change the 3D mesh, making complicated 2D contour representations after deformation. CPP was able to effectively reorganize the points in 2D planes no matter how complicated the 2D contours were. The mesh-based approach did not require a post-processing of the contour, thus accurately showing the actual deformation in DIR. The mesh-based approach could keep some fine details and resulted in smoother contours than the image-based approach did, especially for the lung structure. Image-based approach appeared to over-process contours and suffered from image resolution limits. The mesh-based approach was integrated into in-house DIR software for use in routine clinic and research. Conclusion: We developed a practical approach for accurate contour deformation. The efficiency of this approach was demonstrated in both clinic and

  11. USGS Elevation Contours Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Elevation Contours service from The National Map (TNM) consists of contours generated for the conterminous United States from 1- and 1/3 arc-second...

  12. Radiodiagnosis of gastric diseases on the basis of thin contour findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubarev, A.V.; Zavodnov, V.Ya.; Sklyanskaya, O.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have analyzed the role of the thin contour in radiodiagnisis of various diseases of the gastric mucosa. Altogether 140 patients with various gastric diseases were investigated. Using X-ray examination of the stomach based on the common 2-phase method, thin contour images were obtained in 80 % of the cases. The results of the investigation have revealed direct correlation between the type of the thin contour and a morphological picture of the gastric mucosa in chronic gastritis. Early stomach cancer was characterized by the local absence or rearrangement of a usual pattern of the thin contour on stomach radiograms. It was difficult to defect single erosions or polyps with a diameter under 5 mm against a background of the gastric mucosa thin contour. Good visualization of stomach areolae, particularly those of a rough nodular type in the proximal part of the stomach was suggestive of an ulcerative lesion

  13. Evaluating the impact of a Canadian national anatomy and radiology contouring boot camp for radiation oncology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, Jasbir; D'Souza, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Tay, KengYeow; Fung, Kevin; Nichols, Anthony; Landis, Mark; Leung, Eric; Kassam, Zahra; Willmore, Katherine; D'Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy; Palma, David A

    2015-03-15

    Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course ("boot camp") designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, Pradiology in addition to enhancing their confidence and accuracy in contouring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. What Property of the Contour of a Deforming Region Biases Percepts toward Liquid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Kawabe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human observers can perceive the existence of a transparent surface from dynamic image deformation. They can also easily discriminate a transparent solid material such as plastic and glass from a transparent fluid one such as water and shampoo just by viewing them. However, the image information required for material discrimination of this sort is still unclear. A liquid changes its contour shape non-rigidly. We therefore examined whether additional properties of the contour of a deformation-defined region, which indicated contour non-rigidity, biased percepts of the region toward liquid materials. Our stimuli had a translating circular region wherein a natural texture image was deformed at the spatiotemporal deformation frequency that was optimal for the perception of a transparent layer. In Experiment 1, we dynamically deformed the contour of the circular region and found that large deformation of the contour biased the percept toward liquid. In Experiment 2, we manipulated the blurriness of the contour and observed that a strongly blurred contour biased percepts toward liquid. Taken together, the results suggest that a deforming region lacking a discrete contour biases percepts toward liquid.

  15. Contour junctions defined by dynamic image deformations enhance perceptual transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2017-11-01

    The majority of work on the perception of transparency has focused on static images with luminance-defined contour junctions, but recent work has shown that dynamic image sequences with dynamic image deformations also provide information about transparency. The present study demonstrates that when part of a static image is dynamically deformed, contour junctions at which deforming and nondeforming contours are connected facilitate the deformation-based perception of a transparent layer. We found that the impression of a transparent layer was stronger when a dynamically deforming area was adjacent to static nondeforming areas than when presented alone. When contour junctions were not formed at the dynamic-static boundaries, however, the impression of a transparent layer was not facilitated by the presence of static surrounding areas. The effect of the deformation-defined junctions was attenuated when the spatial pattern of luminance contrast at the junctions was inconsistent with the perceived transparency related to luminance contrast, while the effect did not change when the spatial luminance pattern was consistent with it. In addition, the results showed that contour completions across the junctions were required for the perception of a transparent layer. These results indicate that deformation-defined junctions that involve contour completion between deforming and nondeforming regions enhance the perception of a transparent layer, and that the deformation-based perceptual transparency can be promoted by the simultaneous presence of appropriately configured luminance and contrast-other features that can also by themselves produce the sensation of perceiving transparency.

  16. Gait Recognition Based on Outermost Contour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Liu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gait recognition aims to identify people by the way they walk. In this paper, a simple but e ective gait recognition method based on Outermost Contour is proposed. For each gait image sequence, an adaptive silhouette extraction algorithm is firstly used to segment the frames of the sequence and a series of postprocessing is applied to obtain the normalized silhouette images with less noise. Then a novel feature extraction method based on Outermost Contour is performed. Principal Component Analysis (PCA is adopted to reduce the dimensionality of the distance signals derived from the Outermost Contours of silhouette images. Then Multiple Discriminant Analysis (MDA is used to optimize the separability of gait features belonging to di erent classes. Nearest Neighbor (NN classifier and Nearest Neighbor classifier with respect to class Exemplars (ENN are used to classify the final feature vectors produced by MDA. In order to verify the e ectiveness and robustness of our feature extraction algorithm, we also use two other classifiers: Backpropagation Neural Network (BPNN and Support Vector Machine (SVM for recognition. Experimental results on a gait database of 100 people show that the accuracy of using MDA, BPNN and SVM can achieve 97.67%, 94.33% and 94.67%, respectively.

  17. Analysis of Cruising Fuel Conservation Capabilities of Multi-Mode Engine with the Third Contour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Drygin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis results from the patent search and review of domestic and foreign publications in variable cycle engines (VCE was created a classification of the possible schematic diagrams of VCE realizing three-stream engine technologies (the adaptive low pressure compressor (LPC with air extraction behind stages, FLADE compressor, various feeding types of extraction air to the flowing path of the engine, etc..To estimate a three-stream engine application as a part of the power-plant (PP efficiency, was chosen an adaptive LPC technology scheme with the third contour air bypass beyond the critical section of a basic jet nozzle for which a mathematical model (MM of the PP has been created on the basis of one-dimensional MM of the engine. The MM of the PP included 3D modeling results of the air inlet, the LPC with various air extractions to the third contour, and the jet nozzle taking into account the interaction between the basic stream and the third contour stream.The predicted performance of an air inlet have been used to estimate the changes in a total pressure restoration coefficient and an additional resistance coefficient along «a fluid contour» when air extraction is included in the third contour in several cruiser modes of flight.An integrated characteristic of the LPC has been received at various points and levels of air extraction to the third contour, and parameters of extracted air (depending on the point and amount of air extraction, and also on the fan operating mode have been calculated. When analyzing the obtained calculation results, the effect of pressure lines displacement to the right (towards the large reduced rates, growth of efficiency values, and also position displacement of its maximum value to the left (towards the descent reduced rates has been found.To estimate how air extraction of the third contour between the plates of an adjustable supersonic nozzle impacts on its aft deck resistance various parameters of

  18. Field-level financial assessment of contour prairie strips for enhancement of environmental quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, John C; Schulte, Lisa A; Liebman, Matthew; Helmers, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    The impacts of strategically located contour prairie strips on sediment and nutrient runoff export from watersheds maintained under an annual row crop production system have been studied at a long-term research site in central Iowa. Data from 2007 to 2011 indicate that the contour prairie strips utilized within row crop-dominated landscapes have greater than proportionate and positive effects on the functioning of biophysical systems. Crop producers and land management agencies require comprehensive information about the Best Management Practices with regard to performance efficacy, operational/management parameters, and the full range of financial parameters. Here, a farm-level financial model assesses the establishment, management, and opportunity costs of contour prairie strips within cropped fields. Annualized, depending on variable opportunity costs the 15-year present value cost of utilizing contour prairie strips ranges from $590 to $865 ha(-1) year(-1) ($240-$350 ac(-1) year(-1)). Expressed in the context of "treatment area" (e.g., in this study 1 ha of prairie treats 10 ha of crops), the costs of contour prairie strips can also be viewed as $59 to about $87 per treated hectare ($24-$35 ac(-1)). If prairie strips were under a 15-year CRP contract, total per acre cost to farmers would be reduced by over 85 %. Based on sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen export data from the related field studies and across low, medium, and high land rent scenarios, a megagram (Mg) of soil retained within the watershed costs between $7.79 and $11.46 mg(-1), phosphorus retained costs between $6.97 and $10.25 kg(-1), and nitrogen retained costs between $1.59 and $2.34 kg(-1). Based on overall project results, contour prairie strips may well become one of the key conservation practices used to sustain US Corn Belt agriculture in the decades to come.

  19. An Event-Related Potential Examination of Contour Integration Deficits in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela D Butler

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Perceptual organization, which refers to the ability to integrate fragments of stimuli to form a representation of a whole edge, part, or object, is impaired in schizophrenia. A contour integration paradigm, involving detection of a set of Gabor patches forming an oval contour pointing to the right or left embedded in a field of randomly oriented Gabors, has been developed for use in clinical trials of schizophrenia. The purpose of the present study was to assess contributions of early and later stages of processing to deficits in contour integration, as well as to develop an event-related potential (ERP analog of this task. Twenty-one patients with schizophrenia and 28 controls participated. The Gabor elements forming the contours were given a low or high degree of orientational jitter, making it either easy or difficult to identify the direction in which the contour was pointing. ERP results showed greater negative peaks at ~165 (N1 component and ~270 ms for the low-jitter versus the high-jitter contours, with a much greater difference between jitter conditions at 270 ms. This later ERP component was previously termed Ncl for closure negativity. Source localization identified the Ncl in the lateral occipital object recognition area. Patients showed a significant decrease in the Ncl, but not N1, compared to controls, and this was associated with impaired behavioral ability to identify contours. In addition, an earlier negative peak was found at ~120 ms (termed N120 that differentiated jitter conditions, had a dorsal stream source, and differed between patients and controls. Patients also showed a deficit in the dorsal stream sensory P1 component. These results are in accord with impairments in distributed circuitry contributing to perceptual organization deficits and provide an ERP analog to the behavioral contour integration task.

  20. Reinforcement Learning of Linking and Tracing Contours in Recurrent Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Tobias; Neumann, Heiko; Roelfsema, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    The processing of a visual stimulus can be subdivided into a number of stages. Upon stimulus presentation there is an early phase of feedforward processing where the visual information is propagated from lower to higher visual areas for the extraction of basic and complex stimulus features. This is followed by a later phase where horizontal connections within areas and feedback connections from higher areas back to lower areas come into play. In this later phase, image elements that are behaviorally relevant are grouped by Gestalt grouping rules and are labeled in the cortex with enhanced neuronal activity (object-based attention in psychology). Recent neurophysiological studies revealed that reward-based learning influences these recurrent grouping processes, but it is not well understood how rewards train recurrent circuits for perceptual organization. This paper examines the mechanisms for reward-based learning of new grouping rules. We derive a learning rule that can explain how rewards influence the information flow through feedforward, horizontal and feedback connections. We illustrate the efficiency with two tasks that have been used to study the neuronal correlates of perceptual organization in early visual cortex. The first task is called contour-integration and demands the integration of collinear contour elements into an elongated curve. We show how reward-based learning causes an enhancement of the representation of the to-be-grouped elements at early levels of a recurrent neural network, just as is observed in the visual cortex of monkeys. The second task is curve-tracing where the aim is to determine the endpoint of an elongated curve composed of connected image elements. If trained with the new learning rule, neural networks learn to propagate enhanced activity over the curve, in accordance with neurophysiological data. We close the paper with a number of model predictions that can be tested in future neurophysiological and computational studies

  1. Segmentation of urinary bladder in CT urography (CTU) using CLASS with enhanced contour conjoint procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    We are developing a computerized method for bladder segmentation in CT urography (CTU) for computeraided diagnosis of bladder cancer. A challenge for computerized bladder segmentation in CTU is that the bladder often contains regions filled with intravenous (IV) contrast and without contrast. Previously, we proposed a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) consisting of four stages: preprocessing and initial segmentation, 3D and 2D level set segmentation, and post-processing. In case the bladder is partially filled with contrast, CLASS segments the non-contrast (NC) region and the contrast (C) filled region separately and conjoins the contours with a Contour Conjoint Procedure (CCP). The CCP is not trivial. Inaccuracies in the NC and C contours may cause CCP to exclude portions of the bladder. To alleviate this problem, we implemented model-guided refinement to propagate the C contour if the level set propagation in the region stops prematurely due to substantial non-uniformity of the contrast. An enhanced CCP with regularized energies further propagates the conjoint contours to the correct bladder boundary. Segmentation performance was evaluated using 70 cases. For all cases, 3D hand segmented contours were obtained as reference standard, and computerized segmentation accuracy was evaluated in terms of average volume intersection %, average % volume error, and average minimum distance. With enhanced CCP, those values were 84.4±10.6%, 8.3±16.1%, 3.4±1.8 mm, respectively. With CLASS, those values were 74.6±13.1%, 19.6±18.6%, 4.4±2.2 mm, respectively. The enhanced CCP improved bladder segmentation significantly (p<0.001) for all three performance measures.

  2. Circular contour retrieval in real-world conditions by higher order statistics and an alternating-least squares algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiping; Marot, Julien; Fossati, Caroline; Bourennane, Salah

    2011-12-01

    In real-world conditions, contours are most often blurred in digital images because of acquisition conditions such as movement, light transmission environment, and defocus. Among image segmentation methods, Hough transform requires a computational load which increases with the number of noise pixels, level set methods also require a high computational load, and some other methods assume that the contours are one-pixel wide. For the first time, we retrieve the characteristics of multiple possibly concentric blurred circles. We face correlated noise environment, to get closer to real-world conditions. For this, we model a blurred circle by a few parameters--center coordinates, radius, and spread--which characterize its mean position and gray level variations. We derive the signal model which results from signal generation on circular antenna. Linear antennas provide the center coordinates. To retrieve the circle radii, we adapt the second-order statistics TLS-ESPRIT method for non-correlated noise environment, and propose a novel version of TLS-ESPRIT based on higher-order statistics for correlated noise environment. Then, we derive a least-squares criterion and propose an alternating least-squares algorithm to retrieve simultaneously all spread values of concentric circles. Experiments performed on hand-made and real-world images show that the proposed methods outperform the Hough transform and a level set method dedicated to blurred contours in terms of computational load. Moreover, the proposed model and optimization method provide the information of the contour grey level variations.

  3. Understanding Physiological and Degenerative Natural Vision Mechanisms to Define Contrast and Contour Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demongeot, Jacques; Fouquet, Yannick; Tayyab, Muhammad; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Background Dynamical systems like neural networks based on lateral inhibition have a large field of applications in image processing, robotics and morphogenesis modeling. In this paper, we will propose some examples of dynamical flows used in image contrasting and contouring. Methodology First we present the physiological basis of the retina function by showing the role of the lateral inhibition in the optical illusions and pathologic processes generation. Then, based on these biological considerations about the real vision mechanisms, we study an enhancement method for contrasting medical images, using either a discrete neural network approach, or its continuous version, i.e. a non-isotropic diffusion reaction partial differential system. Following this, we introduce other continuous operators based on similar biomimetic approaches: a chemotactic contrasting method, a viability contouring algorithm and an attentional focus operator. Then, we introduce the new notion of mixed potential Hamiltonian flows; we compare it with the watershed method and we use it for contouring. Conclusions We conclude by showing the utility of these biomimetic methods with some examples of application in medical imaging and computed assisted surgery. PMID:19547712

  4. Understanding physiological and degenerative natural vision mechanisms to define contrast and contour operators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Demongeot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dynamical systems like neural networks based on lateral inhibition have a large field of applications in image processing, robotics and morphogenesis modeling. In this paper, we will propose some examples of dynamical flows used in image contrasting and contouring. METHODOLOGY: First we present the physiological basis of the retina function by showing the role of the lateral inhibition in the optical illusions and pathologic processes generation. Then, based on these biological considerations about the real vision mechanisms, we study an enhancement method for contrasting medical images, using either a discrete neural network approach, or its continuous version, i.e. a non-isotropic diffusion reaction partial differential system. Following this, we introduce other continuous operators based on similar biomimetic approaches: a chemotactic contrasting method, a viability contouring algorithm and an attentional focus operator. Then, we introduce the new notion of mixed potential Hamiltonian flows; we compare it with the watershed method and we use it for contouring. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude by showing the utility of these biomimetic methods with some examples of application in medical imaging and computed assisted surgery.

  5. Pose Estimation using a Hierarchical 3D Representation of Contours and Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anders Glent; Kraft, Dirk; Kämäräinen, Joni-Kristian

    2013-01-01

    We present a system for detecting the pose of rigid objects using texture and contour information. From a stereo image view of a scene, a sparse hierarchical scene representation is reconstructed using an early cognitive vision system. We define an object model in terms of a simple context...

  6. Time contour expression of limited range phenomena on stack chart; Jugo chart jo deno kyokuchi gensho jikan contour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kametani, T

    1997-05-27

    Time contour expression of limited range phenomena on stack chart is examined for further improvement on the result of the ultimate interpretation in the seismic reflection survey. The policy is made clear from the beginning that local phenomena are to be discussed, and data prior CMP stacking is interpreted in detail. For this purpose, it is effective to make use of the time contour expression in the midpoint-offset plane simultaneously with the CMP and COP panels. For the review of data prior to CMP stacking, it is convenient to use the CMP (CDP) stacking chart in which the data is arranged methodically. In this chart, all the channels which are crude data prior to stacking are plotted on midpoint-offset coordinates, which plane is called the MOD (Midpoint Offset Domain) panel. Various panels can be chosen unrestrictedly, and their mutual relations can be easily grasped. When data points are given a time axis, they can be expressed in a time contour. Studies are conducted about the underground structure, multiple reflection paths divided by it, and characteristics of detour reflection attributable to faults. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  7. The Effect of Contouring Variability on Dosimetric Parameters for Brain Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, Julia; Dunscombe, Peter; Lau, Harold; Burns, Paul; Lim, Gerald; Liu, Hong-Wei; Nordal, Robert; Starreveld, Yves; Valev, Boris; Voroney, Jon-Paul; Spencer, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of contouring variation on stereotactic radiosurgery plan quality metrics for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Fourteen metastases, each contoured by 8 physicians, formed the basis of this study. A template-based dynamic conformal 5-arc dose distribution was developed for each of the 112 contours, and each dose distribution was applied to the 7 other contours in each patient set. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) plan quality metrics and the Paddick conformity index were calculated for each of the 896 combinations of dose distributions and contours. Results: The ratio of largest to smallest contour volume for each metastasis varied from 1.25 to 4.47, with a median value of 1.68 (n=8). The median absolute difference in RTOG conformity index between the value for the reference contour and the values for the alternative contours was 0.35. The variation of the range of conformity index for all contours for a given tumor varied with the tumor size. Conclusions: The high degree of interobserver contouring variation strongly suggests that peer review or consultation should be adopted to standardize tumor volume prescription. Observer confidence was not reflected in contouring consistency. The impact of contouring variability on plan quality metrics, used as criteria for clinical trial protocol compliance, was such that the category of compliance was robust to interobserver effects only 70% of the time

  8. Design of a Vibrotactile Vest for Contour Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A vibrotactile array is a promising human computer interface which could display graphical information to users in a tactile form. This paper presents the design and testing of an image contour display system with a vibrotactile array. The tactile image display system is attached to the back of the user. It converts visual graphics into 2D tactile images and allows subjects to feel the contours of objects through vibration stimulus. The system consists of a USB camera, 48 (6×8 vibrating motors and an embedded control system. The image is captured by the camera and the 2D contour is extracted and transformed into vibrotactile stimuli using a temporal-spatial dynamic coding method. Preliminary experiments were carried out and the optimal parameters of the vibrating time and duration were explored. To evaluate the feasibility and robustness of this vibration mode, letters were also tactilely displayed and the recognition rate about the alphabet letter display was investigated. It was shown that under the condition of no pre-training for the subjects, the recognition rate was 82%. Such a recognition rate is higher than that of the scanning mode (47.5% and the improved handwriting mode (76.8%. The results indicated that the proposed method was efficient in conveying the contour information to the visually impaired by means of vibrations.

  9. Fully-automated identification of fish species based on otolith contour: using short-time Fourier transform and discriminant analysis (STFT-DA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Nima; Loh, Kar Hoe; Kaur Dhillon, Sarinder; Chong, Ving Ching

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fish species may be identified based on their unique otolith shape or contour. Several pattern recognition methods have been proposed to classify fish species through morphological features of the otolith contours. However, there has been no fully-automated species identification model with the accuracy higher than 80%. The purpose of the current study is to develop a fully-automated model, based on the otolith contours, to identify the fish species with the high classification accuracy. Methods. Images of the right sagittal otoliths of 14 fish species from three families namely Sciaenidae, Ariidae, and Engraulidae were used to develop the proposed identification model. Short-time Fourier transform (STFT) was used, for the first time in the area of otolith shape analysis, to extract important features of the otolith contours. Discriminant Analysis (DA), as a classification technique, was used to train and test the model based on the extracted features. Results. Performance of the model was demonstrated using species from three families separately, as well as all species combined. Overall classification accuracy of the model was greater than 90% for all cases. In addition, effects of STFT variables on the performance of the identification model were explored in this study. Conclusions. Short-time Fourier transform could determine important features of the otolith outlines. The fully-automated model proposed in this study (STFT-DA) could predict species of an unknown specimen with acceptable identification accuracy. The model codes can be accessed at http://mybiodiversityontologies.um.edu.my/Otolith/ and https://peerj.com/preprints/1517/. The current model has flexibility to be used for more species and families in future studies.

  10. Female Facial Attractiveness Assessed from Three-Dimensional Contour Lines by University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwara Jirathamopas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three-dimensional (3D images could provide more accurate evaluation for facial attractiveness than two-dimensional (2D images. The 3D facial image could be simplified into gray scale 3D contour lines. Whether female facial attractiveness could be perceived in these simplified 3D facial contour lines should be determined. Methods: A series of 100 2D photographs (one frontal and two lateral views and 3D contour lines extracted from 3D facial images of females were projected onto a screen. Each image presentation lasted 5 s, and the evaluators marked their impression of each image’s facial attractiveness on a five-point Likert scale within 3 s of its presentation. The evaluation of the 3D contour lines was performed twice, 2 weeks apart. The evaluators were university students. Results: High consistency (r = 0.92 was found for the first and second evaluation of 3D facial contour lines for female facial attractiveness. The judgments of unattractive face were more consistent than the judgments of attractive face. Male students tended to give lower scores than female students in the evaluation of female facial attractiveness. Conclusions: Female facial attractiveness could be evaluated by 3D facial contour lines. 3D facial contour lines should be one of the key factors of facial attractiveness.

  11. Peripheral Contour Grouping and Saccade Targeting: The Role of Mirror Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Sassi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrating shape contours in the visual periphery is vital to our ability to locate objects and thus make targeted saccadic eye movements to efficiently explore our surroundings. We tested whether global shape symmetry facilitates peripheral contour integration and saccade targeting in three experiments, in which observers responded to a successful peripheral contour detection by making a saccade towards the target shape. The target contours were horizontally (Experiment 1 or vertically (Experiments 2 and 3 mirror symmetric. Observers responded by making a horizontal (Experiments 1 and 2 or vertical (Experiment 3 eye movement. Based on an analysis of the saccadic latency and accuracy, we conclude that the figure-ground cue of global mirror symmetry in the periphery has little effect on contour integration or on the speed and precision with which saccades are targeted towards objects. The role of mirror symmetry may be more apparent under natural viewing conditions with multiple objects competing for attention, where symmetric regions in the visual field can pre-attentively signal the presence of objects, and thus attract eye movements.

  12. SU-D-202-02: Quantitative Imaging: Correlation Between Image Feature Analysis and the Accuracy of Manually Drawn Contours On PET Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamichhane, N; Johnson, P; Chinea, F; Patel, V; Yang, F [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between image features and the accuracy of manually drawn target contours on synthetic PET images Methods: A digital PET phantom was used in combination with Monte Carlo simulation to create a set of 26 simulated PET images featuring a variety of tumor shapes and activity heterogeneity. These tumor volumes were used as a gold standard in comparisons with manual contours delineated by 10 radiation oncologist on the simulated PET images. Metrics used to evaluate segmentation accuracy included the dice coefficient, false positive dice, false negative dice, symmetric mean absolute surface distance, and absolute volumetric difference. Image features extracted from the simulated tumors consisted of volume, shape complexity, mean curvature, and intensity contrast along with five texture features derived from the gray-level neighborhood difference matrices including contrast, coarseness, busyness, strength, and complexity. Correlation between these features and contouring accuracy were examined. Results: Contour accuracy was reasonably well correlated with a variety of image features. Dice coefficient ranged from 0.7 to 0.90 and was correlated closely with contrast (r=0.43, p=0.02) and complexity (r=0.5, p<0.001). False negative dice ranged from 0.10 to 0.50 and was correlated closely with contrast (r=0.68, p<0.001) and complexity (r=0.66, p<0.001). Absolute volumetric difference ranged from 0.0002 to 0.67 and was correlated closely with coarseness (r=0.46, p=0.02) and complexity (r=0.49, p=0.008). Symmetric mean absolute difference ranged from 0.02 to 1 and was correlated closely with mean curvature (r=0.57, p=0.02) and contrast (r=0.6, p=0.001). Conclusion: The long term goal of this study is to assess whether contouring variability can be reduced by providing feedback to the practitioner based on image feature analysis. The results are encouraging and will be used to develop a statistical model which will enable a prediction of

  13. Orientation-Cue Invariant Population Responses to Contrast-Modulated and Phase-Reversed Contour Stimuli in Macaque V1 and V2

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xu; Gong, Hongliang; Yin, Jiapeng; Wang, Xiaochun; Pan, Yanxia; Zhang, Xian; Lu, Yiliang; Yang, Yupeng; Toth, Zoltan; Schiessl, Ingo; McLoughlin, Niall; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Visual scenes can be readily decomposed into a variety of oriented components, the processing of which is vital for object segregation and recognition. In primate V1 and V2, most neurons have small spatio-temporal receptive fields responding selectively to oriented luminance contours (first order), while only a subgroup of neurons signal non-luminance defined contours (second order). So how is the orientation of second-order contours represented at the population level in macaque V1 and V2? Here we compared the population responses in macaque V1 and V2 to two types of second-order contour stimuli generated either by modulation of contrast or phase reversal with those to first-order contour stimuli. Using intrinsic signal optical imaging, we found that the orientation of second-order contour stimuli was represented invariantly in the orientation columns of both macaque V1 and V2. A physiologically constrained spatio-temporal energy model of V1 and V2 neuronal populations could reproduce all the recorded population responses. These findings suggest that, at the population level, the primate early visual system processes the orientation of second-order contours initially through a linear spatio-temporal filter mechanism. Our results of population responses to different second-order contour stimuli support the idea that the orientation maps in primate V1 and V2 can be described as a spatial-temporal energy map. PMID:25188576

  14. Computerized liver volumetry on MRI by using 3D geodesic active contour segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hieu Trung; Karademir, Ibrahim; Oto, Aytekin; Suzuki, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to develop an accurate automated 3D liver segmentation scheme for measuring liver volumes on MRI. Our scheme for MRI liver volumetry consisted of three main stages. First, the preprocessing stage was applied to T1-weighted MRI of the liver in the portal venous phase to reduce noise and produce the boundary-enhanced image. This boundary-enhanced image was used as a speed function for a 3D fast-marching algorithm to generate an initial surface that roughly approximated the shape of the liver. A 3D geodesic-active-contour segmentation algorithm refined the initial surface to precisely determine the liver boundaries. The liver volumes determined by our scheme were compared with those manually traced by a radiologist, used as the reference standard. The two volumetric methods reached excellent agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.98) without statistical significance (p = 0.42). The average (± SD) accuracy was 99.4% ± 0.14%, and the average Dice overlap coefficient was 93.6% ± 1.7%. The mean processing time for our automated scheme was 1.03 ± 0.13 minutes, whereas that for manual volumetry was 24.0 ± 4.4 minutes (p volumetry based on our automated scheme agreed excellently with reference-standard volumetry, and it required substantially less completion time.

  15. Effectiveness of mesotherapy on body contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Ha; Kim, Deok Woo; Lee, Min Ah; Yoo, Sang Chul; Rhee, Seung Chul; Koo, Sang Hwan; Seol, Geun Hye; Cho, Eun Young

    2008-04-01

    Despite the increasing interest in mesotherapy as an alternative method for body contouring, there are few reports of its safety, efficacy, and mechanism of action. A clinical examination was performed to evaluate the efficacy of mesotherapy for body contouring. Twenty women were enrolled in this prospective, case-controlled study over a 12-week period. The authors injected a mixed solution (i.e., aminophylline, buflomedil, and lidocaine) into the superficial dermis of the medial aspect of one thigh weekly using a mechanical delivery gun. There was no treatment to the other thigh. The change in the fat level was evaluated by measuring the girth of the thighs and by computed tomographic scanning. The lipid profiles were checked to determine the effect of mesotherapy on lipid metabolism, and questionnaires were used to determine the satisfaction rate of the patients. The loss of thigh girth on the treated side was not significantly different from that of the untreated side. The computed tomographic scans showed no statistically significant difference in the cross-sectional area or thickness of the fat layer between each group. There were no statistically significant changes in the lipid profiles except for the triglyceride level. A questionnaire asking about the effect of mesotherapy indicated poor patient satisfaction. Mesotherapy is not an effective alternative treatment modality for body contouring.

  16. New method of contour image processing based on the formalism of spiral light beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volostnikov, Vladimir G.; Kishkin, S. A.; Kotova, S. P.

    2013-07-01

    The possibility of applying the mathematical formalism of spiral light beams to the problems of contour image recognition is theoretically studied. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed approach are evaluated; the results of numerical modelling are presented.

  17. Adaptive Pseudo Dilation for Gestalt Edge Grouping and Contour Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papari, Giuseppe; Petkov, Nicolai

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting object contours in natural images. In many cases, local luminance changes turn out to be stronger in textured areas than on object contours. Therefore, local edge features, which only look at a small neighborhood of each pixel, cannot be reliable indicators of

  18. Assessment and improvement of radiation oncology trainee contouring ability utilizing consensus-based penalty metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallock, Abhirami; Read, Nancy; D'Souza, David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and assess the feasibility of utilizing consensus-based penalty metrics for the purpose of critical structure and organ at risk (OAR) contouring quality assurance and improvement. A Delphi study was conducted to obtain consensus on contouring penalty metrics to assess trainee-generated OAR contours. Voxel-based penalty metric equations were used to score regions of discordance between trainee and expert contour sets. The utility of these penalty metric scores for objective feedback on contouring quality was assessed by using cases prepared for weekly radiation oncology radiation oncology trainee treatment planning rounds. In two Delphi rounds, six radiation oncology specialists reached agreement on clinical importance/impact and organ radiosensitivity as the two primary criteria for the creation of the Critical Structure Inter-comparison of Segmentation (CriSIS) penalty functions. Linear/quadratic penalty scoring functions (for over- and under-contouring) with one of four levels of severity (none, low, moderate and high) were assigned for each of 20 OARs in order to generate a CriSIS score when new OAR contours are compared with reference/expert standards. Six cases (central nervous system, head and neck, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, gynaecological and thoracic) then were used to validate 18 OAR metrics through comparison of trainee and expert contour sets using the consensus derived CriSIS functions. For 14 OARs, there was an improvement in CriSIS score post-educational intervention. The use of consensus-based contouring penalty metrics to provide quantitative information for contouring improvement is feasible.

  19. VT Data - Lidar 1ft Contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to contours derived from Quality Level 2 (QL2) Lidar 'collections' with a resolution (RESCLASS) of 0.7m. For an overview of...

  20. 47 CFR 73.6010 - Class A TV station protected contour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class A TV station protected contour. 73.6010... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6010 Class A TV station protected contour. (a) A Class A TV station will be protected from interference within the following predicted...

  1. What is in a contour map? A region-based logical formalization of contour semantics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usery, E. Lynn; Hahmann, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Contours maps (such as topographic maps) compress the information of a function over a two-dimensional area into a discrete set of closed lines that connect points of equal value (isolines), striking a fine balance between expressiveness and cognitive simplicity. They allow humans to perform many common sense reasoning tasks about the underlying function (e.g. elevation).

  2. The role of remote closure in the perception of occlusion at junctions and illusory contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Barbara J; Grove, Philip M; Layden, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. Perceived occlusion at T-junctions or illusory contours at implicit T-junctions are often modelled by using edge information without surface context. We explored the effect of closure on perceived occlusion at T-junctions. Two vertical lines separated by a gap each had six abutting horizontal lines on opposite sides forming T-junctions. These lines were either closed or not closed into pairs at the stem ends of the Ts. In experiment 1, closed T-junction stems gave a much stronger sense of occlusion at the vertical lines than unclosed ones, even though closure information was remote from the putative occlusion and local T-junction information remained constant. When the outer two T-junctions were converted to L-junctions, perceived occlusion considerably diminished. The effect of closure on illusory-contour strength for stimuli like those of experiment 1 but with the vertical lines omitted was explored in experiment 2. The two sets of horizontal lines, separated by a gap, were either closed or not closed into pairs at their outer ends. Illusory-contour strength along the vertical alignments was much greater for closed pairs. Line terminations on both sides of the gap enhanced illusory-contour strength, but whether they were collinear or not had little effect.

  3. New method of contour image processing based on the formalism of spiral light beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volostnikov, Vladimir G; Kishkin, S A; Kotova, S P

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of applying the mathematical formalism of spiral light beams to the problems of contour image recognition is theoretically studied. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed approach are evaluated; the results of numerical modelling are presented. (optical image processing)

  4. Evaluating the Impact of a Canadian National Anatomy and Radiology Contouring Boot Camp for Radiation Oncology Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaswal, Jasbir [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); D' Souza, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Tay, KengYeow [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Fung, Kevin; Nichols, Anthony [Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Victoria Hospital, London, Ontario (Canada); Landis, Mark [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Leung, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Kassam, Zahra [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care London, London, Ontario (Canada); Willmore, Katherine [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); D' Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Background: Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course (“boot camp”) designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. Methods: The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Results: Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, P<.001). Across all contoured structures, there was a 0.20 median improvement in students' average Dice score (P<.001). For individual structures, significant Dice improvements occurred in 10 structures. Residents self-reported an improved ability to contour OARs and interpret radiographs in all anatomic sites, 92% of students found the MDT format effective for their learning, and 93% found the boot camp

  5. Evaluating the Impact of a Canadian National Anatomy and Radiology Contouring Boot Camp for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaswal, Jasbir; D'Souza, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Tay, KengYeow; Fung, Kevin; Nichols, Anthony; Landis, Mark; Leung, Eric; Kassam, Zahra; Willmore, Katherine; D'Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy; Palma, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course (“boot camp”) designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. Methods: The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Results: Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, P<.001). Across all contoured structures, there was a 0.20 median improvement in students' average Dice score (P<.001). For individual structures, significant Dice improvements occurred in 10 structures. Residents self-reported an improved ability to contour OARs and interpret radiographs in all anatomic sites, 92% of students found the MDT format effective for their learning, and 93% found the boot camp

  6. Contour entropy: a new determinant of perceiving ground or a hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Barbara J; Grove, Philip M

    2011-06-01

    Figure-ground perception is typically described as seeing one surface occluding another. Figure properties, not ground properties, are considered the significant factors. In scenes, however, a near surface will often occlude multiple contours and surfaces, often at different depths, producing alignments that are improbable except under conditions of occlusion. We thus hypothesized that unrelated (high entropy) lines would tend to appear as ground in a figure-ground paradigm more often than similarly aligned ordered (low entropy) lines. We further hypothesized that for lines spanning a closed area, high line entropy should increase the hole-like appearance of that area. These predictions were confirmed in three experiments. The probability that patterned rectangles were seen as ground when alternated with blank rectangles increased with pattern entropy. A single rectangular shape appeared more hole-like when the entropy of the enclosed contours increased. Furthermore, these same contours, with the outline shape removed, gave rise to bounding illusory contours whose strength increased with contour entropy. We conclude that figure-ground and hole perception can be determined by properties of ground in the absence of any figural shape, or surround, factors.

  7. Correlations between contouring similarity metrics and simulated treatment outcome for prostate radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, D.; Jameson, M. G.; Dowling, J. A.; Ebert, M. A.; Greer, P. B.; Kennedy, A. M.; Watt, S.; Holloway, L. C.

    2018-02-01

    Many similarity metrics exist for inter-observer contouring variation studies, however no correlation between metric choice and prostate cancer radiotherapy dosimetry has been explored. These correlations were investigated in this study. Two separate trials were undertaken, the first a thirty-five patient cohort with three observers, the second a five patient dataset with ten observers. Clinical and planning target volumes (CTV and PTV), rectum, and bladder were independently contoured by all observers in each trial. Structures were contoured on T2-weighted MRI and transferred onto CT following rigid registration for treatment planning in the first trial. Structures were contoured directly on CT in the second trial. STAPLE and majority voting volumes were generated as reference gold standard volumes for each structure for the two trials respectively. VMAT treatment plans (78 Gy to PTV) were simulated for observer and gold standard volumes, and dosimetry assessed using multiple radiobiological metrics. Correlations between contouring similarity metrics and dosimetry were calculated using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. No correlations were observed between contouring similarity metrics and dosimetry for CTV within either trial. Volume similarity correlated most strongly with radiobiological metrics for PTV in both trials, including TCPPoisson (ρ  =  0.57, 0.65), TCPLogit (ρ  =  0.39, 0.62), and EUD (ρ  =  0.43, 0.61) for each respective trial. Rectum and bladder metric correlations displayed no consistency for the two trials. PTV volume similarity was found to significantly correlate with rectum normal tissue complication probability (ρ  =  0.33, 0.48). Minimal to no correlations with dosimetry were observed for overlap or boundary contouring metrics. Future inter-observer contouring variation studies for prostate cancer should incorporate volume similarity to provide additional insights into dosimetry during analysis.

  8. Contouring a guide to the analysis and display of spatial data

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    This unique book is the key to computer contouring, exploring in detail the practice and principles using a personal computer. Contouring allows a three dimensional view in two dimensions and is a fundamental technique to represent spatial data. All aspects of this type of representation are covered including data preparation, selecting contour intervals, interpolation and griding, computing volumes and output and display. Formulated for both the novice and the experienced user, this book initially conducts the reader through a step by step explanation of PC software and its application to per

  9. An approach to contouring the dorsal vagal complex for radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Steen, Lillie; Amdur, Robert J., E-mail: amdurr@shands.ufl.edu

    2016-04-01

    Multiple studies suggest that radiation dose to the area of the brainstem called the “dorsal vagal complex (DVC)” influences the frequency of nausea and vomiting during radiotherapy. The purpose of this didactic article is to describe the step-by-step process that we use to contour the general area of the DVC on axial computed tomography (CT) images as would be done for radiotherapy planning. The contouring procedure that we describe for contouring the area of the DVC is useful to medical dosimetrists and radiation oncologists.

  10. Standardization of surgical techniques used in facial bone contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Sung

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of facial bone contouring surgery for cosmetic purposes, various surgical methods have been used to improve the aesthetics of facial contours. In general, by standardizing the surgical techniques, it is possible to decrease complication rates and achieve more predictable surgical outcomes, thereby increasing patient satisfaction. The technical strategies used by the author to standardize facial bone contouring procedures are introduced here. The author uses various pre-manufactured surgical tools and hardware for facial bone contouring. During a reduction malarplasty or genioplasty procedure, double-bladed reciprocating saws and pre-bent titanium plates customized for the zygomatic body, arch and chin are used. Various guarded oscillating saws are used for mandibular angloplasty. The use of double-bladed saws and pre-bent plates to perform reduction malarplasty reduces the chances of post-operative asymmetry or under- or overcorrection of the zygoma contours due to technical faults. Inferior alveolar nerve injury and post-operative jawline asymmetry or irregularity can be reduced by using a guarded saw during mandibular angloplasty. For genioplasty, final placement of the chin in accordance with preoperative quantitative analysis can be easily performed with pre-bent plates, and a double-bladed saw allows more procedural accuracy during osteotomies. Efforts by the surgeon to avoid unintentional faults are key to achieving satisfactory results and reducing the incidence of complications. The surgical techniques described in this study in conjunction with various in-house surgical tools and modified hardware can be used to standardize techniques to achieve aesthetically gratifying outcomes. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Purse-string platysmaplasty: the third dimension for neck contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Richard D

    2005-11-01

    Techniques and concepts for treatment of the aging neck have been evolving since the late 1960s and rely on two-dimensional anterior approximation with lateral imbrication of the platysma with or without submental fat reduction, However, the medial approximation can sometimes give a "boxy" appearance to the anterior neck, especially if anterior shifting of the platysma recurs after platysmaplasty with laxity redeveloping in this midline location. The "purse-string" platysmaplasty (PSP) is a new concept in neck contouring that facilitates an enhanced definition for the cervicomandibular transition to better simulate the well-defined contour of this transition that is present in youth. It aids in the contouring of difficult poorly defined necks and in male patients. The PSP adds a "third dimension" to neck recontouring by invaginating the platysma with a plication suture and pexing the platysma, without incising it, to deeper neck fascia with a technique that adds support and definition to the neck contour. The PSP can be performed in patients undergoing a full rhytidectomy as well as in individuals having isolated neck rejuvenation. The PSP is especially helpful in rejuvenating the male lower face and neck because of the relatively heavier deeper structures of the male neck and the need to enhance definition along the jawline.

  12. A method for automatically constructing the initial contour of the common carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Omran

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose a novel method to automatically set the initial contour that is used by the Active contours algorithm.The proposed method exploits the accumulative intensity profiles to locate the points on the arterial wall. The intensity profiles of sections that intersect the artery show distinguishable characterstics that make it possible to recognize them from the profiles of sections that do not intersect the artery walls. The proposed method is applied on ultrasound images of the transverse section of the common carotid artery, but it can be extended to be used on the images of the longitudinal section. The intensity profiles are classified using Support vector machine algorithm, and the results of different kernels are compared. The extracted features used for the classification are basically statistical features of the intensity profiles. The echogenicity of the arterial lumen, and gives the profiles that intersect the artery a special shape that helps recognizing these profiles from other general profiles.The outlining of the arterial walls may seem a classic task in image processing. However, most of the methods used to outline the artery start from a manual, or semi-automatic, initial contour.The proposed method is highly appreciated in automating the entire process of automatic artery detection and segmentation.

  13. Contour Detection for UAV-Based Cadastral Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Crommelinck

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs provide a flexible and low-cost solution for the acquisition of high-resolution data. The potential of high-resolution UAV imagery to create and update cadastral maps is being increasingly investigated. Existing procedures generally involve substantial fieldwork and many manual processes. Arguably, multiple parts of UAV-based cadastral mapping workflows could be automated. Specifically, as many cadastral boundaries coincide with visible boundaries, they could be extracted automatically using image analysis methods. This study investigates the transferability of gPb contour detection, a state-of-the-art computer vision method, to remotely sensed UAV images and UAV-based cadastral mapping. Results show that the approach is transferable to UAV data and automated cadastral mapping: object contours are comprehensively detected at completeness and correctness rates of up to 80%. The detection quality is optimal when the entire scene is covered with one orthoimage, due to the global optimization of gPb contour detection. However, a balance between high completeness and correctness is hard to achieve, so a combination with area-based segmentation and further object knowledge is proposed. The localization quality exhibits the usual dependency on ground resolution. The approach has the potential to accelerate the process of general boundary delineation during the creation and updating of cadastral maps.

  14. Contour Propagation With Riemannian Elasticity Regularization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Troels; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Sapru, W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Adaptive techniques allow for correction of spatial changes during the time course of the fractionated radiotherapy. Spatial changes include tumor shrinkage and weight loss, causing tissue deformation and residual positional errors even after translational and rotational image...... the planning CT onto the rescans and correcting to reflect actual anatomical changes. For deformable registration, a free-form, multi-level, B-spline deformation model with Riemannian elasticity, penalizing non-rigid local deformations, and volumetric changes, was used. Regularization parameters was defined...... on the original delineation and tissue deformation in the time course between scans form a better starting point than rigid propagation. There was no significant difference of locally and globally defined regularization. The method used in the present study suggests that deformed contours need to be reviewed...

  15. Joint classification and contour extraction of large 3D point clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Timo; Wegner, Jan D.; Schindler, Konrad

    2017-08-01

    We present an effective and efficient method for point-wise semantic classification and extraction of object contours of large-scale 3D point clouds. What makes point cloud interpretation challenging is the sheer size of several millions of points per scan and the non-grid, sparse, and uneven distribution of points. Standard image processing tools like texture filters, for example, cannot handle such data efficiently, which calls for dedicated point cloud labeling methods. It turns out that one of the major drivers for efficient computation and handling of strong variations in point density, is a careful formulation of per-point neighborhoods at multiple scales. This allows, both, to define an expressive feature set and to extract topologically meaningful object contours. Semantic classification and contour extraction are interlaced problems. Point-wise semantic classification enables extracting a meaningful candidate set of contour points while contours help generating a rich feature representation that benefits point-wise classification. These methods are tailored to have fast run time and small memory footprint for processing large-scale, unstructured, and inhomogeneous point clouds, while still achieving high classification accuracy. We evaluate our methods on the semantic3d.net benchmark for terrestrial laser scans with >109 points.

  16. A historical note on illusory contours in shadow writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzani, Stefano; Marino, Barbara F M

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that illusory contours have been first displayed and discussed by Schumann (1900, Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane 23 1-32). Here we show that, before him, Jastrow (1899, Popular Science Monthly 54 299-312) produced illusory contours consisting of a shadow word. A brief history of shadow writing in psychological literature from Jastrow to Brunswik is presented, in which the contributions of Pillsbury, Warren, Koffka, and Benussi are examined.

  17. A framework for automated contour quality assurance in radiation therapy including adaptive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, M B; Kavanaugh, J A; Wooten, H O; Green, O L; DeWees, T A; Gay, H; Thorstad, W L; Li, H; Mutic, S

    2015-01-01

    Contouring of targets and normal tissues is one of the largest sources of variability in radiation therapy treatment plans. Contours thus require a time intensive and error-prone quality assurance (QA) evaluation, limitations which also impair the facilitation of adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Here, an automated system for contour QA is developed using historical data (the ‘knowledge base’). A pilot study was performed with a knowledge base derived from 9 contours each from 29 head-and-neck treatment plans. Size, shape, relative position, and other clinically-relevant metrics and heuristically derived rules are determined. Metrics are extracted from input patient data and compared against rules determined from the knowledge base; a computer-learning component allows metrics to evolve with more input data, including patient specific data for ART. Nine additional plans containing 42 unique contouring errors were analyzed. 40/42 errors were detected as were 9 false positives. The results of this study imply knowledge-based contour QA could potentially enhance the safety and effectiveness of RT treatment plans as well as increase the efficiency of the treatment planning process, reducing labor and the cost of therapy for patients. (paper)

  18. Modeling Perceptual Grouping and Figure-Ground Segregation by Means of Active Reentrant Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf; Tononi, Giulio; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1991-01-01

    The segmentation of visual scenes is a fundamental process of early vision, but the underlying neural mechanisms are still largely unknown. Theoretical considerations as well as neurophysiological findings point to the importance in such processes of temporal correlations in neuronal activity. In a previous model, we showed that reentrant signaling among rhythmically active neuronal groups can correlate responses along spatially extended contours. We now have modified and extended this model to address the problems of perceptual grouping and figure-ground segregation in vision. A novel feature is that the efficacy of the connections is allowed to change on a fast time scale. This results in active reentrant connections that amplify the correlations among neuronal groups. The responses of the model are able to link the elements corresponding to a coherent figure and to segregate them from the background or from another figure in a way that is consistent with the so-called Gestalt laws.

  19. Modeling perceptual grouping and figure-ground segregation by means of active reentrant connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, O; Tononi, G; Edelman, G M

    1991-01-01

    The segmentation of visual scenes is a fundamental process of early vision, but the underlying neural mechanisms are still largely unknown. Theoretical considerations as well as neurophysiological findings point to the importance in such processes of temporal correlations in neuronal activity. In a previous model, we showed that reentrant signaling among rhythmically active neuronal groups can correlate responses along spatially extended contours. We now have modified and extended this model to address the problems of perceptual grouping and figure-ground segregation in vision. A novel feature is that the efficacy of the connections is allowed to change on a fast time scale. This results in active reentrant connections that amplify the correlations among neuronal groups. The responses of the model are able to link the elements corresponding to a coherent figure and to segregate them from the background or from another figure in a way that is consistent with the so-called Gestalt laws.

  20. Contour extraction of echocardiographic images based on pre-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Zinah Rajab; Rahmat, Rahmita Wirza; Abdullah, Lili Nurliyana [Department of Multimedia, Faculty of Computer Science and Information Technology, Department of Computer and Communication Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering University Putra Malaysia 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zamrin, D M [Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, National University of Malaysia, 56000 Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saripan, M Iqbal

    2011-02-15

    In this work we present a technique to extract the heart contours from noisy echocardiograph images. Our technique is based on improving the image before applying contours detection to reduce heavy noise and get better image quality. To perform that, we combine many pre-processing techniques (filtering, morphological operations, and contrast adjustment) to avoid unclear edges and enhance low contrast of echocardiograph images, after implementing these techniques we can get legible detection for heart boundaries and valves movement by traditional edge detection methods.

  1. Contour extraction of echocardiographic images based on pre-processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Zinah Rajab; Rahmat, Rahmita Wirza; Abdullah, Lili Nurliyana; Zamrin, D M; Saripan, M Iqbal

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a technique to extract the heart contours from noisy echocardiograph images. Our technique is based on improving the image before applying contours detection to reduce heavy noise and get better image quality. To perform that, we combine many pre-processing techniques (filtering, morphological operations, and contrast adjustment) to avoid unclear edges and enhance low contrast of echocardiograph images, after implementing these techniques we can get legible detection for heart boundaries and valves movement by traditional edge detection methods.

  2. Segmenting Bone Parts for Bone Age Assessment using Point Distribution Model and Contour Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Singh Mann, Kulwinder, Dr.

    2018-01-01

    Bone age assessment (BAA) is a task performed on radiographs by the pediatricians in hospitals to predict the final adult height, to diagnose growth disorders by monitoring skeletal development. For building an automatic bone age assessment system the step in routine is to do image pre-processing of the bone X-rays so that features row can be constructed. In this research paper, an enhanced point distribution algorithm using contours has been implemented for segmenting bone parts as per well-established procedure of bone age assessment that would be helpful in building feature row and later on; it would be helpful in construction of automatic bone age assessment system. Implementation of the segmentation algorithm shows high degree of accuracy in terms of recall and precision in segmenting bone parts from left hand X-Rays.

  3. An evaluation of the contouring abilities of medical dosimetry students for the anatomy of a prostate cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common diseases treated in a radiation oncology department. One of the major predictors of the treatment outcome and patient side effects is the accuracy of the anatomical contours for the treatment plan. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine which anatomical structures are most often contoured correctly and incorrectly by medical dosimetry students. The author also wanted to discover whether a review of the contouring rules would increase contouring accuracy. To achieve this, a male computed tomography dataset consisting of 72 transverse slices was sent to students for contouring. The students were instructed to import this dataset into their treatment planning system and contour the following structures: skin, bladder, rectum, prostate, penile bulb, seminal vesicles, left femoral head, and right femoral head. Upon completion of the contours, the contour file was evaluated against a “gold standard” contour set using StructSure software (Standard Imaging, Inc). A review of the initial contour results was conducted and then students were instructed to contour the dataset a second time. The results of this study showed significant differences between contouring sessions. These results and the standardization of contouring rules should benefit all individuals who participate in the treatment planning of cancer patients.

  4. The inter-relationship between the periodontium and contours of artificial crowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fareed, K.; Omar, R.

    1989-01-01

    The subject of axial contour of artificial crowns has and continues to be highly controversial. Much of the controversy centers arounrj whether the gingival sulcus is really in need of protection from buccal and/or lingual convexities, or whether a flatter emergence profile affords self cleansing muscle action. Evidence is reviewed in this part which suggests that overcontouring is probably more detrimental to gingival health than undercontouring. The critical role played by proper tooth reduction in attaining correct axial contour is shown and a rationale presented for the important interplay between preparation design, properties of the restorative materials to be employed and physiologic contour. (author)

  5. Calf Contouring with Endoscopic Fascial Release, Calf Implant, and Structural Fat Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Karacaoglu, MD

    2013-08-01

    Conclusions: A novel endoscopic approach for lower leg contouring is discussed. Endoscopic fasciotomy technique with calf implant and structural fat grafting for improved lower leg aesthetics is a simple, effective, reliable, and predictable technique for calf contouring.

  6. Robust iterative learning contouring controller with disturbance observer for machine tool feed drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simba, Kenneth Renny; Bui, Ba Dinh; Msukwa, Mathew Renny; Uchiyama, Naoki

    2018-04-01

    In feed drive systems, particularly machine tools, a contour error is more significant than the individual axial tracking errors from the view point of enhancing precision in manufacturing and production systems. The contour error must be within the permissible tolerance of given products. In machining complex or sharp-corner products, large contour errors occur mainly owing to discontinuous trajectories and the existence of nonlinear uncertainties. Therefore, it is indispensable to design robust controllers that can enhance the tracking ability of feed drive systems. In this study, an iterative learning contouring controller consisting of a classical Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller and disturbance observer is proposed. The proposed controller was evaluated experimentally by using a typical sharp-corner trajectory, and its performance was compared with that of conventional controllers. The results revealed that the maximum contour error can be reduced by about 37% on average. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Technical report on the surface reconstruction of stacked contours by using the commercial software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Sun; Chung, Min Suk; Hwang, Sung Bae; Park, Jin Seo

    2007-03-01

    After drawing and stacking contours of a structure, which is identified in the serially sectioned images, three-dimensional (3D) image can be made by surface reconstruction. Usually, software is composed for the surface reconstruction. In order to compose the software, medical doctors have to acquire the help of computer engineers. So in this research, surface reconstruction of stacked contours was tried by using commercial software. The purpose of this research is to enable medical doctors to perform surface reconstruction to make 3D images by themselves. The materials of this research were 996 anatomic images (1 mm intervals) of left lower limb, which were made by serial sectioning of a cadaver. On the Adobe Photoshop, contours of 114 anatomic structures were drawn, which were exported to Adobe Illustrator files. On the Maya, contours of each anatomic structure were stacked. On the Rhino, superoinferior lines were drawn along all stacked contours to fill quadrangular surfaces between contours. On the Maya, the contours were deleted. 3D images of 114 anatomic structures were assembled with their original locations preserved. With the surface reconstruction technique, developed in this research, medical doctors themselves could make 3D images of the serially sectioned images such as CTs and MRIs.

  8. Mandibular marginal contouring in oriental aesthetic surgery: refined surgical concept and operative procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kaneshige; Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-05-01

    In aesthetic mandibular contouring surgery, which is often conducted in Asians, the operative procedure is thought to deliver a more aesthetic mandibular shape by means of contouring conducted as a whole from the ramus to the symphysis. The authors describe the refined concept and operative procedures of mandibular marginal contouring. For the 7-year period from 2004 to 2011, mandibular marginal contouring has been used in 57 consecutive series of Japanese subjects. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 33 years, and the subjects included 15 men and 42 women. The surgery was carried out by cutting off the protruding deformed mandibular margin from the ramus to the symphysis. In 53 of 57 cases, the focus was on angle contouring. Concomitant genioplasty by horizontal osteotomy of the chin was conducted in 42 of 57 cases (recession, advancement, shortening, elongation, and correction of the shift variously). In 22 materials exhibiting bulk around the mandibular, the ramus to the body was excised sagittally and thinned. In all the patients, mandibular marginal contouring from the ramus to the symphysis was completed. Partial masseter muscle resection was conducted in 11 of 57 cases. Mandibular contouring effectively achieved a highly satisfactory result in all cases. The upper portion of the peripheral branch of the trunk of the mental nerve was dissected by an electric scalpel in 1 case but sutured immediately using an 8-0 nylon stitch. Transient palsy of the mental nerve was noticed in a few cases but subsided in 1 to 2 months. No particular complications were encountered. No secondary revision was required in this series. In mandibular angle plasty, mandibular marginal contouring from the ramus to the symphysis should be carried out by cutting off the angle keeping in mind the entire mandibular shape. This concept and the procedure can deliver greater patient satisfaction.

  9. Pre- and postoperative quantitative analysis of contour abnormalities in Graves upper eyelid retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Sara F T; Milbratz, Gherusa H; Garcia, Denny M; Devoto, Martin; Guilherme Neto, H; Mörschbächer, Ricardo; Pereira, Filipe J; Cruz, Antonio A V

    2012-01-01

    One of the most common problems of the surgical management of Graves upper eyelid retraction is the occurrence of eyelid contour abnormalities. In the present study, the postoperative contour of a large sample of eyelids of patients with Graves orbitopathy was measured. The postoperative upper eyelid contour of 62 eyes of 43 patients with Graves orbitopathy was subjectively classified by 3 experienced surgeons in 3 categories: poor, fair, and good. The shape of the eyelid contours in each category was then measured with a recently developed custom-made software by measuring multiple midpupil eyelid distances each 15° along the palpebral fissure. The upper eyelid contour of 60 normal subjects was also quantified as a control group. The mean ratio between the sum of the lateral and medial midpupil eyelid distances (lateral/medial ratio) was 1.10 ± 0.11 standard deviation in controls and 1.15 ± 0.13 standard deviation in patients. Postoperatively, the mean midpupil eyelid distance at 90° was 4.16 ± 1.13 mm standard deviation. The distribution lateral/medial ratios of the eyelids judged as having good contours was similar to the distribution of the controls with a modal value centered on the interval between 1.0 and 1.10. The distribution of lateral/medial ratios of the eyelids judged as having poor contour was bimodal, with eyelids with low and high lateral/medial ratios. Low lateral/medial ratios occurred when there was a lateral overcorrection, giving the eyelid a flat or a medial ptosis appearance. High lateral/medial ratios were due to a central or medial overcorrection or a lateral peak maintenance. Postoperative upper eyelid contour abnormalities can be quantified by comparing the sum of multiple midpupil eyelid distances of the lateral and medial sectors of the eyelid. Low and high lateral/medial ratios are anomalous and judged as unpleasant.

  10. SU-E-J-93: Development of Pre-Contoured Human Model Library in DICOM-RT Format for the Epidemiological Study of the Radiotherapy Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D beams-eye-view from the conventional simulator. To analyze the outcomes of such treatments for radiation late effects, 3D computational human models are often used in commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, several underlying difficulties such as time-consuming manual delineation procedures of a large number of structures in the model have always limited its applications. Primary objective of this work was to develop a human model library for the epidemiological study by converting 3D-surface model organs to DICOM-RT format (DICOM-RT structure) using an in-house built software. We converted the ICRP reference human models to DICOM-RT models, which can be readily adopted for various dose calculations. Methods: MATLAB based code were utilized to convert the contour drawings extracted in text-format from the 3D graphic-tool, Rhinoceros into DICOM-RT structure format for 50 different organs of each model using a 16GB dual-core processor. The conversion periods were measured for each DICOM-RT models, and the reconstructed structure volumes were validated against the original 3D-surface models in the TPS. Ten reference hybrid whole-body models (8-pediatric and 2-adults) were automatically processed to create DICOM-RT computational human model library. Results: Mean contour conversion period was found to be 580 (N=2) and 394.5 (N=8) seconds for 50 organs in the adult and pediatric models respectively. A good agreement for large organs (NRMSD <1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD <7.7%) was also observed between the original volumes and corresponding DICOM-RT structure volumes of the organs. Conclusion: The ICRP reference human models were converted into DICOM-RT format to support the epidemiological study using a large cohort of conventional radiotherapy patients. Due to its DICOM-compatibility, the library may be implemented to many other different

  11. SU-E-J-93: Development of Pre-Contoured Human Model Library in DICOM-RT Format for the Epidemiological Study of the Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Jung, J [East Carolina Univ, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D beams-eye-view from the conventional simulator. To analyze the outcomes of such treatments for radiation late effects, 3D computational human models are often used in commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, several underlying difficulties such as time-consuming manual delineation procedures of a large number of structures in the model have always limited its applications. Primary objective of this work was to develop a human model library for the epidemiological study by converting 3D-surface model organs to DICOM-RT format (DICOM-RT structure) using an in-house built software. We converted the ICRP reference human models to DICOM-RT models, which can be readily adopted for various dose calculations. Methods: MATLAB based code were utilized to convert the contour drawings extracted in text-format from the 3D graphic-tool, Rhinoceros into DICOM-RT structure format for 50 different organs of each model using a 16GB dual-core processor. The conversion periods were measured for each DICOM-RT models, and the reconstructed structure volumes were validated against the original 3D-surface models in the TPS. Ten reference hybrid whole-body models (8-pediatric and 2-adults) were automatically processed to create DICOM-RT computational human model library. Results: Mean contour conversion period was found to be 580 (N=2) and 394.5 (N=8) seconds for 50 organs in the adult and pediatric models respectively. A good agreement for large organs (NRMSD <1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD <7.7%) was also observed between the original volumes and corresponding DICOM-RT structure volumes of the organs. Conclusion: The ICRP reference human models were converted into DICOM-RT format to support the epidemiological study using a large cohort of conventional radiotherapy patients. Due to its DICOM-compatibility, the library may be implemented to many other different

  12. Is interpolation cognitively encapsulated? Measuring the effects of belief on Kanizsa shape discrimination and illusory contour formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Brian P.; Lu, Hongjing; Papathomas, Thomas V.; Silverstein, Steven M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Contour interpolation is a perceptual process that fills-in missing edges on the basis of how surrounding edges (inducers) are spatiotemporally related. Cognitive encapsulation refers to the degree to which perceptual mechanisms act in isolation from beliefs, expectations, and utilities (Pylyshyn, 1999). Is interpolation encapsulated from belief? We addressed this question by having subjects discriminate briefly-presented, partially-visible fat and thin shapes, the edges of which either induced or did not induce illusory contours (relatable and non-relatable conditions, respectively). Half the trials in each condition incorporated task-irrelevant distractor lines, known to disrupt the filling-in of contours. Half of the observers were told that the visible parts of the shape belonged to a single thing (group strategy); the other half were told that the visible parts were disconnected (ungroup strategy). It was found that distractor lines strongly impaired performance in the relatable condition, but minimally in the non-relatable condition; that strategy did not alter the effects of the distractor lines for either the relatable or non-relatable stimuli; and that cognitively grouping relatable fragments improved performance whereas cognitively grouping non-relatable fragments did not. These results suggest that 1) filling-in effects during illusory contour formation cannot be easily removed via strategy; 2) filling-in effects cannot be easily manufactured from stimuli that fail to elicit interpolation; and 3) actively grouping fragments can readily improve discrimination performance, but only when those fragments form interpolated contours. Taken together, these findings indicate that discriminating filled-in shapes depends on strategy but filling-in itself may be encapsulated from belief. PMID:22440789

  13. Complications following body contouring surgery after massive weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasanbegovic, Emir; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a way to achieve lasting weight loss in the obese. Body contouring surgery seeks to alleviate some of the discomfort caused by the excessive loose skin following massive weight loss. Higher complication rates are described in this type of surgery when done post......-bariatric. The purpose of this article is to compare complication rates of body contouring surgery when performed on patients with weight loss due to bariatric surgery compared to patients who lost weight due to dietary changes and/or exercise....

  14. Brightness Alteration with Interweaving Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roncato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromatic induction is observed whenever the perceived colour of a target surface shifts towards the hue of a neighbouring surface. Some vivid manifestations may be seen in a white background where thin coloured lines have been drawn (assimilation or when lines of different colours are collinear (neon effect or adjacent (watercolour to each other. This study examines a particular colour induction that manifests in concomitance with an opposite effect of colour saturation (or anti-spread. The two phenomena can be observed when a repetitive pattern is drawn in which outline thin contours intercept wider contours or surfaces, colour spreading appear to fill the surface occupied by surfaces or thick lines whereas the background traversed by thin lines is seen as brighter or filled of a saturated white. These phenomena were first observed by Bozzi (1975 and Kanizsa (1979 in figural conditions that did not allow them to document their conjunction. Here we illustrate various manifestations of this twofold phenomenon and compare its effects with the known effects of brightness and colour induction. Some conjectures on the nature of these effects are discussed.

  15. Contours, 2 foot contours automatically generated from 2008 LIDAR for the purpose of supporting FEMA floodplain mapping. Limited manual editing, breaklines for waterbodies greater than 5 acres created and use.10' index contours labeled., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, City of Portage Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Contours dataset current as of 2008. 2 foot contours automatically generated from 2008 LIDAR for the purpose of supporting FEMA floodplain mapping. Limited manual...

  16. I/O-Efficient Algorithms for Computing Contour Lines on a Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj Kumar; Arge, Lars; Sadri, Bardia

    2008-01-01

    A terrain M is the graph of a bivariate function. We assume that M is represented as a triangulated surface with N vertices. A contour (or isoline) of M is a connected component of a level set of M. Generically, each contour is a closed polygonal curve; at "critical" levels these curves may touch...

  17. Maintaining Contour Trees of Dynamic Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Mølhave, Thomas; Revsbæk, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of maintaining the contour tree T of a terrain Sigma, represented as a triangulated xy-monotone surface, as the heights of its vertices vary continuously with time. We characterize the combinatorial changes in T and how they relate to topological changes in Sigma. We present ...

  18. A phantom study of tumor contouring on PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Song; Li Xuena; Li Yaming; Yin Yafu; Li Na; Han Chunqi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore an algorithm to define the threshold value for tumor contouring on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging. Methods: A National Electrical Manufacturing Association (NEMA)NU 2 1994 PET phantom with 5 spheres of different diameters were filled with 18 F-FDG. Seven different sphere-to-background ratios were obtained and the phantom was scanned by Discovery LS 4. For each sphere-to-background ratio, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of each sphere, the SUV of the border of each sphere (SUV border ), the mean SUV of a 1 cm region of background (SUV bg ) and the diameter (D) of each sphere were measured. SPSS 13.0 software was used for curve fitting and regression analysis to obtain the threshold algorithm. The calculated thresholds were applied to delineate 29 pathologically confirmed lung cancer lesions on PET images and the obtained volumes were compared with the volumes contoured on CT images in lung window. Results: The algorithm for defining contour threshold is TH% = 33.1% + 46.8% SUV bg /SUV max + 13.9%/D (r = 0.994) by phantom studies. For 29 lung cancer lesions, the average gross tumor volumes (GTV) delineated on PET and CT are (7.36±1.62) ml and (8.31±2.05) ml, respectively (t = -1.26, P>0.05). Conclusion: The proposed threshold algorithm for tumor contouring on PET image could provide comparable GTV with CT. (authors)

  19. Direct Optimization of Printed Reflectarrays for Contoured Beam Satellite Antenna Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Min; Sorensen, Stig B.; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2013-01-01

    An accurate and efficient direct optimization technique for the design of contoured beam reflectarrays is presented. It is based on the spectral domain method of moments assuming local periodicity and minimax optimization. Contrary to the conventional phase-only optimization techniques, the geome......An accurate and efficient direct optimization technique for the design of contoured beam reflectarrays is presented. It is based on the spectral domain method of moments assuming local periodicity and minimax optimization. Contrary to the conventional phase-only optimization techniques......, the geometrical parameters of the array elements are directly optimized to fulfill the contoured beam requirements, thus maintaining a direct relation between optimization goals and optimization variables, and hence resulting in more optimal designs. Both co- and cross-polar radiation patterns of the reflectarray...... can be optimized for multiple frequencies, polarizations, and feed illuminations. Several contoured beam reflectarrays, that radiate a high-gain beam on a European coverage, have been designed and compared to similar designs obtained using the phase-only optimization technique. The comparisons show...

  20. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future

  1. Automatic writer identification using connected-component contours and edge-based features of uppercase western script

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schomaker, L; Bulacu, M

    In this paper, a new technique for offline writer identification is presented, using connected-component contours (COCOCOs or CO(3)s) in uppercase handwritten samples. In our model, the writer is considered to be characterized by a stochastic pattern generator, producing a family of connected

  2. Robust Improvement in Estimation of a Covariance Matrix in an Elliptically Contoured Distribution Respect to Quadratic Loss Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Khodadadi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Let S be matrix of residual sum of square in linear model Y = Aβ + e where matrix e is distributed as elliptically contoured with unknown scale matrix Σ. In present work, we consider the problem of estimating Σ with respect to squared loss function, L(Σˆ , Σ = tr(ΣΣˆ −1 −I 2 . It is shown that improvement of the estimators were obtained by James, Stein [7], Dey and Srivasan [1] under the normality assumption remains robust under an elliptically contoured distribution respect to squared loss function

  3. Axial Force Analysis and Roll Contour Configuration of Four-High CVC Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-ming Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the influence of technical parameters on work roll axial force of four-high continuous variable crown (CVC mill, the deformation analyzing model with top roll system and strip was established based on influence function method. Then a CVC work roll curve designing scheme was proposed and it was carried out on some cold rolling mill considering the requirement of comprehensive work roll axial force minimization. The status of comprehensive work roll axial force is improved considering the rolling schedule that is beneficial to the roller bearing. Corresponding to the newly designed work roll contour, the backup roll end chamfer was designed considering comprehensive performance of interroll stress concentration, comprehensive work roll axial force, and strip shape control ability. The distribution of roll wear with newly designed backup roll contour is more even according to the field application data. The newly established roll configuration scheme is beneficial to four-high CVC mill.

  4. An automatic contour propagation method to follow parotid gland deformation during head-and-neck cancer tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faggiano, E; Scalco, E; Rizzo, G; Fiorino, C; Broggi, S; Cattaneo, M; Maggiulli, E; Calandrino, R; Dell'Oca, I; Di Muzio, N

    2011-01-01

    We developed an efficient technique to auto-propagate parotid gland contours from planning kVCT to daily MVCT images of head-and-neck cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy. The method deformed a 3D surface mesh constructed from manual kVCT contours by B-spline free-form deformation to generate optimal and smooth contours. Deformation was calculated by elastic image registration between kVCT and MVCT images. Data from ten head-and-neck cancer patients were considered and manual contours by three observers were included in both kVCT and MVCT images. A preliminary inter-observer variability analysis demonstrated the importance of contour propagation in tomotherapy application: a high variability was reported in MVCT parotid volume estimation (p = 0.0176, ANOVA test) and a larger uncertainty of MVCT contouring compared with kVCT was demonstrated by DICE and volume variability indices (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p -4 for both indices). The performance analysis of our method showed no significant differences between automatic and manual contours in terms of volumes (p > 0.05, in a multiple comparison Tukey test), center-of-mass distances (p = 0.3043, ANOVA test), DICE values (p = 0.1672, Wilcoxon signed rank test) and average and maximum symmetric distances (p = 0.2043, p = 0.8228 Wilcoxon signed rank tests). Results suggested that our contour propagation method could successfully substitute human contouring on MVCT images.

  5. An automatic contour propagation method to follow parotid gland deformation during head-and-neck cancer tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggiano, E; Scalco, E; Rizzo, G [Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare (IBFM), CNR, Milan (Italy); Fiorino, C; Broggi, S; Cattaneo, M; Maggiulli, E; Calandrino, R [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Dell' Oca, I; Di Muzio, N, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2011-02-07

    We developed an efficient technique to auto-propagate parotid gland contours from planning kVCT to daily MVCT images of head-and-neck cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy. The method deformed a 3D surface mesh constructed from manual kVCT contours by B-spline free-form deformation to generate optimal and smooth contours. Deformation was calculated by elastic image registration between kVCT and MVCT images. Data from ten head-and-neck cancer patients were considered and manual contours by three observers were included in both kVCT and MVCT images. A preliminary inter-observer variability analysis demonstrated the importance of contour propagation in tomotherapy application: a high variability was reported in MVCT parotid volume estimation (p = 0.0176, ANOVA test) and a larger uncertainty of MVCT contouring compared with kVCT was demonstrated by DICE and volume variability indices (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p < 10{sup -4} for both indices). The performance analysis of our method showed no significant differences between automatic and manual contours in terms of volumes (p > 0.05, in a multiple comparison Tukey test), center-of-mass distances (p = 0.3043, ANOVA test), DICE values (p = 0.1672, Wilcoxon signed rank test) and average and maximum symmetric distances (p = 0.2043, p = 0.8228 Wilcoxon signed rank tests). Results suggested that our contour propagation method could successfully substitute human contouring on MVCT images.

  6. Self-adaptive method to distinguish inner and outer contours of industrial computed tomography image for rapid prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Liming; Ye Yong; Zhang Xia; Zuo Jian

    2013-01-01

    A self-adaptive identification method is proposed for realizing more accurate and efficient judgment about the inner and outer contours of industrial computed tomography (CT) slice images. The convexity-concavity of the single-pixel-wide closed contour is identified with angle method at first. Then, contours with concave vertices are distinguished to be inner or outer contours with ray method, and contours without concave vertices are distinguished with extreme coordinate value method. The method was chosen to automatically distinguish contours by means of identifying the convexity and concavity of the contours. Thus, the disadvantages of single distinguishing methods, such as ray method's time-consuming and extreme coordinate method's fallibility, can be avoided. The experiments prove the adaptability, efficiency, and accuracy of the self-adaptive method. (authors)

  7. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bosch, Walter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Haas, Rick L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Translational Research Consortium, 21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Dian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed.

  8. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, Nawaid; Sloboda, Ron; Kamal, Wafa; Ghosh, Sunita; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Monajemi, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  9. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Abrams, Ross A.; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Deville, Curtiland; Chen, Yen-Lin; Finkelstein, Steven E.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed

  10. Poster - Thur Eve - 65: Optimization of an automatic image contouring system for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T; Nedialkov, N; Wierzbicki, M

    2012-07-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced technique used to concentrate the prescribed dose in the tumour while minimizing exposure to healthy tissues. Success in IMRT is greatly dependent upon the localization of the target volume and normal tissue, thus accurate contouring is crucial. In this paper, we describe an automated atlas-based image contouring system and our approach for improving the system by performing a full-scale optimization of registration parameters using high-performance computing. To achieve this, we use manually pre-contoured CT images of ten head and neck patients. For any parameter set, each patient data is registered with the remaining patients. Accuracy of the resulting contours is determined automatically by comparing their overlap with manually defined targets using Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC). This allows us to compare all permutations of the image registration parameter sets and input data to investigate their impact on final contour accuracy. Investigating the parameter space required 27,000 image registrations and 216,000 DSC computations. To perform these registrations we introduced a large cluster of high-performance computers and developed a parallel testing harness. The metrics collected from the tests show a wide range of performance, indicating that parameter selection is crucial in our contouring system. By selecting an optimized parameter set, we increased the mean overlap of the automatically contoured regions of interest by 50% and reduced registration time by 50% compared to the original parameters. Our findings illustrate that full-scale optimization is an effective method for improving the performance of the automated image contouring system. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Cardiac output by pulse contour analysis does not match the increase measured by rebreathing during human spaceflight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, Richard L; Peterson, Sean D; Yee, Nicholas J; Greaves, Danielle K

    2017-11-01

    Pulse contour analysis of the noninvasive finger arterial pressure waveform provides a convenient means to estimate cardiac output (Q̇). The method has been compared with standard methods under a range of conditions but never before during spaceflight. We compared pulse contour analysis with the Modelflow algorithm to estimates of Q̇ obtained by rebreathing during preflight baseline testing and during the final month of long-duration spaceflight in nine healthy male astronauts. By Modelflow analysis, stroke volume was greater in supine baseline than seated baseline or inflight. Heart rate was reduced in supine baseline so that there were no differences in Q̇ by Modelflow estimate between the supine (7.02 ± 1.31 l/min, means ± SD), seated (6.60 ± 1.95 l/min), or inflight (5.91 ± 1.15 l/min) conditions. In contrast, rebreathing estimates of Q̇ increased from seated baseline (4.76 ± 0.67 l/min) to inflight (7.00 ± 1.39 l/min, significant interaction effect of method and spaceflight, P < 0.001). Pulse contour analysis utilizes a three-element Windkessel model that incorporates parameters dependent on aortic pressure-area relationships that are assumed to represent the entire circulation. We propose that a large increase in vascular compliance in the splanchnic circulation invalidates the model under conditions of spaceflight. Future spaceflight research measuring cardiac function needs to consider this important limitation for assessing absolute values of Q̇ and stroke volume. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Noninvasive assessment of cardiac function during human spaceflight is an important tool to monitor astronaut health. This study demonstrated that pulse contour analysis of finger arterial blood pressure to estimate cardiac output failed to track the 46% increase measured by a rebreathing method. These results strongly suggest that alternative methods not dependent on pulse contour analysis are required to track cardiac function in spaceflight

  12. SU-F-J-88: Comparison of Two Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for CT-To-CT Contour Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, A; Xu, H; Chen, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the contour propagation accuracy of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms in the Raystation treatment planning system – the “Hybrid” algorithm based on image intensities and anatomical information; and the “Biomechanical” algorithm based on linear anatomical elasticity and finite element modeling. Methods: Both DIR algorithms were used for CT-to-CT deformation for 20 lung radiation therapy patients that underwent treatment plan revisions. Deformation accuracy was evaluated using landmark tracking to measure the target registration error (TRE) and inverse consistency error (ICE). The deformed contours were also evaluated against physician drawn contours using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC). Contour propagation was qualitatively assessed using a visual quality score assigned by physicians, and a refinement quality score (0 0.9 for lungs, > 0.85 for heart, > 0.8 for liver) and similar qualitative assessments (VQS 0.75 for lungs). When anatomical structures were used to control the deformation, the DSC improved more significantly for the biomechanical DIR compared to the hybrid DIR, while the VQS and RQS improved only for the controlling structures. However, while the inclusion of controlling structures improved the TRE for the hybrid DIR, it increased the TRE for the biomechanical DIR. Conclusion: The hybrid DIR was found to perform slightly better than the biomechanical DIR based on lower TRE while the DSC, VQS, and RQS studies yielded comparable results for both. The use of controlling structures showed considerable improvement in the hybrid DIR results and is recommended for clinical use in contour propagation.

  13. Principle and realization of segmenting contour series algorithm in reverse engineering based on X-ray computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanfang; Liu Li; Yan Yonglian; Shan Baoci; Tang Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    A new algorithm of segmenting contour series of images is presented, which can achieve three dimension reconstruction with parametric recognition in Reverse Engineering based on X-ray CT. First, in order to get the nested relationship between contours, a method of a certain angle ray is used. Second, for realizing the contour location in one slice, another approach is presented to generate the contour tree by scanning the relevant vector only once. Last, a judge algorithm is put forward to accomplish the contour match between slices by adopting the qualitative and quantitative properties. The example shows that this algorithm can segment contour series of CT parts rapidly and precisely. (authors)

  14. Closed contour fractal dimension estimation by the Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florindo, J.B.; Bruno, O.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel fractal dimension concept, based on Fourier spectrum, is proposed. → Computationally simple. Computational time smaller than conventional fractal methods. → Results are closer to Hausdorff-Besicovitch than conventional methods. → The method is more accurate and robustness to geometric operations and noise addition. - Abstract: This work proposes a novel technique for the numerical calculus of the fractal dimension of fractal objects which can be represented as a closed contour. The proposed method maps the fractal contour onto a complex signal and calculates its fractal dimension using the Fourier transform. The Fourier power spectrum is obtained and an exponential relation is verified between the power and the frequency. From the parameter (exponent) of the relation, is obtained the fractal dimension. The method is compared to other classical fractal dimension estimation methods in the literature, e.g., Bouligand-Minkowski, box-counting and classical Fourier. The comparison is achieved by the calculus of the fractal dimension of fractal contours whose dimensions are well-known analytically. The results showed the high precision and robustness of the proposed technique.

  15. Heavy ion scattering in 3D TDHF. [Isodensity contours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, M.S.

    1977-09-01

    Results of three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent Hartree--Fock (TDHF) calculations are presented. The assumptions used in the calculations are summarized. The first reaction considered is /sup 16/O + /sup 16/O at 105 MeV (lab); isodensity contours integrated perpendicular to the reaction plane are shown for several impact parameters as a function of time. Trajectories are also shown, and the kinetics of the reaction is discussed; several other energies were also examined. Most of the deeply inelastic scattering seems to come from small impact parameters. Density contours and trajectories are next shown for /sup 40/Ca + /sup 40/Ca at 278 MeV (lab). Finally, density contours are shown for asymmetric systems: /sup 4/He + /sup 16/O at l = 5 h-bar and 50 MeV (lab) and /sup 16/O + /sup 40/Ca at l = 20, 40, 60, 80 h-bar and 315 MeV (lab). The light fragment seems to maintain the same average number of nucleons with which it started. 25 figures. (RWR)

  16. Contour forming of metals by laser peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

  17. Measurement of anatomy contouring in EPI review: a practical method for use in radiation therapy departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halkett, Georgia; Williams, Marie

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy treatment verification can be performed using hard copy portal films or digital Electronic Portal Images (EPI) of the treatment field, acquired at the time of treatment. This paper describes a practical method of assessing the accuracy of reference anatomy outlining, for treatment sites involving the pelvis, breast and lumbar spine. Seven original bone anatomy outlines contoured onto verification images of five patients, were printed on transparency sheets and reference points were marked at equal distances along the anatomy curves. Two sample anatomy contour sets were created by two independent radiation therapists who outlined visible bone anatomy on the same seven digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) and hard copy outlines were obtained. Three independent observers with differing levels of experience, assessed the discrepancies between the original anatomy contours and the sample sets on two occasions one week apart, by measuring the distances between the original and sample set contours (absolute values in mm). The degree of agreement between the same assessor on two occasions (intra-rater reliability) and between assessors (inter-rater reliability) was analysed using parametric analysis for levels of relationship and significant differences. This simple method of reference anatomy outline measurement was shown to be highly reliable within assessors and between assessors (r > 0.87 and rz > 0.75 for both intra- and inter-rater comparisons). This measurement process may be a suitable method, for undertaking quality assurance activities in image verification within radiation therapy departments. Copyright (2004) Australian Institute of Radiography

  18. Transference of Fermi Contour Anisotropy to Composite Fermions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Insun; Rosales, K A Villegas; Mueed, M A; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Baldwin, K W; Winkler, R; Padmanabhan, Medini; Shayegan, M

    2017-07-07

    There has been a surge of recent interest in the role of anisotropy in interaction-induced phenomena in two-dimensional (2D) charged carrier systems. A fundamental question is how an anisotropy in the energy-band structure of the carriers at zero magnetic field affects the properties of the interacting particles at high fields, in particular of the composite fermions (CFs) and the fractional quantum Hall states (FQHSs). We demonstrate here tunable anisotropy for holes and hole-flux CFs confined to GaAs quantum wells, via applying in situ in-plane strain and measuring their Fermi wave vector anisotropy through commensurability oscillations. For strains on the order of 10^{-4} we observe significant deformations of the shapes of the Fermi contours for both holes and CFs. The measured Fermi contour anisotropy for CFs at high magnetic field (α_{CF}) is less than the anisotropy of their low-field hole (fermion) counterparts (α_{F}), and closely follows the relation α_{CF}=sqrt[α_{F}]. The energy gap measured for the ν=2/3 FQHS, on the other hand, is nearly unaffected by the Fermi contour anisotropy up to α_{F}∼3.3, the highest anisotropy achieved in our experiments.

  19. THE FORMATION OF THE CONTOUR OF THE DOCUMENTED AND REAL FLIGHT SAFETY IN THE SYSTEM OF THE INFORMATION PROVISION OF SAFETY OF FLIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Bachkalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the principles and mechanisms of formation of the contour of the real safety of flights and contour of the documented safety, allowing us to obtain information to control fligh safety. The proposed approach can be used in the algorithms of active on-board flight safety management system for the implementation of information support to the crew in flight and automatic control of flight safety.

  20. A fully automated contour detection algorithm the preliminary step for scatter and attenuation compensation in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, R.B.; Mas, J.; Bidet, R.

    1988-01-01

    Contour detection is an important step in information extraction from nuclear medicine images. In order to perform accurate quantitative studies in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) a new procedure is described which can rapidly derive the best fit contour of an attenuated medium. Some authors evaluate the influence of the detected contour on the reconstructed images with various attenuation correction techniques. Most of the methods are strongly affected by inaccurately detected contours. This approach uses the Compton window to redetermine the convex contour: It seems to be simpler and more practical in clinical SPECT studies. The main advantages of this procedure are the high speed of computation, the accuracy of the contour found and the programme's automation. Results obtained using computer simulated and real phantoms or clinical studies demonstrate the reliability of the present algorithm. (orig.)

  1. Luminance contours can gate afterimage colors and "real" colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstis, Stuart; Vergeer, Mark; Van Lier, Rob

    2012-09-06

    It has long been known that colored images may elicit afterimages in complementary colors. We have already shown (Van Lier, Vergeer, & Anstis, 2009) that one and the same adapting image may result in different afterimage colors, depending on the test contours presented after the colored image. The color of the afterimage depends on two adapting colors, those both inside and outside the test. Here, we further explore this phenomenon and show that the color-contour interactions shown for afterimage colors also occur for "real" colors. We argue that similar mechanisms apply for both types of stimulation.

  2. Tonal Language Background and Detecting Pitch Contour in Spoken and Musical Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Catherine J.; Keller, Peter E.; Tyler, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment investigated the effect of tonal language background on discrimination of pitch contour in short spoken and musical items. It was hypothesized that extensive exposure to a tonal language attunes perception of pitch contour. Accuracy and reaction times of adult participants from tonal (Thai) and non-tonal (Australian English) language…

  3. SU-C-BRA-03: An Automated and Quick Contour Errordetection for Auto Segmentation in Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Ates, O; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a tool that can quickly and automatically assess contour quality generated from auto segmentation during online adaptive replanning. Methods: Due to the strict time requirement of online replanning and lack of ‘ground truth’ contours in daily images, our method starts with assessing image registration accuracy focusing on the surface of the organ in question. Several metrics tightly related to registration accuracy including Jacobian maps, contours shell deformation, and voxel-based root mean square (RMS) analysis were computed. To identify correct contours, additional metrics and an adaptive decision tree are introduced. To approve in principle, tests were performed with CT sets, planned and daily CTs acquired using a CT-on-rails during routine CT-guided RT delivery for 20 prostate cancer patients. The contours generated on daily CTs using an auto-segmentation tool (ADMIRE, Elekta, MIM) based on deformable image registration of the planning CT and daily CT were tested. Results: The deformed contours of 20 patients with total of 60 structures were manually checked as baselines. The incorrect rate of total contours is 49%. To evaluate the quality of local deformation, the Jacobian determinant (1.047±0.045) on contours has been analyzed. In an analysis of rectum contour shell deformed, the higher rate (0.41) of error contours detection was obtained compared to 0.32 with manual check. All automated detections took less than 5 seconds. Conclusion: The proposed method can effectively detect contour errors in micro and macro scope by evaluating multiple deformable registration metrics in a parallel computing process. Future work will focus on improving practicability and optimizing calculation algorithms and metric selection.

  4. SU-C-BRA-03: An Automated and Quick Contour Errordetection for Auto Segmentation in Online Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Ates, O; Li, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a tool that can quickly and automatically assess contour quality generated from auto segmentation during online adaptive replanning. Methods: Due to the strict time requirement of online replanning and lack of ‘ground truth’ contours in daily images, our method starts with assessing image registration accuracy focusing on the surface of the organ in question. Several metrics tightly related to registration accuracy including Jacobian maps, contours shell deformation, and voxel-based root mean square (RMS) analysis were computed. To identify correct contours, additional metrics and an adaptive decision tree are introduced. To approve in principle, tests were performed with CT sets, planned and daily CTs acquired using a CT-on-rails during routine CT-guided RT delivery for 20 prostate cancer patients. The contours generated on daily CTs using an auto-segmentation tool (ADMIRE, Elekta, MIM) based on deformable image registration of the planning CT and daily CT were tested. Results: The deformed contours of 20 patients with total of 60 structures were manually checked as baselines. The incorrect rate of total contours is 49%. To evaluate the quality of local deformation, the Jacobian determinant (1.047±0.045) on contours has been analyzed. In an analysis of rectum contour shell deformed, the higher rate (0.41) of error contours detection was obtained compared to 0.32 with manual check. All automated detections took less than 5 seconds. Conclusion: The proposed method can effectively detect contour errors in micro and macro scope by evaluating multiple deformable registration metrics in a parallel computing process. Future work will focus on improving practicability and optimizing calculation algorithms and metric selection.

  5. Comparing subjective contours for Kanizsa squares and linear edge alignments ('New York Titanic' figures).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Barbara; Marlow, Phillip J

    2014-01-01

    One current view is that subjective contours may involve high-level detection of a salient shape with back propagation to early visual areas where small receptive fields allow for scrutiny of relevant details. This idea applies to Kanizsa-type figures. However, Gillam and Chan (2002 Psychological Science, 13, 279-282) using figures based on Gillam's graphic 'New York Titanic' (Gillam, 1997 Thresholds: Limits of perception. New York: Arts Magazine) showed that strong subjective contours can be seen along the linearly aligned edges of a set of shapes if occlusion cues of 'extrinsic edge' and 'entropy contrast' are strong. Here we compared ratings of the strength of subjective contours along linear alignments with those seen in Kanizsa figures. The strongest subjective contour for a single set of linearly aligned shapes was similar in strength to the edges of a Kanizsa square (controlling for support ratio) despite the lack of a salient region. The addition of a second set of linearly aligned inducers consistent with a common surface increased subjective-contour strength, as did having four rather than two 'pacmen' in the Kanizsa figure, indicating a role for surface support. We argue that linear subjective contours allow for the investigation of certain occlusion cues and the interactions between them that are not easily explored with Kanizsa figures.

  6. Maintaining Contour Trees of Dynamic Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars; Mølhave, Thomas

    We consider maintaining the contour tree T of a piecewise-linear triangulation M that is the graph of a time varying height function h:R2→R. We carefully describe the combinatorial change in T that happen as h varies over time and how these changes relate to topological changes in M. We present a...

  7. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  8. Pre-cancer risk assessment in habitual smokers from DIC images of oral exfoliative cells using active contour and SVM analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Susmita; Sarkar, Ripon; Chatterjee, Kabita; Datta, Pallab; Barui, Ananya; Maity, Santi P

    2017-04-01

    Habitual smokers are known to be at higher risk for developing oral cancer, which is increasing at an alarming rate globally. Conventionally, oral cancer is associated with high mortality rates, although recent reports show the improved survival outcomes by early diagnosis of disease. An effective prediction system which will enable to identify the probability of cancer development amongst the habitual smokers, is thus expected to benefit sizable number of populations. Present work describes a non-invasive, integrated method for early detection of cellular abnormalities based on analysis of different cyto-morphological features of exfoliative oral epithelial cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy provides a potential optical tool as this mode provides a pseudo three dimensional (3-D) image with detailed morphological and textural features obtained from noninvasive, label free epithelial cells. For segmentation of DIC images, gradient vector flow snake model active contour process has been adopted. To evaluate cellular abnormalities amongst habitual smokers, the selected morphological and textural features of epithelial cells are compared with the non-smoker (-ve control group) group and clinically diagnosed pre-cancer patients (+ve control group) using support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Accuracy of the developed SVM based classification has been found to be 86% with 80% sensitivity and 89% specificity in classifying the features from the volunteers having smoking habit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Social Evaluation of Perception on Body Contouring Surgery by Turkish Male Aesthetic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Bora; Sezgin, Billur; Guney, Kirdar; Latifoglu, Osman; Celebi, Cemallettin

    2015-02-01

    Although aesthetic procedures are known to have a higher impact on women, men are becoming more inclined toward such procedures since the last decade. To determine the reason behind the increase in demand for male aesthetic procedures and to learn about the expectations and inquietude related to body contouring surgery, a prospective questionnaire study was conducted on 200 Turkish males from January 1, 2011-May 31, 2012. Demographic information, previous aesthetic procedures and thoughts on body contouring procedures with given reasons were questioned. The results of the study showed that 53 % of all participants considered undergoing body contouring surgery with the given reason that they believed their current body structure required it. For those who did not consider contouring operations, 92.5 % said they felt that they did not need such a procedure. The results of the statistical analysis showed that BMI was a significant factor in the decision making process for wanting to undergo body contouring procedures. The results of the study showed that men's consideration for aesthetic operations depends mainly on necessity and that the most considered region was the abdominal zone in regard to contouring. We can conclude that men are becoming more interested in body contouring operations and therefore different surgical procedures should be refined and re-defined according to the expectations of this new patient group.

  10. A word by any other intonation: fMRI evidence for implicit memory traces for pitch contours of spoken words in adult brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Inspector

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Intonation may serve as a cue for facilitated recognition and processing of spoken words and it has been suggested that the pitch contour of spoken words is implicitly remembered. Thus, using the repetition suppression (RS effect of BOLD-fMRI signals, we tested whether the same spoken words are differentially processed in language and auditory brain areas depending on whether or not they retain an arbitrary intonation pattern. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Words were presented repeatedly in three blocks for passive and active listening tasks. There were three prosodic conditions in each of which a different set of words was used and specific task-irrelevant intonation changes were applied: (i All words presented in a set flat monotonous pitch contour (ii Each word had an arbitrary pitch contour that was set throughout the three repetitions. (iii Each word had a different arbitrary pitch contour in each of its repetition. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The repeated presentations of words with a set pitch contour, resulted in robust behavioral priming effects as well as in significant RS of the BOLD signals in primary auditory cortex (BA 41, temporal areas (BA 21 22 bilaterally and in Broca's area. However, changing the intonation of the same words on each successive repetition resulted in reduced behavioral priming and the abolition of RS effects. CONCLUSIONS: Intonation patterns are retained in memory even when the intonation is task-irrelevant. Implicit memory traces for the pitch contour of spoken words were reflected in facilitated neuronal processing in auditory and language associated areas. Thus, the results lend support for the notion that prosody and specifically pitch contour is strongly associated with the memory representation of spoken words.

  11. Evaluation of the optical conductivity tensor in terms of contour integrations

    OpenAIRE

    Szunyogh, Laszlo; Weinberger, Peter

    2000-01-01

    For the case of finite life-time broadening the standard Kubo-formula for the optical conductivity tensor is rederived in terms of Green's functions by using contour integrations, whereby finite temperatures are accounted for by using the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. For zero life-time broadening, the present formalism is related to expressions well-known in the literature. Numerical aspects of how to calculate the corresponding contour integrals are also outlined.

  12. Ship-borne contour integration for flux determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeskamp, S.; Maas, L.R.M.

    2012-01-01

    The consumption of nutrients by mussel beds can be monitored by measuring the net nutrient flux across a circumscribing vertical surface. Measuring this nutrient flux not only requires resolving the spatial (and temporal) distribution of nutrients at the bounding contour, but also an ability to

  13. Feasibility of geometrical verification of patient set-up using body contours and computed tomography data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploeger, Lennert S.; Betgen, Anja; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A.; Herk, Marcel van

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Body contours can potentially be used for patient set-up verification in external-beam radiotherapy and might enable more accurate set-up of patients prior to irradiation. The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of patient set-up verification using a body contour scanner. Material and methods: Body contour scans of 33 lung cancer and 21 head-and-neck cancer patients were acquired on a simulator. We assume that this dataset is representative for the patient set-up on an accelerator. Shortly before acquisition of the body contour scan, a pair of orthogonal simulator images was taken as a reference. Both the body contour scan and the simulator images were matched in 3D to the planning computed tomography scan. Movement of skin with respect to bone was quantified based on an analysis of variance method. Results: Set-up errors determined with body-contours agreed reasonably well with those determined with simulator images. For the lung cancer patients, the average set-up errors (mm)±1 standard deviation (SD) for the left-right, cranio-caudal and anterior-posterior directions were 1.2±2.9, -0.8±5.0 and -2.3±3.1 using body contours, compared to -0.8±3.2, -1.0±4.1 and -1.2±2.4 using simulator images. For the head-and-neck cancer patients, the set-up errors were 0.5±1.8, 0.5±2.7 and -2.2±1.8 using body contours compared to -0.4±1.2, 0.1±2.1, -0.1±1.8 using simulator images. The SD of the set-up errors obtained from analysis of the body contours were not significantly different from those obtained from analysis of the simulator images. Movement of the skin with respect to bone (1 SD) was estimated at 2.3 mm for lung cancer patients and 1.7 mm for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusion: Measurement of patient set-up using a body-contouring device is possible. The accuracy, however, is limited by the movement of the skin with respect to the bone. In situations where the error in the patient set-up is relatively large, it is

  14. Measuring multiple residual-stress components using the contour method and multiple cuts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swenson, Hunter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pagliaro, Pierluigi [U. PALERMO; Zuccarello, Bernardo [U. PALERMO

    2009-01-01

    The conventional contour method determines one component of stress over the cross section of a part. The part is cut into two, the contour of the exposed surface is measured, and Bueckner's superposition principle is analytically applied to calculate stresses. In this paper, the contour method is extended to the measurement of multiple stress components by making multiple cuts with subsequent applications of superposition. The theory and limitations are described. The theory is experimentally tested on a 316L stainless steel disk with residual stresses induced by plastically indenting the central portion of the disk. The stress results are validated against independent measurements using neutron diffraction. The theory has implications beyond just multiple cuts. The contour method measurements and calculations for the first cut reveal how the residual stresses have changed throughout the part. Subsequent measurements of partially relaxed stresses by other techniques, such as laboratory x-rays, hole drilling, or neutron or synchrotron diffraction, can be superimposed back to the original state of the body.

  15. The contour deformation method in momentum space and effective interactions for weakly bound nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, Gaute

    2005-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis has been to investigate and develop methods suitable for study of resonance phenomena in nuclear and subatomic physics. Emphasis has been on the momentum space formulation of the Schrodinger equation. It has been shown; starting from the integral formulation of the Schrodinger equation, that an efficient way of obtaining a complete set of states including bound- antibound and resonant states is through the Contour Deformation Method. The strength of the Contour Deformation Method has been illustrated by studying a wide range of different cases in subatomic physics where resonance phenomena appear. These applications ranges from the case of a single-particle moving in a spherically symmetric field to the case of strong deformations of the field. Further, it has been studied how resonances may be solved for in complex potentials which models absorptive and emittive processes, using the Contour Deformation Method. The results obtained in these specific applications, strongly favour the Contour Deformation Method in comparison with other methods such as complex coordinate scaling and analytic continuation in the coupling strength. The most appealing feature of CD-NI is that not only does it give accurate results for resonances and anti-bound states, but in addition it provides us with a complete set of states which may be used in many different eigenfunction expansions. The only limitation of CDM is that the analytic structure of the potential has to be known, since the choice of contour is dictated by the singularity structure of the potential. The revival and study of CDM applied to nuclear physics, may be considered the main issue of the first part of this thesis, and is also the topic of Paper 1. In the second part of this thesis, the focus was directed towards the issue of how resonance phenomena may be understood in nuclei, when several valence particles are present. The newly developed Gamow Shell Model is a promising approach in

  16. Evaluation of marginal fit of 2 CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min-Kyung; Park, Ji-Hee; Park, Sang-Won; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2015-08-01

    This study was to evaluate the marginal fit of two CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown systems compared to lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. Shoulder and deep chamfer margin were formed on each acrylic resin tooth model of a maxillary first premolar. Two CAD-CAM systems (Prettau®Zirconia and ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max®press) crowns were made (n=16). Each crown was bonded to stone dies with resin cement (Rely X Unicem). Marginal gap and absolute marginal discrepancy of crowns were measured using a light microscope equipped with a digital camera (Leica DFC295) magnified by a factor of 100. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey's HSD test were conducted to analyze the significance of crown marginal fit regarding the finish line configuration and the fabrication system. The mean marginal gap of lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) was significantly lower than that of the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) (Pmarginal discrepancy (Pmarginal gap than the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia). In terms of absolute marginal discrepancy, the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (ZENOSTAR®ZR translucent) had under-extended margin, whereas the CAD-CAM anatomic contour zirconia crown system (Prettau®Zirconia) and lithium disilicate glass ceramic crowns (IPS e.max®press) had overextended margins.

  17. Development and evaluation of a new contoured cushion system with an optimized normalization algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sujiao; Zhang, Zhengxiang; Wang, Jue

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of pressure sores remains a significant problem confronting spinal cord injury patients and the elderly with limited mobility. One vital aspect of this subject concerns the development of cushions to decrease pressure ulcers for seated patients, particularly those bound by wheelchairs. Here, we present a novel cushion system that employs interface pressure distribution between the cushion and the buttocks to design custom contoured foam cushion. An optimized normalization algorithm was proposed, with which interface pressure distribution was transformed into the carving depth of foam cushions according to the biomechanical characteristics of the foam. The shape and pressure-relief performance of the custom contoured foam cushions was investigated. The outcomes showed that the contoured shape of personalized cushion matched the buttock contour very well. Moreover, the custom contoured cushion could alleviate pressure under buttocks and increase subjective comfort and stability significantly. Furthermore, the fabricating method not only decreased the unit production cost but also simplified the procedure for manufacturing. All in all, this prototype seat cushion would be an effective and economical way to prevent pressure ulcers.

  18. Analysis of irradiance losses on a soiled photovoltaic panel using contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulipaka, Subrahmanyam; Kumar, Rajneesh

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An irradiance loss factor to quantify relationship between irradiance, tilt angle and power of soiled panel is proposed. • Artificial soiling experiment and Sieve analysis are performed to obtain data for developing contours. • Contour analysis is used to observe the deviation in power of a soiled panel from clean panel. • A correction factor to calculate power of a soiled panel is proposed. • The correction factor is expressed in terms of soil particle size composition present on panel. - Abstract: This paper introduces an irradiance loss factor that quantifies the relationship between irradiance, tilt angle and power output of a soiled panel with the soil particle size composition. Artificial soiling experiments were performed using four soil samples at irradiance levels between 200 and 1200 W/m"2 at 18 tilt angles. Biharmonic interpolation was used to develop power contours in terms of irradiance and tilt angle from experimentally obtained data. These contours were compared with ideal ones of a clean panel to observe deviation in the nature of contours for a soiled panel. A correction factor in terms of particle size composition (as a coefficient to tilt angle) was proposed to calculate power output of a tilted soiled panel. The angular loss on a panel with soil sample containing 150 μm particle size in abundance was observed to be 22% and for sample containing 75 μm particles in majority, the loss is 24%. Presence of 300 μm particle size in abundance causes a 23.7% loss, while 52% angular loss was observed for soil with highest composition of less than 75 μm particle size.

  19. Extension of Fourier methods to the calculation of effective depths in heterogeneous media of arbitrary contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkschall, G.

    1986-01-01

    The description of patient contours and internal structures by means of truncated Fourier series can be extended to continuous contours of arbitrary shape and location by expressing the x and z Cartesian coordinates of the contour as independent Fourier series in a parameter t. An analytic equation for the intersection of the contour and a ray line is then written as an equation in the parameter t. The equation can be solved using numerical methods yielding the Cartesian coordinates of the intersection point directly

  20. Variations in the Contouring of Organs at Risk: Test Case From a Patient With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelms, Benjamin E., E-mail: alpha@canislupusllc.com [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, WI (United States); Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Robinson, Greg [Radiation Oncology Resources, Goshen, IN (United States); Wheeler, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Goshen Health System Goshen, IN (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomy contouring is critical in radiation therapy. Inaccuracy and variation in defining critical volumes will affect everything downstream: treatment planning, dose-volume histogram analysis, and contour-based visual guidance used in image-guided radiation therapy. This study quantified: (1) variation in the contouring of organs at risk (OAR) in a clinical test case and (2) corresponding effects on dosimetric metrics of highly conformal plans. Methods and Materials: A common CT data set with predefined targets from a patient with oropharyngeal cancer was provided to a population of clinics, which were asked to (1) contour OARs and (2) design an intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan. Thirty-two acceptable plans were submitted as DICOM RT data sets, each generated by a different clinical team. Using those data sets, we quantified: (1) the OAR contouring variation and (2) the impact this variation has on dosimetric metrics. New technologies were employed, including a software tool to quantify three-dimensional structure comparisons. Results: There was significant interclinician variation in OAR contouring. The degree of variation is organ-dependent. We found substantial dose differences resulting strictly from contouring variation (differences ranging from -289% to 56% for mean OAR dose; -22% to 35% for maximum dose). However, there appears to be a threshold in the OAR comparison metric beyond which the dose differences stabilize. Conclusions: The effects of interclinician variation in contouring organs-at-risk in the head and neck can be large and are organ-specific. Physicians need to be aware of the effect that variation in OAR contouring can play on the final treatment plan and not restrict their focus only to the target volumes.

  1. Residual stress measurement of EB-welded plates with contour method. Part 2: FEM analysis of contour profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romppanen, A.-J.; Immonen, E.

    2013-12-01

    The residual stresses formed as a result of Electronic Beam welding (EB-welding) in copper are investigated by Posiva. In the present study, residual stresses of EB-welded copper plates were studied with contour method. In the method eleven copper plates (X436 - X440 and X453 - X458) were cut in half with wire electric discharge machining (EDM) after which the deformation due to stress relaxation was measured with coordinate measurement system. The measured data was then used as boundary displacement data for the FEM analyses, in which the corresponding residual stresses were calculated. Before giving the corresponding displacement boundary conditions to the FE models, the deformation data was processed and smoothed appropriately. The residual stress levels of the copper plates were found to be around 40 - 55 MPa at maximum. This corresponds to other reported residual stress measurements and current state of knowledge with this material in Posiva. (orig.)

  2. High-accuracy contouring using projection moiré

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.; Lamberti, Luciano; Sciammarella, Federico M.

    2005-09-01

    Shadow and projection moiré are the oldest forms of moiré to be used in actual technical applications. In spite of this fact and the extensive number of papers that have been published on this topic, the use of shadow moiré as an accurate tool that can compete with alternative devices poses very many problems that go to the very essence of the mathematical models used to obtain contour information from fringe pattern data. In this paper some recent developments on the projection moiré method are presented. Comparisons between the results obtained with the projection method and the results obtained by mechanical devices that operate with contact probes are presented. These results show that the use of projection moiré makes it possible to achieve the same accuracy that current mechanical touch probe devices can provide.

  3. Sound wave contours around wind turbine arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Beek, A.; Van Blokland, G.J.

    1993-02-01

    Noise pollution is an important factor in selecting suitable sites for wind turbines in order to realize 1000 MW of wind power as planned by the Dutch government for the year 2000. Therefore an accurate assessment of wind turbine noise is important. The amount of noise pollution from a wind turbine depends on the wind conditions. An existing standard method to assess wind turbine noise is supplemented and adjusted. In the first part of the investigation the method was developed and applied for a solitary sound source. In the second part attention is paid to the use of the method for wind turbine arrays. It appears that the adjusted method results in a shift of the contours of the permitted noise level. In general the contours are 15-25% closer to the wind farm, which means that the minimal permitted distance between houses and wind turbine arrays can be reduced. 14 figs., 1 tab., 4 appendices, 7 refs

  4. Top-Down Modulation on the Perception and Categorization of Identical Pitch Contours in Speech and Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joey L. Weidema

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whether pitch in language and music is governed by domain-specific or domain-general cognitive mechanisms is contentiously debated. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether mechanisms governing pitch contour perception operate differently when pitch information is interpreted as either speech or music. By modulating listening mode, this study aspired to demonstrate that pitch contour perception relies on domain-specific cognitive mechanisms, which are regulated by top-down influences from language and music. Three groups of participants (Mandarin speakers, Dutch speaking non-musicians, and Dutch musicians were exposed to identical pitch contours, and tested on their ability to identify these contours in a language and musical context. Stimuli consisted of disyllabic words spoken in Mandarin, and melodic tonal analogues, embedded in a linguistic and melodic carrier phrase, respectively. Participants classified identical pitch contours as significantly different depending on listening mode. Top-down influences from language appeared to alter the perception of pitch contour in speakers of Mandarin. This was not the case for non-musician speakers of Dutch. Moreover, this effect was lacking in Dutch speaking musicians. The classification patterns of pitch contours in language and music seem to suggest that domain-specific categorization is modulated by top-down influences from language and music.

  5. Atlas-Based Segmentation Improves Consistency and Decreases Time Required for Contouring Postoperative Endometrial Cancer Nodal Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Amy V.; Wortham, Angela; Wernick, Iddo; Evans, Andrew; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target delineation of the nodal volumes is essential for three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for endometrial cancer adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that atlas-based segmentation ('autocontouring') would lead to time savings and more consistent contours among physicians. Methods and Materials: A reference anatomy atlas was constructed using the data from 15 postoperative endometrial cancer patients by contouring the pelvic nodal clinical target volume on the simulation computed tomography scan according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0418 trial using commercially available software. On the simulation computed tomography scans from 10 additional endometrial cancer patients, the nodal clinical target volume autocontours were generated. Three radiation oncologists corrected the autocontours and delineated the manual nodal contours under timed conditions while unaware of the other contours. The time difference was determined, and the overlap of the contours was calculated using Dice's coefficient. Results: For all physicians, manual contouring of the pelvic nodal target volumes and editing the autocontours required a mean ± standard deviation of 32 ± 9 vs. 23 ± 7 minutes, respectively (p = .000001), a 26% time savings. For each physician, the time required to delineate the manual contours vs. correcting the autocontours was 30 ± 3 vs. 21 ± 5 min (p = .003), 39 ± 12 vs. 30 ± 5 min (p = .055), and 29 ± 5 vs. 20 ± 5 min (p = .0002). The mean overlap increased from manual contouring (0.77) to correcting the autocontours (0.79; p = .038). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that autocontouring leads to increased consistency and time savings when contouring the nodal target volumes for adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer, although the autocontours still required careful editing to ensure that the lymph nodes at risk of recurrence are properly included in the target volume.

  6. A Method for Extracting Suspected Parotid Lesions in CT Images using Feature-based Segmentation and Active Contours based on Stationary Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T. Y.; Lin, S. F.

    2013-10-01

    Automatic suspected lesion extraction is an important application in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). In this paper, we propose a method to automatically extract the suspected parotid regions for clinical evaluation in head and neck CT images. The suspected lesion tissues in low contrast tissue regions can be localized with feature-based segmentation (FBS) based on local texture features, and can be delineated with accuracy by modified active contour models (ACM). At first, stationary wavelet transform (SWT) is introduced. The derived wavelet coefficients are applied to derive the local features for FBS, and to generate enhanced energy maps for ACM computation. Geometric shape features (GSFs) are proposed to analyze each soft tissue region segmented by FBS; the regions with higher similarity GSFs with the lesions are extracted and the information is also applied as the initial conditions for fine delineation computation. Consequently, the suspected lesions can be automatically localized and accurately delineated for aiding clinical diagnosis. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing with the results outlined by clinical experts. The experiments on 20 pathological CT data sets show that the true-positive (TP) rate on recognizing parotid lesions is about 94%, and the dimension accuracy of delineation results can also approach over 93%.

  7. Determination of patients contour for using in radiotherapy planning, by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.; Souto, S.L.L.

    1987-01-01

    This work describes a system for measuring the contour of patients, based on a mechanical device which, during the movement of its tip over the patient's contour, changes the resistence of three potenciometers while the device change its angles. The resistence variation, produces voltage changes, which are digitalized by an analog to digital converter in a microcomputer. The mathematical routines for processing the acquired data, and the obtained results, are discussed in this paper. (author) [pt

  8. Determination of patient's contour for use in radiotherapeutic planning by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbern, A.W.; Souto, S.L.L.

    1987-01-01

    A system for measuring the contour of patients based on a mechanical device, is described. During the movement of the device's tip, over the patient's contour, changes in the resistence of three potenciometers are reported, and the device changes its angles. Voltage changes produced by resistence variation, are digitalized by an analog to digital converter in a micro-computer. The mathematical routines for processing the acquired data, and the obtained results are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  9. SU-F-J-88: Comparison of Two Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for CT-To-CT Contour Propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, A; Xu, H; Chen, S [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Columbia, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the contour propagation accuracy of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms in the Raystation treatment planning system – the “Hybrid” algorithm based on image intensities and anatomical information; and the “Biomechanical” algorithm based on linear anatomical elasticity and finite element modeling. Methods: Both DIR algorithms were used for CT-to-CT deformation for 20 lung radiation therapy patients that underwent treatment plan revisions. Deformation accuracy was evaluated using landmark tracking to measure the target registration error (TRE) and inverse consistency error (ICE). The deformed contours were also evaluated against physician drawn contours using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC). Contour propagation was qualitatively assessed using a visual quality score assigned by physicians, and a refinement quality score (0 0.9 for lungs, > 0.85 for heart, > 0.8 for liver) and similar qualitative assessments (VQS < 0.35, RQS > 0.75 for lungs). When anatomical structures were used to control the deformation, the DSC improved more significantly for the biomechanical DIR compared to the hybrid DIR, while the VQS and RQS improved only for the controlling structures. However, while the inclusion of controlling structures improved the TRE for the hybrid DIR, it increased the TRE for the biomechanical DIR. Conclusion: The hybrid DIR was found to perform slightly better than the biomechanical DIR based on lower TRE while the DSC, VQS, and RQS studies yielded comparable results for both. The use of controlling structures showed considerable improvement in the hybrid DIR results and is recommended for clinical use in

  10. Rapid Automated Target Segmentation and Tracking on 4D Data without Initial Contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chebrolu, V.V.; Chebrolu, V.V.; Saenz, D.; Tewatia, D.; Paliwal, B.R.; Chebrolu, V.V.; Saenz, D.; Paliwal, B.R.; Sethares, W.A.; Cannon, G.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve rapid automated delineation of gross target volume (GTV) and to quantify changes in volume/position of the target for radiotherapy planning using four-dimensional (4D) CT. Methods and Materials. Novel morphological processing and successive localization (MPSL) algorithms were designed and implemented for achieving auto segmentation. Contours automatically generated using MPSL method were compared with contours generated using state-of-the-art deformable registration methods (using Elastix © and MIMV ista software). Metrics such as the Dice similarity coefficient, sensitivity, and positive predictive value (PPV) were analyzed. The target motion tracked using the centroid of the GTV estimated using MPSL method was compared with motion tracked using deformable registration methods. Results. MPSL algorithm segmented the GTV in 4DCT images in 27.0 ±11.1 seconds per phase ( 512 ×512 resolution) as compared to 142.3±11.3 seconds per phase for deformable registration based methods in 9 cases. Dice coefficients between MPSL generated GTV contours and manual contours (considered as ground-truth) were 0.865 ± 0.037. In comparison, the Dice coefficients between ground-truth and contours generated using deformable registration based methods were 0.909 ± 0.051. Conclusions. The MPSL method achieved similar segmentation accuracy as compared to state-of-the-art deformable registration based segmentation methods, but with significant reduction in time required for GTV segmentation.

  11. Rapid Automated Target Segmentation and Tracking on 4D Data without Initial Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata V. Chebrolu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To achieve rapid automated delineation of gross target volume (GTV and to quantify changes in volume/position of the target for radiotherapy planning using four-dimensional (4D CT. Methods and Materials. Novel morphological processing and successive localization (MPSL algorithms were designed and implemented for achieving autosegmentation. Contours automatically generated using MPSL method were compared with contours generated using state-of-the-art deformable registration methods (using Elastix© and MIMVista software. Metrics such as the Dice similarity coefficient, sensitivity, and positive predictive value (PPV were analyzed. The target motion tracked using the centroid of the GTV estimated using MPSL method was compared with motion tracked using deformable registration methods. Results. MPSL algorithm segmented the GTV in 4DCT images in 27.0±11.1 seconds per phase (512×512 resolution as compared to 142.3±11.3 seconds per phase for deformable registration based methods in 9 cases. Dice coefficients between MPSL generated GTV contours and manual contours (considered as ground-truth were 0.865±0.037. In comparison, the Dice coefficients between ground-truth and contours generated using deformable registration based methods were 0.909 ± 0.051. Conclusions. The MPSL method achieved similar segmentation accuracy as compared to state-of-the-art deformable registration based segmentation methods, but with significant reduction in time required for GTV segmentation.

  12. Rapid Automated Target Segmentation and Tracking on 4D Data without Initial Contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebrolu, Venkata V; Saenz, Daniel; Tewatia, Dinesh; Sethares, William A; Cannon, George; Paliwal, Bhudatt R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To achieve rapid automated delineation of gross target volume (GTV) and to quantify changes in volume/position of the target for radiotherapy planning using four-dimensional (4D) CT. Methods and Materials. Novel morphological processing and successive localization (MPSL) algorithms were designed and implemented for achieving autosegmentation. Contours automatically generated using MPSL method were compared with contours generated using state-of-the-art deformable registration methods (using Elastix© and MIMVista software). Metrics such as the Dice similarity coefficient, sensitivity, and positive predictive value (PPV) were analyzed. The target motion tracked using the centroid of the GTV estimated using MPSL method was compared with motion tracked using deformable registration methods. Results. MPSL algorithm segmented the GTV in 4DCT images in 27.0 ± 11.1 seconds per phase (512 × 512 resolution) as compared to 142.3 ± 11.3 seconds per phase for deformable registration based methods in 9 cases. Dice coefficients between MPSL generated GTV contours and manual contours (considered as ground-truth) were 0.865 ± 0.037. In comparison, the Dice coefficients between ground-truth and contours generated using deformable registration based methods were 0.909 ± 0.051. Conclusions. The MPSL method achieved similar segmentation accuracy as compared to state-of-the-art deformable registration based segmentation methods, but with significant reduction in time required for GTV segmentation.

  13. Contour analysis of steady state tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoto, R.S.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of analysis for presenting the possible operating space for steady state, non-ignited tokamak reactors is proposed. The method uses contours of reactor performance and plasma characteristics, fusion power gain, wall neutron flux, current drive power, etc., plotted on a two-dimensional grid, the axes of which are the plasma current I p and the normalized beta, β n = β/(I p /aB 0 ), to show possible operating points. These steady state operating contour plots are called SOPCONS. This technique is illustrated in an application to a design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) with neutral beam, lower hybrid and bootstrap current drive. The utility of the SOPCON plots for pointing out some of the non-intuitive considerations in steady state reactor design is shown. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 16 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  14. Tumour auto-contouring on 2d cine MRI for locally advanced lung cancer: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Martin F; Eiben, Björn; Menten, Martin J; Wetscherek, Andreas; Hawkes, David J; McClelland, Jamie R; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-12-01

    Radiotherapy guidance based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently becoming a clinical reality. Fast 2d cine MRI sequences are expected to increase the precision of radiation delivery by facilitating tumour delineation during treatment. This study compares four auto-contouring algorithms for the task of delineating the primary tumour in six locally advanced (LA) lung cancer patients. Twenty-two cine MRI sequences were acquired using either a balanced steady-state free precession or a spoiled gradient echo imaging technique. Contours derived by the auto-contouring algorithms were compared against manual reference contours. A selection of eight image data sets was also used to assess the inter-observer delineation uncertainty. Algorithmically derived contours agreed well with the manual reference contours (median Dice similarity index: ⩾0.91). Multi-template matching and deformable image registration performed significantly better than feature-driven registration and the pulse-coupled neural network (PCNN). Neither MRI sequence nor image orientation was a conclusive predictor for algorithmic performance. Motion significantly degraded the performance of the PCNN. The inter-observer variability was of the same order of magnitude as the algorithmic performance. Auto-contouring of tumours on cine MRI is feasible in LA lung cancer patients. Despite large variations in implementation complexity, the different algorithms all have relatively similar performance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Contour Tracking Control for the REMUS Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Reet, Alan R

    2005-01-01

    In the interest of enhancing the capabilities of autonomous underwater vehicles used in US Naval Operations, controlling vehicle position to follow depth contours presents exciting potential for navigation...

  16. Contour detection based on nonclassical receptive field inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorescu, Cosmin; Petkov, Nicolai; Westenberg, Michel A.

    We propose a biologically motivated computational step, called nonclassical receptive field (non-CRF) inhibition, more generally surround inhibition or suppression, to improve contour detection in machine vision. Non-CRF inhibition is exhibited by 80% of the orientation-selective neurons in the

  17. Automatic contouring of geologic fabric and finite strain data on the unit hyperboloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frederick W.

    2018-06-01

    Fabric and finite strain analysis, an integral part of studies of geologic structures and orogenic belts, is commonly done by the analysis of particles whose shapes can be approximated as ellipses. Given a sample of such particles, the mean and confidence intervals of particular parameters can be calculated, however, taking the extra step of plotting and contouring the density distribution can identify asymmetries or modes related to sedimentary fabrics or other factors. A common graphical strain analysis technique is to plot final ellipse ratios, Rf , versus orientations, ϕf on polar Elliott or Rf / ϕ plots to examine the density distribution. The plot may be contoured, however, it is desirable to have a contouring method that is rapid, reproducible, and based on the underlying geometry of the data. The unit hyperboloid, H2 , gives a natural parameter space for two-dimensional strain, and various projections, including equal-area and stereographic, have useful properties for examining density distributions for anisotropy. An index, Ia , is given to quantify the magnitude and direction of anisotropy. Elliott and Rf / ϕ plots can be understood by applying hyperbolic geometry and recognizing them as projections of H2 . These both distort area, however, so the equal-area projection is preferred for examining density distributions. The algorithm presented here gives fast, accurate, and reproducible contours of density distributions calculated directly on H2 . The algorithm back-projects the data onto H2 , where the density calculation is done at regular nodes using a weighting value based on the hyperboloid distribution, which is then contoured. It is implemented as an Octave compatible MATLAB function that plots ellipse data using a variety of projections, and calculates and displays contours of their density distribution on H2 .

  18. Automatic cumulative sums contour detection of FBP-reconstructed multi-object nuclear medicine images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protonotarios, Nicholas E; Spyrou, George M; Kastis, George A

    2017-06-01

    The problem of determining the contours of objects in nuclear medicine images has been studied extensively in the past, however most of the analysis has focused on a single object as opposed to multiple objects. The aim of this work is to develop an automated method for determining the contour of multiple objects in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstructed images. These contours can be used for computing body edges for attenuation correction in PET and SPECT, as well as for eliminating streak artifacts outside the objects, which could be useful in compressive sensing reconstruction. Contour detection has been accomplished by applying a modified cumulative sums (CUSUM) scheme in the sinogram. Our approach automatically detects all objects in the image, without requiring a priori knowledge of the number of distinct objects in the reconstructed image. This method has been tested in simulated phantoms, such as an image-quality (IQ) phantom and two digital multi-object phantoms, as well as a real NEMA phantom and a clinical thoracic study. For this purpose, a GE Discovery PET scanner was employed. The detected contours achieved root mean square accuracy of 1.14 pixels, 1.69 pixels and 3.28 pixels and a Hausdorff distance of 3.13, 3.12 and 4.50 pixels, for the simulated image-quality phantom PET study, the real NEMA phantom and the clinical thoracic study, respectively. These results correspond to a significant improvement over recent results obtained in similar studies. Furthermore, we obtained an optimal sub-pattern assignment (OSPA) localization error of 0.94 and 1.48, for the two-objects and three-objects simulated phantoms, respectively. Our method performs efficiently for sets of convex objects and hence it provides a robust tool for automatic contour determination with precise results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 30 CFR 785.16 - Permits incorporating variances from approximate original contour restoration requirements for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... approximate original contour restoration requirements for steep slope mining. 785.16 Section 785.16 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL... approximate original contour restoration requirements for steep slope mining. (a) The regulatory authority may...

  20. Iterative Method of Regularization with Application of Advanced Technique for Detection of Contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedziela, T.; Stankiewicz, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel iterative method of regularization with application of an advanced technique for detection of contours. To eliminate noises, the properties of convolution of functions are utilized. The method can be accomplished in a simple neural cellular network, which creates the possibility of extraction of contours by automatic image recognition equipment. (author)

  1. Brain MR image segmentation based on an improved active contour model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangrui Meng

    Full Text Available It is often a difficult task to accurately segment brain magnetic resonance (MR images with intensity in-homogeneity and noise. This paper introduces a novel level set method for simultaneous brain MR image segmentation and intensity inhomogeneity correction. To reduce the effect of noise, novel anisotropic spatial information, which can preserve more details of edges and corners, is proposed by incorporating the inner relationships among the neighbor pixels. Then the proposed energy function uses the multivariate Student's t-distribution to fit the distribution of the intensities of each tissue. Furthermore, the proposed model utilizes Hidden Markov random fields to model the spatial correlation between neigh-boring pixels/voxels. The means of the multivariate Student's t-distribution can be adaptively estimated by multiplying a bias field to reduce the effect of intensity inhomogeneity. In the end, we reconstructed the energy function to be convex and calculated it by using the Split Bregman method, which allows our framework for random initialization, thereby allowing fully automated applications. Our method can obtain the final result in less than 1 second for 2D image with size 256 × 256 and less than 300 seconds for 3D image with size 256 × 256 × 171. The proposed method was compared to other state-of-the-art segmentation methods using both synthetic and clinical brain MR images and increased the accuracies of the results more than 3%.

  2. ANALYTICAL ENGINEERING OF A TELECONTROLLED PILOTLESS AIRCRAFT CONTOUR IN ACCORDANCE WITH GENERALIZED WORK CRITERION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Eromin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the non­terminal problem for neutral contour of a telecontrolled pilotless aircraft. Optimal control synthesis is provided on the basis of minimization of generalized work functional. The analysis of optimal telecontrolled pilotless aircraft contour is carried out.

  3. Contours, This Layer was derived from the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) based on 7.5 minute Digital Elevation Model (DEM) image files., Published in 1999, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — Contours dataset current as of 1999. This Layer was derived from the USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) based on 7.5 minute Digital Elevation Model (DEM) image...

  4. Elasticity of short DNA molecules: theory and experiment for contour lengths of 0.6-7 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Li, Jinyu; Nelson, Philip C; Perkins, Thomas T; Betterton, M D

    2007-12-15

    The wormlike chain (WLC) model currently provides the best description of double-stranded DNA elasticity for micron-sized molecules. This theory requires two intrinsic material parameters-the contour length L and the persistence length p. We measured and then analyzed the elasticity of double-stranded DNA as a function of L (632 nm-7.03 microm) using the classic solution to the WLC model. When the elasticity data were analyzed using this solution, the resulting fitted value for the persistence length p(wlc) depended on L; even for moderately long DNA molecules (L = 1300 nm), this apparent persistence length was 10% smaller than its limiting value for long DNA. Because p is a material parameter, and cannot depend on length, we sought a new solution to the WLC model, which we call the "finite wormlike chain (FWLC)," to account for effects not considered in the classic solution. Specifically we accounted for the finite chain length, the chain-end boundary conditions, and the bead rotational fluctuations inherent in optical trapping assays where beads are used to apply the force. After incorporating these corrections, we used our FWLC solution to generate force-extension curves, and then fit those curves with the classic WLC solution, as done in the standard experimental analysis. These results qualitatively reproduced the apparent dependence of p(wlc) on L seen in experimental data when analyzed with the classic WLC solution. Directly fitting experimental data to the FWLC solution reduces the apparent dependence of p(fwlc) on L by a factor of 3. Thus, the FWLC solution provides a significantly improved theoretical framework in which to analyze single-molecule experiments over a broad range of experimentally accessible DNA lengths, including both short (a few hundred nanometers in contour length) and very long (microns in contour length) molecules.

  5. SU-E-E-05: Improving Contouring Precision and Consistency for Physicians-In-Training with Simple Lab Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L; Larson, D A [University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Target contouring for high-dose treatments such as radiosurgery of brain metastases is highly critical in eliminating marginal failure and reducing complications as shown by recent clinical studies. In order to improve contouring accuracy and practice consistency for the procedure, we introduced a self-assessed physics lab practice for the physicians-in-training. Methods: A set of commercially acquired high-precision PMMA plastic spheres were randomly embedded in a Styrofoam block and then scanned with the CT/MR via the clinical procedural imaging protocol. A group of first-year physicians-in-training (n=6) from either neurosurgery or radiation oncology department were asked to contour the scanned objects (diameter ranged from 0.4 cm to 3.8 cm). These user-defined contours were then compared with the ideal contour sets of object shape for self assessments to determine the maximum areas of the observed discrepancies and method of improvements. Results: The largest discrepancies from initial practice were consistently found to be located near the extreme longitudinal portions of the target for all the residents. Discrepancy was especially prominent when contouring small objects < 1.0 cm in diameters. For example, the mean volumes rendered from the initial contour data set differed from the ideal data set by 7.7%±6.6% for the participants (p> 0.23 suggesting agreement cannot be established). However, when incorporating a secondary imaging scan such as reconstructed coronal or sagittal images in a repeat practice, the agreement was dramatically improved yielding p<0.02 in agreement with the reference data set for all the participants. Conclusion: A simple physics lab revealed a common pitfall in contouring small metastatic brain tumors for radiosurgical procedures and provided a systematic tool for physicians-in-training in improving their clinical contouring skills. Dr Ma is current a board member of international stereotactic radiosurgical society.

  6. Strain-induced fermi contour anisotropy of GaAs 2D holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, J; Shayegan, M; Winkler, R

    2008-03-07

    We report measurements of magnetoresistance commensurability peaks, induced by a square array of antidots, in GaAs (311)A two-dimensional holes as a function of applied in-plane strain. The data directly probe the shapes of the Fermi contours of the two spin subbands that are split thanks to the spin-orbit interaction and strain. The experimental results are in quantitative agreement with the predictions of accurate energy band calculations, and reveal that the majority spin subband has a severely distorted Fermi contour whose anisotropy can be tuned with strain.

  7. Free-convective flow of fluid in a thin porous contour and geothermal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magomedbekov Kh.G.; Ramazanov, M.M.; Vagabov, M.V.

    1996-01-24

    The problem of free convection in a thin porous contour, placed in uniform impermeable massif is considered. The approximate analitical solution of conjugate problem is obtained. The critical Rayleigh number is determined, by exceeding of which the steady fluid circulation in an annulus is established. The computations of abnormal heat flow near surface are carried out, stipulated by thermoconvection in a contour.

  8. Quality of life long-term after body contouring surgery following bariatric surgery: sustained improvement after 7 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, Eva S J; Geenen, Rinie; de Heer, Francine A G; van der Molen, Aebele B Mink; van Ramshorst, Bert

    2012-11-01

    Bariatric surgery for morbid obesity results in massive weight loss and improvement of health and quality of life. A downside of the major weight loss is the excess of overstretched skin, which may influence the patient's quality of life by causing functional and aesthetic problems. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the patient's quality of life long-term after body contouring following bariatric surgery. Quality of life was measured with the Obesity Psychosocial State Questionnaire in 33 post-bariatric surgery patients 7.2 years (range, 3.2 to 13.3 years) after body contouring surgery. Data were compared with previous assessments 4.1 years (range, 0.7 to 9.2 years) after body contouring surgery of the quality of life at that time and before body contouring surgery. Compared with appraisals of quality of life before body contouring surgery, a significant, mostly moderate to large, sustained improvement of quality of life was observed in post-bariatric surgery patients 7.2 years after body contouring surgery in six of the seven psychosocial domains. A small deterioration occurred between 4.1- and 7.2-year follow-up on two of the seven domains except for the domain efficacy toward eating, which showed a significant improvement. At 7-year follow-up, 18 patients (55 percent) were satisfied with the result of body contouring surgery. This study indicates a sustained quality-of-life improvement in post-bariatric surgery patients after body contouring surgery. This suggests the importance of including reconstructive surgery as a component in the multidisciplinary approach in the surgical treatment of morbid obesity. Therapeutic, IV.

  9. Development and Validation of Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer After Radical Cystectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Brian C. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Bahl, Amit [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Birtle, Alison J. [Royal Preston Hospital, Preston (United Kingdom); Breau, Rodney H. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Challapalli, Amarnath [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Chang, Albert J. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Choudhury, Ananya [Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); The University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Heath Science Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Daneshmand, Sia [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); El-Gayed, Ali [Saskatoon Cancer Centre, Saskatoon (Canada); Feldman, Adam [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa, Oklahoma (United States); Guzzo, Thomas J. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hilman, Serena [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Jani, Ashesh [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Malkowicz, S. Bruce [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mantz, Constantine A. [21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); 21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Master, Viraj [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Mitra, Anita V. [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Murthy, Vedang [Tata Memorial Center, Mumbai (India); and others

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To develop multi-institutional consensus clinical target volumes (CTVs) and organs at risk (OARs) for male and female bladder cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: We convened a multidisciplinary group of bladder cancer specialists from 15 centers and 5 countries. Six radiation oncologists and 7 urologists participated in the development of the initial contours. The group proposed initial language for the CTVs and OARs, and each radiation oncologist contoured them on computed tomography scans of a male and female cystectomy patient with input from ≥1 urologist. On the basis of the initial contouring, the group updated its CTV and OAR descriptions. The cystectomy bed, the area of greatest controversy, was contoured by another 6 radiation oncologists, and the cystectomy bed contouring language was again updated. To determine whether the revised language produced consistent contours, CTVs and OARs were redrawn by 6 additional radiation oncologists. We evaluated their contours for level of agreement using the Landis-Koch interpretation of the κ statistic. Results: The group proposed that patients at elevated risk for local-regional failure with negative margins should be treated to the pelvic nodes alone (internal/external iliac, distal common iliac, obturator, and presacral), whereas patients with positive margins should be treated to the pelvic nodes and cystectomy bed. Proposed OARs included the rectum, bowel space, bone marrow, and urinary diversion. Consensus language describing the CTVs and OARs was developed and externally validated. The revised instructions were found to produce consistent contours. Conclusions: Consensus descriptions of CTVs and OARs were successfully developed and can be used in clinical trials of adjuvant radiation therapy for bladder cancer.

  10. Pseudo-Hermitian description of PT-symmetric systems defined on a complex contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method that allows for a practical application of the theory of pseudo-Hermitian operators to PT-symmetric systems defined on a complex contour. We apply this method to study the Hamiltonians H = p 2 + x 2 (ix) ν with ν ε (-2, ∞) that are defined along the corresponding anti-Stokes lines. In particular, we reveal the intrinsic non-Hermiticity of H for the cases that ν is an even integer, so that H p 2 ± x 2+ν , and give a proof of the discreteness of the spectrum of H for all ν ε (-2, ∞). Furthermore, we study the consequences of defining a square-well Hamiltonian on a wedge-shaped complex contour. This yields a PT-symmetric system with a finite number of real eigenvalues. We present a comprehensive analysis of this system within the framework of pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics. We also outline a direct pseudo-Hermitian treatment of PT-symmetric systems defined on a complex contour which clarifies the underlying mathematical structure of the formulation of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics based on the charge-conjugation operator. Our results provide conclusive evidence that pseudo-Hermitian quantum mechanics provides a complete description of general PT-symmetric systems regardless of whether they are defined along the real line or a complex contour

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF VISUALLY GUIDED BEHAVIOR REQUIRES ORIENTED CONTOURS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRENNER, E; CORNELISSEN, FW

    1992-01-01

    Kittens do not learn to use visual information to guide their behaviour if they are deprived of the optic flow that accompanies their own movements. We show that the optic flow that is required for developing visually guided behaviour is derived from changes in contour orientations, rather than from

  12. Active mask segmentation of fluorescence microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D; Kovacević, Jelena

    2009-08-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the "contour" to that of "inside and outside," or masks, allowing for easy multidimensional segmentation. It adapts to the topology of the image through the use of multiple masks. The algorithm is almost invariant under initialization, allowing for random initialization, and uses a few easily tunable parameters. Experiments show that the active mask algorithm matches the ground truth well and outperforms the algorithm widely used in fluorescence microscopy, seeded watershed, both qualitatively, as well as quantitatively.

  13. Automated contour detection in cardiac MRI using active appearance models: the effect of the composition of the training set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelié, Emmanuelle; Oost, Elco R.; Hendriksen, Dennis; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2007-01-01

    Definition of the optimal training set for the automated segmentation of short-axis left ventricular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies in clinical practice based on active appearance model (AAM). We investigated the segmentation accuracy by varying the size and composition of the training set

  14. Anatomically contoured plates for fixation of rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottlang, Michael; Helzel, Inga; Long, William B; Madey, Steven

    2010-03-01

    : Intraoperative contouring of long bridging plates for stabilization of flail chest injuries is difficult and time consuming. This study implemented for the first time biometric parameters to derive anatomically contoured rib plates. These plates were tested on a range of cadaveric ribs to quantify plate fit and to extract a best-fit plating configuration. : Three left and three right rib plates were designed, which accounted for anatomic parameters required when conforming a plate to the rib surface. The length lP over which each plate could trace the rib surface was evaluated on 109 cadaveric ribs. For each rib level 3-9, the plate design with the highest lP value was extracted to determine a best-fit plating configuration. Furthermore, the characteristic twist of rib surfaces was measured on 49 ribs to determine the surface congruency of anatomic plates with a constant twist. : The tracing length lP of the best-fit plating configuration ranged from 12.5 cm to 14.7 cm for ribs 3-9. The corresponding range for standard plates was 7.1-13.7 cm. The average twist of ribs over 8-cm, 12-cm, and 16-cm segments was 8.3 degrees, 20.6 degrees, and 32.7 degrees, respectively. The constant twist of anatomic rib plates was not significantly different from the average rib twist. : A small set of anatomic rib plates can minimize the need for intraoperative plate contouring for fixation of ribs 3-9. Anatomic rib plates can therefore reduce the time and complexity of flail chest stabilization and facilitate spanning of flail segments with long plates.

  15. Automatic contour propagation using deformable image registration to determine delivered dose to spinal cord in head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, P. L.; Noble, D. J.; Harrison, K.; Bates, A. M.; Burnet, N. G.; Jena, R.; Romanchikova, M.; Sutcliffe, M. P. F.; Thomas, S. J.; Barnett, G. C.; Benson, R. J.; Jefferies, S. J.; Parker, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    To determine delivered dose to the spinal cord, a technique has been developed to propagate manual contours from kilovoltage computed-tomography (kVCT) scans for treatment planning to megavoltage computed-tomography (MVCT) guidance scans. The technique uses the Elastix software to perform intensity-based deformable image registration of each kVCT scan to the associated MVCT scans. The registration transform is then applied to contours of the spinal cord drawn manually on the kVCT scan, to obtain contour positions on the MVCT scans. Different registration strategies have been investigated, with performance evaluated by comparing the resulting auto-contours with manual contours, drawn by oncologists. The comparison metrics include the conformity index (CI), and the distance between centres (DBC). With optimised registration, auto-contours generally agree well with manual contours. Considering all 30 MVCT scans for each of three patients, the median CI is 0.759 +/- 0.003 , and the median DBC is (0.87 +/- 0.01 ) mm. An intra-observer comparison for the same scans gives a median CI of 0.820 +/- 0.002 and a DBC of (0.64 +/- 0.01 ) mm. Good levels of conformity are also obtained when auto-contours are compared with manual contours from one observer for a single MVCT scan for each of 30 patients, and when they are compared with manual contours from six observers for two MVCT scans for each of three patients. Using the auto-contours to estimate organ position at treatment time, a preliminary study of 33 patients who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancers indicates good agreement between planned and delivered dose to the spinal cord.

  16. Automatic contour propagation using deformable image registration to determine delivered dose to spinal cord in head-and-neck cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, P L; Noble, D J; Harrison, K; Bates, A M; Burnet, N G; Jena, R; Romanchikova, M; Sutcliffe, M P F; Thomas, S J; Barnett, G C; Benson, R J; Jefferies, S J; Parker, M A

    2017-07-12

    To determine delivered dose to the spinal cord, a technique has been developed to propagate manual contours from kilovoltage computed-tomography (kVCT) scans for treatment planning to megavoltage computed-tomography (MVCT) guidance scans. The technique uses the Elastix software to perform intensity-based deformable image registration of each kVCT scan to the associated MVCT scans. The registration transform is then applied to contours of the spinal cord drawn manually on the kVCT scan, to obtain contour positions on the MVCT scans. Different registration strategies have been investigated, with performance evaluated by comparing the resulting auto-contours with manual contours, drawn by oncologists. The comparison metrics include the conformity index (CI), and the distance between centres (DBC). With optimised registration, auto-contours generally agree well with manual contours. Considering all 30 MVCT scans for each of three patients, the median CI is [Formula: see text], and the median DBC is ([Formula: see text]) mm. An intra-observer comparison for the same scans gives a median CI of [Formula: see text] and a DBC of ([Formula: see text]) mm. Good levels of conformity are also obtained when auto-contours are compared with manual contours from one observer for a single MVCT scan for each of 30 patients, and when they are compared with manual contours from six observers for two MVCT scans for each of three patients. Using the auto-contours to estimate organ position at treatment time, a preliminary study of 33 patients who underwent radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancers indicates good agreement between planned and delivered dose to the spinal cord.

  17. Memory for pure tone sequences without contour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Christine; Jolicœur, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    We presented pure tones interspersed with white noise sounds to disrupt contour perception in an acoustic short-term memory (ASTM) experiment during which we recorded the electroencephalogram. The memory set consisted of seven stimuli, 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 of which were to-be-remembered tones. We estimated each participant׳s capacity, K, for each set size and measured the amplitude of the SAN (sustained anterior negativity, an ERP related to acoustic short-term memory). We correlated their K slopes with their SAN amplitude slopes as a function of set size, and found a significant link between performance and the SAN: a larger increase in SAN amplitude was linked with a larger number of stimuli maintained in ASTM. The SAN decreased in amplitude in the later portion of the silent retention interval, but the correlation between the SAN and capacity remained strong. These results show the SAN is not an index of contour but rather an index of the maintenance of individual objects in STM. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Afterimage watercolors: an exploration of contour-based afterimage filling-in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazenberg, Simon J; van Lier, Rob

    2013-01-01

    We investigated filling-in of colored afterimages and compared them with filling-in of "real" colors in the watercolor illusion. We used shapes comprising two thin adjacent undulating outlines of which the inner or the outer outline was chromatic, while the other was achromatic. The outlines could be presented simultaneously, inducing the original watercolor effect, or in an alternating fashion, inducing colored afterimages of the chromatic outlines. In Experiment 1, using only alternating outlines, these afterimages triggered filling-in, revealing an "afterimage watercolor" effect. Depending on whether the inner or the outer outline was chromatic, filling-in of a complementary or a similarly colored afterimage was perceived. In Experiment 2, simultaneous and alternating presentations were compared. Additionally, gray and black achromatic contours were tested, having an increased luminance contrast with the background for the black contours. Compared to "real" color filling-in, afterimage filling-in was more easily affected by different luminance settings. More in particular, afterimage filling-in was diminished when high-contrast contours were used. In the discussion we use additional demonstrations in which we further explore the "watercolor afterimage." All in all, comparisons between both types of illusions show similarities and differences with regard to color filling-in. Caution, however, is warranted in attributing these effects to different underlying processing differences.

  19. Distribution of lithostratigraphic units within the central block of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A three-dimensional computer-based model, Version YMP.R2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buesch, D.C.; Nelson, J.E.; Dickerson, R.P.; Drake, R.M. II; San Juan, C.A.; Spengler, R.W.; Geslin, J.K.; Moyer, T.C.

    1996-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is underlain by 14.0 to 11.6 Ma volcanic rocks tilted eastward 3 degree to 20 degree and cut by faults that were primarily active between 12.7 and 11.6 Ma. A three-dimensional computer-based model of the central block of the mountain consists of seven structural subblocks composed of six formations and the interstratified-bedded tuffaceous deposits. Rocks from the 12.7 Ma Tiva Canyon Tuff, which forms most of the exposed rocks on the mountain, to the 13.1 Ma Prow Pass Tuff are modeled with 13 surfaces. Modeled units represent single formations such as the Pah Canyon Tuff, grouped units such as the combination of the Yucca Mountain Tuff with the superjacent bedded tuff, and divisions of the Topopah Spring Tuff such as the crystal-poor vitrophyre interval. The model is based on data from 75 boreholes from which a structure contour map at the base of the Tiva Canyon Tuff and isochore maps for each unit are constructed to serve as primary input. Modeling consists of an iterative cycle that begins with the primary structure-contour map from which isochore values of the subjacent model unit are subtracted to produce the structure contour map on the base of the unit. This new structure contour map forms the input for another cycle of isochore subtraction to produce the next structure contour map. In this method of solids modeling, the model units are presented by surfaces (structure contour maps), and all surfaces are stored in the model. Surfaces can be converted to form volumes of model units with additional effort. This lithostratigraphic and structural model can be used for (1) storing data from, and planning future, site characterization activities, (2) preliminary geometry of units for design of Exploratory Studies Facility and potential repository, and (3) performance assessment evaluations

  20. Computer-Assisted Segmentation of Videocapsule Images Using Alpha-Divergence-Based Active Contour in the Framework of Intestinal Pathologies Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Meziou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract through natural orifices is a challenge for endoscopists. Videoendoscopy is currently the “gold standard” technique for diagnosis of different pathologies of the intestinal tract. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE has been developed in the 1990s as an alternative to videoendoscopy to allow direct examination of the gastrointestinal tract without any need for sedation. Nevertheless, the systematic postexamination by the specialist of the 50,000 (for the small bowel to 150,000 images (for the colon of a complete acquisition using WCE remains time-consuming and challenging due to the poor quality of WCE images. In this paper, a semiautomatic segmentation for analysis of WCE images is proposed. Based on active contour segmentation, the proposed method introduces alpha-divergences, a flexible statistical similarity measure that gives a real flexibility to different types of gastrointestinal pathologies. Results of segmentation using the proposed approach are shown on different types of real-case examinations, from (multipolyp(s segmentation, to radiation enteritis delineation.

  1. An open CAM system for dentistry on the basis of China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and industrial CAM software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Liu, Shusheng; Shi, Shenggen; Yang, Jianzhong

    2011-10-01

    China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and domestically developed industrial computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology were used for full crown fabrication and measurement of crown accuracy, with an attempt to establish an open CAM system for dental processing and to promote the introduction of domestic dental computer-aided design (CAD)/CAM system. Commercially available scanning equipment was used to make a basic digital tooth model after preparation of crown, and CAD software that comes with the scanning device was employed to design the crown by using domestic industrial CAM software to process the crown data in order to generate a solid model for machining purpose, and then China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool was used to complete machining of the whole crown and the internal accuracy of the crown internal was measured by using 3D-MicroCT. The results showed that China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool in combination with domestic industrial CAM technology can be used for crown making and the crown was well positioned in die. The internal accuracy was successfully measured by using 3D-MicroCT. It is concluded that an open CAM system for dentistry on the basis of China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and domestic industrial CAM software has been established, and development of the system will promote the introduction of domestically-produced dental CAD/CAM system.

  2. Mandarin-Speaking Children’s Speech Recognition: Developmental Changes in the Influences of Semantic Context and F0 Contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this developmental speech perception study was to assess whether and how age group modulated the influences of high-level semantic context and low-level fundamental frequency (F0 contours on the recognition of Mandarin speech by elementary and middle-school-aged children in quiet and interference backgrounds. The results revealed different patterns for semantic and F0 information. One the one hand, age group modulated significantly the use of F0 contours, indicating that elementary school children relied more on natural F0 contours than middle school children during Mandarin speech recognition. On the other hand, there was no significant modulation effect of age group on semantic context, indicating that children of both age groups used semantic context to assist speech recognition to a similar extent. Furthermore, the significant modulation effect of age group on the interaction between F0 contours and semantic context revealed that younger children could not make better use of semantic context in recognizing speech with flat F0 contours compared with natural F0 contours, while older children could benefit from semantic context even when natural F0 contours were altered, thus confirming the important role of F0 contours in Mandarin speech recognition by elementary school children. The developmental changes in the effects of high-level semantic and low-level F0 information on speech recognition might reflect the differences in auditory and cognitive resources associated with processing of the two types of information in speech perception.

  3. Cross Validation on the Equality of Uav-Based and Contour-Based Dems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, R.; Xu, Z.; Wu, L.; Liu, S.

    2018-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been widely used for Digital Elevation Model (DEM) generation in geographic applications. This paper proposes a novel framework of generating DEM from UAV images. It starts with the generation of the point clouds by image matching, where the flight control data are used as reference for searching for the corresponding images, leading to a significant time saving. Besides, a set of ground control points (GCP) obtained from field surveying are used to transform the point clouds to the user's coordinate system. Following that, we use a multi-feature based supervised classification method for discriminating non-ground points from ground ones. In the end, we generate DEM by constructing triangular irregular networks and rasterization. The experiments are conducted in the east of Jilin province in China, which has been suffered from soil erosion for several years. The quality of UAV based DEM (UAV-DEM) is compared with that generated from contour interpolation (Contour-DEM). The comparison shows a higher resolution, as well as higher accuracy of UAV-DEMs, which contains more geographic information. In addition, the RMSE errors of the UAV-DEMs generated from point clouds with and without GCPs are ±0.5 m and ±20 m, respectively.

  4. Georadiological surveying for oil and gas and subsurface structure contour mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A prospecting system is described for hydrocarbons using emanoradiation measurements of the neutron, beta, gamma rays, and radon gas emitted at the earth surface and atmosphere from the earth basement complex and, the overlying sedimentary deposits of carbonaceous rocks, shales and sandstone that are impregnated with uranium, thorium and potassium derived from the eroded earth basement complex materials. A number of check points are measured and the radiation levels are plotted to form a georadiograph. A comparison between the background level and the check point levels is used in determining the contour data basically of the earth's stratosphere, altered in its variation by hydrocarbons, radiation active substances, and/or mineral deposits. 2 claims, 10 figures

  5. Posterior belly of digastric muscle flap for contour deformity correction after superficial parotidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, A; Jain, A; Khan, M

    2017-10-23

    The correction of the contour deformity after parotidectomy has become an essential procedure in the recent times for the betterment of patients' quality of life. Various modalities have been highlighted in the literature for the same. We recommend the use of posterior belly of digastric muscle flap for correction of contour deformity post excision of parotid gland tumors, subsequently ameliorating the aesthetics of the face. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Masculine Chest-Wall Contouring in FtM Transgender: a Personal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Giulia; Tanini, Sara; Innocenti, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Chest-wall contouring surgery is one of the first steps in sexual reassignment in female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals that contributes to strengthening of the self-image and facilitates living in the new gender role. The main goal is to masculinize the chest by removing the female contour. Chest contour, scar placement, scar shape, scar length, nipple-areola position, nipple size and the areola size are the key points. Between July 2013 and June 2016, 25 FtM transgender patients underwent surgical procedures to create a masculine chest-wall contour. In our study, we just considered 16 patients who have undergone chest surgery with the double incision method. The patients' survey revealed a high satisfaction rate with the aesthetic result. In our group, no complications occurred, and two patients have undergone supplementary surgery for axillary dog-ear revision and nipple reconstruction. The authors propose a new technical approach and indications for FtM transgender patients' surgery. A longer scar that emphasizes the pectoralis muscle, a smaller nipple and a resized and refaced areola are the key points of our technique to give a masculine appearance to the chest. The scars are permanent, but most of them will fade and the patients are enthusiastic with their new "male" chest appearance. The high level of satisfaction, the great aesthetic result and the low rate of complications suggest to us the use of this technique in medium- and large-size breasts. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  7. Aircraft Segmentation in SAR Images Based on Improved Active Shape Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Xiong, B.; Kuang, G.

    2018-04-01

    In SAR image interpretation, aircrafts are the important targets arousing much attention. However, it is far from easy to segment an aircraft from the background completely and precisely in SAR images. Because of the complex structure, different kinds of electromagnetic scattering take place on the aircraft surfaces. As a result, aircraft targets usually appear to be inhomogeneous and disconnected. It is a good idea to extract an aircraft target by the active shape model (ASM), since combination of the geometric information controls variations of the shape during the contour evolution. However, linear dimensionality reduction, used in classic ACM, makes the model rigid. It brings much trouble to segment different types of aircrafts. Aiming at this problem, an improved ACM based on ISOMAP is proposed in this paper. ISOMAP algorithm is used to extract the shape information of the training set and make the model flexible enough to deal with different aircrafts. The experiments based on real SAR data shows that the proposed method achieves obvious improvement in accuracy.

  8. Identifying ambiguous prostate gland contours from histology using capsule shape information and least squares curve fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Rania [DigiPen Institute of Technology, Department of Computer Engineering, Redmond, WA (United States); McKenzie, Frederic D. [Old Dominion University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2007-12-15

    To obtain an accurate assessment of the percentage and depth of extra-capsular soft tissue removed with the prostate by the various surgical techniques in order to help surgeons in determining the appropriateness of different surgical approaches. This can be enhanced by an accurate and automated means of identifying the prostate gland contour. To facilitate 3D reconstruction and, ultimately, more accurate analyses, it is essential for us to identify the capsule boundary that separates the prostate gland tissue from its extra-capsular tissue. However, the capsule is sometimes unrecognizable due to the naturally occurring intrusion of muscle and connective tissue into the prostate gland. At these regions where the capsule disappears, its contour can be arbitrarily created with a continuing contour line based on the natural shape of the prostate. We utilize an algorithm based on a least squares curve fitting technique that uses a prostate shape equation to merge previously detected capsule parts with the shape equation to produce an approximated curve that represents the prostate capsule. We have tested our algorithm using three different shapes on 13 histologic prostate slices that are cut at different locations from the apex. The best result shows a 90% average contour match when compared to pathologist-drawn contours. We believe that automatically identifying histologic prostate contours will lead to increased objective analyses of surgical margins and extracapsular spread of cancer. Our results show that this is achievable. (orig.)

  9. Identifying ambiguous prostate gland contours from histology using capsule shape information and least squares curve fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Rania; McKenzie, Frederic D.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain an accurate assessment of the percentage and depth of extra-capsular soft tissue removed with the prostate by the various surgical techniques in order to help surgeons in determining the appropriateness of different surgical approaches. This can be enhanced by an accurate and automated means of identifying the prostate gland contour. To facilitate 3D reconstruction and, ultimately, more accurate analyses, it is essential for us to identify the capsule boundary that separates the prostate gland tissue from its extra-capsular tissue. However, the capsule is sometimes unrecognizable due to the naturally occurring intrusion of muscle and connective tissue into the prostate gland. At these regions where the capsule disappears, its contour can be arbitrarily created with a continuing contour line based on the natural shape of the prostate. We utilize an algorithm based on a least squares curve fitting technique that uses a prostate shape equation to merge previously detected capsule parts with the shape equation to produce an approximated curve that represents the prostate capsule. We have tested our algorithm using three different shapes on 13 histologic prostate slices that are cut at different locations from the apex. The best result shows a 90% average contour match when compared to pathologist-drawn contours. We believe that automatically identifying histologic prostate contours will lead to increased objective analyses of surgical margins and extracapsular spread of cancer. Our results show that this is achievable. (orig.)

  10. Hemispheric lateralization for early auditory processing of lexical tones: dependence on pitch level and pitch contour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Ming; Chen, Lin

    2013-09-01

    In Mandarin Chinese, a tonal language, pitch level and pitch contour are two dimensions of lexical tones according to their acoustic features (i.e., pitch patterns). A change in pitch level features a step change whereas that in pitch contour features a continuous variation in voice pitch. Currently, relatively little is known about the hemispheric lateralization for the processing of each dimension. To address this issue, we made whole-head electrical recordings of mismatch negativity in native Chinese speakers in response to the contrast of Chinese lexical tones in each dimension. We found that pre-attentive auditory processing of pitch level was obviously lateralized to the right hemisphere whereas there is a tendency for that of pitch contour to be lateralized to the left. We also found that the brain responded faster to pitch level than to pitch contour at a pre-attentive stage. These results indicate that the hemispheric lateralization for early auditory processing of lexical tones depends on the pitch level and pitch contour, and suggest an underlying inter-hemispheric interactive mechanism for the processing. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perception of illusory contour figures: Microgenetic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gvozdenović Vasilije P.

    2004-01-01

    Microgenetic analysis was used to investigate perception of illusory contour figures which represent whole, completed forms on the basis of segmented, incomplete stimulation. The analysis provided an experimental approach to this phenomenon which was standardly investigated phenomenologically. Experimental procedure consisted of two phases: a) priming phase and b) test phase which consisted of visual search task. Two types of visual search tasks were applied: (i) classic detection, in which s...

  12. Limited capacity for contour curvature in iconic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Koji

    2006-06-01

    We measured the difference threshold for contour curvature in iconic memory by using the cued discrimination method. The study stimulus consisting of 2 to 6 curved contours was briefly presented in the fovea, followed by two lines as cues. Subjects discriminated the curvature of two cued curves. The cue delays were 0 msec. and 300 msec. in Exps. 1 and 2, respectively, and 50 msec. before the study offset in Exp. 3. Analysis of data from Exps. 1 and 2 showed that the Weber fraction rose monotonically with the increase in set size. Clear set-size effects indicate that iconic memory has a limited capacity. Moreover, clear set-size effect in Exp. 3 indicates that perception itself has a limited capacity. Larger set-size effects in Exp. 1 than in Exp. 3 suggest that iconic memory after perceptual process has limited capacity. These properties of iconic memory at threshold level are contradictory to the traditional view that iconic memory has a high capacity both at suprathreshold and categorical levels.

  13. A Dynamic Multi-Projection-Contour Approximating Framework for the 3D Reconstruction of Buildings by Super-Generalized Optical Stereo-Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiming; Su, Nan; Zhao, Chunhui; Wang, Liguo

    2017-09-19

    In this paper, a novel framework of the 3D reconstruction of buildings is proposed, focusing on remote sensing super-generalized stereo-pairs (SGSPs). As we all know, 3D reconstruction cannot be well performed using nonstandard stereo pairs, since reliable stereo matching could not be achieved when the image-pairs are collected at a great difference of views, and we always failed to obtain dense 3D points for regions of buildings, and cannot do further 3D shape reconstruction. We defined SGSPs as two or more optical images collected in less constrained views but covering the same buildings. It is even more difficult to reconstruct the 3D shape of a building by SGSPs using traditional frameworks. As a result, a dynamic multi-projection-contour approximating (DMPCA) framework was introduced for SGSP-based 3D reconstruction. The key idea is that we do an optimization to find a group of parameters of a simulated 3D model and use a binary feature-image that minimizes the total differences between projection-contours of the building in the SGSPs and that in the simulated 3D model. Then, the simulated 3D model, defined by the group of parameters, could approximate the actual 3D shape of the building. Certain parameterized 3D basic-unit-models of typical buildings were designed, and a simulated projection system was established to obtain a simulated projection-contour in different views. Moreover, the artificial bee colony algorithm was employed to solve the optimization. With SGSPs collected by the satellite and our unmanned aerial vehicle, the DMPCA framework was verified by a group of experiments, which demonstrated the reliability and advantages of this work.

  14. Attention capture by contour onsets and offsets: no special role for onsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, D G; Humphreys, G W

    1995-07-01

    In five experiments, we investigated the power of targets defined by the onset or offset of one of an object's parts (contour onsets and offsets) either to guide or to capture visual attention. In Experiment 1, search for a single contour onset target was compared with search for a single contour offset target against a static background of distractors; no difference was found between the efficiency with which each could be detected. In Experiment 2, onsets and offsets were compared for automatic attention capture, when both occurred simultaneously. Unlike in previous studies, the effects of overall luminance change, new-object creation, and number of onset and offset items were controlled. It was found that contour onset and offset items captured attention equally well. However, display size effects on both target types were also apparent. Such effects may have been due to competition for selection between multiple onset and offset stimuli. In Experiments 3 and 4, single onset and offset stimuli were presented simultaneously and pitted directly against one another among a background of static distractors. In Experiment 3, we examined "guided search," for a target that was formed either from an onset or from an offset among static items. In Experiment 4, the onsets and offsets were uncorrelated with the target location. Similar results occurred in both experiments: target onsets and offsets were detected more efficiently than static stimuli which needed serial search; there remained effects of display size on performance; but there was still no advantage for onsets. In Experiment 5, we examined automatic attention capture by single onset and offset stimuli presented individually among static distractors. Again, there was no advantage for onset over offset targets and a display size effect was also present. These results suggest that, both in isolation and in competition, onsets that do not form new objects neither guide nor gain automatic attention more efficiently

  15. SU-E-J-131: Augmenting Atlas-Based Segmentation by Incorporating Image Features Proximal to the Atlas Contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li; Kapp, Daniel S.; Xing, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For facilitating the current automatic segmentation, in this work we propose a narrow-shell strategy to enhance the information of each contour in the library and to improve the accuracy of the exiting atlas-based approach. Methods: In setting up an atlas-based library, we include not only the coordinates of contour points, but also the image features adjacent to the contour. 139 planning CT scans with normal appearing livers obtained during their radiotherapy treatment planning were used to construct the library. The CT images within the library were registered each other using affine registration. A nonlinear narrow shell with the regional thickness determined by the distance between two vertices alongside the contour. The narrow shell was automatically constructed both inside and outside of the liver contours. The common image features within narrow shell between a new case and a library case were first selected by a Speed-up Robust Features (SURF) strategy. A deformable registration was then performed using a thin plate splines (TPS) technique. The contour associated with the library case was propagated automatically onto the images of the new patient by exploiting the deformation field vectors. The liver contour was finally obtained by employing level set based energy function within the narrow shell. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by comparing quantitatively the auto-segmentation results with that delineated by a physician. Results: Application of the technique to 30 liver cases suggested that the technique was capable of reliably segment organs such as the liver with little human intervention. Compared with the manual segmentation results by a physician, the average and discrepancies of the volumetric overlap percentage (VOP) was found to be 92.43%+2.14%. Conclusion: Incorporation of image features into the library contours improves the currently available atlas-based auto-contouring techniques and provides a clinically

  16. SU-E-J-131: Augmenting Atlas-Based Segmentation by Incorporating Image Features Proximal to the Atlas Contours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dengwang; Liu, Li [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Kapp, Daniel S.; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For facilitating the current automatic segmentation, in this work we propose a narrow-shell strategy to enhance the information of each contour in the library and to improve the accuracy of the exiting atlas-based approach. Methods: In setting up an atlas-based library, we include not only the coordinates of contour points, but also the image features adjacent to the contour. 139 planning CT scans with normal appearing livers obtained during their radiotherapy treatment planning were used to construct the library. The CT images within the library were registered each other using affine registration. A nonlinear narrow shell with the regional thickness determined by the distance between two vertices alongside the contour. The narrow shell was automatically constructed both inside and outside of the liver contours. The common image features within narrow shell between a new case and a library case were first selected by a Speed-up Robust Features (SURF) strategy. A deformable registration was then performed using a thin plate splines (TPS) technique. The contour associated with the library case was propagated automatically onto the images of the new patient by exploiting the deformation field vectors. The liver contour was finally obtained by employing level set based energy function within the narrow shell. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by comparing quantitatively the auto-segmentation results with that delineated by a physician. Results: Application of the technique to 30 liver cases suggested that the technique was capable of reliably segment organs such as the liver with little human intervention. Compared with the manual segmentation results by a physician, the average and discrepancies of the volumetric overlap percentage (VOP) was found to be 92.43%+2.14%. Conclusion: Incorporation of image features into the library contours improves the currently available atlas-based auto-contouring techniques and provides a clinically

  17. Wh-question intonation in Peninsular Spanish: Multiple contours and the effect of task type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C. Henriksen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an experimental investigation of wh-question intonation in Peninsular Spanish. Speech data were collected from six León, Spain Peninsular Spanish speakers, and oral production data were elicited under two conditions: a computerized sentence reading task and an information gap task-oriented dialogue. The latter task was an adaptation of the HCRC Map Task method (cf. Anderson et al., 1991 and was designed to elicit multiple wh-question productions in an unscripted and more spontaneous speech style than the standard sentence reading task. Results indicate that four contours exist in the tonal inventory of the six speakers. The two most frequent contours were a final rise contour and a nuclear circumflex contour. Systematic task-based differences were found for four of the six speakers, indicating that sentence reading task data alone may not accurately reflect spontaneous speech tonal patterns (cf. Cruttenden, 2007; but see also Lickley, Schepman, & Ladd, 2005. The experimental findings serve to clarify a number of assumptions about the syntax-prosody interface underlying wh-question utterance signaling; they also have implications for research methods in intonation and task-based variation in laboratory phonology.

  18. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection

  19. The role of non-CRF inhibition in contour detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorescu, C.; Petkov, N.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a biologically motivated computational step, called non-classical receptive field (non-CRF) inhibition, to improve the performance of contour detectors. Non-CRF inhibition is exhibited by 80% of the orientation selective neurons in the primary visual cortex of macaque monkeys and has been

  20. Validation of contour-driven thin-plate splines for tracking fraction-to-fraction changes in anatomy and radiation therapy dose mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaly, B; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Dyk, J Van

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study is to validate a deformable model using contour-driven thin-plate splines for application to radiation therapy dose mapping. Our testing includes a virtual spherical phantom as well as real computed tomography (CT) data from ten prostate cancer patients with radio-opaque markers surgically implanted into the prostate and seminal vesicles. In the spherical mathematical phantom, homologous control points generated automatically given input contour data in CT slice geometry were compared to homologous control point placement using analytical geometry as the ground truth. The dose delivered to specific voxels driven by both sets of homologous control points were compared to determine the accuracy of dose tracking via the deformable model. A 3D analytical spherically symmetric dose distribution with a dose gradient of ∼10% per mm was used for this phantom. This test showed that the uncertainty in calculating the delivered dose to a tissue element depends on slice thickness and the variation in defining homologous landmarks, where dose agreement of 3-4% in high dose gradient regions was achieved. In the patient data, radio-opaque marker positions driven by the thin-plate spline algorithm were compared to the actual marker positions as identified in the CT scans. It is demonstrated that the deformable model is accurate (∼2.5 mm) to within the intra-observer contouring variability. This work shows that the algorithm is appropriate for describing changes in pelvic anatomy and for the dose mapping application with dose gradients characteristic of conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy

  1. Validation of contour-driven thin-plate splines for tracking fraction-to-fraction changes in anatomy and radiation therapy dose mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaly, B; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Van Dyk, J

    2005-02-07

    The goal of this study is to validate a deformable model using contour-driven thin-plate splines for application to radiation therapy dose mapping. Our testing includes a virtual spherical phantom as well as real computed tomography (CT) data from ten prostate cancer patients with radio-opaque markers surgically implanted into the prostate and seminal vesicles. In the spherical mathematical phantom, homologous control points generated automatically given input contour data in CT slice geometry were compared to homologous control point placement using analytical geometry as the ground truth. The dose delivered to specific voxels driven by both sets of homologous control points were compared to determine the accuracy of dose tracking via the deformable model. A 3D analytical spherically symmetric dose distribution with a dose gradient of approximately 10% per mm was used for this phantom. This test showed that the uncertainty in calculating the delivered dose to a tissue element depends on slice thickness and the variation in defining homologous landmarks, where dose agreement of 3-4% in high dose gradient regions was achieved. In the patient data, radio-opaque marker positions driven by the thin-plate spline algorithm were compared to the actual marker positions as identified in the CT scans. It is demonstrated that the deformable model is accurate (approximately 2.5 mm) to within the intra-observer contouring variability. This work shows that the algorithm is appropriate for describing changes in pelvic anatomy and for the dose mapping application with dose gradients characteristic of conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy.

  2. Detection of the carpal bone contours from 3-D MR images of the wrist using a planar radial scale-space snake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J. G.; Venema, H. W.; Grimbergen, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problems encountered when applying snake models to detect the contours of the carpal bones in 3-D MR images of the wrist. In order to improve the performance of the original snake model introduced by Kass [1], we propose a new image force based on one-dimensional (1-D)

  3. Spatiotemporal frequency characteristics of cerebral oscillations during the perception of fundamental frequency contour changes in one-syllable intonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Sanae; Okumura, Eiichi; Remijn, Gerard B; Yoshimura, Yuko; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Shitamichi, Kiyomi; Nagao, Kikuko; Mochiduki, Masayuki; Haruta, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Norio; Munesue, Toshio; Tsubokawa, Tsunehisa; Oi, Manabu; Nakatani, Hideo; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio

    2012-05-02

    Accurate perception of fundamental frequency (F0) contour changes in the human voice is important for understanding a speaker's intonation, and consequently also his/her attitude. In this study, we investigated the neural processes involved in the perception of F0 contour changes in the Japanese one-syllable interjection "ne" in 21 native-Japanese listeners. A passive oddball paradigm was applied in which "ne" with a high falling F0 contour, used when urging a reaction from the listener, was randomly presented as a rare deviant among a frequent "ne" syllable with a flat F0 contour (i.e., meaningless intonation). We applied an adaptive spatial filtering method to the neuromagnetic time course recorded by whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) and estimated the spatiotemporal frequency dynamics of event-related cerebral oscillatory changes in the oddball paradigm. Our results demonstrated a significant elevation of beta band event-related desynchronization (ERD) in the right temporal and frontal areas, in time windows from 100 to 300 and from 300 to 500 ms after the onset of deviant stimuli (high falling F0 contour). This is the first study to reveal detailed spatiotemporal frequency characteristics of cerebral oscillations during the perception of intonational (not lexical) F0 contour changes in the human voice. The results further confirmed that the right hemisphere is associated with perception of intonational F0 contour information in the human voice, especially in early time windows. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of life among adults following bariatric and body contouring surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Jo; Bath-Hextall, Fiona; Maclean, Joan; Stanton, Wendy; Soldin, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Weight loss following bariatric surgery is associated with significant improvements in obesity-related comorbidities, body satisfaction and psychosocial outcomes, at least in the short term. However, in the context of extreme weight loss, body image and appearance may worsen again because the "excess" or "loose" skin can lead to both functional and profound dissatisfaction with appearance. These concerns have led to an increasing uptake of post-bariatric surgery, "body-contouring" procedures but the implications for quality of life (QoL) have not been thoroughly considered. The objective was to identify the best available evidence regarding the QoL outcomes for adults following bariatric and body contouring surgery. The review considered studies involving people aged 18 years and beyond who underwent bariatric surgery and body contouring surgery. The review considered studies that evaluated bariatric surgery as well as body contouring surgery. The review considered both experimental and epidemiological study designs. The primary outcomes were QoL as measured by validated tools at less than two years, two to five years and more than five years following body contouring surgery. The secondary outcomes were adverse events, unsatisfactory aesthetic appearance and weight gain. Six databases were searched, including Cochrane Central, MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO and CINAHL. Studies published from 1954 to 2014 were considered. Additional searches for unpublished studies were undertaken in BIOSIS citation index, Register of Current Controlled Trials and Global Health Observatory. The methodological quality of eligible studies was assessed independently by two reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute quality assessment tool. Data extraction from the included studies was undertaken and summarized independently by two reviewers using the standardized Joanna Briggs Institute data extraction tool. Studies were too heterogeneous and could not be pooled in

  5. Making the cut for the contour method

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, P. John; Ledgard, Peter; Hiller, Stan; Hosseinzadh Torknezhad, Foroogh

    2012-01-01

    The contour method is becoming an increasingly popular measurement technique for mapping residual stress in engineering components. The accuracy of the technique is critically dependent on the quality of the cut performed. This paper presents results from blind cutting trials on austenitic stainless steel using electro-discharge machines made by three manufacturers. The suitability of the machines is assessed based on the surface finish achieved, risk of wire breakages and the nature of cutti...

  6. Optimizing body contour in massive weight loss patients: the modified vertical abdominoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Luiz Fernando da; Landecker, Alan; Manta, Anísio Marinho

    2004-12-01

    In morbid obesity, contour deformities of the abdomen are common after bariatric surgery and radical weight loss. Traditional abdominoplasty techniques often fail to maximally improve body contour in these cases because adjacent sites such as the hip rolls and flanks are not treated, leaving the patient with large lateral tissue redundancies and dog-ears. In an attempt to solve these challenging problems, the authors present the modified vertical abdominoplasty technique, a single-stage procedure that involves a combined vertical and transverse approach in which an "en bloc" resection of the redundant tissues is performed without undermining, drainage, or reinforcement of the abdominal wall. The latter is only carried out when diastasis and/or hernias are present, and Marlex mesh may be utilized when indicated. In patients with simultaneous large umbilical hernias and/or excessively long stalks, neoumbilicoplasty is recommended. A significant improvement of abdominal contour was obtained in the vast majority of patients because the resection design offers simultaneous treatment of both vertical and transverse tissue redundancies in the abdomen and neighboring regions, with more harmonic results when compared with purely vertical or transverse approaches. The modified vertical abdominoplasty technique is an easy, fast, and reliable alternative for treating these patients, with less intraoperative bleeding, reduced overall cost, and low morbidity rates. In selected cases, the technique is capable of offering excellent results in terms of contouring and maximizes the overall outcome of treatment protocols for these patients, who can then be integrated into normal life with heightened self-esteem, happiness, and productivity.

  7. Automatic segmentation of closed-contour features in ophthalmic images using graph theory and dynamic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Stephanie J.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized framework for segmenting closed-contour anatomical and pathological features using graph theory and dynamic programming (GTDP). More specifically, the GTDP method previously developed for quantifying retinal and corneal layer thicknesses is extended to segment objects such as cells and cysts. The presented technique relies on a transform that maps closed-contour features in the Cartesian domain into lines in the quasi-polar domain. The features of interest are then segmented as layers via GTDP. Application of this method to segment closed-contour features in several ophthalmic image types is shown. Quantitative validation experiments for retinal pigmented epithelium cell segmentation in confocal fluorescence microscopy images attests to the accuracy of the presented technique. PMID:22567602

  8. Luminance contours can gate afterimage colors and 'real' colors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anstis, S.; Vergeer, M.L.T.; Lier, R.J. van

    2012-01-01

    It has long been known that colored images may elicit afterimages in complementary colors. We have already shown (Van Lier, Vergeer, & Anstis, 2009) that one and the same adapting image may result in different afterimage colors, depending on the test contours presented after the colored image. The

  9. A Fast and On-Machine Measuring System Using the Laser Displacement Sensor for the Contour Parameters of the Drill Pipe Thread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixu Dong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The inconvenient loading and unloading of a long and heavy drill pipe gives rise to the difficulty in measuring the contour parameters of its threads at both ends. To solve this problem, in this paper we take the SCK230 drill pipe thread-repairing machine tool as a carrier to design and achieve a fast and on-machine measuring system based on a laser probe. This system drives a laser displacement sensor to acquire the contour data of a certain axial section of the thread by using the servo function of a CNC machine tool. To correct the sensor’s measurement errors caused by the measuring point inclination angle, an inclination error model is built to compensate data in real time. To better suppress random error interference and ensure real contour information, a new wavelet threshold function is proposed to process data through the wavelet threshold denoising. Discrete data after denoising is segmented according to the geometrical characteristics of the drill pipe thread, and the regression model of the contour data in each section is fitted by using the method of weighted total least squares (WTLS. Then, the thread parameters are calculated in real time to judge the processing quality. Inclination error experiments show that the proposed compensation model is accurate and effective, and it can improve the data acquisition accuracy of a sensor. Simulation results indicate that the improved threshold function is of better continuity and self-adaptability, which makes sure that denoising effects are guaranteed, and, meanwhile, the complete elimination of real data distorted in random errors is avoided. Additionally, NC50 thread-testing experiments show that the proposed on-machine measuring system can complete the measurement of a 25 mm thread in 7.8 s, with a measurement accuracy of ±8 μm and repeatability limit ≤ 4 μm (high repeatability, and hence the accuracy and efficiency of measurement are both improved.

  10. Response surface modeling of acid activation of raw diatomite using in sunflower oil bleaching by: Box-Behnken experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larouci, M; Safa, M; Meddah, B; Aoues, A; Sonnet, P

    2015-03-01

    The optimum conditions for acid activation of diatomite for maximizing bleaching efficiency of the diatomite in sun flower oil treatment were studied. Box-Behnken experimental design combining with response surface modeling (RSM) and quadratic programming (QP) was employed to obtain the optimum conditions of three independent variables (acid concentration, activation time and solid to liquid) for acid activation of diatomite. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by means of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95 % confidence limits (α = 0.05). The optimum values of the selected variables were obtained by solving the quadratic regression model, as well as by analyzing the response surface contour plots. The experimental conditions at this global point were determined to be acid concentration = 8.963 N, activation time = 11.9878 h, and solid to liquid ratio = 221.2113 g/l, the corresponding bleaching efficiency was found to be about 99 %.

  11. Diffusion tensor driven contour closing for cell microinjection targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, Gabriele; Mattos, Leonardo S; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a novel approach to robust automatic detection of unstained living cells in bright-field (BF) microscope images with the goal of producing a target list for an automated microinjection system. The overall image analysis process is described and includes: preprocessing, ridge enhancement, image segmentation, shape analysis and injection point definition. The developed algorithm implements a new version of anisotropic contour completion (ACC) based on the partial differential equation (PDE) for heat diffusion which improves the cell segmentation process by elongating the edges only along their tangent direction. The developed ACC algorithm is equivalent to a dilation of the binary edge image with a continuous elliptic structural element that takes into account local orientation of the contours preventing extension towards normal direction. Experiments carried out on real images of 10 to 50 microm CHO-K1 adherent cells show a remarkable reliability in the algorithm along with up to 85% success for cell detection and injection point definition.

  12. Flyby Error Analysis Based on Contour Plots for the Cassini Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, P. W.; Gist, E. M.; Goodson, T. D.; Hahn, Y.; Wagner, S. V.; Williams, P. N.

    2008-01-01

    The maneuver cancellation analysis consists of cost contour plots employed by the Cassini maneuver team. The plots are two-dimensional linear representations of a larger six-dimensional solution to a multi-maneuver, multi-encounter mission at Saturn. By using contours plotted with the dot product of vectors B and R and the dot product of vectors B and T components, it is possible to view the effects delta V on for various encounter positions in the B-plane. The plot is used in operations to help determine if the Approach Maneuver (ensuing encounter minus three days) and/or the Cleanup Maneuver (ensuing encounter plus three days) can be cancelled and also is a linear check of an integrated solution.

  13. THREE DIMENSIONAL DIGITIZATION OF HUMAN HEAD BY FUSING STRUCTURED LIGHT AND CONTOURS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Gang; Li Dehua; Hu Hanping; Hu Bing

    2002-01-01

    Three dimensional digitization of human head is desired in many applications. In this paper, an information fusion based scheme is presented to obtain 3-D information of human head. Structured light technology is employed to measure depth. For the special reflection areas,in which the structured light stripe can not be detected directly, the shape of the structured light stripe can be calculated from the corresponding contour. By fusing the information of structured light and the contours, the problem of reflectance influence is solved, and the whole shape of head,including hair area, can be obtained. Some good results are obtained.

  14. Implementing Head and Neck Contouring Peer Review without Pathway Delay: The On-demand Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, C; Sanghera, P; Good, J; Nightingale, P; Hartley, A

    2017-12-01

    Peer review of contour volume is a priority in the radiotherapy treatment quality assurance process for head and neck cancer. It is essential that incorporation of peer review activity does not introduce additional delays. An on-demand peer review process was piloted to assess the feasibility and efficiency of this approach, as compared with a historic scheduled weekly approach. Between November 2016 and April 2017 four head and neck clinicians in one centre took part in an on-demand peer review process. Cases were of radical or adjuvant intent of any histology and submitted on a voluntary basis. The outcome of contour peer review would be one of unchanged (UC), unchanged with variation or discretion noted (UV), minor change (M) or significant change (S). The time difference between the completion of the on-demand peer review was compared with the time difference to a hypothetical next Monday or Tuesday weekly peer review meeting. The time taken to review each case was also documented in the latter period of the pilot project. In total, 62 cases underwent peer review. Peer review on-demand provided dosimetrists with an average of an extra two working days available per case to meet treatment start dates. The proportion of cases with outcomes UC, UV, M and S were 45%, 16%, 26% and 13%, respectively. The mean peer review time spent per case was 17 min (12 cases). The main reason for S was discrepancy in imaging interpretation (4/8 cases). A lower proportion of oropharyngeal cases were submitted and had S outcomes. A higher proportion of complex cases, e.g. sinonasal/nasopharynx location or previous downstaging chemotherapy had S outcomes. The distribution of S outcomes appears to be similar regardless of clinician experience. The level of peer review activity among individuals differed by workload and job timetable. On-demand peer review of the head and neck contour volume is feasible, reduces delay to the start of dosimetry planning and bypasses the logistical

  15. Piezoelectric Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Ring Shaped Contour-Mode MEMS Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasambe, P. V.; Asgaonkar, V. V.; Bangera, A. D.; Lokre, A. S.; Rathod, S. S.; Bhoir, D. V.

    2018-02-01

    Flexibility in setting fundamental frequency of resonator independent of its motional resistance is one of the desired criteria in micro-electromechanical (MEMS) resonator design. It is observed that ring-shaped piezoelectric contour-mode MEMS resonators satisfy this design criterion than in case of rectangular plate MEMS resonators. Also ring-shaped contour-mode piezoelectric MEMS resonator has an advantage that its fundamental frequency is defined by in-plane dimensions, but they show variation of fundamental frequency with different Platinum (Pt) thickness referred as change in ratio of fNEW /fO . This paper presents the effects of variation in geometrical parameters and change in piezoelectric material on the resonant frequencies of Platinum piezoelectric-Aluminium ring-shaped contour-mode MEMS resonators and its electrical parameters. The proposed structure with Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) as the piezoelectric material was observed to be a piezoelectric material with minimal change in fundamental resonant frequency due to Platinum thickness variation. This structure was also found to exhibit extremely low motional resistance of 0.03 Ω as compared to the 31-35 Ω range obtained when using AlN as the piezoelectric material. CoventorWare 10 is used for the design, simulation and corresponding analysis of resonators which is Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis and design tool for MEMS devices.

  16. Effect of CT scanning parameters on volumetric measurements of pulmonary nodules by 3D active contour segmentation: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, Ted W; Chan, H-P; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Zhou Chuan; Chughtai, Aamer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of CT scanning and reconstruction parameters on automated segmentation and volumetric measurements of nodules in CT images. Phantom nodules of known sizes were used so that segmentation accuracy could be quantified in comparison to ground-truth volumes. Spherical nodules having 4.8, 9.5 and 16 mm diameters and 50 and 100 mg cc -1 calcium contents were embedded in lung-tissue-simulating foam which was inserted in the thoracic cavity of a chest section phantom. CT scans of the phantom were acquired with a 16-slice scanner at various tube currents, pitches, fields-of-view and slice thicknesses. Scans were also taken using identical techniques either within the same day or five months apart for study of reproducibility. The phantom nodules were segmented with a three-dimensional active contour (3DAC) model that we previously developed for use on patient nodules. The percentage volume errors relative to the ground-truth volumes were estimated under the various imaging conditions. There was no statistically significant difference in volume error for repeated CT scans or scans taken with techniques where only pitch, field of view, or tube current (mA) were changed. However, the slice thickness significantly (p < 0.05) affected the volume error. Therefore, to evaluate nodule growth, consistent imaging conditions and high resolution should be used for acquisition of the serial CT scans, especially for smaller nodules. Understanding the effects of scanning and reconstruction parameters on volume measurements by 3DAC allows better interpretation of data and assessment of growth. Tracking nodule growth with computerized segmentation methods would reduce inter- and intraobserver variabilities

  17. An aid to two-dimensional contouring using nonuniform orthogonal grids - A Fortran algorithm

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gouveia, A.D.

    of grids in which Ax and Ay can differ with x and y respectively. Contours obtained in this manner should be used with care if slopes or trends are to be calculated. This algorithm has applications for data presentation in several specialized fields... showing the main features of the variable, care must be taken if the contours are to be used for quantitative estimations of slopes and trends. This procedure, however, avoids the possible errors of injudicious interpolation of the data onto a regular...

  18. An Investigation of Visual Contour Integration Ability in Relation to Writing Performance in Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Tsang, Cecilia W. P.; Wong, Agnes S. K.; Chan, Jackson Y.; Lee, Amos Y. T.; Lam, Miko C. Y.; Wong, C. W.; Lu, Zhonglin

    2012-01-01

    A previous study found a visual deficit in contour integration in English readers with dyslexia (Simmers & Bex, 2001). Visual contour integration may play an even more significant role in Chinese handwriting particularly due to its logographic presentation (Lam, Au, Leung, & Li-Tsang, 2011). The current study examined the relationship…

  19. Long-term stability of contour augmentation in the esthetic zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon S; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Gruber, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    , recent data from cone beam computed tomography studies have shown the augmented volume to be stable long-term. However, no human histologic data are available to document the tissue reactions to this bone augmentation procedure. METHODS: Over an 8-year period, 12 biopsies were harvested 14 to 80 months......BACKGROUND: Contour augmentation around early-placed implants (Type 2 placement) using autogenous bone chips combined with deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) and a collagen barrier membrane has been documented to predictably provide esthetically satisfactory clinical outcomes. In addition...... after implant placement with simultaneous contour augmentation in 10 patients. The biopsies were subjected to histologic and histomorphometric analysis. RESULTS: The biopsies consisted of 32.0% ± 9.6% DBBM particles and 40.6% ± 14.6% mature bone. 70.3% ± 14.5% of the DBBM particle surfaces were covered...

  20. Comparison of Computed Tomography– and Magnetic Resonance Imaging–based Clinical Target Volume Contours at Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanick, Cameron W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Castle, Katherine O. [Southeast Louisiana Radiation Oncology Group, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Vedam, Sastry [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Turner, Lehendrick M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rauch, Gaiane M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Klopp, Ann H., E-mail: aklopp@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: We prospectively compared computed tomography (CT)– and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–based high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) contours at the time of brachytherapy for cervical cancer in an effort to identify patients who might benefit most from MRI-based planning. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven patients who had undergone a pretreatment diagnostic MRI scan were included in the analysis. We delineated the HR-CTV on the brachytherapy CT and brachytherapy MRI scans independently for each patient. We then calculated the absolute volumes for each HR-CTV and the Dice coefficient of similarity (DC, a measure of spatial agreement) for the HR-CTV contours. We identified the clinical and tumor factors associated with (1) a discrepancy in volume between the CT HR-CTV and MRI HR-CTV contours; and (2) DC. The mean values were compared using 1-way analysis of variance or paired or unpaired t tests, as appropriate. Simple and multivariable linear regression analyses were used to model the effects of covariates on the outcomes. Results: Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB to IVA cervical cancer were treated with intracavitary brachytherapy using tandem and ovoid (n=33) or tandem and cylinder (n=4) applicators. The mean CT HR-CTV volume (44.1 cm{sup 3}) was larger than the mean MRI HR-CTV volume (35.1 cm{sup 3}; P<.0001, paired t test). On multivariable analysis, a higher body mass index (BMI) and tumor size ≥5 cm with parametrial invasion on the MRI scan at diagnosis were associated with an increased discrepancy in volume between the HR-CTV contours (P<.02 for both). In addition, the spatial agreement (as measured by DC) between the HR-CTV contours decreased with an increasing BMI (P=.013). Conclusions: We recommend MRI-based brachytherapy planning for patients with tumors >5 cm and parametrial invasion on MRI at diagnosis and for those with a high BMI.

  1. CMOS image sensor with contour enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Liya; Lai, Xiaofeng; Chen, Kun; Yuan, Xianghui

    2010-10-01

    Imitating the signal acquisition and processing of vertebrate retina, a CMOS image sensor with bionic pre-processing circuit is designed. Integration of signal-process circuit on-chip can reduce the requirement of bandwidth and precision of the subsequent interface circuit, and simplify the design of the computer-vision system. This signal pre-processing circuit consists of adaptive photoreceptor, spatial filtering resistive network and Op-Amp calculation circuit. The adaptive photoreceptor unit with a dynamic range of approximately 100 dB has a good self-adaptability for the transient changes in light intensity instead of intensity level itself. Spatial low-pass filtering resistive network used to mimic the function of horizontal cell, is composed of the horizontal resistor (HRES) circuit and OTA (Operational Transconductance Amplifier) circuit. HRES circuit, imitating dendrite of the neuron cell, comprises of two series MOS transistors operated in weak inversion region. Appending two diode-connected n-channel transistors to a simple transconductance amplifier forms the OTA Op-Amp circuit, which provides stable bias voltage for the gate of MOS transistors in HRES circuit, while serves as an OTA voltage follower to provide input voltage for the network nodes. The Op-Amp calculation circuit with a simple two-stage Op-Amp achieves the image contour enhancing. By adjusting the bias voltage of the resistive network, the smoothing effect can be tuned to change the effect of image's contour enhancement. Simulations of cell circuit and 16×16 2D circuit array are implemented using CSMC 0.5μm DPTM CMOS process.

  2. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Weight Loss and Body Contouring Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lotte; Klassen, Anne; Rose, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health-related quality of life and satisfaction with appearance are important outcomes in bariatric and body contouring surgery. To investigate these outcomes, scientifically sound and clinically meaningful patient-reported outcome instruments are needed. The authors measured health-r...

  3. Contours, 2ft Contour Information in AutoCAD & ArcInfo formats. AutoCAD contains cut line information. NAD83, Nevada State Plane, West Zone, US Foot. Broken into Township, Range, and Section Grids, Published in 2006, City of Carson City Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Contours dataset current as of 2006. 2ft Contour Information in AutoCAD & ArcInfo formats. AutoCAD contains cut line information. NAD83, Nevada State Plane, West...

  4. LV challenge LKEB contribution : fully automated myocardial contour detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhout, J.S.; Hendriksen, D.; Assen, van H.C.; Geest, van der R.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a contour detection method is described and evaluated on the evaluation data sets of the Cardiac MR Left Ventricle Segmentation Challenge as part of MICCAI 2009s 3D Segmentation Challenge for Clinical Applications. The proposed method, using 2D AAM and 3D ASM, performs a fully

  5. Eyeglasses Lens Contour Extraction from Facial Images Using an Efficient Shape Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Borza

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system that automatically extracts the position of the eyeglasses and the accurate shape and size of the frame lenses in facial images. The novelty brought by this paper consists in three key contributions. The first one is an original model for representing the shape of the eyeglasses lens, using Fourier descriptors. The second one is a method for generating the search space starting from a finite, relatively small number of representative lens shapes based on Fourier morphing. Finally, we propose an accurate lens contour extraction algorithm using a multi-stage Monte Carlo sampling technique. Multiple experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  6. Study fidelity spatial contours of industrial robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ivanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper to identify deviations fidelity spatial contours of industrial robots, determine the error pattern detected, and define the ways to solve the problem.The paper presents the research results of fidelity spatial contours done by Fanuc M- 710iC/50 industrial robot when moving along a predetermined path. The proposed method uses a QC20-W ballbar wireless system of Renishaw company, designed to diagnose the state of the measurement and playback linear and angular displacements of the CNC.The solutions to adapt the QC20-W ballbar system to the constructive peculiarities of industrial robots with five or more independently controlled axes are given. The stages of the preparation of diagnostic systems and software robot movements are described.According to study results of errors that arise while playing back the programmed motions of a fixed point of robot capture in three mutually perpendicular planes its practical accuracy has been defined when performing movements in a given region of the working area, thereby allowing us, eventually, to draw a conclusion on the possibility to use a robot in one technological process or another.The study has resulted in emerging the guidelines for the operation of industrial robots with five or more independently controlled axes. Using these guidelines enables us to increase the playback accuracy of the industrial robot to 0.01 mm.

  7. Design and milling manufacture of polyurethane custom contoured cushions for wheelchair users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Kindlein Junior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe design of custom contoured cushions manufactured inflexible polyurethane foams is an option to improvepositioning and comfort for people with disabilities thatspend most of the day seated in the same position. Thesesurfaces increase the contact area between the seat and theuser. This fact contributes to minimise the local pressuresthat can generate problems like decubitus ulcers. Thepresent research aims at establishing development routesfor custom cushion production to wheelchair users. Thisstudy also contributes to the investigation of ComputerNumerical Control (CNC machining of flexible polyurethanefoams.MethodThe proposed route to obtain the customised seat beganwith acquiring the user’s contour in adequate posturethrough plaster cast. To collect the surface geometry, thecast was three-dimensionally scanned and manipulated inCAD/CAM software. CNC milling parameters such as tools,spindle speeds and feed rates to machine flexiblepolyurethane foams were tested. These parameters wereanalysed regarding the surface quality. The best parameterswere then tested in a customised seat. The possibledimensional changes generated during foam cutting wereanalysed through 3D scanning. Also, the customised seatpressure and temperature distribution was tested.ResultsThe best parameters found for foams with a density of50kg/cm3 were high spindle speeds (24000 rpm and feedrates between 2400–4000mm/min. Those parameters didnot generate significant deformities in the machinedcushions. The custom contoured cushion satisfactorilyincreased the contact area between wheelchair and user, asit distributed pressure and heat evenly.ConclusionThrough this study it was possible to define routes for thedevelopment and manufacturing of customised seats usingdirect CNC milling in flexible polyurethane foams. It alsoshowed that custom contoured cushions efficientlydistribute pressure and temperature, which is believed tominimise tissue lesions such as pressure

  8. Contour tracking and corner detection in a logic programming environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bell, Benjamin; Pau, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    The added functionality such as contour tracking and corner detection which logic programming lends to standard image operators is described. An environment for implementing low-level imaging operations with Prolog predicates is considered. Within this environment, higher-level image predicates (...

  9. Adapting Active Shape Models for 3D segmentation of tubular structures in medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; van Ginneken, Bram; Viergever, Max A; Niessen, Wiro J

    2003-07-01

    Active Shape Models (ASM) have proven to be an effective approach for image segmentation. In some applications, however, the linear model of gray level appearance around a contour that is used in ASM is not sufficient for accurate boundary localization. Furthermore, the statistical shape model may be too restricted if the training set is limited. This paper describes modifications to both the shape and the appearance model of the original ASM formulation. Shape model flexibility is increased, for tubular objects, by modeling the axis deformation independent of the cross-sectional deformation, and by adding supplementary cylindrical deformation modes. Furthermore, a novel appearance modeling scheme that effectively deals with a highly varying background is developed. In contrast with the conventional ASM approach, the new appearance model is trained on both boundary and non-boundary points, and the probability that a given point belongs to the boundary is estimated non-parametrically. The methods are evaluated on the complex task of segmenting thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Shape approximation errors were successfully reduced using the two shape model extensions. Segmentation using the new appearance model significantly outperformed the original ASM scheme; average volume errors are 5.1% and 45% respectively.

  10. Does atlas-based autosegmentation of neck levels require subsequent manual contour editing to avoid risk of severe target underdosage? A dosimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voet, Peter W.J.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Teguh, David N.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of not editing auto-contours of the elective neck and organs at risk (OAR), generated with atlas-based autosegmentation (ABAS) (Elekta software) for head and neck cancer patients. Materials and methods: For nine patients ABAS auto-contours and auto-contours edited by two observers were available. Based on the non-edited auto-contours clinically acceptable IMRT plans were constructed (designated 'ABAS plans'). These plans were then evaluated for the two edited structure sets, by quantifying the percentage of the neck-PTV receiving more than 95% of the prescribed dose (V 95 ) and the near-minimum dose (D 99 ) in the neck PTV. Dice coefficients and mean contour distances were calculated to quantify the similarity of ABAS auto-contours with the structure sets edited by observer 1 and observer 2. To study the dosimetric importance of editing OAR auto-contours a new IMRT plan was generated for each patient-observer combination, based on the observer's edited CTV and the non-edited salivary gland auto-contours. For each plan mean doses for the non-edited glands were compared with doses for the same glands edited by the observer. Results: For both observers, edited neck CTVs were larger than ABAS auto-contours (p ≤ 0.04), by a mean of 8.7%. When evaluating ABAS plans on the PTVs of the edited structure sets, V 95 reduced by 7.2% ± 5.4% (1 SD) (p 99 was 14.2 Gy (range 1-54 Gy). Even for Dice coefficients >0.8 and mean contour distances 99 up to 11 Gy were observed. For treatment plans based on observer PTVs and non-edited auto-contoured salivary glands, the mean doses in the edited glands differed by only -0.6 Gy ± 1.0 Gy (p = 0.06). Conclusions: Editing of auto-contoured neck CTVs generated by ABAS is required to avoid large underdosages in target volumes. Often used similarity measures for evaluation of auto-contouring algorithms, such as dice coefficients, do not predict well for expected PTV underdose

  11. Surface and contour-preserving origamic architecture paper pop-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Sang N; Leow, Su-Jun; Le-Nguyen, Tuong-Vu; Ruiz, Conrado; Low, Kok-Lim

    2014-02-01

    Origamic architecture (OA) is a form of papercraft that involves cutting and folding a single sheet of paper to produce a 3D pop-up, and is commonly used to depict architectural structures. Because of the strict geometric and physical constraints, OA design requires considerable skill and effort. In this paper, we present a method to automatically generate an OA design that closely depicts an input 3D model. Our algorithm is guided by a novel set of geometric conditions to guarantee the foldability and stability of the generated pop-ups. The generality of the conditions allows our algorithm to generate valid pop-up structures that are previously not accounted for by other algorithms. Our method takes a novel image-domain approach to convert the input model to an OA design. It performs surface segmentation of the input model in the image domain, and carefully represents each surface with a set of parallel patches. Patches are then modified to make the entire structure foldable and stable. Visual and quantitative comparisons of results have shown our algorithm to be significantly better than the existing methods in the preservation of contours, surfaces, and volume. The designs have also been shown to more closely resemble those created by real artists.

  12. Surface- and Contour-Preserving Origamic Architecture Paper Pop-Ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Sang N; Leow, Su-Jun; Le-Nguyen, Tuong-Vu; Ruiz, Conrado; Low, Kok-Lim

    2013-08-02

    Origamic architecture (OA) is a form of papercraft that involves cutting and folding a single sheet of paper to produce a 3D pop-up, and is commonly used to depict architectural structures. Because of the strict geometric and physical constraints, OA design requires considerable skill and effort. In this paper, we present a method to automatically generate an OA design that closely depicts an input 3D model. Our algorithm is guided by a novel set of geometric conditions to guarantee the foldability and stability of the generated pop-ups. The generality of the conditions allows our algorithm to generate valid pop-up structures that are previously not accounted for by other algorithms. Our method takes a novel image-domain approach to convert the input model to an OA design. It performs surface segmentation of the input model in the image domain, and carefully represents each surface with a set of parallel patches. Patches are then modified to make the entire structure foldable and stable. Visual and quantitative comparisons of results have shown our algorithm to be significantly better than the existing methods in the preservation of contours, surfaces and volume. The designs have also been shown to more closely resemble those created by real artists.

  13. Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies to the Spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmond, Kristin J.; Robertson, Scott; Lo, Simon S.; Soltys, Scott G.; Ryu, Samuel; McNutt, Todd; Chao, Samuel T.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Ghia, Amol; Chang, Eric L.; Sheehan, Jason; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop consensus contouring guidelines for postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Methods and Materials: Ten spine SBRT specialists representing 10 international centers independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV), spinal cord, and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for 10 representative clinical scenarios in postoperative spine SBRT for metastatic solid tumor malignancies. Contours were imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Agreement between physicians was calculated with an expectation minimization algorithm using simultaneous truth and performance level estimation with κ statistics. Target volume definition guidelines were established by finding optimized confidence level consensus contours using histogram agreement analyses. Results: Nine expert radiation oncologists and 1 neurosurgeon completed contours for all 10 cases. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 (range, 0.71-0.89) and 0.94 (range, 0.90-0.99) for the CTV and 0.79 (range, 0.70-0.95) and 0.92 (range, 0.87-0.99) for the PTV), respectively. Mean κ agreement, which demonstrates the probability that contours agree by chance alone, was 0.58 (range, 0.43-0.70) for CTV and 0.58 (range, 0.37-0.76) for PTV (P<.001 for all cases). Optimized consensus contours were established for all patients with 80% confidence interval. Recommendations for CTV include treatment of the entire preoperative extent of bony and epidural disease, plus immediately adjacent bony anatomic compartments at risk of microscopic disease extension. In particular, a “donut-shaped” CTV was consistently applied in cases of preoperative circumferential epidural extension, regardless of extent of residual epidural extension. Otherwise more conformal anatomic-based CTVs were determined and described. Spinal instrumentation was consistently excluded from the CTV. Conclusions: We provide

  14. Image-based historical manuscript dating using contour and stroke fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Sheng; Samara, Petros; Burgers, Jan; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2016-01-01

    Historical manuscript dating has always been an important challenge for historians but since countless manuscripts have become digitally available recently, the pattern recognition community has started addressing the dating problem as well. In this paper, we present a family of local contour

  15. The effect of betel nut chewing on contour and object masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Chou; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2011-11-01

    The betel nut is a common stimulant in many Asian countries. We employed the masking task developed by Enns and Di Lollo (Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 4, 345-352, 1997) to investigate the effects of betel nuts on sensory and attentional processing. In the masking task, participants needed to identify a target that was masked by either a contour mask or an object mask. Sensory processing was assessed by examining target identification in the contour mask condition when the target was presented only centrally, whereas attentional processing was assessed by examining target identification in the object mask condition when the target was presented randomly in either a central or a parafoveal location. The results showed that chewing betel nut and chewing gum produced significant contour masking with a large effect size, similar to the pure control condition, in which participants chewed nothing, and the placebo control condition, in which what participants chewed was disguised. This suggests that neither betel nut nor gum affects sensory processing. Alternatively, betel nut chewing could produce a reduction in object masking for the habitual chewers and the nonchewers, suggesting an effect of betel nut on attentional processing. This concentrated attention was also observed in the placebo control condition; thus, it cannot be exclusively driven by the expectation effect. Also, chewing per se reduced the attentional distribution foveally.

  16. Object detection approach using generative sparse, hierarchical networks with top-down and lateral connections for combining texture/color detection and shape/contour detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiton, Dylan M.; Kenyon, Garrett T.; Brumby, Steven P.; Schultz, Peter F.; George, John S.

    2015-07-28

    An approach to detecting objects in an image dataset may combine texture/color detection, shape/contour detection, and/or motion detection using sparse, generative, hierarchical models with lateral and top-down connections. A first independent representation of objects in an image dataset may be produced using a color/texture detection algorithm. A second independent representation of objects in the image dataset may be produced using a shape/contour detection algorithm. A third independent representation of objects in the image dataset may be produced using a motion detection algorithm. The first, second, and third independent representations may then be combined into a single coherent output using a combinatorial algorithm.

  17. Object detection approach using generative sparse, hierarchical networks with top-down and lateral connections for combining texture/color detection and shape/contour detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiton, Dylan M.; Kenyon, Garrett T.; Brumby, Steven P.; Schultz, Peter F.; George, John S.

    2016-10-25

    An approach to detecting objects in an image dataset may combine texture/color detection, shape/contour detection, and/or motion detection using sparse, generative, hierarchical models with lateral and top-down connections. A first independent representation of objects in an image dataset may be produced using a color/texture detection algorithm. A second independent representation of objects in the image dataset may be produced using a shape/contour detection algorithm. A third independent representation of objects in the image dataset may be produced using a motion detection algorithm. The first, second, and third independent representations may then be combined into a single coherent output using a combinatorial algorithm.

  18. Contoured-gap coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, F. D.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Cassibry, J. T.; Hsu, S. C.

    2014-10-01

    Arrays of supersonic, high momentum flux plasma jets can be used as standoff compression drivers for generating spherically imploding plasma liners for driving magneto-inertial fusion, hence the name plasma-jet-driven MIF (PJMIF). HyperV developed linear plasma jets for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL where two guns were successfully tested. Further development at HyperV resulted in achieving the PLX goal of 8000 μg at 50 km/s. Prior work on contoured-gap coaxial guns demonstrated an approach to control the blowby instability and achieved substantial performance improvements. For future plasma liner experiments we propose to use contoured-gap coaxial guns with small Minirailgun injectors. We will describe such a gun for a 60-gun plasma liner experiment. Discussion topics will include impurity control, plasma jet symmetry and topology (esp. related to uniformity and compactness), velocity capability, and techniques planned for achieving gun efficiency of >50% using tailored impedance matched pulse forming networks. Mach2 and UAH SPH code simulations will be included. Work supported by US DOE DE-FG02-05ER54810.

  19. SU-F-J-161: Prostate Contouring in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prostheses: Impact of Using Artifact-Reduced CT Images and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzibak, A; Loblaw, A; Morton, G; Vesprini, D; Liu, S; Chung, H; Davidson, M [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the usefulness of metal artifact reduction in CT images of patients with bilateral hip prostheses (BHP) for contouring the prostate and determine if the inclusion of MR images provides additional benefits. Methods: Five patients with BHP were CT scanned using our clinical protocol (140kV, 300mAs, 3mm slices, 1.5mm increment, Philips Medical Systems, OH). Images were reconstructed with the orthopaedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm. MRI scanning was then performed (1.5T, GE Healthcare, WI) with a flat table-top (T{sub 2}-weighted, inherent body coil, FRFSE, 3mm slices with 0mm gap). All images were transferred to Pinnacle (Version 9.2, Philips Medical Systems). For each patient, two data sets were produced: one containing the O-MAR-corrected CT images and another containing fused MRI and O-MAR-corrected CT images. Four genito-urinary radiation oncologists contoured the prostate of each patient on the O-MAR-corrected CT data. Two weeks later, they contoured the prostate on the fused data set, blinded to all other contours. During each contouring session, the oncologists reported their confidence in the contours (1=very confident, 3=not confident) and the contouring difficulty that they experienced (1=really easy, 4=very challenging). Prostate volumes were computed from the contours and the conformity index was used to evaluate inter-observer variability. Results: Larger prostate volumes were found on the O-MAR-corrected CT set than on the fused set (p< 0.05, median=36.9cm{sup 3} vs. 26.63 cm{sup 3}). No significant differences were noted in the inter-observer variability between the two data sets (p=0.3). Contouring difficulty decreased with the addition of MRI (p<0.05) while the radiation oncologists reported more confidence in their contours when MRI was fused with the O-MAR-corrected CT data (p<0.05). Conclusion: This preliminary work demonstrated that, while O-MAR correction to CT images improves visualization of anatomy, the

  20. Effects of Semantic Context and Fundamental Frequency Contours on Mandarin Speech Recognition by Second Language Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linjun; Li, Yu; Wu, Han; Li, Xin; Shu, Hua; Zhang, Yang; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Speech recognition by second language (L2) learners in optimal and suboptimal conditions has been examined extensively with English as the target language in most previous studies. This study extended existing experimental protocols (Wang et al., 2013) to investigate Mandarin speech recognition by Japanese learners of Mandarin at two different levels (elementary vs. intermediate) of proficiency. The overall results showed that in addition to L2 proficiency, semantic context, F0 contours, and listening condition all affected the recognition performance on the Mandarin sentences. However, the effects of semantic context and F0 contours on L2 speech recognition diverged to some extent. Specifically, there was significant modulation effect of listening condition on semantic context, indicating that L2 learners made use of semantic context less efficiently in the interfering background than in quiet. In contrast, no significant modulation effect of listening condition on F0 contours was found. Furthermore, there was significant interaction between semantic context and F0 contours, indicating that semantic context becomes more important for L2 speech recognition when F0 information is degraded. None of these effects were found to be modulated by L2 proficiency. The discrepancy in the effects of semantic context and F0 contours on L2 speech recognition in the interfering background might be related to differences in processing capacities required by the two types of information in adverse listening conditions.

  1. Body contour measurements by conoscopy: application in nuclear medicine, study of feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheiber, C.; Musse, O.; Mallet, Y.; Sirat, G.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a precise mapping of the human body contours as viewed by the gamma camera during acquisition for pathological focus detection and as intermediary in the fusion with morphological images sources (CT, IRM, US). The measurement of the human body contours, making use of a telemeter system, was proposed by O. Peria (Ph.D Thesis, University of Grenoble) by using a laser telemeter and then structured-light sources. We proposed utilization of a non-coherent interferometer, the conoscope developed by G. Sirat, coupled to an electro-mechanical sweeping system mounted on the gamma camera rack. The first tests realized with a slow prototype (3 pt/s), have allowed the recording of visage contours (a profile obtained by angular rotation of the camera (10 deg.) on an (Elscint, Haifa) Helix gamma camera). For this experiment the voluntary subject has worn protection spectacles (the light source being a laser of 1 mW). Among the advantages of this compact system (14 x 10 x 15 cm) we stress: a) a high precision (0.2 mm); b) being installed on the rack, the calibration procedures are simplified and their shifts are potentially reduced; c) the procedures of intra-modality image matching is simplified; d) an integrated fast electronic circuitry (DSP) allows to exploit directly, in real time if necessary, the obtained results (x,y,z coordinates of the studied point). We considered that by its precision, its insensitivity to luminous environment conditions and its integration with the turning gamma camera, the system deserves to be evaluated for application in medical imaging. This system as other intermediate captors, using body contours, allows the superimposing of data, other than the image data, what helps the stereotaxic localization

  2. Design and milling manufacture of polyurethane custom contoured cushions for wheelchair users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fabio Pinto; Beretta, Elisa Marangon; Prestes, Rafael Cavalli; Kindlein Junior, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    The design of custom contoured cushions manufactured in flexible polyurethane foams is an option to improve positioning and comfort for people with disabilities that spend most of the day seated in the same position. These surfaces increase the contact area between the seat and the user. This fact contributes to minimise the local pressures that can generate problems like decubitus ulcers. The present research aims at establishing development routes for custom cushion production to wheelchair users. This study also contributes to the investigation of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining of flexible polyurethane foams. The proposed route to obtain the customised seat began with acquiring the user's contour in adequate posture through plaster cast. To collect the surface geometry, the cast was three-dimensionally scanned and manipulated in CAD/CAM software. CNC milling parameters such as tools, spindle speeds and feed rates to machine flexible polyurethane foams were tested. These parameters were analysed regarding the surface quality. The best parameters were then tested in a customised seat. The possible dimensional changes generated during foam cutting were analysed through 3D scanning. Also, the customised seat pressure and temperature distribution was tested. The best parameters found for foams with a density of 50kg/cm(3) were high spindle speeds (24000 rpm) and feed rates between 2400-4000mm/min. Those parameters did not generate significant deformities in the machined cushions. The custom contoured cushion satisfactorily increased the contact area between wheelchair and user, as it distributed pressure and heat evenly. Through this study it was possible to define routes for the development and manufacturing of customised seats using direct CNC milling in flexible polyurethane foams. It also showed that custom contoured cushions efficiently distribute pressure and temperature, which is believed to minimise tissue lesions such as pressure ulcers.

  3. Detection of elliptical contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokland, J.A.K.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation describes the quantitation of myocardial perfusion defects in planar thallium-201 scintigrams. To be able to quantify the distribution of 201 Tl in the myocardium as imaged by the scintigram, accurate delineation of the target object is a prerequisite. The distribution of the radionuclide within the contour of the left ventricle can be described by application of circumferential profiles. By comparing the computed circumferential profile with those of normal subjects, humans with no evidence of coronary artery disease, segments of the left ventricle with decreased bloodflow can be detected. In practice there is no real standard to compare with, and due to noise and biological variations, it is not always possible to make a definite decision regarding the presence of a defect in the distribution of the radionuclide. The value and limitations of the developed quantification procedure are discussed. Some future developments are suggested. 108 refs.; 57 figs.; 5 tabs

  4. Computational Modeling of Fluorescence Loss in Photobleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Valdemar; Schroll, Achim; Wüstner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    sequences as reaction– diffusion systems on segmented cell images. The cell geometry is extracted from microscopy images using the Chan–Vese active contours algorithm [8]. The PDE model is subsequently solved by the automated Finite Element software package FEniCS [20]. The flexibility of FEniCS allows...

  5. Creation of RTOG compliant patient CT-atlases for automated atlas based contouring of local regional breast and high-risk prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velker, Vikram M; Rodrigues, George B; Dinniwell, Robert; Hwee, Jeremiah; Louie, Alexander V

    2013-07-25

    Increasing use of IMRT to treat breast and prostate cancers at high risk of regional nodal spread relies on accurate contouring of targets and organs at risk, which is subject to significant inter- and intra-observer variability. This study sought to evaluate the performance of an atlas based deformable registration algorithm to create multi-patient CT based atlases for automated contouring. Breast and prostate multi-patient CT atlases (n = 50 and 14 respectively) were constructed to be consistent with RTOG consensus contouring guidelines. A commercially available software algorithm was evaluated by comparison of atlas-predicted contours against manual contours using Dice Similarity coefficients. High levels of agreement were demonstrated for prediction of OAR contours of lungs, heart, femurs, and minor editing required for the CTV breast/chest wall. CTVs generated for axillary nodes, supraclavicular nodes, prostate, and pelvic nodes demonstrated modest agreement. Small and highly variable structures, such as internal mammary nodes, lumpectomy cavity, rectum, penile bulb, and seminal vesicles had poor agreement. A method to construct and validate performance of CT-based multi-patient atlases for automated atlas based auto-contouring has been demonstrated, and can be adopted for clinical use in planning of local regional breast and high-risk prostate radiotherapy.

  6. Creation of RTOG compliant patient CT-atlases for automated atlas based contouring of local regional breast and high-risk prostate cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velker, Vikram M; Rodrigues, George B; Dinniwell, Robert; Hwee, Jeremiah; Louie, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    Increasing use of IMRT to treat breast and prostate cancers at high risk of regional nodal spread relies on accurate contouring of targets and organs at risk, which is subject to significant inter- and intra-observer variability. This study sought to evaluate the performance of an atlas based deformable registration algorithm to create multi-patient CT based atlases for automated contouring. Breast and prostate multi-patient CT atlases (n = 50 and 14 respectively) were constructed to be consistent with RTOG consensus contouring guidelines. A commercially available software algorithm was evaluated by comparison of atlas-predicted contours against manual contours using Dice Similarity coefficients. High levels of agreement were demonstrated for prediction of OAR contours of lungs, heart, femurs, and minor editing required for the CTV breast/chest wall. CTVs generated for axillary nodes, supraclavicular nodes, prostate, and pelvic nodes demonstrated modest agreement. Small and highly variable structures, such as internal mammary nodes, lumpectomy cavity, rectum, penile bulb, and seminal vesicles had poor agreement. A method to construct and validate performance of CT-based multi-patient atlases for automated atlas based auto-contouring has been demonstrated, and can be adopted for clinical use in planning of local regional breast and high-risk prostate radiotherapy

  7. Comparison of surface contour and volumetric three-dimensional imaging of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilford, W.B.; Ullrich, C.G.; Moore, T.

    1988-01-01

    Both surface contour and volumetric three-dimensional image processing from CT data can provide accurate demonstration of skeletal anatomy. While realistic, surface contour images may obscure fine detail such as nondisplaced fractures, and thin bone may disappear. Volumetric processing can provide high detail, but the transparency effect is unnatural and may yield a confusing image. Comparison of both three-dimensional modes is presented to demonstrate those findings best shown with each and to illustrate helpful techniques to improve volumetric display, such as disarticulation of unnecessary anatomy, short-angle repeating rotation (dithering), and image combination into overlay displays

  8. Fermi surface contours obtained from scanning tunneling microscope images around surface point defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotkevych-Sanina, N V; Kolesnichenko, Yu A; Van Ruitenbeek, J M

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the standing wave patterns in scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images, which occur around surface point defects. We consider arbitrary dispersion relations for the surface states and calculate the conductance for a system containing a small-size tunnel contact and a surface impurity. We find rigorous theoretical relations between the interference patterns in the real-space STM images, their Fourier transforms and the Fermi contours of two-dimensional electrons. We propose a new method for reconstructing Fermi contours of surface electron states, directly from the real-space STM images around isolated surface defects. (paper)

  9. Depth Contours for select locations across the U.S. Pacific Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are depth contours (isobaths) derived at 50 meters for most islands and reefs in the Mariana Archipelago, American Samoa, and the Pacific Remote Island...

  10. Body contouring following massive weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Langer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a global disease with epidemic proportions. Bariatric surgery or modified lifestyles go a long way in mitigating the vast weight gain. Patients following these interventions usually undergo massive weight loss. This results in redundant tissues in various parts of the body. Loose skin causes increased morbidity and psychological trauma. This demands various body contouring procedures that are usually excisional. These procedures are complex and part of a painstaking process that needs a committed patient and an industrious plastic surgeon. As complications in these patients can be quite frequent, both the patient and the surgeon need to be aware and willing to deal with them.

  11. Redefining face contour with a novel anti-aging cosmetic product: an open-label, prospective clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garre A

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aurora Garre,1 Gemma Martinez-Masana,1 Jaime Piquero-Casals,2 Corinne Granger1 1Innovation and Development, ISDIN S.A., Barcelona, Spain; 2Dermik Clinic, Barcelona, Spain Background: Skin aging is accelerated by multiple extrinsic factors: ultraviolet radiation, smoking and pollution increase oxidative activity, damaging cellular and extracellular components such as DNA, proteins, and lipids. With age, collagen and hyaluronic acid levels decline, resulting in loss of elasticity and moisture of the skin. Over time this damage leads to characteristic signs that make the skin look older: altered facial contour, sagging skin, wrinkles, and an uneven complexion. This study evaluated the anti-aging effects of a new facial cream formulated with carnosine, Alteromonas ferment extract, crosspolymer hyaluronic acid, and a tripeptide. Methods: An open-label intra-individual study to assess the anti-aging efficacy of the investigational product in 33 women aged 45 to 65 years. The product was applied twice daily for 56 days. Facial contour and skin deformation, elasticity, hydration, and complexion were measured with specialized equipment at baseline and days 28 and 56. Additionally, subjects completed questionnaires at days 28 and 56 on the perceived efficacy and cosmetic characteristics of the product. Results: After 56 days of use of the investigational product, a redefining effect was observed, with a significant decrease in sagging jawline (7%. Skin was significantly more hydrated (12%, firmer (29%, and more elastic (20% (P<0.001 for all. On complexion assessment, skin texture (a measure of skin smoothness and spots (brown and red skin lesions also improved significantly (12% and 6% decrease, respectively. In the subjective self-evaluation, the majority of subjects reported that the skin was visibly tightened and more elastic, flexible, and moisturized (91%, 88%, 91%, and 90%, respectively. The product was well tolerated with no adverse events reported

  12. WE-G-BRD-07: Automated MR Image Standardization and Auto-Contouring Strategy for MRI-Based Adaptive Brachytherapy for Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H Al; Erickson, B; Paulson, E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI-based adaptive brachytherapy (ABT) is an emerging treatment modality for patients with gynecological tumors. However, MR image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) can vary from fraction to fraction, complicating image interpretation and auto-contouring accuracy. We demonstrate here an automated MR image standardization and auto-contouring strategy for MRI-based ABT of cervix cancer. Methods: MR image standardization consisted of: 1) IINU correction using the MNI N3 algorithm, 2) noise filtering using anisotropic diffusion, and 3) signal intensity normalization using the volumetric median. This post-processing chain was implemented as a series of custom Matlab and Java extensions in MIM (v6.4.5, MIM Software) and was applied to 3D T2 SPACE images of six patients undergoing MRI-based ABT at 3T. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/µ) were calculated for both original and standardized images and compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Patient-specific cumulative MR atlases of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid contours were constructed throughout ABT, using original and standardized MR images from all previous ABT fractions. Auto-contouring was performed in MIM two ways: 1) best-match of one atlas image to the daily MR image, 2) multi-match of all previous fraction atlas images to the daily MR image. Dice’s Similarity Coefficients (DSCs) were calculated for auto-generated contours relative to reference contours for both original and standardized MR images and compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Significant improvements in CV were detected following MR image standardization (p=0.0043), demonstrating an improvement in MR image uniformity. DSCs consistently increased for auto-contoured bladder, rectum, and sigmoid following MR image standardization, with the highest DSCs detected when the combination of MR image standardization and multi-match cumulative atlas-based auto-contouring was utilized. Conclusion: MR image standardization significantly improves MR image

  13. WE-G-BRD-07: Automated MR Image Standardization and Auto-Contouring Strategy for MRI-Based Adaptive Brachytherapy for Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H Al; Erickson, B; Paulson, E [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-based adaptive brachytherapy (ABT) is an emerging treatment modality for patients with gynecological tumors. However, MR image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) can vary from fraction to fraction, complicating image interpretation and auto-contouring accuracy. We demonstrate here an automated MR image standardization and auto-contouring strategy for MRI-based ABT of cervix cancer. Methods: MR image standardization consisted of: 1) IINU correction using the MNI N3 algorithm, 2) noise filtering using anisotropic diffusion, and 3) signal intensity normalization using the volumetric median. This post-processing chain was implemented as a series of custom Matlab and Java extensions in MIM (v6.4.5, MIM Software) and was applied to 3D T2 SPACE images of six patients undergoing MRI-based ABT at 3T. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/µ) were calculated for both original and standardized images and compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Patient-specific cumulative MR atlases of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid contours were constructed throughout ABT, using original and standardized MR images from all previous ABT fractions. Auto-contouring was performed in MIM two ways: 1) best-match of one atlas image to the daily MR image, 2) multi-match of all previous fraction atlas images to the daily MR image. Dice’s Similarity Coefficients (DSCs) were calculated for auto-generated contours relative to reference contours for both original and standardized MR images and compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Significant improvements in CV were detected following MR image standardization (p=0.0043), demonstrating an improvement in MR image uniformity. DSCs consistently increased for auto-contoured bladder, rectum, and sigmoid following MR image standardization, with the highest DSCs detected when the combination of MR image standardization and multi-match cumulative atlas-based auto-contouring was utilized. Conclusion: MR image standardization significantly improves MR image

  14. Alveolar Ridge Contouring with Free Connective Tissue Graft at Implant Placement: A 5-Year Consecutive Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Thomas; Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated volume stability after alveolar ridge contouring with free connective tissue grafts at implant placement in single-tooth gaps. A total of 52 single-tooth gaps with labial volume deficiencies in the maxilla (incisors, canines, and premolars) were consecutively treated with implants and concomitant free palatal connective tissue grafts in 46 patients between 2006 and 2009. Implants had to be covered with at least 2 mm peri-implant local bone after insertion. At implant placement, a free connective tissue graft from the palate was fixed inside a labial split-thickness flap to form an existing concave buccal alveolar ridge contour due to tissue volume deficiency into a convex shape. Standardized volumetric measurements of the labial alveolar contour using a template were evaluated before connective tissue grafting and at 2 weeks, 1 year, and 5 years after implantprosthetic incorporation. Tissue volume had increased significantly (P tissue contour of the implant before connective tissue grafting to baseline (2 weeks after implant-prosthetic incorporation). Statistically, 50% of the reference points (P > .05) kept their volume from baseline to 1 year after prosthetic incorporation and from baseline to 5 years after prosthetic incorporation, respectively, whereas reference points located within the area of the implant sulcus showed a significant (P connective tissue grafting appears to be an appropriate long-term means to contour preexisting buccal alveolar volume deficiencies in single implants.

  15. Radiofrequency-assisted Liposuction for Arm Contouring: Technique under Local Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spero Theodorou, MD

    2013-08-01

    Conclusions: In appropriately selected patients, RFAL arm contouring under local anesthesia represents an alternative procedure with acceptably low morbidity and high patient satisfaction. To achieve consistent results while minimizing complications, consideration to anatomic details, infiltration of the local anesthetic, and application of the radiofrequency energy must be given.

  16. An Accurate and Efficient Design Tool for Large Contoured Beam Reflectarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Min; Sørensen, Stig B.; Jørgensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    An accurate and efficient tool for the design of contoured beam reflectarrays is presented. It is based on the Spectral Domain Method of Moments, the Local Periodicity approach, and a minimax optimization algorithm. Contrary to the conventional phase-only optimization techniques, the geometrical...... parameters of the array elements are directly optimized to fulfill the far-field requirements. The design tool can be used to optimize reflectarrays based on a regular grid as well as an irregular grid. Both coand cross-polar radiation can be optimized for multiple frequencies, polarizations, and feed...... illuminations. Two offset contoured beam reflectarrays that radiate a highgain beam on an European coverage have been designed, manufactured, and measured at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility. An excellent agreement is obtained for the simulated and measured patterns. To show the design...

  17. A treatment planning comparison of four target volume contouring guidelines for locally advanced pancreatic cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Eccles, Cynthia; Patel, Neel; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Warren, Samantha; McKenna, W. Gillies; Brunner, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Contouring of target volumes varies significantly in radiotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). There is a lack of consensus as to whether elective lymph nodes (eLN’s) should be included or not in the planning target volume (PTV). In the present study we analyzed the dosimetric coverage of the eLN’s and organs at risk (OAR) by comparing four different contouring guidelines. Methods and materials: PTVs were delineated with (Oxford and RTOG guidelines) or without (Michigan and SCALOP guidelines) including the eLNs in eleven patients with PDAC. eLNs included the peripancreatic, paraaortic, paracaval, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric and portal vein clinical target volumes (CTVs). A 3D-CRT plan (50.40 Gy in 28 fractions) was performed to analyze and compare the dosimetric coverage of all eLNs and OAR between the 4 contouring guidelines. Results: The size of Oxford and RTOG PTVs was comparable and significantly larger than the SCALOP and Michigan PTVs. Interestingly the eLNs received a significant amount of incidental dose irradiation by PTV-based plans that only aimed to treat the tumor without the eLNs. The dosimetric coverage of eLN presented a large variability according to the respective contouring methods. The difference in the size of the 4 PTVs was reflected to the dose distribution at the OAR. Conclusions: Our study provides important information regarding the impact of different contouring guidelines on the dose distribution to the eLNs and the OAR in patients with locally advanced PDAC treated with radiotherapy

  18. Active Mask Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscope Images

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C.; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D.; Kovačević, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the “contour” to that of “inside and outside”, or, masks, allowing for easy mul...

  19. Development of optical surface contouring technique using laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Sung Hoon; Kim, Min Suk; Park, Seung Kyu

    1998-12-01

    Laser contouring system capable of measuring relief profiles using a line-shaped laser beam with anisotropic magnification optics composed with two cylindrical lenses was developed. The anisotropic magnification optical system allows it to obtain higher resolution in the relief profile measurements. The image processing and 3-D display software are developed to reconstruct 3-D shape. The power supply of laser diode with adaptive current control circuit is designed. (author). 4 refs., 5 tabs., 33 figs.

  20. Investigation of Raman bands vapour of contours of trichloroethylene at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleskaya, G.A.; Ikramov, M.; Shukurov, T.

    1989-01-01

    Investigation of high-pressure extraneous gas on contour comb. band, spreading trichloroethylene steams are in given article. Increasing of extraneous gas pressure brings to decreasing free molecule circling time is shown

  1. SU-E-T-182: Feasibility of Dose Painting by Numbers in Proton Therapy with Contour-Driven Plan Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, A Barragan; Differding, S; Lee, J; Sterpin, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The work aims to 1) prove the feasibility of dose painting by numbers (DPBN) in proton therapy with usual contour-driven plan optimization and 2) compare the achieved plan quality to that of rotational IMRT. Methods: For two patients with head and neck cancers, voxel-by-voxel prescription to the target volume (PTV-PET) was calculated from 18 FDG-PET images and converted to contour-based prescription by defining several sub-contours. Treatments were planned with RayStation (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) and proton pencil beam scanning modality. In order to determine the optimal plan parameters to approach the DPBN prescription, the effect of the number of fields, number of sub-contours and use of range shifter were tested separately on each patient. The number of sub-contours were increased from 3 to 11 while the number of fields were set to 3, 5, 7 and 9. Treatment plans were also optimized on two rotational IMRT systems (TomoTherapy and Varian RapidArc) using previously published guidelines. Results: For both patients, more than 99% of the PTV-PET received at least 95% of the prescribed dose while less than 1% of the PTV-PET received more than 105%, which demonstrates the feasibility of the treatment. Neither the use of a range shifter nor the increase of the number of fields had a significant influence on PTV coverage. Plan quality increased when increasing number of fields up to 7 or 9 and slightly decreased for a bigger number of sub-contours. Good OAR sparing is achieved while keeping high plan quality. Finally, proton therapy achieved significantly better plan quality than rotational IMRT. Conclusion: Voxel-by-voxel prescriptions can be approximated accurately in proton therapy using a contour-driven optimization. Target coverage is nearly insensitive to the number of fields and the use of a range shifter. Finally, plan quality assessment confirmed the superiority of proton therapy compared to rotational IMRT

  2. Recommendation for a contouring method and atlas of organs at risk in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ying; Yu, Xiao-Li; Luo, Wei; Lee, Anne W.M.; Wee, Joseph Tien Seng; Lee, Nancy; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Tao, Chang-Juan; Guo, Rui; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Rong; Guo, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To recommend contouring methods and atlas of organs at risk (OARs) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy, in order to help reach a consensus on interpretations of OARs delineation. Methods and materials: Two to four contouring methods for the middle ear, inner ear, temporal lobe, parotid gland and spinal cord were identified via systematic literature review; their volumes and dosimetric parameters were compared in 41 patients. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for temporal lobe contouring were compared in 21 patients with unilateral temporal lobe necrosis (TLN). Results: Various contouring methods for the temporal lobe, middle ear, inner ear, parotid gland and spinal cord lead to different volumes and dosimetric parameters (P < 0.05). For TLN, D1 of PRV was the most relevant dosimetric parameter and 64 Gy was the critical point. We suggest contouring for the temporal lobe, middle ear, inner ear, parotid gland and spinal cord. A CT–MRI fusion atlas comprising 33 OARs was developed. Conclusions: Different dosimetric parameters may hinder the dosimetric research. The present recommendation and atlas, may help reach a consensus on subjective interpretation of OARs delineation to reduce inter-institutional differences in NPC patients

  3. Diffusion coefficients gases, dissolved in fluid of NPPs circulation contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piontkovskij, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    In article is brought analysis of diverse gases diffusion coefficients computation methods, dissolved in liquid. On the basis of this analysis and treatment of being equalizations for concrete gases and certain parameters offers universal diffusion coefficients determination dependence for diverse gases in wide range of parameters, circulation contours typical for work NPP

  4. Translocation of Soil Particles during Secondary Soil Tillage along Contour Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novák Petr

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A high percentage of arable land and erosion risk on agricultural land are typical of current agriculture. While tillage erosion is a less frequently studied issue, it impacts vast areas of agricultural land. Not all relationships between cultivation equipment, the gradient of the plot and other factors have been known until now. Intensive soil tillage can be a crucial erosive factor mainly when the cultivation equipment moves in a fall line direction. Nevertheless, even when the equipment moves along contour lines, soil particles can be translocated perpendicular to the direction of the equipment movement (in a fall line direction. This phenomenon has not yet been adequately studied. For measurements, a field trial with secondary tillage of soil was laid out (a seedbed preparation implement was used. The objective of the trial was to evaluate the effect of the working tools of the cultivation equipment on the crosswise and lengthwise translocation of soil particles during soil tillage. Aluminium cubes, with a side length of 16 mm, were used as tracers. Before the operation, the tracers were inserted in a row perpendicular (at a right angle to a direction of the equipment passes. After the equipment passes, position of tracers was evaluated within a two-axis grid. The trial was performed at three gradients of the plot (2°, 6° and 11°. For each gradient, the 1-pass, 2-pass and 3-pass treatments were tested. The equipment always moved along the plot contour line. After the equipment passes in all treatments, all tracers were localized on an orthogonal grid. The results of the trial demonstrate the effect of the slope gradient on the crosswise translocation of particles during secondary tillage of soil in the slope direction. The tillage equipment translocated particles in the fall line direction even if it passed along the contour line. With the increasing intensity of passes, the effect of the equipment on crosswise translocation increases

  5. Redefining face contour with a novel anti-aging cosmetic product: an open-label, prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garre, Aurora; Martinez-Masana, Gemma; Piquero-Casals, Jaime; Granger, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    Skin aging is accelerated by multiple extrinsic factors: ultraviolet radiation, smoking and pollution increase oxidative activity, damaging cellular and extracellular components such as DNA, proteins, and lipids. With age, collagen and hyaluronic acid levels decline, resulting in loss of elasticity and moisture of the skin. Over time this damage leads to characteristic signs that make the skin look older: altered facial contour, sagging skin, wrinkles, and an uneven complexion. This study evaluated the anti-aging effects of a new facial cream formulated with carnosine, Alteromonas ferment extract, crosspolymer hyaluronic acid, and a tripeptide. An open-label intra-individual study to assess the anti-aging efficacy of the investigational product in 33 women aged 45 to 65 years. The product was applied twice daily for 56 days. Facial contour and skin deformation, elasticity, hydration, and complexion were measured with specialized equipment at baseline and days 28 and 56. Additionally, subjects completed questionnaires at days 28 and 56 on the perceived efficacy and cosmetic characteristics of the product. After 56 days of use of the investigational product, a redefining effect was observed, with a significant decrease in sagging jawline (7%). Skin was significantly more hydrated (12%), firmer (29%), and more elastic (20%) ( P <0.001 for all). On complexion assessment, skin texture (a measure of skin smoothness) and spots (brown and red skin lesions) also improved significantly (12% and 6% decrease, respectively). In the subjective self-evaluation, the majority of subjects reported that the skin was visibly tightened and more elastic, flexible, and moisturized (91%, 88%, 91%, and 90%, respectively). The product was well tolerated with no adverse events reported during the study. This new cosmetic product demonstrated anti-aging effects after 56 days of use, most notably a redefined facial contour and improved complexion. It is a safe and effective anti-aging product.

  6. Fully automated left ventricular contour detection for gated radionuclide angiography, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoba, Minoru; Wani, Hidenobu; Hiroe, Michiaki; Kusakabe, Kiyoko.

    1984-01-01

    A fully automated practical method has been developed to detect the left ventricular (LV) contour from gated pool images. Ejection fraction and volume curve can be computed accurately without operater variance. The characteristics of the method are summarized as follows: 1. Optimal design of the filter that works on Fourier domain, can be achieved to improve the signal to noise ratio. 2. New algorithm which use the cosine and sine transform images has been developed for the separating ventricle from atrium and defining center of LV. 3. Contrast enhancement by optimized square filter. 4. Radial profiles are generated from the center of LV and smoothed by fourth order Fourier series approximation. The crossing point with local threshold value searched from the center of the LV is defined as edge. 5. LV contour is obtained by conecting all the edge points defined on radial profiles by fitting them to Fourier function. (author)

  7. Assessment of residual stress of 7050-T7452 aluminum alloy forging using the contour method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheng [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Yang, Yinfei, E-mail: yyfgoat@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Li, Liang [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Chen, Bo; Tian, Hui [Xi’an Aircraft Industrial (Group) Co. Ltd., Xi’an 710000 (China)

    2015-09-17

    The cold-compression stress relief process has been used to reduce the quench-induced stresses in high-strength aerospace aluminum alloy forgings. However, this method does not completely relieve the stress. Longitudinal residual stresses in 7050-T7452 aluminum alloy forging were measured with contour method. The measuring procedure of the contour method including specimen cutting under clamps with a wire electrical discharge machine, contour measurement of the cut surface with a laser scanner, careful data processing and elastic finite element analysis was introduced in detail. In addition, multiple cuts were used to map cross sectional stress at different cut surfaces. Finally, the longitudinal residual stress throughout the cut plane was mapped, and through thickness longitudinal stress profiles were also analyzed. Investigated results suggest that spatial variation of stress distribution can be attributed to the non-uniform plastic deformation of the cold-compression stress relief process. The overall reduction of peak stress magnitudes is approximately 43–79%.

  8. Assessment of residual stress of 7050-T7452 aluminum alloy forging using the contour method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Yinfei; Li, Liang; Chen, Bo; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The cold-compression stress relief process has been used to reduce the quench-induced stresses in high-strength aerospace aluminum alloy forgings. However, this method does not completely relieve the stress. Longitudinal residual stresses in 7050-T7452 aluminum alloy forging were measured with contour method. The measuring procedure of the contour method including specimen cutting under clamps with a wire electrical discharge machine, contour measurement of the cut surface with a laser scanner, careful data processing and elastic finite element analysis was introduced in detail. In addition, multiple cuts were used to map cross sectional stress at different cut surfaces. Finally, the longitudinal residual stress throughout the cut plane was mapped, and through thickness longitudinal stress profiles were also analyzed. Investigated results suggest that spatial variation of stress distribution can be attributed to the non-uniform plastic deformation of the cold-compression stress relief process. The overall reduction of peak stress magnitudes is approximately 43–79%

  9. Comparison of 3D quantitative structure-activity relationship methods: Analysis of the in vitro antimalarial activity of 154 artemisinin analogues by hypothetical active-site lattice and comparative molecular field analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfrey, John R.; Avery, Mitchell A.; Doweyko, Arthur M.

    1998-03-01

    Two three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) methods, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and hypothetical active site lattice (HASL), were compared with respect to the analysis of a training set of 154 artemisinin analogues. Five models were created, including a complete HASL and two trimmed versions, as well as two CoMFA models (leave-one-out standard CoMFA and the guided-region selection protocol). Similar r2 and q2 values were obtained by each method, although some striking differences existed between CoMFA contour maps and the HASL output. Each of the four predictive models exhibited a similar ability to predict the activity of a test set of 23 artemisinin analogues, although some differences were noted as to which compounds were described well by either model.

  10. The Effect of Context Upon Elementary Children's Attention to Contour and Interior Pattern of Shapes in Color Drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschalek, Douglas G.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of first-, third-, and fifth-grade students to perceive similarities and differences in contour and interior pattern of shapes in color drawings. Results showed that with increase of age, attention to contour information was significantly affected by the surrounding contextual information found in the drawings.…

  11. Contributions of pitch contour, tonality, rhythm, and meter to melodic similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jon B

    2014-12-01

    The identity of a melody resides in its sequence of pitches and durations, both of which exhibit surface details as well as structural properties. In this study, pitch contour (pattern of ups and downs) served as pitch surface information, and tonality (musical key) as pitch structure; in the temporal dimension, surface information was the ordinal duration ratios of adjacent notes (rhythm), and meter (beat, or pulse) comprised the structure. Factorially manipulating the preservation or alteration of all of these forms of information in 17 novel melodies (typifying Western music) enabled measuring their effect on perceived melodic similarity. In Experiment 1, 34 participants (varied musical training) rated the perceived similarity of melody pairs transposed to new starting pitches. Rhythm was the largest contributor to perceived similarity, then contour, meter, and tonality. Experiment 2 used the same melodies but varied the tempo within a pair, and added a prefix of 3 chords, which oriented the listener to the starting pitch and tempo before the melody began. Now contour was the strongest influence on similarity ratings, followed by tonality, and then rhythm; meter was not significant. Overall, surface features influenced perceived similarity more than structural, but both had observable effects. The primary theoretical advances in melodic similarity research are that (a) the relative emphasis on pitch and temporal factors is flexible; (b) pitch and time functioned independently when factorially manipulated, regardless of which dimension is more influential; and (c) interactions between surface and structural information were unreliable and never occurred between dimensions. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, Shannon C; Xu, Jun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of breast lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the first step in lesion diagnosis in a computer-aided diagnosis framework. Because manual segmentation of such lesions is both time consuming and highly susceptible to human error and issues of reproducibility, an automated lesion segmentation method is highly desirable. Traditional automated image segmentation methods such as boundary-based active contour (AC) models require a strong gradient at the lesion boundary. Even when region-based terms are introduced to an AC model, grayscale image intensities often do not allow for clear definition of foreground and background region statistics. Thus, there is a need to find alternative image representations that might provide (1) strong gradients at the margin of the object of interest (OOI); and (2) larger separation between intensity distributions and region statistics for the foreground and background, which are necessary to halt evolution of the AC model upon reaching the border of the OOI. In this paper, the authors introduce a spectral embedding (SE) based AC (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast DCE-MRI. SE, a nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme, is applied to the DCE time series in a voxelwise fashion to reduce several time point images to a single parametric image where every voxel is characterized by the three dominant eigenvectors. This parametric eigenvector image (PrEIm) representation allows for better capture of image region statistics and stronger gradients for use with a hybrid AC model, which is driven by both boundary and region information. They compare SEAC to ACs that employ fuzzy c-means (FCM) and principal component analysis (PCA) as alternative image representations. Segmentation performance was evaluated by boundary and region metrics as well as comparing lesion classification using morphological features from SEAC, PCA+AC, and FCM+AC. On a cohort of 50 breast DCE-MRI studies, Pr

  13. Multi-object segmentation framework using deformable models for medical imaging analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namías, Rafael; D'Amato, Juan Pablo; Del Fresno, Mariana; Vénere, Marcelo; Pirró, Nicola; Bellemare, Marc-Emmanuel

    2016-08-01

    Segmenting structures of interest in medical images is an important step in different tasks such as visualization, quantitative analysis, simulation, and image-guided surgery, among several other clinical applications. Numerous segmentation methods have been developed in the past three decades for extraction of anatomical or functional structures on medical imaging. Deformable models, which include the active contour models or snakes, are among the most popular methods for image segmentation combining several desirable features such as inherent connectivity and smoothness. Even though different approaches have been proposed and significant work has been dedicated to the improvement of such algorithms, there are still challenging research directions as the simultaneous extraction of multiple objects and the integration of individual techniques. This paper presents a novel open-source framework called deformable model array (DMA) for the segmentation of multiple and complex structures of interest in different imaging modalities. While most active contour algorithms can extract one region at a time, DMA allows integrating several deformable models to deal with multiple segmentation scenarios. Moreover, it is possible to consider any existing explicit deformable model formulation and even to incorporate new active contour methods, allowing to select a suitable combination in different conditions. The framework also introduces a control module that coordinates the cooperative evolution of the snakes and is able to solve interaction issues toward the segmentation goal. Thus, DMA can implement complex object and multi-object segmentations in both 2D and 3D using the contextual information derived from the model interaction. These are important features for several medical image analysis tasks in which different but related objects need to be simultaneously extracted. Experimental results on both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging show that the proposed

  14. Prostate contouring uncertainty in megavoltage computed tomography images acquired with a helical tomotherapy unit during image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, William Y.; Chiu, Bernard; Bauman, Glenn S.; Lock, Michael; Rodrigues, George; Ash, Robert; Lewis, Craig; Fenster, Aaron; Battista, Jerry J.; Van Dyk, Jake

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the image-guidance capabilities of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT), this article compares the interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty in kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) used for radiotherapy planning with MVCT acquired with helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Five prostate-cancer patients were evaluated. Each patient underwent a KVCT and an MVCT study, a total of 10 CT studies. For interobserver variability analysis, four radiation oncologists, one physicist, and two radiation therapists (seven observers in total) contoured the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) in the 10 studies. The intraobserver variability was assessed by asking all observers to repeat the contouring of 1 patient's KVCT and MVCT studies. Quantitative analysis of contour variations was performed by use of volumes and radial distances. Results: The interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty was larger in MVCT compared with KVCT. Observers consistently segmented larger volumes on MVCT where the ratio of average prostate and SV volumes was 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. On average (interobserver and intraobserver), the local delineation variability, in terms of standard deviations [Δσ = √(σ 2 MVCT - σ 2 KVCT )], increased by 0.32 cm from KVCT to MVCT. Conclusions: Although MVCT was inferior to KVCT for prostate delineation, the application of MVCT in prostate radiotherapy remains useful

  15. Inter-observer variability in contouring the penile bulb on CT images for prostate cancer treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, Lucia; Cozzarini, Cesare; Maggiulli, Eleonora; Fellin, Gianni; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Vavassori, Vittorio; Villa, Sergio; Fiorino, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Several investigations have recently suggested the existence of a correlation between the dose received by the penile bulb (PB) and the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED) after radical radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate carcinoma. A prospective multi-Institute study (DUE-01) was implemented with the aim to assess the predictive parameters of ED. Previously, an evaluation of inter-observer variations of PB contouring was mandatory in order to quantify its impact on PB dose-volume parameters by means of a dummy run exercise. Fifteen observers, from different Institutes, drew the PB on the planning CT images of ten patients; inter-observer variations were analysed in terms of PB volume variation and cranial/caudal limits. 3DCRT treatment plans were simulated to evaluate the impact of PB contouring inter-variability on dose-volume statistics parameters. For DVH analysis the values of PB mean dose and the volume of PB receiving more than 50 Gy and 70 Gy (V50 and V70, respectively) were considered. Systematic differences from the average values were assessed by the Wilcoxon test. Seven observers systematically overestimated or underestimated the PB volume with deviations from the average volumes ranging between -48% and +34% (p < 0.05). The analysis of the cranial and caudal borders showed a prevalence of random over systematic deviations. Inter-observer contouring variability strongly impacts on DVH parameters, although standard deviations of inter-patient differences were larger than inter-observer variations: 14.5 Gy versus 6.8 Gy for mean PB dose, 23.0% versus 11.0% and 16.8% versus 9.3% for V50 and V70 respectively. In conclusion, despite the large i