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Sample records for active constrained layer

  1. Modeling and analysis of rotating plates by using self sensing active constrained layer damping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zheng Chao; Wong, Pak Kin; Chong, Ian Ian [Univ. of Macau, Macau (China)

    2012-10-15

    This paper proposes a new finite element model for active constrained layer damped (CLD) rotating plate with self sensing technique. Constrained layer damping can effectively reduce the vibration in rotating structures. Unfortunately, most existing research models the rotating structures as beams that are not the case many times. It is meaningful to model the rotating part as plates because of improvements on both the accuracy and the versatility. At the same time, existing research shows that the active constrained layer damping provides a more effective vibration control approach than the passive constrained layer damping. Thus, in this work, a single layer finite element is adopted to model a three layer active constrained layer damped rotating plate. Unlike previous ones, this finite element model treats all three layers as having the both shear and extension strains, so all types of damping are taken into account. Also, the constraining layer is made of piezoelectric material to work as both the self sensing sensor and actuator. Then, a proportional control strategy is implemented to effectively control the displacement of the tip end of the rotating plate. Additionally, a parametric study is conducted to explore the impact of some design parameters on structure's modal characteristics.

  2. Modeling and analysis of rotating plates by using self sensing active constrained layer damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Zheng Chao; Wong, Pak Kin; Chong, Ian Ian

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new finite element model for active constrained layer damped (CLD) rotating plate with self sensing technique. Constrained layer damping can effectively reduce the vibration in rotating structures. Unfortunately, most existing research models the rotating structures as beams that are not the case many times. It is meaningful to model the rotating part as plates because of improvements on both the accuracy and the versatility. At the same time, existing research shows that the active constrained layer damping provides a more effective vibration control approach than the passive constrained layer damping. Thus, in this work, a single layer finite element is adopted to model a three layer active constrained layer damped rotating plate. Unlike previous ones, this finite element model treats all three layers as having the both shear and extension strains, so all types of damping are taken into account. Also, the constraining layer is made of piezoelectric material to work as both the self sensing sensor and actuator. Then, a proportional control strategy is implemented to effectively control the displacement of the tip end of the rotating plate. Additionally, a parametric study is conducted to explore the impact of some design parameters on structure's modal characteristics

  3. Modelling and Vibration Control of Beams with Partially Debonded Active Constrained Layer Damping Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, D.; TONG, L.

    2002-05-01

    A detailed model for the beams with partially debonded active constraining damping (ACLD) treatment is presented. In this model, the transverse displacement of the constraining layer is considered to be non-identical to that of the host structure. In the perfect bonding region, the viscoelastic core is modelled to carry both peel and shear stresses, while in the debonding area, it is assumed that no peel and shear stresses be transferred between the host beam and the constraining layer. The adhesive layer between the piezoelectric sensor and the host beam is also considered in this model. In active control, the positive position feedback control is employed to control the first mode of the beam. Based on this model, the incompatibility of the transverse displacements of the active constraining layer and the host beam is investigated. The passive and active damping behaviors of the ACLD patch with different thicknesses, locations and lengths are examined. Moreover, the effects of debonding of the damping layer on both passive and active control are examined via a simulation example. The results show that the incompatibility of the transverse displacements is remarkable in the regions near the ends of the ACLD patch especially for the high order vibration modes. It is found that a thinner damping layer may lead to larger shear strain and consequently results in a larger passive and active damping. In addition to the thickness of the damping layer, its length and location are also key factors to the hybrid control. The numerical results unveil that edge debonding can lead to a reduction of both passive and active damping, and the hybrid damping may be more sensitive to the debonding of the damping layer than the passive damping.

  4. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  5. Active constrained layer damping of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded plates using piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M C

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis has been presented for functionally graded (FG) plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment and subjected to a temperature field. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite (PFRC) material. The temperature field is assumed to be spatially uniform over the substrate plate surfaces and varied through the thickness of the host FG plates. The temperature-dependent material properties of the FG substrate plates are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction of the plates according to a power-law distribution while the Poisson's ratio is assumed to be a constant over the domain of the plate. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla–Hughes–McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation theory, a three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG substrate plates under the thermal environment. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates in the absence or the presence of the temperature gradient across the thickness of the plates. It is found that the ACLD treatment is more effective in controlling the geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates than in controlling their linear vibrations. The analysis also reveals that the ACLD patch is more effective for controlling the nonlinear vibrations of FG plates when it is attached to the softest surface of the FG plates than when it is bonded to the stiffest surface of the plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also discussed

  6. Active constrained layer damping of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded plates using piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis has been presented for functionally graded (FG) plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment and subjected to a temperature field. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite (PFRC) material. The temperature field is assumed to be spatially uniform over the substrate plate surfaces and varied through the thickness of the host FG plates. The temperature-dependent material properties of the FG substrate plates are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction of the plates according to a power-law distribution while the Poisson's ratio is assumed to be a constant over the domain of the plate. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation theory, a three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG substrate plates under the thermal environment. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates in the absence or the presence of the temperature gradient across the thickness of the plates. It is found that the ACLD treatment is more effective in controlling the geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates than in controlling their linear vibrations. The analysis also reveals that the ACLD patch is more effective for controlling the nonlinear vibrations of FG plates when it is attached to the softest surface of the FG plates than when it is bonded to the stiffest surface of the plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also discussed.

  7. Active constrained layer damping treatments for shell structures: a deep-shell theory, some intuitive results, and an energy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, I. Y.

    1997-02-01

    This paper studies vibration control of a shell structure through use of an active constrained layer (ACL) damping treatment. A deep-shell theory that assumes arbitrary Lamé parameters 0964-1726/6/1/011/img1 and 0964-1726/6/1/011/img2 is first developed. Application of Hamilton's principle leads to the governing Love equations, the charge equation of electrostatics, and the associated boundary conditions. The Love equations and boundary conditions imply that the control action of the ACL for shell treatments consists of two components: free-end boundary actuation and membrane actuation. The free-end boundary actuation is identical to that of beam and plate ACL treatments, while the membrane actuation is unique to shell treatments as a result of the curvatures of the shells. In particular, the membrane actuation may reinforce or counteract the boundary actuation, depending on the location of the ACL treatment. Finally, an energy analysis is developed to determine the proper control law that guarantees the stability of ACL shell treatments. Moreover, the energy analysis results in a simple rule predicting whether or not the membrane actuation reinforces the boundary actuation.

  8. Hybrid Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels with Constrained Layer Damping and Model Predictive Feedback Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    make the controller adaptive. For example, a mathematical model of the plant could be periodically updated as the plant changes, and the feedback gains recomputed from the updated model. To be practical, this approach requires a simple plant model that can be updated quickly with reasonable computational requirements. A recent paper by the authors discussed one way to simplify a feedback controller, by reducing the number of actuators and sensors needed for good performance. The work was done on a tensioned aircraft-style panel excited on one side by TBL flow in a low speed wind tunnel. Actuation was provided by a piezoelectric (PZT) actuator mounted on the center of the panel. For sensing, the responses of four accelerometers, positioned to approximate the response of the first radiation mode of the panel, were summed and fed back through the controller. This single input-single output topology was found to have nearly the same noise reduction performance as a controller with fifteen accelerometers and three PZT patches. This paper extends the previous results by looking at how constrained layer damping (CLD) on a panel can be used to enhance the performance of the feedback controller thus providing a more robust and efficient hybrid active/passive system. The eventual goal is to use the CLD to reduce sound radiation at high frequencies, then implement a very simple, reduced order, low sample rate adaptive controller to attenuate sound radiation at low frequencies. Additionally this added damping smoothes phase transitions over the bandwidth which promotes robustness to natural frequency shifts. Experiments were conducted in a transmission loss facility on a clamped-clamped aluminum panel driven on one side by a loudspeaker. A generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm, which is suited to online adaptation of its parameters, was used in single input-single output and multiple input-single output configurations. Because this was a preliminary look at the potential

  9. Fringe instability in constrained soft elastic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaoting; Cohen, Tal; Zhang, Teng; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Abeyaratne, Rohan; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2016-11-04

    Soft elastic layers with top and bottom surfaces adhered to rigid bodies are abundant in biological organisms and engineering applications. As the rigid bodies are pulled apart, the stressed layer can exhibit various modes of mechanical instabilities. In cases where the layer's thickness is much smaller than its length and width, the dominant modes that have been studied are the cavitation, interfacial and fingering instabilities. Here we report a new mode of instability which emerges if the thickness of the constrained elastic layer is comparable to or smaller than its width. In this case, the middle portion along the layer's thickness elongates nearly uniformly while the constrained fringe portions of the layer deform nonuniformly. When the applied stretch reaches a critical value, the exposed free surfaces of the fringe portions begin to undulate periodically without debonding from the rigid bodies, giving the fringe instability. We use experiments, theory and numerical simulations to quantitatively explain the fringe instability and derive scaling laws for its critical stress, critical strain and wavelength. We show that in a force controlled setting the elastic fingering instability is associated with a snap-through buckling that does not exist for the fringe instability. The discovery of the fringe instability will not only advance the understanding of mechanical instabilities in soft materials but also have implications for biological and engineered adhesives and joints.

  10. Modeling constrained sintering of bi-layered tubular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Kothanda Ramachandran, Dhavanesan; Ni, De Wei

    2015-01-01

    Constrained sintering of tubular bi-layered structures is being used in the development of various technologies. Densification mismatch between the layers making the tubular bi-layer can generate stresses, which may create processing defects. An analytical model is presented to describe the densi...... and thermo-mechanical analysis. Results from the analytical model are found to agree well with finite element simulations as well as measurements from sintering experiment....

  11. Thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweickert, H.; Fehsenfeld, P.

    1995-01-01

    The reliability of industrial equip ment is substantially influenced by wear and corrosion; monitoring can prevent accidents and avoid down-time. One powerful tool is thin layer activation analysis (TLA) using accelerator systems. The information is used to improve mechanical design and material usage; the technology is used by many large companies, particularly in the automotive industry, e.g. Daimler Benz. A critical area of a machine component receives a thin layer of radioactivity by irradiation with charged particles from an accelerator - usually a cyclotron. The radioactivity can be made homogeneous by suitable selection of particle, beam energy and angle of incidence. Layer thickness can be varied from 20 microns to around 1 mm with different depth distributions; the position and size of the wear zone can be set to within 0.1 mm. The machine is then reassembled and operated so that wear can be measured. An example is a combustion engine comprising piston ring, cylinder wall, cooling water jacket and housing wall, where wear measurements on the cylinder wall are required in a critical zone around the dead-point of the piston ring. Proton beam bombardment creates a radioactive layer whose thickness is known accurately, and characteristic gamma radiation from this radioactive zone penetrates through the engine and is detected externally. Measurements can be made either of the activity removed from the surface, or of the (reduced) residual activity; wear measurement of the order of 10 -9 metres is possible

  12. Topology Optimization of Constrained Layer Damping on Plates Using Method of Moving Asymptote (MMA Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ling

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Damping treatments have been extensively used as a powerful means to damp out structural resonant vibrations. Usually, damping materials are fully covered on the surface of plates. The drawbacks of this conventional treatment are also obvious due to an added mass and excess material consumption. Therefore, it is not always economical and effective from an optimization design view. In this paper, a topology optimization approach is presented to maximize the modal damping ratio of the plate with constrained layer damping treatment. The governing equation of motion of the plate is derived on the basis of energy approach. A finite element model to describe dynamic performances of the plate is developed and used along with an optimization algorithm in order to determine the optimal topologies of constrained layer damping layout on the plate. The damping of visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. Considering the vibration and energy dissipation mode of the plate with constrained layer damping treatment, damping material density and volume factor are considered as design variable and constraint respectively. Meantime, the modal damping ratio of the plate is assigned as the objective function in the topology optimization approach. The sensitivity of modal damping ratio to design variable is further derived and Method of Moving Asymptote (MMA is adopted to search the optimized topologies of constrained layer damping layout on the plate. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed topology optimization approach. The results show that vibration energy dissipation of the plates can be enhanced by the optimal constrained layer damping layout. This optimal technology can be further extended to vibration attenuation of sandwich cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles as an

  13. Improved Modeling Approaches for Constrained Sintering of Bi-Layered Porous Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Esposito, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Shape instabilities during constrained sintering experiment of bi-layer porous and dense cerium gadolinium oxide (CGO) structures have been analyzed. An analytical and a numerical model based on the continuum theory of sintering has been implemented to describe the evolution of bow and densificat...

  14. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Knox, Hunter Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); James, Stephanie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, Rebekah [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cole, Chris [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  15. A One-Layer Recurrent Neural Network for Constrained Complex-Variable Convex Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sitian; Feng, Jiqiang; Song, Jiahui; Wen, Xingnan; Xu, Chen

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, based on calculus and penalty method, a one-layer recurrent neural network is proposed for solving constrained complex-variable convex optimization. It is proved that for any initial point from a given domain, the state of the proposed neural network reaches the feasible region in finite time and converges to an optimal solution of the constrained complex-variable convex optimization finally. In contrast to existing neural networks for complex-variable convex optimization, the proposed neural network has a lower model complexity and better convergence. Some numerical examples and application are presented to substantiate the effectiveness of the proposed neural network.

  16. Numerical studies of shear damped composite beams using a constrained damping layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, R.F.; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2008-01-01

    Composite beams containing one or more damping layers are studied numerically. The work is based on a semi-analytical model using a Timoshenko beam theory and a full 2D finite element model. The material system analysed, is inspired by a train wagon suspension system used in a EUREKA project Sigma......!1841. For the material system, the study shows that the effect of the damping layer is strongly influenced by the presence of a stiff constraining layer, that enforces large shear strain amplitudes. The thickness of the damping rubber layer itself has only a minor influence on the overall damping....... In addition, a large influence of ill positioned cuts in the damping layer is observed....

  17. A Decomposition Method for Security Constrained Economic Dispatch of a Three-Layer Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junfeng; Luo, Zhiqiang; Dong, Cheng; Lai, Xiaowen; Wang, Yang

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a new decomposition method for the security-constrained economic dispatch in a three-layer large-scale power system. The decomposition is realized using two main techniques. The first is to use Ward equivalencing-based network reduction to reduce the number of variables and constraints in the high-layer model without sacrificing accuracy. The second is to develop a price response function to exchange signal information between neighboring layers, which significantly improves the information exchange efficiency of each iteration and results in less iterations and less computational time. The case studies based on the duplicated RTS-79 system demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  18. A one-layer recurrent neural network for constrained nonsmooth invex optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guocheng; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Invexity is an important notion in nonconvex optimization. In this paper, a one-layer recurrent neural network is proposed for solving constrained nonsmooth invex optimization problems, designed based on an exact penalty function method. It is proved herein that any state of the proposed neural network is globally convergent to the optimal solution set of constrained invex optimization problems, with a sufficiently large penalty parameter. In addition, any neural state is globally convergent to the unique optimal solution, provided that the objective function and constraint functions are pseudoconvex. Moreover, any neural state is globally convergent to the feasible region in finite time and stays there thereafter. The lower bounds of the penalty parameter and convergence time are also estimated. Two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the performances of the proposed neural network. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Layered and Laterally Constrained 2D Inversion of Time Domain Induced Polarization Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Ramm, James; Auken, Esben

    description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function allowing for a quantitative interpretation of the parameters. The code has been optimized for parallel computation and the inversion time is comparable to codes inverting just for direct current resistivity. The new inversion......In a sedimentary environment, quasi-layered models often represent the actual geology more accurately than smooth minimum-structure models. We have developed a new layered and laterally constrained inversion algorithm for time domain induced polarization data. The algorithm is based on the time...... transform of a complex resistivity forward response and the inversion extracts the spectral information of the time domain measures in terms of the Cole-Cole parameters. The developed forward code and inversion algorithm use the full time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate...

  20. Resource Constrained Planning of Multiple Projects with Separable Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Susumu; Morita, Hiroshi; Kanawa, Takuya

    In this study we consider a resource constrained planning problem of multiple projects with separable activities. This problem provides a plan to process the activities considering a resource availability with time window. We propose a solution algorithm based on the branch and bound method to obtain the optimal solution minimizing the completion time of all projects. We develop three methods for improvement of computational efficiency, that is, to obtain initial solution with minimum slack time rule, to estimate lower bound considering both time and resource constraints and to introduce an equivalence relation for bounding operation. The effectiveness of the proposed methods is demonstrated by numerical examples. Especially as the number of planning projects increases, the average computational time and the number of searched nodes are reduced.

  1. Use of segmented constrained layer damping treatment for improved helicopter aeromechanical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Gu, Haozhong; Liu, Qiang; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Zhou, Xu

    2000-08-01

    The use of a special type of smart material, known as segmented constrained layer (SCL) damping, is investigated for improved rotor aeromechanical stability. The rotor blade load-carrying member is modeled using a composite box beam with arbitrary wall thickness. The SCLs are bonded to the upper and lower surfaces of the box beam to provide passive damping. A finite-element model based on a hybrid displacement theory is used to accurately capture the transverse shear effects in the composite primary structure and the viscoelastic and the piezoelectric layers within the SCL. Detailed numerical studies are presented to assess the influence of the number of actuators and their locations for improved aeromechanical stability. Ground and air resonance analysis models are implemented in the rotor blade built around the composite box beam with segmented SCLs. A classic ground resonance model and an air resonance model are used in the rotor-body coupled stability analysis. The Pitt dynamic inflow model is used in the air resonance analysis under hover condition. Results indicate that the surface bonded SCLs significantly increase rotor lead-lag regressive modal damping in the coupled rotor-body system.

  2. PRUDENTIAL CONSTRAINS OF BANKS LENDING ACTIVITIES AFTER FINANCIAL CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ercegovac

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Both economic practice and economic theory are interested in analyzing the role of financial sector in promoting the economic development and economic growth. Commercial banks are the most important financial institutions in bank-based economies. The lending activities of commercial banks are limited by regulatory framework, management decisions and credit capacities of borrowers. Regulatory framework has been limited lending potentials of commercial banks because of capital requirements and liquidity management costs. Information asymmetry and adverse selection in decision-making enforce commercial banks to implement credit rationing process even in case of social significance of investment projects. Social responsibility of commercial banks cannot be measured according to the risk-taking activities. Banking financial intermediations have to keep the value of savings deposits under control and protect the stability of financial system. This paper will analyze the risk structure and prudential constrains of bank lending activities. To employ the credit capacity of commercial banks, it is necessary to extend guarantee schemes or promote the alternative financing opportunities in sharing the risk of accelerated growth.

  3. Topology Optimization for Minimizing the Resonant Response of Plates with Constrained Layer Damping Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanpeng Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A topology optimization method is proposed to minimize the resonant response of plates with constrained layer damping (CLD treatment under specified broadband harmonic excitations. The topology optimization problem is formulated and the square of displacement resonant response in frequency domain at the specified point is considered as the objective function. Two sensitivity analysis methods are investigated and discussed. The derivative of modal damp ratio is not considered in the conventional sensitivity analysis method. An improved sensitivity analysis method considering the derivative of modal damp ratio is developed to improve the computational accuracy of the sensitivity. The evolutionary structural optimization (ESO method is used to search the optimal layout of CLD material on plates. Numerical examples and experimental results show that the optimal layout of CLD treatment on the plate from the proposed topology optimization using the conventional sensitivity analysis or the improved sensitivity analysis can reduce the displacement resonant response. However, the optimization method using the improved sensitivity analysis can produce a higher modal damping ratio than that using the conventional sensitivity analysis and develop a smaller displacement resonant response.

  4. Improved helicopter aeromechanical stability analysis using segmented constrained layer damping and hybrid optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2000-06-01

    Aeromechanical stability plays a critical role in helicopter design and lead-lag damping is crucial to this design. In this paper, the use of segmented constrained damping layer (SCL) treatment and composite tailoring is investigated for improved rotor aeromechanical stability using formal optimization technique. The principal load-carrying member in the rotor blade is represented by a composite box beam, of arbitrary thickness, with surface bonded SCLs. A comprehensive theory is used to model the smart box beam. A ground resonance analysis model and an air resonance analysis model are implemented in the rotor blade built around the composite box beam with SCLs. The Pitt-Peters dynamic inflow model is used in air resonance analysis under hover condition. A hybrid optimization technique is used to investigate the optimum design of the composite box beam with surface bonded SCLs for improved damping characteristics. Parameters such as stacking sequence of the composite laminates and placement of SCLs are used as design variables. Detailed numerical studies are presented for aeromechanical stability analysis. It is shown that optimum blade design yields significant increase in rotor lead-lag regressive modal damping compared to the initial system.

  5. FXR agonist activity of conformationally constrained analogs of GW 4064.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Bass, Jonathan Y; Caldwell, Richard D; Caravella, Justin A; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L; Deaton, David N; Madauss, Kevin P; Marr, Harry B; McFadyen, Robert B; Miller, Aaron B; Navas, Frank; Parks, Derek J; Spearing, Paul K; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P; Bruce Wisely, G

    2009-08-15

    Two series of conformationally constrained analogs of the FXR agonist GW 4064 1 were prepared. Replacement of the metabolically labile stilbene with either benzothiophene or naphthalene rings led to the identification of potent full agonists 2a and 2g.

  6. Modeling of Passive Constrained Layer Damping as Applied to a Gun Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Z. Kiehl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the damping effects of a cantilever beam system consisting of a gun tube wrapped with a constrained viscoelastic polymer on terrain induced vibrations. A time domain solution to the forced motion of this system is developed using the GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish method to incorporate the viscoelastic properties of the polymer. An impulse load is applied at the free end and the tip deflection of the cantilevered beam system is determined. The resulting GHM equations are then solved in MATLAB by transformation to the state-space domain.

  7. Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS) contains over 100 data sets pertaining to permafrost and frozen ground topics. It also contains detailed...

  8. Lithospheric Layering beneath the Contiguous United States Constrained by S-to-P Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Liu, K. H.; Kong, F.; Gao, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    The greatly-improved spatial coverage of broadband seismic stations as a result of the deployment of the EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) stations and the diversity of tectonic environments in the contiguous United States provide a unique opportunity to investigate the depth variation and nature of intra-lithospheric interfaces in different tectonic regimes. A total of 284,121 high-quality S-to-P receiver functions (SRFs) are obtained from 3,809 broadband seismic stations in the TA and other permanent and temporary deployments in the contiguous United States. The SRFs are computed using frequency domain deconvolution, and are stacked in consecutive circles with a radius of 2°. They are converted to depth series after move-out corrections using the IASP91 Earth model. Similar to previous SRF studies, a robust negative arrival, representing a sharp discontinuity of velocity reduction with depth, is visible in virtually all the stacked traces in the depth range of 30-110 km. Beneath the western US, the depth of this discontinuity is 69±17 km, and beneath the eastern US, it ranges from 75 to 90 km, both of which are comparable to the depth of the tomographically-determined lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). In contrast, the depth of the discontinuity beneath the central US is 83±10 km which is significantly smaller than the 250 km LAB depth determined by seismic surface wave tomography. Based on previous seismic tomography, shear-wave splitting and mantle xenolith studies, we interpret this discontinuity as the top of a frozen-in layer of volatile-rich melt beneath the central US. The observations and the discrepancy between the SRF and seismic tomography results for the central US as well as the amplitude of the corresponding arrival on the SRFs may be explained by spatial variations of the thickness of the transitional layer between the "pure" lithosphere and the "pure" asthenosphere. Under this hypothesis, the consistency between the results from the

  9. A one-layer recurrent neural network for constrained pseudoconvex optimization and its application for dynamic portfolio optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingshan; Guo, Zhishan; Wang, Jun

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a one-layer recurrent neural network is proposed for solving pseudoconvex optimization problems subject to linear equality and bound constraints. Compared with the existing neural networks for optimization (e.g., the projection neural networks), the proposed neural network is capable of solving more general pseudoconvex optimization problems with equality and bound constraints. Moreover, it is capable of solving constrained fractional programming problems as a special case. The convergence of the state variables of the proposed neural network to achieve solution optimality is guaranteed as long as the designed parameters in the model are larger than the derived lower bounds. Numerical examples with simulation results illustrate the effectiveness and characteristics of the proposed neural network. In addition, an application for dynamic portfolio optimization is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Constraining slip rates and spacings for active normal faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Patience A.; Roberts, Gerald P.

    2001-12-01

    Numerous observations of extensional provinces indicate that neighbouring faults commonly slip at different rates and, moreover, may be active over different time intervals. These published observations include variations in slip rate measured along-strike of a fault array or fault zone, as well as significant across-strike differences in the timing and rates of movement on faults that have a similar orientation with respect to the regional stress field. Here we review published examples from the western USA, the North Sea, and central Greece, and present new data from the Italian Apennines that support the idea that such variations are systematic and thus to some extent predictable. The basis for the prediction is that: (1) the way in which a fault grows is fundamentally controlled by the ratio of maximum displacement to length, and (2) the regional strain rate must remain approximately constant through time. We show how data on fault lengths and displacements can be used to model the observed patterns of long-term slip rate where measured values are sparse. Specifically, we estimate the magnitude of spatial variation in slip rate along-strike and relate it to the across-strike spacing between active faults.

  11. A one-layer recurrent neural network for constrained nonsmooth optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingshan; Wang, Jun

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a novel one-layer recurrent neural network modeled by means of a differential inclusion for solving nonsmooth optimization problems, in which the number of neurons in the proposed neural network is the same as the number of decision variables of optimization problems. Compared with existing neural networks for nonsmooth optimization problems, the global convexity condition on the objective functions and constraints is relaxed, which allows the objective functions and constraints to be nonconvex. It is proven that the state variables of the proposed neural network are convergent to optimal solutions if a single design parameter in the model is larger than a derived lower bound. Numerical examples with simulation results substantiate the effectiveness and illustrate the characteristics of the proposed neural network.

  12. A one-layer recurrent neural network for constrained nonconvex optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guocheng; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a one-layer recurrent neural network is proposed for solving nonconvex optimization problems subject to general inequality constraints, designed based on an exact penalty function method. It is proved herein that any neuron state of the proposed neural network is convergent to the feasible region in finite time and stays there thereafter, provided that the penalty parameter is sufficiently large. The lower bounds of the penalty parameter and convergence time are also estimated. In addition, any neural state of the proposed neural network is convergent to its equilibrium point set which satisfies the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions of the optimization problem. Moreover, the equilibrium point set is equivalent to the optimal solution to the nonconvex optimization problem if the objective function and constraints satisfy given conditions. Four numerical examples are provided to illustrate the performances of the proposed neural network.

  13. Constraining the contribution of active galactic nuclei to reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sultan; Davé, Romeel; Mitra, Sourav; Finlator, Kristian; Ciardi, Benedetta; Santos, Mario G.

    2018-01-01

    Recent results have suggested that active galactic nuclei (AGN) could provide enough photons to reionize the Universe. We assess the viability of this scenario using a semi-numerical framework for modelling reionization, to which we add a quasar contribution by constructing a Quasar Halo Occupancy Distribution (QHOD) based on Giallongo et al. observations. Assuming a constant QHOD, we find that an AGN-only model cannot simultaneously match observations of the optical depth τe, neutral fraction and ionizing emissivity. Such a model predicts τe too low by ∼2σ relative to Planck constraints, and reionizes the Universe at z ≲ 5. Arbitrarily increasing the AGN emissivity to match these results yields a strong mismatch with the observed ionizing emissivity at z ∼ 5. If we instead assume a redshift-independent AGN luminosity function yielding an emissivity evolution like that assumed in Madau & Haardt model, then we can match τe albeit with late reionization; however, such evolution is inconsistent with observations at z ∼ 4-6 and poorly motivated physically. These results arise because AGN are more biased towards massive haloes than typical reionizing galaxies, resulting in stronger clustering and later formation times. AGN-dominated models produce larger ionizing bubbles that are reflected in ∼×2 more 21 cm power on all scales. A model with equal part galaxies and AGN contribution is still (barely) consistent with observations, but could be distinguished using next-generation 21 cm experiments such as Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and SKA-low. We conclude that, even with recent claims of more faint AGN than previously thought, AGN are highly unlikely to dominate the ionizing photon budget for reionization.

  14. Dynamic Optimization of Constrained Layer Damping Structure for the Headstock of Machine Tools with Modal Strain Energy Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakai Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic stiffness and damping of the headstock, which is a critical component of precision horizontal machining center, are two main factors that influence machining accuracy and surface finish quality. Constrained Layer Damping (CLD structure is proved to be effective in raising damping capacity for the thin plate and shell structures. In this paper, one kind of high damping material is utilized on the headstock to improve damping capacity. The dynamic characteristic of the hybrid headstock is investigated analytically and experimentally. The results demonstrate that the resonant response amplitudes of the headstock with damping material can decrease significantly compared to original cast structure. To obtain the optimal configuration of damping material, a topology optimization method based on the Evolutionary Structural Optimization (ESO is implemented. Modal Strain Energy (MSE method is employed to analyze the damping and to derive the sensitivity of the modal loss factor. The optimization results indicate that the added weight of damping material decreases by 50%; meanwhile the first two orders of modal loss factor decrease by less than 23.5% compared to the original structure.

  15. Development of smart active layer sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sup; Lee, Sang Il; Yoon, Dong Jin; Kwon, Jae Hwa

    2004-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is a new technology that will be increasingly applied at the industrial field as a potential approach to improve cost and convenience of structural inspection. Recently, the development of smart sensor is very active for real application. This study has focused on preparation and application study of SAL sensor. In order to detect elastic wave, smart piezoelectric sensor, SAL, is fabricated by using a piezoelectric element, shielding layer and protection layer. This protection layer plays an important role in a patched network of distributed piezoelectric sensor and shielding treatment. Four types of SAL sensor are designed/prepared/tested, and these details will be discussed in the paper. In this study, SAL sensor can be feasibly applied to perform structural health monitoring and to detect damage sources which result in elastic waves.

  16. Thin layer activation: measuring wear and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvigne, T.; Leyman, D.; Oxorn, K.

    1995-01-01

    The technique known as thin layer activation (TLA) is explained and assessed in this article. Widely used, in for example the automotive industry, TLA allows on-line monitoring of the loss of matter from a critical surface, by wear erosion and corrosion. The technique offers extremely high sensitivity thus leading to reduced test times. On-line wear phenomena can be assessed during operation of a mechanical process, even through thick engine walls. (UK)

  17. MR constrained simultaneous reconstruction of activity and attenuation maps in brain TOF-PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-29

    The maximum likelihood estimation of attenuation and activity (MLAA) algorithm has been proposed to jointly estimate activity and attenuation from emission data only. Salomon et al employed the MLAA to estimate activity and attenuation from time-of-flight PET data with spatial MR prior information on attenuation. Recently, we proposed a novel algorithm to impose both spatial and statistical constraints on attenuation estimation within the MLAA algorithm using Dixon MR images and a constrained Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In this study, we compare the proposed algorithm with MLAA and MLAA-Salomon in brain TOF-PET/MR imaging.

  18. MR constrained simultaneous reconstruction of activity and attenuation maps in brain TOF-PET/MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    The maximum likelihood estimation of attenuation and activity (MLAA) algorithm has been proposed to jointly estimate activity and attenuation from emission data only. Salomon et al employed the MLAA to estimate activity and attenuation from time-of-flight PET data with spatial MR prior information on attenuation. Recently, we proposed a novel algorithm to impose both spatial and statistical constraints on attenuation estimation within the MLAA algorithm using Dixon MR images and a constrained Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In this study, we compare the proposed algorithm with MLAA and MLAA_Salomon in brain TOF-PET/MR imaging.

  19. Sporadi-E layer and metereological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scotto

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Obscrvations of Es laycr performed at the ionospheric observatory of Rome from 1982 to 1989 have been used to investigate a possible correlation with cold front passages. Such a correlation may exist because of the AGW excited by tropospheric activity at cold front passages. A relationship with thunderclouds electrostatic field is also marginally considered. The treatment of data shows that the distributions of the frequencies of renection at cold front passages present only small differences compared to normal days, both for the f and for the I type; therefore, a correlation between Es layer anù meteorological activity cannot be affirmed.

  20. A Nonparametric Shape Prior Constrained Active Contour Model for Segmentation of Coronaries in CTA Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a nonparametric shape constrained algorithm for segmentation of coronary arteries in computed tomography images within the framework of active contours. An adaptive scale selection scheme, based on the global histogram information of the image data, is employed to determine the appropriate window size for each point on the active contour, which improves the performance of the active contour model in the low contrast local image regions. The possible leakage, which cannot be identified by using intensity features alone, is reduced through the application of the proposed shape constraint, where the shape of circular sampled intensity profile is used to evaluate the likelihood of current segmentation being considered vascular structures. Experiments on both synthetic and clinical datasets have demonstrated the efficiency and robustness of the proposed method. The results on clinical datasets have shown that the proposed approach is capable of extracting more detailed coronary vessels with subvoxel accuracy.

  1. Sows’ activity classification device using acceleration data – A resource constrained approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchioro, Gilberto Fernandes; Cornou, Cécile; Kristensen, Anders Ringgaard

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the main architectural alternatives and design decisions in order to implement a sows’ activity classification model on electronic devices. The different possibilities are analyzed in practical and technical aspects, focusing on the implementation metrics, like cost......, performance, complexity and reliability. The target architectures are divided into: server based, where the main processing element is a central computer; and embedded based, where the processing is distributed on devices attached to the animals. The initial classification model identifies the activities...... of a heuristic classification approach, focusing on the resource constrained characteristics of embedded systems. The new approach classifies the activities performed by the sows with accuracy close to 90%. It was implemented as a hardware module that can easily be instantiated to provide preprocessed...

  2. Escaping the Ashby limit for mechanical damping/stiffness trade-off using a constrained high internal friction interfacial layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, A P; Hine, P J; Ward, I M; Fujita, M; Tanaka, E; Gusev, A A

    2018-02-06

    The development of new materials with reduced noise and vibration levels is an active area of research due to concerns in various aspects of environmental noise pollution and its effects on health. Excessive vibrations also reduce the service live of the structures and limit the fields of their utilization. In oscillations, the viscoelastic moduli of a material are complex and it is their loss part - the product of the stiffness part and loss tangent - that is commonly viewed as a figure of merit in noise and vibration damping applications. The stiffness modulus and loss tangent are usually mutually exclusive properties so it is a technological challenge to develop materials that simultaneously combine high stiffness and high loss. Here we achieve this rare balance of properties by filling a solid polymer matrix with rigid inorganic spheres coated by a sub-micron layer of a viscoelastic material with a high level of internal friction. We demonstrate that this combination can be experimentally realised and that the analytically predicted behaviour is closely reproduced, thereby escaping the often termed 'Ashby' limit for mechanical stiffness/damping trade-off and offering a new route for manufacturing advanced composite structures with markedly reduced noise and vibration levels.

  3. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina, E-mail: marinaness@yahoo.com; Congiu, Mirko, E-mail: congiumat@gmail.com; Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico de, E-mail: graeff@fc.unesp.br [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences - UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Jéssica Colnaghi, E-mail: jeziga-cf@yahoo.com.br; Biziak de Figueiredo, Natália, E-mail: natbiziak@yahoo.com.br; Mulato, Marcelo, E-mail: mmulato@ffclrp.usp.br [Department of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy, Science and Letters at Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  4. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina; Congiu, Mirko; Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico de; Fernandes, Jéssica Colnaghi; Biziak de Figueiredo, Natália; Mulato, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine

  5. Active Layer Monitoring, Arctic and Subarctic Canada, Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project involves measuring regional and site variability in maximum annual active layer development and vertical surface movement over permafrost, and...

  6. Constrained Active Learning for Anchor Link Prediction Across Multiple Heterogeneous Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxing; Zhang, Jiawei; Wu, Quanyuan; Jia, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Wei, Xiaokai; Yu, Philip S

    2017-08-03

    Nowadays, people are usually involved in multiple heterogeneous social networks simultaneously. Discovering the anchor links between the accounts owned by the same users across different social networks is crucial for many important inter-network applications, e.g., cross-network link transfer and cross-network recommendation. Many different supervised models have been proposed to predict anchor links so far, but they are effective only when the labeled anchor links are abundant. However, in real scenarios, such a requirement can hardly be met and most anchor links are unlabeled, since manually labeling the inter-network anchor links is quite costly and tedious. To overcome such a problem and utilize the numerous unlabeled anchor links in model building, in this paper, we introduce the active learning based anchor link prediction problem. Different from the traditional active learning problems, due to the one-to-one constraint on anchor links, if an unlabeled anchor link a = ( u , v ) is identified as positive (i.e., existing), all the other unlabeled anchor links incident to account u or account v will be negative (i.e., non-existing) automatically. Viewed in such a perspective, asking for the labels of potential positive anchor links in the unlabeled set will be rewarding in the active anchor link prediction problem. Various novel anchor link information gain measures are defined in this paper, based on which several constraint active anchor link prediction methods are introduced. Extensive experiments have been done on real-world social network datasets to compare the performance of these methods with state-of-art anchor link prediction methods. The experimental results show that the proposed Mean-entropy-based Constrained Active Learning (MC) method can outperform other methods with significant advantages.

  7. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of constrained heterocyclic analogues of combretastatin A4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthuis, Martin; Pontikis, Renée; Chabot, Guy G; Seguin, Johanne; Quentin, Lionel; Bourg, Stéphane; Morin-Allory, Luc; Florent, Jean-Claude

    2011-09-05

    A series of combretastatin A4 (CA4) analogues with a lactam or lactone ring fused to the trimethoxyphenyl or the B-phenyl moiety were synthesized in an efficient and stereoselective manner by using a domino Heck-Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction. The vascular-disrupting potential of these conformationally restricted CA4 analogues was assessed by various in vitro assays: inhibition of tubulin polymerization, modification of endothelial cell morphology, and disruption of endothelial cell cords. Compounds were also evaluated for their growth inhibitory effects against murine and human tumor cells. B-ring-constrained derivatives that contain an oxindole ring (in contrast to compounds with a benzofuranone ring) as well as analogues bearing a six-membered lactone core fused to the trimethoxyphenyl ring are endowed with significant biological activity. The most potent compound of this series (oxindole 9 b) is of particular interest, as it combines chemical stability and a biological activity profile characteristic of a vascular-disrupting agent. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Surface plasmon polariton modulator with optimized active layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    package CST Microwave Studio in the frequency domain. We explore different permittivities of the ITO layer, which can be achieved by utilizing different anneal conditions. To increase transmittance and enhance modulation depth or efficiency, we propose to pattern the continuous active layer. Dependence...... from the pattern size and filling factor of the active material are analyzed for tuned permittivity of the ITO layer. Direct simulation of the device functionality validates optimization design....

  9. The modelisation of constrained damping layer treatments using the finite element method: spatial model and viscoelastic behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Moreira; José Dias Rodrigues

    2002-01-01

    Surface and integrated damping treatments with viscoelastic layers play an important position among the passive damping treatments for light and flexible structures under vibration. Application simplicity, low cost, reduced structural modification and reduced additional mass, along with an inherent high efficiency, are the main reasons of it successful usage.However, the design process of these treatments is not simple and requires a reliable tool for adequate designing and analysis.The finit...

  10. Constrained Bayesian Active Learning of Interference Channels in Cognitive Radio Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakmalis, Anestis; Chatzinotas, Symeon; Ottersten, Bjorn

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a sequential probing method for interference constraint learning is proposed to allow a centralized Cognitive Radio Network (CRN) accessing the frequency band of a Primary User (PU) in an underlay cognitive scenario with a designed PU protection specification. The main idea is that the CRN probes the PU and subsequently eavesdrops the reverse PU link to acquire the binary ACK/NACK packet. This feedback indicates whether the probing-induced interference is harmful or not and can be used to learn the PU interference constraint. The cognitive part of this sequential probing process is the selection of the power levels of the Secondary Users (SUs) which aims to learn the PU interference constraint with a minimum number of probing attempts while setting a limit on the number of harmful probing-induced interference events or equivalently of NACK packet observations over a time window. This constrained design problem is studied within the Active Learning (AL) framework and an optimal solution is derived and implemented with a sophisticated, accurate and fast Bayesian Learning method, the Expectation Propagation (EP). The performance of this solution is also demonstrated through numerical simulations and compared with modified versions of AL techniques we developed in earlier work.

  11. Future active layer dynamics and carbon dioxide production from thawing permafrost layers in Northeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollesen, Jørgen; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Thawing permafrost and the resulting mineralization of previously frozen organic carbon (C) is considered an important future feedback from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. Here, we use a dynamic process oriented permafrost model, the CoupModel, to link surface and subsurface temperatures....... The model is successfully adjusted and applied for the study area and shown to be able to simulate active layer dynamics. Subsequently, the model is used to predict the active layer thickness under future warming scenarios. The model predicts an increase of maximum active layer thickness from today 70 to 80......–105 cm as a result of a 2–6 °C warming. An additional increase in the maximum active layer thickness of a few centimetres may be expected due to heat production from decomposition of organic matter. Simulated future soil temperatures and water contents are subsequently used with measured basal soil...

  12. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  13. Thin layer activation techniques in research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    The following key application of thin layer activation technique (TLA) are discussed: ion-erosion in fusion tokamaks, bio-engineering technology, automobile industry. Future developments of the techniques, such as fission fragment TLA, multi-layer TLA and recoil implantation are discussed as well. 7 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  14. Developing a Coding Scheme to Analyse Creativity in Highly-constrained Design Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekoninck, Elies; Yue, Huang; Howard, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    This work is part of a larger project which aims to investigate the nature of creativity and the effectiveness of creativity tools in highly-constrained design tasks. This paper presents the research where a coding scheme was developed and tested with a designer-researcher who conducted two rounds...... of design and analysis on a highly constrained design task. This paper shows how design changes can be coded using a scheme based on creative ‘modes of change’. The coding scheme can show the way a designer moves around the design space, and particularly the strategies that are used by a creative designer...... larger study with more designers working on different types of highly-constrained design task is needed, in order to draw conclusions on the modes of change and their relationship to creativity....

  15. Active layer thickness and ground temperatures, Svea, Svalbard, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Snow and soil temperature records for January 1988 - May 1996 are presented. Included are snow depth and weight measurements, snow density (calculated), active layer...

  16. Investigation of Factors That May Constrain Participation of Sportive and Non-Sportive Recreational Activities Among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurullah Emir Ekinci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze, which recreational sport or non- sport such as cultural/ art activities that university students prefer in their leisure time and underlying reasons that constrains participating in these activities with regard to different variables. Randomly chosen 339 students from The Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Sciences and Engineering at University of Dumlupiınar volunteered for the study. In this research as a data collection tool “Leisure Constraint Scale” was used. During the evaluation of the data in addition to descriptive statistical methods such as Percentage (% and frequency (f Independent Samples t-test and One way Anova were used. As a result it was found that 19.2% participants choose recreational sport activities in their leisure time. In addition, significant differences have emerged between participants’ gender and constrains to leisure in "lack of information", "lack of friends" and "time" sub-dimensions, between age and barriers to leisure in "time" sub-dimension, and between average monthly income levels and constrains to leisure in "individual psychology" and "facilities / services" sub dimensions (p <0.05. But no significant differences were found according to activities that they choose in their leisure time.

  17. Homoepitaxial VPE growth of SiC active layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burk, A.A. Jr. [Northrop Grumman Electron. Sensors and Syst. Div., Baltimore, MD (United States); Rowland, L.B. [Northrop Grumman Sci. and Technol. Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    SiC active layers of tailored thickness and doping form the heart of all SiC electronic devices. These layers are most conveniently formed by vapor phase epitaxy (VPE). Exacting requirements are placed upon the SiC-VPE layers` material properties by both semiconductor device physics and available methods of device processing. In this paper, the current ability of the SiC-VPE process to meet these requirements is described along with continuing improvements in SiC epitaxial reactors, processes and materials. (orig.) 48 refs.

  18. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  19. Layer-by-layer assembly of thin organic films on PTFE activated by cold atmospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth András

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An air diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge is used to activate the surface of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE samples, which are subsequently coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP and tannic acid (TAN single, bi- and multilayers, respectively, using the dip-coating method. The surfaces are characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Attenuated Total Reflection – Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. The XPS measurements show that with plasma treatment the F/C atomic ratio in the PTFE surface decreases, due to the diminution of the concentration of CF2 moieties, and also oxygen incorporation through formation of new C–O, C=O and O=C–O bonds can be observed. In the case of coated samples, the new bonds indicated by XPS show the bonding between the organic layer and the surface, and thus the stability of layers, while the gradual decrease of the concentration of F atoms with the number of deposited layers proves the creation of PVP/TAN bi- and multi-layers. According to the ATR-FTIR spectra, in the case of PVP/TAN multilayer hydrogen bonding develops between the PVP and TAN, which assures the stability of the multilayer. The AFM lateral friction measurements show that the macromolecular layers homogeneously coat the plasma treated PTFE surface.

  20. Neutron activation analysis of baths forming conversion layer on aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, Istvan; Maleczki, Emil; Bodizs, Denes

    1988-01-01

    Chromate layers were formed on the surface of aluminium using yellow and green chromating solutions. For the determination of the aluminium content neutron activation method was used. Nuclear effects disturbing the determination were eliminated by double irradiation technique. (author) 8 refs.; 4 figs

  1. Thin layer activation technique applied to the measurement of wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphries, P [UKAEA Research Group, Harwell. Atomic Energy Research Establishment

    1978-01-01

    A thin layer of radioactive atoms is produced in the material by bombardment with charged particles, and as the material is worn away the total activity level is monitored. If the activity to depth relationship is then known the amount of material worn away can be determined. By a selective choice of the charged particle species and energy the depth of the active layer, its natural decay rate, and the energy of the emitted radiation can be pre-determined. The Harwell Tandem Electrostatic Generator has been found very suitable for the work. The total activity level can be made as little or as large as required, but a level around 5 to 10 microcuries is usually found to be adequate, and the active layer usually has a depth of 50 to 300 ..mu..m. The activated area can be from < 1 mm/sup 2/ to 4 cm/sup 2/. Particular reference is made to the production of /sup 56/Co in Fe. Experimental arrangements for the irradiation of components are described. Some practical applications undertaken by Harwell for industry are briefly mentioned, including wear of diesel engine valve seatings and fuel injection equipment, engine testing of lubricants, surface loss of rails and railway wheels, wear of gears, wear of graphite bearing materials, and corrosion and erosion of materials. 4 references.

  2. Development of Smart Active Layer Sensor (II): Manufacturing and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sup; Lee, Sang Il; Kwon, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Dong Jin

    2004-01-01

    This paper is the second part of the study on the development of a smart active layer (SAL) sensor, which consists of two parts. As mentioned in the first paper, structural health monitoring (SHM) is a new technology that is being increasingly applied at the industrial field as a potential approach to improve cost and convenience of structural inspection. Recently, the development of smart sensor is very active for real application. This study has focused on preparation and application study of SAL sensor which is described with regard to the theory and concept of the SAL sensor in the first paper. In order to detect elastic wave, smart piezoelectric sensor, SAL, is fabricated by using a piezoelectric element, shielding layer and protection layer. This protection layer plays an important role in a patched network of distributed piezoelectric sensor and shielding treatment. Four types of SAL sensor are designed/prepared/tested, and these details will be discussed in the paper In this study, SAL sensor ran be feasibly applied to perform structural health monitoring and to detect damage sources which result in elastic waves

  3. Investigating the Mechanisms of Learning from a Constrained Preparation for Future Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, Stephanie A.; Klahr, David; Price, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown benefits associated with engaging students in problem-solving activities prior to administering lessons. These problem-solving activities are assumed to activate relevant knowledge and allow students to develop some initial knowledge structures, which support understanding of the lesson. In this paper we report the results…

  4. The curved kinetic boundary layer of active matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John F

    2018-01-03

    A body submerged in active matter feels the swim pressure through a kinetic accumulation boundary layer on its surface. The boundary layer results from a balance between translational diffusion and advective swimming and occurs on the microscopic length scale . Here , D T is the Brownian translational diffusivity, τ R is the reorientation time and l = U 0 τ R is the swimmer's run length, with U 0 the swim speed [Yan and Brady, J. Fluid. Mech., 2015, 785, R1]. In this work we analyze the swim pressure on arbitrary shaped bodies by including the effect of local shape curvature in the kinetic boundary layer. When δ ≪ L and l ≪ L, where L is the body size, the leading order effects of curvature on the swim pressure are found analytically to scale as J S λδ 2 /L, where J S is twice the (non-dimensional) mean curvature. Particle-tracking simulations and direct solutions to the Smoluchowski equation governing the probability distribution of the active particles show that λδ 2 /L is a universal scaling parameter not limited to the regime δ, l ≪ L. The net force exerted on the body by the swimmers is found to scale as F net /(n ∞ k s T s L 2 ) = f(λδ 2 /L), where f(x) is a dimensionless function that is quadratic when x ≪ 1 and linear when x ∼ 1. Here, k s T s = ζU 0 2 τ R /6 defines the 'activity' of the swimmers, with ζ the drag coefficient, and n ∞ is the uniform number density of swimmers far from the body. We discuss the connection of this boundary layer to continuum mechanical descriptions of active matter and briefly present how to include hydrodynamics into this purely kinetic study.

  5. Adolescent Self-Reported Physical Activity and Autonomy: A Case for Constrained and Structured Environments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome N. Rachele, Timo Jaakkola, Tracy L. Washington, Thomas F. Cuddihy, Steven M. McPhail

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The provision of autonomy supportive environments that promote physical activity engagement have become popular in contemporary youth settings. However, questions remain about whether adolescent perceptions of their autonomy have implications for physical activity. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the association between adolescents’ self-reported physical activity and their perceived autonomy. Participants (n = 384 adolescents aged between 12 and 15 years were recruited from six secondary schools in metropolitan Brisbane, Australia. Self-reported measures of physical activity and autonomy were obtained. Logistic regression with inverse probability weights were used to examine the association between autonomy and the odds of meeting youth physical activity guidelines. Autonomy (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.49-0.76 and gender (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.46-0.83 were negatively associated with meeting physical activity guidelines. However, the model explained only a small amount of the variation in whether youth in this sample met physical activity guidelines (R2 = 0.023. For every 1 unit decrease in autonomy (on an index from 1 to 5, participants were 1.64 times more likely to meet physical activity guidelines. The findings, which are at odds with several previous studies, suggest that interventions designed to facilitate youth physical activity should limit opportunities for youth to make independent decisions about their engagement. However, the small amount of variation explained by the predictors in the model is a caveat, and should be considered prior to applying such suggestions in practical settings. Future research should continue to examine a larger age range, longitudinal observational or intervention studies to examine assertions of causality, as well as objective measurement of physical activity.

  6. Typology of nonlinear activity waves in a layered neural continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Paul; Leisman, Gerry

    2006-04-01

    Neural tissue, a medium containing electro-chemical energy, can amplify small increments in cellular activity. The growing disturbance, measured as the fraction of active cells, manifests as propagating waves. In a layered geometry with a time delay in synaptic signals between the layers, the delay is instrumental in determining the amplified wavelengths. The growth of the waves is limited by the finite number of neural cells in a given region of the continuum. As wave growth saturates, the resulting activity patterns in space and time show a variety of forms, ranging from regular monochromatic waves to highly irregular mixtures of different spatial frequencies. The type of wave configuration is determined by a number of parameters, including alertness and synaptic conditioning as well as delay. For all cases studied, using numerical solution of the nonlinear Wilson-Cowan (1973) equations, there is an interval in delay in which the wave mixing occurs. As delay increases through this interval, during a series of consecutive waves propagating through a continuum region, the activity within that region changes from a single-frequency to a multiple-frequency pattern and back again. The diverse spatio-temporal patterns give a more concrete form to several metaphors advanced over the years to attempt an explanation of cognitive phenomena: Activity waves embody the "holographic memory" (Pribram, 1991); wave mixing provides a plausible cause of the competition called "neural Darwinism" (Edelman, 1988); finally the consecutive generation of growing neural waves can explain the discontinuousness of "psychological time" (Stroud, 1955).

  7. Layer-by-Layer Assembly and Photocatalytic Activity of Titania Nanosheets on Coal Fly Ash Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Cui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address the problem with titania distribution and recovery, series of Ti0.91O2/CFA photocatalysts (Ti0.91O2/CFA-n, n=2,4,6, and 8 were fabricated by assembling Ti0.91O2 nanosheets on coal fly ash (CFA microspheres via the layer-by-layer assembly (LBLA process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, N2-sorption, and ultraviolet-visible absorption (UV-vis techniques. The SEM images and UV-vis spectra illustrated that Ti0.91O2 nanosheets were immobilized successfully on the CFA by the LBLA approach and changed the characteristics of CFA noticeably. The photocatalytic activity of Ti0.91O2/CFA was evaluated by the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB under UV irradiation. The results demonstrated that Ti0.91O2/CFA-6 showed the best photocatalytic activity among the series of Ti0.91O2/CFA irradiated for 60 min, with a decoloration rate above 43%. After photocatalysis, the Ti0.91O2/CFA could be easily separated and recycled from aqueous solution and Ti0.91O2 nanosheets were still anchored on the CFA.

  8. Lithospheric strength in the active boundary between the Pacific Plate and Baja California microplate constrained from lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzaras, Vasileios; van der Werf, Thomas; Kriegsman, Leo M.; Kronenberg, Andreas; Tikoff, Basil; Drury, Martyn R.

    2017-04-01

    The lower crust is the most poorly understood of the lithospheric layers in terms of its rheology, particularly at active plate boundaries. We studied naturally deformed lower crustal xenoliths within an active plate boundary, in order to link their microstructures and rheological parameters to the well-defined active tectonic context. The Baja California shear zone (BCSZ), located at the western boundary of the Baja California microplate, comprises the active boundary accommodating the relative motion between the Pacific plate and Baja California microplate. The basalts of the Holocene San Quintin volcanic field carry lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths, which sample the Baja California microplate lithosphere in the vicinity of the BCSZ. The lower crustal xenoliths range from undeformed gabbros to granoblastic two-pyroxene granulites. Two-pyroxene geothermometry shows that the granulites equilibrated at temperatures of 690-920 oC. Phase equilibria (P-T pseudosections using Perple_X) indicate that symplectites with intergrown pyroxenes, plagioclase, olivine and spinel formed at 3.6-5.4 kbar, following decompression from pressures exceeding 6 kbar. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the water content of plagioclase varies among the analyzed xenoliths; plagioclase is relatively dry in two xenoliths while one xenolith contains hydrated plagioclase grains. Microstructural observations and analysis of the crystallographic texture provide evidence for deformation of plagioclase by a combination of dislocation creep and grain boundary sliding. To constrain the strength of the lower crust and upper mantle near the BCSZ we estimated the differential stress using plagioclase and olivine grain size paleopiezomtery, respectively. Differential stress estimates for plagioclase range from 10 to 32 MPa and for olivine are 30 MPa. Thus the active microplate boundary records elevated crustal temperatures, heterogeneous levels of hydration, and low strength in both the lower crust and

  9. Constrained consequence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available their basic properties and relationship. In Section 3 we present a modal instance of these constructions which also illustrates with an example how to reason abductively with constrained entailment in a causal or action oriented context. In Section 4 we... of models with the former approach, whereas in Section 3.3 we give an example illustrating ways in which C can be de ned with both. Here we employ the following versions of local consequence: De nition 3.4. Given a model M = hW;R;Vi and formulas...

  10. Activation of plantar flexor muscles is constrained by multiple muscle synergies rather than joint torques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahito Suzuki

    Full Text Available Behavioral evidence has suggested that a small number of muscle synergies may be responsible for activating a variety of muscles. Nevertheless, such dimensionality reduction may also be explained using the perspective of alternative hypotheses, such as predictions based on linear combinations of joint torques multiplied by corresponding coefficients. To compare the explanatory capacity of these hypotheses for describing muscle activation, we enrolled 12 male volunteers who performed isometric plantar flexor contractions at 10-100% of maximum effort. During each plantar flexor contraction, the knee extensor muscles were isometrically contracted at 0%, 50%, or 100% of maximum effort. Electromyographic activity was recorded from the vastus lateralis, medial gastrocnemius (MG, lateral gastrocnemius (LG, and soleus muscles and quantified using the average rectified value (ARV. At lower plantar flexion torque, regression analysis identified a clear linear relationship between the MG and soleus ARVs and between the MG and LG ARVs, suggesting the presence of muscle synergy (r2 > 0.65. The contraction of the knee extensor muscles induced a significant change in the slope of this relationship for both pairs of muscles (MG × soleus, P = 0.002; MG × LG, P = 0.006. Similarly, the slope of the linear relationship between the plantar flexion torque and the ARV of the MG or soleus changed significantly with knee extensor contraction (P = 0.031 and P = 0.041, respectively. These results suggest that muscle synergies characterized by non-mechanical constraints are selectively recruited according to whether contraction of the knee extensor muscles is performed simultaneously, which is relatively consistent with the muscle synergy hypothesis.

  11. Management of Ground and Groundwater Contamination on a Compact Site Constrained by Ongoing Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilbeck, K.E.; Reeve, P.

    2009-01-01

    Sellafield Site is a compact and complex site which since the 1940's has been home to a range of facilities associated with the production and reprocessing of fissile material. The site contains the UK equivalent of the Chicago Pile-1 reactor, Hanford B Reactor, Rocky Flats Buildings 771 and 774, West Valley Main Process Plant Building, Savannah River Vitrification Plant, Savannah River MOX Plant, Savannah River F Canyon, Hanford 222 Analytical Laboratory, Savannah River K-, L-, and P-Basins, and the Fort St. Vrain Reactor all in an area of approximately 1000 acres. Spent fuel reprocessing is still undertaken on site; however waste management and decommissioning activities are of increasing importance. These include the emptying and removal of fragile ponds and silos containing significant radioactive inventories, the decommissioning of reactors (including the world's first commercial reactor for power generation and the Windscale Piles, the site of a reactor fire in the late 1950's) and the construction of a new generation of vitrification and encapsulation plants. Leaks, spills and on-site disposals during the site's industrial lifetime have resulted in a legacy of fission products and other radionuclides in the ground and groundwater. Volumes of contaminated ground have been estimated as being as much as 18 million m 3 and an estimated below ground inventory of approximately 1.8 E16 Bq. These have all occurred within close proximity to a range of receptors including farm land and the sea. The cramped nature of the facilities on site, overlapping source terms and ongoing decommissioning, waste management and operating activities all raise significant challenges in the management and remediation of contaminated land and groundwater. The strategy to address these challenges includes: 1. Data collection, management and interpretation. The congested nature of the site and the age of some of the monitoring facilities has resulted in particular difficulties. For

  12. The thin layer activation method and its applications in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The thin layer activation (TLA) method is one of the most effective and precise methods for the measurement and monitoring of corrosion (erosion) and wear in industry and is used for on-line remote measurement of wear and corrosion rate of central parts in machines or processing vessels under real operating conditions. This document is a comprehensive manual on TLA method in its applications for monitoring wear and corrosion in industry. It describes the theory and presents case studies on TLA method applications in industry. In addition, in annexes are given tables of nuclear data relating to TLA (decay characteristics, depth distribution of reaction products, activation data for charged-particle nuclear reactions), references from INIS database on TLA and a detailed production of the application of TLA for wear measurement of superhard turning tools

  13. The thin layer activation method and its applications in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The thin layer activation (TLA) method is one of the most effective and precise methods for the measurement and monitoring of corrosion (erosion) and wear in industry and is used for on-line remote measurement of wear and corrosion rate of central parts in machines or processing vessels under real operating conditions. This document is a comprehensive manual on TLA method in its applications for monitoring wear and corrosion in industry. It describes the theory and presents case studies on TLA method applications in industry. In addition, in annexes are given tables of nuclear data relating to TLA (decay characteristics, depth distribution of reaction products, activation data for charged-particle nuclear reactions), references from INIS database on TLA and a detailed production of the application of TLA for wear measurement of superhard turning tools.

  14. Thin layer activation and ultra thin layer activation: two complementary techniques for wear and corrosion studies in various fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauvage, T.; Vincent, L.; Blondiaux, G.

    2002-01-01

    Thin layer activation (TLA) is widely used since more than 25 years to study surface wear or corrosion. This well known technique uses most of the time charged particles activation, which gives sensitivity in the range of the micrometer, except when the fluid mode of detection is utilized. In this case application of the method is limited to phenomena where we have transport of radioactive fragments to detection point. The main disadvantage of this procedure is the error due to trapping phenomena between the wear or corrosion point and detection setup. So the ultra thin layer activation (UTLA) has been developed to get nanometric sensitivity without using any fluid for radioactivity transportation, which is the main source of error of the TLA technique. In this paper we shall briefly describe the TLA technique and the most important fields of application. Then we shall emphasise on UTLA with a presentation of the principle of the method and actual running of application. The main problem concerning UTLA is calibration which requires the use of thin films (usually 10 to 100 nanometers) deposited on substrate. This process is time consuming and we shall demonstrate how running software developed in the lab can solve it. We shall finish the presentation by giving some potential application of the technique in various fields. (authors)

  15. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes...... inversions are compared against classical smooth results and available boreholes. With the focusing approach, the obtained blocky results agree with the underlying geology and allow for easier interpretation by the end-user....

  16. Application of thin layer activation method to industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masago; Hatakeyama, Noriko

    1996-01-01

    A thin layer activation method was reviewed for non-destructive, rapid, precise and real-time measurement of wear and corrosion. The review included wear measurement, the principle of the method, actual measurement, application, and laws and regulations. The method is to activate the material surface alone by accelerated ions like p, d and He ions produced by cyclotron, Van de Graaf apparatus or other accelerators and to utilize the yielded radioisotopes as a tracer, is widely used in the tribology field, and is more useful than the previous method with the reactor since it activated the whole material. Application of the method was reportedly resulted in saving the 80% cost and 90% time in the wear measurement of automobile parts such as engine and transmission. Actually, the activated material was combined into the part to be run and the radioactivity was to be measured externally or in the worn particles suitably collected. The activation thickness was generally in the range of 10-200 μm and the resultant radioactivity, 0.2-2 MBq. In most cases in Japan, the method would be under the law concerning prevention from radiation hazards due to radioisotopes, etc. (K.H.)

  17. Choosing health, constrained choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee Khoon Chan

    2009-12-01

    In parallel with the neo-liberal retrenchment of the welfarist state, an increasing emphasis on the responsibility of individuals in managing their own affairs and their well-being has been evident. In the health arena for instance, this was a major theme permeating the UK government's White Paper Choosing Health: Making Healthy Choices Easier (2004), which appealed to an ethos of autonomy and self-actualization through activity and consumption which merited esteem. As a counterpoint to this growing trend of informed responsibilization, constrained choices (constrained agency) provides a useful framework for a judicious balance and sense of proportion between an individual behavioural focus and a focus on societal, systemic, and structural determinants of health and well-being. Constrained choices is also a conceptual bridge between responsibilization and population health which could be further developed within an integrative biosocial perspective one might refer to as the social ecology of health and disease.

  18. Finite-time convergent recurrent neural network with a hard-limiting activation function for constrained optimization with piecewise-linear objective functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingshan; Wang, Jun

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a one-layer recurrent neural network for solving a class of constrained nonsmooth optimization problems with piecewise-linear objective functions. The proposed neural network is guaranteed to be globally convergent in finite time to the optimal solutions under a mild condition on a derived lower bound of a single gain parameter in the model. The number of neurons in the neural network is the same as the number of decision variables of the optimization problem. Compared with existing neural networks for optimization, the proposed neural network has a couple of salient features such as finite-time convergence and a low model complexity. Specific models for two important special cases, namely, linear programming and nonsmooth optimization, are also presented. In addition, applications to the shortest path problem and constrained least absolute deviation problem are discussed with simulation results to demonstrate the effectiveness and characteristics of the proposed neural network.

  19. Spinal NMDA receptor activation constrains inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation in Charles River Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, K A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2014-10-01

    Reduced spinal synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit a unique form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF requires tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) activity within spinal segments containing the phrenic motor nucleus to stabilize early, transient increases in phrenic burst amplitude into long-lasting iPMF. Here we tested the hypothesis that spinal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation constrains long-lasting iPMF in some rat substrains. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized, ventilated Harlan (HSD) and Charles River (CRSD) Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to a 30-min central neural apnea. HSD rats expressed a robust, long-lasting (>60 min) increase in phrenic burst amplitude (i.e., long-lasting iPMF) when respiratory neural activity was restored. By contrast, CRSD rats expressed an attenuated, transient (∼15 min) iPMF. Spinal NMDAR inhibition with DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) before neural apnea or shortly (4 min) prior to the resumption of respiratory neural activity revealed long-lasting iPMF in CRSD rats that was phenotypically similar to that in HSD rats. By contrast, APV did not alter iPMF expression in HSD rats. Spinal TNF-α or aPKC inhibition impaired long-lasting iPMF enabled by NMDAR inhibition in CRSD rats, suggesting that similar mechanisms give rise to long-lasting iPMF in CRSD rats with NMDAR inhibition as those giving rise to long-lasting iPMF in HSD rats. These results suggest that NMDAR activation can impose constraints on TNF-α-induced aPKC activation after neural apnea, impairing stabilization of transient iPMF into long-lasting iPMF. These data may have important implications for understanding differential responses to reduced respiratory neural activity in a heterogeneous human population. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Directed Vertical Diffusion of Photovoltaic Active Layer Components into Porous ZnO-Based Cathode Buffer Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jia-Jhen; Yang, Tsung-Yu; Lan, Yi-Kang; Wu, Wei-Ru; Su, Chun-Jen; Weng, Shih-Chang; Yamada, Norifumi L; Su, An-Chung; Jeng, U-Ser

    2018-04-01

    Cathode buffer layers (CBLs) can effectively further the efficiency of polymer solar cells (PSCs), after optimization of the active layer. Hidden between the active layer and cathode of the inverted PSC device configuration is the critical yet often unattended vertical diffusion of the active layer components across CBL. Here, a novel methodology of contrast variation with neutron and anomalous X-ray reflectivity to map the multicomponent depth compositions of inverted PSCs, covering from the active layer surface down to the bottom of the ZnO-based CBL, is developed. Uniquely revealed for a high-performance model PSC are the often overlooked porosity distributions of the ZnO-based CBL and the differential diffusions of the polymer PTB7-Th and fullerene derivative PC 71 BM of the active layer into the CBL. Interface modification of the ZnO-based CBL with fullerene derivative PCBEOH for size-selective nanochannels can selectively improve the diffusion of PC 71 BM more than that of the polymer. The deeper penetration of PC 71 BM establishes a gradient distribution of fullerene derivatives over the ZnO/PCBE-OH CBL, resulting in markedly improved electron mobility and device efficiency of the inverted PSC. The result suggests a new CBL design concept of progressive matching of the conduction bands. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Identification of constrained peptides that bind to and preferentially inhibit the activity of the hepatitis C viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, Anthony; Zaccardi, Joe; Mullen, Stanley; Olland, Stephane; Orlowski, Mark; Feld, Boris; Labonte, Patrick; Mak, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A class of disulfide constrained peptides containing a core motif FPWG was identified from a screen of phage displayed library using the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) as a bait. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that three highly purified synthetic constrained peptides bound to immobilized NS5B with estimated K d values ranging from 30 to 60 μM. In addition, these peptides inhibited the NS5B activity in vitro with IC 50 ranging from 6 to 48 μM, whereas in contrast they had no inhibitory effect on the enzymatic activities of calf thymus polymerase α, human polymerase β, RSV polymerase, and HIV reverse transcriptase in vitro. Two peptides demonstrated conformation-dependent inhibition since their synthetic linear versions were not inhibitory in the NS5B assay. A constrained peptide with the minimum core motif FPWG retained selective inhibition of NS5B activity with an IC 50 of 50 μM. Alanine scan analyses of a representative constrained peptide, FPWGNTW, indicated that residues F1 and W7 were critical for the inhibitory effect of this peptide, although residues P2 and N5 had some measurable inhibitory effect as well. Further analyses of the mechanism of inhibition indicated that these peptides inhibited the formation of preelongation complexes required for the elongation reaction. However, once the preelongation complex was formed, its activity was refractory to peptide inhibition. Furthermore, the constrained peptide FPWGNTW inhibited de novo initiated RNA synthesis by NS5B from a poly(rC) template. These data indicate that the peptides confer selective inhibition of NS5B activity by binding to the enzyme and perturbing an early step preceding the processive elongation step of RNA synthesis

  2. The Padul normal fault activity constrained by GPS data: Brittle extension orthogonal to folding in the central Betic Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Antonio J.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; Borque, Maria Jesús; Sánchez-Alzola, Alberto; Martinez-Martos, Manuel; Alfaro, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    The Padul Fault is located in the Central Betic Cordillera, formed in the framework of the NW-SE Eurasian-African plate convergence. In the Internal Zone, large E-W to NE-SW folds of western Sierra Nevada accommodated the greatest NW-SE shortening and uplift of the cordillera. However, GPS networks reveal a present-day dominant E-W to NE-SW extensional setting at surface. The Padul Fault is the most relevant and best exposed active normal fault that accommodates most of the NE-SW extension of the Central Betics. This WSW-wards dipping fault, formed by several segments of up to 7 km maximum length, favored the uplift of the Sierra Nevada footwall away from the Padul graben hanging wall. A non-permanent GPS network installed in 1999 constrains an average horizontal extensional rate of 0.5 mm/yr in N66°E direction. The fault length suggests that a (maximum) 6 magnitude earthquake may be expected, but the absence of instrumental or historical seismic events would indicate that fault activity occurs at least partially by creep. Striae on fault surfaces evidence normal-sinistral kinematics, suggesting that the Padul Fault may have been a main transfer fault of the westernmost end of the Sierra Nevada antiform. Nevertheless, GPS results evidence: (1) shortening in the Sierra Nevada antiform is in its latest stages, and (2) the present-day fault shows normal with minor oblique dextral displacements. The recent change in Padul fault kinematics will be related to the present-day dominance of the ENE-WSW regional extension versus NNW-SSE shortening that produced the uplift and northwestwards displacement of Sierra Nevada antiform. This region illustrates the importance of heterogeneous brittle extensional tectonics in the latest uplift stages of compressional orogens, as well as the interaction of folding during the development of faults at shallow crustal levels.

  3. Initiation and slow propagation of epileptiform activity from ventral to dorsal medial entorhinal cortex is constrained by an inhibitory gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridler, Thomas; Matthews, Peter; Phillips, Keith G; Randall, Andrew D; Brown, Jonathan T

    2018-03-31

    The medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) has an important role in initiation and propagation of seizure activity. Several anatomical relationships exist in neurophysiological properties of mEC neurons; however, in the context of hyperexcitability, previous studies often considered it as a homogeneous structure. Using multi-site extracellular recording techniques, ictal-like activity was observed along the dorso-ventral axis of the mEC in vitro in response to various ictogenic stimuli. This originated predominantly from ventral areas, spreading to dorsal mEC with a surprisingly slow velocity. Modulation of inhibitory tone was capable of changing the slope of ictal initiation, suggesting seizure propagation behaviours are highly dependent on levels of GABAergic function in this region. A distinct disinhibition model also showed, in the absence of inhibition, a prevalence for interictal-like initiation in ventral mEC, reflecting the intrinsic differences in mEC neurons. These findings suggest the ventral mEC is more prone to hyperexcitable discharge than the dorsal mEC, which may be relevant under pathological conditions. The medial entorhinal cortex (mEC) has an important role in the generation and propagation of seizure activity. The organization of the mEC is such that a number of dorso-ventral relationships exist in neurophysiological properties of neurons. These range from intrinsic and synaptic properties to density of inhibitory connectivity. We examined the influence of these gradients on generation and propagation of epileptiform activity in the mEC. Using a 16-shank silicon probe array to record along the dorso-ventral axis of the mEC in vitro, we found 4-aminopyridine application produces ictal-like activity originating predominantly in ventral areas. This activity spreads to dorsal mEC at a surprisingly slow velocity (138 μm s -1 ), while cross-site interictal-like activity appeared relatively synchronous. We propose that ictal propagation is constrained by

  4. Activity and lifetime of urease immobilized using layer-by-layer nano self-assembly on silicon microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Scott R; Elmore, Bill B; Palmer, James D

    2005-01-01

    Urease has been immobilized and layered onto the walls of manufactured silicon microchannels. Enzyme immobilization was performed using layer-by-layer nano self-assembly. Alternating layers of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, with enzyme layers "encased" between them, were deposited onto the walls of the silicon microchannels. The polycations used were polyethylenimine (PEI), polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDDA), and polyallylamine (PAH). The polyanions used were polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) and polyvinylsulfate (PVS). The activity of the immobilized enzyme was tested by pumping a 1 g/L urea solution through the microchannels at various flow rates. Effluent concentration was measured using an ultraviolet/visible spectrometer by monitoring the absorbance of a pH sensitive dye. The architecture of PEI/PSS/PEI/urease/PEI with single and multiple layers of enzyme demonstrated superior performance over the PDDA and PAH architectures. The precursor layer of PEI/PSS demonstrably improved the performance of the reactor. Conversion rates of 70% were achieved at a residence time of 26 s, on d 1 of operation, and >50% at 51 s, on d 15 with a six-layer PEI/urease architecture.

  5. Active AirCore Sampling: Constraining Point Sources of Methane and Other Gases with Fixed Wing Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, J. D.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P. P.; Newberger, T.; Higgs, J. A.; Wolter, S.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate estimates of point source gas emissions are essential for reconciling top-down and bottom-up greenhouse gas measurements, but sampling such sources is challenging. Remote sensing methods are limited by resolution and cloud cover; aircraft methods are limited by air traffic control clearances, and the need to properly determine boundary layer height. A new sampling approach leverages the ability of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to measure all the way to the surface near the source of emissions, improving sample resolution, and reducing the need to characterize a wide downstream swath, or measure to the full height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The "Active-AirCore" sampler, currently under development, will fly on a fixed wing UAS in Class G airspace, spiraling from the surface to 1200 ft AGL around point sources such as leaking oil wells to measure methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. The sampler collects a 100-meter long sample "core" of air in an 1/8" passivated stainless steel tube. This "core" is run on a high-precision instrument shortly after the UAS is recovered. Sample values are mapped to a specific geographic location by cross-referencing GPS and flow/pressure metadata, and fluxes are quantified by applying Gauss's theorem to the data, mapped onto the spatial "cylinder" circumscribed by the UAS. The AirCore-Active builds off the sampling ability and analytical approach of the related AirCore sampler, which profiles the atmosphere passively using a balloon launch platform, but will add an active pumping capability needed for near-surface horizontal sampling applications. Here, we show design elements, laboratory and field test results for methane, describe the overall goals of the mission, and discuss how the platform can be adapted, with minimal effort, to measure other gas species.

  6. Review and applicative perspectives of thin layer activation in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racolta, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Thin Layer Activation (TLA) is an ion beam based technique. It consists in an accelerated ion bombardment of the surface of interest of a machine part subjected to wear. Wear and some types of corrosion phenomena characterized by a loss of material can be studied by monitoring the resulted changes in radioactivity. In this paper some general considerations on the physical phenomena involved, a short description of the two developed measuring methods, a zoom on the specific steps of the experiments (irradiation, calibration, experimental setups and instrumentation), and some applications will be presented. Although the level of activity used in TLA lies under the limit of the range considered to be safe from the point of view of radiation protection, industry hesitates to use this technique mainly due to psychological reasons with respect to the handling of radioactive material. Recognizing this problem we have decided to offer to industry wear/corrosion measurements using TLA in the form of a 'complete package'. The conception of this procedure will be presented also. (author)

  7. Constraining Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections through Multi-wavelength Analysis of the Active M Dwarf EQ Peg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosley, M. K.; Osten, R. A.

    2018-03-01

    Stellar coronal mass ejections remain experimentally unconstrained, unlike their stellar flare counterparts, which are observed ubiquitously across the electromagnetic spectrum. Low-frequency radio bursts in the form of a type II burst offer the best means of identifying and constraining the rate and properties of stellar CMEs. CME properties can be further improved through the use of proposed solar-stellar scaling relations and multi-wavelength observations of CMEs through the use of type II bursts and the associated flares expected to occur alongside them. We report on 20 hr of observation of the nearby, magnetically active, and well-characterized M dwarf star EQ Peg. The observations are simultaneously observed with the Jansky Very Large Array at their P-band (230–470 MHz) and at the Apache Point observatory in the SDSS u‧ filter (λ = 3557 Å). Dynamic spectra of the P-band data, constructed to search for signals in the frequency-time domains, did not reveal evidence of drifting radio bursts that could be ascribed to type II bursts. Given the sensitivity of our observations, we are able to place limits on the brightness temperature and source size of any bursts that may have occurred. Using solar scaling rations on four observed stellar flares, we predict CME parameters. Given the constraints on coronal density and photospheric field strength, our models suggest that the observed flares would have been insufficient to produce detectable type II bursts at our observed frequencies. We consider the implications of these results, and other recent findings, on stellar mass loss.

  8. Microbial diversity in European alpine permafrost and active layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Beat; Rime, Thomas; Phillips, Marcia; Stierli, Beat; Hajdas, Irka; Widmer, Franco; Hartmann, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Permafrost represents a largely understudied genetic resource. Thawing of permafrost with global warming will not only promote microbial carbon turnover with direct feedback on greenhouse gases, but also unlock an unknown microbial diversity. Pioneering metagenomic efforts have shed light on the permafrost microbiome in polar regions, but temperate mountain permafrost is largely understudied. We applied a unique experimental design coupled to high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal markers to characterize the microbiota at the long-term alpine permafrost study site 'Muot-da-Barba-Peider' in eastern Switzerland with an approximate radiocarbon age of 12 000 years. Compared to the active layers, the permafrost community was more diverse and enriched with members of the superphylum Patescibacteria (OD1, TM7, GN02 and OP11). These understudied phyla with no cultured representatives proposedly feature small streamlined genomes with reduced metabolic capabilities, adaptations to anaerobic fermentative metabolisms and potential ectosymbiotic lifestyles. The permafrost microbiota was also enriched with yeasts and lichenized fungi known to harbour various structural and functional adaptation mechanisms to survive under extreme sub-zero conditions. These data yield an unprecedented view on microbial life in temperate mountain permafrost, which is increasingly important for understanding the biological dynamics of permafrost in order to anticipate potential ecological trajectories in a warming world. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Interstratified nanohybrid assembled by alternating cationic layered double hydroxide nanosheets and anionic layered titanate nanosheets with superior photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Bizhou; Sun, Ping; Zhou, Yi; Jiang, Shaofeng; Gao, Bifen; Chen, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two kinds of nanosheets are well arranged in a layer-by-layer alternating fashion. • Effective interfacial heterojunction and high specific surface were observed. • Interstratified nanohybrid exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Oppositely charged 2D inorganic nanosheets of ZnAl-layered double hydroxide and layered titanate were successfully assembled into an interstratified nanohybrid through simply mixing the corresponding nanosheet suspensions. Powder X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscope clearly revealed that the component nanosheets in the as-obtained nanohybrid ZnAl–Ti 3 O 7 retain the 2D sheet skeletons of the pristine materials and that the two kinds of nanosheets are well arranged in a layer-by-layer alternating fashion with a basal spacing of about 1.3 nm, coincident with the thickness summation of the two component nanosheets. The effective interfacial heterojunction between them and the high specific surface area resulted in that the nanohybrid exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methylene blue with a reaction constant k of 2.81 × 10 −2 min −1 , which is about 9 and 4 times higher than its precursors H 2 Ti 3 O 7 and ZnAl-LDH, respectively. Based on UV–vis, XPS and photoelectrochemical measurements, a proposed photoexcitation model was provided to understand its photocatalytic behavior

  10. Layer-by-layer self-assembled active electrodes for hybrid photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniprath, Rolf

    2008-11-18

    Solar cells based on thin organic/inorganic heterofilms are currently in the focus of research, since they represent promising candidates for cost-efficient photovoltaic energy conversion. In this type of cells, charges are separated at a heterointerface between dissimilar electrode materials. These materials either absorb light themselves, or they are sensitized by an additional absorber layer at the interface. The present work investigates photovoltaic cells which are composed of nanoporous TiO{sub 2} combined with conjugated polymers and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The method of layer-by-layer self-assembly of oppositely charged nanoparticles and polymers is used for the fabrication of such devices. This method allows to fabricate nanoporous films with controlled thicknesses in the range of a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers. Investigations with scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveal that the surface morphology of the films depends only on the chemical structure of the polyions used in the production process, and not on their molecular weight or conformation. From dye adsorption at the internal surface of the electrodes one can estimate that the internal surface area of a 1 {mu}m thick film is up to 120 times larger than the projection plane. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to demonstrate that during the layer-by-layer self-assembly at least 40% of the TiO{sub 2} surface is covered with polymers. This feature allows to incorporate polythiophene derivatives into the films and to use them as sensitizers for TiO{sub 2}. Further, electrodes containing CdSe or CdTe quantum dots (QDs) as sensitizers are fabricated. For the fabrication of photovoltaic cells the layer-by-layer grown films are coated with an additional polymer layer, and Au back electrodes are evaporated on top. The cells are illuminated through transparent doped SnO{sub 2} front electrodes. The I/V curves of all fabricated cells show diode

  11. Distinct microbial communities in the active and permafrost layers on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Liang; Deng, Ye; Ding, Jin-Zhi; Hu, Hang-Wei; Xu, Tian-Le; Li, Fei; Yang, Gui-Biao; Yang, Yuan-He

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost represents an important understudied genetic resource. Soil microorganisms play important roles in regulating biogeochemical cycles and maintaining ecosystem function. However, our knowledge of patterns and drivers of permafrost microbial communities is limited over broad geographic scales. Using high-throughput Illumina sequencing, this study compared soil bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities between the active and permafrost layers on the Tibetan Plateau. Our results indicated that microbial alpha diversity was significantly higher in the active layer than in the permafrost layer with the exception of fungal Shannon-Wiener index and Simpson's diversity index, and microbial community structures were significantly different between the two layers. Our results also revealed that environmental factors such as soil fertility (soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and total nitrogen contents) were the primary drivers of the beta diversity of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities in the active layer. In contrast, environmental variables such as the mean annual precipitation and total phosphorus played dominant roles in driving the microbial beta diversity in the permafrost layer. Spatial distance was important for predicting the bacterial and archaeal beta diversity in both the active and permafrost layers, but not for fungal communities. Collectively, these results demonstrated different driving factors of microbial beta diversity between the active layer and permafrost layer, implying that the drivers of the microbial beta diversity observed in the active layer cannot be used to predict the biogeographic patterns of the microbial beta diversity in the permafrost layer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. One Isotope, Two Tales: using plant and cosmogenic 14C to constrain Holocene glacier activity on Baffin Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, S.; Miller, G. H.; Lifton, N. A.; Young, N. E.

    2017-12-01

    As the cryosphere continues to undergo rapid and accelerating change, it is more important than ever to understand past glacier activity to predict the future of the cryosphere. However, continuous Holocene glacier records are notoriously difficult to reconstruct because an advancing glacier will re-incorporate previous deposits so that moraines typically only record the farthest downvalley glacier expansion. Here we combine dates of ice margin advance from in situ dead vegetation with in situ cosmogenic 14C (in situ 14C) from preserved bedrock surfaces at the same locations to further constrain the timing of ice-free episodes during the Holocene following deglaciation on southern Baffin Island. Radiocarbon ages from recently exposed in situ plants suggest that ice last advanced over sample locations at 9.4, 9.2, 9.0, and 3.7 ka and that they remained ice covered until modern times. Associated in situ 14C inventories are variable, but well above background levels, suggesting some amount of Holocene in situ 14C production. Using plant 14C ages representing the beginning of ice coverage and in situ 14C inventories representative of exposure prior to ice coverage, a simple model of cosmogenic in situ 14C production (accounting for muon production through ice) provides constraints timing and duration of ice-free times at sample locations prior to their most recent burial. Using conservative Holocene ice thicknesses, the locations buried at 9.4, 9.2, and 9.0 ka require, at minimum, 1000 years of pre-burial exposure to match the observed in situ 14C inventory. This suggests these locations were ice free by at least 10 ka and likely earlier. The in situ 14C inventory at the location buried at 3.7 ka limits prior exposure to 2000 years, suggesting that this location experienced more complex Holocene ice cover/burial history. These pilot data show that valuable information regarding periods of exposure is contained within in situ 14C inventories. Additional paired plant and

  13. Silica nanoparticles for the layer-by-layer assembly of fully electro-active cytochrome c multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifel Sven C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For bioanalytical systems sensitivity and biomolecule activity are critical issues. The immobilization of proteins into multilayer systems by the layer-by-layer deposition has become one of the favorite methods with this respect. Moreover, the combination of nanoparticles with biomolecules on electrodes is a matter of particular interest since several examples with high activities and direct electron transfer have been found. Our study describes the investigation on silica nanoparticles and the redox protein cytochrome c for the construction of electro-active multilayer architectures, and the electron transfer within such systems. The novelty of this work is the construction of such artificial architectures with a non-conducting building block. Furthermore a detailed study of the size influence of silica nanoparticles is performed with regard to formation and electrochemical behavior of these systems. Results We report on interprotein electron transfer (IET reaction cascades of cytochrome c (cyt c immobilized by the use of modified silica nanoparticles (SiNPs to act as an artificial matrix. The layer-by-layer deposition technique has been used for the formation of silica particles/cytochrome c multilayer assemblies on electrodes. The silica particles are characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Zeta-potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The modified particles have been studied with respect to act as an artificial network for cytochrome c and to allow efficient interprotein electron transfer reactions. We demonstrate that it is possible to form electro-active assemblies with these non-conducting particles. The electrochemical response is increasing linearly with the number of layers deposited, reaching a cyt c surface concentration of about 80 pmol/cm2 with a 5 layer architecture. The interprotein electron transfer through the layer system and the

  14. Constrained Appropriations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildermuth, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    cultures of media consumption which unify and divide Brazil's (urban) youth, attention is also given to an  understanding of the relationship between young people and media, as developed in concrete attempts to increase the cultural competences of young, ‘disprivileged' media consumers. The contribution......  A discussion of the contingent character of young Brazilian's media culture is the focus of my contribution's theoretical approach. Thus, while giving recognition to young people's active agency in the creation of media-centred lifestyles and youth cultures, I will seek to demonstrate...

  15. Influence of the active layer pattern on the electrical characteristics of organic inverters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kwon, Jin-Hyuk; Bae, Jin-Hyuk [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae-Hoon; Baang, Sung-Keun [Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We describe the importance of a patterned active layer for the fine driving of organic inverters. In the case of a non-patterned inverter, the capacitance as a function of the applied bias in an organic capacitor structure exhibits a slow saturation nature due to the slow movement of charge carriers. Hence, during the operation of organic inverters with non-patterned active layers, the voltage gains inevitably exhibit lower values whereas higher gains are achieved in the case of sharply-patterned pentacene layers. These results suggest that the patterning of the active layer can be a decisive factor for realizing high-performance electronic circuits based on organic semiconductors.

  16. Exposure assessment of kneeling work activities among floor layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L K; Rytter, S; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    high external knee forces ranging from 0.3 Newton (SD 0.2) times body weight when floor layers were kneeling back on the heels, to 3.5 Newton (SD 0.3) times body weight in the crawling work position. The study highlights the need for prevention by minimizing the amount of kneeling work positions among...

  17. Amino Acid Composition, Urease Activity and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity after Toasting of Soybean in Thick and Thin Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Krička, Tajana; Jurišić, Vanja; Voća, Neven; Ćurić, Duška; Brlek Savić, Tea; Matin, Ana

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine amino acid content, urease activity and trypsin inhibitor activity in soybean grain for polygastric animals’ feed aft er toasting with the aim to introduce thick layer in toasting technology. Hence, soybean was toasted both in thick and thin layer at 130 oC during 10 minutes. In order to properly monitor the technological process of soybean thermal processing, it was necessary to study crude protein content, urease activity, trypsin inhibitor activ...

  18. Voc enhancement of a solar cell with doped Li+-PbS as the active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez Portillo, M.; Alvarado Pulido, J.; Gallardo Hernández, S.; Soto Cruz, B. S.; Alcántara Iniesta, S.; Gutiérrez Pérez, R.; Portillo Moreno, O.

    2018-06-01

    In this report, we investigate the fabrication of solar cells obtained by chemical bath technique, based on CdS as window layer and PbS and PbS-Li+-doped as the active layer. We report open-circuit-voltage Voc values of ∼392 meV for PbS and ∼630 meV for PbSLi+-doped, a remarkable enhanced in the open circuit voltage is shown for solar cells with doped active layer. Li+ ion passivate the dangling bonds in PbS-metal layer interface in consequence reducing the recombination centers.

  19. Organic biocides hosted in layered double hydroxides: enhancing antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Alejandra Santana

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Samples of layered double hydroxides containing carbonates as compensating anions were prepared by the urea method. These LDHs were used as hosts of anions coming from pipemidic and nalidixic acid. XRD results confirm that these anions were hosted in the interlayer space of LDHs. Further, from 27Al NMR MAS characterization of an interaction between the brucite-like layers and anions was suggested. Then the hybrids LDHs were used as biocide of Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli. The release profile of pipemidic and nalidixic anions from hybrid LDHs occurs for periods as long as 3.5 hours. The free-organic acid LDHs were not able to kill S. Typhi, neither E. coli. In contrast, the hybrids LDHs eliminate almost completely bacteria within short times.

  20. Layered silicate films with photochemically active porphyrin cations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čeklovský, A.; Czímerová, A.; Lang, Kamil; Bujdák, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 8 (2009), s. 1385-1396 ISSN 0033-4545 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100500651; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/1244 Grant - others:GA(SK) VEGA2/6180/27 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : clay minerals * layer charge * smectites Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.289, year: 2009

  1. Active Boundary Layer Control on a Highly Loaded Turbine Exit Case Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kurz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A highly loaded turbine exit guide vane with active boundary layer control was investigated experimentally in the High Speed Cascade Wind Tunnel at the University of the German Federal Armed Forces, Munich. The experiments include profile Mach number distributions, wake traverse measurements as well as boundary layer investigations with a flattened Pitot probe. Active boundary layer control by fluidic oscillators was applied to achieve improved performance in the low Reynolds number regime. Low solidity, which can be applied to reduce the number of blades, increases the risk of flow separation resulting in increased total pressure losses. Active boundary layer control is supposed to overcome these negative effects. The experiments show that active boundary layer control by fluidic oscillators is an appropriate way to suppress massive open separation bubbles in the low Reynolds number regime.

  2. Bi-layered nanocomposite bandages for controlling microbial infections and overproduction of matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjana, J; Mohandas, Annapoorna; Seethalakshmy, S; Suresh, Maneesha K; Menon, Riju; Biswas, Raja; Jayakumar, R

    2018-04-15

    Chronic diabetic wounds is characterised by increased microbial contamination and overproduction of matrix metalloproteases that would degrade the extracellular matrix. A bi-layer bandage was developed, that promotes the inhibition of microbial infections and matrix metalloprotease (MMPs) activity. Bi-layer bandage containing benzalkonium chloride loaded gelatin nanoparticles (BZK GNPs) in chitosan-Hyaluronic acid (HA) as a bottom layer and sodium alendronate containing chitosan as top layer was developed. We hypothesized that the chitosan-gelatin top layer with sodium alendronate could inhibit the MMPs activity, whereas the chitosan-HA bottom layer with BZK GNPs (240±66nm) would enable the elimination of microbes. The porosity, swelling and degradation nature of the prepared Bi-layered bandage was studied. The bottom layer could degrade within 4days whereas the top layer remained upto 7days. The antimicrobial activity of the BZK NPs loaded bandage was determined using normal and clinical strains. Gelatin zymography shows that the proteolytic activity of MMP was inhibited by the bandage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Diamagneto-Dielectric Anisotropic Wide Angle Impedance Matching Layers for Active Phased Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestri, F.; Cifola, L.; Gerini, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the full process of designing anisotropic metamaterial (MM) wide angle impedance matching (WAIM) layers. These layers are used to reduce the scan losses that occur in active phased arrays for large scanning angles. Numerical results are provided to show the improvement in

  4. Diamagneto-dielectric anisotropic wide angle impedance matching layers for active phased arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestri, F.; Cifola, L.; Gerini, G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the full process of designing anisotropic metamaterial (MM) wide angle impedance matching (WAIM) layers. These layers are used to reduce the scan losses that occur in active phased arrays for large scanning angles. Numerical results are provided to show the improvement in

  5. Quantitative Collection and Enzymatic Activity of Glucose Oxidase Nanotubes Fabricated by Templated Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shouwei; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Jonas, Alain M

    2015-08-10

    We report on the fabrication of enzyme nanotubes in nanoporous polycarbonate membranes via the layer-by-layer (LbL) alternate assembly of polyethylenimine (PEI) and glucose oxidase (GOX), followed by dissolution of the sacrificial template in CH2Cl2, collection, and final dispersion in water. An adjuvant-assisted filtration methodology is exploited to extract quantitatively the nanotubes without loss of activity and morphology. Different water-soluble CH2Cl2-insoluble adjuvants are tested for maximal enzyme activity and nanotube stability; whereas NaCl disrupts the tubes by screening electrostatic interactions, the high osmotic pressure created by fructose also contributes to loosening the nanotubular structures. These issues are solved when using neutral, high molar mass dextran. The enzymatic activity of intact free nanotubes in water is then quantitatively compared to membrane-embedded nanotubes, showing that the liberated nanotubes have a higher catalytic activity in proportion to their larger exposed surface. Our study thus discloses a robust and general methodology for the fabrication and quantitative collection of enzymatic nanotubes and shows that LbL assembly provides access to efficient enzyme carriers for use as catalytic swarming agents.

  6. Pervaporation dehydration of ethanol by hyaluronic acid/sodium alginate two-active-layer composite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chengyun; Zhang, Minhua; Ding, Jianwu; Pan, Fusheng; Jiang, Zhongyi; Li, Yifan; Zhao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The composite membranes with two-active-layer (a capping layer and an inner layer) were prepared by sequential spin-coatings of hyaluronic acid (HA) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) support layer. The SEM showed a mutilayer structure and a distinct interface between the HA layer and the NaAlg layer. The coating sequence of two-active-layer had an obvious influence on the pervaporation dehydration performance of membranes. When the operation temperature was 80 °C and water concentration in feed was 10 wt.%, the permeate fluxes of HA/Alg/PAN membrane and Alg/HA/PAN membrane were similar, whereas the separation factor were 1130 and 527, respectively. It was found that the capping layer with higher hydrophilicity and water retention capacity, and the inner layer with higher permselectivity could increase the separation performance of the composite membranes. Meanwhile, effects of operation temperature and water concentration in feed on pervaporation performance as well as membrane properties were studied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Performance improvement of organic thin film transistors by using active layer with sandwich structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yao; Zhou, Jianlin; Kuang, Peng; Lin, Hui; Gan, Ping; Hu, Shengdong; Lin, Zhi

    2017-08-01

    We report organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) with pentacene/fluorinated copper phthalo-cyanine (F16CuPc)/pentacene (PFP) sandwich configuration as active layers. The sandwich devices not only show hole mobility enhancement but also present a well control about threshold voltage and off-state current. By investigating various characteristics, including current-voltage hysteresis, organic film morphology, capacitance-voltage curve and resistance variation of active layers carefully, it has been found the performance improvement is mainly attributed to the low carrier traps and the higher conductivity of the sandwich active layer due to the additional induced carriers in F16CuPc/pentacene. Therefore, using proper multiple active layer is an effective way to gain high performance OTFTs.

  8. Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Program Network, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CALM network includes 168 active sites in both hemispheres with 15 participating countries. This network represents the only coordinated and standardized program...

  9. Highly sensitive multi-layer pressure sensor with an active nanostructured layer of an organic molecular metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laukhin, V; Lebedev, V; Laukhina, E; Rovira, C; Veciana, J

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses to the modern technologies that need to be instrumented with lightweight highly sensitive pressure sensors. The paper presents the development of a new plain flexible thin pressure sensor using a nanostructured layer of the highly sensitive organic piezoresistive metal β-(BEDT-TTF) 2 I 3 as an active component; BEDT-TTF=bis (ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene. The original construction approach permits one to operate the developed sensor on the principle of electrical resistance variations when its piezoresistive layer is elongated under a pressure increase. The pressure sensing element and a set of gold electrodes were integrated into one compact multi-layer design. The construction was optimized to enable one generic design for pressure ranges from 1 to 400 bar. The pressure tests showed that the sensor is able to control a small pressure change as a well definite electrical signal. So the developed type of the sensors is very attractive as a new generation of compact, lightweight, low-cost sensors that might monitor pressure with a good level of measurement accuracy. (paper)

  10. In situ nuclear magnetic response of permafrost and active layer soil in boreal and tundra ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kass, Mason Andrew; Irons, Trevor; Minsley, Burke J.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of permafrost, particularly warm and near-surface permafrost which can contain significant liquid water, is critical to understanding complex interrelationships with climate change, ecosystems, and disturbances such as wildfires. Understanding the vulnerability and resilience...... of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response of the active layer and permafrost in a variety of soil conditions, types, and saturations. In this paper, we summarize the NMR data and present quantitative relationships between active layer and permafrost liquid water content and pore sizes and show...

  11. Murein Hydrolase Activity in the Surface Layer of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356▿

    OpenAIRE

    Prado Acosta, Mariano; Palomino, María Mercedes; Allievi, Mariana C.; Rivas, Carmen Sanchez; Ruzal, Sandra M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new enzymatic functionality for the surface layer (S-layer) of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356, namely, an endopeptidase activity against the cell wall of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport, assayed via zymograms and identified by Western blotting. Based on amino acid sequence comparisons, the hydrolase activity was predicted to be located at the C terminus. Subsequent cloning and expression of the C-terminal domain in Bacillus subtilis resulted in the functional verificati...

  12. Constraining stellar physics from red-giant stars in binaries – stellar rotation, mixing processes and stellar activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to an improved understanding of stellar structure and evolution - in particular for solar-like oscillators in this context. Binary stars are fascinating objects. Because they were formed together, binary systems provide a set of two stars with very well constrained parameters. Those can be used to study properties and physical processes, such as the stellar rotation, dynamics and rotational mixing of elements and allows us to learn from the differences we find between the two components. In this work, we discussed a detailed study of the binary system KIC 9163796, discovered through Kepler photometry. The ground-based follow-up spectroscopy showed that this system is a double-lined spectroscopic binary, with a mass ratio close to unity. However, the fundamental parameters of the components of this system as well as their lithium abundances differ substantially. Kepler photometry of this system allows to perform a detailed seismic analysis as well as to derive the orbital period and the surface rotation rate of the primary component of the system. Indications of the seismic signature of the secondary are found. The differing parameters are best explained with both components located in the early and the late phase of the first dredge up at the bottom of the red-giant branch. Observed lithium abundances in both components are in good agreement with prediction of stellar models including rotational mixing. By combining observations and theory, a comprehensive picture of the system can be drawn.

  13. Nonlinear optical activity in Bridgman growth layered compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M.I., E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2010-02-15

    Layered semiconductor compound CdI{sub 2} has been grown with the Bridgman technique and studied by nonlinear transmittance spectroscopy. The optical absorption in CdI{sub 2} shows a nonlinear transmission of the incident laser power (P{sub 0}) within a lower power limit. The transmission, however, is found to saturate at high powers, giving a clamped output. The value of the incident power (P{sub 0C}) at which clamping starts is also found to depend on the crystal temperature (T{sub L}). The values of P{sub OC} ranges from 55 to 65 MW cm{sup -2} for T{sub L} = 4.2-180 K. The dynamic range (D{sub R}) as a function of T{sub L} is calculated and the values are found to range from D{sub R} = 2 to 1.6. The optical limiting mechanisms are discussed. The two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficient ({beta}) of the optical nonlinear process in CdI{sub 2} is estimated. The values are found to be within a range from {beta} = 47 to 25 cm GW{sup -1} and be decreasing with increasing T{sub L}. As expected for the TPA process, the experimental data within a certain range follows the linear relation: log (P{sub 0}/P{sub T}) = A{sub G} + {Omega}(P{sub 0} - P{sub T}), where P{sub T} is the transmitted power, A{sub G} is the absorbance of the ground state and {Omega} is a constant depending on the absorption cross-section and the relaxation time. The values of A{sub G} and {Omega} estimated from the fits to the measured data vary with T{sub L}. The findings resulting from this investigation might have potential applications in optical sensors protection.

  14. Adsorption of pharmaceuticals onto isolated polyamide active layer of NF/RO membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Yang, Hong-Wei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2018-06-01

    Adsorption of trace organic compounds (TrOCs) onto the membrane materials has a great impact on their rejection by nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. This study aimed to investigate the difference in adsorption of various pharmaceuticals (PhACs) onto different NF/RO membranes and to demonstrate the necessity of isolating the polyamide (PA) active layer from the polysulfone (PS) support layer for adsorption characterization and quantification. Both the isolated PA layers and the PA+PS layers of NF90 and ESPA1 membranes were used to conduct static adsorption tests. Results showed that apparent differences existed between the PA layer and the PA+PS layer in the adsorption capacity of PhACs as well as the time necessary to reach the adsorption equilibrium. PhACs with different physicochemical properties could be adsorbed to different extents by the isolated PA layer, which was mainly attributed to electrostatic attraction/repulsion and hydrophobic interactions. The PA layer of ESPA1 exhibited apparently higher adsorption capacities for the positively charged PhACs and similar adsorption capacities for the neutral PhACs although it had significantly less total interfacial area (per unit membrane surface area) for adsorption compared to the PA layer of NF90. The higher affinity of the PA layer of ESPA1 for the PhACs could be due to its higher capacity of forming hydrogen bonds with PhACs resulted from the modified chemistry with more -OH groups. This study provides a novel approach to determining the TrOC adsorption onto the active layer of membranes for the ease of investigating adsorption mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Plasmonic modulator optimized by patterning of active layer and tuning permittivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    as electrodes. External field changes carrier density in the ultra-thin ITO layer, which influences the permittivity. The metal-insulator-metal system possesses a plasmon resonance, and it is strongly affected by changes in the permittivity of the active layer. To improve performance of the structure we propose...... several optimizations. We examine influence of the ITO permittivity on the modulator's performance and point out appropriate values. We analyze eigenmodes of the waveguide structure and specify the range for its efficient operation. We show that substituting the continuous active layer by a one......-dimension periodic stripes increases transmittance through the device and keeps the modulator's performance at the same level. The dependence on the pattern size and filling factor of the active material is analyzed and optimum parameters are found. Patterned ITO layers allow us to design a Bragg grating inside...

  16. Separable Crossover-Promoting and Crossover-Constraining Aspects of Zip1 Activity during Budding Yeast Meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Voelkel-Meiman

    2015-06-01

    . Our data suggest that features of S. cerevisiae Zip1 or of the assembled SC in S. cerevisiae normally constrain MutLγ to preferentially promote resolution of MutSγ-associated recombination intermediates.

  17. Characterisation of Wear Resistant Boride Layers on a Tool Steel by Activity Controlled Pack Boronising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work addresses the production and characterisation of iron boride layers by pack boronising of a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The boride layers were produced at 900°C for 2h using different pack compositions in order to obtain a single-phase boride layer. The layers were characterized...... by electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Vickers hardness tests and wear testing with a pin-on-disc tribometer. It was found that the type of boride phases (FeB and/or Fe2B) present in the treated layer can be controlled by changing the boron activity...... by pack boronising for all conditions as compared to the heat treated tool steel....

  18. Ionospheric F2-Layer Semi-Annual Variation in Middle Latitude by Solar Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Kyung Park

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine the ionospheric F2-layer electron density variation by solar activity in middle latitude by using foF2 observed at the Kokubunji ionosonde station in Japan for the period from 1997 to 2008. The semi-annual variation of foF2 shows obviously in high solar activity (2000-2002 than low solar activity (2006-2008. It seems that variation of geomagnetic activity by solar activity influences on the semi-annual variation of the ionospheric F2-layer electron density. According to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis of foF2 and Ap index, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bs (IMF Bz <0 component, solar wind speed, solar wind number density and flow pressure which influence the geomagnetic activity, we examine how the geomagnetic activity affects the ionospheric F2-layer electron density variation. We find that the semi-annual variation of daily foF2, Ap index and IMF Bs appear clearly during the high solar activity. It suggests that the semi-annual variation of geomagnetic activity, caused by Russell-McPherron effect, contributes greatly to the ionospheric F2-layer semi-annual electron density variation, except dynamical effects in the thermosphere.

  19. Evaluation of polyethylenimine/carrageenan multi-layer for antibacterial activity of pathogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briones, Annabelle V.; Bigol, Urcila G.; Sato, Toshinori

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the antibacterial activity of multi-layer of polyethylenimine (PEI) and carrageenan (κ,ι, λ) for potential use as coating on biomaterial surface. The multi-layer of PEI/carrageenan was formed using the layer-by-layer assembly absorption technique and was monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and bio molecular interaction analysis. All samples were prepared in phosphate buffer solution and applied to mica disk alternately. The micrographs showed the formation of bi-layer of polyethylenimine and carrageenan (κ, ι, λ) as observed in the change of height of the layer and surface morphology. The bimolecular binding of carrageenan with polyethylenimine was also investigated using a biosensor. The sensorgram showed that PEI interacted molecularly with carrageenan. Results were: 1,916.08 pg/nm 2 for kappa type; 1,844.1 pg/nm 2 for iota type and 6,074.24 pg/nm 2 for lambda type. The multi-layer showed antibacterial activity against Enterobacter cloaceae, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcal strains (Enterococcus faecalis (EF) 29212 and 29505). (author)

  20. Thermally activated flux creep in strongly layered high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, S.; Ivlev, B.I.; Ovchinnikov, Y.N.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal activation energies for single vortices and vortex bundles in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the layers are calculated. The pinning considered is intrinsic and is due to the strongly layered structure of high-temperature superconductors. The magnetic field and the current dependence of the activation energy are studied in detail. The calculation of the activation energy is used to determine the current-voltage characteristic. It may be possible to observe the effects discussed in this paper in a pure enough sample

  1. Dual active layer a-IGZO TFT via homogeneous conductive layer formation by photochemical H-doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung-Ki; Kim, Myeong-Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeon; Seo, Hyungtak; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, InGaZnO (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) with a dual active layer (DAL) structure are fabricated by inserting a homogeneous embedded conductive layer (HECL) in an amorphous IGZO (a-IGZO) channel with the aim of enhancing the electrical characteristics of conventional bottom-gate-structure TFTs. A highly conductive HECL (carrier concentration at 1.6 × 10(13) cm(-2), resistivity at 4.6 × 10(-3) Ω∙cm, and Hall mobility at 14.6 cm(2)/Vs at room temperature) is fabricated using photochemical H-doping by irradiating UV light on an a-IGZO film. The electrical properties of the fabricated DAL TFTs are evaluated by varying the HECL length. The results reveal that carrier mobility increased proportionally with the HECL length. Further, a DAL TFT with a 60-μm-long HECL embedded in an 80-μm-long channel exhibits comprehensive and outstanding improvements in its electrical properties: a saturation mobility of 60.2 cm(2)/Vs, threshold voltage of 2.7 V, and subthreshold slope of 0.25 V/decade against the initial values of 19.9 cm(2)/Vs, 4.7 V, and 0.45 V/decade, respectively, for a TFT without HECL. This result confirms that the photochemically H-doped HECL significantly improves the electrical properties of DAL IGZO TFTs.

  2. Rapid electrostatics-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Khalid; Leo, Sin-Yen; Xu, Can; Liu, Danielle; Jiang, Peng

    2016-11-15

    Here we report a rapid and scalable bottom-up technique for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembling near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals consisting of large (⩾1μm) silica microspheres. By combining a new electrostatics-assisted colloidal transferring approach with spontaneous colloidal crystallization at an air/water interface, we have demonstrated that the crystal transfer speed of traditional Langmuir-Blodgett-based colloidal assembly technologies can be enhanced by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, the crystalline quality of the resultant photonic crystals is not compromised by this rapid colloidal assembly approach. They exhibit thickness-dependent near-infrared stop bands and well-defined Fabry-Perot fringes in the specular transmission and reflection spectra, which match well with the theoretical calculations using a scalar-wave approximation model and Fabry-Perot analysis. This simple yet scalable bottom-up technology can significantly improve the throughput in assembling large-area, multilayer colloidal crystals, which are of great technological importance in a variety of optical and non-optical applications ranging from all-optical integrated circuits to tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Classification of permafrost active layer depth from remotely sensed and topographic evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddle, D.R.; Franklin, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The remote detection of permafrost (perennially frozen ground) has important implications to environmental resource development, engineering studies, natural hazard prediction, and climate change research. In this study, the authors present results from two experiments into the classification of permafrost active layer depth within the zone of discontinuous permafrost in northern Canada. A new software system based on evidential reasoning was implemented to permit the integrated classification of multisource data consisting of landcover, terrain aspect, and equivalent latitude, each of which possessed different formats, data types, or statistical properties that could not be handled by conventional classification algorithms available to this study. In the first experiment, four active layer depth classes were classified using ground based measurements of the three variables with an accuracy of 83% compared to in situ soil probe determination of permafrost active layer depth at over 500 field sites. This confirmed the environmental significance of the variables selected, and provided a baseline result to which a remote sensing classification could be compared. In the second experiment, evidence for each input variable was obtained from image processing of digital SPOT imagery and a photogrammetric digital elevation model, and used to classify active layer depth with an accuracy of 79%. These results suggest the classification of evidence from remotely sensed measures of spectral response and topography may provide suitable indicators of permafrost active layer depth

  4. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad, E-mail: a.rosikhin86@yahoo.co.id; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto, E-mail: toto@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of physics, physics of electronic materials research division Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132, Jawa Barat – Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  5. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad; Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-01-01

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO 2 in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO 2 layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices

  6. Contrasting effects of strabismic amblyopia on metabolic activity in superficial and deep layers of striate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Daniel L; Economides, John R; Horton, Jonathan C

    2015-05-01

    To probe the mechanism of visual suppression, we have raised macaques with strabismus by disinserting the medial rectus muscle in each eye at 1 mo of age. Typically, this operation produces a comitant, alternating exotropia with normal acuity in each eye. Here we describe an unusual occurrence: the development of severe amblyopia in one eye of a monkey after induction of exotropia. Shortly after surgery, the animal demonstrated a strong fixation preference for the left eye, with apparent suppression of the right eye. Later, behavioral testing showed inability to track or to saccade to targets with the right eye. With the left eye occluded, the animal demonstrated no visually guided behavior. Optokinetic nystagmus was absent in the right eye. Metabolic activity in striate cortex was assessed by processing the tissue for cytochrome oxidase (CO). Amblyopia caused loss of CO in one eye's rows of patches, presumably those serving the blind eye. Layers 4A and 4B showed columns of reduced CO, in register with pale rows of patches in layer 2/3. Layers 4C, 5, and 6 also showed columns of CO activity, but remarkably, comparison with more superficial layers showed a reversal in contrast. In other words, pale CO staining in layers 2/3, 4A, and 4B was aligned with dark CO staining in layers 4C, 5, and 6. No experimental intervention or deprivation paradigm has been reported previously to produce opposite effects on metabolic activity in layers 2/3, 4A, and 4B vs. layers 4C, 5, and 6 within a given eye's columns. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Joint reconstruction of dynamic PET activity and kinetic parametric images using total variation constrained dictionary sparse coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiqing; Chen, Shuhang; Chen, Yunmei; Liu, Huafeng

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) is capable of providing both spatial and temporal information of radio tracers in vivo. In this paper, we present a novel joint estimation framework to reconstruct temporal sequences of dynamic PET images and the coefficients characterizing the system impulse response function, from which the associated parametric images of the system macro parameters for tracer kinetics can be estimated. The proposed algorithm, which combines statistical data measurement and tracer kinetic models, integrates a dictionary sparse coding (DSC) into a total variational minimization based algorithm for simultaneous reconstruction of the activity distribution and parametric map from measured emission sinograms. DSC, based on the compartmental theory, provides biologically meaningful regularization, and total variation regularization is incorporated to provide edge-preserving guidance. We rely on techniques from minimization algorithms (the alternating direction method of multipliers) to first generate the estimated activity distributions with sub-optimal kinetic parameter estimates, and then recover the parametric maps given these activity estimates. These coupled iterative steps are repeated as necessary until convergence. Experiments with synthetic, Monte Carlo generated data, and real patient data have been conducted, and the results are very promising.

  8. Fabrication Processes to Generate Concentration Gradients in Polymer Solar Cell Active Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Shusei; Vohra, Varun

    2017-01-01

    Polymer solar cells (PSCs) are considered as one of the most promising low-cost alternatives for renewable energy production with devices now reaching power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) above the milestone value of 10%. These enhanced performances were achieved by developing new electron-donor (ED) and electron-acceptor (EA) materials as well as finding the adequate morphologies in either bulk heterojunction or sequentially deposited active layers. In particular, producing adequate vertical concentration gradients with higher concentrations of ED and EA close to the anode and cathode, respectively, results in an improved charge collection and consequently higher photovoltaic parameters such as the fill factor. In this review, we relate processes to generate active layers with ED–EA vertical concentration gradients. After summarizing the formation of such concentration gradients in single layer active layers through processes such as annealing or additives, we will verify that sequential deposition of multilayered active layers can be an efficient approach to remarkably increase the fill factor and PCE of PSCs. In fact, applying this challenging approach to fabricate inverted architecture PSCs has the potential to generate low-cost, high efficiency and stable devices, which may revolutionize worldwide energy demand and/or help develop next generation devices such as semi-transparent photovoltaic windows. PMID:28772878

  9. Constraining the Lateral Helix of Respiratory Complex I by Cross-linking Does Not Impair Enzyme Activity or Proton Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B

    2015-08-21

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a multisubunit, membrane-bound enzyme of the respiratory chain. The energy from NADH oxidation in the peripheral region of the enzyme is used to drive proton translocation across the membrane. One of the integral membrane subunits, nuoL in Escherichia coli, has an unusual lateral helix of ∼75 residues that lies parallel to the membrane surface and has been proposed to play a mechanical role as a piston during proton translocation (Efremov, R. G., Baradaran, R., and Sazanov, L. A. (2010) Nature 465, 441-445). To test this hypothesis we have introduced 11 pairs of cysteine residues into Complex I; in each pair one is in the lateral helix, and the other is in a nearby region of subunit N, M, or L. The double mutants were treated with Cu(2+) ions or with bi-functional methanethiosulfonate reagents to catalyze cross-link formation in membrane vesicles. The yields of cross-linked products were typically 50-90%, as judged by immunoblotting, but in no case did the activity of Complex I decrease by >10-20%, as indicated by deamino-NADH oxidase activity or rates of proton translocation. In contrast, several pairs of cysteine residues introduced at other interfaces of N:M and M:L subunits led to significant loss of activity, in particular, in the region of residue Glu-144 of subunit M. The results do not support the hypothesis that the lateral helix of subunit L functions like a piston, but rather, they suggest that conformational changes might be transmitted more directly through the functional residues of the proton translocation apparatus. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Active-layer thermal monitoring on the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R. F. M.; Schaefer, C. E. G. R.; Simas, F. M. B.; Francelino, M. R.; Fernandes-Filho, E. I.; Lyra, G. B.; Bockheim, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    International attention to climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of this paper is to present active-layer temperature data for one Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring South hemisphere (CALM-S) site located on the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica over an 57-month period (2008-2012). The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ±0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a high-capacity data logger. A series of statistical analyses was performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trends, and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models was tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The affects of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights into the influence of climate change on permafrost. The active-layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environments, with extreme variation in surface during the summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active-layer thickness (ALT) over the studied period shows a degree of variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model could describe the data adequately and is an important tool for more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and ACT over the studied period, no trend can be identified.

  11. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R. F. M.; Schaefer, C. E. G. R.; Simas, F. N. B.; Francelino M., R.; Fernandes-Filho, E. I.; Lyra, G. B.; Bockheim, J. G.

    2014-07-01

    International attention to the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of the this paper is to present active layer temperature data for one CALM-S site located at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica over an fifth seven month period (2008-2012). The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ± 0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a~high capacity data logger. A series of statistical analysis were performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trend and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The controls of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights about the influence of climate chance over the permafrost. The active layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environment, with extreme variation at the surface during summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active layer thickness (ALT) over the studied period showed variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model was considered appropriate to treat the dataset, enabling more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and active layer thickness over the studied period, no warming trend was detected.

  12. Protecting peroxidase activity of multilayer enzyme-polyion films using outer catalase layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiyun; Rusling, James F; Hu, Naifei

    2007-12-27

    Films constructed layer-by-layer on electrodes with architecture {protein/hyaluronic acid (HA)}n containing myoglobin (Mb) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were protected against protein damage by H2O2 by using outer catalase layers. Peroxidase activity for substrate oxidation requires activation by H2O2, but {protein/HA}n films without outer catalase layers are damaged slowly and irreversibly by H2O2. The rate and extent of damage were decreased dramatically by adding outer catalase layers to decompose H2O2. Comparative studies suggest that protection results from catalase decomposing a fraction of the H2O2 as it enters the film, rather than by an in-film diffusion barrier. The outer catalase layers controlled the rate of H2O2 entry into inner regions of the film, and they biased the system to favor electrocatalytic peroxide reduction over enzyme damage. Catalase-protected {protein/HA}n films had an increased linear concentration range for H2O2 detection. This approach offers an effective way to protect biosensors from damage by H2O2.

  13. Research of acceptor impurity thermal activation in GaN: Mg epitaxial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr V. Mazalov

    2016-06-01

    The effect of thermal annealing of GaN:Mg layers on acceptor impurity activation has been investigated. Hole concentration increased and mobility decreased with an increase in thermal annealing temperature. The sample annealed at 1000 °C demonstrated the lowest value of resistivity. Rapid thermal annealing (annealing with high heating speed considerably improved the efficiency of Mg activation in the GaN layers. The optimum time of annealing at 1000 °C has been determined. The hole concentration increased by up to 4 times compared to specimens after conventional annealing.

  14. Magmatism and crustal extension: Constraining activation of the ductile shearing along the Gediz detachment, Menderes Massif (western Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Federico; Asti, Riccardo; Faccenna, Claudio; Gerdes, Axel; Lucci, Federico; Theye, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    The Menderes Massif of western Turkey is a key area to study feedback relationships between magma generation/emplacement and activation of extensional detachment tectonics. Here, we present new textural analysis and in situ U-(Th)-Pb titanite dating from selected samples collected in the transition from the undeformed to the mylonitized zones of the Salihli granodiorite at the footwall of the Neogene, ductile-to-brittle, top-to-the-NNE Gediz-Alaşheir (GDF) detachment fault. Ductile shearing was accompanied by the fluid-mediated sub-solidus transformation of the granodiorite to orthogneiss, which occurred at shallower crustal levels and temperatures compatible with the upper greenschist-to-amphibolite facies metamorphic conditions (530-580 °C and P system ages during fluid-assisted syn-tectonic re-crystallisation in the transition from magma crystallization and emplacement (at 16-17 Ma) to the syn-tectonic, solid-state shearing (at 14-15 Ma). A minimum time lapse of ca. 1-2 Ma is then inferred between the crustal emplacement of the Salihli granodiorite and nucleation of the ductile extensional shearing along the Gediz detachment. The reconstruction of the cooling history of the Salihli granodiorite documents a punctuated evolution dominated by two episodes of rapid cooling, between 14 Ma and 12 Ma ( 100 °C/Ma) and between 3 and 2 Ma ( 105 °C/Ma). We relate the first episode to nucleation and development of post-emplacement of ductile shearing along the GDF and the second to brittle high-angle faulting, respectively. Our dataset suggests that in the Menderes Massif the activation of ductile extension was a consequence, rather than the cause, of magma emplacement in the extending crust.

  15. Development of a low activation concrete shielding wall by multi-layered structure for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Maegawa, Toshio; Yoshimatsu, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Nonaka, Akira; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    A multi-layered concrete structure has been developed to reduce induced activity in the shielding for neutron generating facilities such as a fusion reactor. The multi-layered concrete structure is composed of: (1) an inner low activation concrete, (2) a boron-doped low activation concrete as the second layer, and (3) ordinary concrete as the outer layer of the neutron shield. With the multi-layered concrete structure the volume of boron is drastically decreased compared to a monolithic boron-doped concrete. A 14 MeV neutron shielding experiment with multi-layered concrete structure mockups was performed at FNS and several reaction rates and induced activity in the mockups were measured. This demonstrated that the multi-layered concrete effectively reduced low energy neutrons and induced activity.

  16. Constraining Silicate Weathering Processes in an Active Volcanic Complex: Implications for the Long-term Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, K.; West, A. J.; Hartmann, J.; Amann, T.; Hosono, T.; Ide, K.

    2017-12-01

    While analyzing geochemical archives and carbon cycle modelling can further our understanding of the role of silicate weathering as a sink in the long-term carbon cycle, it is necessary to study modern weathering processes to inform these efforts. A recent compilation of data from rivers draining basaltic catchments estimates that rock weathering in active volcanic fields (AVFs) consumes atmospheric CO2 approximately three times faster than in inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), suggesting that the eruption and subsequent weathering of large igneous provinces likely played a major role in the carbon cycle in the geologic past [1]. The study demonstrates a significant correlation between catchment mean annual temperature (MAT) and atmospheric CO2 consumption rate for IVFs. However CO2 consumption due to weathering of AVFs is not correlated with MAT as the relationship is complicated by variability in hydrothermal fluxes, reactive surface area, and groundwater flow paths. To investigate the controls on weathering processes in AVFs, we present data for dissolved and solid weathering products from Mount Aso Caldera, Japan. Aso Caldera is an ideal site for studying the how the chemistry of rivers draining an AVF is impacted by high-temperature water/rock interactions, volcanic ash weathering, and varied groundwater flow paths and residence times. Samples were collected over five field seasons from two rivers and their tributaries, cold groundwater springs, and thermal springs. These samples capture the region's temperature and precipitation seasonality. Solid samples of unaltered volcanic rocks, hydrothermally-altered materials, volcanic ash, a soil profile, and suspended and bedload river sediments were also collected. The hydrochemistry of dissolved phases were analyzed at the University of Hamburg, while the mineralogy and geochemical compositions of solid phases were analyzed at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles. This work will be discussed in the context of

  17. Study of wear in piston ring of the vehicle engine using thin layer activation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.H.; Farooq, M.; Ghiyas-ud-Din; Gul, S.; Qureshi, R.M.; Jin Joon Ha; Wallace, G.

    2004-01-01

    Thin Layer Activation (TLA) technique was used to investigate piston ring wear of a six cylinders vehicle engine at various engine speeds and load conditions. The activated ring was installed in cylinder no.5 of the engine at middle position (compression ring). Monitoring was carried out on-line (extremely on the engine block) using 'Thin Layer Difference Method'. The calibration curve of the activity profile was prepared with the help of activation parameters determined at the time of ring activation in particle accelerator. The results show that the piston ring wear varies from 0.309 micron/hour to 0.404 micron/hour at given engine speed and load conditions. (author)

  18. New Spectral Model for Constraining Torus Covering Factors from Broadband X-Ray Spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloković, M.; Brightman, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Comastri, A.; Ricci, C.; Buchner, J.; Gandhi, P.; Farrah, D.; Stern, D.

    2018-02-01

    The basic unified model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) invokes an anisotropic obscuring structure, usually referred to as a torus, to explain AGN obscuration as an angle-dependent effect. We present a new grid of X-ray spectral templates based on radiative transfer calculations in neutral gas in an approximately toroidal geometry, appropriate for CCD-resolution X-ray spectra (FWHM ≥ 130 eV). Fitting the templates to broadband X-ray spectra of AGNs provides constraints on two important geometrical parameters of the gas distribution around the supermassive black hole: the average column density and the covering factor. Compared to the currently available spectral templates, our model is more flexible, and capable of providing constraints on the main torus parameters in a wider range of AGNs. We demonstrate the application of this model using hard X-ray spectra from NuSTAR (3–79 keV) for four AGNs covering a variety of classifications: 3C 390.3, NGC 2110, IC 5063, and NGC 7582. This small set of examples was chosen to illustrate the range of possible torus configurations, from disk-like to sphere-like geometries with column densities below, as well as above, the Compton-thick threshold. This diversity of torus properties challenges the simple assumption of a standard geometrically and optically thick toroidal structure commonly invoked in the basic form of the unified model of AGNs. Finding broad consistency between our constraints and those from infrared modeling, we discuss how the approach from the X-ray band complements similar measurements of AGN structures at other wavelengths.

  19. MAC-Layer Active Dropping for Real-Time Video Streaming in 4G Access Networks

    KAUST Repository

    She, James

    2010-12-01

    This paper introduces a MAC-layer active dropping scheme to achieve effective resource utilization, which can satisfy the application-layer delay for real-time video streaming in time division multiple access based 4G broadband wireless access networks. When a video frame is not likely to be reconstructed within the application-layer delay bound at a receiver for the minimum decoding requirement, the MAC-layer protocol data units of such video frame will be proactively dropped before the transmission. An analytical model is developed to evaluate how confident a video frame can be delivered within its application-layer delay bound by jointly considering the effects of time-varying wireless channel, minimum decoding requirement of each video frame, data retransmission, and playback buffer. Extensive simulations with video traces are conducted to prove the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. When compared to conventional cross-layer schemes using prioritized-transmission/retransmission, the proposed scheme is practically implementable for more effective resource utilization, avoiding delay propagation, and achieving better video qualities under certain conditions.

  20. Layer- and Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Excitatory Neuronal Activity in the Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Radnikow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available From an anatomical point of view the neocortex is subdivided into up to six layers depending on the cortical area. This subdivision has been described already by Meynert and Brodmann in the late 19/early 20. century and is mainly based on cytoarchitectonic features such as the size and location of the pyramidal cell bodies. Hence, cortical lamination is originally an anatomical concept based on the distribution of excitatory neuron. However, it has become apparent in recent years that apart from the layer-specific differences in morphological features, many functional properties of neurons are also dependent on cortical layer or cell type. Such functional differences include changes in neuronal excitability and synaptic activity by neuromodulatory transmitters. Many of these neuromodulators are released from axonal afferents from subcortical brain regions while others are released intrinsically. In this review we aim to describe layer- and cell-type specific differences in the effects of neuromodulator receptors in excitatory neurons in layers 2–6 of different cortical areas. We will focus on the neuromodulator systems using adenosine, acetylcholine, dopamine, and orexin/hypocretin as examples because these neuromodulator systems show important differences in receptor type and distribution, mode of release and functional mechanisms and effects. We try to summarize how layer- and cell type-specific neuromodulation may affect synaptic signaling in cortical microcircuits.

  1. Influence of layer eccentricity on the resonant properties of cylindrical active coated nano-particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, R. O.; Arslanagic, Samel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the influence of the layer eccentricity on the resonant properties of active coated nano-particles made of a silver core and gain impregnated silica shell illuminated by a near-by magnetic line source. For a fixed over-all size of the particle, designs with small and large cores...

  2. Evolutionary constrained optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Deb, Kalyanmoy

    2015-01-01

    This book makes available a self-contained collection of modern research addressing the general constrained optimization problems using evolutionary algorithms. Broadly the topics covered include constraint handling for single and multi-objective optimizations; penalty function based methodology; multi-objective based methodology; new constraint handling mechanism; hybrid methodology; scaling issues in constrained optimization; design of scalable test problems; parameter adaptation in constrained optimization; handling of integer, discrete and mix variables in addition to continuous variables; application of constraint handling techniques to real-world problems; and constrained optimization in dynamic environment. There is also a separate chapter on hybrid optimization, which is gaining lots of popularity nowadays due to its capability of bridging the gap between evolutionary and classical optimization. The material in the book is useful to researchers, novice, and experts alike. The book will also be useful...

  3. Patchwork-Type Spontaneous Activity in Neonatal Barrel Cortex Layer 4 Transmitted via Thalamocortical Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenobu Mizuno

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Establishment of precise neuronal connectivity in the neocortex relies on activity-dependent circuit reorganization during postnatal development; however, the nature of cortical activity during this period remains largely unknown. Using two-photon calcium imaging of the barrel cortex in vivo during the first postnatal week, we reveal that layer 4 (L4 neurons within the same barrel fire synchronously in the absence of peripheral stimulation, creating a “patchwork” pattern of spontaneous activity corresponding to the barrel map. By generating transgenic mice expressing GCaMP6s in thalamocortical axons, we show that thalamocortical axons also demonstrate the spontaneous patchwork activity pattern. Patchwork activity is diminished by peripheral anesthesia but is mostly independent of self-generated whisker movements. The patchwork activity pattern largely disappeared during postnatal week 2, as even L4 neurons within the same barrel tended to fire asynchronously. This spontaneous L4 activity pattern has features suitable for thalamocortical (TC circuit refinement in the neonatal barrel cortex. : By two-photon calcium imaging of layer 4 neurons and thalamocortical axon terminals in neonatal mouse barrel cortex, Mizuno et al. find a patchwork-like spontaneous activity pattern corresponding to the barrel map, which may be important for thalamocortical circuit maturation. Keywords: activity-dependent development, spontaneous activity, synchronized activity, barrel cortex, thalamocortical axons, neonates, in vivo calcium imaging, awake, single-cell labeling, whisker monitoring

  4. A demonstration of on-line plant corrosion monitoring using thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, J.; Webb, J.W.; Wilkins, N.J.M.; Lawrence, P.F.; UKAEA Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell. Materials Development Div.)

    1981-12-01

    The corrosion of a 1 inch water pipe in an evaporative cooling system has been monitored over three periods of plant operation using thin layer activation (TLA). The corrosion rate was followed at a sensitivity of about 1 μm and clearly reflected changes in plant operation. Examination of the test section after removal, both by autoradiography and metallography revealed the extent of corrosion and pitting over the active area. (author)

  5. Transition layers formation on the boundaries carbon fiber-copper dependence on the active additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlosinski, W.; Pietrzak, K.

    1993-01-01

    The basic problem connected with fabrication of carbon fiber-copper composites is to overcome the problem of low wettability of carbon fiber by copper. One of the possible solutions of that problem is to use the copper doped with active metals. The investigation results of transition layer forming on the phase boundary in the system have been discussed in respect of the kind and content of active elements added to the copper. 5 refs, 5 figs, 5 tabs

  6. Leveraging Subsidence in Permafrost with Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A.; Chen, J.; Chen, R. H.; Liu, L.; Michaelides, R. J.; Moghaddam, M.; Parsekian, A.; Tabatabaeenejad, A.; Thompson, J. A.; Zebker, H. A.; Meyer, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) product uses the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to measure ground subsidence in permafrost regions. Seasonal subsidence results from the expansion of soil water into ice as the surface soil or active layer freezes and thaws each year. Subsidence trends result from large-scale thaw of permafrost and from the melting and subsequent drainage of excess ground ice in permafrost-affected soils. The attached figure shows the 2006-2010 average seasonal subsidence from ReSALT around Barrow, Alaska. The average active layer thickness (the maximum surface thaw depth during summer) is 30-40 cm, resulting in an average seasonal subsidence of 1-3 cm. Analysis of the seasonal subsidence and subsidence trends provides valuable insights into important permafrost processes, such as the freeze/thaw of the active layer, large-scale thawing due to climate change, the impact of fire, and infrastructure vulnerability. ReSALT supports the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign in Alaska and northwest Canada and is a precursor for a potential NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) product. ReSALT includes uncertainties for all parameters and is validated against in situ measurements from the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) network, Ground Penetrating Radar and mechanical probe measurements. Here we present examples of ReSALT products in Alaska to highlight the untapped potential of the InSAR technique to understand permafrost dynamics, with a strong emphasis on the underlying processes that drive the subsidence.

  7. Electrical and mechanical characterization of nanoscale-layered cellulose-based electro-active paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Gyu-Young; Yun, Ki-Ju; Kim, Joo-Hyung; Kim, Jaehwan

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the electro-mechanical behavior of piezoelectric electro active paper (EAPap), the converse and direct piezoelectric characterization of cellulose EAPap was studied and compared. A delay between the electrical field and the induced strain of EAPap was observed due to the inner nano-voids or the localized amorphous regions in layer-by-layered structure to capture or hold the electrical charges and remnant ions. The linear relation between electric field and induced strain is also observed. The electro-mechanical performance of EAPap is discussed in detail in this paper.

  8. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of small ellipsoidal scatterers. [of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Kubacsi, M. C.; Kong, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied within the Rayleigh approximation to calculate the backscattering cross section of a layer of randomly positioned and oriented small ellipsoids. The orientation of the ellipsoids is characterized by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative approach to first order in albedo. In the half space limit the results are identical to those obtained via the approach of Foldy's and distorted Born approximation. Numerical results of the theory are illustrated using parameters encountered in active remote sensing of vegetation layers. A distinctive characteristic is the strong depolarization shown by vertically aligned leaves.

  9. High polysilicon TFT field effect mobility reached thanks to slight phosphorus content in the active layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghdoudi, M.; Rogel, R.; Alzaied, N.; Fathallah, M.; Mohammed-Brahim, T.

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the effect of slightly phosphorus atoms introduced during deposition of polysilicon films. Polysilicon films are used as an active layer in thin film transistors (TFTs) fabricated on glass substrates at a maximum temperature of 600 deg. C.Three phosphorus atoms contents, determined by the value of the phosphine to silane ratio: Γ (3.7 x 10 -7 , 8 x 10 -7 , 26 x 10 -6 ), are used to optimize the active layer quality. The in-situ doped layers induce a better stability of the electrical characteristics, a higher mobility and lower value of the threshold voltage for the slightly doped active layers [M. Zaghdoudi, M.M. Abdelkrim, M. Fathallah, T. Mohammed-Brahim and F. Le-Bihan Control of the weak phosphorus doping in polysilicon, Materials Science and Forum, Vols. 480-481 (2005) pp.305.]. The present work shows that the effect of slightly phosphorus content improves the quality of oxide/polysilicon interface and decreases the defects density. Degradation of electrical properties is shown to originate from the creation of defect at the channel-interface oxide and in the grain boundaries. The effect of temperature change on the electrical properties was studied and the behaviour was also analyzed

  10. Geochemical fingerprints by activation analysis of tephra layers in Lake Van sediments, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landmann, Guenter [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften, Schnittspahnstr. 9, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Steinhauser, Georg; Sterba, Johannes H. [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Kempe, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften, Schnittspahnstr. 9, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Bichler, Max, E-mail: bichler@ati.ac.a [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-07-15

    We discuss geochemical and sedimentological characteristics of 12 tephra layers, intercalated within the finely laminated sediments of Lake Van. Within the about 15 kyr long sediment record studied, volcanic activity concentrated in the periods 2.6-7.2 and 11.9-12.9 kyr B.P. Concentrations of 25 elements provide the geochemical fingerprint of each tephra layer and allow comparison to literature values of potential source volcanoes such as Mts. Nemrut and Suephan. The youngest two tephra layers (and probably also the other three ashes from the 2.6-7.2 kyr B.P. eruptions) originate from the Nemrut volcano. The source of the older tephra (11.9-12.9 kyr B.P.), however, remains unidentified.

  11. Diffusion layer characteristics for increasing the performance of activated carbon air cathodes in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; He, Weihua; Yang, Wulin; Liu, Jia; Wang, Qiuying; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E.

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of several different types of diffusion layers were systematically examined to improve the performance of activated carbon air cathodes used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A diffusion layer of carbon black and polytetrafluoroethylene (CB + PTFE) that was pressed onto a stainless steel mesh current collector achieved the highest cathode performance. This cathode also had a high oxygen mass transfer coefficient and high water pressure tolerance (>2 m), and it had the highest current densities in abiotic chronoamperometry tests compared to cathodes with other diffusion layers. In MFC tests, this cathode also produced maximum power densities (1610 ± 90 mW m−2) that were greater than those of cathodes with other diffusion layers, by 19% compared to Gore-Tex (1350 ± 20 mW m−2), 22% for a cloth wipe with PDMS (1320 ± 70 mW m−2), 45% with plain PTFE (1110 ± 20 mW m−2), and 19% higher than those of cathodes made with a Pt catalyst and a PTFE diffusion layer (1350 ± 50 mW m−2). The highly porous diffusion layer structure of the CB + PTFE had a relatively high oxygen mass transfer coefficient (1.07 × 10−3 cm s−1) which enhanced oxygen transport to the catalyst. The addition of CB enhanced cathode performance by increasing the conductivity of the diffusion layer. Oxygen mass transfer coefficient, water pressure tolerance, and the addition of conductive particles were therefore critical features for achieving higher performance AC air cathodes.

  12. A new analysis of archival images of comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 to constrain the rotation state of and active regions on its nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambeau, C.; Fernández, Y.; Samarasinha, N.; Mueller, B.; Woodney, L.; Lisse, C.; Kelley, M.; Meech, K.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (SW1) is a unique comet (and Centaur) with an almost circular orbit just outside the orbit of Jupiter. This orbit results in SW1 receiving a nearly constant insolation, thus giving a simpler environment in which to study thermal properties and behaviors of this comet's nucleus. Such knowledge is crucial for improving our understanding of coma morphology, nuclear thermal evolution, and nuclear structure. To this end, our overarching goal is to develop a thermophysical model of SW1's nucleus that makes use of realistic physical and structural properties as inputs. This model will help to explain the highly variable gas- and dust-production rates of this comet; SW1 is well known for its frequent but stochastic outbursts of mass loss [1,2,3]. Here we will report new constraints on the effective radius, beaming parameter, spin state, and location of active regions on the nucleus of SW1. Results: The analysis completed so far consists of a re-analysis of Spitzer Space Telescope thermal-IR images of SW1 from UT 2003 November 21 and 24, when SW1 was observed outside of outburst. The images are from Spitzer's IRAC 5.8-μm and 8.0-μm bands and MIPS 24.0-μm and 70-μm bands. This analysis is similar to that of Stansberry et al. [4, 5], but with data products generated from the latest Spitzer pipeline. Also, analysis of the 5.8-μm image had not been reported before. Coma removal techniques (e.g., Fernández et al. [6]) were applied to each image letting us measure the nuclear point-source contribution to each image. The measured flux densities for each band were fit with a Near Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM, [7]) and resulted in values for the effective radius of SW1's nucleus, constraints on the thermal inertia, and an IR beaming-parameter value. Current efforts have shifted to constraining the spin properties of SW1's nucleus and surface areas of activity through use of an existing Monte Carlo model [8, 9] to reproduce

  13. Constrained Adherable Area of Nanotopographic Surfaces Promotes Cell Migration through the Regulation of Focal Adhesion via Focal Adhesion Kinase/Rac1 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jiwon; Choi, Andrew; Kim, Hyung Woo; Yoon, Hyungjun; Park, Sang Min; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Kaneko, Makoto; Kim, Dong Sung

    2018-05-02

    Cell migration is crucial in physiological and pathological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing; such migration is strongly guided by the surrounding nanostructured extracellular matrix. Previous studies have extensively studied the cell migration on anisotropic nanotopographic surfaces; however, only a few studies have reported cell migration on isotropic nanotopographic surfaces. We herein, for the first time, propose a novel concept of adherable area on cell migration using isotropic nanopore surfaces with sufficient nanopore depth by adopting a high aspect ratio. As the pore size of the nanopore surface was controlled to 200, 300, and 400 nm in a fixed center-to-center distance of 480 nm, it produced 86, 68, and 36% of adherable area, respectively, on the fabricated surface. A meticulous investigation of the cell migration in response to changes in the constrained adherable area of the nanotopographic surface showed 1.4-, 1.5-, and 1.6-fold increase in migration speeds and a 1.4-, 2-, and 2.5-fold decrease in the number of focal adhesions as the adherable area was decreased to 86, 68, and 36%, respectively. Furthermore, a strong activation of FAK/Rac1 signaling was observed to be involved in the promoted cell migration. These results suggest that the reduced adherable area promotes cell migration through decreasing the FA formation, which in turn upregulates FAK/Rac1 activation. The findings in this study can be utilized to control the cell migration behaviors, which is a powerful tool in the research fields involving cell migration such as promoting wound healing and tissue repair.

  14. Air-Coupled Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Polypropylene Foam Matching Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás E. Gómez Alvarez-Arenas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the design, construction and characterization of air-coupled piezoelectric transducers using 1–3 connectivity piezocomposite disks with a stack of matching layers being the outer one an active quarter wavelength layer made of polypropylene foam ferroelectret film. This kind of material has shown a stable piezoelectric response together with a very low acoustic impedance (<0.1 MRayl. These features make them a suitable candidate for the dual use or function proposed here: impedance matching layer and active material for air-coupled transduction. The transducer centre frequency is determined by the l/4 resonance of the polypropylene foam ferroelectret film (0.35 MHz, then, the rest of the transducer components (piezocomposite disk and passive intermediate matching layers are all tuned to this frequency. The transducer has been tested in several working modes including pulse-echo and pitch-catch as well as wide and narrow band excitation. The performance of the proposed novel transducer is compared with that of a conventional air-coupled transducers operating in a similar frequency range.

  15. Correlation between active layer thickness and ambient gas stability in IGZO thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xu; Mao, Bao-Hua; Wang, Sui-Dong; Lin, Meng-Fang; Shimizu, Maki; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Ou-Yang, Wei; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Nabatame, Toshihide; Liu, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the active layer thickness has been recently reported as an alternative way to achieve fully depleted oxide thin-film transistors for the realization of low-voltage operations. However, the correlation between the active layer thickness and device resistivity to environmental changes is still unclear, which is important for the optimized design of oxide thin-film transistors. In this work, the ambient gas stability of IGZO thin-film transistors is found to be strongly correlated to the IGZO thickness. The TFT with the thinnest IGZO layer shows the highest intrinsic electron mobility in a vacuum, which is greatly reduced after exposure to O 2 /air. The device with a thick IGZO layer shows similar electron mobility in O 2 /air, whereas the mobility variation measured in the vacuum is absent. The thickness dependent ambient gas stability is attributed to a high-mobility region in the IGZO surface vicinity with less sputtering-induced damage, which will become electron depleted in O 2 /air due to the electron transfer to adsorbed gas molecules. The O 2 adsorption and deduced IGZO surface band bending is demonstrated by the ambient-pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy results. (paper)

  16. Expanding the "Active Layer": Discussion of Church and Haschenburger (2017) What is the "Active Layer"? Water Resources Research 53, 5-10, Doi:10.1002/2016WR019675

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Peter; Peirce, Sarah; Leduc, Pauline

    2018-03-01

    Church and Haschenburger (2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/2016WR019675) make helpful distinctions around the issue of defining the active layer, with which we agree. We propose expanding discussion and definition of the "active layer" in fluvial bedload transport to include the concept of the "morphological active layer." This is particularly applicable to laterally unstable rivers (such as braided rivers) in which progressive morphological change over short time periods is the process by which much of the bedload transport occurs. The morphological active layer is also distinguished by variable lateral and longitudinal extent continuity over a range of flows and transport intensity. We suggest that the issue of forms of active layer raised by Church and Haschenburger opens up an important discussion on the nature of bedload transport in relation to river morpho-dynamics over the range of river types.

  17. Exploring Constrained Creative Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk

    2017-01-01

    Creative collaboration via online tools offers a less ‘media rich’ exchange of information between participants than face-to-face collaboration. The participants’ freedom to communicate is restricted in means of communication, and rectified in terms of possibilities offered in the interface. How do...... these constrains influence the creative process and the outcome? In order to isolate the communication problem from the interface- and technology problem, we examine via a design game the creative communication on an open-ended task in a highly constrained setting, a design game. Via an experiment the relation...... between communicative constrains and participants’ perception of dialogue and creativity is examined. Four batches of students preparing for forming semester project groups were conducted and documented. Students were asked to create an unspecified object without any exchange of communication except...

  18. Thiophene Rings Improve the Device Performance of Conjugated Polymers in Polymer Solar Cells with Thick Active Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, C.; Gao, K.; Colberts, F. J. M.; Liu, F.; Meskers, S. C. J.; Wienk, M. M.; Janssen, R. A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Developing novel materials that tolerate thickness variations of the active layer is critical to further enhance the efficiency of polymer solar cells and enable large-scale manufacturing. Presently, only a few polymers afford high efficiencies at active layer thickness exceeding 200 nm and

  19. Synthesis of Polythiophene–Fullerene Hybrid Additives as Potential Compatibilizers of BHJ Active Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Kakogianni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorophenyl functionalities have been introduced as side chain substituents onto regioregular poly(3-hexyl thiophene (rr-P3HT, under various percentages. These functional groups were then converted to azides which were used to create polymeric hybrid materials with fullerene species, either C60 or C70. The P3HT–fullerene hybrids thus formed were thereafter evaluated as potential compatibilizers of BHJ active layers comprising P3HT and fullerene based acceptors. Therefore, a systematic investigation of the optical and morphological properties of the purified polymer–fullerene hybrid materials was performed, via different complementary techniques. Additionally, P3HT:PC70BM blends containing various percentages of the herein synthesized hybrid material comprising rr-P3HT and C70 were investigated via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM in an effort to understand the effect of the hybrids as additives on the morphology and nanophase separation of this typically used active layer blend for OPVs.

  20. Network Layer Protocol Activation for Packet Data Access in UMTS WCDMA Laboratory Network

    OpenAIRE

    Lakkisto, Erkka

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this Bachelor’s Thesis was to set up the UMTS WCDMA network in the laboratory environment of Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences and to study the network layer protocol activation for packet data access. The development of 3G technology has been very rapid and it can be considered as one of the main technologies in telecommunication. Implementing the laboratory network in Metropolia enables teaching and researching of the modern network technology. Labora...

  1. Interoperability In Multi-Layered Active Defense:The Need For Commonality And Robustness Between Active Defense Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    into areas where there is no access to maritime platforms. Sea-based interceptor platforms have the ability to intercept targets at each stage of the...argues that the most efficient concept for integrating active defense weapon systems is a multi- layered architecture with redundant intercept ...faster data transfer and will prevent data loss. The need for almost 100% interception successes is increasing as the threat becomes more

  2. MMP activity in the hybrid layer detected with in situ zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, A; Nascimento, F D; Carrilho, M; Tersariol, I; Papa, V; Tjäderhane, L; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Breschi, L

    2012-05-01

    Dentinal proteases are believed to play an important role in the degradation of hybrid layers (HL). This study investigated the HL gelatinolytic activity by in situ zymography and functional enzyme activity assay. The hypotheses were that HLs created by an etch-and-rinse adhesive exhibit active gelatinolytic activity, and MMP-2 and -9 activities in dentin increase during adhesive procedures. Etched-dentin specimens were bonded with Adper Scotchbond 1XT and restored with composite. Adhesive/dentin interface slices were placed on microscope slides, covered with fluorescein-conjugated gelatin, and observed with a multi-photon confocal microscope after 24 hrs. Human dentin powder aliquots were prepared and assigned to the following treatments: A, untreated; B, etched with 10% phosphoric acid; or C, etched with 10% phosphoric acid and mixed with Scotchbond 1XT. The MMP-2 and -9 activities of extracts of dentin powder were measured with functional enzyme assays. Intense and continuous enzyme activity was detected at the bottom of the HL, while that activity was more irregular in the upper HL. Both acid-etching and subsequent adhesive application significantly increased MMP-2 and -9 activities (p < 0.05). The results demonstrate, for the first time, intrinsic MMP activity in the HL, and intense activation of matrix-bound MMP activity with both etching and adhesive application.

  3. The cerebellar Golgi cell and spatiotemporal organization of granular layer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio eD‘Angelo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar granular layer has been suggested to perform a complex spatiotemporal reconfiguration of incoming mossy fiber signals. Central to this role is the inhibitory action exerted by Golgi cells over granule cells: Golgi cells inhibit granule cells through double feedforward and feedback inhibitory loops and generate a broad lateral inhibition that extends beyond the afferent synaptic field. This characteristic connectivity has recently been investigated in great detail and been correlated with specific functional properties of the neuron. These include theta-frequency pacemaking, network entrainment into coherent oscillations and phase resetting. Important advances have also been made in terms of determining the membrane and synaptic properties of the neuron, and clarifying the mechanisms of activation by input bursts. Moreover, voltage sensitive dye imaging and multi-electrode array recordings, combined with mathematical simulations based on realistic computational models, have improved our understanding of the impact of Golgi cell activity on granular layer circuit computations. These investigations have highlighted the critical role of Golgi cells in: generating dense clusters of granule cell activity organized in center-surround structures, implementing combinatorial operations on multiple mossy fiber inputs, regulating transmission gain and cut-off frequency, controlling spike timing and burst transmission, and determining the sign, intensity and extension of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. This review considers recent advances in the field, highlighting the functional implications of Golgi cells for granular layer network computation and indicating new challenges for cerebellar research.

  4. Intracortical Microstimulation (ICMS) Activates Motor Cortex Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons Mainly Transsynaptically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Ahmed T; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Brown, Andrew R; Pittman, Quentin J; Teskey, G Campbell

    2015-01-01

    Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) is a technique used for a number of purposes including the derivation of cortical movement representations (motor maps). Its application can activate the output layer 5 of motor cortex and can result in the elicitation of body movements depending upon the stimulus parameters used. The extent to which pyramidal tract projection neurons of the motor cortex are activated transsynaptically or directly by ICMS remains an open question. Given this uncertainty in the mode of activation, we used a preparation that combined patch clamp whole-cell recordings from single layer 5 pyramidal neurons and extracellular ICMS in slices of motor cortex as well as a standard in vivo mapping technique to ask how ICMS activated motor cortex pyramidal neurons. We measured changes in synaptic spike threshold and spiking rate to ICMS in vitro and movement threshold in vivo in the presence or absence of specific pharmacological blockers of glutamatergic (AMPA, NMDA and Kainate) receptors and GABAA receptors. With major excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission blocked (with DNQX, APV and bicuculline methiodide), we observed a significant increase in the ICMS current intensity required to elicit a movement in vivo as well as to the first spike and an 85% reduction in spiking responses in vitro. Subsets of neurons were still responsive after the synaptic block, especially at higher current intensities, suggesting a modest direct activation. Taken together our data indicate a mainly synaptic mode of activation to ICMS in layer 5 of rat motor cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  6. Active flow control insight gained from a modified integral boundary layer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Avraham

    2016-11-01

    Active Flow Control (AFC) can alter the development of boundary layers with applications (e.g., reducing drag by separation delay or separating the boundary layers and enhancing vortex shedding to increase drag). Historically, significant effects of steady AFC methods were observed. Unsteady actuation is significantly more efficient than steady. Full-scale AFC tests were conducted with varying levels of success. While clearly relevant to industry, AFC implementation relies on expert knowledge with proven intuition and or costly and lengthy computational efforts. This situation hinders the use of AFC while simple, quick and reliable design method is absent. An updated form of the unsteady integral boundary layer (UIBL) equations, that include AFC terms (unsteady wall transpiration and body forces) can be used to assist in AFC analysis and design. With these equations and given a family of suitable velocity profiles, the momentum thickness can be calculated and matched with an outer, potential flow solution in 2D and 3D manner to create an AFC design tool, parallel to proven tools for airfoil design. Limiting cases of the UIBL equation can be used to analyze candidate AFC concepts in terms of their capability to modify the boundary layers development and system performance.

  7. Real-time monitoring of enzyme activity in a mesoporous silicon double layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Manuel M.; Pacholski, Claudia; Sailor, Michael J.

    2009-04-01

    The activity of certain proteolytic enzymes is often an indicator of disease states such as cancer, stroke and neurodegeneracy, so there is a need for rapid assays that can characterize the kinetics and substrate specificity of enzymatic reactions. Nanostructured membranes can efficiently separate biomolecules, but coupling a sensitive detection method to such a membrane remains difficult. Here, we demonstrate a single mesoporous nanoreactor that can isolate and quantify in real time the reaction products of proteases. The reactor consists of two layers of porous films electrochemically prepared from crystalline silicon. The upper layer, with large pore sizes (~100 nm in diameter), traps the protease and acts as the reactor. The lower layer, with smaller pore sizes (~6 nm), excludes the proteases and other large proteins and captures the reaction products. Infiltration of the digested fragments into the lower layer produces a measurable change in optical reflectivity, and this allows label-free quantification of enzyme kinetics in real time within a volume of ~5 nl.

  8. Constrained superfields in supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall’Agata, Gianguido; Farakos, Fotis [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-02-16

    We analyze constrained superfields in supergravity. We investigate the consistency and solve all known constraints, presenting a new class that may have interesting applications in the construction of inflationary models. We provide the superspace Lagrangians for minimal supergravity models based on them and write the corresponding theories in component form using a simplifying gauge for the goldstino couplings.

  9. Minimal constrained supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cribiori, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dall' Agata, G., E-mail: dallagat@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Farakos, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Porrati, M. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We describe minimal supergravity models where supersymmetry is non-linearly realized via constrained superfields. We show that the resulting actions differ from the so called “de Sitter” supergravities because we consider constraints eliminating directly the auxiliary fields of the gravity multiplet.

  10. Minimal constrained supergravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cribiori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe minimal supergravity models where supersymmetry is non-linearly realized via constrained superfields. We show that the resulting actions differ from the so called “de Sitter” supergravities because we consider constraints eliminating directly the auxiliary fields of the gravity multiplet.

  11. Minimal constrained supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cribiori, N.; Dall'Agata, G.; Farakos, F.; Porrati, M.

    2017-01-01

    We describe minimal supergravity models where supersymmetry is non-linearly realized via constrained superfields. We show that the resulting actions differ from the so called “de Sitter” supergravities because we consider constraints eliminating directly the auxiliary fields of the gravity multiplet.

  12. Microbial activities at the benthic boundary layer in the Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A.; Tholosan, O.; Garcin, J.; Polychronaki, T.; Tselepides, A.; Buscail, R.; Duineveld, G.

    2003-05-01

    During the Aegean Sea component of the EU MTP-MATER project, benthic samples were acquired along a depth gradient from two continental margins in the Aegean Sea. Sampling was undertaken during spring and summer 1997 and the microbial metabolic activities measured (Vmax for aminopeptidase activity, 14C-glutamate respiration and assimilation) displayed seasonal variability even in deep-sea conditions. The metabolic rates encountered in the North Aegean (average depth 566±234 m), were approximately five-fold higher than in the deeper (1336±140 m) Southern part of the Aegean. The aminopeptidase rates, however, were the exception with higher values recorded in the more oligotrophic sediments of the Southern stations (1383±152 vs. 766±297 nmol MCA cm-2 h-1). A discrepancy in bacterial metabolism also appeared in the near bottom waters. In the Southern stations, 80% of the glutamate uptake was used for energy yielding processes and only 20% devoted to biomass production, while in the North Aegean, most of the used glutamate was incorporated into bacterial cells. During the early burial stages, bacterial mineralization rates estimated from 14C-glutamate respiration decreased drastically compared to the rates of biopolymer hydrolysis estimated by aminopeptidase assays. Thus, at the 2-cm depth layer, these rates were only 32 and up to 77% of the corresponding average values, respectively, in the superficial layer. Such a discrepancy between the evolution of these two metabolic activities is possibly due to the rapid removal of readily utilizable monomers in the surface deposits. The correlation between bacterial respiration and total organic carbon, or total organic nitrogen, is higher in the surficial sediment (0-2 and 2-4 cm) than in the underlying layer. Conversely, it is only at 4-cm depth layer that the hydrolysis rates appear correlated with organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations. This pattern confirms the drastic degradation of organic matter during the early

  13. Active Brownian particles near straight or curved walls: Pressure and boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzgun, Ayhan; Selinger, Jonathan V.

    2018-03-01

    Unlike equilibrium systems, active matter is not governed by the conventional laws of thermodynamics. Through a series of analytic calculations and Langevin dynamics simulations, we explore how systems cross over from equilibrium to active behavior as the activity is increased. In particular, we calculate the profiles of density and orientational order near straight or circular walls and show the characteristic width of the boundary layers. We find a simple relationship between the enhancements of density and pressure near a wall. Based on these results, we determine how the pressure depends on wall curvature and hence make approximate analytic predictions for the motion of curved tracers, as well as the rectification of active particles around small openings in confined geometries.

  14. Height of the E layer as a function of solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, L.A.; Ivanov-Kholodnyj, G.S.; Zhivolup, T.G.

    1992-01-01

    Variations of h m E height of E layer maximum with solar activity are investigated using data of from rocket measurements. These data are contradictory ones and requires more exact definition. h m E decrease with growth of solar activity is predicted theoretically: small monotone decrease during solar cycle on the one hand, and/or jump-like decrease of h m E at a certain intermediate value of F 10.7 - on the other hand. New rather reliable results are obtained due to data from incoherent dissipation station. On the basis of these measurements it is obtained that at low and even at rather high solar activity there is a small monotone decrease of h m E, while at intermediate activity, when F 10.7 =140-180 there occurs more abrupt variation of h m E

  15. Low-noise encoding of active touch by layer 4 in the somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hires, Samuel Andrew; Gutnisky, Diego A; Yu, Jianing; O'Connor, Daniel H; Svoboda, Karel

    2015-08-06

    Cortical spike trains often appear noisy, with the timing and number of spikes varying across repetitions of stimuli. Spiking variability can arise from internal (behavioral state, unreliable neurons, or chaotic dynamics in neural circuits) and external (uncontrolled behavior or sensory stimuli) sources. The amount of irreducible internal noise in spike trains, an important constraint on models of cortical networks, has been difficult to estimate, since behavior and brain state must be precisely controlled or tracked. We recorded from excitatory barrel cortex neurons in layer 4 during active behavior, where mice control tactile input through learned whisker movements. Touch was the dominant sensorimotor feature, with >70% spikes occurring in millisecond timescale epochs after touch onset. The variance of touch responses was smaller than expected from Poisson processes, often reaching the theoretical minimum. Layer 4 spike trains thus reflect the millisecond-timescale structure of tactile input with little noise.

  16. Accumulation and distribution of elements in rice (seed, brand layer, husk) by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Van, L.; Teherani, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Various rice samples (seed, brand layer, husk) from Vietnam were analyzed for Se, Hg, Cr, Ni, Sc, Rb, Fe, Zn and Co by neutron activation analysis. The concentration values found (seed) were as follows: Se 0.04-0.07 ppm, Hg 0.02-0.07 ppm, Cr 2.13-8.65 ppm, Ni 1.56-4.95 ppm, Sc 0.02-0.06 ppm, Rb 0.84-2.71 ppm, Fe 26.31-96.07 ppm, Zn 10.65-27.39 ppm and Co 0.02-0.15 ppm. The values were reported in ppm (dry weight). Statistical analysis showed that the content of elements varies in different parts of rice; the content of Rb, Fe, Ni, Cr of husk was significantly higher than in seed and brand layer. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  17. On-line monitoring of wear and/or corrosion processes by thin layer activation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Popa-Simil, L.; Voiculescu, D.; Racolta, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Thin Layer Activation (TLA) principle consists in creating a radioactive layer by ion beam irradiation of a machine part subjected to wear. The method is based on the determination of the increasing radioactivity in the lubricant due to suspended wear particles and has a sensitivity threshold of about 40 μ g / cm 2 . The most used radioactive markers are 56 Co, 57 Co, 65 Zn, 51 Cr, 48 V, 124 Sb. In this paper, we have chosen to present an on-line wear level determination experiment performed for a thermal engine. The study of possible influence of a SR3 added lubricant upon the wear level of a Dacia 1410 car engine is presented, illustrating the on-line TLA based monitoring of wear for industrial uses. The examples presented outline the advantages of this method over the conventional one, like the fast response and the high sensitivity, while no dismantling of the engine is implied. (author)

  18. High efficient photocatalytic activity of Zn-Al-Ti layered double hydroxides nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amor F.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work establishes a simple method for synthesising layered double hydroxides (LDHs powders with coprecipitation. The characteristics of the samples were investigated y X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and spectrophotometer UV–Vis (DRS. Non-uniform distribution was shown for LDHs samples by SEM. Photocatalytic efficiencies were tested using methylene blue (MB dye as a model contaminant under UV irradiation. In particular, Zn–Al-Ti LDH exhibited an excellent performance towards MB degradation compared with commercial TiO2 nanoparticles. Methylene blue removal percentage was reached at almost 100%, whereas commercial TiO2 reached a removal rate of only 66% under the same conditions within 20 min. The aim of the current work is to prepare Zn-Al-Ti layered double hydroxides nanocomposite and to evaluate their photocatalytic activity in the removal of methylene blue under UV irradiation.

  19. Variation of nutrients and antioxidant activity in seed and exocarp layer of some Persian pistachio genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Tayefeh Aliakbarkhani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pistachio nuts are rich sources of nutrients which are essential for human wellbeing. In the present study we investigate the variation of oil, protein, total phenol, mineral contents, and antioxidant activity of twenty rare Persian pistachio nuts and exocarp layer. Among the 20 pistachio genotypes, in seeds Mn concentration was varied from 5.73 to 17.33 mg/kg; Fe ranged from 17 to 62.4 mg/kg; Zn varied from 6.76 to 30.3 mg/kg; Na ranged from 0.06 to 0.126%; K varied from 0.68 to 1.35%; P varied from 0.42 to 0.73%; N ranged from 2.6 to 4.29%; Mg varied from 0.11 to 0.17%, Ca varied from 0.23 to 0.47%, oil ranged from 47.94 to 57.29% and protein ranged from 16.26 to 25.5%. The G3 genotype had the highest total phenol content (35.64 mg GAEs/g and antioxidant activity (90.55% in exocarp layer and oil content in seeds (57.29%. The highest phosphorus (0.73% in exocarp layer and phenol (4.2 mg GAEs/g contents in seeds were observed in G19. According to the correlation analysis, there were a correlation between total phenol (in exocarp layer and oil contents gain with some values; these two values had a significant correlation with PC1. Cluster analysis separated the genotypes into three groups considering all measured Values.

  20. Pentacene Active Channel Layers Prepared by Spin-Coating and Vacuum Evaporation Using Soluble Precursors for OFET Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ochiai, Shizuyasu; Palanisamy, Kumar; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Shin, Paik-Kyun

    2012-01-01

    Pentacene OFETs of bottom-gate/bottom-contact were fabricated with three types of pentacene organic semiconductors and cross linked Poly(4-vinylphenol) or polycarbonate as gate dielectric layer. Two different processes were used to prepare the pentacene active channel layers: (1) spin-coating on dielectric layer using two different soluble pentacene precursors of SAP and DMP; (2) vacuum evaporation on PC insulator. X-ray diffraction studies revealed coexistence of thin film and bulk phase of ...

  1. Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Ying-Xi

    2002-11-01

    Microgravity experiments on the Constrained Vapor Bubble Heat Exchanger, CVB, are being developed for the International Space Station. In particular, we present results of a precursory experimental and theoretical study of the vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble in the Earth's environment. A novel non-isothermal experimental setup was designed and built to study the transport processes in an ethanol/quartz vertical CVB system. Temperature profiles were measured using an in situ PC (personal computer)-based LabView data acquisition system via thermocouples. Film thickness profiles were measured using interferometry. A theoretical model was developed to predict the curvature profile of the stable film in the evaporator. The concept of the total amount of evaporation, which can be obtained directly by integrating the experimental temperature profile, was introduced. Experimentally measured curvature profiles are in good agreement with modeling results. For microgravity conditions, an analytical expression, which reveals an inherent relation between temperature and curvature profiles, was derived.

  2. Constrained noninformative priors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, C.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Jeffreys noninformative prior distribution for a single unknown parameter is the distribution corresponding to a uniform distribution in the transformed model where the unknown parameter is approximately a location parameter. To obtain a prior distribution with a specified mean but with diffusion reflecting great uncertainty, a natural generalization of the noninformative prior is the distribution corresponding to the constrained maximum entropy distribution in the transformed model. Examples are given

  3. Characterizing permafrost active layer dynamics and sensitivity to landscape spatial heterogeneity in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yonghong; Kimball, John S.; Chen, Richard H.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Reichle, Rolf H.; Mishra, Umakant; Zona, Donatella; Oechel, Walter C.

    2018-01-01

    An important feature of the Arctic is large spatial heterogeneity in active layer conditions, which is generally poorly represented by global models and can lead to large uncertainties in predicting regional ecosystem responses and climate feedbacks. In this study, we developed a spatially integrated modeling and analysis framework combining field observations, local-scale ( ˜ 50 m resolution) active layer thickness (ALT) and soil moisture maps derived from low-frequency (L + P-band) airborne radar measurements, and global satellite environmental observations to investigate the ALT sensitivity to recent climate trends and landscape heterogeneity in Alaska. Modeled ALT results show good correspondence with in situ measurements in higher-permafrost-probability (PP ≥ 70 %) areas (n = 33; R = 0.60; mean bias = 1.58 cm; RMSE = 20.32 cm), but with larger uncertainty in sporadic and discontinuous permafrost areas. The model results also reveal widespread ALT deepening since 2001, with smaller ALT increases in northern Alaska (mean trend = 0.32±1.18 cm yr-1) and much larger increases (> 3 cm yr-1) across interior and southern Alaska. The positive ALT trend coincides with regional warming and a longer snow-free season (R = 0.60 ± 0.32). A spatially integrated analysis of the radar retrievals and model sensitivity simulations demonstrated that uncertainty in the spatial and vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) was the largest factor affecting modeled ALT accuracy, while soil moisture played a secondary role. Potential improvements in characterizing SOC heterogeneity, including better spatial sampling of soil conditions and advances in remote sensing of SOC and soil moisture, will enable more accurate predictions of active layer conditions and refinement of the modeling framework across a larger domain.

  4. Long-term comparison of Kuparuk Watershed active layer maps, northern Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, K. E.; Queen, C.; Nelson, F. E.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Klene, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    The active layer, or the uppermost soil horizon that thaws seasonally, is among the most dynamic components of the permafrost system. Evaluation of the thickness and spatial variation of the active layer is critical to many components of Arctic research, including climatology, ecology, environmental monitoring, and engineering. In this study we mapped active-layer thickness (ALT) across the 22,278 sq. km Kuparuk River basin on Alaska's North Slope throughout the summer of 2016. The Kuparuk River extends from the Brooks Range through the Arctic Foothills and across the Arctic Coastal Plain physiographic provinces, and drains into the Beaufort Sea. Methodology followed procedures used to produce an ALT map of the basin in 1995 accounting for the effects of topography, vegetation, topoclimate, and soils, using the same spatial sampling scheme for direct ALT and temperature measurement at representative locations and relating these parameters to vegetation-soil associations. A simple semi-empirical engineering solution was used to estimate thaw rates for the different associations. An improved lapse-rate formulation and a higher-resolution DEM were used to relate temperature to elevation. Three ALT maps were generated for the 2016 summer, combining measured thaw depth, temperature records, the 25 m ArcticDEM, high resolution remote sensed data, empirical laps rates, and a topoclimatic index through the thaw solution. These maps were used to track the spatial progression of thaw through the 2016 summer season and estimate a total volume of thawed soil. Maps produced in this study were compared to the 1995 map to track areas of significant geographic changes in patterns of ALT and total volume of thawed soil.

  5. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  6. Dynamics of ozone layer under Serbia and solar activity: Previous statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducić Vladan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify ozone layer dynamics under Serbian area, as well as possible relations of change in stratospheric ozone concentration with some parameters of solar activity. During the period 1979-2005, the statistical decrease of ozone concentration was noticed under Serbian territory cumulatively for 24.5 DU (7.2%, apropos 9.4 DU (2.8% by decade. These changes are consistent with the changes in surrounding countries. From absolute minimum 1993, flexible trend of ozone layer pentad values validate hypotheses of its recovery. Correspondence of ozone thickness extreme period with Wolf's number and with the greatest volcanic eruptions shows that interannual variations of stratospheric ozone concentration are still in the function of natural factors above all, as are solar and volcanic activities. Investigation of larger number solar activity parameters shows statistically important antiphase synchronous between the number of polar faculae on the Sun and stratospheric ozone dynamics under Serbia. Respecting that relation between these two features until now isn't depicted, some possible causal mechanisms are proposed.

  7. Outdoor corrosion of zinc coated carbon steel, determined by thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, M.L.; Laguzzi, G.; De Cristofaro, N.; Stroosnijder, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Thin Layer Activation was applied in the frame of a European programme addressed to the evaluation of the corrosion the behaviour of different steels. This included outdoor exposure of zinc coated carbon steel in a rural-marine climatic environment, for a period of several months. The zinc layer of specimens was 10 micrometers thick. For the TLA studies 65Zn radio nuclides were produced along the full depth of the coating, by a cyclotron accelerated deuteron beam. For quantification of the material release, activity versus depth was determined using different thickness of Zn coatings on top the carbon steel. After exposure corrosion product were removed from the surface using a pickling solution and the residual activity was determined by gamma spectrometry. The high sensitivity of the method allowed the evaluation of relatively small thickness losses (i.e. 1.2 micrometer). Thickness loss results, obtained by the TLA method, were compared with those arising from the Atomic Absorption analysis of zinc detected in the pickling solutions. A good agreement was observed between the different methods

  8. Mapping of permafrost surface and active layer properties using GPR: a comparison of frequency dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gacitua, Guisella; Uribe, José Andrés; Tamstorf, Mikkel Peter

    2011-01-01

    of the permafrost and from the internal features in the unfrozen soil. These results will be further used to determine the distribution of dielectric heterogeneities to support water content estimated from the same profiles. Comparing results from 400 and 800 MHz, we found that although both frequencies...... are suitable to measure thickness and to detect features in the active layer, the 400 MHz gives a better impression of the influence of the dielectric contrast effect from top of the permafrost zone which can be used to quantify the soil water content....

  9. Excimer-laser-induced activation of Mg-doped GaN layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y.-J.; Liu, W.-F.; Lee, C.-T.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the 248 nm excimer-laser-induced activation of the Mg-doped GaN layers. According to the observed photoluminescence results and the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we found that the dissociation of the Mg-H complexes and the formation of hydrogenated Ga vacancies (i.e., V Ga H 2 ) and/or the Ga vacancies occupied by interstitial Mg during the laser irradiation process, led to an increase in the hole concentration

  10. Improved Power Conversion Efficiency of Inverted Organic Solar Cells by Incorporating Au Nanorods into Active Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yeyuan; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Li, Zhiqi; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-07-29

    This Research Article describes a cooperative plasmonic effect on improving the performance of organic solar cells. When Au nanorods(NRs) are incorporated into the active layers, the designed project shows superior enhanced light absorption behavior comparing with control devices, which leads to the realization of organic solar cell with power conversion efficiency of 6.83%, accounting for 18.9% improvement. Further investigations unravel the influence of plasmonic nanostructures on light trapping, exciton generation, dissociation, and charge recombination and transport inside the thin films devices. Moreover, the introduction of high-conductivity Au NRs improves electrical conductivity of the whole device, which contributes to the enhanced fill factor.

  11. Selective UV–O3 treatment for indium zinc oxide thin film transistors with solution-based multiple active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-Jung; Jeong, Jun-Kyo; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jeong, Byung-Jun; Lee, Hi-Deok; Lee, Ga-Won

    2018-06-01

    In this study, a method to control the electrical performance of solution-based indium zinc oxide (IZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) is proposed by ultraviolet–ozone (UV–O3) treatment on the selective layer during multiple IZO active layer depositions. The IZO film is composed of triple layers formed by spin coating and UV–O3 treatment only on the first layer or last layer. The IZO films are compared by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the results show that the atomic ratio of oxygen vacancy (VO) increases in the UV–O3 treatment on the first layer, while it decreases on last layer. The device characteristics of the bottom gated structure are also improved in the UV–O3 treatment on the first layer. This indicates that the selective UV–O3 treatment in a multi-stacking active layer is an effective method to optimize TFT properties by controlling the amount of VO in the IZO interface and surface independently.

  12. Determining the Scattering Properties of Vertically-Structured Nepheloid Layers From the Fusion of Active and Passive Optical Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bissett, W. P; Kohler, David D

    2006-01-01

    ... from the bottom back toward the surface. The net result is that these layers reduce the ability of active and passive optical instruments to retrieve estimates of bathymetry and bottom classification, as well as reduce the abilities...

  13. Development of counting system for wear measurements using Thin Layer Activation and the Wearing Apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    França, Michel de A.; Suita, Julio C.; Salgado, César M., E-mail: mchldante@gmail.com, E-mail: suita@ien.gov.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This paper focus on developing a counting system for the Wearing Apparatus, which is a device previously built to generate measurable wear on a given surface (Main Source) and to carry the fillings from it to a filter (second source). The Thin Layer Activation is a technique used to produce activity on one of the Wearing Apparatus' piece, this activity is proportional to the amount of material worn, or scrapped, from the piece's surface. Thus, by measuring the activity on those two points it is possible to measure the produced wear. The methodology used in this work is based on simulations through MCNP-X Code to nd the best specifications for shielding, solid angles, detectors dimensions and collimation for the Counting System. By simulating several scenarios, each one different from the other, and analyzing the results in the form of Counts Per Second, the ideal counting system's specifications and geometry to measure the activity in the Main Source and the Filter (second source) is chosen. After that, a set of previously activated stainless steel foils were used to reproduce the real experiments' conditions, this real experiment consists of using TLA and the Wearing Apparatus, the results demonstrate that the counting system and methodology are adequate for such experiments. (author)

  14. Layer-by-layer evolution of structure, strain, and activity for the oxygen evolution reaction in graphene-templated Pt monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafiz, Ali; Vitale, Adam; Joiner, Corey; Vogel, Eric; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2015-03-25

    In this study, we explore the dimensional aspect of structure-driven surface properties of metal monolayers grown on a graphene/Au template. Here, surface limited redox replacement (SLRR) is used to provide precise layer-by-layer growth of Pt monolayers on graphene. We find that after a few iterations of SLRR, fully wetted 4-5 monolayer Pt films can be grown on graphene. Incorporating graphene at the Pt-Au interface modifies the growth mechanism, charge transfers, equilibrium interatomic distances, and associated strain of the synthesized Pt monolayers. We find that a single layer of sandwiched graphene is able to induce a 3.5% compressive strain on the Pt adlayer grown on it, and as a result, catalytic activity is increased due to a greater areal density of the Pt layers beyond face-centered-cubic close packing. At the same time, the sandwiched graphene does not obstruct vicinity effects of near-surface electron exchange between the substrate Au and adlayers Pt. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques are used to examine charge mediation across the Pt-graphene-Au junction and the local atomic arrangement as a function of the Pt adlayer dimension. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are used as probes to examine the electrochemically active area of Pt monolayers and catalyst activity, respectively. Results show that the inserted graphene monolayer results in increased activity for the Pt due to a graphene-induced compressive strain, as well as a higher resistance against loss of the catalytically active Pt surface.

  15. Synthesis, structure and photocatalytic activity of calcined Mg-Al-Ti-layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, Khaled; Abdelkarim, Omar; Srasra, Ezzeddine [Centre National des Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux (CNRSM), Soliman (Turkey); Frini-Srasra, Najoua [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (FST), Tunis (Turkey)

    2015-01-15

    Mg-Al-Ti layered double hydroxides (LDH), consisting of di-, tri- and tetra-valent cations with different Al{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} ratio, have been synthesized by co-precipitation which was demonstrated as efficient visible-light photocatalysts. The structure and chemical composition of the compound were characterized by PXRD, FT-IR, SAA, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, and DSC techniques. It is found that no hydrotalcites structure were formed for Ti{sup 4+}/(Ti{sup 4+}+ Al{sup 3+})>0.5 and the substitution of Ti(IV) for Al(III) in the layer increases the thermal stability of the resulting LDH materials. The calcined sample containing titanium showed relatively high adsorption capacity for MB as compared to that without titanium. Results show that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir were found to correlate the experimental data well. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated for the degradation of the methylene blue. The photocatalytic activity increased with the increase of the Al/Ti cationic ratio. 71% of the dye could be removed by the Mg/Al/Ti-LDH with the cationic ratio Al/Ti=0 : 1 and calcined at 500 .deg. C.

  16. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2–C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2–C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2–C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment. PMID:27703168

  17. Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT at Barrow, Alaska Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Schaefer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active layer thickness (ALT is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost that is typically measured at specific locations using probing, in situ temperature sensors, or other ground-based observations. Here we evaluated the Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT product that uses the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique to measure seasonal surface subsidence and infer ALT around Barrow, Alaska. We compared ReSALT with ground-based ALT obtained using probing and calibrated, 500 MHz Ground Penetrating Radar at multiple sites around Barrow. ReSALT accurately reproduced observed ALT within uncertainty of the GPR and probing data in ~76% of the study area. However, ReSALT was less than observed ALT in ~22% of the study area with well-drained soils and in ~1% of the area where soils contained gravel. ReSALT was greater than observed ALT in some drained thermokarst lake basins representing ~1% of the area. These results indicate remote sensing techniques based on InSAR could be an effective way to measure and monitor ALT over large areas on the Arctic coastal plain.

  18. Electron density variations in the F2 layer maximum during solar activity cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besprozvannaya, A.S.; Kozina, P.E.; AN Kazakhskoj SSR, Alma-Ata. Sektor Ionosfery)

    1988-01-01

    R value, characterizing for F2 relation of hourly median values in solar activity minimum and maximum, is calculated by average monthly values of F2 layer critical frequencies for June, October and December 1958 and 1964. R latitudinal-temporal distributions are plotted for different seasons according to the data from the north hemisphere west and east stations, placed within the Φ'=35-70deg latitudes interval. The following peculiarities of F2 lyer ionization relation with solar activity are pointed out. There are day-time hours, they are - winter one characterized by the gain rate increase with the widths increase, and summer one, realizing the opposite regularity. In night-time hours R value is characterized by the abnormally low values (∼ 1.2) at the latitudes to the south of the ionospheric through and to the pole from it. For all three seasons during 24 hours the periods with ionization gain maximal rate, which occur at nights in summer time and in the hours after the sunset - in winter and equinoctial months, are observed. The quantitative explanation of the peculiarities detected concerning the to-day concepts on F2 layer formation mechanisms is given

  19. Misfit Strain in Superlattices Controlling the Electron-Lattice Interaction via Micro strain in Active Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poccia, N.; Ricci, A.; Bianconi, N.

    2010-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity (HTS) emerges in quite different electronic materials: cuprates, diborides, and iron-pnictide superconductors. Looking for unity in the diversity we find in all these materials a common lattice architecture: they are practical realizations of heterostructures at atomic limit made of superlattices of metallic active layers intercalated by spacers as predicted in 1993 by one of us. The multilayer architecture is the key feature for the presence of electronic topological transitions where the Fermi surface of one of the subbands changes dimensionality. The superlattice misfit strain η between the active and spacer layers is shown to be a key variable to drive the system to the highest critical temperature Tc that occurs at a particular point of the 3D phase diagram Tc(θ, η) where d is the charge transfer or doping. The plots of Tc as a function of misfit strain at constant charge transfer in cuprates show a first-order quantum critical phase transition where an itinerant striped magnetic phase competes with superconductivity in the proximity of a structural phase transition, that is, associated with an electronic topological transition. The shape resonances in these multi gap superconductors is associated with the maximum Tc.

  20. A study of thermally activated Mg–Fe layered double hydroxides as potential environmental catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA S. HADNAĐEV-KOSTIĆ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs and mixed oxides derived after thermal decomposition of LDHs with different Mg–Fe contents were investigated. These materials were chosen because of the possibility to tailor their various properties, such as ion-exchange capability, redox and acid–base and surface area. Layered double hydroxides, [Mg1-xFex(OH2](CO3x/2×mH2O (where x presents the content of trivalent ions, x = M(III/(M(II + M(III were synthesized using the low supersaturation precipitation method. The influence of different Mg/Fe ratios on the structure and surface properties of the LDH and derived mixed oxides was investigated in correlation to their catalytic properties in the chosen test reaction (Fischer–Tropsch synthesis. It was determined that the presence of active sites in the mixed oxides is influenced by the structural properties of the initial LDH and by the presence of additional Fe phases. Furthermore, a synthesis outside the optimal range for the synthesis of single phase LDHs leads to the formation of metastable, multiphase systems with specific characteristics and active sites.

  1. Organic thin film transistors using a liquid crystalline palladium phthalocyanine as active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Tejada, Juan A.; Lopez-Varo, Pilar; Chaure, Nandu B.; Chambrier, Isabelle; Cammidge, Andrew N.; Cook, Michael J.; Jafari-Fini, Ali; Ray, Asim K.

    2018-03-01

    70 nm thick solution-processed films of a palladium phthalocyanine (PdPc6) derivative bearing eight hexyl (-C6H13) chains at non-peripheral positions have been employed as active layers in the fabrication of bottom-gate bottom-contact organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) deposited on highly doped p-type Si (110) substrates with SiO2 gate dielectric. The dependence of the transistor electrical performance upon the mesophase behavior of the PdPc6 films has been investigated by measuring the output and transfer characteristics of the OTFT having its active layer ex situ vacuum annealed at temperatures between 500 °C and 200 °C. A clear correlation between the annealing temperature and the threshold voltage and carrier mobility of the transistors, and the transition temperatures extracted from the differential scanning calorimetric curves for bulk materials has been established. This direct relation has been obtained by means of a compact electrical model in which the contact effects are taken into account. The precise determination of the contact-voltage drain-current curves allows for obtaining such a relation.

  2. Ring-constrained Join

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Karras, Panagiotis; Mamoulis, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    . This new operation has important applications in decision support, e.g., placing recycling stations at fair locations between restaurants and residential complexes. Clearly, RCJ is defined based on a geometric constraint but not on distances between points. Thus, our operation is fundamentally different......We introduce a novel spatial join operator, the ring-constrained join (RCJ). Given two sets P and Q of spatial points, the result of RCJ consists of pairs (p, q) (where p ε P, q ε Q) satisfying an intuitive geometric constraint: the smallest circle enclosing p and q contains no other points in P, Q...

  3. Optimization of Multi-layer Active Magnetic Regenerator towards Compact and Efficient Refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Tian; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic refrigerators can theoretically be more efficient than current vapor compression systems and use no vapor refrigerants with global warming potential. The core component, the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) operates based on the magnetocaloric effect of magnetic materials and the heat r....... In addition, simulations are carried out to investigate the potential of applying nanofluid in future magnetic refrigerators.......Magnetic refrigerators can theoretically be more efficient than current vapor compression systems and use no vapor refrigerants with global warming potential. The core component, the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) operates based on the magnetocaloric effect of magnetic materials and the heat...... their Curie temperature. Simulations are implemented to investigate how to layer the FOPT materials for obtaining higher cooling capacity. Moreover, based on entropy generation minimization, optimization of the regenerator geometry and related operating parameters is presented for improving the AMR efficiency...

  4. Characteristics of gravure printed InGaZnO thin films as an active channel layer in thin film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yuri; Kim, Gun Hee; Jeong, Woong Hee; Kim, Hyun Jae; Chin, Byung Doo; Yu, Jae-Woong

    2010-01-01

    Characteristics of oxide semiconductor thin film transistor prepared by gravure printing technique were studied. This device had inverted staggered structure of glass substrate/MoW/SiNx/ printed active layer. The active layer was printed with precursor of indium gallium zinc oxide solution and then annealed at 550 o C for 2 h. Influences of printing parameters (i.e. speed and force) were studied. As the gravure printing force was increased, the thickness of printed film was decreased and the refractive index of printed active layer was increased. The best printed result in our study was obtained with printing speed of 0.4 m/s, printing force of 400 N and the thickness of printed active layer was 45 nm. According to AFM image, surface of printed active layer was quite smooth and the root-mean square roughness was approximately 0.5 nm. Gravure printed active layer had a field-effect mobility of 0.81 cm 2 /Vs and an on-off current ratio was 1.36 x 10 6 .

  5. Polyfurfuryl alcohol derived activated carbons for high power electrical double layer capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, V. [CSIRO Division of Energy Technology, Box 312, Clayton South, Vic. 3169 (Australia); Pandolfo, A.G., E-mail: tony.pandolfo@csiro.a [CSIRO Division of Energy Technology, Box 312, Clayton South, Vic. 3169 (Australia)

    2010-10-30

    Polyfurfuryl alcohol (PFA) derived activated carbons were prepared by the acid catalysed polymerization of furfuryl alcohol, followed by potassium hydroxide activation. Activated carbons with apparent BET surface areas ranging from 1070 to 2600 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and corresponding average micropore sizes between 0.6 and 1.6 nm were obtained. The porosity of these carbons can be carefully controlled during activation and their performance as electrode materials in electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) in a non-aqueous electrolyte (1 M Et{sub 4}NBF{sub 4}/ACN) is investigated. Carbon materials with a low average pore size (<{approx}0.6 nm) exhibited electrolyte accessibility issues and an associated decrease in capacitance at high charging rates. PFA carbons with larger average pore sizes exhibited greatly improved performance, with specific electrode capacitances of 150 F g{sup -1} at an operating voltage window of 0-2.5 V; which corresponds to 32 Wh kg{sup -1} and 38 kW kg{sup -1} on an active material basis. These carbons also displayed an outstanding performance at high current densities delivering up to 100 F g{sup -1} at current densities as high as 250 A g{sup -1}. The exceptionally high capacitance and power of this electrode material is attributed to its good electronic conductivity and a highly effective combination of micro- and fine mesoporosity.

  6. Polyfurfuryl alcohol derived activated carbons for high power electrical double layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, V.; Pandolfo, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Polyfurfuryl alcohol (PFA) derived activated carbons were prepared by the acid catalysed polymerization of furfuryl alcohol, followed by potassium hydroxide activation. Activated carbons with apparent BET surface areas ranging from 1070 to 2600 m 2 g -1 , and corresponding average micropore sizes between 0.6 and 1.6 nm were obtained. The porosity of these carbons can be carefully controlled during activation and their performance as electrode materials in electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) in a non-aqueous electrolyte (1 M Et 4 NBF 4 /ACN) is investigated. Carbon materials with a low average pore size ( -1 at an operating voltage window of 0-2.5 V; which corresponds to 32 Wh kg -1 and 38 kW kg -1 on an active material basis. These carbons also displayed an outstanding performance at high current densities delivering up to 100 F g -1 at current densities as high as 250 A g -1 . The exceptionally high capacitance and power of this electrode material is attributed to its good electronic conductivity and a highly effective combination of micro- and fine mesoporosity.

  7. Modified processing conditions for optimized organic solar cells with inkjet printed P3HT:PC61BM active layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Alexander; Hollaender, Andreas; Wegener, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Inkjet printing was used to deposit P3HT:PC 61 BM solar cell active layers. ► The fill factor was dependent on the drying conditions used after printing. ► Fast drying at 100 °C and post-annealing resulted in good device performance. ► Devices with active layers which were slowly dried had high efficiencies without post-annealing. -- Abstract: Inkjet printing can be used to deposit the functional layers of organic solar cells and it offers advantages over spin coating such as the possibility to print films with user-defined patterns. In this study, inkjet printing was utilized to deposit polymer:fullerene solar cell active layers and different drying and annealing conditions were examined in order to optimize device performance. Low fill factors of approximately 30% were found for devices with printed active layers that were dried at 100 °C and a considerable shift in the fill factor of up to 60% was seen after post-annealing at 150 °C. Changes in the fill factor corresponded to an increase in device efficiency from ∼1.3% to ∼2.4% after post-annealing. An alternative active layer drying procedure was used based on solvent annealing which resulted in high fill factors of 60% and efficiencies of ∼2.4% without post-annealing. Blend films were examined with atomic force microscopy, ultra-violet visible spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was determined that solvent annealed, inkjet printed active layers are considerably rougher and show enhanced organization with respect to films that were dried at 100 °C. Two preparation routes are provided for devices with printed active layers with acceptable efficiencies based on quick drying and post-annealing or slow drying (solvent annealing)

  8. Influence of co-deposited active layers on carrier transport and luminescent properties in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Masaya; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Haishi, Motoki; Ohtani, Naoki [Department of Electronics, Doshisha University, Tatara-Miyakodani, Kyotanabe-shi, Kyoto (Japan); Ando, Taro [Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics, Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-shi, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    We have investigated the influence of a co-deposited active layer in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) on carrier transport and optical properties to improve radiative characteristics of OLEDs. The co-deposited layer consists of two organic materials; one is a hole transport material (TPD) and the other is an electron transport/emissive material (Alq3). We evaluated current-voltage characteristics and electroluminescence (EL) properties of various samples in which the thicknesses and compound ratios of the co-deposited layers are different. The results indicate that the devices consisting of TPD:Alq3 co-deposited layer sandwiched between TPD and Alq3 layers exhibit lower starting voltages for the light emission than the sample of simple TPD/Alq3 heterojunction structure. In addition, the starting voltage is independent of the thickness of TPD:Alq3 co-deposited layer. These samples have two interfaces at both surfaces of TPD:Alq3 co-deposited layer. Thus, we estimated the radiative recombination occurs at the interfaces. Nevertheless, we found that the radiative recombination occurs only at the interface of TPD:Alq3 co-deposited layer and Alq3 layer. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Quantification of functional groups and modeling of their ionization behavior in the active layer of FT30 reverse osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronell, Orlando; Mariñas, Benito J; Zhang, Xijing; Cahill, David G

    2008-07-15

    A new experimental approach was developed to measure the concentration of charged functional groups (FGs) in the active layer of thin-film composite reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes as a function of solution pH. FT30 RO membrane, with a fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layer sandwiched between a polysulfone support and a coating layer, was used. The experiments consisted of saturating charged FGs with heavy ion probes, and determining the ion probe concentration by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Deprotonated carboxylic groups were saturated with Ag+, and protonated amine groups with W04(2-). The ionization behavior of carboxylic and amine groups was modeled based on acid-base equilibrium theory. While the ionization behavior of amine groups was satisfactorily described by one dissociation constant (pKa = 4.74), two pKa values (5.23 and 8.97) were necessary to describe the titration curve of carboxylic groups. These results were consistent with the bimodal pore size distribution (PSD) of FT30 active layer reported in the literature. The calculated total concentrations of carboxylic and amine groups in the active layer of the FT30 RO membrane studied were 0.432 and 0.036 M, respectively, and the isoelectric point (IEP) was 4.7. The total concentration of carboxylic and amine groups revealed that the degree of cross-linking of the PA active layer of the FT30 RO membrane studied was 94%.

  10. Functional Layer-by-Layer Thin Films of Inducible Nitric Oxide (NO) Synthase Oxygenase and Polyethylenimine: Modulation of Enzyme Loading and NO-Release Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Bhagya; Abou Diwan, Charbel; Altawallbeh, Ghaith; Kalil, Haitham; Maher, Shaimaa; Xu, Song; Bayachou, Mekki

    2018-03-07

    Nitric oxide (NO) release counteracts platelet aggregation and prevents the thrombosis cascade in the inner walls of blood vessels. NO-release coatings also prevent thrombus formation on the surface of blood-contacting medical devices. Our previous work has shown that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) films release NO fluxes upon enzymatic conversion of the substrate l-arginine. In this work, we report on the modulation of enzyme loading in layer-by-layer (LbL) thin films of inducible nitric oxide synthase oxygenase (iNOSoxy) on polyethylenimine (PEI). The layer of iNOSoxy is electrostatically adsorbed onto the PEI layer. The pH of the iNOSoxy solution affects the amount of enzyme adsorbed. The overall negative surface charge of iNOSoxy in solution depends on the pH and hence determines the density of adsorbed protein on the positively charged PEI layer. We used buffered iNOSoxy solutions adjusted to pHs 8.6 and 7.0, while saline PEI solution was used at pH 7.0. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the outermost layer shows higher protein adsorption with iNOSoxy at pH 8.6 than with a solution of iNOSoxy at pH 7.0. Graphite electrodes with PEI/iNOSoxy films show higher catalytic currents for nitric oxide reduction mediated by iNOSoxy. The higher enzyme loading translates into higher NO flux when the enzyme-modified surface is exposed to a solution containing the substrate and a source of electrons. Spectrophotometric assays showed higher NO fluxes with iNOSoxy/PEI films built at pH 8.6 than with films built at pH 7.0. Fourier transform infrared analysis of iNOSoxy adsorbed on PEI at pH 8.6 and 7.0 shows structural differences of iNOSoxy in films, which explains the observed changes in enzymatic activity. Our findings show that pH provides a strategy to optimize the NOS loading and enzyme activity in NOS-based LbL thin films, which enables improved NO release with minimum layers of PEI/NOS.

  11. PEMFC catalyst layers: the role of micropores and mesopores on water sorption and fuel cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, Tatyana; Malek, Kourosh; Xie, Zhong; Navessin, Titichai; Holdcroft, Steven

    2011-06-01

    The effects of carbon microstructure and ionomer loading on water vapor sorption and retention in catalyst layers (CLs) of PEM fuel cells are investigated using dynamic vapor sorption. Catalyst layers based on Ketjen Black and Vulcan XC-72 carbon blacks, which possess distinctly different surface areas, pore volumes, and microporosities, are studied. It is found that pores <20 nm diameter facilitate water uptake by capillary condensation in the intermediate range of relative humidities. A broad pore size distribution (PSD) is found to enhance water retention in Ketjen Black-based CLs whereas the narrower mesoporous PSD of Vulcan CLs is shown to have an enhanced water repelling action. Water vapor sorption and retention properties of CLs are correlated to electrochemical properties and fuel cell performance. Water sorption enhances electrochemical properties such as the electrochemically active surface area (ESA), double layer capacitance and proton conductivity, particularly when the ionomer content is very low. The hydrophilic properties of a CL on the anode and the cathode are adjusted by choosing the PSD of carbon and the ionomer content. It is shown that a reduction of ionomer content on either cathode or anode of an MEA does not necessarily have a significant detrimental effect on the MEA performance compared to the standard 30 wt % ionomer MEA. Under operation in air and high relative humidity, a cathode with a narrow pore size distribution and low ionomer content is shown to be beneficial due to its low water retention properties. In dry operating conditions, adequate ionomer content on the cathode is crucial, whereas it can be reduced on the anode without a significant impact on fuel cell performance. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Antibacterial activity of contact lenses bearing surface-immobilized layers of intact liposomes loaded with levofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danion, Anne; Arsenault, Isabelle; Vermette, Patrick

    2007-09-01

    In vitro methods to evaluate antibacterial activity were used with contact lenses bearing levofloxacin-loaded liposomes developed for the prevention and treatment of bacterial ocular infections such as keratitis. Levofloxacin was incorporated into liposomes before these intact liposomes were immobilized onto the surfaces of soft contact lenses using a multilayer immobilization strategy. The release of levofloxacin from contact lenses bearing 2, 5, and 10 layers of liposomes into a saline buffer at 37 degrees C was monitored by fluorescence. The levofloxacin release, as a function of time, was described by a mechanism taking into account two independent first-order kinetic models. The total release of levofloxacin from the contact lenses was completed within 6 days. The release of levofloxacin from contact lenses bearing 10 layers of liposomes and subsequently soaked overnight in a levofloxacin solution was also studied and compare to that of dried contact lenses without any chemical modification rehydrated in a levofloxacin solution. The antibacterial activity of the liposome-coated contact lenses against Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated by measuring (i) the diameters of the inhibition zone on an agar plate and (ii) the optical density using a broth assay. The liposome-coated lenses showed an antibacterial activity both on agar and in broth following 24 h. When initial bacteria inocula were equal or below 10(6) CFU/mL, all the bacteria were inhibited within 2 h. When using initial bacteria inocula of 10(8) CFU/mL, an initial burst release provided by soaking the liposomal lenses was required for the first hours to inhibit bacteria growth. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  13. Study of removing a peat-layer from surface active agents; Deitanso ni yoru kaimen kasseizai no jokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umemiya, H; Kitamura, K [Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    An experiment was performed on a system for recycling water resources by using a peat-layer. A laboratory device was also made in order to examine the effects of a peat-layer on surface active agents. In the experiment, a water examination was carried out in which a mixture of water and kitchen detergent at the rate of 15,000 to 1 was filtered through a peat-layer of 2-3cm thick, as was a mixture of water, kitchen detergent and oil at the rate of 15,000 to 1 to 2. In the water examination, various measurements were done such as the measurement of COD by potassium permanganate acid process, measurement of pH by a pH meter with glass electrodes and measurement of coefficient of permeability by a variable water level permeability test. As a result of the experiment, it was revealed that a peat-layer had ability to remove surface active agents, that injection water tended to increase acidity in a peat-layer and that a peat-layer had ability to remove foaming of surface active agents. The COD of domestic waste water decreased from 12mg/l to 0.16mg/l in the system for recycling water resources using a peat-layer. 3 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. On-line and precise measurement of iron wear using thin layer activation reactions by proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso; Nishimura, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    For the purpose of the on-line measurement of iron wear, thin layer activation (TLA) method or surface layer activation (SLA) method has been carried out since early 1970s. This method uses the irradiation of charged particle beam like protons from an accelerator onto a metal surface to produce a thin activated layer of several tens μm. The wear of this activated layer is measured by nondestructive on-line method with a radiation detector. There are two methods of the measurement. One is the activity loss measurement on the surface, and the other is the activity measurement of the metal debris collected in a filter. The former method is considered here. The purpose it to measure the wear of engine cam noses to help the development of good engine oil. Proton beam irradiation with a tandem van de Graaff accelerator, wear calibration using a gamma ray spectrometer, on-line wear measurement of cam noses of car engines by TLA method and so on are reported. The 7.00 MeV proton beam from a van de Graaff accelerator was used for activation, and Co-56, Co-57 and Co-58 were obtained in thin layers. (K.I.)

  15. Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials as Active Layer Components in Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Tejas Attreya

    Thin-film photovoltaics offer the promise of cost-effective and scalable solar energy conversion, particularly for applications of semi-transparent solar cells where the poor absorption of commercially-available silicon is inadequate. Applications ranging from roof coatings that capture solar energy to semi-transparent windows that harvest the immense amount of incident sunlight on buildings could be realized with efficient and stable thin-film solar cells. However, the lifetime and efficiency of thin-film solar cells continue to trail their inorganic silicon counterparts. Low-dimensional nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides, have recently been explored as materials in thin-film solar cells due to their exceptional optoelectronic properties, solution-processability, and chemical inertness. Thus far, issues with the processing of these materials has held back their implementation in efficient photovoltaics. This dissertation reports processing advances that enable demonstrations of low-dimensional nanomaterials in thin-film solar cells. These low-dimensional photovoltaics show enhanced photovoltaic efficiency and environmental stability in comparison to previous devices, with a focus on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as an active layer component. The introduction summarizes recent advances in the processing of carbon nanotubes and their implementation through the thin-film photovoltaic architecture, as well as the use of two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides in photovoltaic applications and potential future directions for all-nanomaterial solar cells. The following chapter reports a study of the interaction between carbon nanotubes and surfactants that enables them to be sorted by electronic type via density gradient ultracentrifugation. These insights are utilized to construct of a broad distribution of carbon nanotubes that absorb throughout the solar spectrum. This polychiral distribution is then shown

  16. Multi-omics of permafrost, active layer and thermokarst bog soil microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude M; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J; Harden, Jennifer; Turetsky, Merritt R; McGuire, A David; Shah, Manesh B; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Jansson, Janet K

    2015-05-14

    Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, once thawed, may represent the largest future transfer of carbon from the biosphere to the atmosphere. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing, permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments. However, the fate of permafrost carbon depends on climatic, hydrological and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales. Here we use the combination of several molecular 'omics' approaches to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial communities, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy reveals a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  17. Thin Layer Activation (TLA) Analysis for Wear Study of Automotive Component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendiko, E.B.; Nur, M.; Priyono; Suryanto; Silakhuddin

    2000-01-01

    The measurement of surface losses of motor cycle piston ring, the automotive component was carried out. The piston ring is activated by proton beam from cyclotron with energy 12.5 MeV and beam current 1 μA for 30 minutes. The piston ring was installed to the machine and then operated for several times. The method to measured surface loss of piston ring due to wear by concentration, i.e. measured the activity of wear products in the lubricant oil with gamma spectrometry. The measurement the depth layer surface losses used the calibration curve from The Calibration Software Wear, Corrosion And Degradation Monitoring With TLA by Utaja of Iron (Fe) foil was activated by energy proton 12.5 MeV. The surface losses level of piston ring to be 50 hours operated was be 45.0 μm before half-life time correction and 57.0 μm after half-life time correction, its corresponding with count rate lubricant oil activity is 9.04 x 10 -4 μCi before half-life time correction and 1.12 x 10 -3 μCi after half-life time correction. (author)

  18. Gold Dispersion and Activation on the Basal Plane of Single-Layer MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Merida, Cindy S.; Le, Duy; Echeverrí a, Elena M.; Nguyen, Ariana E.; Rawal, Takat B; Naghibi Alvillar, Sahar; Kandyba, Viktor; Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; Losovyj, Yaroslav B.; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Valentin, Michael D.; Huang, Chun-Yu; Gomez, Michael J.; Lu, I-Hsi; Guan, Alison; Barinov, Alexei; Rahman, Talat S; Dowben, Peter A.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2017-01-01

    Gold islands are typically associated with high binding affinity to adsorbates and catalytic activity. Here we present the growth of such dispersed nanoscale gold islands on single layer MoS2, prepared on an inert SiO2/Si support by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This study offers a combination of growth process development, optical characterization, photoelectron spectroscopy at sub-micron spatial resolution, and advanced density functional theory modeling for detailed insight into the electronic interaction between gold and single-layer MoS2. In particular, we find the gold density of states in Au/MoS2/SiO2/Si to be far less well-defined than Au islands on other 2-dimensional materials such as graphene, for which we also provide data. We attribute this effect to the presence of heterogeneous Au adatom/MoS2-support interactions within the nanometer-scale gold cluster. As a consequence, theory predicts that CO will exhibit adsorption energies in excess of 1 eV at the Au cluster edges, where the local density of states is dominated by Au 5dz2 symmetry.

  19. Neutron activation analysis of Permian-Triassic boundary layer samples at the Selong Site in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Y.; Sakamoto, K.; Mingqing, W.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty samples from a limestone stratum across the Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) boundary layer in China were analyzed for 30 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence and ICP-MS, and also for mineral compositions with a powder X-ray diffractometer. The depth profile was found to indicate a sudden change of elemental and mineral compositions across the P-Tr boundary. Also the profile showed several peaks in elemental concentrations in the lower Permian layered samples as well as in the overlying Triassic strata, which are associated with the change of mineral compositions. Elemental profiles were found to be classified into 4 groups and to give some insights in the geochemical records. Ir is far less abundant (0.1 ppt) compared with that of the K-T boundaries (10 ppb), and the Ir/Co ratio is outside the K-T and Cl chondrite trends. This change of elementary profile is suggestive of the internal causes rather than the external ones such as an asteroid impact for the mass extinction at the P-Tr boundary. (author)

  20. Gold Dispersion and Activation on the Basal Plane of Single-Layer MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Merida, Cindy S.

    2017-12-09

    Gold islands are typically associated with high binding affinity to adsorbates and catalytic activity. Here we present the growth of such dispersed nanoscale gold islands on single layer MoS2, prepared on an inert SiO2/Si support by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). This study offers a combination of growth process development, optical characterization, photoelectron spectroscopy at sub-micron spatial resolution, and advanced density functional theory modeling for detailed insight into the electronic interaction between gold and single-layer MoS2. In particular, we find the gold density of states in Au/MoS2/SiO2/Si to be far less well-defined than Au islands on other 2-dimensional materials such as graphene, for which we also provide data. We attribute this effect to the presence of heterogeneous Au adatom/MoS2-support interactions within the nanometer-scale gold cluster. As a consequence, theory predicts that CO will exhibit adsorption energies in excess of 1 eV at the Au cluster edges, where the local density of states is dominated by Au 5dz2 symmetry.

  1. Evaluation of matrix metalloproteinase and cysteine cathepsin activity in dentin hybrid layer by gelatin zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalaxmi, Sekar; Madhubala, Manavalan Madhana; Jayaraman, Mahendran; Sathyakumar, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases(MMPs) and Cysteine Cathepsins (CCs) in the adhesive interface using etch and rinse adhesive at different time intervals using zymographic technique. Twenty freshly extracted non-carious human third molars were used in this study. Occlusal surfaces were ground flat and 1mm thick horizontal dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth using a diamond disc. The dentin surface was polished with 600-grit silicon-carbide paper. Five out of 20 samples were directly pulverized. In the remaining fifteen samples, the dentin was etched and adhesive was applied and light cured according to the manufacturer's instructions. A 1mm thick flowable composite was build up and light cured. Bonded specimens were cut vertically into 3 to 4 dentin slabs by means of diamond disc to expose the adhesive/dentin interfaces. These were then ground down to 500 µm thick resin-dentin interface using a hard tissue microtome. These sections were then pulverised into powder. Following this, every five samples were subjected to zymographic analysis after 1 day, 7 days and 21 days. Zymograms showed clear, thicker bands on all three isoforms in the etched samples compared to control samples at 1st and 7th day intervals and became inactive at 21st day for all three isoforms. MMP 9 activity was relatively higher when compared to CCs and MMP 2. Etch and rinse adhesive activated MMPs and CCs within the hybrid layer that remained active till 7th day and no gelatinolytic activity was found on 21st day and MMPs are more active compared to CCs and MMP-2.

  2. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-05-28

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn(3+)/Mn(4+) ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states.

  3. A study of wear in refrigerating machines using thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, P.; Eichhorn, K.; Eifrig, C.

    1986-01-01

    Wear is studied in a ball-and-socket joint of a newly developed refrigerating machine. Using deuteron activation a 15 μm deep Co-57 layer is generated at the ring-shaped friction area in the steel socket of the joint. The measurement of the Co-57 intensity of the wear particles held back on an oil filter provides information about the wear rate of the socket during machine operation. The measurement of the Co-57 contaminations occuring in the individual parts of the machine at the end of the test gives information about the distribution of the wear particles in the machine and about the material transfer in the ball-and-socket joint. (author)

  4. Development of Smart Active Layer Sensor (I) : Theory and Concept Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dong Jin; Lee, Young Sup; Kwon, Jae Hwa; Lee, Sang Il

    2004-01-01

    This paper is the first part of the study on the development of a smart active layer (SAL) sensor, which consists of two parts. In this first part, the theory and concept of the SAL sensor is investigated, which is designed for the detection of elastic waves caused by internal cracks and damages in structures. For the development SAL sensor, (i) the basic theory of elastic waves was studied, (ii) the feasible study of the SAL as an elastic waves detection sensor using the finite element analysis (FEA) with respect to a piezoceramic disc was performed. (iii) the comparison of performances between some piezoceramic sensors and a commercial acoustic emission (AE) sensor was accomplished to ensure the applicability by the experimental means, such as a pencil lead break test. Also, the conceptional study for the SAL sensor, which can be utilized for the effective detection and locating of defects by the arrangement of regularly distributed sensors, was discussed

  5. Thin layer activation : on-line monitoring of metal loss in process plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, L.H.; Wallace, G.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion, erosion and wear of metals is a common cause of failure in some process plant and equipment. Monitoring of these destructive effects has been done for many years to help plant engineers minimise the damage, in order to avoid unexpected failures and unscheduled shutdowns. Traditional methods of monitoring, such as standard NDT techniques, inform the engineer of what has happened, providing data such as culmulative loss of wall thickness. The modern approach to monitoring however, is to employ a technique which gives both current loss rates as well as integrated losses. Thin Layer Activation (TLA) provides on-line monitoring of corrosion, erosion and wear of metals, to a high degree of accuracy. It also gives cumulative information which can be backed up with weight-loss results if required. Thus current rather than historical loss rates are measured before any significant loss of metal has occurred. (author). 14 refs., 2 figs

  6. Theoretical investigation of the degradation mechanisms in host and guest molecules used in OLED active layers

    KAUST Repository

    Winget, Paul

    2014-10-08

    A feature of OLEDs that has to date received little attention is the prediction of the stability of the molecules involved in the electrical and optical processes. Here, we present computational results intended to aid in the development of stable systems. We identify degradation pathways and define new strategies to guide the synthesis of stable materials for OLED applications for both phosphorescent emitters and organic host materials. The chemical reactivity of these molecules in the active layers of the devices is further complicated by the fact that, during operation, they can be either oxidized or reduced (as they localize a hole or an electron) in addition to forming both singlet and triplet excitons. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  7. Improvement of carrier transport and luminous efficiency of organic light emitting diodes by introducing a co-deposited active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtani, Naoki; Murata, Masaya; Kashiwabara, Keiichiro; Kurata, Kazunori, E-mail: ohtani@mail.doshisha.ac.j [Department of Electronics, Doshisha University, 3-1 Tatara-Miyakodani, Kyotanabe-shi, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    We evaluated carrier transport and luminous efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) whose active regions consist of a single co-deposited layer. One organic material is a hole transport material N,N'-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), while the other is an electron transport/emissive material Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)-aluminum (Alq3). It was found that the luminous efficiency strongly depends on the thickness and the ratio of the TPD:Alq3 co-deposited layer. This indicates that the carrier balance in the active region can be improved by changing the co-deposited layers. In addition, we performed the dye-doping method to clarify the recombination region. As a result, we found that the radiative recombination is caused in the whole TPD:Alq3 co-deposited layer.

  8. Investigation of anti-wear performance of automobile lubricants using thin layer activation analysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswal, Jayashree [Isotope and Radiation Application Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Thakre, G.D. [Tribology and Combustion Division, Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun 248005, Uttarakhand (India); Pant, H.J., E-mail: hjpant@barc.gov.in [Isotope and Radiation Application Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Samantray, J.S. [Isotope and Radiation Application Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Arya, P.K. [Tribology and Combustion Division, Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun 248005, Uttarakhand (India); Sharma, S.C.; Gupta, A.K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2017-05-15

    An investigation was carried out to examine the anti-wear behavior of automobile lubricants using thin layer activation analysis technique. For this study disc gears made of EN 31 steel were labeled with a small amount of radioactivity by irradiating with 13 MeV proton beam from a particle accelerator. Experiments on wear rate measurement of the gear were carried out by mounting the irradiated disc gear on a twin-disc tribometer under lubricated condition. The activity loss was monitored by using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector integrated with a multichannel analyzer. The relative remnant activity was correlated with thickness loss by generating a calibration curve. The wear measurements were carried out for four different types of lubricants, named as, L1, L2, L3 and L4. At lower load L1 and L4 were found to exhibit better anti-wear properties than L2 and L3, whereas, L4 exhibited the best anti-wear performance behavior than other three lubricants at all the loads and speeds investigated.

  9. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saadati, Shagayegh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. ► First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. ► With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. ► Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 reduction. ► Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH 2 -IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH 2 -IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH 2 -IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H 2 O 2 biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k s ) and Michaelis–Menten constant (K M ) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 × 10 −12 mol cm −2 , 5.28 s −1 and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 μA mM −1 cm −2 and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  10. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: Study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadati, Shagayegh [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid were immobilized to GC/TiNnp with LBL assembly method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With alternative assemble of IL and catalase with positive and negative charged, multilayer was formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized catalase shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biosensor response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. - Abstract: A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH{sub 2}-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH{sub 2}-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH{sub 2}-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H{sub 2}O{sub 2} biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) of immobilized catalase were 3.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} mol cm{sup -2}, 5.28 s{sup -1} and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  11. The effect of solvent on the morphology of an inkjet printed active layer of bulk heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauzia, Vivi; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Yahaya, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells were fabricated by sandwiching the active layer between indium tin oxide (ITO) and Al electrodes. The active layer used was a blend of poly(3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3OT) as the electron donor and (6,6)-phenyl C 71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC 71 BM) as the electron acceptor. The active layer thin films were deposited by an inkjet printing technique. Prior to deposition of the thin films, the active materials were blended in three different solvents. The printed films were annealed at three different temperatures. It was found that the selection of the appropriate solvent and annealing treatment significantly influences the printing process, the morphology of the printed film and subsequently the performance of the solar cell devices

  12. Layer-specificity in the effects of attention and working memory on activity in primary visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kerkoerle, Timo; Self, Matthew W.; Roelfsema, Pieter R.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal activity in early visual cortex depends on attention shifts but the contribution to working memory has remained unclear. Here, we examine neuronal activity in the different layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) in an attention-demanding and a working memory task. A current-source density

  13. Layer-specificity in the effects of attention and working memory on activity in primary visual cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kerkoerle, Timo; Self, M.W.; Roelfsema, P.R.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal activity in early visual cortex depends on attention shifts but the contribution to working memory has remained unclear. Here, we examine neuronal activity in the different layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) in an attention-demanding and a working memory task. A current-source density

  14. Spatial variation in soil active-layer geochemistry across hydrologic margins in polar desert ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Barrett

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar deserts are characterized by severe spatial-temporal limitations of liquid water. In soil active layers of the Antarctic Dry Valleys, liquid water is infrequently available over most of the arid terrestrial landscape. However, soils on the margins of glacial melt-water streams and lakes are visibly wet during the brief Austral summer when temperatures permit the existence of liquid water. We examined the role of these hydrologic margins as preferential zones for the transformation and transport of nutrient elements and solutes in an environment where geochemical weathering and biological activity is strictly limited by the dearth of liquid water. We report on hydropedological investigations of aquatic-terrestrial transition zones adjacent to 11 stream and lake systems in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Our results show that wetted zones extended 1–11 m from the edges of lotic and lentic systems. While capillary demand and surface evaporation drive a one-way flux of water through these zones, the scale of these transition zones is determined by the topography and physical characteristics of the surrounding soils. Nutrient concentrations and fluxes appear to be influenced by both the hydrology and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes. Salt concentrations are enriched near the distal boundary of the wetted fronts due to evapo-concentration of pore water in lake margin soils, while organic matter, ammonium and phosphate concentrations are highest in stream channel sediments where potential for biological activity is greatest. Thus, in the Antarctic Dry Valleys, intermittently wet soils on the margins of streams and lakes are important zones of both geochemical cycling and biological activity.

  15. Observation of nanometer-sized electro-active defects in insulating layers by fluorescence microscopy and electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Christophe; Marchuk, Kyle; Ahn, Hyun S; Titus, Eric J; Kim, Jiyeon; Willets, Katherine A; Bard, Allen J

    2015-06-02

    We report a method to study electro-active defects in passivated electrodes. This method couples fluorescence microscopy and electrochemistry to localize and size electro-active defects. The method was validated by comparison with a scanning probe technique, scanning electrochemical microscopy. We used our method for studying electro-active defects in thin TiO2 layers electrodeposited on 25 μm diameter Pt ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs). The permeability of the TiO2 layer was estimated by measuring the oxidation of ferrocenemethanol at the UME. Blocking of current ranging from 91.4 to 99.8% was achieved. Electro-active defects with an average radius ranging between 9 and 90 nm were observed in these TiO2 blocking layers. The distribution of electro-active defects over the TiO2 layer is highly inhomogeneous and the number of electro-active defect increases for lower degree of current blocking. The interest of the proposed technique is the possibility to quickly (less than 15 min) image samples as large as several hundreds of μm(2) while being able to detect electro-active defects of only a few tens of nm in radius.

  16. Investigation of the Active layer thickness and ground subsidence in Taimyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenets, V. I.; Tolmanov, V. A.; Streletskiy, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    The active layer of permafrost (ALT) is highly unstable and dynamic in space and time. Soil undergoes frost heave during the freezing process, and ground subsidence during the thawing. The problem of the development of soil sediments' deformations in ALT is relevant as for natural objects (influence on runoff, changing of landscape and vegetation, etc.), so for industrial infrastructure (pipelines, roads, buildings and structures). The observations in the frame of the CALM program in Taimyr were carried out since 2005 (site R-32) with the measurements of the geodetic level of soil surface since 2007. The results of these measurements were processed and the maps of thawing and changes in meso- and micro-relief were constructed. The differentiation of seasonally thawed layer and ground subsidence in different micro-landscape conditions was investigated. The depth of seasonal thawing and the changes of surface movements were found to be determined by three main systems: a) the weather conditions and the climate trends; b) the permafrost-lithological conditions and drainage; c) the micro-landscape characteristics. It was established that for the Norilsk region (Taimyr) the trend in increasing ALT was 0.3 cm / year (for the period of observations 2005-2016) with a certain slowdown in the last 3 to 4 years. Increase in the depth of the ALT was related to the rising Summer temperatures and reduction of the cold period. A strong high impact of the summer precipitation conditions was revealed: in rather cold summer of 2012, with large amount of precipitation mainly in the warmest month (July), the defrosting was the highest. In the year with the record-breaking number of positive degree days (from all the 85 years of regular meteorological observations) but anomalously dry year 2013 (in July - less than 10 mm atmospheric precipitation), the thawing was minimal at the R-32 site. It is interesting that the ground subsidence in 2012 was 30-40% less, than in 2013. This is due

  17. High reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory with a poly(4-vinyl phenol) charge trapping layer based on a pn-heterojunction active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Lanyi; Ying, Jun; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Letian, E-mail: zlt@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: wwei99@jlu.edu.cn; Wang, Wei, E-mail: zlt@jlu.edu.cn, E-mail: wwei99@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2016-04-25

    In this letter, we demonstrate a high reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a polymer poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) as the charge trapping layer. In the unipolar OFETs, the inreversible shifts of the turn-on voltage (V{sub on}) and severe degradation of the memory window (ΔV{sub on}) at programming (P) and erasing (E) voltages, respectively, block their application in NVMs. The obstacle is overcome by using a pn-heterojunction as the active layer in the OFET memory, which supplied a holes and electrons accumulating channel at the supplied P and E voltages, respectively. Both holes and electrons transferring from the channels to PVP layer and overwriting the trapped charges with an opposite polarity result in the reliable bidirectional shifts of V{sub on} at P and E voltages, respectively. The heterojunction OFET exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory characteristics, with a large ΔV{sub on} of 8.5 V, desired reading (R) voltage at 0 V, reliable P/R/E/R dynamic endurance over 100 cycles and a long retention time over 10 years.

  18. Layer-by-layer construction of graphene/cobalt phthalocyanine composite film on activated GCE for application as a nitrite sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Lili; Pu, Tao; Liu, Ying; He, Xingquan

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel nitrite sensor was prepared by using LBL technique which for the first time used the activated positively charged glassy carbon electrode (A-GCE) as the substrate. The nitrite sensor shows super stability for consecutive CV testing and rather low detection limit. -- Abstract: In this paper, a novel graphene/cobalt phthalocyanine composite film was prepared by layer-by-layer (LBL) technique which for the first time used the activated positively charged glassy carbon electrode (A-GCE) as the substrate. The surface morphology of graphene/cobalt phthalocyanine composite film was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). It is found that graphene/cobalt phthalocyanine composite film modified GCE exhibits good catalytic activity toward the oxidation of nitrite. The oxidation current barely decreases in consecutive CV test. Furthermore, the modified GCE shows long-term stability after 70 days. The super good stability can be attributed to the immobilization and dispersion of electroactive cobalt phthalocyanine by graphene, and using A-GCE as substrate which can enhance the interaction force between GCE and electroactive cobalt phthalocyanine. The nitrite sensor shows rather low detection limit of 0.084 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio = 3 (S/N = 3)

  19. Active control of turbulent boundary layer sound transmission into a vehicle interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caiazzo, A; Alujević, N; Pluymers, B; Desmet, W

    2016-01-01

    In high speed automotive, aerospace, and railway transportation, the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is one of the most important sources of interior noise. The stochastic pressure distribution associated with the turbulence is able to excite significantly structural vibration of vehicle exterior panels. They radiate sound into the vehicle through the interior panels. Therefore, the air flow noise becomes very influential when it comes to the noise vibration and harshness assessment of a vehicle, in particular at low frequencies. Normally, passive solutions, such as sound absorbing materials, are used for reducing the TBL-induced noise transmission into a vehicle interior, which generally improve the structure sound isolation performance. These can achieve excellent isolation performance at higher frequencies, but are unable to deal with the low-frequency interior noise components. In this paper, active control of TBL noise transmission through an acoustically coupled double panel system into a rectangular cavity is examined theoretically. The Corcos model of the TBL pressure distribution is used to model the disturbance. The disturbance is rejected by an active vibration isolation unit reacting between the exterior and the interior panels. Significant reductions of the low-frequency vibrations of the interior panel and the sound pressure in the cavity are observed. (paper)

  20. Cross-Layer Active Predictive Congestion Control Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinfeng Wu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor networks (WSNs, there are numerous factors that may cause network congestion problems, such as the many-to-one communication modes, mutual interference of wireless links, dynamic changes of network topology and the memory-restrained characteristics of nodes. All these factors result in a network being more vulnerable to congestion. In this paper, a cross-layer active predictive congestion control scheme (CL-APCC for improving the performance of networks is proposed. Queuing theory is applied in the CL-APCC to analyze data flows of a single-node according to its memory status, combined with the analysis of the average occupied memory size of local networks. It also analyzes the current data change trends of local networks to forecast and actively adjust the sending rate of the node in the next period. In order to ensure the fairness and timeliness of the network, the IEEE 802.11 protocol is revised based on waiting time, the number of the node‟s neighbors and the original priority of data packets, which dynamically adjusts the sending priority of the node. The performance of CL-APCC, which is evaluated by extensive simulation experiments. is more efficient in solving the congestion in WSNs. Furthermore, it is clear that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of improving the fairness and lifetime of networks.

  1. Preparation of activated carbon aerogels with hierarchically porous structures for electrical double layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Dong; Shen, Jun; Liu, Nianping; Yang, Huiyu; Du, Ai

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbon aerogels (ACAs) with hierarchically porous structures and high specific surface area have been prepared via CO 2 and KOH activation processes. The pore structures of ACAs are characterized by N 2 adsorption/desorption and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that the ACAs contain three types of pores: micropores with diameters below 2 nm, small mesopores with diameters from 2 to 4 nm and large pores or channels with diameters over 30 nm. The typical sample ACAs-4, which possess pore volume of 2.73 cm 3 g −1 and specific surface area of 2119 m 2 g −1 , exhibits high specific capacitances of 250 F g −1 and 198 F g −1 at the current densities of 0.5 A g −1 and 20 A g −1 respectively in 6 M KOH aqueous solution. Furthermore, the resultant ACAs electrode materials also exhibit high power density, good cycling stability and long lifetime. With these features, ACAs are expected to be promising electrode materials for electrical double layer capacitors

  2. Cross-layer active predictive congestion control protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiangwen; Xu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Renjian; Wu, Yinfeng

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks (WSNs), there are numerous factors that may cause network congestion problems, such as the many-to-one communication modes, mutual interference of wireless links, dynamic changes of network topology and the memory-restrained characteristics of nodes. All these factors result in a network being more vulnerable to congestion. In this paper, a cross-layer active predictive congestion control scheme (CL-APCC) for improving the performance of networks is proposed. Queuing theory is applied in the CL-APCC to analyze data flows of a single-node according to its memory status, combined with the analysis of the average occupied memory size of local networks. It also analyzes the current data change trends of local networks to forecast and actively adjust the sending rate of the node in the next period. In order to ensure the fairness and timeliness of the network, the IEEE 802.11 protocol is revised based on waiting time, the number of the node's neighbors and the original priority of data packets, which dynamically adjusts the sending priority of the node. The performance of CL-APCC, which is evaluated by extensive simulation experiments. is more efficient in solving the congestion in WSNs. Furthermore, it is clear that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of improving the fairness and lifetime of networks.

  3. Early cosmology constrained

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul [Institute of Cosmos Sciences, University of Barcelona, IEEC-UB, Martí Franquès, 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bellini, Emilio [University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Pigozzo, Cassio [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Heavens, Alan F., E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: emilio.bellini@physics.ox.ac.uk, E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br, E-mail: a.heavens@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: raul.jimenez@icc.ub.edu [Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology (ICIC), Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    We investigate our knowledge of early universe cosmology by exploring how much additional energy density can be placed in different components beyond those in the ΛCDM model. To do this we use a method to separate early- and late-universe information enclosed in observational data, thus markedly reducing the model-dependency of the conclusions. We find that the 95% credibility regions for extra energy components of the early universe at recombination are: non-accelerating additional fluid density parameter Ω{sub MR} < 0.006 and extra radiation parameterised as extra effective neutrino species 2.3 < N {sub eff} < 3.2 when imposing flatness. Our constraints thus show that even when analyzing the data in this largely model-independent way, the possibility of hiding extra energy components beyond ΛCDM in the early universe is seriously constrained by current observations. We also find that the standard ruler, the sound horizon at radiation drag, can be well determined in a way that does not depend on late-time Universe assumptions, but depends strongly on early-time physics and in particular on additional components that behave like radiation. We find that the standard ruler length determined in this way is r {sub s} = 147.4 ± 0.7 Mpc if the radiation and neutrino components are standard, but the uncertainty increases by an order of magnitude when non-standard dark radiation components are allowed, to r {sub s} = 150 ± 5 Mpc.

  4. Spatial representation of organic carbon and active-layer thickness of high latitude soils in CMIP5 earth system models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Umakant; Drewniak, Beth; Jastrow, Julie D.; Matamala, Roser M.; Vitharana, U. W. A.

    2017-08-01

    Soil properties such as soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and active-layer thickness are used in earth system models (F.SMs) to predict anthropogenic and climatic impacts on soil carbon dynamics, future changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, and associated climate changes in the permafrost regions. Accurate representation of spatial and vertical distribution of these soil properties in ESMs is a prerequisite for redudng existing uncertainty in predicting carbon-climate feedbacks. We compared the spatial representation of SOC stocks and active-layer thicknesses predicted by the coupled Modellntercomparison Project Phase 5 { CMIP5) ESMs with those predicted from geospatial predictions, based on observation data for the state of Alaska, USA. For the geospatial modeling. we used soil profile observations {585 for SOC stocks and 153 for active-layer thickness) and environmental variables (climate, topography, land cover, and surficial geology types) and generated fine-resolution (50-m spatial resolution) predictions of SOC stocks (to 1-m depth) and active-layer thickness across Alaska. We found large inter-quartile range (2.5-5.5 m) in predicted active-layer thickness of CMIP5 modeled results and small inter-quartile range (11.5-22 kg m-2) in predicted SOC stocks. The spatial coefficient of variability of active-layer thickness and SOC stocks were lower in CMIP5 predictions compared to our geospatial estimates when gridded at similar spatial resolutions (24.7 compared to 30% and 29 compared to 38%, respectively). However, prediction errors. when calculated for independent validation sites, were several times larger in ESM predictions compared to geospatial predictions. Primaly factors leading to observed differences were ( 1) lack of spatial heterogeneity in ESM predictions, (2) differences in assumptions concerning environmental controls, and (3) the absence of pedogenic processes in ESM model structures. Our results suggest that efforts to incorporate

  5. Salix polaris growth responses to active layer detachment and solifluction processes in High Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekacz, Liliana

    2015-04-01

    The work is dedicated to demonstrate the potential of Salix polaris grow properties in the dendrogemorphologic image, analyzing periglacially induced slope processes in the high Arctic.. Observed anatomical and morphological plants responses to solifluction and active layer detachment processes are presented qualitatively and quantitatively as a summary of presented features frequency. The results are discussed against the background of the other research results in this field. The investigations was performed in Ebba valley, in the vicinity of Petunia Bay, northernmost part of Billefjorden in central Spitsbergen (Svalbard). Environmental conditions are characterized by annual precipitation sum lower than 200 mm (Hagen et al.,1993) and average summer temperature of about 5°C, with maximum daily temperatures rarely exceeding 10°C (Rachlewicz, 2009). Collected shrub material was prepared according to the methods presented by Schweingruber and Poschlod (2005). Thin (approx. 15-20μm) sections of the whole cross-section were prepared with a sledge microtome, stained with Safranine and Astra blue and finally permanently fixed on microslides with Canada balsam and dried. Snapshots were taken partially for each cross-section with digital camera (ColorView III, Olympus) connected to a microscope (Olympus BX41) and merged into one, high resolution image. After all, ring widths were measured in 3-4 radii in every single cross-section using ImageJ software. Analyzed plants revealed extremely harsh environmental conditions of their growth. Buchwał et al. (2013) provided quantitative data concerning missing rings and partially missing rings in shrubs growing on Ebba valley floor. Mean ring width at the level of 79μm represents one of the smallest values of yearly growth ever noted. The share of missing rings and partially missing rings was 11,2% and 13,6% respectively. Plants growing on Ebba valley slope indicate almost twice smaller values of ring width (41μm), and higher

  6. Using In Situ Observations and Satellite Retrievals to Constrain Large-Eddy Simulations and Single-Column Simulations: Implications for Boundary-Layer Cloud Parameterization in the NASA GISS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remillard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Two low-cloud periods from the CAP-MBL deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility at the Azores are selected through a cluster analysis of ISCCP cloud property matrices, so as to represent two low-cloud weather states that the GISS GCM severely underpredicts not only in that region but also globally. The two cases represent (1) shallow cumulus clouds occurring in a cold-air outbreak behind a cold front, and (2) stratocumulus clouds occurring when the region was dominated by a high-pressure system. Observations and MERRA reanalysis are used to derive specifications used for large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column model (SCM) simulations. The LES captures the major differences in horizontal structure between the two low-cloud fields, but there are unconstrained uncertainties in cloud microphysics and challenges in reproducing W-band Doppler radar moments. The SCM run on the vertical grid used for CMIP-5 runs of the GCM does a poor job of representing the shallow cumulus case and is unable to maintain an overcast deck in the stratocumulus case, providing some clues regarding problems with low-cloud representation in the GCM. SCM sensitivity tests with a finer vertical grid in the boundary layer show substantial improvement in the representation of cloud amount for both cases. GCM simulations with CMIP-5 versus finer vertical gridding in the boundary layer are compared with observations. The adoption of a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme in the GCM is also tested in this framework. The methodology followed in this study, with the process-based examination of different time and space scales in both models and observations, represents a prototype for GCM cloud parameterization improvements.

  7. Chemically-modified graphene sheets as an active layer for eco-friendly metal electroplating on plastic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Joon-Suk; Hwang, Taeseon; Nam, Gi-Yong; Hong, Jung-Pyo; Bae, Ah-Hyun; Son, Sang-Ik; Lee, Geun-Ho; Sung, Hak kyung; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon; Nam, Jae-Do

    2012-01-01

    Eco-friendly nickel (Ni) electroplating was carried out on a plastic substrate using chemically modified graphene sheets as an active and conductive layer to initiate electroplating without using conventional pre-treatment or electroless metal-seeding processes. A graphene oxide (GO) solution was self-assembled on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film followed by evaporation to give GO layers (thickness around 6.5 μm) on PET (GO/PET) film. Then, the GO/PET film was chemically and thermally reduced to convert the GO layers to reduced graphene oxide (RGO) layers on the PET substrate. The RGO-coated PET (RGO/PET) film showed the sheet resistance of 100 Ω per square. On RGO/PET film, Ni electroplating was conducted under the constant-current condition and the entire surface of the PET film was completely metalized with Ni without any voids.

  8. Constraining neutrinoless double beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorame, L.; Meloni, D.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    A class of discrete flavor-symmetry-based models predicts constrained neutrino mass matrix schemes that lead to specific neutrino mass sum-rules (MSR). We show how these theories may constrain the absolute scale of neutrino mass, leading in most of the cases to a lower bound on the neutrinoless double beta decay effective amplitude.

  9. Characteristics of powdered activated carbon treated with dielectric barrier discharge for electric double-layer capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashima, Daisuke; Yoshitama, Hiromu; Sakoda, Tatsuya; Okazaki, Akihito; Kawaji, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The specific capacitance of the EDLCs could be improved by oxygen plasma treatment. ► 15 s treated EDLCs showed a 20% increase in capacitance relative to untreated EDLCs. ► The plasma treatment yields EDLCs that are suitable for high-energy applications. - Abstract: The electrochemical properties of electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) made with plasma-treated powdered activated carbon (treated using a dielectric barrier discharge) were examined using cyclic voltammetry (CV), Cole–Cole plots, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dielectric barrier discharge method, which operates at atmospheric pressure, dramatically reduces the processing time and does not require vacuum equipment, making it a more practical alternative than low-pressure plasma treatment. The experimental data indicate that the specific capacitance of the EDLCs could be improved by oxygen plasma treatment. Capacitance of EDLCs made with activated carbon treated for 15 s showed 193.5 F/g that 20% increase in the specific capacitance relative to untreated EDLCs. This result indicates that the plasma treatment yields EDLCs that are suitable for high-energy applications. The enhancement of capacitance was mainly attributed to an increase in the BET surface area of the activated carbon and the creation of carboxyl groups on the surface of the carbon. The carboxyl groups induced oxidation–reduction reactions in the presence of O 2 which was included in the operation gas. In addition, the carboxyl groups improved the penetration of the electrolyte solution into the carbon electrodes.

  10. Significantly improved efficiency of organic solar cells incorporating Co3O4 NPs in the active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, S. Amber; Ikram, M.; Ali, S.

    2018-03-01

    Effect of various concentrations of fabricated cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) in the active layer of different donors and acceptors based hybrid organic bulk heterojunction-BHJ devices were investigated using inverted architecture. The organic active layer comprising different donors P3HT (poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) and PTB7 (Poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b] thiophenediyl

  11. Direct current (DC) resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, J.; Fiandaca, G.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... the soil freezing as a strong increase in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below...

  12. Direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below-freezing temperature. Time-lapse inversions...

  13. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Smith, A. Peyton; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-12-01

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is uncertain but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e., directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from 30 cores, subjected to two temperatures and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Daily CO2 fluxes were positively correlated with incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen. They also had a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Daily CH4 emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over 6 orders of magnitude higher than that from CH4; cumulative CO2 was correlated with incubation temperature and moisture treatment, with drought cores producing 52-73 % lower C. Cumulative CH4 production was unaffected by any treatment. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be sensitive to changes in soil moisture under aerobic conditions, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost thaws in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have been shown to be

  14. Theoretical Modeling and Analysis of L- and P-band Radar Backscatter Sensitivity to Soil Active Layer Dielectric Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyang Du

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-thaw (FT and moisture dynamics within the soil active layer are critical elements of boreal, arctic and alpine ecosystems, and environmental change assessments. We evaluated the potential for detecting dielectric changes within different soil layers using combined L- and P-band radar remote sensing as a prerequisite for detecting FT and moisture profile changes within the soil active layer. A two-layer scattering model was developed and validated for simulating radar responses from vertically inhomogeneous soil. The model simulations indicated that inhomogeneity in the soil dielectric profile contributes to both L- and P-band backscatter, but with greater P-band sensitivity at depth. The difference in L- and P-band responses to soil dielectric profile inhomogeneity appears suitable for detecting associated changes in soil active layer conditions. Additional evaluation using collocated airborne radar (AIRSAR observations and in situ soil moisture measurements over alpine tundra indicates that combined L- and P-band SAR observations are sensitive to soil dielectric profile heterogeneity associated with variations in soil moisture and FT conditions.

  15. Hard x-ray Morphological and Spectral Studies of the Galactic Center Molecular Cloud SGR B2: Constraining Past SGR A* Flaring Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, NuSTAR observed the Sgr B2 region and for the first time resolved its hard X-ray emission on subarcminute scales. Two prominent features are detected above 10 keV:. a newly emerging cloud, G0.66-0.13, and the central 90 '' radius region containing two compact cores, Sgr B2(M) and Sgr B2(N......), surrounded by diffuse emission. It is inconclusive whether the remaining level of Sgr. B2 emission is still decreasing or has reached a constant background level. A decreasing X-ray emission can be best explained by the X-ray reflection nebula scenario, where the cloud reprocesses a past giant outburst from...... Sgr A*. In the X-ray reflection nebula (XRN) scenario, the 3-79 keV Sgr. B2 spectrum allows us to self-consistently test the XRN model using both the Fe K alpha line and the continuum emission. The peak luminosity of the past Sgr A* outburst is constrained to L3-79keV∼5 x 1038 ergs s-1. A newly...

  16. Study of the active layer at the Spanish Antarctic station “Gabriel de Castilla”, Deception Island, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pablo, M.A. de; Molina, A.; Recio, C.; Ramos, M.; Goyanes, G.; Ropero, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The degradation of permanent frozen ground (permafrost) and the increase in the thickness of the active layer may be caused both by natural processes (such as global climate change) and by anthropic activity, which changes the natural environmental conditions that allow its existence, as has been widely reported to occur in the northern polar and subpolar regions. In the case of Antarctica, some scientific research stations are located in areas with permafrost, such as the Spanish Antarctic station “Gabriel de Castilla” on Deception Island. In the place where the station is located, an important increase in erosion has been observed in recent years, including the excavation of new gullies and the erosion of the coastal cliffs. In order to develop an initial analysis of the possible effects of the station on the permafrost degradation, ground temperature has been monitored since 2012 and the thickness and of the active layer and the temperature, both inside and beneath the station, have also been sporadically measured. Here we show the results and discuss how the station reduces the freezing of the ground during the winter when the station is closed and facilitates the warming of the ground during the living periods of the station in the Antarctic summer. Those initial results and conclusions make necessary to continue the study of the permafrost and the active layer in the station site by systematic monitoring of the ground temperature and the thickness of the active layer. [es

  17. [Soil basal respiration and enzyme activities in the root-layer soil of tea bushes in a red soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shen; He, Zhenli; Zhang, Rongguang; Chen, Guochao; Huang, Changyong

    2003-02-01

    Soil basal respiration potential, metabolic quotient (qCO2), and activities of urease, invertase and acid phosphomonoesterase were investigated in the root-layer of 10-, 40-, and 90-yr-old tea bushes grown on the same type of red soil. The soil daily basal respiration potential ranged from 36.23 to 58.52 mg.kg-1.d-1, and the potentials in the root-layer of 40- or 90-yr-old were greater than that of 10-yr old tea bushes. The daily qCO2, ranging from 0.30 to 0.68, was in the reverse trend. The activities of test three enzymes changed differently with tea bushes' age. Urease activity in the root-layer of all age tea bushes ranged from 41.48 to 47.72 mg.kg-1.h-1 and slightly decreased with tea bushes' age. Invertase activity was 189.29-363.40 mg.kg-1.h-1 and decreased with tea bushes' age, but its activity in the root-layer of 10-year old tea bushes was significantly greater than that in the root-layer soil of 40- or 90-year old tea bushes. Acid phosphomonoesterase activity (444.22-828.32 mg.kg-1.h-1) increased significantly with tea bushes' age. Soil basal respiration potential, qCO2 and activities of 3 soil enzymes were closely related to soil pH, soil organic carbon, total nitrogen and C/N ratio, total soluble phenol, and microbial biomass carbon, respectively.

  18. Mechanism of bonding and debonding using surface activated bonding method with Si intermediate layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kai; Fujino, Masahisa; Matsumoto, Yoshiie; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-04-01

    Techniques of handling thin and fragile substrates in a high-temperature process are highly required for the fabrication of semiconductor devices including thin film transistors (TFTs). In our previous study, we proposed applying the surface activated bonding (SAB) method using Si intermediate layers to the bonding and debonding of glass substrates. The SAB method has successfully bonded glass substrates at room temperature, and the substrates have been debonded after heating at 450 °C, in which TFTs are fabricated on thin glass substrates for LC display devices. In this study, we conducted the bonding and debonding of Si and glass in order to understand the mechanism in the proposed process. Si substrates are also successfully bonded to glass substrates at room temperature and debonded after heating at 450 °C using the proposed bonding process. By the composition analysis of bonding interfaces, it is clarified that the absorbed water on the glass forms interfacial voids and cause the decrease in bond strength.

  19. Wettability of modified silica layers deposited on glass support activated by plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terpiłowski, Konrad, E-mail: terpil@umcs.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Rymuszka, Diana [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Goncharuk, Olena V.; Sulym, Iryna Ya.; Gun’ko, Vladimir M. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • New modified silica materials synthesis. • Support surface plasma activation. • Apparent surface free energy determination. • Equilibrium contact angle calculation. - Abstract: Fumed silica modified by hexamethyldisilazane [HDMS] and polydimethylsiloxane [PDMS] was dispersed in a polystyrene/chloroform solution. To increase adhesion between deposited silica layers and a glass surface, the latter was pretreated with air plasma for 30 s. The silica/polystyrene dispersion was deposited on the glass support using a spin coater. After deposition, the plates were dried in a desiccator for 24 h. Water advancing and receding contact angles were measured using the tilted plate method. The apparent surface free energy (γ{sub S}) was evaluated using the contact angle hysteresis approach. The surface topography was determined using the optical profilometry method. Contact angles changed from 59.7° ± 4.4 (at surface coverage with trimethylsilyl groups Θ = 0.14) to 155° ± 3.1 at Θ = 1. The value of γ{sub S} decreased from 51.3 ± 2.8 mJ/m{sup 2} (for the sample at the lowest value of Θ) to 1.0 ± 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2} for the most hydrophobic sample. Thus, some systems with a high degree of modification by HDMS showed superhydrophobicity, and the sliding angle amounted to about 16° ± 2.1.

  20. Dead layer and active volume determination for GERDA Phase II detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bjoern [TU Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The GERDA experiment investigates the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge and is currently running Phase I of its physics program. Using the same isotope as the Heidelberg Moscow (HDM) experiment, GERDA aims to directly test the claim of observation by a subset of the HDM collaboration. For the update to Phase II of the experiment in 2013, the collaboration organized the production of 30 new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) type detectors from original 35 kg enriched material and tested their performance in the low background laboratory HADES in SCK.CEN, Belgium. With additional 20 kg of detectors, GERDA aims to probe the degenerated hierarchy scenario. One of the crucial detector parameters is the active volume (AV) fraction which directly enters into all physics analysis. This talk presents the methodology of dead layer and AV determination with different calibration sources such as {sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 60}Co and {sup 228}Th and the results obtained for the new Phase II detectors. Furthermore, the AV fraction turned out to be the largest systematic uncertainty in the analysis of Phase I data which makes it imperative to reduce its uncertainty for Phase II. This talk addresses the major contributions to the AV uncertainty and gives an outlook for improvements in Phase II analysis.

  1. Dynamics and characteristics of soil temperature and moisture of active layer in central Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Hu, G.; Wu, X.; Tian, L.

    2017-12-01

    Research on the hydrothermal properties of active layer during the thawing and freezing processes was considered as a key question to revealing the heat and moisture exchanges between permafrost and atmosphere. The characteristics of freezing and thawing processes at Tanggula (TGL) site in permafrost regions on the Tibetan Plateau, the results revealed that the depth of daily soil temperature transmission was about 40 cm shallower during thawing period than that during the freezing period. Soil warming process at the depth above 140 cm was slower than the cooling process, whereas they were close below 140 cm depth. Moreover, the hydro-thermal properties differed significantly among different stages. Precipitation caused an obviously increase in soil moisture at 0-20 cm depth. The vertical distribution of soil moisture could be divided into two main zones: less than 12% in the freeze state and greater than 12% in the thaw state. In addition, coupling of moisture and heat during the freezing and thawing processes also showed that soil temperature decreased faster than soil moisture during the freezing process. At the freezing stage, soil moisture exhibited an exponential relationship with the absolute soil temperature. Energy consumed for water-ice conversion during the freezing process was 149.83 MJ/m2 and 141.22 MJ/m2 in 2011 and 2012, respectively, which was estimated by the soil moisture variation.

  2. Microbial network, phylogenetic diversity and community membership in the active layer across a permafrost thaw gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondav, Rhiannon; McCalley, Carmody K; Hodgkins, Suzanne B; Frolking, Steve; Saleska, Scott R; Rich, Virginia I; Chanton, Jeff P; Crill, Patrick M

    2017-08-01

    Biogenic production and release of methane (CH 4 ) from thawing permafrost has the potential to be a strong source of radiative forcing. We investigated changes in the active layer microbial community of three sites representative of distinct permafrost thaw stages at a palsa mire in northern Sweden. The palsa site (intact permafrost and low radiative forcing signature) had a phylogenetically clustered community dominated by Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria. The bog (thawing permafrost and low radiative forcing signature) had lower alpha diversity and midrange phylogenetic clustering, characteristic of ecosystem disturbance affecting habitat filtering. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens and Acidobacteria dominated the bog shifting from palsa-like to fen-like at the waterline. The fen (no underlying permafrost, high radiative forcing signature) had the highest alpha, beta and phylogenetic diversity, was dominated by Proteobacteria and Euryarchaeota and was significantly enriched in methanogens. The Mire microbial network was modular with module cores consisting of clusters of Acidobacteria, Euryarchaeota or Xanthomonodales. Loss of underlying permafrost with associated hydrological shifts correlated to changes in microbial composition, alpha, beta and phylogenetic diversity associated with a higher radiative forcing signature. These results support the complex role of microbial interactions in mediating carbon budget changes and climate feedback in response to climate forcing. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Multiple layers of posttranslational regulation refine circadian clock activity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Pil Joon; Mas, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock is a cellular time-keeper mechanism that regulates biological rhythms with a period of ~24 h. The circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and development are synchronized by environmental cues such as light and temperature. In plants, proper matching of the internal circadian time with the external environment confers fitness advantages on plant survival and propagation. Accordingly, plants have evolved elaborated regulatory mechanisms that precisely control the circadian oscillations. Transcriptional feedback regulation of several clock components has been well characterized over the past years. However, the importance of additional regulatory mechanisms such as chromatin remodeling, protein complexes, protein phosphorylation, and stability is only starting to emerge. The multiple layers of circadian regulation enable plants to properly synchronize with the environmental cycles and to fine-tune the circadian oscillations. This review focuses on the diverse posttranslational events that regulate circadian clock function. We discuss the mechanistic insights explaining how plants articulate a high degree of complexity in their regulatory networks to maintain circadian homeostasis and to generate highly precise waveforms of circadian expression and activity.

  4. Influence of Active Layer on Separation Potentials of Nanofiltration Membranes for Inorganic Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadekar, Shardul S; Vidic, Radisav D

    2017-05-16

    Active layers of two fully aromatic and two semi-aromatic nanofiltration membranes were studied along with surface charge at different electrolyte composition and effective pore size to elucidate their influence on separation mechanisms for inorganic ions by steric, charge, and dielectric exclusion. The membrane potential method used for pore size measurement is underlined as the most appropriate measurement technique for this application owing to its dependence on the diffusional potentials of inorganic ions. Crossflow rejection experiments with dilute feed composition indicate that both fully aromatic membranes achieved similar rejection despite the differences in surface charge, which suggests that rejection by these membranes is exclusively dependent on size exclusion and the contribution of charge exclusion is weak. Rejection experiments with higher ionic strength and different composition of the feed solution confirmed this hypothesis. On the other hand, increase in the ionic strength of feed solution when the charge exclusion effects are negligible due to charge screening strongly influenced ion rejection by semi-aromatic membranes. The experimental results confirmed that charge exclusion contributes significantly to the performance of semi-aromatic membranes in addition to size exclusion. The contribution of dielectric exclusion to overall ion rejection would be more significant for fully aromatic membranes.

  5. Application of thin layer activation technique for monitoring corrosion of carbon steel in hydrocarbon processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R C; Biswal, Jayashree; Pant, H J; Samantray, J S; Sharma, S C; Gupta, A K; Ray, S S

    2018-05-01

    Acidic crude oil transportation and processing in petroleum refining and petrochemical operations cause corrosion in the pipelines and associated components. Corrosion monitoring is invariably required to test and prove operational reliability. Thin Layer Activation (TLA) technique is a nuclear technique used for measurement of corrosion and erosion of materials. The technique involves irradiation of material with high energy ion beam from an accelerator and measurement of loss of radioactivity after the material is subjected to corrosive environment. In the present study, TLA technique has been used to monitor corrosion of carbon steel (CS) in crude oil environment at high temperature. Different CS coupons were irradiated with a 13 MeV proton beam to produce Cobalt-56 radioisotope on the surface of the coupons. The corrosion studies were carried out by subjecting the irradiated coupons to a corrosive environment, i.e, uninhibited straight run gas oil (SRGO) containing known amount of naphthenic acid (NA) at high temperature. The effects of different parameters, such as, concentration of NA, temperature and fluid velocity (rpm) on corrosion behaviour of CS were studied. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Process for decontaminating objects having radio-active layers of wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groessler, P.

    1980-01-01

    In order to reduce the parts of walls found when decommissioning a nuclear power station in size and be able to transport them in protective containers, an explosion is carried out on the side of the wall opposite the contaminated layers. These layers therefore peel off. Explosives in the form of plates or liquid explosives are used flexibly. (DG) [de

  7. Instabilities and diffusion in a hydrodynamic model of a fluid membrane coupled to a thin active fluid layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, N; Basu, A

    2012-11-01

    We construct a coarse-grained effective two-dimensional (2d hydrodynamic theory as a theoretical model for a coupled system of a fluid membrane and a thin layer of a polar active fluid in its ordered state that is anchored to the membrane. We show that such a system is prone to generic instabilities through the interplay of nonequilibrium drive, polar order and membrane fluctuation. We use our model equations to calculate diffusion coefficients of an inclusion in the membrane and show that their values depend strongly on the system size, in contrast to their equilibrium values. Our work extends the work of S. Sankararaman and S. Ramaswamy (Phys. Rev. Lett., 102, 118107 (2009)) to a coupled system of a fluid membrane and an ordered active fluid layer. Our model is broadly inspired by and should be useful as a starting point for theoretical descriptions of the coupled dynamics of a cell membrane and a cortical actin layer anchored to it.

  8. Multi-Decadal Oscillations of the Ocean Active Upper-Layer Heat Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byshev, Vladimir I.; Neiman, Victor G.; Anisimov, Mikhail V.; Gusev, Anatoly V.; Serykh, Ilya V.; Sidorova, Alexandra N.; Figurkin, Alexander L.; Anisimov, Ivan M.

    2017-07-01

    Spatial patterns in multi-decadal variability in upper ocean heat content for the last 60 years are examined using a numerical model developed at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of Russia (INM Model) and sea water temperature-salinity data from the World Ocean Database (in: Levitus, NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66, U.S. Wash.: Gov. Printing Office, 2009). Both the model and the observational data show that the heat content of the Active Upper Layer (AUL) in particular regions of the Atlantic, Pacific and Southern oceans have experienced prominent simultaneous variations on multi-decadal (25-35 years) time scales. These variations are compared earlier revealed climatic alternations in the Northern Atlantic region during the last century (Byshev et al. in Doklady Earth Sci 438(2):887-892, 2011). We found that from the middle of 1970s to the end of 1990s the AUL heat content decreased in several oceanic regions, while the mean surface temperature increased on Northern Hemisphere continents according to IPCC (in: Stocker et al. Contribution of working group I to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2013). This means that the climate-forcing effect of the ocean-atmosphere interaction in certain energy-active areas determines not only local climatic processes, but also have an influence on global-scale climate phenomena. Here we show that specific regional features of the AUL thermal structure are in a good agreement with climatic conditions on the adjacent continents. Further, the ocean AUL in the five distinctive regions identified in our study have resumed warming in the first decade of this century. By analogy inference from previous climate scenarios, this may signal the onset of more continental climate over mainlands.

  9. Fabrication of Hybrid Polymer Solar Cells By Inverted Structure Based on P3HT:PCBM Active Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobih Shobih

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid polymer solar cell has privilege than its conventional structure, where it usually has structure of (ITO/PEDOT:PSS/Active Layer/Al. In humid environment the PEDOT:PSS will absorb water and hence can easily etch the ITO. Therefore it is necessary to use an alternative method to avoid this drawback and obtain more stable polymer solar cells, namely by using hybrid polymer solar cells structure with an inverted device architecture from the conventional, by reversing the nature of charge collection. In this paper we report the results of the fabrication of inverted bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells based on P3HT:PCBM as active layer, utilizing ZnO interlayer as buffer layer between the ITO and active layer with a stacked structure of ITO/ZnO/P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS/Ag. The ZnO interlayer is formed through short route, i.e. by dissolving ZnO nanoparticles powder in chloroform-methanol solvent blend rather than by sol-gel process. Based on the measurement results on electrical characteristics of inverted polymer solar cells under 500 W/m2 illumination and AM 1.5 direct filter at room temperature, cell with annealing process of active layer at 110 °C for 10 minutes results in higher cell performance than without annealing, with an open-circuit voltage of 0.21 volt, a short-circuit current density of 1.33 mA/cm2 , a fill factor of 43.1%, and a power conversion efficiency of 0.22%. The low cell’s performance is caused by very rough surface of ZnO interlayer.

  10. Constrained evolution in numerical relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew William

    The strongest potential source of gravitational radiation for current and future detectors is the merger of binary black holes. Full numerical simulation of such mergers can provide realistic signal predictions and enhance the probability of detection. Numerical simulation of the Einstein equations, however, is fraught with difficulty. Stability even in static test cases of single black holes has proven elusive. Common to unstable simulations is the growth of constraint violations. This work examines the effect of controlling the growth of constraint violations by solving the constraints periodically during a simulation, an approach called constrained evolution. The effects of constrained evolution are contrasted with the results of unconstrained evolution, evolution where the constraints are not solved during the course of a simulation. Two different formulations of the Einstein equations are examined: the standard ADM formulation and the generalized Frittelli-Reula formulation. In most cases constrained evolution vastly improves the stability of a simulation at minimal computational cost when compared with unconstrained evolution. However, in the more demanding test cases examined, constrained evolution fails to produce simulations with long-term stability in spite of producing improvements in simulation lifetime when compared with unconstrained evolution. Constrained evolution is also examined in conjunction with a wide variety of promising numerical techniques, including mesh refinement and overlapping Cartesian and spherical computational grids. Constrained evolution in boosted black hole spacetimes is investigated using overlapping grids. Constrained evolution proves to be central to the host of innovations required in carrying out such intensive simulations.

  11. Optimized circuit design for flexible 8-bit RFID transponders with active layer of ink-jet printed small molecule semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjellander, B.K.C.; Smaal, W.T.T.; Myny, K.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    We ink-jet print a blend of 6,13-bis(triisopropyl-silylethynyl)pentacene and polystyrene as the active layer for flexible circuits. The discrete ink-jet printed transistors exhibit a saturation mobility of 0.5 cm2 V -1 s-1. The relative spread in transistor characteristics can be very large. This

  12. Spectroelectrochemical evidence for the effect of phase structure and interface on charge behavior in poly(3-hexylthiophene): Fullerene active layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Rong; Ni, Haitao; Wang, Zhaodong; Liu, Yurong; Liu, Hongdong; Yang, Xin; Cheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The steady-state absorption spectra of P3HT"·"+, P3HT"·"−, PCBM"+ and PCBM"− were obtained. • The effect of morphology of active layer on charge generation was identified. • Non-equilibrium transport of electron and hole was confirmed in PSCs. - Abstract: To investigate the correlation between morphology of active layer and performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs). Poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C_6_1-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) were selected as research object and five PSCs based on active layers with varied morphology were fabricated. The results showed that P3HT crystalline phase and donor-acceptor (D-A) interface had an important influence on PSCs performance, which was revealed by structure characterization and J-V measurement. To further understanding the effect of phase structure and D-A interface on charge behavior. Spectroelectrochemistry measurement (SEC) was performed to characterize the steady-state optical absorption of P3HT, PCBM cation and anion in varied active layers, and the spectra difference of cations and anions was analyzed. The results were found that D-A interface could promote charge generation. P3HT crystalline phase and PCBM aggregation phase were beneficial for improving the charge transport ability. Meanwhile, the non-equilibrium transport of electron and hole in PSCs was corroborated by SEC.

  13. Hyperbolicity and constrained evolution in linearized gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzner, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Solving the 4-d Einstein equations as evolution in time requires solving equations of two types: the four elliptic initial data (constraint) equations, followed by the six second order evolution equations. Analytically the constraint equations remain solved under the action of the evolution, and one approach is to simply monitor them (unconstrained evolution). Since computational solution of differential equations introduces almost inevitable errors, it is clearly 'more correct' to introduce a scheme which actively maintains the constraints by solution (constrained evolution). This has shown promise in computational settings, but the analysis of the resulting mixed elliptic hyperbolic method has not been completely carried out. We present such an analysis for one method of constrained evolution, applied to a simple vacuum system, linearized gravitational waves. We begin with a study of the hyperbolicity of the unconstrained Einstein equations. (Because the study of hyperbolicity deals only with the highest derivative order in the equations, linearization loses no essential details.) We then give explicit analytical construction of the effect of initial data setting and constrained evolution for linearized gravitational waves. While this is clearly a toy model with regard to constrained evolution, certain interesting features are found which have relevance to the full nonlinear Einstein equations

  14. Characterization of light element impurities in ultrathin silicon-on-insulator layers by luminescence activation using electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa-Toyota, Satoko; Tajima, Michio; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed light element impurities in ultrathin top Si layers of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by luminescence activation using electron irradiation. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis under ultraviolet (UV) light excitation was performed on various commercial SOI wafers after the irradiation. We detected the C-line related to a complex of interstitial carbon and oxygen impurities and the G-line related to a complex of interstitial and substitutional carbon impurities in the top Si layer with a thickness down to 62 nm after electron irradiation. We showed that there were differences in the impurity concentration depending on the wafer fabrication methods and also that there were variations in these concentrations in the respective wafers. Xenon ion implantation was used to activate top Si layers selectively so that we could confirm that the PL signal under the UV light excitation comes not from substrates but from top Si layers. The present method is a very promising tool to evaluate the light element impurities in top Si layers. (author)

  15. Detection of Interfacial Debonding in a Rubber-Steel-Layered Structure Using Active Sensing Enabled by Embedded Piezoceramic Transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qian; Kong, Qingzhao; Jiang, Jian; Liang, Yabin; Song, Gangbing

    2017-09-01

    Rubber-steel-layered structures are used in many engineering applications. Laminated rubber-steel bearing, as a type of seismic isolation device, is one of the most important applications of the rubber-steel-layered structures. Interfacial debonding in rubber-steel-layered structures is a typical failure mode, which can severely reduce their load-bearing capacity. In this paper, the authors developed a simple but effective active sensing approach using embedded piezoceramic transducers to provide an in-situ detection of the interfacial debonding between the rubber layers and steel plates. A sandwiched rubber-steel-layered specimen, consisting of one rubber layer and two steel plates, was fabricated as the test specimen. A novel installation technique, which allows the piezoceramic transducers to be fully embedded into the steel plates without changing the geometry and the surface conditions of the plates, was also developed in this research. The active sensing approach, in which designed stress waves can propagate between a pair of the embedded piezoceramic transducers (one as an actuator and the other one as a sensor), was employed to detect the steel-rubber debonding. When the rubber-steel debonding occurs, the debonded interfaces will attenuate the propagating stress wave, so that the amplitude of the received signal will decrease. The rubber-steel debonding was generated by pulling the two steel plates in opposite directions in a material-testing machine. The changes of the received signal before and after the debonding were characterized in a time domain and further quantified by using a wavelet packet-based energy index. Experiments on the healthy rubber-steel-layered specimen reveal that the piezoceramic-induced stress wave can propagate through the rubber layer. The destructive test on the specimen demonstrates that the piezoceramic-based active sensing approach can effectively detect the rubber-steel debonding failure in real time. The active sensing

  16. Effect of enzyme location on activity and stability of trypsin and urease immobilized on porous membranes by using layer-by-layer self-assembly of polyelectrolyte

    OpenAIRE

    Guedidi, Sadika; Yürekli, Yılmaz; Deratani, André; Déjardin, Philippe; Innocent, Christophe; Altınkaya, Sacide; Roudesli, Sadok; Yemenicioğlu, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of polyelectrolyte is one of the simplest ways to immobilize enzyme on membrane. In this paper, the immobilization of trypsin (TRY) and urease (URE) on polyacrylonitrile based membranes using the LbL assembly technique was presented. The studied systems consisted in bilayered assemblies with the enzyme layer as the outer layer and trilayered assemblies with the enzyme layer as the inner sandwiched layer. The membrane pore size was chosen so that the smal...

  17. PARALLEL EVOLUTION OF QUASI-SEPARATRIX LAYERS AND ACTIVE REGION UPFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Cristiani, G. D.; Nuevo, F. A.; Vásquez, A. M. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), UBA-CONICET, CC. 67, Suc. 28 Buenos Aires, 1428 (Argentina); Baker, D.; Driel-Gesztelyi, L. van [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Démoulin, P.; Pick, M. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, UMR 8109 (CNRS), F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Vargas Domínguez, S. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2015-08-10

    Persistent plasma upflows were observed with Hinode’s EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) at the edges of active region (AR) 10978 as it crossed the solar disk. We analyze the evolution of the photospheric magnetic and velocity fields of the AR, model its coronal magnetic field, and compute the location of magnetic null-points and quasi-sepratrix layers (QSLs) searching for the origin of EIS upflows. Magnetic reconnection at the computed null points cannot explain all of the observed EIS upflow regions. However, EIS upflows and QSLs are found to evolve in parallel, both temporarily and spatially. Sections of two sets of QSLs, called outer and inner, are found associated to EIS upflow streams having different characteristics. The reconnection process in the outer QSLs is forced by a large-scale photospheric flow pattern, which is present in the AR for several days. We propose a scenario in which upflows are observed, provided that a large enough asymmetry in plasma pressure exists between the pre-reconnection loops and lasts as long as a photospheric forcing is at work. A similar mechanism operates in the inner QSLs; in this case, it is forced by the emergence and evolution of the bipoles between the two main AR polarities. Our findings provide strong support for the results from previous individual case studies investigating the role of magnetic reconnection at QSLs as the origin of the upflowing plasma. Furthermore, we propose that persistent reconnection along QSLs does not only drive the EIS upflows, but is also responsible for the continuous metric radio noise-storm observed in AR 10978 along its disk transit by the Nançay Radio Heliograph.

  18. Biological activity of soddy-calcareous soils and cultural layers in Alanian settlements of the Kislovodsk basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernysheva, E. V.; Kashirskaya, N. N.; Korobov, D. S.; Borisov, A. V.

    2014-09-01

    Microbiological investigations of cultural layers were performed in a settlement of the Alanian culture—Podkumskoe-2 (the 2nd-4th centuries AD). The present-day soddy-calcareous soils (rendzinas) used for different purposes were also studied near this settlement. The most significant changes in the initial characteristics of the soil microbial communities occurred under the residential influence more than 1500 years ago; these changes have been preserved until the present time. In the areas subjected to the anthropogenic impact, the total microbial biomass (the weighted average of 3720 μg C/g soil) was lower than that in the background soil. The minimal values of the microbial biomass were found in the soil of the pasture—2.5 times less than in the background soil. The urease activity of the cultural layer was higher than that of the soils nearby the settlement. Elevated values of the cellulose activity were also recorded only in the cultural layers. The current plowing has led to a significant decrease in the mycelium biomass of the microscopic fungi. In the soil of the fallow, the weighted average value of the fungal hyphae biomass along the profile was twice lower than that in the background soil and cultural layers of the settlement. The pasture first affected the active microbial biomass and, to a lesser extent, the amount of microscopic fungi.

  19. Conformational constraining of inactive and active States of a seven transmembrane receptor by metal ion site engineering in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; David, Ralf; Oerlecke, Ilka

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular part of transmembrane segment V (TM-V) is expected to be involved in the activation process of 7TM receptors, but its role is far from clear. Here, we study the highly constitutively active CXC-chemokine receptor encoded by human herpesvirus 8 (ORF74-HHV8), in which a metal ion ...

  20. Lightweight cryptography for constrained devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alippi, Cesare; Bogdanov, Andrey; Regazzoni, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Lightweight cryptography is a rapidly evolving research field that responds to the request for security in resource constrained devices. This need arises from crucial pervasive IT applications, such as those based on RFID tags where cost and energy constraints drastically limit the solution...... complexity, with the consequence that traditional cryptography solutions become too costly to be implemented. In this paper, we survey design strategies and techniques suitable for implementing security primitives in constrained devices....

  1. Daytime descending intermediate layers observed over a sub-tropical Indian station Waltair during low-solar activity period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Study on daytime descending intermediate layer over subtropical Indian station Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E geographic, 6.4° N, 10° E geomagnetic, 20° N dip located in the equatorial anomaly transition region, using an IPS 42 Digital Ionosonde during the low solar activity year 2004 showed that the layers occur in the altitude range of 140–160 km with maximum occurrence during winter solstice. The layers observed during daytime occur with a double peak variation throughout the year with less occurrence probability and shorter duration presence during forenoon hours. The morning layer descent was associated with a density increase where as during afternoon hours a decrease in density was observed. The downward drift velocity was about 8 km/h during morning hours and between 7–11 km/h during afternoon hours, with a low descent rate of around 4.5 km/h during summer morning hours. The results indicate the presence of a 6 h tide at this location as observed from the characteristics of the descending layers, unlike at majority of locations where a significant semi diurnal trend is observed. The study brings out the complex nature of the tidal interaction at different locations.

  2. Active control of flow noise sources in turbulent boundary layer on a flat-plate using piezoelectric bimorph film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Woo Seog; Lee, Seung Bae; Shin, Dong Shin; Na, Yang

    2006-01-01

    The piezoelectric bimorph film, which, as an actuator, can generate more effective displacement than the usual PVDF film, is used to control the turbulent boundary-layer flow. The change of wall pressures inside the turbulent boundary layer is observed by using the multi-channel microphone array flush-mounted on the surface when actuation at the non-dimensional frequency f b + =0.008 and 0.028 is applied to the turbulent boundary layer. The wall pressure characteristics by the actuation to produce local displacement are more dominantly influenced by the size of the actuator module than the actuation frequency. The movement of large-scale turbulent structures to the upper layer is found to be the main mechanism of the reduction in the wall-pressure energy spectrum when the 700ν/u τ -long bimorph film is periodically actuated at the non-dimensional frequency f b + =0.008 and 0.028. The bimorph actuator is triggered with the time delay for the active forcing at a single frequency when a 1/8' pressure-type, pin-holed microphone sensor detects the large-amplitude pressure event by the turbulent spot. The wall-pressure energy in the late-transitional boundary layer is partially reduced near the convection wavenumber by the open-loop control based on the large amplitude event

  3. In silico, in vitro and antifungal activity of the surface layers formed on zinc during this biomaterial degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marta M.; Marques, Luísa M.; Nogueira, Isabel; Santos, Catarina F.; Salazar, Sara B.; Eugénio, Sónia; Mira, Nuno P.; Montemor, M. F.

    2018-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) has been proposed as an alternative metallic biodegradable material to support transient wound-healing processes. Once a Zn piece is implanted inside the organism the degradation will depend upon the physiological surrounding environment. This, by modulating the composition of the surface layers formed on Zn devices, will govern the subsequent interactions with the surrounding living cells (e.g. biocompatibility and/or antifungal behaviour). In silico simulation of an implanted Zn piece at bone-muscle interface or inside the bone yielded the preferential precipitation of simonkolleite or zincite, respectively. To study the impact of these surface layers in the in vitro behaviour of Zn biomaterials, simonkolleite and zincite where synthesised. The successful production of simonkolleite or zincite was confirmed by an extensive physicochemical characterization. An in vitro layer formed on the top of these surface layers revealed that simonkolleite was rather inert, while zincite yielded a complex matrix containing hydroxyapatite, an important bone analogue. When analysing the "anti-biofilm" activity simonkolleite stood out for its activity against an important pathogenic fungi involved in implant-device infections, Candida albicans. The possible physiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. The C-terminal tail of CRTH2 is a key molecular determinant that constrains GalphaI- and downstream-signaling cascade activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Ralf; Merten, Nicole; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin D(2) activation of the seven transmembrane receptor CRTH2 regulates numerous cell functions that are important in inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Despite its disease implication, no studies to date aimed at identifying receptor domains governing signaling and surface expression......2 at the plasma membrane, presence of this domain confers a signaling-compromised conformation onto the receptor. Indeed, a mutant receptor lacking the major portion of its C-terminal tail displays paradoxically enhanced Galphai and ERK1/2 activation in spite of enhanced constitutive and agonist......-mediated internalization. Enhanced activation of Galphai proteins and downstream signaling cascades is likely due to the inability of the tail-truncated receptor to recruit beta-arrestin2 and undergo homologous desensitization. Unexpectedly, CRTH2 is not phosphorylated upon agonist-stimulation, a primary mechanism...

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Salicylate-zinc Layered Hydroxide Nano hybrid for Antiinflammatory Active Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zobir Hussein; Mohd Zobir Hussein; Munirah Ramli; Khatijah Yusoff

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of nano technology has prompted much advancement in various areas of research that includes cellular delivery systems, particularly those dealing with delivery of compounds with therapeutic effects. This study aimed at investigating the use of a layered nano material for formation of a new organic-inorganic nano hybrid material. In this work, a compound of zinc layered hydroxide (ZLH) used as a host for a guest, anti-inflammatory agent salicylate (SA) was synthesized. Through simple, direct reaction of SA solution at various concentrations with commercial zinc oxide, SA was found to be intercalated between the ZLH inorganic layers. Powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns revealed that the basal spacing of the nano hybrid is around 16.14 Angstrom. Further characterizations also confirmed that SA was successfully intercalated into the interlayers of the nano hybrid. Results generated from this work provide information beneficial for development of a new delivery system for therapeutic compounds consisting of antiinflammatory agents. (author)

  6. In situ nuclear magnetic resonance response of permafrost and active layer soil in boreal and tundra ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kass

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of permafrost, particularly warm and near-surface permafrost which can contain significant liquid water, is critical to understanding complex interrelationships with climate change, ecosystems, and disturbances such as wildfires. Understanding the vulnerability and resilience of permafrost requires an interdisciplinary approach, relying on (for example geophysical investigations, ecological characterization, direct observations, remote sensing, and more. As part of a multiyear investigation into the impacts of wildfires on permafrost, we have collected in situ measurements of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR response of the active layer and permafrost in a variety of soil conditions, types, and saturations. In this paper, we summarize the NMR data and present quantitative relationships between active layer and permafrost liquid water content and pore sizes and show the efficacy of borehole NMR (bNMR to permafrost studies. Through statistical analyses and synthetic freezing simulations, we also demonstrate that borehole NMR is sensitive to the nucleation of ice within soil pore spaces.

  7. Electrocatalytic activity of atomic layer deposited Pt-Ru catalysts onto N-doped carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, A.-C.; Larsen, J.V.; Verheijen, M.A.; Haugshøj, K.B.; Clausen, H.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Christensen, L.H.; Thomsen, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Pt-Ru catalysts of various compositions, between 0 and 100 at.% of Ru, were deposited onto N-doped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at 250 C. The Pt and Ru precursors were trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum (MeCpPtMe3) and

  8. Comparison of dust-layer heights from active and passive satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylling, Arve; Vandenbussche, Sophie; Capelle, Virginie; Cuesta, Juan; Klüser, Lars; Lelli, Luca; Popp, Thomas; Stebel, Kerstin; Veefkind, Pepijn

    2018-05-01

    Aerosol-layer height is essential for understanding the impact of aerosols on the climate system. As part of the European Space Agency Aerosol_cci project, aerosol-layer height as derived from passive thermal and solar satellite sensors measurements have been compared with aerosol-layer heights estimated from CALIOP measurements. The Aerosol_cci project targeted dust-type aerosol for this study. This ensures relatively unambiguous aerosol identification by the CALIOP processing chain. Dust-layer height was estimated from thermal IASI measurements using four different algorithms (from BIRA-IASB, DLR, LMD, LISA) and from solar GOME-2 (KNMI) and SCIAMACHY (IUP) measurements. Due to differences in overpass time of the various satellites, a trajectory model was used to move the CALIOP-derived dust heights in space and time to the IASI, GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY dust height pixels. It is not possible to construct a unique dust-layer height from the CALIOP data. Thus two CALIOP-derived layer heights were used: the cumulative extinction height defined as the height where the CALIOP extinction column is half of the total extinction column, and the geometric mean height, which is defined as the geometrical mean of the top and bottom heights of the dust layer. In statistical average over all IASI data there is a general tendency to a positive bias of 0.5-0.8 km against CALIOP extinction-weighted height for three of the four algorithms assessed, while the fourth algorithm has almost no bias. When comparing geometric mean height there is a shift of -0.5 km for all algorithms (getting close to zero for the three algorithms and turning negative for the fourth). The standard deviation of all algorithms is quite similar and ranges between 1.0 and 1.3 km. When looking at different conditions (day, night, land, ocean), there is more detail in variabilities (e.g. all algorithms overestimate more at night than during the day). For the solar sensors it is found that on average SCIAMACHY data

  9. Plastic-bonded electrodes for nickel-cadmium accumulators. IV - Some specific problems of the positive active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micka, K.; Mrha, J.; Klapste, B.

    1980-06-01

    The active layer of plastic-bonded nickel oxide electrodes undergoes expansion during discharging and contraction during charging; the latter however does not fully compensate for the expansion. These volume changes can be made reversible by the action of an external pressure. The electro-chemical behavior of the conductive components, carbon black and graphite, shows more or less severe corrosion during anodic current loading.

  10. Electrochemical activation, voltage decay and hysteresis of Li-rich layered cathode probed by various cobalt content

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Yingqiang; Xie, Leqiong; He, Xiangming; Zhuo, Linhai; Wang, Limin; Ming, Jun

    2018-01-01

    to improve their performances further. In this study, different amount of Co content is designed in Li-rich layered compounds (0.5Li2MnO3·0.5LiMn0.5-xNi0.5-xCo2xO2, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2), and the stepwise electrochemical activation process is applied to explore

  11. Influence of annealing conditions on anodic tungsten oxide layers and their photoelectrochemical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrek, Karolina; Zych, Marta; Zaraska, Leszek; Sulka, Grzegorz D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of annealing temperature on the morphology and crystalline structure of anodic WO 3 was investigated. • Photoelectrochemical properties of WO 3 layers annealed at different temperatures were studied. • Edges of conduction and valence bands were estimated for tungsten oxide layers annealed at different temperatures. • Influence of annealing time on crystalline structure, morphology and photoelectrochemical performance was studied. - Abstract: The nanoporous tungsten oxide films having an amorphous structure were prepared in an electrolyte containing fluoride ions via an anodization process. The as-synthesized anodic oxide layers can be easily converted to the monoclinic WO 3 phase upon annealing in air. The as-synthesized and annealed WO 3 layers were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and photocurrent spectroscopy. The effect of annealing temperature and annealing time on the oxide morphology, crystal structure and electrochemical properties were studied. The samples were annealed in air at the temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 °C, and it was found that the original porous morphology of oxide is completely lost after annealing at 600 °C. The changes in the average crystallite sizes upon annealing were confirmed by XRD measurements. The photoelectrochemical performance of the annealed WO 3 layers were studied under pulsed UV illumination, and the highest photocurrents were observed at the incident light wavelength of 350 nm for the sample annealed at 500 °C for 2 h. The band gap energy and the positions of conduction and valence band edges were determined for all studied samples.

  12. Effectiveness of various irrigation activation protocols and the self-adjusting file system on smear layer and debris removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çapar, İsmail Davut; Aydinbelge, Hale Ari

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate smear layer generation and residual debris after using self-adjusting file (SAF) or rotary instrumentation and to compare the debris and smear layer removal efficacy of the SAF cleaning/shaping irrigation system against final agitation techniques. One hundred and eight maxillary lateral incisor teeth were randomly divided into nine experimental groups (n = 12), and root canals were prepared using ProTaper Universal rotary files, with the exception of the SAF instrumentation group. During instrumentation, root canals were irrigated with a total of 16 mL of 5% NaOCl. For final irrigation, rotary-instrumented groups were irrigated with 10 mL of 17% EDTA and 10 mL of 5% NaOCl using different irrigation agitation regimens (syringe irrigation with needles, NaviTip FX, manual dynamic irrigation, CanalBrush, EndoActivator, EndoVac, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and SAF irrigation). In the SAF instrumentation group, root canals were instrumented for 4 min at a rate of 4 mL/min with 5% NaOCl and received a final flush with same as syringe irrigation with needles. The surface of the root dentin was observed using a scanning electron microscope. The SAF instrumentation group generated less smear layer and yielded cleaner canals compared to rotary instrumentation. The EndoActivator, EndoVac, PUI, and SAF irrigation groups increased the efficacy of irrigating solutions on the smear layer and debris removal. The SAF instrumentation yielded cleaner canal walls when compared to rotary instrumentation. None of the techniques completely removed the smear layer from the root canal walls. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Control of a White Organic Light Emitting Diode emission parameters using a single doped RGB active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, D. [Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus da Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pinto, A.; Califórnia, A.; Gomes, J. [CeNTI – Centro de Nanotecnologia, Materiais Técnicos, Funcionais e Inteligentes, Rua Fernando Mesquita 2785, 4760-034 Vila Nova de Famalicão (Portugal); Pereira, L., E-mail: luiz@ua.pt [Departmento de Física e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • A simple WOLED for Solid State Lighting is proposed with high color stability. • Energy transfer and electroluminescence dynamics of a single RGB layer for WOLEDs. • White shade modulation and stability over large emitting areas and applied voltages. - Abstract: Solid State Lighting technologies based on Organic Light Emitting Diodes, became an interesting focus due to their unique properties. The use of a unique RGB active layer for white emission, although simple in theory, shows difficulty to stabilize both CIE coordinates and color modulation. In this work, a WOLED using a simple RGB layer, was developed achieving a high color stability and shade modulation. The RGB matrix comprises a blue host material NPB, doped with two guests, a green (Coumarin 153) and a red (DCM1) in low concentrations. The RGB layer carrier dynamics allows for the white emission in low device complexity and high stability. This was also shown independent of the white shade, obtained through small changes in the red dopant resulting in devices ranging from warm to cool white i.e. an easy color tuning. A detailed analysis of the opto-electrical behavior is made.

  14. Complex Boron Redistribution in P+ Doped-polysilicon / Nitrogen Doped Silicon Bi-layers during Activation Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadli, S.; Mansour, F.; Perrera, E. Bedel

    We have investigated and modeled the complex phenomenon of boron (B) redistribution process in strongly doped silicon bilayers structure. A one-dimensional two stream transfer model well adapted to the particular structure of bi- layers and to the effects of strong-concentrations has been developed. This model takes into account the instantaneous kinetics of B transfer, trapping, clustering and segregation during the thermal B activation annealing. The used silicon bi-layers have been obtained by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) method, using in-situ nitrogen- doped-silicon (NiDoS) layer and strongly B doped polycrystalline-silicon (P+) layer. To avoid long redistributions, thermal annealing was carried out at relatively lowtemperatures (600 °C and 700 °C) for various times ranging between 30 minutes and 2 hours. The good adjustment of the simulated profiles with the experimental secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles allowed a fundamental understanding about the instantaneous physical phenomena giving and disturbing the complex B redistribution profiles-shoulders kinetics.

  15. Control of a White Organic Light Emitting Diode emission parameters using a single doped RGB active layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, D.; Pinto, A.; Califórnia, A.; Gomes, J.; Pereira, L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple WOLED for Solid State Lighting is proposed with high color stability. • Energy transfer and electroluminescence dynamics of a single RGB layer for WOLEDs. • White shade modulation and stability over large emitting areas and applied voltages. - Abstract: Solid State Lighting technologies based on Organic Light Emitting Diodes, became an interesting focus due to their unique properties. The use of a unique RGB active layer for white emission, although simple in theory, shows difficulty to stabilize both CIE coordinates and color modulation. In this work, a WOLED using a simple RGB layer, was developed achieving a high color stability and shade modulation. The RGB matrix comprises a blue host material NPB, doped with two guests, a green (Coumarin 153) and a red (DCM1) in low concentrations. The RGB layer carrier dynamics allows for the white emission in low device complexity and high stability. This was also shown independent of the white shade, obtained through small changes in the red dopant resulting in devices ranging from warm to cool white i.e. an easy color tuning. A detailed analysis of the opto-electrical behavior is made.

  16. The Photocatalytic Activity and Compact Layer Characteristics of TiO2 Films Prepared Using Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 compact layers are used in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs to prevent charge recombination between the electrolyte and the transparent conductive substrate (indium tin oxide, ITO; fluorine-doped tin oxide, FTO. Thin TiO2 compact layers are deposited onto ITO/glass by means of radio frequency (rf magnetron sputtering, using deposition parameters that ensure greater photocatalytic activity and increased DSSC conversion efficiency. The photoinduced decomposition of methylene blue (MB and the photoinduced hydrophilicity of the TiO2 thin films are also investigated. The photocatalytic performance characteristics for the deposition of TiO2 films are improved by using the Grey-Taguchi method. The average transmittance in the visible region exceeds 85% for all samples. The XRD patterns of the TiO2 films, for sol-gel with spin coating of porous TiO2/TiO2 compact/ITO/glass, show a good crystalline structure. In contrast, without the TiO2 compact layer (only porous TiO2, the peak intensity of the anatase (101 plane in the XRD patterns for the TiO2 film has a lower value, which demonstrates inferior crystalline quality. With a TiO2 compact layer to prevent charge recombination, a higher short-circuit current density is obtained. The DSSC with the FTO/glass and Pt counter electrode demonstrates the energy conversion efficiency increased.

  17. Dynamic behaviour of ball bearing applications with constrained damping layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillema, Hedzer G.; Wicks, Alfred L.

    2001-01-01

    Rolling bearing noise has become an aspect of increasing importance for the performance of rotating machinery, like electric motors and gearboxes. Generally, two aspects are important with regard to bearing noise, i.e. the transmission characteristics and the vibration generation characteristics. A

  18. P3HT:PCBM-based organic solar cells : Optimisation of active layer nanostructure and interface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadem, Burak Yahya

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) have attracted a significant attention during the last decade due to their simple processability on a flexible substrate as well as scope for large-scale production using role to role technique. Improving the performance of the organic solar cells and their lifetime stability are one of the main challenges faced by researchers in this field. In this thesis, work has been carried out using a blend of Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-Phenyl C[61] butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as an active layer in the ratio of (1:1) (P3HT:PCBM). The efficiency and stability of P3HT:PCBM-based solar cells have been examined using different methods and employing novel materials such as1-[N-(2-ethoxyethyl) pent-4-ynamide] -8 (11), 15 (18), 22 (25) -tris-{2-[2-(2-ethoxyethoxy) ethoxy]-1-[2-((2- ethoxyethoxy) - ethoxy) methyl] ethyloxy} phthalocyaninato zinc (II) (ZnPc) to construct a ternary hybrid as the active layer. Controlling the morphology and crystallinity of P3HT:PCBM active layer was carried out using different solvents including chloroform (CF), chlorobenzene (CB) and dichlorobenzene (DCB) and their co-solvents in the ratio of (1:1) to dissolve the P3HT:PCBM blend. Optimum morphology and crystallinity were achieved using a co-solvent made of CB:CF with the obtained solar cell exhibiting the highest performance with PCE reaching 2.73% among other devices prepared using different solvents. Further device performance improvement was observed through optimization of active layer thickness with studied thickness falling in range 65-266 nm. Measurements of the PV characteristics of the investigated OSC devices have revealed optimum performance when active layer thickness was 95 nm with PCE=3.846%. The stability of the P3HT:PCBM-based devices on optimisation of the active layer thickness has shown a decrease in PCE of about 71% over a period of 41 days. Furthermore, P3HT has been blended with different fullerene derivatives (PC[60]BM, PC

  19. Cement-free Binders for Radioactive Waste Produced from Blast-furnace Slag using Vortex Layer Activation Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazov Ilya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the issue of recycling granulated blast-furnace slag (gBFS as a source for production of cement-free binder materials for further usage in rare-earth metals production for radioactive waste disposal. The use of the vortex layer activator was provided as main technique allowing to produce high-dispersed chemically activated binders. The paper examines the effect of processing conditions on the physical-chemical and mechanical properties of the resulting BFS-based cement-free materials and gBFS-based concretes.

  20. Recent developments in wear measurements with the thin layer activation technique. Neuere Entwicklungen der Verschleissmesstechnik mit dem Verfahren der Duennschichtaktivierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinrahm, A.; Fehsenfeld, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Kernphysik 3)

    1989-01-01

    At the KfK's compact cyclotron an efficient serial radiation plant for the thin-layer activation of machine and plant components for industry and research was provided. By means of this fully automatic plant it is possible to carry out wear measurements on ceramic compositions, cermets and related hard materials. The further developed RTM activation and measuring technique was used for the investigation of the erosive and corrosive wear behaviour of pipelines and pump parts in liquid mediums with solid matter proportions, in the field of textile technology (knitting machines) and for the detection of material dislocations in the bearing surface of wheel-rail-tribo-systems. (DG).

  1. Low-Cost and Green Fabrication of Polymer Electronic Devices by Push-Coating of the Polymer Active Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Varun; Mróz, Wojciech; Inaba, Shusei; Porzio, William; Giovanella, Umberto; Galeotti, Francesco

    2017-08-02

    Because of both its easy processability and compatibility with roll-to-roll processes, polymer electronics is considered to be the most promising technology for the future generation of low-cost electronic devices such as light-emitting diodes and solar cells. However, the state-of-the-art deposition technique for polymer electronics (spin-coating) generates a high volume of chlorinated solution wastes during the active layer fabrication. Here, we demonstrate that devices with similar or higher performances can be manufactured using the push-coating technique in which a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) layer is simply laid over a very small amount of solution (less than 1μL/covered cm 2 ), which is then left for drying. Using mm thick PDMS provides a means to control the solvent diffusion kinetics (sorption/retention) and removes the necessity for additional applied pressure to generate the desired active layer thickness. Unlike spin-coating, push-coating is a slow drying process that induces a higher degree of crystallinity in the polymer thin film without the necessity for a post-annealing step. The polymer light-emitting diodes and solar cells prepared by push-coating exhibit slightly higher performances with respect to the reference spin-coated devices, whereas at the same time reduce the amounts of active layer materials and chlorinated solvents by 50 and 20 times, respectively. These increased performances can be correlated to the higher polymer crystallinities obtained without applying a post-annealing treatment. As push-coating is a roll-to-roll compatible method, the results presented here open the path to low-cost and eco-friendly fabrication of a wide range of emerging devices based on conjugated polymer materials.

  2. Differential proliferation and metabolic activity of Sertoli cells in the testes of broiler and layer breeder chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Mélanie; Guibert, Edith; Crochet, Sabine; Chartrin, Pascal; Brillard, Jean-Pierre; Collin, Anne; Froment, Pascal

    2017-07-01

    Decades of genetic selection have generated 2 different, highly specialized types of chickens in which 1 type, known as the layer-type chicken, expresses high laying performance while the other type, known as the broiler-type chicken, is dedicated to the production of fast-growing birds. Selected lines for the latter type often express disorders in their reproductive performance including early sexual maturation and accelerated, non-reversible seasonal decline of their semen production and mating behavior. The aim of the present study was to characterize some metabolic markers of the Sertoli cell populations. Sertoli cells are somatic cells known to support, coordinate, nourish, and protect the germ cell populations from onset to the end of their meiotic process. Comparisons of gonadal development between males of the 2 genetic types taken at their pre-pubertal period indicated that the testes of layer-type chickens are significantly less developed than in broiler-type males taken at the same age. In addition, cultures of purified Sertoli cells from the 2 types revealed in vitro a higher proliferative capacity when issued from layer compared to broiler-type chickens. This was associated with a higher expression of the genes involved in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids (CPT1; PPARβ) as well as a 4-fold increase in the Lactate Dehydrogenase-A expression and activity. In contrast, Sertoli cells from broiler-type chickens presented an elevated activity of citrate synthase and mitochondria, suggesting a better efficacy of aerobic metabolism in Sertoli cells from broiler compared to layer-type chickens. Moreover, the testis from broiler-type chickens seems to be more sensitive to oxidative stress due to the lower global antioxidant capacity compared to layer-type chickens.In conclusion, these results suggest that the metabolic activity of testicular tissues is different in the layer and broiler breeder chickens. The aerobic metabolism more prevalent in broiler

  3. Composition-dependent phase separation effects of organic solar cells using P3HT:PCBM as active layer and chromium oxide as hole transporting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Pingli; Fang Guojia; Sun Nanhai; Fan Xi; Zheng Qiao; Chen Fei; Wan Jiawei; Zhao Xingzhong

    2011-01-01

    Phase separation of the poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) active layer (ATL) was investigated by varying their relative ratio in the organic solar cells (OSCs). With the help of the UV/visible spectrophotometer, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope, we found that the cluster of PCBM at the interface or surface was affected by Al cathode, the composition of the blends and thermal annealing. The disc-like shape crystals of PCBM substituted for the needle-like ones at higher PCBM compositions at the ATL/Al interface, which led to stronger contacts and bigger contact area. It could make short circuit current density increase, but may affect the blend morphology and result in parallel resistance and open circuit voltage decreased with the PCBM ratio increasing from 40 to 60%. The microstructure of the P3HT:PCBM ATL, determined by the composition dependent phase separation, supported the optimized performance of the OSCs with the composition of 40-50% PCBM.

  4. Nickel hydroxide ultrathin nanosheets as building blocks for electrochemically active layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneiderová, Barbora; Demel, Jan; Pleštil, Josef; Janda, Pavel; Bohuslav, Jan; Ihiawakrim, D.; Ersen, O.; Rogez, G.; Lang, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 37 (2013), s. 11429-11437 ISSN 2050-7488 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/10/1447; GA ČR GP13-09462P Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : layered hydroxide * delamination * nanosheet * batteries Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V); CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W)

  5. Synthesis of active absorber layer by dip-coating method for perovskite solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Noor, I. M.; Singh, Pramod K.; Bhattacharya, B.; Arof, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we develop the hybrid perovskite-based n-i-p solar cell using a simple, fast and low-cost dip-coating method. Hot solution and the pre-annealed substrate are used for coating the perovskite thin film by this method this is further used for studying its structural and electrical properties. UV-vis spectroscopy is carried out for calculating the band gap of the hybrid perovskite layer which is ∼1.6 eV. X-ray spectroscopy confirms that the formation of hybrid perovskite layer. The profilometer is used to study the surface roughness and also for measuring the thickness of the perovskite layer with varying substrate temperature. The optimized sample was further used for cross-sectional SEM image to verify the thickness measured from the profiler. The electrical parameter of JV characteristic with varying temperature is tabulated in the table. Whereas, the perovskite sensitized solar cell exhibits highest short circuit current density, Jsc of 11 mA cm-2, open circuit voltage, Voc of 0.87 V, fill factor of 0.55 and efficiency, η of >5%.

  6. Impacts of the active layer on runoff in an upland permafrost basin, northern Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tanguang; Zhang, Tingjun; Guo, Hong; Hu, Yuantao; Shang, Jianguo; Zhang, Yulan

    2018-01-01

    The paucity of studies on permafrost runoff generation processes, especially in mountain permafrost, constrains the understanding of permafrost hydrology and prediction of hydrological responses to permafrost degradation. This study investigated runoff generation processes, in addition to the contribution of summer thaw depth, soil temperature, soil moisture, and precipitation to streamflow in a small upland permafrost basin in the northern Tibetan Plateau. Results indicated that the thawing period and the duration of the zero-curtain were longer in permafrost of the northern Tibetan Plateau than in the Arctic. Limited snowmelt delayed the initiation of surface runoff in the peat permafrost in the study area. The runoff displayed intermittent generation, with the duration of most runoff events lasting less than 24 h. Precipitation without runoff generation was generally correlated with lower soil moisture conditions. Combined analysis suggested runoff generation in this region was controlled by soil temperature, thaw depth, precipitation frequency and amount, and antecedent soil moisture. This study serves as an important baseline to evaluate future environmental changes on the Tibetan Plateau.

  7. Effect of active layer deposition temperature on the performance of sputtered amorphous In—Ga—Zn—O thin film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jie; Shi Junfei; Dong Chengyuan; Chen Yuting; Zhou Daxiang; Hu Zhe; Zhan Runze; Zou Zhongfei

    2014-01-01

    The effect of active layer deposition temperature on the electrical performance of amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) is investigated. With increasing annealing temperature, TFT performance is firstly improved and then degraded generally. Here TFTs with best performance defined as ''optimized-annealed'' are selected to study the effect of active layer deposition temperature. The field effect mobility reaches maximum at deposition temperature of 150 °C while the room-temperature fabricated device shows the best subthreshold swing and off-current. From Hall measurement results, the carrier concentration is much higher for intentional heated a-IGZO films, which may account for the high off-current in the corresponding TFT devices. XPS characterization results also reveal that deposition temperature affects the atomic ratio and O1s spectra apparently. Importantly, the variation of field effect mobility of a-IGZO TFTs with deposition temperature does not coincide with the tendencies in Hall mobility of a-IGZO thin films. Based on the further analysis of the experimental results on a-IGZO thin films and the corresponding TFT devices, the trap states at front channel interface rather than IGZO bulk layer properties may be mainly responsible for the variations of field effect mobility and subthreshold swing with IGZO deposition temperature. (semiconductor devices)

  8. Constraining walking and custodial technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Sannino, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    We show how to constrain the physical spectrum of walking technicolor models via precision measurements and modified Weinberg sum rules. We also study models possessing a custodial symmetry for the S parameter at the effective Lagrangian level-custodial technicolor-and argue that these models...

  9. Improved performance of polymer solar cells using PBDTT-F-TT:PC{sub 71}BM blend film as active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Yue; Gao, Xiumin, E-mail: oemt@hdu.edu.cn; Lu, Xinmiao; Xin, Qing; Lin, Jun; Zhao, Jufeng

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • The PCE of PBDTT-F-TT-based PSCs was improved to 9.34% by morphology control and device engineering. • Effect of DIO additive on the BHJ morphology and charge transport was investigated. • Effect of device architecture on the performance was studied in depth by optical modeling. • A low-temperature processed interfacial layer was introduced for plastic substrates. - Abstract: A detailed study of high-efficiency polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on a low bandgap polymer PBDTT-F-TT and PC{sub 71}BM as the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is carried out. By using 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) as solvent additive to control the morphology of active layer and comparing different device architecture to optimize the optical field distribution, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the resulted devices can be reached as high as 9.34%. Comprehensive characterization and optical modeling of the resulting devices is performed to understand the effect of DIO and device geometry on photovoltaic performance. It was found that the addition of DIO can significantly improve the nanoscale morphology and increased electron mobility in the BHJ layer. The inverted device architecture was chosen because the results from optical modeling shows that it offers better optical field distribution and exciton generation profile. Based on these results, a low-temperature processed ZnO was finally introduced as an electron transport layer to facility the fabrication on flexible substrates and showed comparable performance with the device based on conventional ZnO interlayer prepared by sol-gel process.

  10. ESR analyses for herbivore teeth and molluscs from Kharga, Dakhleh, and Bir Tarfawi Oases: Constraining water availability and hominin paleolithic activity in the Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, B. A. B.; Skinner, A. R.; Smith, J. R.; Hill, C. L.; Churcher, C. S.; Kieniewicz, J. M.; Adelsberger, K. A.; Blickstein, J. I. B.; Florentin, J. A.; Deely, A. E.; Spillar, K. V.

    2017-12-01

    Today, Bir Tarfawi, Kharga and Dakhleh Oases all sit in Egypt's hyperarid Western Desert. A dearth of naturally occurring surface water coupled with ≤ 0.1 mm/y of precipitation, and evaporation rates > 2 m/y make Bir Tarfawi uninhabitable today, while Dakhleh and Kharga depend on borehole water to support human inhabitation. Yet in scattered locations dotting the Quaternary surfaces and deposits near each oasis, Paleolithic artefacts, fossil ungulate teeth, and snails record times when surface water did exist in wetlands, small ponds, and even large lakes. At Bir Tarfawi in Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5, 7, and 13, wetlands or small lakes supported freshwater snails, large herbivores, and hominins. Dakhleh Oasis hosted a large lake in MIS 6 that provided a deep reliable water supply for many millennia subsequently. ESR dates on fossils and tufa dates show thriving lacustrine and terrestrial ecosystems at Dakhleh during MIS 5, 7, 9, 11, and 17, and in shorter episodes in MIS 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12. At Kharga Oasis, springs discharged along the Libyan Escarpment edge, but the water was ponded in small basins dammed within tufa deposits. These dated deposits and fossils attest that water existed there in MIS 2-11, and one spot dating to ∼ 2.3 Ma. This proxy evidence suggest that, thanks to higher rainfall and/or groundwater tables, sufficient water persisted for much of the Pleistocene, supporting food resources, like large herbivores and molluscs, to thrive and enabling hominin habitation. and activity in the Western Desert.

  11. High gamma power in ECoG reflects cortical electrical stimulation effects on unit activity in layers V/VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdan-Shahmorad, Azadeh; Kipke, Daryl R.; Lehmkuhle, Mark J.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Cortical electrical stimulation (CES) has been used extensively in experimental neuroscience to modulate neuronal or behavioral activity, which has led this technique to be considered in neurorehabilitation. Because the cortex and the surrounding anatomy have irregular geometries as well as inhomogeneous and anisotropic electrical properties, the mechanism by which CES has therapeutic effects is poorly understood. Therapeutic effects of CES can be improved by optimizing the stimulation parameters based on the effects of various stimulation parameters on target brain regions. Approach. In this study we have compared the effects of CES pulse polarity, frequency, and amplitude on unit activity recorded from rat primary motor cortex with the effects on the corresponding local field potentials (LFP), and electrocorticograms (ECoG). CES was applied at the surface of the cortex and the unit activity and LFPs were recorded using a penetrating electrode array, which was implanted below the stimulation site. ECoGs were recorded from the vicinity of the stimulation site. Main results. Time-frequency analysis of LFPs following CES showed correlation of gamma frequencies with unit activity response in all layers. More importantly, high gamma power of ECoG signals only correlated with the unit activity in lower layers (V-VI) following CES. Time-frequency correlations, which were found between LFPs, ECoGs and unit activity, were frequency- and amplitude-dependent. Significance. The signature of the neural activity observed in LFP and ECoG signals provides a better understanding of the effects of stimulation on network activity, representative of large numbers of neurons responding to stimulation. These results demonstrate that the neurorehabilitation and neuroprosthetic applications of CES targeting layered cortex can be further improved by using field potential recordings as surrogates to unit activity aimed at optimizing stimulation efficacy. Likewise, the signatures

  12. Recent Progress in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells for Improving Efficiency: TiO2 Nanotube Arrays in Active Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Yeop Rho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs have been widely studied due to several advantages, such as low cost-to-performance ratio, low cost of fabrication, functionality at wide angles and low intensities of incident light, mechanical robustness, and low weight. This paper summarizes the recent progress in DSSC technology for improving efficiency, focusing on the active layer in the photoanode, with a part of the DSSC consisting of dyes and a TiO2 film layer. In particular, this review highlights a huge pool of studies that report improvements in the efficiency of DSSCs using TiO2 nanotubes, which exhibit better electron transport. Finally, this paper suggests opportunities for future research.

  13. Impact of CH3NH3PbI3-PCBM bulk heterojunction active layer on the photovoltaic performance of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Dhirendra K.; Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Lokendra

    2017-10-01

    We report here the impact of CH3NH3PbI3-PCBM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) active layer on the photovoltaic performance of perovskite solar cells. The solar cells were prepared in normal architecture on FTO coated glass substrates with compact TiO2 (c-TiO2) layer on FTO as electron transport layer (ETL) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as hole transport layer (HTL). For comparison, a few solar cells were also prepared in planar heterojunction structure using CH3NH3PbI3 only as the active layer. The bulk heterojunction CH3NH3PbI3-PCBM active layer exhibited very large crystalline grains of 2-3 μm compared to ∼150 nm only in CH3NH3PbI3 active layer. Larger grains in bulk-heterojunction solar cells resulted in enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) through enhancement in all the photovoltaic parameters compared to planar heterojunction solar cells. The bulk-heterojunction solar cells exhibited ∼9.25% PCE with short circuit current density (Jsc) of ∼18.649 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.894 V and Fill Factor (FF) of 0.554. There was ∼36.9% enhancement in the PCE of bulk-heterojunction solar cells compared to that of planar heterojunction solar cells. The larger grains are formed as a result of incorporation on PCBM in the active layer.

  14. Active but inoperable thrombin is accumulated in a plasma protein layer surrounding Streptococcus pyogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naudin, Clément; Hurley, Sinead M.; Malmström, Erik; Plug, Tom; Shannon, Oonagh; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Activation of thrombin is a critical determinant in many physiological and pathological processes including haemostasis and inflammation. Under physiological conditions many of these functions are involved in wound healing or eradication of an invading pathogen. However, when activated systemically,

  15. Subsurface flow pathway dynamics in the active layer of coupled permafrost-hydrogeological systems under seasonal and annual temperature variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    There is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the active layer in order to better understand permafrost-hydrological-carbon feedbacks, in particular with regards to how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface terrestrial arctic water systems under climate change. Studying solute transport in arctic systems is also relevant in the context of anthropogenic pollution which may increase due to increased activity in cold region environments. In this contribution subsurface solute transport subject to ground surface warming causing permafrost thaw and active layer change is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The timing of the start of increase in travel time depends on heterogeneity structure, combined with the rate of permafrost degradation that also depends on material thermal and hydrogeological properties. These travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport velocities due to a shift from horizontal saturated groundwater flow near the surface to vertical water percolation deeper into the subsurface, and pathway length increase and temporary immobilization caused by cryosuction-induced seasonal freeze cycles. The impact these change mechanisms have on solute and dissolved substance transport is further analysed by integrating pathway analysis with a Lagrangian approach, incorporating considerations for both dissolved organic and inorganic

  16. Preparation of Layered Double Hydroxide-Immobilized Lipase for High Yield and Optically Active (-)-Menthyl butyrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siti; Salhah; Othman; Mahiran; Basri; Mohd.Zobir; Hussein; Mohd; Basyaruddin; Abdul; Rahman; Raja; Noor; Zaliha; Raja; Abdul; Rahman; Abu; Bakar; Salleh; Salina; Mat; Radzi; Azwani; Sofia; Ahmad; Khiar

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) finds extensive usage in the areas of pharmaceutical sciences and catalysis. In this study, a member of the LDH family, Mg/Al-hydrotalcite (HT), or the so-called anionic clay, was prepared at ratio 4 (HT) by co-precipitating through continuous agitation. X-ray diffraction pattern and thermogravimetric analysis of the material indicated that a pure HT had been successfully synthesized. This matrix was then used as support in the immobilization of lipase from Cand...

  17. Measuring the Impact of Wildfire on Active Layer Thickness in a Discontinuous Permafrost region using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, R. J.; Schaefer, K. M.; Zebker, H. A.; Liu, L.; Chen, J.; Parsekian, A.

    2017-12-01

    In permafrost regions, the active layer is defined as the uppermost portion of the permafrost table that is subject to annual freeze/thaw cycles. The active layer plays a crucial role in surface processes, surface hydrology, and vegetation succession; furthermore, trapped methane, carbon dioxide, and other greenhouse gases in permafrost are released into the atmosphere as permafrost thaws. A detailed understanding of active layer dynamics is therefore critical towards understanding the interactions between permafrost surface processes, freeze/thaw cycles, and climate-especially in regions across the Arctic subject to long-term permafrost degradation. The Yukon-Kuskokwim (YK) delta in southwestern Alaska is a region of discontinuous permafrost characterized by surface lakes, wetlands, and thermokarst depressions. Furthermore, extensive wildfires have burned across the YK delta in 2006, 2007, and 2015, impacting vegetation cover, surface soil moisture, and the active layer. Using data from the ALOS PALSAR, ALOS-2 PALSAR-2, and Sentinel-1A/B space borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, we generate a series of interferograms over a study site in the YK delta spanning 2007-2011, and 2014-present. Using the ReSALT (Remotely-Sensed Active Layer Thickness) technique, we demonstrate that active layer can be characterized over most of the site from the relative interferometric phase difference due to ground subsidence and rebound associated with the seasonal active layer freeze/thaw cycle. Additionally, we show that this technique successfully discriminates between burned and unburned regions, and can resolve increases in active layer thickness in burned regions on the order of 10's of cms. We use the time series of interferograms to discuss permafrost recovery following wildfire burn, and compare our InSAR observations with GPR and active layer probing data from a 2016 summer field campaign to the study site. Finally, we compare the advantages and disadvantages of

  18. Seabed gallery intakes: Investigation of the water pretreatment effectiveness of the active layer using a long-term column experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Dehwah, Abdullah

    2017-05-11

    Seabed gallery intake systems used for seawater reverse osmosis facilities employ the same principle of water treatment as slow sand filtration in freshwater systems. An investigation concerning the effectiveness of the active layer (top layer) in improving raw water quality was conducted by using a long-term bench-scale columns experiment. Two different media types, silica and carbonate sand, were tested in 1 m columns to evaluate the effectiveness of media type in terms of algae, bacteria, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) and Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) removal over a period of 620 days. Nearly all algae in the silica sand column, 87% (σ = 0.04) of the bacteria, 59% (σ = 0.11) of the biopolymer fraction of NOM, 59% (σ = 0.16) of particulate and 32% (σ = 0.25) of colloidal TEP were removed during the last 330 days of the experiment. Total removal was observed in the carbonate sand column for algal concentration, while the bacterial removal was lower at 74% (σ = 0.08). Removal of biopolymers, particulate and colloidal TEP were higher in the carbonate column during the last 330 days with 72% (σ = 0.15), 66% (σ = 0.08) and 36% (σ = 0.12) removed for these organics respectively. Removal of these key organics through the 1 m thick column, representing the active layer, will likely reduce the rate of biofouling, reduce chemical usage and minimize operating cost in SWRO systems. The data show that the media will require several months at the beginning of operation to reach equilibrium so that high organic removal rates can be achieved. No development of a “schmutzdecke” layer occurred. The experimental results suggest that unlike freshwater slow sand filtration wherein most water treatment occurs in the upper 10 cm, in seawater systems treatment occurs throughout the full active layer depth of 1 m. The results of this study will help in designing and operating seabed gallery intake systems in varied geological conditions.

  19. Knowledge about Sounds – Context-Specific Meaning Differently Activates Cortical Hemispheres, Auditory Cortical Fields and Layers in House Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana B. Geissler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the auditory cortex (AC by a given sound pattern is plastic, depending, in largely unknown ways, on the physiological state and the behavioral context of the receiving animal and on the receiver's experience with the sounds. Such plasticity can be inferred when house mouse mothers respond maternally to pup ultrasounds right after parturition and naïve females have to learn to respond. Here we use c-FOS immunocytochemistry to quantify highly activated neurons in the AC fields and layers of seven groups of mothers and naïve females who have different knowledge about and are differently motivated to respond to acoustic models of pup ultrasounds of different behavioral significance. Profiles of FOS-positive cells in the AC primary fields (AI, AAF, the ultrasonic field (UF, the secondary field (AII, and the dorsoposterior field (DP suggest that activation reflects in AI, AAF, and UF the integration of sound properties with animal state-dependent factors, in the higher-order field AII the news value of a given sound in the behavioral context, and in the higher-order field DP the level of maternal motivation and, by left-hemisphere activation advantage, the recognition of the meaning of sounds in the given context. Anesthesia reduced activation in all fields, especially in cortical layers 2/3. Thus, plasticity in the AC is field-specific preparing different output of AC fields in the process of perception, recognition and responding to communication sounds. Further, the activation profiles of the auditory cortical fields suggest the differentiation between brains hormonally primed to know (mothers and brains which acquired knowledge via implicit learning (naïve females. In this way, auditory cortical activation discriminates between instinctive (mothers and learned (naïve females cognition.

  20. On the influence of solar activity on the mid-latitude sporadic E layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzopane, Michael; Pignalberi, Alessio; Pietrella, Marco

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the influence of solar cycle variability on the sporadic E layer (Es), hourly measurements of the critical frequency of the Es ordinary mode of propagation, foEs, and of the blanketing frequency of the Es layer, fbEs, recorded from January 1976 to December 2009 at the Rome (Italy) ionospheric station (41.8° N, 12.5° E), were examined. The results are: (1) a high positive correlation between the F10.7 solar index and foEs as well as between F10.7 and fbEs, both for the whole data set and for each solar cycle separately, the correlation between F10.7 and fbEs being much higher than the one between F10.7 and foEs; (2) a decreasing long-term trend of the F10.7, foEs and fbEs time series, with foEs decreasing more rapidly than F10.7 and fbEs; (3) clear and statistically significant peaks at 11 years in the foEs and fbEs time series, inferred from Lomb-Scargle periodograms.

  1. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by thermal atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide after industrial firing activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, B; Stangl, R; Ma, F; Mueller, T; Lin, F; Aberle, A G; Bhatia, C S; Hoex, B

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that by using a water (H 2 O)-based thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) film, excellent surface passivation can be attained on planar low-resistivity silicon wafers. Effective carrier lifetime values of up to 12 ms and surface recombination velocities as low as 0.33 cm s −1 are achieved on float-zone wafers after a post-deposition thermal activation of the Al 2 O 3 passivation layer. This post-deposition activation is achieved using an industrial high-temperature firing process which is commonly used for contact formation of standard screen-printed silicon solar cells. Neither a low-temperature post-deposition anneal nor a silicon nitride capping layer is required in this case. Deposition temperatures in the 100–400 °C range and peak firing temperatures of about 800 °C (set temperature) are investigated. Photoluminescence imaging shows that the surface passivation is laterally uniform. Corona charging and capacitance–voltage measurements reveal that the negative fixed charge density near the AlO x /c-Si interface increases from 1.4 × 10 12 to 3.3 × 10 12 cm −2 due to firing, while the midgap interface defect density reduces from 3.3 × 10 11 to 0.8 × 10 11 cm −2 eV −1 . This work demonstrates that direct firing activation of thermal ALD Al 2 O 3 is feasible, which could be beneficial for solar cell manufacturing. (paper)

  2. Comparison of properties of medial entorhinal cortex layer II neurons in two anatomical dimensions with and without cholinergic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Motoharu; Jochems, Arthur; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying grid cell firing in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) still remain unknown. Computational modeling studies have suggested that cellular properties such as spike frequency adaptation and persistent firing might underlie the grid cell firing. Recent in vivo studies also suggest that cholinergic activation influences grid cell firing. Here we investigated the anatomical distribution of firing frequency adaptation, the medium spike after hyperpolarization potential (mAHP), subthreshold membrane potential oscillations, sag potential, input resistance and persistent firing, in MEC layer II principal cells using in vitro whole-cell patch clamp recordings in rats. Anatomical distributions of these properties were compared along both the dorso-ventral and medio-lateral axes, both with and without the cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol. We found that spike frequency adaptation is significantly stronger in ventral than in dorsal neurons both with and without carbachol. Spike frequency adaptation was significantly correlated with the duration of the mAHP, which also showed a gradient along the dorso-ventral axis. In carbachol, we found that about 50% of MEC layer II neurons show persistent firing which lasted more than 30 seconds. Persistent firing of MEC layer II neurons might contribute to grid cell firing by providing the excitatory drive. Dorso-ventral differences in spike frequency adaptation we report here are opposite from previous predictions by a computational model. We discuss an alternative mechanism as to how dorso-ventral differences in spike frequency adaptation could contribute to different scales of grid spacing.

  3. Mechanical properties and osteogenic activity of poly(l-lactide) fibrous membrane synergistically enhanced by chitosan nanofibers and polydopamine layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Li, Wenling; Wen, Wei; Luo, Binghong; Liu, Mingxian; Ding, Shan; Zhou, Changren

    2017-12-01

    To synergistically improve the mechanical properties and osteogenic activity of electrospinning poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) membrane, chitosan (CS) nanofibers were firstly introduced to prepare sub-micro and nanofibers interpenetrated PLLA/CS membrane, which was further surface modified with a polydopamine (PDA) layer to obtain PLLA/CS-PDA. Surface morphology, porosity, surface area and hydrophilicity of the obtained fibrous membranes were studied in detail. As compared to pure PLLA, the significant increase in the mechanical properties of the PLLA/CS, and especially of the PLLA/CS-PDA, was confirmed by tensile testing both in dry and wet states. Cells culture results indicated that both the PLLA/CS and PLLA/CS-PDA membranes, especially the latter, were more beneficial to adhesion, spreading and proliferation, as well as up-regulating alkaline phosphate activity and calcium deposition of MC3T3-E1 cells than PLLA membrane. Results suggested there was a synergistic effect of the CS nanofibers and PDA layer on the mechanical properties and osteogenic activity of PLLA membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of supported heteropolymolybdate nanoparticles between silicate layers of Bentonite with enhanced catalytic activity for epoxidation of alkenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salavati, Hossein; Rasouli, Nahid

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The PVMo and nanocomposite catalyst (PVMo/Bentonite) as catalyst for epoxidation of alkenes. → The composite catalyst showed higher catalytic activity than parent heteropolymolybdate (PVMo). →The use of ultrasonic irradiation increased the conversions and reduced the reaction times. → The H 2 O 2 is a green and eco-friendly oxidant in this catalytic system. -- Abstract: A new heterogeneous catalyst (PVMo/Bentonite) consisting of vanadium substituted heteropolymolybdate with Keggin-type structure Na 5 [PV 2 Mo 10 O 40 ].14H 2 O (PVMo) supported between silicate layers of bentonite has been synthesized by impregnation method and characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated that PVMo was finely dispersed into layers of bentonite as support. The PVMo/Bentonite used as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for epoxidation of alkenes. Various cyclic and linear alkenes were oxidized into the corresponding epoxides in high yields and selectivity with 30% aqueous H 2 O 2 . The catalyst was reused several times, without observable loss of activity and selectivity. The obtained results showed that the catalytic activity of the PVMo/Bentonite was higher than that of pure heteropolyanion (PVMo).

  5. Low-temperature SiON films deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition method using activated silicon precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Sungin; Kim, Jun-Rae; Kim, Seongkyung; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Kim, Hyeong Joon, E-mail: thinfilm@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering with Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center (ISRC), Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Seung Wook, E-mail: tazryu78@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-2311 (United States); Cho, Seongjae [Department of Electronic Engineering and New Technology Component & Material Research Center (NCMRC), Gachon University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 13120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    It has not been an easy task to deposit SiN at low temperature by conventional plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) since Si organic precursors generally have high activation energy for adsorption of the Si atoms on the Si-N networks. In this work, in order to achieve successful deposition of SiN film at low temperature, the plasma processing steps in the PE-ALD have been modified for easier activation of Si precursors. In this modification, the efficiency of chemisorption of Si precursor has been improved by additional plasma steps after purging of the Si precursor. As the result, the SiN films prepared by the modified PE-ALD processes demonstrated higher purity of Si and N atoms with unwanted impurities such as C and O having below 10 at. % and Si-rich films could be formed consequently. Also, a very high step coverage ratio of 97% was obtained. Furthermore, the process-optimized SiN film showed a permissible charge-trapping capability with a wide memory window of 3.1 V when a capacitor structure was fabricated and measured with an insertion of the SiN film as the charge-trap layer. The modified PE-ALD process using the activated Si precursor would be one of the most practical and promising solutions for SiN deposition with lower thermal budget and higher cost-effectiveness.

  6. Accurate estimation of CO2 adsorption on activated carbon with multi-layer feed-forward neural network (MLFNN algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rostami

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Global warming due to greenhouse effect has been considered as a serious problem for many years around the world. Among the different gases which cause greenhouse gas effect, carbon dioxide is of great difficulty by entering into the surrounding atmosphere. So CO2 capturing and separation especially by adsorption is one of the most interesting approaches because of the low equipment cost, ease of operation, simplicity of design, and low energy consumption.In this study, experimental results are presented for the adsorption equilibria of carbon dioxide on activated carbon. The adsorption equilibrium data for carbon dioxide were predicted with two commonly used isotherm models in order to compare with multi-layer feed-forward neural network (MLFNN algorithm for a wide range of partial pressure. As a result, the ANN-based algorithm shows much better efficiency and accuracy than the Sips and Langmuir isotherms. In addition, the applicability of the Sips and Langmuir models are limited to isothermal conditions, even though the ANN-based algorithm is not restricted to the constant temperature condition. Consequently, it is proved that MLFNN algorithm is a promising model for calculation of CO2 adsorption density on activated carbon. Keywords: Global warming, CO2 adsorption, Activated carbon, Multi-layer feed-forward neural network algorithm, Statistical quality measures

  7. Power efficiency of the active boundary layer control around the hump by a slotted synthetic jet generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pick Petr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution summarizes the power efficiency of the active flow control of the boundary layer of air around a hump. The synthetic jet generator with a rectangular output part, i.e. a slot, is actuated using a modulated signal. The actuation of the synthetic jet is carried out by modulating the input voltage of acoustic transducers of the generator. This causes the decrease of the loss coefficient and the change of the mixing size area (e.g. wake. A comparison of three types of modulating signals and their influence on the loss coefficient is performed. The main advantages of modulated signal are then described.

  8. Trends in PDE constrained optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Benner, Peter; Engell, Sebastian; Griewank, Andreas; Harbrecht, Helmut; Hinze, Michael; Rannacher, Rolf; Ulbrich, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Optimization problems subject to constraints governed by partial differential equations (PDEs) are among the most challenging problems in the context of industrial, economical and medical applications. Almost the entire range of problems in this field of research was studied and further explored as part of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) priority program 1253 on “Optimization with Partial Differential Equations” from 2006 to 2013. The investigations were motivated by the fascinating potential applications and challenging mathematical problems that arise in the field of PDE constrained optimization. New analytic and algorithmic paradigms have been developed, implemented and validated in the context of real-world applications. In this special volume, contributions from more than fifteen German universities combine the results of this interdisciplinary program with a focus on applied mathematics.   The book is divided into five sections on “Constrained Optimization, Identification and Control”...

  9. Investigation of Various Active Layers for Their Performance on Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pao-Hsun; Wang, Yeong-Her; Ke, Jhong-Ciao; Huang, Chien-Jung

    2016-08-09

    The theoretical mechanism of open-circuit voltages (V OC ) in OSCs based on various small molecule organic materials is studied. The structure under investigation is simple planar heterojunction (PHJ) by thermal vacuum evaporation deposition. The various wide band gaps of small molecule organic materials are used to enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCE). The donor materials used in the device include: Alpha-sexithiophene (α-6T), Copper(II) phthalocyanine (CuPc), boron subnaphthalocyanine chloride (SubNc) and boron Subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc). It is combined with fullerene or SubPc acceptor material to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the charge transport behavior. It is found that the V OC of the device is largely limited by charge transport. This was associated with the space charge effects and hole accumulation. These results are attributed to the improvement of surface roughness and work function after molybdenum trioxide (MoO₃) is inserted as an anode buffer layer.

  10. Grouping annotations on the subcellular layered interactome demonstrates enhanced autophagy activity in a recurrent experimental autoimmune uveitis T cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuzhi Jia

    Full Text Available Human uveitis is a type of T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that often shows relapse-remitting courses affecting multiple biological processes. As a cytoplasmic process, autophagy has been seen as an adaptive response to cell death and survival, yet the link between autophagy and T cell-mediated autoimmunity is not certain. In this study, based on the differentially expressed genes (GSE19652 between the recurrent versus monophasic T cell lines, whose adoptive transfer to susceptible animals may result in respective recurrent or monophasic uveitis, we proposed grouping annotations on a subcellular layered interactome framework to analyze the specific bioprocesses that are linked to the recurrence of T cell autoimmunity. That is, the subcellular layered interactome was established by the Cytoscape and Cerebral plugin based on differential expression, global interactome, and subcellular localization information. Then, the layered interactomes were grouping annotated by the ClueGO plugin based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. The analysis showed that significant bioprocesses with autophagy were orchestrated in the cytoplasmic layered interactome and that mTOR may have a regulatory role in it. Furthermore, by setting up recurrent and monophasic uveitis in Lewis rats, we confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that, in comparison to the monophasic disease, recurrent uveitis in vivo showed significantly increased autophagy activity and extended lymphocyte infiltration to the affected retina. In summary, our framework methodology is a useful tool to disclose specific bioprocesses and molecular targets that can be attributed to a certain disease. Our results indicated that targeted inhibition of autophagy pathways may perturb the recurrence of uveitis.

  11. Estrogenic activity, estrogens, and calcium in runoff post-layer litter application from rainfall simulated events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogens in runoff from fields fertilized with animal wastes have been implicated as endocrine disruptors of fish in recipient surface waters. The goal of this study was to measure estrogenic activity in runoff post-application of animal waste with the greatest potential for estrogenic activity - ...

  12. Theoretical investigation of the degradation mechanisms in host and guest molecules used in OLED active layers

    KAUST Repository

    Winget, Paul; Hong, Minki; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    systems. We identify degradation pathways and define new strategies to guide the synthesis of stable materials for OLED applications for both phosphorescent emitters and organic host materials. The chemical reactivity of these molecules in the active

  13. Electrochemical activation, voltage decay and hysteresis of Li-rich layered cathode probed by various cobalt content

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Yingqiang

    2018-02-01

    The high capacity of Li-rich layered cathode materials have attracted great attention for the greater energy density lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries, but the understanding of knowledge associated with electrochemical behaviours are still needed to improve their performances further. In this study, different amount of Co content is designed in Li-rich layered compounds (0.5Li2MnO3·0.5LiMn0.5-xNi0.5-xCo2xO2, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2), and the stepwise electrochemical activation process is applied to explore the features. We discover that the substitution of Co3+ ions can accelerate the electrochemical activation of Li2MnO3 component, and the Co-doped compound delivers much higher capacities even they suffer an apparent voltage decay comparing to the Co-free one. Besides, a fast metal ions migration exists (e.g., from the metastable tetrahedral site to the lower energy cubic site) in initial dozens of cycles (e.g., 30 cycles at 0.1C); thereafter, they likely return to the original octahedral site, as demonstrated in the voltage decay and hysteresis analysis.

  14. Using ammonium bicarbonate as pore former in activated carbon catalyst layer to enhance performance of air cathode microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Wang, Haiman; Feng, Yujie

    2014-12-01

    The rolling catalyst layers in air cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are prepared by introducing NH4HCO3 as pore former (PF) with four PF/activated carbon mass ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0. The maximum power density of 892 ± 8 mW m-2 is obtained by cathodes with the mass ratio of 0.2, which is 33% higher than that of the control reactor (without PF, 671 ± 22 mW m-2). Pore analysis indicates the porosity increases by 38% and the major pore range concentrates between 0.5 μm-0.8 μm which likely facilitates to enrich the active reaction sites compared to 0.8 μm-3.0 μm in the control and other PF-cathodes. In addition, pore structure endows the cathode improved exchange current density by 2.4 times and decreased charge transfer resistance by 44%, which are the essential reasons to enhance the oxygen reduction. These results show that addition of NH4HCO3 proves an effective way to change the porosity and pore distribution of catalyst layers and then enhance the MFC performance.

  15. Isolating the effect of pore size distribution on electrochemical double-layer capacitance using activated fluid coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani, Jocelyn E.; Tong, Shitang; Kirk, Donald W.; Jia, Charles Q.

    2015-12-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) use physical ion adsorption in the capacitive electrical double layer of high specific surface area (SSA) materials to store electrical energy. Previous work shows that the SSA-normalized capacitance increases when pore diameters are less than 1 nm. However, there still remains uncertainty about the charge storage mechanism since the enhanced SSA-normalized capacitance is not observed in all microporous materials. In previous studies, the total specific surface area and the chemical composition of the electrode materials were not controlled. The current work is the first reported study that systematically compares the performance of activated carbon prepared from the same raw material, with similar chemical composition and specific surface area, but different pore size distributions. Preparing samples with similar SSAs, but different pores sizes is not straightforward since increasing pore diameters results in decreasing the SSA. This study observes that the microporous activated carbon has a higher SSA-normalized capacitance, 14.1 μF cm-2, compared to the mesoporous material, 12.4 μF cm-2. However, this enhanced SSA-normalized capacitance is only observed above a threshold operating voltage. Therefore, it can be concluded that a minimum applied voltage is required to induce ion adsorption in these sub-nanometer micropores, which increases the capacitance.

  16. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea H. Rossander

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording scattering measurements in situ, enabling us to follow the crystal formation during drying. By varying the distance between the coating head and the point where the X-ray beam hits the film, we obtained measurements of 4 different stages of drying. For each of those stages, the scattering from as long a foil as possible is summed together, with the distance from coating head to scattering point kept constant. The results are average crystallographic properties for the active layer coated on a 30 m long foil. With this insight into the dynamics of crystallization in a roll-coated polymer film, we find that the formation of textured and untextured crystallites seems uncorrelated, and happens at widely different rates. Untextured P3HT crystallites form later in the drying process than expected which may explain previous studies speculating that untextured crystallization depends on concentration. Textured crystallites, however, begin forming much earlier and steadily increases as the film dries, showing a development similar to other in situ studies of these materials.

  17. Investigation of Various Active Layers for Their Performance on Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Hsun Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical mechanism of open-circuit voltages (VOC in OSCs based on various small molecule organic materials is studied. The structure under investigation is simple planar heterojunction (PHJ by thermal vacuum evaporation deposition. The various wide band gaps of small molecule organic materials are used to enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCE. The donor materials used in the device include: Alpha-sexithiophene (α-6T, Copper(II phthalocyanine (CuPc, boron subnaphthalocyanine chloride (SubNc and boron Subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc. It is combined with fullerene or SubPc acceptor material to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the charge transport behavior. It is found that the VOC of the device is largely limited by charge transport. This was associated with the space charge effects and hole accumulation. These results are attributed to the improvement of surface roughness and work function after molybdenum trioxide (MoO3 is inserted as an anode buffer layer.

  18. Use of the thin layer activation technique to measure on-line aeronautical components wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, A.; Dubois, G.; Escuriol, M.; Monnot, R.; Pommier, S.; Fehsenfeld, P.; Kleinrahm, A.; Delvigne, T.; Le Menestrel, M.

    1992-01-01

    The superficial activation technique was applied in order to study the phenomena odscaling at the level of a reactor bearing. The exterior path of the bearing roller was activated on its whole contact surface and to a depth of 80 μm, according to the reaction 56 Fe(p, n) 56 Co. In spite of a very low rate of activation of 0.5 MBq, the first signs of scaling were detected 30 min before a notable rise in the vibratory level could be recorded. Then, the amount of scaled matter escaping from the outer ring of the roller could be followed continuously, with a precision of 0.2 mg. 5 refs., 7 figs

  19. Nested Sampling with Constrained Hamiltonian Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Betancourt, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Nested sampling is a powerful approach to Bayesian inference ultimately limited by the computationally demanding task of sampling from a heavily constrained probability distribution. An effective algorithm in its own right, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo is readily adapted to efficiently sample from any smooth, constrained distribution. Utilizing this constrained Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, I introduce a general implementation of the nested sampling algorithm.

  20. 2D double-layer-tube-shaped structure Bi2S3/ZnS heterojunction with enhanced photocatalytic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiaoming; Wang, Zihang; Fu, Feng; Li, Xiang; Li, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Bi 2 S 3 /ZnS heterojunction with 2D double-layer-tube-shaped structures was prepared by the facile synthesis method. The corresponding relationship was obtained among loaded content to phase, morphology, and optical absorption property of Bi 2 S 3 /ZnS composite. The results shown that Bi 2 S 3 loaded could evidently change the crystallinity of ZnS, enhance the optical absorption ability for visible light of ZnS, and improve the morphologies and microstructure of ZnS. The photocatalytic activities of the Bi 2 S 3 /ZnS sample were evaluated for the photodegradation of phenol and desulfurization of thiophene under visible light irradiation. The results showed that Bi 2 S 3 loaded greatly improved the photocatalytic activity of ZnS, and the content of loaded Bi 2 S 3 had an impact on the catalytic activity of ZnS. Moreover, the mechanism of enhanced photocatalytic activity was also investigated by analysis of relative band positions of Bi 2 S 3 and ZnS, and photo-generated hole was main active radicals during photocatalytic oxidation process

  1. 2D double-layer-tube-shaped structure Bi2S3/ZnS heterojunction with enhanced photocatalytic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoming; Wang, Zihang; Fu, Feng; Li, Xiang; Li, Wenhong

    2015-10-01

    Bi2S3/ZnS heterojunction with 2D double-layer-tube-shaped structures was prepared by the facile synthesis method. The corresponding relationship was obtained among loaded content to phase, morphology, and optical absorption property of Bi2S3/ZnS composite. The results shown that Bi2S3 loaded could evidently change the crystallinity of ZnS, enhance the optical absorption ability for visible light of ZnS, and improve the morphologies and microstructure of ZnS. The photocatalytic activities of the Bi2S3/ZnS sample were evaluated for the photodegradation of phenol and desulfurization of thiophene under visible light irradiation. The results showed that Bi2S3 loaded greatly improved the photocatalytic activity of ZnS, and the content of loaded Bi2S3 had an impact on the catalytic activity of ZnS. Moreover, the mechanism of enhanced photocatalytic activity was also investigated by analysis of relative band positions of Bi2S3 and ZnS, and photo-generated hole was main active radicals during photocatalytic oxidation process.

  2. Electrochemical probing into the active sites of graphitic-layer encapsulated iron oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Lijie; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2018-01-01

    is still unclear compared with the well-recognized surface coordinated FeNx/C structure. Using the strong complexing effect of the iron component with anions, cyanide (CN−) in alkaline and thiocyanate (SCN−) in acidic media, the metal containing active sites are electrochemically probed. Three...

  3. Aerosol Activation Properties within and above Mixing Layer in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z.; Ran, L.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol particles, serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), may modify the properties of clouds and have an impact on climate. The vertical distribution of aerosols and their activation properties is critical to quantify the effect of aerosols on clouds. An intensive field campaign, Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols in the North China Plain (VOGA-NCP 2013), was conducted in the North China Plain during the late July and early August 2013 to measure the vertical profiles of atmospheric components in this polluted region and estimate their effects on atmospheric environment and climate. Aerosols were measured with in-situ instruments and Lidar. Particularly, the aerosols were collected at 1000 m height with a 1 m3 bag sampler attached to a tethered balloon, and subsequently measured with combined scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and CCN counter. Comparisons of size-resolved activation ratios at ground level and 1000 m height showed that aerosols in upper atmosphere were not only less concentrated, but also less CCN-active than those at the surface. The difference in aerosol properties between upper atmosphere and the ground indicates that the analysis of impacts of aerosols on cloud might be misleading in heavily polluted region based on the relationship of cloud properties and surface aerosols or column without considering the vertical distribution of aerosol activation abilities.

  4. Modelling porous active layer electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells; Modelisation des couches actives d'electrodes volumiques de piles a combustible a membrane echangeuse de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultel, Yann

    1997-07-01

    This work focusses on the modeling of mass, charge and heat transfer in the active layers of the volume electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). A first part describes the structure of fuel cells and the physico-chemical processes taking place at the electrodes. An analysis of the classical models encountered in the literature shows that they all assume that the electro-catalysts is uniformly distributed in a plane or in volume. In a second part, the modeling of mass and charge transport phenomena has been carried out with a numerical calculation software which uses the finite-elements method and which allows to take into consideration the discrete distribution of the catalyst in nano-particulates. The simulations show the limitations of the catalyst use because of the diffusion and ionic ohmic drop both at the electrolyte and particulates scale. In order to improve the modeling of PEMFC fuel cells, the classical models have been modified to consider these local contributions. They require only simple numerical methods, like the finite-differences one. When applied to the oxygen reduction at the cathode or to the hydrogen oxidation at the anode, these models allow to determine the kinetics parameters (exchange current densities and slopes of the Tafel lines) after correction of the active layer diffusion. A modeling of the heat transfers at the active layers scale is proposed. The model takes into account the convective heat transfers between the solid phases and the gas, the electro-osmosis water transfer, and the generation of heat by joule effect and by the electrochemical reactions. Finally, the last chapter presents a study of the reaction mechanisms in the case of porous electrodes using the impedances method. Numerical and analytical models have been developed to calculate the electrode impedances and are applied to the study of oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation. (J.S.)

  5. Constrained minimization in C ++ environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymov, S.N.; Kurbatov, V.S.; Silin, I.N.; Yashchenko, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    Based on the ideas, proposed by one of the authors (I.N.Silin), the suitable software was developed for constrained data fitting. Constraints may be of the arbitrary type: equalities and inequalities. The simplest of possible ways was used. Widely known program FUMILI was realized to the C ++ language. Constraints in the form of inequalities φ (θ i ) ≥ a were taken into account by change into equalities φ (θ i ) = t and simple inequalities of type t ≥ a. The equalities were taken into account by means of quadratic penalty functions. The suitable software was tested on the model data of the ANKE setup (COSY accelerator, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany)

  6. Coherent states in constrained systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, M.; Kojima, K.

    2001-01-01

    When quantizing the constrained systems, there often arise the quantum corrections due to the non-commutativity in the re-ordering of constraint operators in the products of operators. In the bosonic second-class constraints, furthermore, the quantum corrections caused by the uncertainty principle should be taken into account. In order to treat these corrections simultaneously, the alternative projection technique of operators is proposed by introducing the available minimal uncertainty states of the constraint operators. Using this projection technique together with the projection operator method (POM), these two kinds of quantum corrections were investigated

  7. Scheduling of resource-constrained projects

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Project management has become a widespread instrument enabling organizations to efficiently master the challenges of steadily shortening product life cycles, global markets and decreasing profit margins. With projects increasing in size and complexity, their planning and control represents one of the most crucial management tasks. This is especially true for scheduling, which is concerned with establishing execution dates for the sub-activities to be performed in order to complete the project. The ability to manage projects where resources must be allocated between concurrent projects or even sub-activities of a single project requires the use of commercial project management software packages. However, the results yielded by the solution procedures included are often rather unsatisfactory. Scheduling of Resource-Constrained Projects develops more efficient procedures, which can easily be integrated into software packages by incorporated programming languages, and thus should be of great interest for practiti...

  8. Adsorption and photocatalytic activity of electron-irradiated polystyrene nanosphere multi-layer film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Oh; Yoo, Seung Hwa; Kim, Jea Joon; Kum, Jong Min

    2012-01-01

    Photocatalytic decomposition of aqueous organic pollutant on semiconductor materials has been widely studied as a simple and clean process for organic pollutant removal. The reaction mechanism have been revealed and some fundamental requirements should be satisfied for high photocatalytic activity, such as high chemical, thermal stability in water, intense light absorption, efficient charge separation, large surface area, high pollutant adsorption ability, etc. However, until now on, no single material fulfills all these requirements. Therefore, lots of efforts have been made to enhance the activity of photocatalysts by several approaches. By controlling the band-gap of photocatalyst or combining with narrow band-gap semiconductor, the light absorption can expand to the visible-light spectrum region that increases the charge-carrier generation. By adopting nanostructured morphologies, large surface area can provide huge amount of surface reaction sites and reduce the charge-carrier recombination before it reaches these sites. Also, several reports have shown that, by increasing the adsorption of pollutant on the photocatalyst surface, synergistic enhancement can occur in the photocatalytic activity. Along with these fundamental requirements, photocatalysts should be non-toxic, abundant, and easily synthesizable for economical and eco-friendly applications. During a few decades, various inorganic semiconductors, especially, metal oxides (TiO 2 , ZnO 2 , WO 3 , etc), metal sulfides (CdS, PbS, etc), and dye molecules with a metal core (Ru-, Ir- based single-molecules) have been widely studied as a photocatalyst. However, even though lots of studies have been made, issues related to the potential threat against human health by using these kinds of metal-containing inorganic semiconductors are still under dispute. Recently, metal-free organic photocatalyst (g-C 3 N 4 , C 3 N 3 S 3 ) have been synthesized, and showed outstanding photocatalytic activities for H 2

  9. Vertically oriented graphene bridging active-layer/current-collector interface for ultrahigh rate supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Zheng; Zhu, Weiguang; Ma, Wei; Wen, Zhenhai; Shuai, Xiaorui; Chen, Junhong; Yan, Jianhua; Wang, Zhihua; Cen, Kefa; Feng, Xinliang

    2013-10-25

    Dense networks of graphene nanosheets standing vertically on a current collector can work as numerous electrically conductive bridges to facilitate charge transport and mitigate the constriction/spreading resistance at the interface between the active material and the current collector. The vertically oriented graphene-bridged supercapacitors present excellent rate and power capabilities. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Enzyme activity of topsoii layer on reclaimed and unreclaimed post-mining sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heděnec, Petr; Vindušková, O.; Kukla, J.; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Baldrian, Petr; Frouz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 1 (2017), s. 19-25 ISSN 2542-2154 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066; GA ČR GAP504/12/1288 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : enzyme assay * microbial activity * litterbag * macrofauna * soil fauna Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) OBOR OECD: Soil science; Microbiology (MBU-M)

  11. Stability and activity of lactate dehydrogenase on biofunctional layers deposited by activated vapor silanization (AVS) and immersion silanization (IS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jorge Nieto-Márquez; Elices, Manuel; Guinea, Gustavo V.; Pérez-Rigueiro, José; Arroyo-Hernández, María

    2017-09-01

    The interaction between surfaces and biological elements, in particular, proteins is critical for the performance of biomaterials and biosensors. This interaction can be controlled by modifying the surface in a process known as biofunctionalization. In this work, the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used to study the stability of the interaction between a functional protein and amine-functionalized surfaces. Two different functionalization procedures were compared: Activated Vapor Silanization (AVS) and Immersion Silanization (IS). Adsorption kinetics is shown to follow the Langmuir model for AVS-functionalized samples, while IS-functionalized samples show a certain instability if immersed in an aqueous medium for several hours. In turn, the enzymatic activity of LDH is preserved for longer times by using glutaraldehyde as crosslinker between the AVS biofunctional surface and the enzyme.

  12. Role of wind forcing and eddy activity in the intraseasonal variability of the barrier layer in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhanlin; Xie, Qiang; Zeng, Lili; Wang, Dongxiao

    2018-03-01

    In addition to widely discussed seasonal variability, the barrier layer (BL) of the South China Sea (SCS) also exhibits significant intraseasonal variability (ISV) and plays an important role in the upper heat and salt balances. The characteristics and mechanisms of spatiotemporal variations in the BL are investigated using an eddy-resolving ocean model OFES (OGCM For the Earth Simulator) ouput and related atmospheric and oceanic processes. The active intraseasonal BL variability in the SCS occurs mainly during the late summer/autumn and winter and exhibits remarkable differences between these two periods. The BL ISV in late summer/autumn occurs in the southern basin, while in winter, it is limited to the northwestern basin. To further discuss the evolution and driving thermodynamic mechanisms, we quantify the processes that control the variability of intraseasonal BL. Different mechanisms for the intraseasonal BL variability for these two active periods are investigated based on the case study and composite analysis. During late summer/autumn, the active BL in the southern basin is generated by advected and local freshwater, and then decays rapidly with the enhanced wind. In winter, anticyclonic eddy activity is associated with the evolution of the BL by affecting the thermocline and halocline variations, while wind stress and wind stress curl have no obvious influence on BL.

  13. Synchronization in primate cerebellar granule cell layer local field potentials: Basic anisotropy and dynamic changes during active expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Courtemanche

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellar cortex is remarkable for its organizational regularity, out of which task-related neural networks should emerge. So, in Purkinje cells, both complex and simple spike network patterns are evident in sensorimotor behavior. However, task-related patterns of activity in the granule cell layer (GCL have been less studied. We recorded local field potential (LFP activity simultaneously in pairs of GCL sites in monkeys performing an active expectancy (lever-press task, in passive expectancy, and at rest. LFP sites were selected when they showed strong 10-25 Hz oscillations; pair orientation was in stereotaxic sagittal and coronal (mainly, and diagonal. As shown previously, LFP oscillations at each site were modulated during the lever-press task. Synchronization across LFP pairs showed an evident basic anisotropy at rest: sagittal pairs of LFPs were better synchronized (more than double the cross-correlation coefficients than coronal pairs, and more than diagonal pairs. On the other hand, this basic anisotropy was modifiable: during the active expectancy condition, where sagittal and coronal orientations were tested, synchronization of LFP pairs would increase just preceding movement, most notably for the coronal pairs. This lateral extension of synchronization was not observed in passive expectancy. The basic pattern of synchronization at rest, favoring sagittal synchrony, thus seemed to adapt in a dynamic fashion, potentially extending laterally to include more cerebellar cortex elements. This dynamic anisotropy in LFP synchronization could underlie GCL network organization in the context of sensorimotor tasks.

  14. Zn(3)(4-OOCC(6)H(4)PO(3))(2): A polar metal phosphonate with pillared layered structure showing SHG-activity and large dielectric anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Tang; Cao, Deng-Ke; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Zheng, Li-Min

    2010-10-07

    A new metal phosphonate Zn(3)(4-OOCC(6)H(4)PO(3))(2) (1) is reported which crystallizes in orthorhombic space group Pca2(1). It shows a pillared layered structure in which the {ZnO(4)}, {ZnO(5)} and {PO(3)C} polyhedra are connected through corner- or edge-sharing to form an inorganic layer in the ab plane which contains 4- and 5-member rings. These layers are pillared by the uni-oriented 4-carboxylatephenylphosphonate ligands, thus leading to a polar 3D architecture. The dielectric anisotropy measurements of a single crystal of 1 reveal that dielectric constant along the inter-layer is larger than that along the intra-layer with a ratio of about 2.3. Second harmonic generation (SHG) activity is observed.

  15. Activation of Al–Cu–Fe quasicrystalline surface: fabrication of a fine nanocomposite layer with high catalytic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kameoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A fine layered nanocomposite with a total thickness of about 200 nm was formed on the surface of an Al63Cu25Fe12 quasicrystal (QC. The nanocomposite was found to exhibit high catalytic performance for steam reforming of methanol. The nanocomposite was formed by a self-assembly process, by leaching the Al–Cu–Fe QC using a 5 wt% Na2CO3 aqueous solution followed by calcination in air at 873 K. The quasiperiodic nature of the QC played an important role in the formation of such a structure. Its high catalytic activity originated from the presence of highly dispersed copper and iron species, which also suppressed the sintering of nanoparticles.

  16. A concentration-independent micro/nanofluidic active diode using an asymmetric ion concentration polarization layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyekyung; Kim, Junsuk; Kim, Hyeonsoo; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Hyomin; Kim, Sung Jae

    2017-08-24

    Over the past decade, nanofluidic diodes that rectify ionic currents (i.e. greater current in one direction than in the opposite direction) have drawn significant attention in biomolecular sensing, switching and energy harvesting devices. To obtain current rectification, conventional nanofluidic diodes have utilized complex nanoscale asymmetry such as nanochannel geometry, surface charge density, and reservoir concentration. Avoiding the use of sophisticated nano-asymmetry, micro/nanofluidic diodes using microscale asymmetry have been recently introduced; however, their diodic performance is still impeded by (i) low (even absent) rectification effects at physiological concentrations over 100 mM and strong dependency on the bulk concentration, and (ii) the fact that they possess only passive predefined rectification factors. Here, we demonstrated a new class of micro/nanofluidic diode with an ideal perm-selective nanoporous membrane based on ion concentration polarization (ICP) phenomenon. Thin side-microchannels installed near a nanojunction served as mitigators of the amplified electrokinetic flows generated by ICP and induced convective salt transfer to the nanoporous membrane, leading to actively controlled micro-scale asymmetry. Using this device, current rectifications were successfully demonstrated in a wide range of electrolytic concentrations (10 -5 M to 3 M) as a function of the fluidic resistance of the side-microchannels. Noteworthily, it was confirmed that the rectification factors were independent from the bulk concentration due to the ideal perm-selectivity. Moreover, the rectification of the presenting diode was actively controlled by adjusting the external convective flows, while that of the previous diode was passively determined by invariant nanoscale asymmetry.

  17. Role of organically modified layered silicate both as an active interfacial modifier and nanofiller for immiscible polymer blends.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ray, SS

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ) revealed efficient mixing of the polymers in the presence of organically modified layered silicate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations showed that silicate layers were either intercalated or exfoliated...

  18. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide films using plasma-activated triisopropylsilane as a precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Ki-Moon; Shin, Jae-Su; Yun, Ju-Young; Jun Lee, Sang; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process was developed as a growth technique of SiO 2 thin films using a plasma-activated triisopropylsilane [TIPS, ((iPr) 3 SiH)] precursor. TIPS was activated by an argon plasma at the precursor injection stage of the process. Using the activated TIPS, it was possible to control the growth rate per cycle of the deposited films by adjusting the plasma ignition time. The PEALD technique allowed deposition of SiO 2 films at temperatures as low as 50 °C without carbon impurities. In addition, films obtained with plasma ignition times of 3 s and 10 s had similar values of root-mean-square surface roughness. In order to evaluate the suitability of TIPS as a precursor for low-temperature deposition of SiO 2 films, the vapor pressure of TIPS was measured. The thermal stability and the reactivity of the gas-phase TIPS with respect to water vapor were also investigated by analyzing the intensity changes of the C–H and Si–H peaks in the Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of TIPS

  19. Profiling EGFR activity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by using a novel layered membrane Western blot technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vyomesh; Ramesh, Arun; Traicoff, June L; Baibakov, Galina; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Gutkind, J Silvio; Knezevic, Vladimir

    2005-05-01

    Given the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), several rational approaches have now been utilized to abrogate tyrosine kinase activity and its disengagement from downstream signal transducers. Monitoring the activity of these molecules could potentially be useful to determine not only drug efficacy but also to identify HNSCC patients most likely to benefit from this type of therapy. In this study we have used a novel high throughput multi-layered Western blotting (MLWestern) method that allows the detection of multiple proteins from a single experiment in order to characterize key components in the EGFR signaling pathway in HNSCC cells. Total and activated forms of EGFR and the downstream effectors, Erk and Akt were readily detected in HNSCC cells, where in the control cells (HaCaT) these proteins could only be detected in EGF stimulated cells. Results from conventional Western blot and MLWestern were comparable. Clustering analysis of protein expression revealed similarities in cellular response between some of the cell lines indicative of similarities in their biological response. The data indicate that MLWestern can be potentially applied to identify molecular targets that could be used for rational therapeutic intervention strategies.

  20. Polyurethane Ionophore-Based Thin Layer Membranes for Voltammetric Ion Activity Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gaston A; Bakker, Eric

    2016-06-07

    We report on a plasticized polyurethane ionophore-based thin film material (of hundreds of nanometer thickness) for simultaneous voltammetric multianalyte ion activity detection triggered by the oxidation/reduction of an underlying poly(3-octylthiophene) film. This material provides excellent mechanical, physical, and chemical robustness compared to other polymers. Polyurethane films did not exhibit leaching of lipophilic additives after rinsing with a direct water jet and exhibited resistance to detachment from the underlying electrode surface, resulting in a voltammetric current response with less than acrylate) ionophore-based membranes of the same thickness and composition exhibited a significant deterioration of the signal after identical treatment. While previously reported works emphasized fundamental advancement of multi-ion detection with multi-ionophore-based thin films, polyurethane thin membranes allow one to achieve real world measurements without sacrificing analytical performance. Indeed, polyurethane membranes are demonstrated to be useful for the simultaneous determination of potassium and lithium in undiluted human serum and blood with attractive precision.

  1. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  2. Thin layer chromatography fingerprint, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities of rhizomes, stems, and leaves of Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safitri, A.; Batubara, I.; Khumaida, N.

    2017-05-01

    Fingerprints of 5 temu hitam (Curcuma aeruginosa Roxb.) accessions (Malang, Cirebon, Kuningan 1, Bogor, and Liwa) were determined by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and compared to fingerprints of turmeric (Curcuma longa L), temu putih (Curcuma zedoaria (Christm.) Roscoe), and temu lawak (Curcuma zanthorriza Roxb.). Maceration method with ethanol as the solvent was used for extraction. The eluent used for fingerprint by TLC was chloroform:dichloromethane (9:1v/v). Five accessions of temu hitam show similar fingerprint patterns, but different in band thickness. Temu hitam rhizomes have bands of curcuminoid (Rf 0.22, 0.10, 0.03), and characteristic bands of Rf 0.42, 0.27, and 0.77, which can be distinguished from turmeric and temu lawak and Rf 0.13, which is different from temu putih. Leaves and stems of temu hitam can be distinguished from temu putih, turmeric, and temu lawak at Rf 0.60. Rhizomes of all plants reveal strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and antioxidant activity on DPPH radicals than its corresponding stems and leaves. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities were determined by microdilution and TLC-bioautography. Antibacterial activity of rhizomes of Cirebon and Kuningan 1 accessions are higher than that of other accessions (MIC = 250 μg/mL MBC = 500 μg/mL, but lower as compared to that of temu lawak (MIC = 62.5 μg/mL, MBC = 250 μg/mL) and tetracycline (MIC = MBC = 15.63 μg/mL). Rhizome of Liwa accession exhibits the highest antioxidant activity (IC50 = 124.88 μg/mL) amongst all accessions, but lower than that of temu lawak (IC50 = 18.45 μg/mL), turmeric (IC50 = 18.82 μg/mL), and temu putih (IC50 = 94.35 μg/mL).

  3. Phosphorolytic activity of Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase towards its cognate aminoacyl adenylate detected by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Led, Jens Jørgen; Switon, Werner K.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1983-01-01

    The catalytic activity of highly purified Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase has been studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography on poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose. It was found that this synthetase, besides the activation of its cognate amino acid and the syntheses...

  4. Formal language constrained path problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, C.; Jacob, R.; Marathe, M.

    1997-07-08

    In many path finding problems arising in practice, certain patterns of edge/vertex labels in the labeled graph being traversed are allowed/preferred, while others are disallowed. Motivated by such applications as intermodal transportation planning, the authors investigate the complexity of finding feasible paths in a labeled network, where the mode choice for each traveler is specified by a formal language. The main contributions of this paper include the following: (1) the authors show that the problem of finding a shortest path between a source and destination for a traveler whose mode choice is specified as a context free language is solvable efficiently in polynomial time, when the mode choice is specified as a regular language they provide algorithms with improved space and time bounds; (2) in contrast, they show that the problem of finding simple paths between a source and a given destination is NP-hard, even when restricted to very simple regular expressions and/or very simple graphs; (3) for the class of treewidth bounded graphs, they show that (i) the problem of finding a regular language constrained simple path between source and a destination is solvable in polynomial time and (ii) the extension to finding context free language constrained simple paths is NP-complete. Several extensions of these results are presented in the context of finding shortest paths with additional constraints. These results significantly extend the results in [MW95]. As a corollary of the results, they obtain a polynomial time algorithm for the BEST k-SIMILAR PATH problem studied in [SJB97]. The previous best algorithm was given by [SJB97] and takes exponential time in the worst case.

  5. Value, Cost, and Sharing: Open Issues in Constrained Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2006-01-01

    Clustering is an important tool for data mining, since it can identify major patterns or trends without any supervision (labeled data). Over the past five years, semi-supervised (constrained) clustering methods have become very popular. These methods began with incorporating pairwise constraints and have developed into more general methods that can learn appropriate distance metrics. However, several important open questions have arisen about which constraints are most useful, how they can be actively acquired, and when and how they should be propagated to neighboring points. This position paper describes these open questions and suggests future directions for constrained clustering research.

  6. Ultra thin layer activation by recoil implantation of radioactive heavy ions. Applicability in wear and corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, O.; Sauvage, T.; Blondiaux, G.; Guinard, L.

    1997-07-01

    A new calibration procedure is proposed for the application of recoil implantation of radioactive heavy ions (energies between a few hundred keV and a few MeV) into the near surface of materials as part of a research programme on sub-micrometric wear or corrosion phenomena. The depth profile of implanted radioelements is performed by using ultra thin deposited films obtained by cathode sputtering under argon plasma. Two curves for 56 Co ion in nickel have been determined for implantation depths of 110 and 200 nm, respectively, and stress the feasibility and reproducibility of this method for such activated depths. The achieved surface loss detection sensitivities are about 1 and 2 nm respectively. The on line detection mode is performed directly on the sample of interest. A general description of the method is presented. A study of the reaction kinematics followed by a general treatment on the irradiation parameters to be adopted are also developed with the intention of using the ultra thin layer activation method (UTLA) to further applications in research and industry. (author)

  7. Nitrogen and vanadium Co-doped TiO{sub 2} mesosponge layers for enhancement in visible photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiasong Zhong [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, 310018 (China); Xu, Jinrong [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Anhui University of Architecture, Hefei, 230022 (China); Wang, Qingyao, E-mail: wangqingyao0532@163.com [School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Ludong University, Yantai, 264025 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • N and V co-doped TiO{sub 2} mesosponges were prepared by hydrothermal method. • The first-principle was used to investigate the novel porous materials. • N-V-TMSW had a remarkable visible absorption and photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Novel N and V co-doped TiO{sub 2} mesosponge (N-V-TMSW) layers were successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays, and the phase composition, morphology and optical property were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV–vis diffusion reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The crystal structure and density of states were studied by means of the first-principle pseudo-potential plane wave. The results indicated that titanium ions and oxygen atoms in TiO{sub 2} were successfully substituted by vanadium ions and nitrogen atoms, respectively. The sample N-V0.1-TMSW showed a remarkable absorption in the visible light range of 400–600 nm and high visible photocatalytic activity.

  8. Effects of surface chemical properties of activated carbon modified by amino-fluorination for electric double-layer capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Jung; Jeong, Euigyung; Cho, Seho; Yeo, Sang Young; Lee, Young-Seak

    2012-09-01

    The surface of phenol-based activated carbon (AC) was seriatim amino-fluorinated with solution of ammonium hydroxide and hydrofluoric acid in varying ratio to fabricate electrode materials for use in an electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC). The specific capacitance of the amino-fluorinated AC-based EDLC was measured in a 1 M H(2)SO(4) electrolyte, in which it was observed that the specific capacitances increased from 215 to 389 Fg(-1) and 119 and 250 Fg(-1) with the current densities of 0.1 and 1.0 Ag(-1), respectively, in comparison with those of an untreated AC-based EDLC when the amino-fluorination was optimized via seriatim mixed solution of 7.43 mol L(-1) ammonium hydroxide and 2.06 mol L(-1) hydrofluoric acid. This enhancement of capacitance was attributed to the synergistic effects of an increased electrochemical activity due to the formation of surface N- and F-functional groups and increased, specific surface area, and mesopore volumes, all of which resulted from the amino-fluorination of the electrode material. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Fungus-Inducible Pepper Carboxylesterase Exhibits Antifungal Activity by Decomposing the Outer Layer of Fungal Cell Walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyo-Hyoun; Park, Ae Ran; Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Park, Sangkyu; Han, Yun-Jeong; Hoang, Quyen T N; Choi, Gyung Ja; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Kim, Young Soon; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2018-05-01

    Colletotrichum species are major fungal pathogens that cause devastating anthracnose diseases in many economically important crops. In this study, we observed the hydrolyzing activity of a fungus-inducible pepper carboxylesterase (PepEST) on cell walls of C. gloeosporioides, causing growth retardation of the fungus by blocking appressorium formation. To determine the cellular basis for the growth inhibition, we observed the localization of PepEST on the fungus and found the attachment of the protein on surfaces of conidia and germination tubes. Moreover, we examined the decomposition of cell-wall materials from the fungal surface after reaction with PepEST, which led to the identification of 1,2-dithiane-4,5-diol (DTD) by gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis. Exogenous DTD treatment did not elicit expression of defense-related genes in the host plant but did trigger the necrosis of C. gloeosporioides. Furthermore, the DTD compound displayed protective effects on pepper fruits and plants against C. gloeosporioides and C. coccodes, respectively. In addition, DTD was also effective in preventing other diseases, such as rice blast, tomato late blight, and wheat leaf rust. Therefore, our results provide evidence that PepEST is involved in hydrolysis of the outmost layer of the fungal cell walls and that DTD has antifungal activity, suggesting an alternative strategy to control agronomically important phytopathogens.

  10. Impact of active layer thickness of nitrogen-doped In–Sn–Zn–O films on materials and thin film transistor performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yue; Yang, Hao-Zhi; Chen, Sheng-Chi; Lu, Ying-Bo; Xin, Yan-Qing; Yang, Tian-Lin; Sun, Hui

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen-doped indium tin zinc oxide (ITZO:N) thin film transistors (TFTs) were deposited on SiO2 (200 nm)/p-Si〈1 0 0〉 substrates by RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The structural, chemical compositions, surface morphology, optical and electrical properties as a function of the active layer thickness were investigated. As the active layer thickness increases, Zn content decreases and In content increases gradually. Meanwhile, Sn content is almost unchanged. When the thickness of the active layer is more than 45 nm, the ITZO:N films become crystallized and present a crystal orientation along InN(0 0 2) plan. No matter what the thickness is, ITZO:N films always display a high transmittance above 80% in the visible region. Their optical band gaps fluctuate between 3.4 eV and 3.62 eV. Due to the dominance of low interface trap density and high carrier concentration, ITZO:N TFT shows enhanced electrical properties as the active layer thickness is 35 nm. Its field-effect mobility, on/off radio and sub-threshold swing are 17.53 cm2 V‑1 · s‑1, 106 and 0.36 V/dec, respectively. These results indicate that the suitable thickness of the active layer can enhance the quality of ITZO:N films and decrease the defects density of ITZO:N TFT. Thus, the properties of ITZO:N TFT can be optimized by adjusting the thickness of the active layer.

  11. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genet, H; Euskirchen, E S; McGuire, A D; Barrett, K; Breen, A; Bennett, A; Rupp, T S; Johnstone, J F; Kasischke, E S; Melvin, A M; Mack, M C; Schuur, A E G; Turetsky, M R; Yuan, F

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layer caused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness

  12. Current and calcium responses to local activation of axonal NMDA receptors in developing cerebellar molecular layer interneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Rossi

    Full Text Available In developing cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs, NMDA increases spontaneous GABA release. This effect had been attributed to either direct activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs or an indirect pathway involving activation of somato-dendritic NMDARs followed by passive spread of somatic depolarization along the axon and activation of axonal voltage dependent Ca(2+ channels (VDCCs. Using Ca(2+ imaging and electrophysiology, we searched for preNMDARs by uncaging NMDAR agonists either broadly throughout the whole field or locally at specific axonal locations. Releasing either NMDA or glutamate in the presence of NBQX using short laser pulses elicited current transients that were highly sensitive to the location of the spot and restricted to a small number of varicosities. The signal was abolished in the presence of high Mg(2+ or by the addition of APV. Similar paradigms yielded restricted Ca(2+ transients in interneurons loaded with a Ca(2+ indicator. We found that the synaptic effects of NMDA were not inhibited by blocking VDCCs but were impaired in the presence of the ryanodine receptor antagonist dantrolene. Furthermore, in voltage clamped cells, bath applied NMDA triggers Ca(2+ elevations and induces neurotransmitter release in the axonal compartment. Our results suggest the existence of preNMDARs in developing MLIs and propose their involvement in the NMDA-evoked increase in GABA release by triggering a Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release process mediated by presynaptic Ca(2+ stores. Such a mechanism is likely to exert a crucial role in various forms of Ca(2+-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  13. Active control of turbulent boundary layer-induced sound transmission through the cavity-backed double panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, A.; Alujević, N.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of active control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound transmission through the cavity-backed double panels. The aerodynamic model used is based on the Corcos wall pressure distribution. The structural-acoustic model encompasses a source panel (skin panel), coupled through an acoustic cavity to the radiating panel (trim panel). The radiating panel is backed by a larger acoustic enclosure (the back cavity). A feedback control unit is located inside the acoustic cavity between the two panels. It consists of a control force actuator and a sensor mounted at the actuator footprint on the radiating panel. The control actuator can react off the source panel. It is driven by an amplified velocity signal measured by the sensor. A fully coupled analytical structural-acoustic model is developed to study the effects of the active control on the sound transmission into the back cavity. The stability and performance of the active control system are firstly studied on a reduced order model. In the reduced order model only two fundamental modes of the fully coupled system are assumed. Secondly, a full order model is considered with a number of modes large enough to yield accurate simulation results up to 1000 Hz. It is shown that convincing reductions of the TBL-induced vibrations of the radiating panel and the sound pressure inside the back cavity can be expected. The reductions are more pronounced for a certain class of systems, which is characterised by the fundamental natural frequency of the skin panel larger than the fundamental natural frequency of the trim panel.

  14. Monitoring of active layer dynamics at a permafrost site on Svalbard using multi-channel ground-penetrating radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Westermann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel ground-penetrating radar is used to investigate the late-summer evolution of the thaw depth and the average soil water content of the thawed active layer at a high-arctic continuous permafrost site on Svalbard, Norway. Between mid of August and mid of September 2008, five surveys have been conducted in gravelly soil over transect lengths of 130 and 175 m each. The maximum thaw depths range from 1.6 m to 2.0 m, so that they are among the deepest thaw depths recorded in sediments on Svalbard so far. The thaw depths increase by approximately 0.2 m between mid of August and beginning of September and subsequently remain constant until mid of September. The thaw rates are approximately constant over the entire length of the transects within the measurement accuracy of about 5 to 10 cm. The average volumetric soil water content of the thawed soil varies between 0.18 and 0.27 along the investigated transects. While the measurements do not show significant changes in soil water content over the first four weeks of the study, strong precipitation causes an increase in average soil water content of up to 0.04 during the last week. These values are in good agreement with evapotranspiration and precipitation rates measured in the vicinity of the the study site. While we cannot provide conclusive reasons for the detected spatial variability of the thaw depth at the study site, our measurements show that thaw depth and average soil water content are not directly correlated.

    The study demonstrates the potential of multi-channel ground-penetrating radar for mapping thaw depth in permafrost areas. The novel non-invasive technique is particularly useful when the thaw depth exceeds 1.5 m, so that it is hardly accessible by manual probing. In addition, multi-channel ground-penetrating radar holds potential for mapping the latent heat content of the active layer and for estimating weekly to monthly averages of the ground heat flux during the

  15. Wavelet library for constrained devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Johan Hendrik; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2007-04-01

    The wavelet transform is a powerful tool for image and video processing, useful in a range of applications. This paper is concerned with the efficiency of a certain fast-wavelet-transform (FWT) implementation and several wavelet filters, more suitable for constrained devices. Such constraints are typically found on mobile (cell) phones or personal digital assistants (PDA). These constraints can be a combination of; limited memory, slow floating point operations (compared to integer operations, most often as a result of no hardware support) and limited local storage. Yet these devices are burdened with demanding tasks such as processing a live video or audio signal through on-board capturing sensors. In this paper we present a new wavelet software library, HeatWave, that can be used efficiently for image/video processing/analysis tasks on mobile phones and PDA's. We will demonstrate that HeatWave is suitable for realtime applications with fine control and range to suit transform demands. We shall present experimental results to substantiate these claims. Finally this library is intended to be of real use and applied, hence we considered several well known and common embedded operating system platform differences; such as a lack of common routines or functions, stack limitations, etc. This makes HeatWave suitable for a range of applications and research projects.

  16. Study of Electrical Transport Properties of Thin Films Used as HTL and as Active Layer in Organic Solar Cells, through Impedance Spectroscopy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo A. Otalora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Impedance spectroscopy (IS is used for studying the electrical transport properties of thin films used in organic solar cells with structure ITO/HTL/active layer/cathode, where PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:polystyrene sulfonic acid and CuPC (tetrasulfonated copper-phthalocyanine were investigated as HTL (hole transport layer and P3HT:PCBM (poly-3-hexylthiophene:phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester blends prepared from mesitylene and chlorobenzene based solutions were studied as active layer and Ag and Al were used as cathode. The study allowed determining the influence of the type of solvent used for the preparation of the active layer as well as the speed at which the solvents are removed on the carriers mobility. The effect of exposing the layer of P3HT to the air on its mobility was also studied. It was established that samples of P3HT and P3HT:PCBM prepared using mesitylene as a solvent have mobility values significantly higher than those prepared from chlorobenzene which is the solvent most frequently used. It was also determined that the mobility of carriers in P3HT films strongly decreases when this sample is exposed to air. In addition, it was found that the electrical properties of P3HT:PCBM thin films can be improved by removing the solvent slowly which is achieved by increasing the pressure inside the system of spin-coating during the film growth.

  17. Active Layer Spin Coating Speed Dependence of Inverted Organic Solar Cell Based on Eosin-Y-Coated ZnO Nanorod Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, R. T.; Yap, C. C.; Yahaya, M.; Fauzia, V.; Salleh, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    The active layer spin coating speed dependence of the performance of inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) based on Eosin-Y-coated ZnOnanorods has been investigated. An active layer consisted of poly(2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl)-hexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV) as donor and phenyl-c61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as acceptor was employed, whereas ZnO nanorods were utilized as electron transporting layer. The active layer was deposited on top of Eosin-Y-coated ZnO nanorods with various spin coating speeds (1000-4000 rpm). Inverted OSCs with a structure of FTO/Eosin-Y-coated ZnO nanorods/MEH-PPV:PCBM /Ag were characterized through the current density-voltage (J-V) measurement under illumination intensity of 100 mW/cm2. Based on the investigation, the short circuit current density (Jsc) and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) enhanced significantly, where as fill factor slightly increased with spin coating speed. The two-diode equivalent model was found to fit the experimental J-V curves very well. The optimum PCE of 1.18 ± 0.07% was achieved at the highest spin coating speed of 4000 rpm, as a result of the decrement of diffusion current density (Jdiff), recombination current density (Jrec), and ideality factor, thus further confirms the strong built-in electric field in thinner photoactive layer.

  18. Building unique surface structure on aramid fibers through a green layer-by-layer self-assembly technique to develop new high performance fibers with greatly improved surface activity, thermal resistance, mechanical properties and UV resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lifang; Yuan, Li; Guan, Qingbao; Gu, Aijuan, E-mail: ajgu@suda.edu.cn; Liang, Guozheng, E-mail: lgzheng@suda.edu.cn

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • A green technology is setup to build unique surface structure on aramid fiber (AF). • The method is layer-by-layer self-assembling SiO{sub 2} and layered double hydroxide. • The surface of AF is adjustable by controlling the self-assembly cycle number. • New AF has excellent surface activity, anti-UV, thermal and mechanical properties. • The origin behind attractive performances of new AFs was intensively studied. - Abstract: Combining green preparation and high performance is becoming the direction of sustainable development of materials. How to simultaneously overcome the two bottlenecks (poor surface activity and UV resistance) of aramid fibers (AFs) while improving thermal and mechanical properties through a green process is still an interesting issue with big challenge. Herein, new AFs (BL-AFs) were prepared by alternately self-assembling SiO{sub 2} and MgAlFe layered double hydroxide (LDH) on surfaces of AFs, successively, through a green layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly technique without using high temperature and organic solvent. The structures and properties of BL-AFs were systematically studied, which are controllable by adjusting the number of self-assembly cycle. The new fibers with three or more self-assembly cycles have remarkably improved surface activity, thermal resistance, mechanical properties and UV resistance compared with AFs. Typically, with three self-assembly cycles, the initial degradation temperature and char yield of the new fiber (3BL-AF) are as high as 552.9 °C and 81.2%, about 92 °C and 25.2% higher than those of AF, respectively; after 168 h-UV irradiation, the retention of tensile performances of 3BL-AF fiber is as high as 91–95%, about 29–14% higher than that of AF, showing the best overall performances among all modified AFs prepared using a green technique reported so far. The origin behind the attractive performances of BL-AFs is revealed through correlating with structures of original and

  19. A low-crystalline ruthenium nano-layer supported on praseodymium oxide as an active catalyst for ammonia synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Imamura, Kazuya; Kawano, Yukiko; Miyahara, Shin-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia is a crucial chemical feedstock for fertilizer production and is a potential energy carrier. However, the current method of synthesizing ammonia, the Haber-Bosch process, consumes a great deal of energy. To reduce energy consumption, a process and a substance that can catalyze ammonia synthesis under mild conditions (low temperature and low pressure) are strongly needed. Here we show that Ru/Pr 2 O 3 without any dopant catalyzes ammonia synthesis under mild conditions at 1.8 times the rates reported with other highly active catalysts. Scanning transmission electron micrograph observations and energy dispersive X-ray analyses revealed the formation of low-crystalline nano-layers of ruthenium on the surface of Pr 2 O 3 . Furthermore, CO 2 temperature-programmed desorption revealed that the catalyst was strongly basic. These unique structural and electronic characteristics are considered to synergistically accelerate the rate-determining step of NH 3 synthesis, cleavage of the N 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000

  20. Temperature sensitivity of gaseous elemental mercury in the active layer of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Zhijia; Peng, Fei; Xue, Xian; Zhang, Xiaoshan

    2018-07-01

    Soils represent the single largest mercury (Hg) reservoir in the global environment, indicating that a tiny change of Hg behavior in soil ecosystem could greatly affect the global Hg cycle. Climate warming is strongly altering the structure and functions of permafrost and then would influence the Hg cycle in permafrost soils. However, Hg biogeochemistry in climate-sensitive permafrost is poorly investigated. Here we report a data set of soil Hg (0) concentrations in four different depths of the active layer in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau permafrost. We find that soil Hg (0) concentrations exhibited a strongly positive and exponential relationship with temperature and showed different temperature sensitivity under the frozen and unfrozen condition. We conservatively estimate that temperature increases following latest temperature scenarios of the IPCC could result in up to a 54.9% increase in Hg (0) concentrations in surface permafrost soils by 2100. Combining the simultaneous measurement of air-soil Hg (0) exchange, we find that enhanced Hg (0) concentrations in upper soils could favor Hg (0) emissions from surface soil. Our findings indicate that Hg (0) emission could be stimulated by permafrost thawing in a warmer world. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An organic water-gated ambipolar transistor with a bulk heterojunction active layer for stable and tunable photodetection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haihua; Zhu, Qingqing; Wu, Tongyuan; Chen, Wenwen; Zhou, Guodong; Li, Jun; Zhang, Huisheng; Zhao, Ni

    2016-11-01

    Organic water-gated transistors (OWGTs) have emerged as promising sensing architectures for biomedical applications and environmental monitoring due to their ability of in-situ detection of biological substances with high sensitivity and low operation voltage, as well as compatibility with various read-out circuits. Tremendous progress has been made in the development of p-type OWGTs. However, achieving stable n-type operation in OWGTs due to the presence of solvated oxygen in water is still challenging. Here, we report an ambipolar OWGT based on a bulk heterojunction active layer, which exhibits a stable hole and electron transport when exposed to aqueous environment. The device can be used as a photodetector both in the hole and electron accumulation regions to yield a maximum responsivity of 0.87 A W-1. More importantly, the device exhibited stable static and dynamic photodetection even when operated in the n-type mode. These findings bring possibilities for the device to be adopted for future biosensing platforms, which are fully compatible with low-cost and low-power organic complementary circuits.

  2. Long-term performance of activated carbon air cathodes with different diffusion layer porosities in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2011-08-01

    Activated carbon (AC) air-cathodes are inexpensive and useful alternatives to Pt-catalyzed electrodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but information is needed on their long-term stability for oxygen reduction. AC cathodes were constructed with diffusion layers (DLs) with two different porosities (30% and 70%) to evaluate the effects of increased oxygen transfer on power. The 70% DL cathode initially produced a maximum power density of 1214±123mW/m 2 (cathode projected surface area; 35±4W/m 3 based on liquid volume), but it decreased by 40% after 1 year to 734±18mW/m 2. The 30% DL cathode initially produced less power than the 70% DL cathode, but it only decreased by 22% after 1 year (from 1014±2mW/m 2 to 789±68mW/m 2). Electrochemical tests were used to examine the reasons for the degraded performance. Diffusion resistance in the cathode was found to be the primary component of the internal resistance, and it increased over time. Replacing the cathode after 1 year completely restored the original power densities. These results suggest that the degradation in cathode performance was due to clogging of the AC micropores. These findings show that AC is a cost-effective material for oxygen reduction that can still produce ~750mW/m 2 after 1 year. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Electric double-layer capacitors with tea waste derived activated carbon electrodes and plastic crystal based flexible gel polymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, M.; Deraman, M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Omar, R.; Hashim, M. A.; Basri, N. H.; Nor, N. S. M.; Dolah, B. N. M.; Hanappi, M. F. Y. M.; Hamdan, E.; Sazali, N. E. S.; Tajuddin, N. S. M.; Jasni, M. R. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report a novel configuration of symmetrical electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) comprising a plastic crystalline succinonitrile (SN) based flexible polymer gel electrolyte, incorporated with sodium trifluoromethane sulfonate (NaTf) immobilised in a host polymer poly (vinylidine fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP). The cost-effective activated carbon powder possessing a specific surface area (SSA) of ~ 1700 m2g-1 containing a large proportion of meso-porosity has been derived from tea waste to use as supercapacitor electrodes. The high ionic conductivity (~3.6×10-3 S cm-1 at room temperature) and good electrochemical stability render the gel polymer electrolyte film a suitable candidate for the fabrication of EDLCs. The performance of the EDLCs has been tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and galvanostatic charge-discharge studies. The performance of the EDLC cell is found to be promising in terms of high values of specific capacitance (~270 F g-1), specific energy (~ 36 Wh kg-1), and power density (~ 33 kW kg-1).

  4. Electric double-layer capacitors with tea waste derived activated carbon electrodes and plastic crystal based flexible gel polymer electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleman, M; Deraman, M; Othman, M A R; Omar, R; Basri, N H; Nor, N S M; Dolah, B N M; Hanappi, M F Y M; Hamdan, E; Sazali, N E S; Tajuddin, N S M; Jasni, M R M; Hashim, M A

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel configuration of symmetrical electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) comprising a plastic crystalline succinonitrile (SN) based flexible polymer gel electrolyte, incorporated with sodium trifluoromethane sulfonate (NaTf) immobilised in a host polymer poly (vinylidine fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP). The cost-effective activated carbon powder possessing a specific surface area (SSA) of ∼ 1700 m 2 g -1 containing a large proportion of meso-porosity has been derived from tea waste to use as supercapacitor electrodes. The high ionic conductivity (∼3.6×10 -3 S cm -1 at room temperature) and good electrochemical stability render the gel polymer electrolyte film a suitable candidate for the fabrication of EDLCs. The performance of the EDLCs has been tested by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and galvanostatic charge-discharge studies. The performance of the EDLC cell is found to be promising in terms of high values of specific capacitance (∼270 F g -1 ), specific energy (∼ 36 Wh kg -1 ), and power density (∼ 33 kW kg -1 ). (paper)

  5. Complete Analysis of a Biologically Active Tetrapeptide: A Project Utilizing Thin-Layer Chromatography and Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Joseph W.; Dodsworth, David W.

    2000-04-01

    The biologically active tetrapeptide d-Ala-Gly-l-Phe-d-Leu ([des-Tyr1-d-Ala2-d-Leu5]enkephalin) was analyzed for its amino acid content and stereochemistry by normal and reversed-phase thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and its sequence was determined by tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry. The project involved sequential N-dansylation of a portion of the tetrapeptide, hydrolysis, isolation, and identification of the N-terminal amino acid as dansyl-alanine by comparison with standards using normal-phase TLC. A second portion of the tetrapeptide was hydrolyzed and the resulting four free amino acids were converted to their corresponding dansyl derivatives and purified by preparative normal-phase TLC. The three dansyl amino acids not identified previously were identified by TLC. The stereochemistry of each was determined by comparison with dansyl-dl-amino acid standards using reversed-phase TLC in the presence of ß-cyclodextrin, a chiral mobile phase additive. Finally, the correct amino acid sequence was determined by tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry. This project gives students valuable experience in microscale synthesis, both normal and reversed-phase TLC, stereochemical analysis, and mass spectrometry.

  6. Analysis of low active-pharmaceutical-ingredient signal drugs based on thin layer chromatography and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Qingxia; Liu, Yan; Lu, Feng

    2016-11-30

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) embedded in the excipients of the formula can usually be unravelled by normal Raman spectroscopy (NRS). However, more and more drugs with low API content and/or low Raman scattering coefficient were insensitive to NRS analysis, which was for the first time defined as Low API-Signal Drugs (LASIDs) in this paper. The NRS spectra of these LASIDs were similar to their dominant excipients' profiles, such as lactose, starch, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), etc., and were classified into three types as such. 21 out of 100 kinds of drugs were screened as LASIDs and characterized further by Raman microscopic mapping. Accordingly, we proposed a tailored solution to the qualitation and quantitation problem of these LASIDs, using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) detection on the thin layer chromatographic (TLC) plate both in situ and after-separation. Experimental conditions and parameters including TLC support matrix, SERS substrate, detection mode, similarity threshold, internal standard, etc., were optimized. All LASIDs were satisfactorily identified and the quantitation results agreed well with those of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For some structural analogues of LASIDs, although they presented highly similar SERS spectra and were tough to distinguish even with Raman microscopic mapping, they could be successfully discriminated from each other by coupling SERS (with portable Raman spectrometer) with TLC. These results demonstrated that the proposed solution could be employed to detect the LASIDs with high accuracy and cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrosynthesis and characterization of ZnO nanoparticles as inorganic component in organic thin-film transistor active layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picca, Rosaria Anna; Sportelli, Maria Chiara; Hötger, Diana; Manoli, Kyriaki; Kranz, Christine; Mizaikoff, Boris; Torsi, Luisa; Cioffi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PSS-capped ZnO NPs were synthesized via a green electrochemical-thermal method • The influence of electrochemical conditions and temperature was studied • Spectroscopic data show that PSS functionalities are retained in the annealed NPs • Nanostructured ZnO improved the performance of P3HT-based thin film transistors - Abstract: ZnO nanoparticles have been prepared via a green electrochemical synthesis method in the presence of a polymeric anionic stabilizer (poly-sodium-4-styrenesulfonate, PSS), and then applied as inorganic component in poly-3-hexyl-thiophene thin-film transistor active layers. Different parameters (i.e. current density, electrolytic media, PSS concentration, and temperature) influencing nanoparticle synthesis have been studied. The resulting nanomaterials have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, infrared, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies), assessing the most suitable conditions for the synthesis and thermal annealing of nanostructured ZnO. The proposed ZnO nanoparticles have been successfully coupled with a poly-3-hexyl-thiophene thin-film resulting in thin-film transistors with improved performance.

  8. Potential Carbon Transport: Linking Soil Aggregate Stability and Sediment Enrichment for Updating the Soil Active Layer within Intensely Managed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacha, K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Abban, B. K.; Wilson, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, many biogeochemical models lack the mechanistic capacity to accurately simulate soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics, especially within intensely managed landscapes (IMLs) such as those found in the U.S. Midwest. These modeling limitations originate by not accounting for downslope connectivity of flowpathways initiated and governed by landscape processes and hydrologic forcing, which induce dynamic updates to the soil active layer (generally top 20-30cm of soil) with various sediment size fractions and aggregates being transported and deposited along the downslope. These hydro-geomorphic processes, often amplified in IMLs by tillage events and seasonal canopy, can greatly impact biogeochemical cycles (e.g., enhanced mineralization during aggregate breakdown) and in turn, have huge implications/uncertainty when determining SOC budgets. In this study, some of these limitations were addressed through a new concept, Potential Carbon Transport (PCT), a term which quantifies a maximum amount of material available for transport at various positions of the landscape, which was used to further refine a coupled modeling framework focused on SOC redistribution through downslope/lateral connectivity. Specifically, the size fractions slaked from large and small aggregates during raindrop-induced aggregate stability tests were used in conjunction with rainfall-simulated sediment enrichment ratio (ER) experiments to quantify the PCT under various management practices, soil types and landscape positions. Field samples used in determining aggregate stability and the ER experiments were collected/performed within the historic Clear Creek Watershed, home of the IML Critical Zone Observatory, located in Southeastern Iowa.

  9. Activation of the CREB/c-Fos Pathway during Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity in the Cerebellum Granular Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gandolfi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The induction of long-term potentiation and depression (LTP and LTD is thought to trigger gene expression and protein synthesis, leading to consolidation of synaptic and neuronal changes. However, while LTP and LTD have been proposed to play important roles for sensori-motor learning in the cerebellum granular layer, their association with these mechanisms remained unclear. Here, we have investigated phosphorylation of the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB and activation of the immediate early gene c-Fos pathway following the induction of synaptic plasticity by theta-burst stimulation (TBS in acute cerebellar slices. LTP and LTD were localized using voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDi. At two time points following TBS (15 min and 120 min, corresponding to the early and late phases of plasticity, slices were fixed and processed to evaluate CREB phosphorylation (P-CREB and c-FOS protein levels, as well as Creb and c-Fos mRNA expression. High levels of P-CREB and Creb/c-Fos were detected before those of c-FOS, as expected if CREB phosphorylation triggered gene expression followed by protein synthesis. No differences between control slices and slices stimulated with TBS were observed in the presence of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR antagonist. Interestingly, activation of the CREB/c-Fos system showed a relevant degree of colocalization with long-term synaptic plasticity. These results show that NMDAR-dependent plasticity at the cerebellum input stage bears about transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes potentially contributing to cerebellar learning and memory consolidation.

  10. Laterally constrained inversion for CSAMT data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruo; Yin, Changchun; Wang, Miaoyue; Di, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Laterally constrained inversion (LCI) has been successfully applied to the inversion of dc resistivity, TEM and airborne EM data. However, it hasn't been yet applied to the interpretation of controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data. In this paper, we apply the LCI method for CSAMT data inversion by preconditioning the Jacobian matrix. We apply a weighting matrix to Jacobian to balance the sensitivity of model parameters, so that the resolution with respect to different model parameters becomes more uniform. Numerical experiments confirm that this can improve the convergence of the inversion. We first invert a synthetic dataset with and without noise to investigate the effect of LCI applications to CSAMT data, for the noise free data, the results show that the LCI method can recover the true model better compared to the traditional single-station inversion; and for the noisy data, the true model is recovered even with a noise level of 8%, indicating that LCI inversions are to some extent noise insensitive. Then, we re-invert two CSAMT datasets collected respectively in a watershed and a coal mine area in Northern China and compare our results with those from previous inversions. The comparison with the previous inversion in a coal mine shows that LCI method delivers smoother layer interfaces that well correlate to seismic data, while comparison with a global searching algorithm of simulated annealing (SA) in a watershed shows that though both methods deliver very similar good results, however, LCI algorithm presented in this paper runs much faster. The inversion results for the coal mine CSAMT survey show that a conductive water-bearing zone that was not revealed by the previous inversions has been identified by the LCI. This further demonstrates that the method presented in this paper works for CSAMT data inversion.

  11. Order-constrained linear optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, Joe W; Dougherty, Michael R; Chrabaszcz, Jeffrey S; Thomas, Rick P

    2017-11-01

    Despite the fact that data and theories in the social, behavioural, and health sciences are often represented on an ordinal scale, there has been relatively little emphasis on modelling ordinal properties. The most common analytic framework used in psychological science is the general linear model, whose variants include ANOVA, MANOVA, and ordinary linear regression. While these methods are designed to provide the best fit to the metric properties of the data, they are not designed to maximally model ordinal properties. In this paper, we develop an order-constrained linear least-squares (OCLO) optimization algorithm that maximizes the linear least-squares fit to the data conditional on maximizing the ordinal fit based on Kendall's τ. The algorithm builds on the maximum rank correlation estimator (Han, 1987, Journal of Econometrics, 35, 303) and the general monotone model (Dougherty & Thomas, 2012, Psychological Review, 119, 321). Analyses of simulated data indicate that when modelling data that adhere to the assumptions of ordinary least squares, OCLO shows minimal bias, little increase in variance, and almost no loss in out-of-sample predictive accuracy. In contrast, under conditions in which data include a small number of extreme scores (fat-tailed distributions), OCLO shows less bias and variance, and substantially better out-of-sample predictive accuracy, even when the outliers are removed. We show that the advantages of OCLO over ordinary least squares in predicting new observations hold across a variety of scenarios in which researchers must decide to retain or eliminate extreme scores when fitting data. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  12. CONSTRAINED EVOLUTION OF A RADIALLY MAGNETIZED PROTOPLANETARY DISK: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANETARY MIGRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Thompson, Christopher [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2015-12-10

    We consider the inner ∼1 AU of a protoplanetary disk (PPD) at a stage where angular momentum transport is driven by the mixing of a radial magnetic field into the disk from a T Tauri wind. Because the radial profile of the imposed magnetic field is well constrained, a constrained calculation of the disk mass flow becomes possible. The vertical disk profiles obtained in Paper I imply a stronger magnetization in the inner disk, faster accretion, and a secular depletion of the disk material. Inward transport of solids allows the disk to maintain a broad optical absorption layer even when the grain abundance becomes too small to suppress its ionization. Thus, a PPD may show a strong mid- to near-infrared spectral excess even while its mass profile departs radically from the minimum-mass solar nebula. The disk surface density is buffered at ∼30 g cm{sup −2}; below this, X-rays trigger magnetorotational turbulence at the midplane strong enough to loft millimeter- to centimeter-sized particles high in the disk, followed by catastrophic fragmentation. A sharp density gradient bounds the inner depleted disk and propagates outward to ∼1–2 AU over a few megayears. Earth-mass planets migrate through the inner disk over a similar timescale, whereas the migration of Jupiters is limited by the supply of gas. Gas-mediated migration must stall outside 0.04 AU, where silicates are sublimated and the disk shifts to a much lower column. A transition disk emerges when the dust/gas ratio in the MRI-active layer falls below X{sub d} ∼ 10{sup −6} (a{sub d}/μm), where a{sub d} is the grain size.

  13. Comparison of positive-pressure, passive ultrasonic, and laser-activated irrigations on smear-layer removal from the root canal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahar-Helft, Sharonit; Sarp, Ayşe Sena Kabaş; Stabholtz, Adam; Gutkin, Vitaly; Redenski, Idan; Steinberg, Doron

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of three irrigation techniques for smear-layer removal with 17% EDTA. Cleaning and shaping the root canal system during endodontic treatment produces a smear layer and hard tissue debris. Three irrigation techniques were tested for solution infiltration of this layer: positive-pressure irrigation, passive ultrasonic irrigation, and laser-activated irrigation. Sixty extracted teeth were divided into six equal groups; 17% EDTA was used for 60 sec irrigation of five of the groups. The groups were as follows: Group 1, treated only with ProTaper™ F3 Ni-Ti files; Group 2, positive-pressure irrigation, with a syringe; Group 3, passive ultrasonic irrigation, inserted 1 mm short of the working length; Group 4, passive ultrasonic irrigation, inserted in the upper coronal third of the root; Group 5, Er:YAG laser-activated irrigation, inserted 1 mm short of the working length; and Group 6, Er:YAG laser-activated irrigation, inserted in the upper coronal third of the root. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the smear layer is removed most efficiently using laser-activated irrigation at low energy with 17% EDTA, inserted either at the working length or only in the coronal upper third of the root. Amounts of Ca, P, and O were not significantly different on all treated dentin surfaces. Smear-layer removal was most effective when the root canals were irrigated using Er:YAG laser at low energy with 17% EDTA solution. Interestingly, removal of the smear layer along the entire canal was similar when the laser was inserted in the upper coronal third and at 1 mm short of the working length of the root canal. This effect was not observed with the ultrasonic and positive-pressure techniques.

  14. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy and electrochemical activities of graphitic layer encapsulated iron electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Lijie; Frandsen, Cathrine; Mørup, Steen

    2018-01-01

    Graphitic layer encapsulated iron based nanoparticles (G@FeNPs) have recently been disclosed as an interesting type of highly active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the complex composition of the metal-containing components and their contributions in catalysis r...

  15. Characterization of the Organic Thin Film Solar Cells with Active Layers of PTB7/PC71BM Prepared by Using Solvent Mixtures with Different Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Ito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic thin film solar cells (OTFSCs were fabricated with blended active layers of poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyloxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexylcarbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  16. Kinetic analysis of anionic surfactant adsorption from aqueous solution onto activated carbon and layered double hydroxide with the zero length column method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, N.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Euverink, G.J.W.; de Haan, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Low cost adsorption technology offers high potential to clean-up laundry rinsing water. From an earlier selection of adsorbents, layered double hydroxide (LDH) and granular activated carbon (GAC) proved to be interesting materials for the removal of anionic surfactant, linear alkyl benzene sulfonate

  17. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossander, Lea Hildebrandt; Zawacka, Natalia Klaudia; Dam, Henrik Friis

    2014-01-01

    The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording...

  18. Flexible strategy for immobilizing redox-active compounds using in situ generation of diazonium salts. Investigations of the blocking and catalytic properties of the layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Jean-Marc; Sjöberg, Béatrice; Marsac, Rémi; Zigah, Dodzi; Bergamini, Jean-François; Wang, Aifang; Rigaut, Stéphane; Hapiot, Philippe; Lagrost, Corinne

    2009-11-03

    A versatile two-step method is developed to covalently immobilize redox-active molecules onto carbon surfaces. First, a robust anchoring platform is grafted onto surfaces by electrochemical reduction of aryl diazonium salts in situ generated. Depending on the nature of the layer termini, -COOH or -NH(2), a further chemical coupling involving ferrocenemethylamine or ferrocene carboxylic acid derivatives leads to the covalent binding of ferrocene centers. The chemical strategy using acyl chloride activation is efficient and flexible, since it can be applied either to surface-reactive end groups or to reactive species in solution. Cyclic voltammetry analyses point to the covalent binding of ferrocene units restricted to the upper layers of the underlying aryl films, while AFM measurements show a lost of compactness of the layers after the chemical attachment of ferrocene centers. The preparation conditions of the anchoring layers were found to determine the interfacial properties of the resulted ferrocenyl-modified electrodes. The ferrocene units promoted effective redox mediation providing that the free redox probes are adequately chosen (i.e., vs size/formal potential) and the underlying layers exhibit strong blocking properties. For anchoring films with weaker blocking effect, the coexistence of two distinct phenomena, redox mediation and ET at pinholes could be evidenced.

  19. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active layer of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schostag, Morten; Stibal, Marek; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2015-01-01

    organic matter on the bacterial communities. The copy number of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts revealed no distinct seasonal changes indicating potential bacterial activity during winter despite soil temperatures well below -10ºC. Multivariate statistical analysis of the bacterial diversity data (DNA......The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil chemistry, which likely affect bacterial activity and community structure. We studied seasonal variations in the bacterial community of active layer soil from Svalbard (78º......N) by co-extracting DNA and RNA from 12 soil cores collected monthly over a year. PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes (DNA) and reverse transcribed transcripts (cDNA) were quantified and sequenced to test for the effect of low winter temperature and seasonal variation in concentration of easily degradable...

  20. Extrapolating active layer thickness measurements across Arctic polygonal terrain using LiDAR and NDVI data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Rowland, Joel C; Hubbard, Susan S; Brumby, Steven P; Liljedahl, Anna K; Wainwright, Haruko; Wilson, Cathy J; Altmann, Garrett L; Dafflon, Baptiste; Peterson, John; Ulrich, Craig; Tweedie, Craig E; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2014-08-01

    Landscape attributes that vary with microtopography, such as active layer thickness ( ALT ), are labor intensive and difficult to document effectively through in situ methods at kilometer spatial extents, thus rendering remotely sensed methods desirable. Spatially explicit estimates of ALT can provide critically needed data for parameterization, initialization, and evaluation of Arctic terrestrial models. In this work, we demonstrate a new approach using high-resolution remotely sensed data for estimating centimeter-scale ALT in a 5 km 2 area of ice-wedge polygon terrain in Barrow, Alaska. We use a simple regression-based, machine learning data-fusion algorithm that uses topographic and spectral metrics derived from multisensor data (LiDAR and WorldView-2) to estimate ALT (2 m spatial resolution) across the study area. Comparison of the ALT estimates with ground-based measurements, indicates the accuracy (r 2  = 0.76, RMSE ±4.4 cm) of the approach. While it is generally accepted that broad climatic variability associated with increasing air temperature will govern the regional averages of ALT , consistent with prior studies, our findings using high-resolution LiDAR and WorldView-2 data, show that smaller-scale variability in ALT is controlled by local eco-hydro-geomorphic factors. This work demonstrates a path forward for mapping ALT at high spatial resolution and across sufficiently large regions for improved understanding and predictions of coupled dynamics among permafrost, hydrology, and land-surface processes from readily available remote sensing data.

  1. Hybrid polymer-CdS solar cell active layers formed by in situ growth of CdS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masala, S.; Del Gobbo, S.; Borriello, C.; Bizzarro, V.; La Ferrara, V.; Re, M.; Pesce, E.; Minarini, C.; De Crescenzi, M.; Di Luccio, T.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) into a polymeric matrix has the potential to enhance the performance of polymer-based solar cells taking advantage of the physical properties of NPs and polymers. We synthesize a new class of CdS-NPs-based active layer employing a low-cost and low temperature route compatible with large-scale device manufacturing. Our approach is based on the controlled in situ thermal decomposition of a cadmium thiolate precursor in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The casted P3HT:precursor solid foils were heated up from 200 to 300 °C to allow the precursor decomposition and the CdS-NP formation within the polymer matrix. The CdS-NP growth was controlled by varying the annealing temperature. The polymer:precursor weight ratio was also varied to investigate the effects of increasing the NP volume fraction on the solar cell performances. The optical properties were studied by using UV–Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at room temperature. To investigate the photocurrent response of P3HT:CdS nanocomposites, ITO/P3HT:CdS/Al solar cell devices were realized. We measured the external quantum efficiency (EQE) as a function of the wavelength. The photovoltaic response of the devices containing CdS-NPs showed a variation compared with the devices with P3HT only. By changing the annealing temperature the EQE is enhanced in the 400–600 nm spectral region. By increasing the NPs volume fraction remarkable changes in the EQE spectra were observed. The data are discussed also in relation to morphological features of the interfaces studied by Focused Ion Beam technique.

  2. Modeling the microstructural evolution during constrained sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Tikare, V.

    A numerical model able to simulate solid state constrained sintering of a powder compact is presented. The model couples an existing kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model for free sintering with a finite element (FE) method for calculating stresses on a microstructural level. The microstructural response...... to the stress field as well as the FE calculation of the stress field from the microstructural evolution is discussed. The sintering behavior of two powder compacts constrained by a rigid substrate is simulated and compared to free sintering of the same samples. Constrained sintering result in a larger number...

  3. Asymptotic Likelihood Distribution for Correlated & Constrained Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ujjwal

    2016-01-01

    It describes my work as summer student at CERN. The report discusses the asymptotic distribution of the likelihood ratio for total no. of parameters being h and 2 out of these being are constrained and correlated.

  4. Constrained bidirectional propagation and stroke segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, S; Gillespie, W; Suen, C Y

    1983-03-01

    A new method for decomposing a complex figure into its constituent strokes is described. This method, based on constrained bidirectional propagation, is suitable for parallel processing. Examples of its application to the segmentation of Chinese characters are presented. 9 references.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Constrained Hamiltonian Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, A.J. van der; Maschke, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Network modelling of unconstrained energy conserving physical systems leads to an intrinsic generalized Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamics. Constrained energy conserving physical systems are directly modelled as implicit Hamiltonian systems with regard to a generalized Dirac structure on the

  6. Client's Constraining Factors to Construction Project Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    factors as a significant system that constrains project management success of public and ... finance for the project and prompt payment for work executed; clients .... consideration of the loading patterns of these variables, the major factor is ...

  7. Granular flows in constrained geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Tejas; Viswanathan, Koushik

    Confined geometries are widespread in granular processing applications. The deformation and flow fields in such a geometry, with non-trivial boundary conditions, determine the resultant mechanical properties of the material (local porosity, density, residual stresses etc.). We present experimental studies of deformation and plastic flow of a prototypical granular medium in different nontrivial geometries- flat-punch compression, Couette-shear flow and a rigid body sliding past a granular half-space. These geometries represent simplified scaled-down versions of common industrial configurations such as compaction and dredging. The corresponding granular flows show a rich variety of flow features, representing the entire gamut of material types, from elastic solids (beam buckling) to fluids (vortex-formation, boundary layers) and even plastically deforming metals (dead material zone, pile-up). The effect of changing particle-level properties (e.g., shape, size, density) on the observed flows is also explicitly demonstrated. Non-smooth contact dynamics particle simulations are shown to reproduce some of the observed flow features quantitatively. These results showcase some central challenges facing continuum-scale constitutive theories for dynamic granular flows.

  8. On the origin of constrained superfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall’Agata, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dudas, E. [Centre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay,F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Farakos, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2016-05-06

    In this work we analyze constrained superfields in supersymmetry and supergravity. We propose a constraint that, in combination with the constrained goldstino multiplet, consistently removes any selected component from a generic superfield. We also describe its origin, providing the operators whose equations of motion lead to the decoupling of such components. We illustrate our proposal by means of various examples and show how known constraints can be reproduced by our method.

  9. Software architecture for time-constrained machine vision applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Molleda, Julio; García, Daniel F.; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2013-01-01

    Real-time image and video processing applications require skilled architects, and recent trends in the hardware platform make the design and implementation of these applications increasingly complex. Many frameworks and libraries have been proposed or commercialized to simplify the design and tuning of real-time image processing applications. However, they tend to lack flexibility, because they are normally oriented toward particular types of applications, or they impose specific data processing models such as the pipeline. Other issues include large memory footprints, difficulty for reuse, and inefficient execution on multicore processors. We present a novel software architecture for time-constrained machine vision applications that addresses these issues. The architecture is divided into three layers. The platform abstraction layer provides a high-level application programming interface for the rest of the architecture. The messaging layer provides a message-passing interface based on a dynamic publish/subscribe pattern. A topic-based filtering in which messages are published to topics is used to route the messages from the publishers to the subscribers interested in a particular type of message. The application layer provides a repository for reusable application modules designed for machine vision applications. These modules, which include acquisition, visualization, communication, user interface, and data processing, take advantage of the power of well-known libraries such as OpenCV, Intel IPP, or CUDA. Finally, the proposed architecture is applied to a real machine vision application: a jam detector for steel pickling lines.

  10. Background synaptic activity in rat entorhinal cortex shows a progressively greater dominance of inhibition over excitation from deep to superficial layers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart David Greenhill

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex (EC controls hippocampal input and output, playing major roles in memory and spatial navigation. Different layers of the EC subserve different functions and a number of studies have compared properties of neurones across layers. We have studied synaptic inhibition and excitation in EC neurones, and we have previously compared spontaneous synaptic release of glutamate and GABA using patch clamp recordings of synaptic currents in principal neurones of layers II (L2 and V (L5. Here, we add comparative studies in layer III (L3. Such studies essentially look at neuronal activity from a presynaptic viewpoint. To correlate this with the postsynaptic consequences of spontaneous transmitter release, we have determined global postsynaptic conductances mediated by the two transmitters, using a method to estimate conductances from membrane potential fluctuations. We have previously presented some of this data for L3 and now extend to L2 and L5. Inhibition dominates excitation in all layers but the ratio follows a clear rank order (highest to lowest of L2>L3>L5. The variance of the background conductances was markedly higher for excitation and inhibition in L2 compared to L3 or L5. We also show that induction of synchronized network epileptiform activity by blockade of GABA inhibition reveals a relative reluctance of L2 to participate in such activity. This was associated with maintenance of a dominant background inhibition in L2, whereas in L3 and L5 the absolute level of inhibition fell below that of excitation, coincident with the appearance of synchronized discharges. Further experiments identified potential roles for competition for bicuculline by ambient GABA at the GABAA receptor, and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in residual inhibition in L2. We discuss our results in terms of control of excitability in neuronal subpopulations of EC neurones and what these may suggest for their functional roles.

  11. Effectiveness of four different final irrigation activation techniques on smear layer removal in curved root canals : a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Ahuja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of apical negative pressure (ANP, manual dynamic agitation (MDA, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI and needle irrigation (NI as final irrigation activation techniques for smear layer removal in curved root canals.Mesiobuccal root canals of 80 freshly extracted maxillary first molars with curvatures ranging between 25° and 35° were used. A glide path with #08-15 K files was established before cleaning and shaping with Mtwo rotary instruments (VDW, Munich, Germany up to size 35/0.04 taper. During instrumentation, 1 ml of 2.5% NaOCl was used at each change of file. Samples were divided into 4 equal groups (n=20 according to the final irrigation activation technique: group 1, apical negative pressure (ANP (EndoVac; group 2, manual dynamic agitation (MDA; group 3, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI; and group 4, needle irrigation (NI. Root canals were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The presence of smear layer at coronal, middle and apical levels was evaluated by superimposing 300-μm square grid over the obtained photomicrographs using a four-score scale with X1,000 magnification.Amongst all the groups tested, ANP showed the overall best smear layer removal efficacy (p < 0.05. Removal of smear layer was least effective with the NI technique.ANP (EndoVac system can be used as the final irrigation activation technique for effective smear layer removal in curved root canals.

  12. In situ generation of highly dispersed metal nanoparticles on two-dimensional layered SiO2 by topotactic structure conversion and their superior catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Jia, Da-Shuang; Zhou, Yue; Hao, Jiang; Liang, Yu; Cui, Zhi-Min; Song, Wei-Guo

    2018-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles such as Ag, Cu and Fe are effective catalysts for many reactions, whereas a facile method to prepare metal nanoparticles with high uniformed dispersion is still desirable. Herein, the topotactic structure conversion of layered silicate, RUB-15, was utilized to support metal nanoparticles. Through simple ion-exchange and following calcination step, metal nanoparticles were generated in situ inside the interlayer space of layered silica, and the topotactic structure conversion process assured nano-sized and highly uniformed dispersion of metal nanoparticles. The obtained Ag/SiO2 composite showed superior catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and methylene blue (MB), with a rate constant as high as 0.0607 s-1 and 0.0778 s-1. The simple and universal synthesis method as well as high activity of the product composite endow the strategy good application prospect.

  13. Visible light activity of pulsed layer deposited BiVO{sub 4}/MnO{sub 2} films decorated with gold nanoparticles: The evidence for hydroxyl radicals formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzciński, Konrad, E-mail: trzcinskikonrad@gmail.com [Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Szkoda, Mariusz [Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Sawczak, Mirosław [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery, Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk (Poland); Karczewski, Jakub [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Lisowska-Oleksiak, Anna [Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The BiVO{sub 4} + MnO{sub 2} photoactive layers were prepared by pulsed laser deposition method. • Prepared layers can act as photoanodes for water splitting. • The thin BiVO{sub 4} + MnO{sub 2} film can be used as photocatalyst for methylene blue degradation. • The formation of hydroxyl radicals during photocatalys illumination has been proved. • The dropcasted GNP improved significantly photocatalytic properties of tested layers. - Abstract: Thin films containing BiVO{sub 4} and MnO{sub 2} deposited on FTO and modified by Au nanoparticles were studied towards their photoelectrochemical and photocatalytical activities in an aqueous electrolyte. Electrodes were prepared by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The surfactant-free ablation process was used for preparation of the gold nanoparticles (GNP) water suspension. Obtained layers of varied thicknesses (27–115 nm) were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical methods such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, linear voltammetry and chronoamperometry under visible light illumination and in the dark were applied to characterize layers as photoanodes. Simple modification of the BiVO{sub 4} + MnO{sub 2} layer by drop-casting of small amount of colloidal gold (1.5 × 10{sup −14} mol of GNP on 1 cm{sup 2}) leads to enhancement of the generated photocurrent recorded at E = 0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl (0.1 M KCl) from 63 μA/cm{sup 2} to 280 μA/cm{sup 2}. Photocatalytical studies were also exploited towards decomposition of methylene blue (MB). A possible mechanism of MB photodegradation was proposed. The formation of hydroxyl radicals was detected by photoluminescence spectra using terephthalic acid as the probe molecule.

  14. Enhancing carrier injection in the active region of a 280nm emission wavelength LED using graded hole and electron blocking layers

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2014-02-27

    A theoretical investigation of AlGaN UV-LED with band engineering of hole and electron blocking layers (HBL and EBL, respectively) was conducted with an aim to improve injection efficiency and reduce efficiency droop in the UV LEDs. The analysis is based on energy band diagrams, carrier distribution and recombination rates (Shockley-Reed-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates) in the quantum well, under equilibrium and forward bias conditions. Electron blocking layer is based on AlaGa1-aN / Al b → cGa1-b → 1-cN / AldGa 1-dN, where a < d < b < c. A graded layer sandwiched between large bandgap AlGaN materials was found to be effective in simultaneously blocking electrons and providing polarization field enhanced carrier injection. The graded interlayer reduces polarization induced band bending and mitigates the related drawback of impediment of holes injection. Similarly on the n-side, the Alx → yGa1-x → 1-yN / AlzGa 1-zN (x < z < y) barrier acts as a hole blocking layer. The reduced carrier leakage and enhanced carrier density in the active region results in significant improvement in radiative recombination rate compared to a structure with the conventional rectangular EBL layers. The improvement in device performance comes from meticulously designing the hole and electron blocking layers to increase carrier injection efficiency. The quantum well based UV-LED was designed to emit at 280nm, which is an effective wavelength for water disinfection application.

  15. Enhancing carrier injection in the active region of a 280nm emission wavelength LED using graded hole and electron blocking layers

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of AlGaN UV-LED with band engineering of hole and electron blocking layers (HBL and EBL, respectively) was conducted with an aim to improve injection efficiency and reduce efficiency droop in the UV LEDs. The analysis is based on energy band diagrams, carrier distribution and recombination rates (Shockley-Reed-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates) in the quantum well, under equilibrium and forward bias conditions. Electron blocking layer is based on AlaGa1-aN / Al b → cGa1-b → 1-cN / AldGa 1-dN, where a < d < b < c. A graded layer sandwiched between large bandgap AlGaN materials was found to be effective in simultaneously blocking electrons and providing polarization field enhanced carrier injection. The graded interlayer reduces polarization induced band bending and mitigates the related drawback of impediment of holes injection. Similarly on the n-side, the Alx → yGa1-x → 1-yN / AlzGa 1-zN (x < z < y) barrier acts as a hole blocking layer. The reduced carrier leakage and enhanced carrier density in the active region results in significant improvement in radiative recombination rate compared to a structure with the conventional rectangular EBL layers. The improvement in device performance comes from meticulously designing the hole and electron blocking layers to increase carrier injection efficiency. The quantum well based UV-LED was designed to emit at 280nm, which is an effective wavelength for water disinfection application.

  16. Metal–organic layers stabilize earth-abundant metal–terpyridine diradical complexes for catalytic C–H activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zekai; Thacker, Nathan C.; Sawano, Takahiro; Drake, Tasha; Ji, Pengfei; Lan, Guangxu; Cao, Lingyun; Liu, Shubin; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin (UNC); (UC); (Xiamen)

    2017-10-30

    Metal–organic layers stabilize FeIIor CoII-terpyridine diradical complexes to catalyze alkylazide Csp3–H amination and benzylic C–H borylation, respectively.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of a layered-type W-Ti-O mixed metal oxide and its solid acid activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murayama, T.; Nakajima, K.; Hirata, J.; Omata, K.; Hensen, E.J.M.; Ueda, W.

    2017-01-01

    A layered-type W–Ti–O mixed oxide was synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis from an aqueous solution of ammonium metatungstate and titanium sulfate. To avoid the formation of titania, oxalic acid was used as a reductant. Optimized synthesis led to rod-like particles comprised of MO6 (M = W, Ti)

  18. Level-set dynamics and mixing efficiency of passive and active scalars in DNS and LES of turbulent mixing layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Vreman, Bert; Kuerten, Hans; Luo, Kai H.

    2001-01-01

    The mixing efficiency in a turbulent mixing layer is quantified by monitoring the surface-area of level-sets of scalar fields. The Laplace transform is applied to numerically calculate integrals over arbitrary level-sets. The analysis includes both direct and large-eddy simulation and is used to

  19. Respons Antibodi Sekunder Terhadap Penyakit Tetelo pada Ayam Petelur Pascavaksinasi Ulangan dengan Vaksin Tetelo Aktif (NEWCASTLE DISEASESECONDARY ANTIBODY RESPONSE AFTER REVACCINATION IN LAYER WITH THE ACTIVE ND VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andika Budi Kurnianto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Revaccination is required in order to preventNewcastle Disease (ND reccurence inlayers chickens. Oneof vaccine for ND revaccination is freeze-died ND active vaccine containing e” 106,5EID50. Revaccinationisdone to trigger a faster secondary antibody responses in layers and can achieve protective antibody titersagainst ND that can be monitored by a hemagglutinationinhibition (HI. The aim of this study was todetermine the ND secondary antibody responses in layers after revaccination with ND active vaccine.Antibody titer of 20 layers chickens of 20 week old were determined before revaccinations (week 0 andafter revaccinations (week 1 until week 9. The first vaccination was conducted using ND-IB (NewcastleDisease-Infectious Bronchitis at the age of 2 days through eye drops and subcutaneous injection at the ageof 5 days using a dose of 1 ampoule.Vaccination is repeated at the age of 20 weeks at a dose of 1 ½ ampoule through drinking water. Blood samples were collected on the wing vein (venous cutane ulnar and left for 5-10 minutes at room temperature.Sera were then collected and stored at -20oC until use. HI antibody titerwas determined by micro titeration system. The HI mean titers were analyzed by Duncan test. The studyresults showed that antibody titer before revaccination was3,47 HI log 2 and the HI titers after revaccinationwere 4,02; 5,22; 6,52; 7,85; 8,4; 8,6; 7,7; 5,92; dan 3,87 HI log 2 respectivelly at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and9.The NDV revaccination with ND active vaccine significantly (P <0.01 increased in antibody titer inlayers starting from week 1 to week 6, but decreased following week 7 to week-9. It can be concluded thatrevaccinantion with ND active vaccine increases the antibody titers in layer chickens.

  20. Piezo-Catalytic Effect on the Enhancement of the Ultra-High Degradation Activity in the Dark by Single- and Few-Layers MoS2 Nanoflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jyh Ming; Chang, Wei En; Chang, Yu Ting; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2016-05-01

    Single- and few-layer MoS2 nanoflowers are first discovered to have a piezo-catalyst effect, exhibiting an ultra-high degradation activity in the dark by introducing external mechanical strains. The degradation ratio of the Rhodamine-B dye solution reaches 93% within 60 s under ultrasonic-wave assistance in the dark. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Photocatalytic activity of porous multiwalled carbon nanotube-TiO{sub 2} composite layers for pollutant degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zouzelka, Radek [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, v.i.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Kusumawati, Yuly [Chimie ParisTech, PSL Research University, CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Remzova, Monika [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, v.i.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 16628 Prague (Czech Republic); Rathousky, Jiri [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, v.i.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Pauporté, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.pauporte@chimie-paristech.fr [Chimie ParisTech, PSL Research University, CNRS, Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • A simple method for TiO{sub 2}/graphene nanocomposite layer preparation. • Stable coatings on glass substrate. • Mesoporous nanocomposite films with high internal surface area. • High photoactivity for 4-chlorophenol degradation. • Analysis of photocatalysis enhancement mechanism. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are suitable building blocks nanostructures for the synthesis of porous functional thin films. Here we report the preparation of films using brookite, P25 titania and anatase pristine nanoparticles and of nanocomposite layers combining anatase nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) at various concentrations. The structure and phase composition of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Their morphology and texture properties were determined by scanning electron microscopy and krypton adsorption experiments, respectively. Additionally to a strong absorption in the UV range, the composites exhibited light absorption in the visible range as well. The photocatalytic performance of the layers was tested in the degradation of aqueous solutions of 4-chlorophenol serving as a model of an eco-persistent pollutant. Besides the determination of the decrease in the concentration of 4-chlorophenol, also the formation of intermediate degradation products, namely hydroquinone and benzoquinone, was followed. The presence of MWCNTs had a beneficial effect on the photocatalytic performance, a marked increase in the photocatalytic degradation rate constant being observed even at very low concentrations of MWCNTs. Compared to a P25 reference layer, the first order rate reaction constant increased by about 100% for the composite films containing MWCNTs at concentrations above 0.6 wt%. The key parameters for the enhancement of the photocatalytic performance are discussed. The presence of carbon nanotubes influences beneficially the degradation of 4-chlorophenol by an attack of the primarily

  2. Development of White-Light Emitting Active Layers in Nitride Based Heterostructures for Phosphorless Solid State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan Talbot; Kailash Mishra

    2007-12-31

    This report provides a summary of research activities carried out at the University of California, San Diego and Central Research of OSRAM SYLVANIA in Beverly, MA partially supported by a research contract from US Department of Energy, DE-FC26-04NT422274. The main objective of this project was to develop III-V nitrides activated by rare earth ions, RE{sup 3+}, which could eliminate the need for phosphors in nitride-based solid state light sources. The main idea was to convert electron-hole pairs injected into the active layer in a LED die to white light directly through transitions within the energy levels of the 4f{sup n}-manifold of RE{sup 3+}. We focused on the following materials: Eu{sup 3+}(red), Tb{sup 3+}(green), Er{sup 3+}(green), Dy{sup 3+}(yellow) and Tm{sup 3+}(blue) in AlN, GaN and alloys of AlN and GaN. Our strategy was to explore candidate materials in powder form first, and then study their behavior in thin films. Thin films of these materials were to be deposited on sapphire substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The photo- and cathode-luminescence measurements of these materials were used to investigate their suitability for white light generation. The project proceeded along this route with minor modifications needed to produce better materials and to expedite our progress towards the final goal. The project made the following accomplishments: (1) red emission from Eu{sup 3+}, green from Tb{sup 3+}, yellow from Dy{sup 3+} and blue from Tm{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (2) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN powder; (3) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} in alloys of GaN and AlN; (4) green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films by PLD; (5) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films deposited by MOVPE; (6) energy transfer from host to RE{sup 3+}; (7) energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (8) emission from AlN powder samples

  3. Method for manufacturing carrier containing e.g. proteins for human during oral drug delivery operation for food and drug administration application in pharmaceutical industry, involves providing active ingredient to core layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    NOVELTY - The method involves preparing a multi-layered film comprising a core layer and a barrier layer, where the core layer comprises active ingredient. The multi-layered film is subjected to a hot embossing step using an embossing stamp including protrusions that allows for generation...... delivery operation for a food and drug administration (FDA) application in a pharmaceutical industry. ADVANTAGE - The method enables allowing an individual micro-structure stuck in an embossing stamp to be demolded under the conditions such that demolding operation is done by treating elastically...

  4. Bulk chlorine uptake by polyamide active layers of thin-film composite membranes upon exposure to free chlorine-kinetics, mechanisms, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    We studied the volume-averaged chlorine (Cl) uptake into the bulk region of the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine. Volume-averaged measurements were obtained using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with samples prepared at a range of free chlorine concentrations, exposure times, and mixing, rinsing, and pH conditions. Our volume-averaged measurements complement previous studies that have quantified Cl uptake at the active layer surface (top ≈ 7 nm) and advance the mechanistic understanding of Cl uptake by aromatic polyamide active layers. Our results show that surface Cl uptake is representative of and underestimates volume-averaged Cl uptake under acidic conditions and alkaline conditions, respectively. Our results also support that (i) under acidic conditions, N-chlorination followed by Orton rearrangement is the dominant Cl uptake mechanism with N-chlorination as the rate-limiting step; (ii) under alkaline conditions, N-chlorination and dechlorination of N-chlorinated amide links by hydroxyl ion are the two dominant processes; and (iii) under neutral pH conditions, the rates of N-chlorination and Orton rearrangement are comparable. We propose a kinetic model that satisfactorily describes Cl uptake under acidic and alkaline conditions, with the largest discrepancies between model and experiment occurring under alkaline conditions at relatively high chlorine exposures.

  5. Balancing computation and communication power in power constrained clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piga, Leonardo; Paul, Indrani; Huang, Wei

    2018-05-29

    Systems, apparatuses, and methods for balancing computation and communication power in power constrained environments. A data processing cluster with a plurality of compute nodes may perform parallel processing of a workload in a power constrained environment. Nodes that finish tasks early may be power-gated based on one or more conditions. In some scenarios, a node may predict a wait duration and go into a reduced power consumption state if the wait duration is predicted to be greater than a threshold. The power saved by power-gating one or more nodes may be reassigned for use by other nodes. A cluster agent may be configured to reassign the unused power to the active nodes to expedite workload processing.

  6. Thin layer activation (TLA) experiment of piston ring F.J product by using nuclear facility proton beam 12.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarmono; Silakhuddin

    2002-01-01

    The experiment of thin layer activation of piston ring F.J product, was done. The purpose of this experiment are to measure material wearing level by using concentration method. The experiment was carried out by activated piston ring proton beam with energy 12,5 MeV and beam current 1 μA for 30 minutes then was continued by wearing process. The measurement of the wear result activity was carried out by pouring the total of volume of lubricant oil for radioactivity measurement. Measurement of the activity level used the gamma spectroscopy. The minimum wearing duration that can detects a wear was 5 hours. The activity count was 1.230 pulse per 30 seconds which is in accordance with a wear in order of 8 mg of Fe material on 1 liter oil lubricant, this result is same with the result of T. Delvigne namely is less than 10 mgr

  7. Microbial immobilization and recycling of 137Cs in the organic layers of forest ecosystems: Relationship to environmental conditions, humification and invertebrate activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckmann, Axel; Wolters, Volkmar

    1994-01-01

    The 137 Cs content of the microbial biomass in the organic layers of 10 German forest sites was quantified with a modified fumigation/extraction method. A K Cs factor was calculated for biomass 137 Cs from the difference between unfumigated and fumigated samples by means of laboratory cultures. The size of the estimated K Cs factors varied between 1.54 and 2.90 (mean, 2.17; S.D., 0.48). The microflora at the different forest sites contained between 1 and 56% of the total amount of 137 Cs found in the organic layers (mean, 13%). Litterbag experiments showed that 137 Cs was actively transported into the L layer by the microflora and that this effect was enhanced by the mesofauna. It is concluded that the immobilization and recycling of 137 Cs by the microflora in the organic layer of forest soils is determined by three major factors: 137 Cs availability, growth conditions of the microflora and biotic interactions

  8. Regional Responses to Constrained Water Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Calvin, K. V.; Hejazi, M. I.; Clarke, L.; Kim, S. H.; Patel, P.

    2017-12-01

    There have been many concerns about water as a constraint to agricultural production, electricity generation, and many other human activities in the coming decades. Nevertheless, how different countries/economies would respond to such constraints has not been explored. Here, we examine the responding mechanism of binding water availability constraints at the water basin level and across a wide range of socioeconomic, climate and energy technology scenarios. Specifically, we look at the change in water withdrawals between energy, land-use and other sectors within an integrated framework, by using the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) that also endogenizes water use and allocation decisions based on costs. We find that, when water is taken into account as part of the production decision-making, countries/basins in general fall into three different categories, depending on the change of water withdrawals and water re-allocation between sectors. First, water is not a constraining factor for most of the basins. Second, advancements in water-saving technologies of the electricity generation cooling systems are sufficient of reducing water withdrawals to meet binding water availability constraints, such as in China and the EU-15. Third, water-saving in the electricity sector alone is not sufficient and thus cannot make up the lowered water availability from the binding case; for example, many basins in Pakistan, Middle East and India have to largely reduce irrigated water withdrawals by either switching to rain-fed agriculture or reducing production. The dominant responding strategy for individual countries/basins is quite robust across the range of alternate scenarios that we test. The relative size of water withdrawals between energy and agriculture sectors is one of the most important factors that affect the dominant mechanism.

  9. Radio Frequency Enhanced Plasma Potential and Flows in the Scrap-Off Layer of an Active Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael John

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems are critical components of current and future tokamak experiments aimed at producing nuclear fusion energy. During ICRH a host of deleterious effects occur, including increased heat flux to plasma facing components and modification of launched wave power. A suspected root cause of these effects is the radio frequency (RF) rectification of the plasma potential. Interest in the antenna scrape-off layer (SOL) region has drawn increasing interest, as it is recognized that mitigating these effects is necessary to achieving fusion power. This dissertation investigates the RF rectification of the plasma potential and the resulting cross-field flows that form due to an active RF antenna. The experiment is performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) utilizing a fast wave antenna and RF amplifier system developed for these studies. The RF system is capable of 150 kW output power for a 1 ms pulse that is repeated at the 1 Hz repetition rate of the LAPD plasma discharge. Upon application of the RF pulse to the antenna, the DC plasma potential, measured with an emissive probe, dramatically increases in certain spatial locations by a factor greater than 10 Te. The largest plasma potentials are observed at locations magnetically connected to the top and bottom of the antenna, and they exist only in the private SOL created between the antenna and a limiter placed 3.6 m away along the LAPD axis. The DC rectified potentials scale linearly with the antenna current over a factor of 12x in the applied current. These DC potentials increase plasma materials interactions (PMI), resulting in the sputtering of antenna materials whose presence is detected in the bulk plasma by the coatings that develop on probe diagnostics. The DC rectified potentials persist in the plasma long after the RF current in the antenna has rung down on the same time scales as the change in the density. At the top and bottom of the antenna are circular flows, often

  10. Snow control on active layer and permafrost in steep alpine rock walls (Aiguille du Midi, 3842 m a.s.l, Mont Blanc massif)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnin, Florence; Westermann, Sebastian; Pogliotti, Paolo; Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Permafrost degradation through the thickening of the active layer and the rising temperature at depth is a crucial process of rock wall stability. The ongoing increase in rock falls observed during hot periods in mid-latitude mountain ranges is regarded as a result of permafrost degradation. However, the short-term thermal dynamics of alpine rock walls are misunderstood since they result of complex processes related to the interaction of local climate variables, heterogeneous snow cover and heat transfers. As a consequence steady-state and long-term changes that can be approached with simpler process mainly related to air temperature, solar radiations and heat conduction were the most common dynamics to be studied so far. The effect of snow on the bedrock surface temperature is increasingly investigated and has already been demonstrated to be an essential factor of permafrost distribution. Nevertheless, its effect on the year-to-year changes of the active layer thickness and of the permafrost temperature in steep alpine bedrock has not been investigated yet, partly due to the lack of appropriate data. We explore the role of snow accumulations on the active layer and permafrost thermal regime of steep rock walls of a high-elevated site, the Aiguille du Midi (AdM, 3842 m a.s.l, Mont Blanc massif, Western European Alps) by mean of a multi-methods approach. We first analyse six years of temperature records in three 10-m-deep boreholes. Then we describe the snow accumulation patterns on two rock faces by means of automatically processed camera records. Finally, sensitivity analyses of the active layer thickness and permafrost temperature towards timing and magnitude of snow accumulations are performed using the numerical permafrost model CryoGrid 3. The energy balance module is forced with local meteorological measurements on the AdM S face and validated with surface temperature measurements at the weather station location. The heat conduction scheme is calibrated with

  11. Towards weakly constrained double field theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanghoon Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that it is possible to construct a well-defined effective field theory incorporating string winding modes without using strong constraint in double field theory. We show that X-ray (Radon transform on a torus is well-suited for describing weakly constrained double fields, and any weakly constrained fields are represented as a sum of strongly constrained fields. Using inverse X-ray transform we define a novel binary operation which is compatible with the level matching constraint. Based on this formalism, we construct a consistent gauge transform and gauge invariant action without using strong constraint. We then discuss the relation of our result to the closed string field theory. Our construction suggests that there exists an effective field theory description for massless sector of closed string field theory on a torus in an associative truncation.

  12. Continuation of Sets of Constrained Orbit Segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schilder, Frank; Brøns, Morten; Chamoun, George Chaouki

    Sets of constrained orbit segments of time continuous flows are collections of trajectories that represent a whole or parts of an invariant set. A non-trivial but simple example is a homoclinic orbit. A typical representation of this set consists of an equilibrium point of the flow and a trajectory...... that starts close and returns close to this fixed point within finite time. More complicated examples are hybrid periodic orbits of piecewise smooth systems or quasi-periodic invariant tori. Even though it is possible to define generalised two-point boundary value problems for computing sets of constrained...... orbit segments, this is very disadvantageous in practice. In this talk we will present an algorithm that allows the efficient continuation of sets of constrained orbit segments together with the solution of the full variational problem....

  13. Enhanced polymer light-emitting diode property using fluorescent conducting polymer-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as active emissive layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jyoti Prakash; Saha, Uttam; Jaiswal, Rimpa; Anand, Raghubir Singh; Srivastava, Anurag; Goswami, Thako Hari

    2014-11-01

    The present article reports the polymer light-emitting diode property of the nanocomposite comprising poly 9,9-dioctyl fluorene- alt-bithiophene and reduced graphene oxide used as an emissive layer. Two times repetition of Hummers oxidation and hydrazine hydrate reduction method produce reduced graphene oxide (term as rGO2) with more uniform distribution in size and thickness. In addition, this uniquely synthesized rGO2 induces favorable shift in balance of electron and hole recombination zone toward the center of emissive layer owing to increase in in-plane crystallite size and high localize aromatic confinement. Five times increase in maximum device efficiency (Cd/A) and three times increase in maximum brightness (Cd/m2) are achieved with the LED device using nanocomposite as emissive layer compared to neat polymer. Also, the fabricated device requires relatively low turn-on voltage (4 V) because of low energy barrier between PEDOT work function (-5.0 eV) and HOMO levels of bi-thiophene copolymer -5.67 eV) and nanocomposite (-5.66 eV).

  14. Electrochemomechanical constrained multiobjective optimization of PPy/MWCNT actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, N; Naguib, H E; Kwon, R H

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) conducting polymers have shown a great potential for the fabrication of conjugated polymer-based actuating devices. Consequently, they have been a key point in developing many advanced emerging applications such as biomedical devices and biomimetic robotics. When designing an actuator, taking all of the related decision variables, their roles and relationships into consideration is of pivotal importance to determine the actuator’s final performance. Therefore, the central focus of this study is to develop an electrochemomechanical constrained multiobjective optimization model of a PPy/MWCNTs trilayer actuator. For this purpose, the objective functions are designed to capture the three main characteristics of these actuators, namely their tip vertical displacement, blocking force and response time. To obtain the optimum range of the designated decision variables within the feasible domain, a multiobjective optimization algorithm is applied while appropriate constraints are imposed. The optimum points form a Pareto surface on which they are consistently spread. The numerical results are presented; these results enable one to design an actuator with consideration to the desired output performances. For the experimental analysis, a multilayer bending-type actuator is fabricated, which is composed of a PVDF layer and two layers of PPy with an incorporated layer of multi-walled carbon nanotubes deposited on each side of the PVDF membrane. The numerical results are experimentally verified; in order to determine the performance of the fabricated actuator, its outputs are compared with a neat PPy actuator’s experimental and numerical counterparts. (paper)

  15. Constrained principal component analysis and related techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Takane, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    In multivariate data analysis, regression techniques predict one set of variables from another while principal component analysis (PCA) finds a subspace of minimal dimensionality that captures the largest variability in the data. How can regression analysis and PCA be combined in a beneficial way? Why and when is it a good idea to combine them? What kind of benefits are we getting from them? Addressing these questions, Constrained Principal Component Analysis and Related Techniques shows how constrained PCA (CPCA) offers a unified framework for these approaches.The book begins with four concre

  16. Constrained Sintering in Fabrication of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Weon; Park, Mansoo; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Hyoungchul; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook

    2016-08-09

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are inevitably affected by the tensile stress field imposed by the rigid substrate during constrained sintering, which strongly affects microstructural evolution and flaw generation in the fabrication process and subsequent operation. In the case of sintering a composite cathode, one component acts as a continuous matrix phase while the other acts as a dispersed phase depending upon the initial composition and packing structure. The clustering of dispersed particles in the matrix has significant effects on the final microstructure, and strong rigidity of the clusters covering the entire cathode volume is desirable to obtain stable pore structure. The local constraints developed around the dispersed particles and their clusters effectively suppress generation of major process flaws, and microstructural features such as triple phase boundary and porosity could be readily controlled by adjusting the content and size of the dispersed particles. However, in the fabrication of the dense electrolyte layer via the chemical solution deposition route using slow-sintering nanoparticles dispersed in a sol matrix, the rigidity of the cluster should be minimized for the fine matrix to continuously densify, and special care should be taken in selecting the size of the dispersed particles to optimize the thermodynamic stability criteria of the grain size and film thickness. The principles of constrained sintering presented in this paper could be used as basic guidelines for realizing the ideal microstructure of SOFCs.

  17. Constrained Sintering in Fabrication of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Weon; Park, Mansoo; Hong, Jongsup; Kim, Hyoungchul; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are inevitably affected by the tensile stress field imposed by the rigid substrate during constrained sintering, which strongly affects microstructural evolution and flaw generation in the fabrication process and subsequent operation. In the case of sintering a composite cathode, one component acts as a continuous matrix phase while the other acts as a dispersed phase depending upon the initial composition and packing structure. The clustering of dispersed particles in the matrix has significant effects on the final microstructure, and strong rigidity of the clusters covering the entire cathode volume is desirable to obtain stable pore structure. The local constraints developed around the dispersed particles and their clusters effectively suppress generation of major process flaws, and microstructural features such as triple phase boundary and porosity could be readily controlled by adjusting the content and size of the dispersed particles. However, in the fabrication of the dense electrolyte layer via the chemical solution deposition route using slow-sintering nanoparticles dispersed in a sol matrix, the rigidity of the cluster should be minimized for the fine matrix to continuously densify, and special care should be taken in selecting the size of the dispersed particles to optimize the thermodynamic stability criteria of the grain size and film thickness. The principles of constrained sintering presented in this paper could be used as basic guidelines for realizing the ideal microstructure of SOFCs. PMID:28773795

  18. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin; Leech, Donal

    2009-01-01

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl) 2 (4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF 6 , to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E 0 '' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  19. 3D morphological characterization of the polyamide active layer of RO and NF membranes using TEM and soft X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Tyler; Paul, Mou; Roy, Abhishek; Rosenberg, Steve; Behr, Michael; Kumar, Manish; Gomez, Enrique; Penn State Team; Dow Team

    Polyamide-based thin-film composite (TFC) membranes used for reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) separation processes are at the forefront of water desalination and purification technologies due to their high salt rejection, high energy efficiency, and ease of operation. Nevertheless, in spite of the benefits of RO and NF membranes, many open questions about the internal nanostructure of the membrane active layer remain, such as the dispersion and distribution of acid functional groups. We demonstrate that resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS), where the X-ray energy is tuned to absorption edges of the constituent materials, is a powerful tool to examine the microstructure of the polyamide layer. In conjunction with complementary techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), where tomography is used to obtain a 3D reconstruction of the polyamide active layer, the effect of cross-linking can be quantified in 3D for a systematic series of membranes. This relationship can then be applied to a series of commercially available RO and NF membranes where the effect of polyamide cross-linking on their respective structure and water transport properties can be evaluated. The combination of RSOXS with traditional characterization tools provides a strategy for linking the chemical structure to the morphology and water transport properties of RO and NF membranes.

  20. Novel Organic Phototransistor-Based Nonvolatile Memory Integrated with UV-Sensing/Green-Emissive Aggregation Enhanced Emission (AEE)-Active Aromatic Polyamide Electret Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shun-Wen; Han, Ting; Huang, Teng-Yung; Chang Chien, Yu-Hsin; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2018-05-30

    A novel aggregation enhanced emission (AEE)-active polyamide TPA-CN-TPE with a high photoluminesence characteristic was successfully synthesized by the direct polymerization of 4-cyanotriphenyl diamine (TPA-CN) and tetraphenylethene (TPE)-containing dicarboxylic acid. The obtained luminescent polyamide plays a significant role as the polymer electret layer in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs)-type memory. The strong green emission of TPA-CN-TPE under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can be directly absorbed by the pentacene channel, displaying a light-induced programming and voltage-driven erasing organic phototransistor-based nonvolatile memory. Memory window can be effectively manipulated between the programming and erasing states by applying UV light illumination and electrical field, respectively. The photoinduced memory behavior can be maintained for over 10 4 s between these two states with an on/off ratio of 10 4 , and the memory switching can be steadily operated for many cycles. With high photoresponsivity ( R) and photosensitivity ( S), this organic phototransistor integrated with AEE-active polyamide electret layer could serve as an excellent candidate for UV photodetectors in optical applications. For comparison, an AEE-inactive aromatic polyimide TPA-PIS electret with much weaker solid-state emission was also applied in the same OFETs device architecture, but this device did not show any UV-sensitive and UV-induced memory characteristics, which further confirmed the significance of the light-emitting capability of the electret layer.

  1. Improved performance of polymer solar cells using PBDTT-F-TT:PC_7_1BM blend film as active layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Yue; Gao, Xiumin; Lu, Xinmiao; Xin, Qing; Lin, Jun; Zhao, Jufeng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The PCE of PBDTT-F-TT-based PSCs was improved to 9.34% by morphology control and device engineering. • Effect of DIO additive on the BHJ morphology and charge transport was investigated. • Effect of device architecture on the performance was studied in depth by optical modeling. • A low-temperature processed interfacial layer was introduced for plastic substrates. - Abstract: A detailed study of high-efficiency polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on a low bandgap polymer PBDTT-F-TT and PC_7_1BM as the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is carried out. By using 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) as solvent additive to control the morphology of active layer and comparing different device architecture to optimize the optical field distribution, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the resulted devices can be reached as high as 9.34%. Comprehensive characterization and optical modeling of the resulting devices is performed to understand the effect of DIO and device geometry on photovoltaic performance. It was found that the addition of DIO can significantly improve the nanoscale morphology and increased electron mobility in the BHJ layer. The inverted device architecture was chosen because the results from optical modeling shows that it offers better optical field distribution and exciton generation profile. Based on these results, a low-temperature processed ZnO was finally introduced as an electron transport layer to facility the fabrication on flexible substrates and showed comparable performance with the device based on conventional ZnO interlayer prepared by sol-gel process.

  2. Fabrication of highly electro catalytic active layer of multi walled carbon nanotube/enzyme for Pt-free dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbab, Alvira Ayoub, E-mail: alvira_arbab@yahoo.com [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Kyung Chul, E-mail: hytec@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Fuel cells and hydrogen technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sahito, Iftikhar Ali, E-mail: iftikhar.sahito@faculty.muet.edu.pk [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Qadir, Muhammad Bilal, E-mail: bilal_ntu81@hotmail.com [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sung Hoon, E-mail: shjeong@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared three different types of enzyme dispersed multiwall carbon nanotube (E-MWCNT) layer for application in Pt-free dye sensitized solar cell (DSSCs). • E-MWCNT catalysts exhibited an extremely good electro-catalytic activity (ECA), compared with the conventional catalyst, when synthesized with lipase enzyme. • E-MWCNT as counter electrode exhibits a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.5%, which can be compared to 8% efficiency of Pt catalyst. - Abstract: Highly dispersed conductive suspensions of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can have intrinsic electrical and electrochemical characteristics, which make them useful candidate for platinum (Pt)-free, dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). High energy conversion efficiency of 7.52% is demonstrated in DSSCs, based on enzyme dispersed MWCNT (E-MWCNT) layer deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. The E-MWCNT layer shows a pivotal role as platform to reduce large amount of iodide species via electro catalytically active layer, fabricated by facile tape casting under air drying technique. The E-MWCNT layer with large surface area, high mechanical adhesion, and good interconnectivity is derived from an appropriate enzyme dispersion, which provides not only enhanced interaction sites for the electrolyte/counter electrode interface but also improved electron transport mechanism. The surface morphology and structural characterization were investigated using field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and electronic microscopy techniques. Electro catalytic activity (ECA) and electrochemical properties of E-MWCNT counter electrode (CE) were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of E-MWCNT CE is associated with the low charge transfer

  3. Fabrication of highly electro catalytic active layer of multi walled carbon nanotube/enzyme for Pt-free dye sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Sun, Kyung Chul; Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared three different types of enzyme dispersed multiwall carbon nanotube (E-MWCNT) layer for application in Pt-free dye sensitized solar cell (DSSCs). • E-MWCNT catalysts exhibited an extremely good electro-catalytic activity (ECA), compared with the conventional catalyst, when synthesized with lipase enzyme. • E-MWCNT as counter electrode exhibits a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.5%, which can be compared to 8% efficiency of Pt catalyst. - Abstract: Highly dispersed conductive suspensions of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can have intrinsic electrical and electrochemical characteristics, which make them useful candidate for platinum (Pt)-free, dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). High energy conversion efficiency of 7.52% is demonstrated in DSSCs, based on enzyme dispersed MWCNT (E-MWCNT) layer deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. The E-MWCNT layer shows a pivotal role as platform to reduce large amount of iodide species via electro catalytically active layer, fabricated by facile tape casting under air drying technique. The E-MWCNT layer with large surface area, high mechanical adhesion, and good interconnectivity is derived from an appropriate enzyme dispersion, which provides not only enhanced interaction sites for the electrolyte/counter electrode interface but also improved electron transport mechanism. The surface morphology and structural characterization were investigated using field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and electronic microscopy techniques. Electro catalytic activity (ECA) and electrochemical properties of E-MWCNT counter electrode (CE) were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of E-MWCNT CE is associated with the low charge transfer

  4. Mature Basin Development Portfolio Management in a Resource Constrained Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandhane, J. M.; Udo, S. D.

    2002-01-01

    Nigerian Petroleum industry is constantly faced with management of resource constraints stemming from capital and operating budget, availability of skilled manpower, capacity of an existing surface facility, size of well assets, amount of soft and hard information, etceteras. Constrained capital forces the industry to rank subsurface resource and potential before proceeding with preparation of development scenarios. Availability of skilled manpower limits scope of integrated reservoir studies. Level of information forces technical and management to find low-risk development alternative in a limited time. Volume of either oil or natural gas or water or combination of them may be constrained due to design limits of the existing facility, or an external OPEC quota, requires high portfolio management skills.The first part of the paper statistically analyses development portfolio of a mature basin for (a) subsurface resources volume, (b) developed and undeveloped and undeveloped volumes, (c) sweating of wells, and (d) facility assets. The analysis presented conclusively demonstrates that the 80/20 is active in the statistical sample. The 80/20 refers to 80% of the effect coming from the 20% of the cause. The second part of the paper deals with how 80/20 could be applied to manage portfolio for a given set of constraints. Three application examples are discussed. Feedback on implementation of them resulting in focussed resource management with handsome rewards is documented.The statistical analysis and application examples from a mature basin form a way forward for a development portfolio management in an resource constrained environment

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure, and photocatalytic activity of a new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase, Li2CaTa2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Zhenhua; Tang Kaibin; Shao Qian; Li Guocan; Zeng Suyuan; Zheng Huagui

    2008-01-01

    A new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 has been synthesized for the first time. The detailed structure determination of Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 performed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microscopy (ED) shows that it crystallizes in the space group Fmmm [a∼5.5153(1), b∼5.4646(1), c∼18.2375(3)A]. UV-visible diffuse reflection spectrum of the prepared Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 indicates that it had absorption in the UV region. The photocatalytic activity of the Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 powders was evaluated by degradation of RhB molecules in water under ultra visible light irradiation. The results showed that Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 has high photocatalytic activity at room temperature. Therefore, the preparation and properties studies of Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 with a two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper structure suggest potential future applications in photocatalysis. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of a two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 A new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 has been synthesized for the first time. Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 crystallizes in the space group Fmmm determined by powder X-ray and electron diffraction. UV-visible diffuse reflection spectra and the photocatalytic degradation of RhB molecules in water under ultra visible light irradiation show that Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 is a potential material in photocatalysis

  6. All-solution-processed bottom-gate organic thin-film transistor with improved subthreshold behaviour using functionalized pentacene active layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinwoo; Jeong, Jaewook; Cho, Hyun Duk; Lee, Changhee; Hong, Yongtaek; Kim, Seul Ong; Kwon, Soon-Ki

    2009-01-01

    We report organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) made by simple solution processes in an ambient air environment. Inkjet-printed silver electrodes were used for bottom-gate and bottom-contacted source/drain electrodes. A spin-coated cross-linked poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVP) and a spin-coated 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) were used as a gate dielectric layer and an active layer, respectively. A high-boiling-point solvent was used for TIPS-pentacene and the resulting film showed stem-like morphology. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement showed the spin-coated active layer was well crystallized, showing the (0 0 1) plane. The reasonable mobility, on/off ratio and threshold voltage of the fabricated device, which are comparable to those of the previously reported TIPS-pentacene OTFT with gold electrodes, show that the printed silver electrodes worked successfully as gate and source/drain electrodes. Furthermore, the device showed a subthreshold slope of 0.61 V/dec in the linear region (V DS = -5 V), which is the lowest value for spin-coated TIPS-pentacene TFT ever reported, and much lower than that of the thermally evaporated pentacene OTFTs. It is thought that the surface energy of the PVP dielectric layer is well matched with that of a well-ordered TIPS-pentacene (0 0 1) surface when a high-boiling-point solvent and a low-temperature drying process are used, thereby making good interface properties, and showing higher performances than those for pentacene TFT with the same structure.

  7. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny

    2015-10-23

    A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  8. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny; Sá nchez Jimé nez, Cecilia; Gurinov, Andrei; Pé rez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel; Carbajal Arí zaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  9. A real-time Java tool chain for resource constrained platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan E.; Søndergaard, Hans; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Java programming language was originally developed for embedded systems, but the resource requirements of previous and current Java implementations – especially memory consumption – tend to exclude them from being used on a significant class of resource constrained embedded platforms. The con......The Java programming language was originally developed for embedded systems, but the resource requirements of previous and current Java implementations – especially memory consumption – tend to exclude them from being used on a significant class of resource constrained embedded platforms...... by integrating the following: (1) a lean virtual machine without any external dependencies on POSIX-like libraries or other OS functionalities; (2) a hardware abstraction layer, implemented almost entirely in Java through the use of hardware objects, first level interrupt handlers, and native variables; and (3....... An evaluation of the presented solution shows that the miniCDj benchmark gets reduced to a size where it can run on resource constrained platforms....

  10. A real-time Java tool chain for resource constrained platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan Erbs; Søndergaard, Hans; Ravn, Anders P.

    2013-01-01

    The Java programming language was originally developed for embedded systems, but the resource requirements of previous and current Java implementations - especially memory consumption - tend to exclude them from being used on a significant class of resource constrained embedded platforms. The con......The Java programming language was originally developed for embedded systems, but the resource requirements of previous and current Java implementations - especially memory consumption - tend to exclude them from being used on a significant class of resource constrained embedded platforms...... by integrating: (1) a lean virtual machine (HVM) without any external dependencies on POSIX-like libraries or other OS functionalities, (2) a hardware abstraction layer, implemented almost entirely in Java through the use of hardware objects, first level interrupt handlers, and native variables, and (3....... An evaluation of the presented solution shows that the miniCDj benchmark gets reduced to a size where it can run on resource constrained platforms....

  11. On Tree-Constrained Matchings and Generalizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Canzar (Stefan); K. Elbassioni; G.W. Klau (Gunnar); J. Mestre

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWe consider the following \\textsc{Tree-Constrained Bipartite Matching} problem: Given two rooted trees $T_1=(V_1,E_1)$, $T_2=(V_2,E_2)$ and a weight function $w: V_1\\times V_2 \\mapsto \\mathbb{R}_+$, find a maximum weight matching $\\mathcal{M}$ between nodes of the two trees, such that

  12. Constrained systems described by Nambu mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassig, C.C.; Joshi, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    Using the framework of Nambu's generalised mechanics, we obtain a new description of constrained Hamiltonian dynamics, involving the introduction of another degree of freedom in phase space, and the necessity of defining the action integral on a world sheet. We also discuss the problem of quantizing Nambu mechanics. (authors). 5 refs

  13. Client's constraining factors to construction project management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analyzed client's related factors that constrain project management success of public and private sector construction in Nigeria. Issues that concern clients in any project can not be undermined as they are the owners and the initiators of project proposals. It is assumed that success, failure or abandonment of ...

  14. A Dynamic Programming Approach to Constrained Portfolios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Holger; Steffensen, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies constrained portfolio problems that may involve constraints on the probability or the expected size of a shortfall of wealth or consumption. Our first contribution is that we solve the problems by dynamic programming, which is in contrast to the existing literature that applies...

  15. A model for optimal constrained adaptive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Reese, Lynda M.

    2001-01-01

    A model for constrained computerized adaptive testing is proposed in which the information on the test at the ability estimate is maximized subject to a large variety of possible constraints on the contents of the test. At each item-selection step, a full test is first assembled to have maximum

  16. A model for optimal constrained adaptive testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Willem J.; Reese, Lynda M.

    1997-01-01

    A model for constrained computerized adaptive testing is proposed in which the information in the test at the ability estimate is maximized subject to a large variety of possible constraints on the contents of the test. At each item-selection step, a full test is first assembled to have maximum

  17. Neutron Powder Diffraction and Constrained Refinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawley, G. S.; Mackenzie, Gordon A.; Dietrich, O. W.

    1977-01-01

    The first use of a new program, EDINP, is reported. This program allows the constrained refinement of molecules in a crystal structure with neutron diffraction powder data. The structures of p-C6F4Br2 and p-C6F4I2 are determined by packing considerations and then refined with EDINP. Refinement is...

  18. Terrestrial Sagnac delay constraining modified gravity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimov, R. Kh.; Izmailov, R. N.; Potapov, A. A.; Nandi, K. K.

    2018-04-01

    Modified gravity theories include f(R)-gravity models that are usually constrained by the cosmological evolutionary scenario. However, it has been recently shown that they can also be constrained by the signatures of accretion disk around constant Ricci curvature Kerr-f(R0) stellar sized black holes. Our aim here is to use another experimental fact, viz., the terrestrial Sagnac delay to constrain the parameters of specific f(R)-gravity prescriptions. We shall assume that a Kerr-f(R0) solution asymptotically describes Earth's weak gravity near its surface. In this spacetime, we shall study oppositely directed light beams from source/observer moving on non-geodesic and geodesic circular trajectories and calculate the time gap, when the beams re-unite. We obtain the exact time gap called Sagnac delay in both cases and expand it to show how the flat space value is corrected by the Ricci curvature, the mass and the spin of the gravitating source. Under the assumption that the magnitude of corrections are of the order of residual uncertainties in the delay measurement, we derive the allowed intervals for Ricci curvature. We conclude that the terrestrial Sagnac delay can be used to constrain the parameters of specific f(R) prescriptions. Despite using the weak field gravity near Earth's surface, it turns out that the model parameter ranges still remain the same as those obtained from the strong field accretion disk phenomenon.

  19. Chance constrained uncertain classification via robust optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben-Tal, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bhattacharayya, C.; Saketha Nat, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of constructing robust classifiers when the training is plagued with uncertainty. The problem is posed as a Chance-Constrained Program (CCP) which ensures that the uncertain data points are classified correctly with high probability. Unfortunately such a CCP turns out

  20. Integrating job scheduling and constrained network routing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the NP-hard problem of scheduling jobs on resources such that the overall profit of executed jobs is maximized. Job demand must be sent through a constrained network to the resource before execution can begin. The problem has application in grid computing, where a number...

  1. Neuroevolutionary Constrained Optimization for Content Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Togelius, Julian

    2011-01-01

    and thruster types and topologies) independently of game physics and steering strategies. According to the proposed framework, the designer picks a set of requirements for the spaceship that a constrained optimizer attempts to satisfy. The constraint satisfaction approach followed is based on neuroevolution...... and survival tasks and are also visually appealing....

  2. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2000) 21, 299 302. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation. Α. Mangalam* & V. Krishan†, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala,. Bangalore 560 034, India. *e mail: mangalam @ iiap. ernet. in. † e mail: vinod@iiap.ernet.in. Abstract. We study the relaxation of a compressible plasma to ...

  3. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active layer of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostag, Morten; Stibal, Marek; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Bælum, Jacob; Taş, Neslihan; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, Janet K.; Semenchuk, Philipp; Priemé, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil chemistry, which likely affect bacterial activity and community structure. We studied seasonal variations in the bacterial community of active layer soil from Svalbard (78°N) by co-extracting DNA and RNA from 12 soil cores collected monthly over a year. PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes (DNA) and reverse transcribed transcripts (cDNA) were quantified and sequenced to test for the effect of low winter temperature and seasonal variation in concentration of easily degradable organic matter on the bacterial communities. The copy number of 16S rRNA genes and transcripts revealed no distinct seasonal changes indicating potential bacterial activity during winter despite soil temperatures well below −10°C. Multivariate statistical analysis of the bacterial diversity data (DNA and cDNA libraries) revealed a season-based clustering of the samples, and, e.g., the relative abundance of potentially active Cyanobacteria peaked in June and Alphaproteobacteria increased over the summer and then declined from October to November. The structure of the bulk (DNA-based) community was significantly correlated with pH and dissolved organic carbon, while the potentially active (RNA-based) community structure was not significantly correlated with any of the measured soil parameters. A large fraction of the 16S rRNA transcripts was assigned to nitrogen-fixing bacteria (up to 24% in June) and phototrophic organisms (up to 48% in June) illustrating the potential importance of nitrogen fixation in otherwise nitrogen poor Arctic ecosystems and of phototrophic bacterial activity on the soil surface. PMID:25983731

  4. Preparation of activated carbon hollow fibers from ramie at low temperature for electric double-layer capacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Chengyang; Chen, Mingming; Qi, Tao; Hua, Chao; Ma, Mingguo

    2013-12-01

    Activated carbon hollow fibers (ACHFs) with high surface area were prepared from inexpensive, renewable ramie fibers (RFs) by a single-step activation method under lower temperature than that of other reports. The effects of activation conditions on the pore structure and turbostratic structure of ACHFs were investigated systematically. The results show that ACHFs surface area decreased but micropore volume and conductivity increased as the increase of activation temperature and activation time. The electrochemical measurements of supercapacitors fabricated from these ACHFs electrodes reveal that the electrochemical properties improved with the enhancing of activation degree. However, too high activation temperature can make the ion diffusion resistance increase. It suggests that pore structure and conductivity are as important as surface area to decide the electrochemical performances of ACHFs electrode materials. A maximum capacity of 287 F g(-1) at 50 mA g(-1) was obtained for the ACHFs electrode prepared under suitable conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis of Mn-intercalated layered titanate by exfoliation–flocculation approach and its efficient photocatalytic activity under visible–light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jie; Tian, Yanlong; Chang, Binbin; Li, Gengnan; Xi, Fengna; Dong, Xiaoping

    2012-01-01

    A novel Mn-intercalated layered titanate as highly active photocatalyst in visible-light region has been synthesized via a convenient and efficient exfoliation–flocculation approach with divalent Mn ions and monolayer titanate nanosheets. The 0.91 nm interlayer spacing of obtained photocatalyst is in accordance with the sum of the thickness of titanate nanosheet and the diameter of Mn ions. The yellow photocatalyst shows a spectral response in visible-light region and the calculated band gap is 2.59 eV. The photocatalytic performance of this material was evaluated by degradation and mineralization of an aqueous dye methylene blue under visible-light irradiation, and an enhanced photocatalytic activity in comparison with protonated titanate as well as the P25 TiO 2 and N-doped TiO 2 was obtained. Additionally, the layered structure is retained, no dye ions intercalating occurs during the photocatalysis process, and a ∼90% photocatalytic activity can be remained after reusing 3 cycles. - Graphical abstract: Mn-intercalated layered titanate as a novel and efficient visible-light harvesting photocatalyst was synthesized via a convenient and efficient exfoliation–flocculation approach in a mild condition. Highlights: ► Mn-intercalated titanate has been prepared by exfoliation–flocculation approach. ► The as-prepared catalyst shows spectral response in the visible-light region. ► Heat treatment at certain temperature enables formation of Mn-doped TiO 2 . ► Dye can be degradated effectively by the catalyst under visible light irradiation.

  6. Morphology Effect of Silver Nanostructures on the Performance of a P3HT:Graphene:AgNs-Based Active Layer Obtained via Dip Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alí Gómez-Acosta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of the use of different silver nanostructures (AgNs layers deposited via dip coating onto a poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and solution processable functionalized graphene (SPFGraphene composite film intended to be used as active layer in BHJ devices. SPFGraphene was added to P3HT in a ratio of 1.5 wt%. The best results were achieved when a layer of silver nano-pseudospheres (AgNPSs obtained after 10 immersion cycles was used as coating; in this case the highest light trapping and efficiency percent (η=0.23% were achieved. This means an increase of ~11.3% in comparison with the efficiency of the noncoated P3HT:SPFGraphene composite. Results also indicate that graphene was successfully functionalized in order to obtain appropriate dispersion in P3HT and that such conjugated polymer remained unaltered after the addition of SPFGraphene. Finally, it can be concluded that the electrical properties of the as-synthesized films are dependent on the shape and concentration of the AgNs deposited via dip coating.

  7. Atomic-Level Co3O4 Layer Stabilized by Metallic Cobalt Nanoparticles: A Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Liu, Jingjun; Li, Zhilin; Wang, Feng

    2018-02-28

    Developing atomic-level transition oxides may be one of the most promising ways for providing ultrahigh electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), compared with their bulk counterparts. In this article, we developed a set of atomically thick Co 3 O 4 layers covered on Co nanoparticles through partial reduction of Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles using melamine as a reductive additive at an elevated temperature. Compared with the original Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles, the synthesized Co 3 O 4 with a thickness of 1.1 nm exhibits remarkably enhanced ORR activity and durability, which are even higher than those obtained by a commercial Pt/C in an alkaline environment. The superior activity can be attributed to the unique physical and chemical structures of the atomic-level oxide featuring the narrowed band gap and decreased work function, caused by the escaped lattice oxygen and the enriched coordination-unsaturated Co 2+ in this atomic layer. Besides, the outstanding durability of the catalyst can result from the chemically epitaxial deposition of the Co 3 O 4 on the cobalt surface. Therefore, the proposed synthetic strategy may offer a smart way to develop other atomic-level transition metals with high electrocatalytic activity and stability for energy conversion and storage devices.

  8. The influence of the UV irradiation intensity on photocatalytic activity of ZnAl layered double hydroxides and derived mixed oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadnađev-Kostić Milica S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs have been studied to a great extent as environmental-friendly complex materials that can be used as photocatalysts or photocatalyst supports. ZnAl layered double hydroxides and their derived mixed oxides were chosen for the investigation of photocatalytic performances in correlation with the UV intensities measured in the South Pannonia region. Low supersaturation coprecipitation method was used for the ZnAl LDH synthesis. For the characterization of LDH and thermal treated samples powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, nitrogen adsorption-desorption were used. The decomposition of azodye, methylene blue was chosen as photocatalytic test reaction. The study showed that the ZnAl mixed oxide obtained by thermal decomposition of ZnAl LDH has stable activity in the broader UV light irradiation range characterizing the selected region. Photocatalytic activity could be mainly attributed to the ZnO phase, detected both in LDH and thermally treated samples. The study showed that the ZnAl mixed oxide obtained by the calcination of ZnAl LDH has a stable activity within the measured UV light irradiation range; whereas the parent ZnAl LDH catalyst did not perform satisfactory when low UV irradiation intensity is implied.

  9. The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost Database: metadata statistics and prospective analysis on future permafrost temperature and active layer depth monitoring site distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskaborn, B. K.; Lanckman, J.-P.; Lantuit, H.; Elger, K.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Cable, W. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-03-01

    The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) provides the first dynamic database associated with the Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP) and the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) programs, which extensively collect permafrost temperature and active layer thickness data from Arctic, Antarctic and Mountain permafrost regions. The purpose of the database is to establish an "early warning system" for the consequences of climate change in permafrost regions and to provide standardized thermal permafrost data to global models. In this paper we perform statistical analysis of the GTN-P metadata aiming to identify the spatial gaps in the GTN-P site distribution in relation to climate-effective environmental parameters. We describe the concept and structure of the Data Management System in regard to user operability, data transfer and data policy. We outline data sources and data processing including quality control strategies. Assessment of the metadata and data quality reveals 63% metadata completeness at active layer sites and 50% metadata completeness for boreholes. Voronoi Tessellation Analysis on the spatial sample distribution of boreholes and active layer measurement sites quantifies the distribution inhomogeneity and provides potential locations of additional permafrost research sites to improve the representativeness of thermal monitoring across areas underlain by permafrost. The depth distribution of the boreholes reveals that 73% are shallower than 25 m and 27% are deeper, reaching a maximum of 1 km depth. Comparison of the GTN-P site distribution with permafrost zones, soil organic carbon contents and vegetation types exhibits different local to regional monitoring situations on maps. Preferential slope orientation at the sites most likely causes a bias in the temperature monitoring and should be taken into account when using the data for global models. The distribution of GTN-P sites within zones of projected temperature change show a high

  10. Preconcentration of rare earth elements from rocks by thin-layer chromatography and their neutron-activation determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabukhin, V.A.; Volynets, M.P.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions were studied for separation of rare earths and accompanying elements in rocks on Fixion 50x8 thin-layer plates using solutions of oxalic acid and ammonium chloride in ammonia medium. A simple technique was developed for TLC proconcentration of rare earths followed by gamma spectrometric analysis of the irradiated fractions that enabled to determine 8-10 elements in samples with a mass of up to 30 mg. The limits of detection (μg/g) were 0.05 (Eu), 0.1 (Sm), 0.2 (Tb), 0.3 (Yb), 0.4 (La), 1.0 (Tu), 2.0 (Ce), 10 (Nd). The relative standard deviation was 0.05-0.20 at element levels 5-10 times as high as the detection limits

  11. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny [Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Centro Universitario Tonalá, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Nuevo Periférico No. 555, C.P. 48525, Tonalá, Jalisco (Mexico); Sánchez Jiménez, Cecilia [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Gurinov, Andrey [Research Resources Center for Magnetic Resonance, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskiy pr. 26, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); NMR Core Lab, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Pérez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe, E-mail: gregoriocarbajal@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guadalajara, Boulevard Marcelino García Barragán 1421, C.P. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LDH structure including dysprosium was prepared by co-precipitation. • LDH was capable to produce contrast in the T1 mode of MRI. • LDH were intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions. - Abstract: A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  12. Dysprosium-containing layered double hydroxides nanoparticles intercalated with biologically active species as an approach for theranostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arratia-Quijada, Jenny; Sánchez Jiménez, Cecilia; Gurinov, Andrey; Pérez Centeno, Armando; Ceja Andrade, Israel; Carbajal Arízaga, Gregorio Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • LDH structure including dysprosium was prepared by co-precipitation. • LDH was capable to produce contrast in the T1 mode of MRI. • LDH were intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions. - Abstract: A layered double hydroxide structure including dysprosium cations was prepared by co-precipitation. The nanoparticles showed a linear relationship with the reciprocal relaxation spin-lattice (T1) time of water protons which is reflected as contrast in aqueous suspensions analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging. The interlayer space of dysprosium containing LDH was successfully intercalated with folate, ibuprofen and gallate ions, which are key molecules for recognition of some cancer cells and treatment of diseases. The paramagnetic property of the dysprosium-containing LDH detected in this work beside the ability to transport drugs open up the opportunity to design theranostic materials in a single crystal phase with nanometric dimensions.

  13. Tetradymite layer assisted heteroepitaxial growth and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Vladimir A.; Endicott, Lynn; Clarke, Roy; Uher, Ctirad

    2017-08-01

    A multilayer stack including a substrate, an active layer, and a tetradymite buffer layer positioned between the substrate and the active layer is disclosed. A method for fabricating a multilayer stack including a substrate, a tetradymite buffer layer and an active layer is also disclosed. Use of such stacks may be in photovoltaics, solar cells, light emitting diodes, and night vision arrays, among other applications.

  14. Constrained Optimization and Optimal Control for Partial Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Leugering, Günter; Griewank, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This special volume focuses on optimization and control of processes governed by partial differential equations. The contributors are mostly participants of the DFG-priority program 1253: Optimization with PDE-constraints which is active since 2006. The book is organized in sections which cover almost the entire spectrum of modern research in this emerging field. Indeed, even though the field of optimal control and optimization for PDE-constrained problems has undergone a dramatic increase of interest during the last four decades, a full theory for nonlinear problems is still lacking. The cont

  15. Frequency Constrained ShiftCP Modeling of Neuroimaging Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Madsen, Kristoffer H.

    2011-01-01

    The shift invariant multi-linear model based on the CandeComp/PARAFAC (CP) model denoted ShiftCP has proven useful for the modeling of latency changes in trial based neuroimaging data[17]. In order to facilitate component interpretation we presently extend the shiftCP model such that the extracted...... components can be constrained to pertain to predefined frequency ranges such as alpha, beta and gamma activity. To infer the number of components in the model we propose to apply automatic relevance determination by imposing priors that define the range of variation of each component of the shiftCP model...

  16. Preparation and biological evaluation of conformationally constrained BACE1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winneroski, Leonard L; Schiffler, Matthew A; Erickson, Jon A; May, Patrick C; Monk, Scott A; Timm, David E; Audia, James E; Beck, James P; Boggs, Leonard N; Borders, Anthony R; Boyer, Robert D; Brier, Richard A; Hudziak, Kevin J; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Garcia Losada, Pablo; Mathes, Brian M; Stout, Stephanie L; Watson, Brian M; Mergott, Dustin J

    2015-07-01

    The BACE1 enzyme is a key target for Alzheimer's disease. During our BACE1 research efforts, fragment screening revealed that bicyclic thiazine 3 had low millimolar activity against BACE1. Analysis of the co-crystal structure of 3 suggested that potency could be increased through extension toward the S3 pocket and through conformational constraint of the thiazine core. Pursuit of S3-binding groups produced low micromolar inhibitor 6, which informed the S3-design for constrained analogs 7 and 8, themselves prepared via independent, multi-step synthetic routes. Biological characterization of BACE inhibitors 6-8 is described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High-throughput roll-to-roll X-ray characterization of polymer solar cell active layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böttiger, Arvid P.L.; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Menzel, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-rays were used to probe active materials for polymer solar cells on flexible polyester foil. The active material was coated onto a flexible 130 micron thick polyester foil using roll-to-roll differentially pumped slot-die coating and presented variation in composition, thickness...

  18. Growing season methane emission from a boreal peatland in the continuous permafrost zone of Northeast China: effects of active layer depth and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Boreal peatlands are significant natural sources of methane and especially vulnerable to abrupt climate change. However, the controlling factors of CH4 emission in boreal peatlands are still unclear. In this study, we investigated CH4 fluxes and abiotic factors (temperature, water table depth, active layer depth, and dissolved CH4 concentrations in pore water during the growing seasons in 2010 and 2011 in both shrub-sphagnum- and sedge-dominated plant communities in the continuous permafrost zone of Northeast China. The objective of our study was to examine the effects of vegetation types and abiotic factors on CH4 fluxes from a boreal peatland. In an Eriophorum-dominated community, mean CH4 emissions were 1.02 and 0.80 mg m−2 h−1 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. CH4 fluxes (0.38 mg m−2 h−1 released from the shrub-mosses-dominated community were lower than that from Eriophorum-dominated community. Moreover, in the Eriophorum-dominated community, CH4 fluxes showed a significant temporal pattern with a peak value in late August in both 2010 and 2011. However, no distinct seasonal variation was observed in the CH4 flux in the shrub-mosses-dominated community. Interestingly, in both Eriophorum- and shrub-sphagnum-dominated communities, CH4 fluxes did not show close correlation with air or soil temperature and water table depth, whereas CH4 emissions correlated well to active layer depth and CH4 concentration in soil pore water, especially in the Eriophorum-dominated community. Our results suggest that CH4 released from the thawed CH4-rich permafrost layer may be a key factor controlling CH4 emissions in boreal peatlands, and highlight that CH4 fluxes vary with vegetation type in boreal peatlands. With

  19. Self-constrained inversion of potential fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, V.; Ialongo, S.; Florio, G.; Fedi, M.; Cella, F.

    2013-11-01

    We present a potential-field-constrained inversion procedure based on a priori information derived exclusively from the analysis of the gravity and magnetic data (self-constrained inversion). The procedure is designed to be applied to underdetermined problems and involves scenarios where the source distribution can be assumed to be of simple character. To set up effective constraints, we first estimate through the analysis of the gravity or magnetic field some or all of the following source parameters: the source depth-to-the-top, the structural index, the horizontal position of the source body edges and their dip. The second step is incorporating the information related to these constraints in the objective function as depth and spatial weighting functions. We show, through 2-D and 3-D synthetic and real data examples, that potential field-based constraints, for example, structural index, source boundaries and others, are usually enough to obtain substantial improvement in the density and magnetization models.

  20. Cosmogenic photons strongly constrain UHECR source models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Vliet Arjen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the newest version of our Monte Carlo code for ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR propagation, CRPropa 3, the flux of neutrinos and photons due to interactions of UHECRs with extragalactic background light can be predicted. Together with the recently updated data for the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB by Fermi LAT, it is now possible to severely constrain UHECR source models. The evolution of the UHECR sources especially plays an important role in the determination of the expected secondary photon spectrum. Pure proton UHECR models are already strongly constrained, primarily by the highest energy bins of Fermi LAT’s IGRB, as long as their number density is not strongly peaked at recent times.

  1. A constrained supersymmetric left-right model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Martin [AHEP Group, Instituto de Física Corpuscular - C.S.I.C./Universitat de València, Edificio de Institutos de Paterna, Apartado 22085, E-46071 València (Spain); Krauss, Manuel E. [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics & Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astronomie, Universität Würzburg,Emil-Hilb-Weg 22, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Opferkuch, Toby [Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics & Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bonn, Nussallee 12, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Porod, Werner [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astronomie, Universität Würzburg,Emil-Hilb-Weg 22, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Staub, Florian [Theory Division, CERN,1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-03-02

    We present a supersymmetric left-right model which predicts gauge coupling unification close to the string scale and extra vector bosons at the TeV scale. The subtleties in constructing a model which is in agreement with the measured quark masses and mixing for such a low left-right breaking scale are discussed. It is shown that in the constrained version of this model radiative breaking of the gauge symmetries is possible and a SM-like Higgs is obtained. Additional CP-even scalars of a similar mass or even much lighter are possible. The expected mass hierarchies for the supersymmetric states differ clearly from those of the constrained MSSM. In particular, the lightest down-type squark, which is a mixture of the sbottom and extra vector-like states, is always lighter than the stop. We also comment on the model’s capability to explain current anomalies observed at the LHC.

  2. Coding for Two Dimensional Constrained Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben Vaarbye

    2006-01-01

    a first order model to model higher order constraints by the use of an alphabet extension. We present an iterative method that based on a set of conditional probabilities can help in choosing the large numbers of parameters of the model in order to obtain a stationary model. Explicit results are given...... for the No Isolated Bits constraint. Finally we present a variation of the encoding scheme of bit-stuffing that is applicable to the class of checkerboard constrained fields. It is possible to calculate the entropy of the coding scheme thus obtaining lower bounds on the entropy of the fields considered. These lower...... bounds are very tight for the Run-Length limited fields. Explicit bounds are given for the diamond constrained field as well....

  3. Communication Schemes with Constrained Reordering of Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovski, Petar; Utkovski, Zoran; Trillingsgaard, Kasper Fløe

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a communication model inspired by two practical scenarios. The first scenario is related to the concept of protocol coding, where information is encoded in the actions taken by an existing communication protocol. We investigate strategies for protocol coding via combinatorial...... reordering of the labelled user resources (packets, channels) in an existing, primary system. However, the degrees of freedom of the reordering are constrained by the operation of the primary system. The second scenario is related to communication systems with energy harvesting, where the transmitted signals...... are constrained by the energy that is available through the harvesting process. We have introduced a communication model that covers both scenarios and elicits their key feature, namely the constraints of the primary system or the harvesting process. We have shown how to compute the capacity of the channels...

  4. Q-deformed systems and constrained dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanov, S.V.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that quantum theories of the q-deformed harmonic oscillator and one-dimensional free q-particle (a free particle on the 'quantum' line) can be obtained by the canonical quantization of classical Hamiltonian systems with commutative phase-space variables and a non-trivial symplectic structure. In the framework of this approach, classical dynamics of a particle on the q-line coincides with the one of a free particle with friction. It is argued that q-deformed systems can be treated as ordinary mechanical systems with the second-class constraints. In particular, second-class constrained systems corresponding to the q-oscillator and q-particle are given. A possibility of formulating q-deformed systems via gauge theories (first-class constrained systems) is briefly discussed. (orig.)

  5. Antifouling composites with self-adaptive controlled release based on an active compound intercalated into layered double hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Miaosen; Gu, Lianghua; Yang, Bin; Wang, Li; Sun, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jiyong; Zhang, Jinwei; Hou, Jian; Lin, Cunguo

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports a novel method to prepare the antifouling composites with properties of self-adaptive controlled release (defined as control the release rate autonomously and adaptively according to the change of environmental conditions) by intercalation of sodium paeonolsilate (PAS) into MgAl and ZnAl layered double hydroxide (LDH) with the molar ratio (M2+/M3+) of 2:1 and 3:1, respectively. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirm the intercalation of PAS into the galleries of LDH. The controlled release behavior triggered by temperature for the PAS-LDH composites has been investigated, and the results show that the release rate of all PAS-LDH composites increases as the increase of temperature. However, the MgAl-PAS-LDH composites (Mg2Al-PAS-LDH and Mg3Al-PAS-LDH) exhibit the increased release rate of 0.21 ppm/°C from 15 to 30 °C in 3.5% NaCl solution, more than three times of the ZnAl-PAS-LDH composites (0.06 ppm/°C), owing to the confined microenvironment influenced by metal types in LDH layers. In addition, a possible diffusion-controlled process with surface diffusion, bulk diffusion and heterogeneous flat surface diffusion has been revealed via fitting four kinetic equations. Moreover, to verify the practical application of the PAS-LDH composites, a model coating denoted as Mg2Al-PAS-LDH coating was fabricated. The release result displays that the release rate increases or decreases as temperature altered at 15 and 25 °C alternately, indicating its self-adaptive controlled release behavior with temperature. Moreover, the superior resistance to the settlement of Ulva spores at 15 and 25 °C was observed for the Mg2Al-PAS-LDH coating, as a result of the controllable release of antifoulant. Therefore, this work provides a facile and effective method for the fabrication of antifouling composites with self-adaptive controlled release behavior in response to temperature, which can be used to prolong

  6. Online constrained model-based reinforcement learning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Niekerk, B

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Constrained Model-based Reinforcement Learning Benjamin van Niekerk School of Computer Science University of the Witwatersrand South Africa Andreas Damianou∗ Amazon.com Cambridge, UK Benjamin Rosman Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, and School... MULTIPLE SHOOTING Using direct multiple shooting (Bock and Plitt, 1984), problem (1) can be transformed into a structured non- linear program (NLP). First, the time horizon [t0, t0 + T ] is partitioned into N equal subintervals [tk, tk+1] for k = 0...

  7. Constraining supergravity models from gluino production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.; Gamberini, G.; Giudice, G.F.; Ridolfi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The branching ratios for gluino decays g tilde → qanti qΧ, g tilde → gΧ into a stable undetected neutralino are computed as functions of the relevant parameters of the underlying supergravity theory. A simple way of constraining supergravity models from gluino production emerges. The effectiveness of hadronic versus e + e - colliders in the search for supersymmetry can be directly compared. (orig.)

  8. Cosmicflows Constrained Local UniversE Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Yepes, Gustavo; Hoffman, Yehuda; Courtois, Helene M.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Tully, R. Brent; Pomarède, Daniel; Carlesi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    This paper combines observational data sets and cosmological simulations to generate realistic numerical replicas of the nearby Universe. The latter are excellent laboratories for studies of the non-linear process of structure formation in our neighbourhood. With measurements of radial peculiar velocities in the local Universe (cosmicflows-2) and a newly developed technique, we produce Constrained Local UniversE Simulations (CLUES). To assess the quality of these constrained simulations, we compare them with random simulations as well as with local observations. The cosmic variance, defined as the mean one-sigma scatter of cell-to-cell comparison between two fields, is significantly smaller for the constrained simulations than for the random simulations. Within the inner part of the box where most of the constraints are, the scatter is smaller by a factor of 2 to 3 on a 5 h-1 Mpc scale with respect to that found for random simulations. This one-sigma scatter obtained when comparing the simulated and the observation-reconstructed velocity fields is only 104 ± 4 km s-1, I.e. the linear theory threshold. These two results demonstrate that these simulations are in agreement with each other and with the observations of our neighbourhood. For the first time, simulations constrained with observational radial peculiar velocities resemble the local Universe up to a distance of 150 h-1 Mpc on a scale of a few tens of megaparsecs. When focusing on the inner part of the box, the resemblance with our cosmic neighbourhood extends to a few megaparsecs (<5 h-1 Mpc). The simulations provide a proper large-scale environment for studies of the formation of nearby objects.

  9. Dynamic Convex Duality in Constrained Utility Maximization

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yusong; Zheng, Harry

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study a constrained utility maximization problem following the convex duality approach. After formulating the primal and dual problems, we construct the necessary and sufficient conditions for both the primal and dual problems in terms of FBSDEs plus additional conditions. Such formulation then allows us to explicitly characterize the primal optimal control as a function of the adjoint process coming from the dual FBSDEs in a dynamic fashion and vice versa. Moreover, we also...

  10. Statistical mechanics of budget-constrained auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Altarelli, F.; Braunstein, A.; Realpe-Gomez, J.; Zecchina, R.

    2009-01-01

    Finding the optimal assignment in budget-constrained auctions is a combinatorial optimization problem with many important applications, a notable example being the sale of advertisement space by search engines (in this context the problem is often referred to as the off-line AdWords problem). Based on the cavity method of statistical mechanics, we introduce a message passing algorithm that is capable of solving efficiently random instances of the problem extracted from a natural distribution,...

  11. Constraining neutron star matter with Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Schaffner-Bielich, Jurgen; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there have been several successful attempts to constrain the equation of state of neutron star matter using input from low-energy nuclear physics and observational data. We demonstrate that significant further restrictions can be placed by additionally requiring the pressure to approach that of deconfined quark matter at high densities. Remarkably, the new constraints turn out to be highly insensitive to the amount --- or even presence --- of quark matter inside the stars.

  12. Paleohydrology on Mars constrained by mass balance and mineralogy of pre-Amazonian sodium chloride lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melwani Daswani, M.; Kite, E. S.

    2017-09-01

    Chloride-bearing deposits on Mars record high-elevation lakes during the waning stages of Mars' wet era (mid-Noachian to late Hesperian). The water source pathways, seasonality, salinity, depth, lifetime, and paleoclimatic drivers of these widespread lakes are all unknown. Here we combine reaction-transport modeling, orbital spectroscopy, and new volume estimates from high-resolution digital terrain models, in order to constrain the hydrologic boundary conditions for forming the chlorides. Considering a T = 0°C system, we find that (1) individual lakes were >100 m deep and lasted decades or longer; (2) if volcanic degassing was the source of chlorine, then the water-to-rock ratio or the total water volume were probably low, consistent with brief excursions above the melting point and/or arid climate; (3) if the chlorine source was igneous chlorapatite, then Cl-leaching events would require a (cumulative) time of >10 years at the melting point; and (4) Cl masses, divided by catchment area, give column densities 0.1-50 kg Cl/m2, and these column densities bracket the expected chlorapatite-Cl content for a seasonally warm active layer. Deep groundwater was not required. Taken together, our results are consistent with Mars having a usually cold, horizontally segregated hydrosphere by the time chlorides formed.

  13. A low-temperature synthesis of electrochemical active Pt nanoparticles and thin films by atomic layer deposition on Si(111) and glassy carbon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Han, Lihao [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Huang, Zhuangqun; Ferrer, Ivonne M. [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smets, Arno H.M.; Zeman, Miro [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices (PVMD) Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, GA Delft 2600 (Netherlands); Brunschwig, Bruce S., E-mail: bsb@caltech.edu [Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lewis, Nathan S., E-mail: nslewis@caltech.edu [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Beckman Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory 127-72, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanoparticles and thin films of Pt onto etched p-type Si(111) wafers and glassy carbon discs. Using precursors of MeCpPtMe{sub 3} and ozone and a temperature window of 200–300 °C, the growth rate was 80–110 pm/cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the composition, structure, morphology, and thickness of the ALD-grown Pt nanoparticle films. The catalytic activity of the ALD-grown Pt for the hydrogen evolution reaction was shown to be equivalent to that of e-beam evaporated Pt on glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Pure Pt films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe3 and ozone. • ALD-grown Pt thin films had high growth rates of 110 pm/cycle. • ALD-grown Pt films were electrocatalytic for hydrogen evolution from water. • Electrocatalytic activity of the ALD Pt films was equivalent to e-beam deposited Pt. • No carbon species were detected in the ALD-grown Pt films.

  14. A low-temperature synthesis of electrochemical active Pt nanoparticles and thin films by atomic layer deposition on Si(111) and glassy carbon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Rui; Han, Lihao; Huang, Zhuangqun; Ferrer, Ivonne M.; Smets, Arno H.M.; Zeman, Miro; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit nanoparticles and thin films of Pt onto etched p-type Si(111) wafers and glassy carbon discs. Using precursors of MeCpPtMe 3 and ozone and a temperature window of 200–300 °C, the growth rate was 80–110 pm/cycle. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the composition, structure, morphology, and thickness of the ALD-grown Pt nanoparticle films. The catalytic activity of the ALD-grown Pt for the hydrogen evolution reaction was shown to be equivalent to that of e-beam evaporated Pt on glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Pure Pt films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe3 and ozone. • ALD-grown Pt thin films had high growth rates of 110 pm/cycle. • ALD-grown Pt films were electrocatalytic for hydrogen evolution from water. • Electrocatalytic activity of the ALD Pt films was equivalent to e-beam deposited Pt. • No carbon species were detected in the ALD-grown Pt films

  15. Improving the Performances of Random Copolymer Based Organic Solar Cells by Adjusting the Film Features of Active Layers Using Mixed Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Zhu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel random copolymer based on donor–acceptor type polymers containing benzodithiophene and dithienosilole as donors and benzothiazole and diketopyrrolopyrrole as acceptors was designed and synthesized by Stille copolymerization, and their optical, electrochemical, charge transport, and photovoltaic properties were investigated. This copolymer with high molecular weight exhibited broad and strong absorption covering the spectra range from 500 to 800 nm with absorption maxima at around 750 nm, which would be very conducive to obtaining large short-circuits current densities. Unlike the general approach using single solvent to prepare the active layer film, mixed solvents were introduced to change the film feature and improve the morphology of the active layer, which lead to a significant improvement of the power conversion efficiency. These results indicate that constructing random copolymer with multiple donor and acceptor monomers and choosing proper mixed solvents to change the characteristics of the film is a very promising way for manufacturing organic solar cells with large current density and high power conversion efficiency.

  16. Simple method to enhance positive bias stress stability of In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors using a vertically graded oxygen-vacancy active layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Yeong-Gyu; Yoon, Seokhyun; Hong, Seonghwan; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-12-10

    We proposed a simple method to deposit a vertically graded oxygen-vacancy active layer (VGA) to enhance the positive bias stress (PBS) stability of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). We deposited a-IGZO films by sputtering (target composition; In2O3:Ga2O3:ZnO = 1:1:1 mol %), and the oxygen partial pressure was varied during deposition so that the front channel of the TFTs was fabricated with low oxygen partial pressure and the back channel with high oxygen partial pressure. Using this method, we were able to control the oxygen vacancy concentration of the active layer so that it varied with depth. As a result, the turn-on voltage shift following a 10 000 s PBS of optimized VGA TFT was drastically improved from 12.0 to 5.6 V compared with a conventional a-IGZO TFT, without a significant decrease in the field effect mobility. These results came from the self-passivation effect and decrease in oxygen-vacancy-related trap sites of the VGA TFTs.

  17. Amide Link Scission in the Polyamide Active Layers of Thin-Film Composite Membranes upon Exposure to Free Chlorine: Kinetics and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Joshua; Luh, Jeanne; Coronell, Orlando

    2015-10-20

    The volume-averaged amide link scission in the aromatic polyamide active layer of a reverse osmosis membrane upon exposure to free chlorine was quantified at a variety of free chlorine exposure times, concentrations, and pH and rinsing conditions. The results showed that (i) hydroxyl ions are needed for scission to occur, (ii) hydroxide-induced amide link scission is a strong function of exposure to hypochlorous acid, (iii) the ratio between amide links broken and chlorine atoms taken up increased with the chlorination pH and reached a maximum of ∼25%, (iv) polyamide disintegration occurs when high free chlorine concentrations, alkaline conditions, and high exposure times are combined, (v) amide link scission promotes further chlorine uptake, and (vi) scission at the membrane surface is unrepresentative of volume-averaged scission in the active layer. Our observations are consistent with previously proposed mechanisms describing amide link scission as a result of the hydrolysis of the N-chlorinated amidic N-C bond due to nucleophilic attack by hydroxyl ions. This study increases the understanding of the physicochemical changes that could occur for membranes in treatment plants using chlorine as an upstream disinfectant and the extent and rate at which those changes would occur.

  18. Solar cells based on particulate structure of active layer: Investigation of light absorption by an ordered system of spherical submicron silicon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskevich, Alexander A.; Loiko, Valery A.

    2015-12-01

    Enhancement of the performance of photovoltaic cells through increasing light absorption due to optimization of an active layer is considered. The optimization consists in creation of particulate structure of active layer. The ordered monolayers and multilayers of submicron crystalline silicon (c-Si) spherical particles are examined. The quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) and the transfer matrix method (TMM) are used to calculate light absorption in the wavelength range from 0.28 μm to 1.12 μm. The integrated over the terrestial solar spectral irradiance "Global tilt" ASTM G173-03 absorption coefficient is calculated. In the wavelength range of small absorption index of c-Si (0.8-1.12 μm) the integral absorption coefficient of monolayer can be more than 20 times higher than the one of the plane-parallel plate of the equivalent volume of material. In the overall considered range (0.28-1.12 μm) the enhancement factor up to ~1.45 for individual monolayer is observed. Maximum value of the spectral absorption coefficient approaches unity for multilayers consisting of large amount of sparse monolayers of small particles. Multilayers with variable concentration and size of particles in the monolayer sequences are considered. Absorption increasing by such gradient multilayers as compared to the non-gradient ones is illustrated. The considered structures are promising for creation of high efficiency thin-film solar cells.

  19. Preparation of activated carbon aerogel and its application to electrode material for electric double layer capacitor in organic electrolyte: Effect of activation temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Soon Hyung; Lee, Eunji; Kim, Myung-Soo; Jung, Ji Chul [Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bum-Soo; Kim, Sang-Gil; Lee, Byung-Jun [Vitzrocell Co., Yesan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Carbon aerogel was chemically activated with KOH at various activation temperatures with the aim of improving the electrochemical performance of carbon aerogel for EDLC electrode. Electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel electrode was determined by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge methods using coin-type EDLC cell in organic electrolyte. Activation temperature played an important role in determining the electrochemical performance of activated carbon aerogel for EDLC electrode. Specific capacitance of activated carbon aerogel at a high current density (5 A/g) showed a volcano-shaped curve with respect to activation temperature. Excessively high activation temperature could have an adverse effect on the electrochemical properties of activated carbon aerogel due to the low electrical conductivity caused by a collapse of characteristic structure of carbon aerogel. Among the carbon samples, carbon aerogel activated at 800 .deg. C with a high surface area and a well-developed porous structure exhibited the highest specific capacitance. In addition, carbon aerogel activated at 800 .deg. C retained a considerable specific capacitance at a high current density even after 1000 cycles of charge/discharge. Therefore, it is concluded that carbon aerogel activated with KOH at 800 .deg. C can serve as an efficient electrode material for commercial EDLC with a high power density.

  20. Constraining the mass of the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Hoffman, Yehuda; Sorce, Jenny G.; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    The mass of the Local Group (LG) is a crucial parameter for galaxy formation theories. However, its observational determination is challenging - its mass budget is dominated by dark matter that cannot be directly observed. To meet this end, the posterior distributions of the LG and its massive constituents have been constructed by means of constrained and random cosmological simulations. Two priors are assumed - the Λ cold dark matter model that is used to set up the simulations, and an LG model that encodes the observational knowledge of the LG and is used to select LG-like objects from the simulations. The constrained simulations are designed to reproduce the local cosmography as it is imprinted on to the Cosmicflows-2 data base of velocities. Several prescriptions are used to define the LG model, focusing in particular on different recent estimates of the tangential velocity of M31. It is found that (a) different vtan choices affect the peak mass values up to a factor of 2, and change mass ratios of MM31 to MMW by up to 20 per cent; (b) constrained simulations yield more sharply peaked posterior distributions compared with the random ones; (c) LG mass estimates are found to be smaller than those found using the timing argument; (d) preferred Milky Way masses lie in the range of (0.6-0.8) × 1012 M⊙; whereas (e) MM31 is found to vary between (1.0-2.0) × 1012 M⊙, with a strong dependence on the vtan values used.