WorldWideScience

Sample records for active combustion control

  1. Active Combustion Control Valve Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, research into active combustion control has yielded impressive results in suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities and widening the...

  2. Active Combustion Control Valve Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, research into active combustion control has yielded impressive results in suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities and widening the operational...

  3. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  4. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  5. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  6. 3rd Active Flow and Combustion Control Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The book reports on the latest theoretical and experimental advances in the  field of active flow and combustion control. It covers new developments in actuator technology and sensing, in robust and optimal open- and closed-loop control, as well as in model reduction for control. It collects contributions presented during the third edition of the Active Flow and Combustion Control conference, held in September 10-12, 2014 at the Technische Universität Berlin (Germany). This conference, as well as the research presented in the book, have been supported by the collaborative research center SFB 1029 -Substantial efficiency increase in gas turbines through direct use of coupled unsteady combustion and flow dynamics, funded by the DFG (German Research Foundation).

  7. Apparatus and method for gas turbine active combustion control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Chukwueloka (Inventor); Kammer, Leonardo C. (Inventor); Shah, Minesh (Inventor); Fortin, Jeffrey B. (Inventor); Knobloch, Aaron (Inventor); Myers, William J. (Inventor); Mancini, Alfred Albert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An Active Combustion Control System and method provides for monitoring combustor pressure and modulating fuel to a gas turbine combustor to prevent combustion dynamics and/or flame extinguishments. The system includes an actuator, wherein the actuator periodically injects pulsed fuel into the combustor. The apparatus also includes a sensor connected to the combustion chamber down stream from an inlet, where the sensor generates a signal detecting the pressure oscillations in the combustor. The apparatus controls the actuator in response to the sensor. The apparatus prompts the actuator to periodically inject pulsed fuel into the combustor at a predetermined sympathetic frequency and magnitude, thereby controlling the amplitude of the pressure oscillations in the combustor by modulating the natural oscillations.

  8. Control using intake and combustion models for conventional and active radical engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Y. [Hitachi Car Engineering Co. Ltd., Hitachinaka (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The combination of physical models of an advanced engine control system was proposed to obtain sophisticated combustion control in ultra-lean combustion engines, including homogeneous compression-ignition and active radical combustion. Physical models of intake, combustion and engine thermodynamics were incorporated, in which the effects of residual gas from prior cycles on intake air mass and combustion were taken into consideration. The control of in-cylinder air/fuel ratio, misfire, knocking and auto-ignition was investigated using simulations. (author)

  9. Novel Active Combustion Control Concept for High-Frequency Modulation of Atomized Fuel Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal by Jansen's Aircraft Systems Controls, Inc presents an innovative solution for Active Combustion Control. Relative to the state of the art, this...

  10. Novel Active Combustion Control Concept for High-Frequency Modulation of Atomized Fuel Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal by Jansen's Aircraft Systems Controls, Inc presents an innovative solution for Active Combustion Control. Relative to the state of the art, this...

  11. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  12. Experimental Investigation of Active Noise Controller for Internal Combustion Engine Exhaust System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Da; Chen, Chih-Keng; Lee, Chun-Ying; Lee, Tian-Hua

    2002-10-01

    Two active noise control (ANC) algorithms for internal combustion engine exhaust systems are developed and their performances are compared in various experiments. The first controller is based on the filtered-x least mean square (FXLMS) algorithm with feedback neutralization, while the second is a fixed controller with a gain-scheduled active control technique for broadband attenuation with thermal effects. Both control algorithms are implemented on a digital signal processing (DSP) platform. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the attenuation performance of the proposed active noise control systems for an engine exhaust system. The results of the experiments indicate that both the adaptive controller and the gain-scheduled controller effectively suppress the noise of engine exhaust systems. The experimental comparison and analysis of the proposed controllers are also described.

  13. Experimental and numerical study of the active control of jets inside combustion chambers; Etude experimentale et numerique du controle actif de jets dans des chambres de combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faivre, V.

    2003-12-15

    Combustion instabilities occur when the flame heat release couples with the acoustic waves propagating in the combustion chamber. This phenomenon can lead to strong vibrations and noise but also, sometimes, to the complete combustion device failure. That is the reason why so many studies focus on the control of those instabilities. The method chosen in this study consists in an active control device (or set of actuators) having a strong effect on the mixing of the burner exhaust flow with the ambient fluid. The model configuration studied consists in a non reactive jet of air controlled by four small tangential secondary jets. Experiments have been carried out to optimize the control device geometry. The configuration identified as the most efficient, in terms of mixing enhancement, has been simulated through Large Eddy Simulations (LES). The objective of the numerical part of the present work is double. First, the numerical simulations provide a better understanding of the phenomena occurring when the control is on. Then, it is shown that LES can be considered as a tool to predict the effects of a control device on a flow. (author)

  14. Performance Evaluation of a High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Modulation Valve for Active Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saus, Joseph R.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a characterization rig was designed and constructed for the purpose of evaluating high bandwidth liquid fuel modulation devices to determine their suitability for active combustion control research. Incorporated into the rig s design are features that approximate conditions similar to those that would be encountered by a candidate device if it were installed on an actual combustion research rig. The characterized dynamic performance measures obtained through testing in the rig are planned to be accurate indicators of expected performance in an actual combustion testing environment. To evaluate how well the characterization rig predicts fuel modulator dynamic performance, characterization rig data was compared with performance data for a fuel modulator candidate when the candidate was in operation during combustion testing. Specifically, the nominal and off-nominal performance data for a magnetostrictive-actuated proportional fuel modulation valve is described. Valve performance data were collected with the characterization rig configured to emulate two different combustion rig fuel feed systems. Fuel mass flows and pressures, fuel feed line lengths, and fuel injector orifice size was approximated in the characterization rig. Valve performance data were also collected with the valve modulating the fuel into the two combustor rigs. Comparison of the predicted and actual valve performance data show that when the valve is operated near its design condition the characterization rig can appropriately predict the installed performance of the valve. Improvements to the characterization rig and accompanying modeling activities are underway to more accurately predict performance, especially for the devices under development to modulate fuel into the much smaller fuel injectors anticipated in future lean-burning low-emissions aircraft engine combustors.

  15. Dynamic behavior of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor with and without active control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Ryosuke; Domen, Shohei; Okuno, Yuta; Nakagaki, Yoshitake; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We experimentally study the dynamic behavior of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations in a laboratory-scale lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor with and without active control. We adopt the delayed feedback control method based on the concept of chaos control to suppress thermoacoustic combustion oscillations. The unstable periodic orbits in the attractor of uncontrolled thermoacoustic combustion oscillations are led to the desired orbits with a small diameter of the attractor when the perturbation is switched on, resulting in the notable suppression of thermoacoustic combustion oscillations. Color-recurrence plots (Gotoda et al., Phys. Rev. E 89, 022910 (2014)) are used for characterizing the complexity of the combustion state with and without delayed feedback control.

  16. Causes of Combustion Instabilities with Passive and Active Methods of Control for practical application to Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Michael D.

    stagnation point, limiting dissipation of heat and reactive species significantly improving stability. Combustion hardware is developed and tested to demonstrate the stability principles developed as part of this research. In order to more completely understand combustion instability a very unique method of combustion was researched where there are no discrete points of combustion initiation such as the forward stagnation point typical in many combustion systems including swirl and jet wake stabilized combustion. This class of combustion which has empirical evidence of great stability and efficient combustion with low CO, NOx and UHC emissions is described as high oxidization temperature distributed combustion. This mechanism of combustion is shown to be stable largely because there are no stagnations points susceptible to fluid mechanic perturbations. The final topic of research is active combustion control by fuel modulation. This may be the only practical method of controlling most instabilities with a single technique. As there are many papers reporting active combustion control algorithms this research focused on the complexities of the physics of fuel modulation at frequencies up to 1000 Hz with proportionally controlled flow amplitude. This research into the physics of high speed fluid movement, oscillation mechanical mechanisms and electromagnetics are demonstrated by development and testing of a High Speed Latching Oscillator Valve.

  17. Pollution active control: a strategy for a clean and efficient combustion; Le controle actif des polluants: une strategie pour une combustion propre et efficace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacas, F. [CNRS Ecole Centrale de Paris, 75 (France). Laboratoire E.M2.C

    1996-12-31

    The active control NOx reduction concept has been applied on two burners (20 kW and 840 kW), using a rotary valve enabling an excitation in the 100 to 1000 Hz band, that can be mounted on existing appliances such as domestic or industrial boilers. NOx level reduction may reach 15 pc for the 20 kW burner, 25 pc for the 840 kW burner with domestic fuel oil and 35 pc for the 840 kW burner using pyridine doped domestic fuel oil. Mechanisms are detailed through flow visualization, and consist mainly in an annular vortex inducing a fuel/air pre-mixing favourable to a large decrease in NOx generation level and establishing a staged process such as in re-burning processes. The pulsed combustion process may be also combined to other pollution control systems

  18. Active control of combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, B.T.; Neumeier, Y. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This 3-year research program was initiated in September, 1995, to investigate active control of detrimental combustion instabilities in low NO{sub x} gas turbines (LNGT), which burn natural gas in a lean premixed mode to reduce NO{sub x} emissions. The program will investigate the mechanisms that drive these instabilities. Furthermore, it will study active control systems (ACS) that can effectively prevent the onset of such instabilities and/or reduce their amplitudes to acceptable levels. An understanding of the driving mechanisms will not only guide the development of effective ACS for LNGT but may also lead to combustor design changes (i.e., passive control) that will fully or partially resolve the problem. Initial attempts to stabilize combustors (i.e., chemical rockets) by ACS were reported more than 40 years ago, but were unsuccessful due to lack of adequate sensors, electronics, and actuators for performing the needed control actions. Progress made in recent years in sensor and actuator technology, electronics, and control theory has rekindled interest in developing ACS for unstable combustors. While initial efforts in this area, which focused on active control of instabilities in air breathing combustors, have demonstrated the considerable potential of active control, they have also indicated that more effective observers, controllers, and actuators are needed for practical applications. Considerable progress has been made in the observer and actuator areas by the principal investigators of this program during the past 2 years under an AFOSR program. The developed observer is based upon wavelets theory, and can identify the amplitudes, frequencies, and phases of the five most dominant combustor modes in (virtually) real time. The developed actuator is a fuel injector that uses a novel magneto-strictive material to modulate the fuel flow rate into the combustor.

  19. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  20. Combustion Process Modelling and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Maduda

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with realization of combustion control system on programmable logic controllers. Control system design is based on analysis of the current state of combustion control systems in technological device of raw material processing area. Control system design is composed of two subsystems. First subsystem is represented by software system for measured data processing and for data processing from simulation of the combustion mathematical model. Outputs are parameters for setting of controller algorithms. Second subsystem consists from programme modules. The programme module is presented by specific control algorithm, for example proportional regulation, programmed proportional regulation, proportional regulation with correction on the oxygen in waste gas, and so on. According to the specific combustion control requirements it is possible built-up concrete control system by programme modules. The programme modules were programmed by Automation studio that is used for development, debugging and testing software for B&R controllers.

  1. Active lubrication applied to internal combustion engines - evaluation of control strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estupinan, Edgar Alberto; Santos, Ilmar

    2009-01-01

    of reducing friction losses and vibrations between the crankshaft and the bearings. The conventional hydrodynamic lubrication is combined with hydrostatic lubrication which is actively modified by radially injecting oil at controllable pressures, through orifices circumferentially located around the bearing....... The behaviour of such parameters is compared to the case when the bearing operates with conventional hydrodynamic lubrication....

  2. An Investigation of Adaptive Signal Processing Approaches to Active Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    stabilizing control using an adaptive feedback architecture. As discussed by Annaswamy et al. (1998), previous researchers have not been able to...accurately represents the dynamics of the limit cycling system and can ultimately be used for stabilizing control . System Identification The approach to...achieve stabilizing control . The first is easily identifiable as a feedback loop instability (see Equation 4), whereas the second is less well-defined as a

  3. Control issues in oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snarheim, Dagfinn

    2009-08-15

    Combustion of fossil fuels is the major energy source in todays society. While the use of fossil fuels is a necessity for our society to function, there has been an increasing concern on the emissions of CO{sub 2} resulting from human activities. Emissions of CO{sub 2} are considered to be the main cause for the global warming and climate changes we have experienced in recent years. To fight the climate changes, the emissions of CO{sub 2} must be reduced in a timely fashion. Strategies to achieve this include switching to less carbon intensive fuels, renewable energy sources, nuclear energy and combustion with CO{sub 2} capture. The use of oxy-fuel combustion is among the alternative post- and pre combustion capture concepts, a strategy to achieve power production from fossil fuels with CO{sub 2} capture. In an oxy-fuel process, the fuel is burned in a mixture of oxygen and CO{sub 2} (or steam), leaving the exhaust consisting mainly of CO{sub 2} and steam. The steam can be removed by use of a condenser, leaving (almost) pure CO{sub 2} ready to be captured. The downside to CO{sub 2} capture is that it is expensive, both in capital cost of extra equipment, and in operation as it costs energy to capture the CO{sub 2}. Thus it is important to maximize the efficiency in such plants. One attractive concept to achieve CO{sub 2} capture by use of oxy-fuel, is a semi-closed oxy-fuel gas turbine cycle. The dynamics of such a plant are highly integrated, involving energy and mass recycle, and optimizing efficiency might lead to operational (control) challenges. In these thesis we investigate how such a power cycle should be controlled. By looking at control at such an early stage in the design phase, it is possible to find control solutions otherwise not feasible, that leads to better overall performance. Optimization is used on a nonlinear model based on first principles, to compare different control structures. Then, closed loop simulations using MPC, are used to validate

  4. FLARE FLAME INSTABILITY AND BURNER COMBUSTION CONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    БОНДАРЕНКО А.В.; В. Э. Волков; Максимов, М. В.

    2014-01-01

    Research of the flare instability development and the laminar-to-turbulent transition for the flares was executed. It was proved that the effects of viscosity and compressibility have the stabilizing influence on the gas flame. The study of the individual flare stability makes the theoretical basis of the fuel burning technology in combustion chambers and for the burner combustion control.

  5. Internal combustion engine and method for control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Daniel G

    2013-05-21

    In one exemplary embodiment of the invention an internal combustion engine includes a piston disposed in a cylinder, a valve configured to control flow of air into the cylinder and an actuator coupled to the valve to control a position of the valve. The internal combustion engine also includes a controller coupled to the actuator, wherein the controller is configured to close the valve when an uncontrolled condition for the internal engine is determined.

  6. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2016-06-28

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  7. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage L.

    2015-07-14

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  8. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  9. Study of mechanically activated coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anatolij P. Burdukov; Vitalij A. Popov; Valentin A. Faleev [Institute of Thermophysics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    Combustion and air gasification of mechanically activated micro-ground coals in the flux have been studied. Influence of mechanically activated methods of coal grinding on their chemical activity at combustion and gasification has been determined. Intense mechanical activation of coals increases their chemical activity that enables development of new highly boosted processing methods for coals with various levels of metamorphism. 10 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  10. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David R. Thompson; Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen

    2004-04-01

    Conventional wisdom says adding oxygen to a combustion system enhances product throughput, system efficiency, and, unless special care is taken, increases NOx emissions. This increase in NOx emissions is typically due to elevated flame temperatures associated with oxygen use leading to added thermal NOx formation. Innovative low flame temperature oxy-fuel burner designs have been developed and commercialized to minimize both thermal and fuel NOx formation for gas and oil fired industrial furnaces. To be effective these systems require close to 100% oxy-fuel combustion and the cost of oxygen is paid for by fuel savings and other benefits. For applications to coal-fired utility boilers at the current cost of oxygen, however, it is not economically feasible to use 100% oxygen for NOx control. In spite of this conventional wisdom, Praxair and its team members, in partnership with the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, have developed a novel way to use oxygen to reduce NOx emissions without resorting to complete oxy-fuel conversion. In this concept oxygen is added to the combustion process to enhance operation of a low NOx combustion system. Only a small fraction of combustion air is replaced with oxygen in the process. By selectively adding oxygen to a low NOx combustion system it is possible to reduce NOx emissions from nitrogen-containing fuels, including pulverized coal, while improving combustion characteristics such as unburned carbon. A combination of experimental work and modeling was used to define how well oxygen enhanced combustion could reduce NOx emissions. The results of this work suggest that small amounts of oxygen replacement can reduce the NOx emissions as compared to the air-alone system. NOx emissions significantly below 0.15 lbs/MMBtu were measured. Oxygen addition was also shown to reduce carbon in ash. Comparison of the costs of using oxygen for NOx control against competing technologies, such as SCR, show that this

  11. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... Recordkeeping § 60.1370 What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1855 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1855 Section 60.1855 Protection of Environment... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of five items:...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15310 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 62.15310 Section 62.15310 Protection of Environment... for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of...

  14. Combustion characteristics and influential factors of isooctane active-thermal atmosphere combustion assisted by two-stage reaction of n-heptane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xingcai; Ji, Libin; Ma, Junjun; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Huang, Zhen [Key Lab. for Power Machinery and Engineering of MOE, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents an experimental study on the isooctane active-thermal atmosphere combustion (ATAC) which is assisted by two-stage reaction of n-heptane. The active-thermal atmosphere is created by low- and high-temperature reactions of n-heptane which is injected at intake port, and isooctane is directly injected into combustion chamber near the top dead center. The effects of isooctane injection timing, active-thermal atmosphere intensity, overall equivalence ratio, and premixed ratio on combustion characteristics and emissions are investigated. The experimental results reveal that, the isooctane ignition and combustion can be classified to thermal atmosphere combustion, active atmosphere combustion, and active-thermal atmosphere combustion respectively according to the extent of n-heptane oxidation as well as effects of isooctane quenching and charge cooling. n-Heptane equivalence ratio, isooctane equivalence ratio and isooctane delivery advance angle are major control parameters. In one combustion cycle, the isooctane ignited and burned after those of n-heptane, and then this combustion phenomenon can also be named as dual-fuel sequential combustion (DFSC). The ignition timing of the overall combustion event is mainly determined by n-heptane equivalence ratio and can be controlled in flexibility by simultaneously adjusting isooctane equivalence ratio. The isooctane ignition regime, overall thermal efficiency, and NO{sub x} emissions show strong sensitivity to the fuel delivery advance angle between 20 CA BTDC and 25 CA BTDC. (author)

  15. Combustion control using an IR diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niska, J.; Rensgard, A.; Malmberg, D. [MEFOS, Lulea (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is a recent development in process instrumentation. This paper describes the testing of a commercial TDLAS instrument for continuous oxygen analysis of the furnace combustion gases in an industrial reheating furnace and in a pilot furnace at MEFOS. A time-averaged oxygen concentration signal with a TDC2000 furnace controller at MEFOS was used to prove automatic control of the air-to-fuel ratio. The local measurements of the oxygen concentration using a zirconia probe in both furnaces compared well with the oxygen concentrations measured by the TDLAS instrument. The advantage of the diode laser is its high reliability for average gas concentration measurements in the path of the beam, when compared to point gas analysis with conventional zirconia instrumentation. Improved process control is derived from reliable gas analysis, which translates into energy savings, reduced emissions and improved productivity for steel reheating furnaces. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Combustion chemistry - activities in the CHEK research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam-Johansen, K.; Johnsson, J.E.; Glarborg, P.; Frandsen, F.; Jensen, A.; Oestberg, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The combustion chemistry in the oxidation of fossil fuels and biofuels determines together with mixing and heat transfer the required size of a furnace, the emission of gaseous pollutants, and the formation of ash and deposits on surfaces. This presentation describes technologies for solid fuels combustion and gives a summary of the fuels, the pollutant chemistry and the inorganic chemistry in combustion processes. Emphasis is put on the work carried out in the CHEC (Combustion and Harmful Emission Control) Research Programme. (orig.)

  17. OXYGEN ENHANCED COMBUSTION FOR NOx CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence E. Bool; Jack C. Chen; David R. Thompson

    2000-07-01

    Increased environmental regulations will require utility boilers to reduce NO{sub x} emissions to less than 0.15lb/MMBtu in the near term. Conventional technologies such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) are unable to achieve these lowered emission levels without substantially higher costs and major operating problems. Oxygen enhanced combustion is a novel technology that allows utilities to meet the NO{sub x} emission requirements without the operational problems that occur with SCR and SNCR. Furthermore, oxygen enhanced combustion can achieve these NO{sub x} limits at costs lower than conventional technologies. The objective of this program is to demonstrate the use of oxygen enhanced combustion as a technical and economical method of meeting the EPA State Implementation Plan for NO{sub x} reduction to less than 0.15lb/MMBtu for a wide range of boilers and coal. The oxygen enhanced coal combustion program (Task 1) focused this quarter on the specific objective of exploration of the impact of oxygen enrichment on NO{sub x} formation utilizing small-scale combustors for parametric testing. Research efforts toward understanding any limitations to the applicability of the technology to different burners and fuels such as different types of coal are underway. The objective of the oxygen transport membrane (OTM) materials development program (Task 2.1) is to ascertain a suitable material composition that can be fabricated into dense tubes capable of producing the target oxygen flux under the operating conditions. This requires that the material have sufficient oxygen permeation resulting from high oxygen ion conductivity, high electronic conductivity and high oxygen surface exchange rate. The OTM element development program (Task 2.2) objective is to develop, fabricate and characterize OTM elements for laboratory and pilot reactors utilizing quality control parameters to ensure reproducibility and superior performance

  18. Magnetic Field Control of Combustion Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, I.; Valdmanis, R.; Zake, M.; Kalis, H.; Marinaki, M.; Strautins, U.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies and mathematical modelling of the effects of magnetic field on combustion dynamics at thermo-chemical conversion of biomass are carried out with the aim of providing control of the processes developing in the reaction zone of swirling flame. The joint research of the magnetic field effect on the combustion dynamics includes the estimation of this effect on the formation of the swirling flame dynamics, flame temperature and composition, providing analysis of the magnetic field effects on the flame characteristics. The results of experiments have shown that the magnetic field exerts the influence on the flow velocity components by enhancing a swirl motion in the flame reaction zone with swirl-enhanced mixing of the axial flow of volatiles with cold air swirl, by cooling the flame reaction zone and by limiting the thermo-chemical conversion of volatiles. Mathematical modelling of magnetic field effect on the formation of the flame dynamics confirms that the electromagnetic force, which is induced by the electric current surrounding the flame, leads to field-enhanced increase of flow vorticity by enhancing mixing of the reactants. The magnetic field effect on the flame temperature and rate of reactions leads to conclusion that field-enhanced increase of the flow vorticity results in flame cooling by limiting the chemical conversion of the reactants.

  19. Design of computer controlled combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isermann, R.; Mueller, N. [Darmstadt University of Technology (Germany). Inst. of Automatic Control

    2003-12-01

    Globalization and growing new markets, as well as increasing emission and fuel consumption requirements, force the car manufacturers and their suppliers to develop new engine control strategies in shorter time periods. This can mainly be reached by development tools and an integrated hardware and software environment enabling rapid implementation and testing of advanced engine control algorithms. The structure of a rapid control prototyping (RCP) system is explained, which allows fast measurement signal evaluation, and rapid prototyping of advanced engine control algorithms. A hardware-in-the-loop simulator for diesel engine control design is illustrated, simulation results for a 40 tons truck are presented. Providing efficient engine models for the proposed development tools, a dynamic local linear neural network approach is explained and applied for modelling the NO{sub x} emission characteristics of a 1.9 1 direct injection diesel engine. Furthermore the application of a RCP system is exemplified by the application of combustion pressure based closed-loop ignition timing control for a SI engine. Experimental results are shown for a 1.01 SI engine on a dynamic engine test stand. (author)

  20. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2014-10-07

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  1. Advanced Combustion and Emission Control Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) Technical Team is focused on removing technical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high-efficiency, emission-compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light-duty vehicle powertrains (i.e., passenger car, minivan, SUV, and pickup trucks).

  2. AFRL Combustion Science Branch Research Activities and Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    AFRL-PR-WP-TP-2005-207 AFRL COMBUSTION SCIENCE BRANCH RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AND CAPABILITIES R.D. Hancock, D.T. Shouse, F.R. Schauer, V.M...Ph.D. Project Monitor Chief Combustion Science Branch Combustion Science Branch _____________//s//___________________ WILLIAM W... COPENHAVER , Ph.D. Principal Scientist Turbine Engine Division This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information

  3. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  4. Fuel design real-time to control HCCI combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Yuchun; HUANG Zhen; LU Xingcai; FANG Junhuan; ZU Linlin

    2006-01-01

    In order to achieve lower emissions and extensive load in the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine system, a novel fuel design concept that high-octane number fuel and high-cetane number fuel are mixed real-time to control HCCI combustion is proposed in this study. HCCI combustion fueled with iso-octane/n-heptane mixtures controlled real-time on a single-cylinder HCCI combustion engine is studied. The test results show that the equivalence ratio of n-heptane in mixtures decides ignition and controls the combustion phase of HCCI combustion. The addition of iso-octane extends knocking limit in equivalence ratio somewhat,but knocking occurrence mainly depends on the total concentration of mixture. Although operating range in equivalence ratio becomes narrow with the increasing proportion of iso-octane, the maximum load of HCCI combustion fueled with iso-octane/n-heptane mixtures controlled real-time is increased about 80% more than that of pure n-heptane. When iso-octane/n-heptane mixtures are controlled in optimized method, it is proved that the load of HCCI combustion can be fully extended and emissions can be decreased remarkably, while at the same time the higher indicated thermal efficiencies are obtained over the extensive operation range.

  5. Combustion chemistry. Activities in the CHEC research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam-Johansen, K.; Johnsson, J.E.; Glarborg, P.; Frandsen, F.; Jensen, A.; Oestberg, M. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The combustion chemistry in the oxidation of fossil fuels and biofuels determines together with mixing and heat transfer the required size of a furnace, the emission of gaseous pollutants, and the formation of ash and deposits on surfaces. This paper describes technologies for solid fuels combustion and gives a summary of the fuels, the pollutant chemistry and the inorganic chemistry in combustion processes. Emphasis is put on the work carried out in the CHEC (Combustion and Harmful Emission Control Research Programme). (au) 173 refs.

  6. A statistical combustion phase control approach of SI engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinwu; Wu, Yuhu; Shen, Tielong

    2017-02-01

    In order to maximize the performance of internal combustion engine, combustion phase is usually controlled to track its desired reference. However, suffering from the cyclic variability of combustion, it is difficulty but meaningful to control mean of combustion phase and constrain its variance. As a combustion phase indicator, the location of peak pressure (LPP) is utilized for real-time combustion phase control in this research. The purpose of the proposed method is to ensure the mean of LPP statistically tracks its reference and constrains the standard deviation of LPP distribution. To achieve this, LPP is first calculated based on the cylinder pressure sensor, and its characteristics are analyzed at the steady-state operating condition, then the distribution of LPP is examined online using hypothesis test criterion. On the basis of the presented statistical algorithm, current mean of LPP is applied in the feedback channel for designing spark advance adjustment law, and the stability of closed-loop system is theoretically ensured according to a steady statistical model. Finally, the proposed strategy is verified on a spark ignition gasoline engine.

  7. New controllable premixed combustion for dimethyl ether engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new concept of the controllable premixed combustion (CPC) system was proposed for dimethyl ether (DME) to explore a new approach to achieving ultra-low NOX emissions with the zero level of particulate matter exhaust emissions. The DME fuel was injected into the premix chamber by means of the electronically controlled low pressure injection system, then the mixture formation and combustion process were controlled with a control-valve set between the main chamber and the premix chamber. The test bench was constructed based on a single diesel engine. Preliminary studies demonstrated that ultra-low NOX emissions had been realized with zero particulate matter emissions under the optimum specifications of the DME engine, NOX emissions were less than 65 × 10-6. According to the engine combustion analysis, it was found that the control-valve played an important role in the pre-mixture formation and ignition timing.

  8. Combustion Dynamics and Control for Ultra Low Emissions in Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Future aircraft engines must provide ultra-low emissions and high efficiency at low cost while maintaining the reliability and operability of present day engines. The demands for increased performance and decreased emissions have resulted in advanced combustor designs that are critically dependent on efficient fuel/air mixing and lean operation. However, all combustors, but most notably lean-burning low-emissions combustors, are susceptible to combustion instabilities. These instabilities are typically caused by the interaction of the fluctuating heat release of the combustion process with naturally occurring acoustic resonances. These interactions can produce large pressure oscillations within the combustor and can reduce component life and potentially lead to premature mechanical failures. Active Combustion Control which consists of feedback-based control of the fuel-air mixing process can provide an approach to achieving acceptable combustor dynamic behavior while minimizing emissions, and thus can provide flexibility during the combustor design process. The NASA Glenn Active Combustion Control Technology activity aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines by providing experiments tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. The intent is to allow the technology maturity of active combustion control to advance to eventual demonstration in an engine environment. Work at NASA Glenn has shown that active combustion control, utilizing advanced algorithms working through high frequency fuel actuation, can effectively suppress instabilities in a combustor which emulates the instabilities found in an aircraft gas turbine engine. Current efforts are aimed at extending these active control technologies to advanced ultra-low-emissions combustors such as those employing multi-point lean direct injection.

  9. Model predictive combustion control based on neural nets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D. [Powitec Intelligent Technologies GmbH, Essen (Germany); Kampschreuer, T. [AVR Afvalverwerking B.V., Duiven/Arnheim (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The first closed-loop Neural Net combustion controller in the Netherlands has been installed at the HVC plant in Alkmaar. During the summer 2006 the first of the 'old' three lines was equipped with an individually controllable primary air distribution. As 'fire controller' the combustion optimiser from Powitec, the PiT Navigator, was selected, a system using digital image processing and neural nets. This paper shows the results from operating the plant with and without the NMPC optimiser and from the performance tests. (orig.)

  10. Control of NOx during stationary combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Yeh; Wei-Yin Chen

    2004-11-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur oxides (SOx) emissions are primary contributors to acid rain, which is associated with a number of effects including acidification of lakes and streams, accelerated corrosion of buildings, and visibility impairment. Among the various nitrogen oxides emitted from stationary combustion; nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) are stable, and NO predominates (over 90%). In health effects, NO{sub 2} can irritate the lungs and lower resistance to respiratory infection. In the area of ozone nonattainment, NOx and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) react in the atmosphere to form ozone, a photochemical oxidant and a major component of smog. Atmospheric ozone can cause respiratory problems by damaging lung tissue and reducing lung function. It is generally believed that over 80% of the total NOx emitted to the atmosphere originate at sources where fossil fuels and industrial wastes are burned. About one-half of the emissions are produced during combustion of fossil fuels in the utility industries. The rate of NOx formation is affected by fuel nitrogen content and by combustor design parameters. Higher firing temperature and combustor pressure increase NOx emissions. Nitric acid plants also produce large amounts of NOx as waste gas, but in much higher concentration than emissions from utility boiler flue gas.

  11. Control Strategies for HCCI Mixed-Mode Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to expand the operational range of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) mixed-mode combustion for gasoline en-gines. ORNL has extensive experience in the analysis, interpretation, and control of dynamic engine phenomena, and Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain compo-nents and subsystems. The partnership of these knowledge bases was important to address criti-cal barriers associated with the realistic implementation of HCCI and enabling clean, efficient operation for the next generation of transportation engines. The foundation of this CRADA was established through the analysis of spark-assisted HCCI data from a single-cylinder research engine. This data was used to (1) establish a conceptual kinetic model to better understand and predict the development of combustion instabilities, (2) develop a low-order model framework suitable for real-time controls, and (3) provide guidance in the initial definition of engine valve strategies for achieving HCCI operation. The next phase focused on the development of a new combustion metric for real-time characterization of the combustion process. Rapid feedback on the state of the combustion process is critical to high-speed decision making for predictive control. Simultaneous to the modeling/analysis studies, Delphi was focused on the development of engine hardware and the engine management system. This included custom Delphi hardware and control systems allowing for flexible control of the valvetrain sys-tem to enable HCCI operation. The final phase of this CRADA included the demonstration of conventional and spark assisted HCCI on the multi-cylinder engine as well as the characterization of combustion instabilities, which govern the operational boundaries of this mode of combustion. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout this project. Meetings were held on a bi-weekly basis with additional reports, presentation, and

  12. Biomass Combustion Control and Stabilization Using Low-Cost Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Piteľ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes methods for biomass combustion process control and burning stabilization based on low-cost sensing of carbon monoxide emissions and oxygen concentration in the flue gas. The designed control system was tested on medium-scale biomass-fired boilers and some results are evaluated and presented in the paper.

  13. Oxy-fuel combustion with integrated pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Brian R [Chicago, IL; Ochs, Thomas Lilburn [Albany, OR; Summers, Cathy Ann [Albany, OR; Oryshchyn, Danylo B [Philomath, OR; Turner, Paul Chandler [Independence, OR

    2012-01-03

    An oxygen fueled integrated pollutant removal and combustion system includes a combustion system and an integrated pollutant removal system. The combustion system includes a furnace having at least one burner that is configured to substantially prevent the introduction of air. An oxygen supply supplies oxygen at a predetermine purity greater than 21 percent and a carbon based fuel supply supplies a carbon based fuel. Oxygen and fuel are fed into the furnace in controlled proportion to each other and combustion is controlled to produce a flame temperature in excess of 3000 degrees F. and a flue gas stream containing CO2 and other gases. The flue gas stream is substantially void of non-fuel borne nitrogen containing combustion produced gaseous compounds. The integrated pollutant removal system includes at least one direct contact heat exchanger for bringing the flue gas into intimated contact with a cooling liquid to produce a pollutant-laden liquid stream and a stripped flue gas stream and at least one compressor for receiving and compressing the stripped flue gas stream.

  14. COMPUTATIONALLY INTELLIGENT MODELLING AND CONTROL OF FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan T Ćirić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper modelling and control approaches for fluidized bed combustion process have been considered, that are based on the use of computational intelligence. Proposed adaptive neuro-fuzzy-genetic modelling and intelligent control strategies provide for efficient combining of available expert knowledge with experimental data. Firstly, based on the qualitative information on the desulphurization process, models of the SO2 emission in fluidized bed combustion have been developed, which provides for economical and efficient reduction of SO2 in FBC by estimation of optimal process parameters and by design of intelligent control systems based on defined emission models. Also, efficient fuzzy nonlinear FBC process modelling strategy by combining several linearized combustion models has been presented. Finally, fuzzy and conventional process control systems for fuel flow and primary air flow regulation based on developed models and optimized by genetic algorithms have also been developed. Obtained results indicate that computationally intelligent approach can be successfully applied for modelling and control of complex fluidized bed combustion process.

  15. Control of combustion area using electrical resistivity method for underground coal gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selivanova Tatiana; Grebenyuk Igor; Belov Alexey

    2012-01-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) is one of the clean technologies to collect heat energy and gases (hydrogen,methane,etc.) in an underground coal seam.It is necessary to further developing environmentally friendly UCG system construction.One of the most important UCG's problems is underground control of combustion area for efficient gas production,estimation of subsidence and gas leakage to the surface.For this objective,laboratory experiments were conducted according to the UCG model to identify the process of combustion cavity development by monitoring the electrical resistivity activity on the coal samples to setup fundamental data for the technology engineering to evaluate combustion area.While burning coal specimens,that had been sampled from various coal deposits,electrical resistivity was monitored.Symmetric four electrodes system (ABMN) of direct and low-frequency current electric resistance method was used.for laboratory resistivity measurement of rock samples.Made research and the results suggest that front-end of electro conductivity activity during heating and combusting of coal specimen depended on heating temperature.Combusting coal electro conductivity has complicated multistage type of change.Electrical resistivity method is expected to be a useful geophysical tool to for evaluation of combustion volume and its migration in the coal seam.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Study of Jet Controlled Compression Ignition on Combustion Phasing Control in Diesel Premixed Compression Ignition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to directly control the premixed combustion phasing, a Jet Controlled Compression Ignition (JCCI for diesel premixed compression ignition systems is investigated. Experiments were conducted on a single cylinder natural aspirated diesel engine without EGR at 3000 rpm. Numerical models were validated by load sweep experiments at fixed spark timing. Detailed combustion characteristics were analyzed based on the BMEP of 2.18 bar. The simulation results showed that the high temperature jets of reacting active radical species issued from the ignition chamber played an important role on the onset of combustion in the JCCI system. The combustion of diesel pre-mixtures was initiated rapidly by the combustion products issued from the ignition chamber. Moreover, the flame propagation was not obvious, similar to that in Pre-mixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI. Consequently, spark timing sweep experiments were conducted. The results showed a good linear relationship between spark timing in the ignition chamber and CA10 and CA50, which indicated the ability for direct combustion phasing control in diesel PCCI. The NOx and soot emissions gradually changed with the decrease of spark advance angle. The maximum reduction of NOx and soot were both over 90%, and HC and CO emissions were increased.

  17. Preliminary study of trace element emissions and control during coal combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Junying; ZHAO Yongchun; DING Feng; ZENG Hancai; ZHENG Chuguang

    2007-01-01

    Hazardous trace element emissions have caused serious harm to human health in China.Several typical high-toxic trace element coals were collected from different districts and were used to investigate the emission characteristics of toxic trace elements (As,Se,Cr,Hg) and to explore preliminary control methods.Coal combustion tests were conducted in several bench-scale furnaces including drop tube furnace (DTF),circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion furnace,and fixed-bed combustion furnace.Calcium oxide was used to control the emission of arsenic and selenium.The granular activated carbons (AC) and activatedcarbon fibers (ACF) were used to remove mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion.The chemical composition and trace element contents of ash and particulate matter (PM)were determined by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES),respectively.The speciation and concentration of mercury were investigated using the Ontario-Hydro method.X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD) was used to determine the mineral composition of production during combustion experiments.With the addition of a calciumbased sorbent,arsenic concentration in PM1 sharply decreased from 0.25-0.11 mg/m3.In fixed-bed combustion of coal,the retention rates of selenium volatiles were between 11.6% and 50.7% using lime.In the circulating fluidized-bed combustion of coal,the content of selenium in ash from the chimney was reduced to one-fourth of its original value and that in leaching water from the chimney decreased by two orders of magnitude using lime.Calcium-based sorbent is an effective additive to control the emission of As and Se during coal combustion.The emission of chromium is influenced by the occurrence mode of Cr in coal.Chromium emission in PM2.5 during coal combustion is 55.5 and 34.7 μg/m3 for Shenbei coal and mixed Pingdingshan coal,respectively.The adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon for Hg0 is

  18. Heat conduction controlled combustion for scramjet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, A.; Agnone, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The use of heat conduction flame generated in a premixed supersonic stream is discussed. It is shown that the flame is controlled initially by heat conduction and then by chemical reaction. Such a flame is shorter than the diffusion type of flame and therefore it requires a much shorter burner. The mixing is obtained by injecting the hydrogen in the inlet. Then the inlet can be cooled by film cooling.

  19. Combustion distribution control using the extremum seeking algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, A.; Krstic, M.; Djurovic, Z.; Kvascev, G.; Papic, V.

    2014-12-01

    Quality regulation of the combustion process inside the furnace is the basis of high demands for increasing robustness, safety and efficiency of thermal power plants. The paper considers the possibility of spatial temperature distribution control inside the boiler, based on the correction of distribution of coal over the mills. Such control system ensures the maintenance of the flame focus away from the walls of the boiler, and thus preserves the equipment and reduces the possibility of ash slugging. At the same time, uniform heat dissipation over mills enhances the energy efficiency of the boiler, while reducing the pollution of the system. A constrained multivariable extremum seeking algorithm is proposed as a tool for combustion process optimization with the main objective of centralizing the flame in the furnace. Simulations are conducted on a model corresponding to the 350MW boiler of the Nikola Tesla Power Plant, in Obrenovac, Serbia.

  20. Mercury emission, control and measurement from coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei-Ping [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering; Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Cao, Yan [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States). Inst. for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology; Zhang, Kai [North China Electric Power Univ., Beijing (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Coal-fired electric power generation accounts for 65% of U.S. emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), 22% of nitrogen oxides (NOx), and 37% of mercury (Hg). The proposed Clear Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) will attempt to regulate these emissions using a cap-and-trade program to replace a number of existing regulatory requirements that will impact this industry over the next decade. Mercury emissions remain the largest source that has not yet been efficiently controlled, in part because this is one of the most expensive to control. Mercury is a toxic, persistent pollutant that accumulates in the food chain. During the coal combustion process, when both sampling and accurate measurements are challenging, we know that mercury is present in three species: elemental, oxidized and particulate. There are three basic types of mercury measurement methods: Ontario Hydro Method, mercury continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) and sorbent-based monitoring. Particulate mercury is best captured by electrostatic precipitators (ESP). Oxidized mercury is best captured in wet scrubbers. Elemental mercury is the most difficult to capture, but selective catalytic reduction units (SCRs) are able to convert elemental mercury to oxidized mercury allowing it to be captured by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This works well for eastern coals with high chlorine contents, but this does not work well on the Wyoming Powder River Basin (PRB) coals. However, no good explanation for its mechanism, correlations of chlorine content in coal with SCR performance, and impacts of higher chlorine content in coal on FGD re-emission are available. The combination of SCR and FGD affords more than an 80% reduction in mercury emissions in the case of high chlorine content coals. The mercury emission results from different coal ranks, boilers, and the air pollution control device (APCD) in power plant will be discussed. Based on this UAEPA new regulation, most power plants

  1. Prediction and control of combustion instabilities in industrial gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, G. [ALSTOM Power Technology Centre, Leicester (United Kingdom); Troger, C. [ALSTOM Power Sweden AB, Finspaang (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    A key enabling technology for highly efficient gas turbines, with low emissions of nitrogen oxides, is the suppression and control of combustion induced thermoacoustic instabilities. This will require an improved understanding of the phenomena governing these instabilities. A multi-partner project, funded in part by the European Commission, has been set up to address this requirement. Known as Preccinsta, the project has the overall aims of: Investigation of the physics, prediction and control of combustor instabilities. This will lead to the development of validated predictive tools and the development of design rules to avoid such instabilities. These advanced techniques will help to design new combustors for gas turbines with improved efficiency, reliability and availability. Investigation of the ability of industrial gas turbines to burn a wider range of fuels such as biomass and waste derived fuels. This paper gives an overview of the development of techniques to understand and control combustion instabilities in industrial gas turbines. It also presents some of the results achieved within the first two years of the project, focusing on passive damping and burner characterisation for an annular combustion system. These topics demonstrate the excellent interaction of analytical modelling and experimental testing within the project. (author)

  2. Amperometric NOx-sensor for Combustion Exhaust Gas Control. Studies on transport properties and catalytic activity of oxygen permeable ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romer, E.W.J.

    2001-04-27

    The aim of the research described in this thesis is the development of a mixed conducting oxide layer, which can be used as an oxygen permselective membrane in an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensor will be used in exhaust gas systems. The exhaust gas-producing engine will run in the lean mix mode. The preparation of this sensor is carried out using screen-printing technology, in which the different layers of the sensor are applied successively. Hereafter, a co-firing step is applied in which all layers are sintered together. This co-firing step imposes several demands on the selection of materials. The design specifications of the sensor further include requirements concerning the operating temperature, measurement range and overall stability. The operating temperature of the sensor varies between 700 and 850C, enabling measurement of NOx concentrations between 50 and 1200 ppm with a measurement accuracy of 10 ppm. Concerning the stability of the sensor, it must withstand the exhaust gas atmosphere containing, amongst others, smoke, acids, abrasive particles and sulphur. Because of the chosen lean-mix engine concept, in which the fuel/air mixture switches continuously between lean (excess oxygen) and fat (excess fuel) mixtures, the sensor must withstand alternately oxidising and reducing atmospheres. Besides, it should be resistant to thermal shock and show no cross-sensitivity of NOx with other exhaust gas constituents like oxygen and hydrocarbons. The response time should be short, typically less than 500 ms. Because of the application in combustion engines of cars, the operational lifetime should be longer than 10 years. Demands on the mixed conducting oxide layer include the following ones. The layer should show minimal catalytic activity towards NOx-reduction. The oxygen permeability must be larger than 6.22 10{sup -8} mol/cm{sup 2}s at a layer thickness between 3-50 {mu}m. Since the mixed conducting oxide layer is coated on the YSZ electrolyte embodiment

  3. Combustion Mode Design with High Efficiency and Low Emissions Controlled by Mixtures Stratification and Fuel Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixture stratification that have been conducted in the authors’ group, including the charge reactivity controlled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion, stratification controlled premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI combustion, and dual-fuel combustion concepts controlled by both fuel reactivity and mixture stratification. The review starts with the charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion, and the works on HCCI fuelled with both high cetane number fuels, such as DME and n-heptane, and high octane number fuels, such as methanol, natural gas, gasoline and mixtures of gasoline/alcohols, are reviewed and discussed. Since single fuel cannot meet the reactivity requirements under different loads to control the combustion process, the studies related to concentration stratification and dual-fuel charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion are then presented, which have been shown to have the potential to achieve effective combustion control. The efforts of using both mixture and thermal stratifications to achieve the auto-ignition and combustion control are also discussed. Thereafter, both charge reactivity and mixture stratification are then applied to control the combustion process. The potential and capability of thermal-atmosphere controlled compound combustion mode and dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI/highly premixed charge combustion (HPCC mode to achieve clean and high efficiency combustion are then presented and discussed. Based on these results and discussions, combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixtures stratification in the whole operating range is proposed.

  4. Utilization of spent activated carbon to enhance the combustion efficiency of organic sludge derived fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Sheng; Lin, Chang-Wen; Chang, Fang-Chih; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Wu, Jhong-Lin

    2012-06-01

    This study examines the heating value and combustion efficiency of organic sludge derived fuel, spent activated carbon derived fuel, and derived fuel from a mixture of organic sludge and spent activated carbon. Spent activated carbon was sampled from an air pollution control device of an incinerator and characterized by XRD, XRF, TG/DTA, and SEM. The spent activated carbon was washed with deionized water and solvent (1N sulfuric acid) and then processed by the organic sludge derived fuel manufacturing process. After washing, the salt (chloride) and sulfide content could be reduced to 99% and 97%, respectively; in addition the carbon content and heating value were increased. Different ratios of spent activated carbon have been applied to the organic sludge derived fuel to reduce the NO(x) emission of the combustion.

  5. Experimental Studies of Hydrocarbon Flame Phenomena: Enabling Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-30

    36 where Su 0 is the burning velocity of the pure fuel , Ea is the activation energy , R represents the universal gas constant, Tb is the mixture...K.M., 2009, “On diluted- fuel combustion issues in burning biogas surrogates,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 131(4), pp. 041802-041802-9. [8...Diluted MethaneFlames in the Near- andFar-Field , Journal of Energy Resources Technology, (12 2013): 0. doi: Andrew R. Hutchins, William A. Reach

  6. Study on Model Based Combustion Control of Diesel Engine with Multi Fuel Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, R.; Yamasaki, Y.; Kaneko, S.

    2016-09-01

    A controller for model-based control of diesel engine with triple injection were developed with a combustion model. In the combustion model, an engine cycle is discretized into several representative points in order to improve calculation speed, while physical equations are employed to expand the versatility. The combustion model can predict in-cylinder pressure and temperature in these discrete points. Prediction accuracy of the combustion model was evaluated by comparison with experimental result. A controller was designed with the combustion model in order to calculate optimal fuel injection pattern for controlling in-cylinder pressure peak timing. The controller's performance was evaluated through simulation in which the combustion model was used as a plant model.

  7. Acoustic excitation of diffusion flames with coherent structure in a plane shear layer. ; Application of active combustion control to two-dimensional phase-locked arranging measurements. Soshiki kozo wo tomonau heimen sendai kakusan kaen no onkyo reiki. ; Nijigen iso heikin bunpu sokutei eno active nensho seigyo no oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Y.; Kojima, T.; Oiwa, N.; Yamaguchi, S. (Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-11-25

    The acoustic excitation of a plane diffusion flame enhances the periodicity of organized eddy controlled combustion. In this study, to clarify an effectiveness of application of active combustion control, phase characteristics of the excited eddy flames with high periodicity have been examined. A computer-aided phase-locked averaging method was employed to obtain graphical two-dimensional contour maps of the instantaneous profiles of temperature and CH emission. Both maps consisting of eight consecutive phases indicated clearly not only the periodic behavior of the organized eddy flame, but also the gas dynamic properties peculiar to those flames with coherent structure. In addition, the profiles of local contribution of the sound field to the combustion process were examined by calculating the two-dimensional distribution of the local Rayleigh index. Calculation results of the two-dimensional distribution of the local Rayleigh index indicated that the organized eddy flames have high sensitivity to sound, and play an important role in an interaction of sound and flame. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; Songgeng Li

    2006-04-01

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Work was performed on the following activities. First, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility were completed. The riser, primary cyclone and secondary cyclone of Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Combustor have been erected. Second, the Mercury Control Workshop and the Grand Opening of Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET) were successfully held on February 22 and 23, 2006, respectively. Third, effects of hydrogen chlorine (HCl) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) on mercury oxidation were studied in a drop tube reactor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  9. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new

  10. Real-Time Combustion Controls and Diagnostics Sensors (CCADS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, J.D.; Richard, G.A.; Dodrill, K.A.; Nutter, R.S. Jr; Straub, D.

    2005-05-03

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for the monitoring of the combustion process within a combustion system. The apparatus comprises; a combustion system, a means for supplying fuel and an oxidizer, a device for igniting the fuel and oxidizer in order to initiate combustion, and a sensor for determining the current conducted by the combustion process. The combustion system comprises a fuel nozzle and an outer shell attached to the combustion nozzle. The outer shell defines a combustion chamber. Preferably the nozzle is a lean premix fuel nozzle (LPN). Fuel and an oxidizer are provided to the fuel nozzle at separate rates. The fuel and oxidizer are ignited. A sensor positioned within the combustion system comprising at least two electrodes in spaced-apart relationship from one another. At least a portion of the combustion process or flame is between the first and second electrodes. A voltage is applied between the first and second electrodes and the magnitude of resulting current between the first and second electrodes is determined.

  11. Flexible fuel engine based on multi-combustion control technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaolu; HUANG Zhen; QIAO Xinqi; SONG Jun; FANG Junhua; XIA Huimin

    2005-01-01

    A combustion control strategy is proposed for diesel engine to reduce PM and NOx emissions significantly, which adopts some technologies including internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), split spray, adjustable fuel delivery advance angle and the application of alternative fuels. Based on this strategy, a flexible fuel engine has been developed. The experimental results show that this engine can be fueled with diesel fuel, alcohol, dimethyl carbonate (DMC), etc. It works with extremely low levels of particulate matter (PM) and NOx, 2~3% higher effective thermal efficiency on moderate and high loads when alternative fuels are used. This engine not only has lower exhaust emissions, but also can be fueled with those alternative fuels, which are difficult to be ignited by compression.

  12. 10 CFR 50.44 - Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors. 50.44... FACILITIES Standards for Licenses, Certifications, and Regulatory Approvals § 50.44 Combustible gas control for nuclear power reactors. (a) Definitions—(1) Inerted atmosphere means a containment atmosphere...

  13. Robust Multivariable Feedback Control of Natural Gas-Diesel RCCI Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indrajuana, A.; Bekdemir, C.; Luo, X.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced combustion concepts such as Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) demonstrate very high thermal efficiencies combined with ultra low NOx emissions. As RCCI is sensitive for operating conditions, closed-loop control is a crucial enabler for stable and robust combustion. The

  14. Robust Multivariable Feedback Control of Natural Gas-Diesel RCCI Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indrajuana, A.; Bekdemir, C.; Luo, X.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced combustion concepts such as Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) demonstrate very high thermal efficiencies combined with ultra low NOx emissions. As RCCI is sensitive for operating conditions, closed-loop control is a crucial enabler for stable and robust combustion. The feedb

  15. Method and device for diagnosing and controlling combustion instabilities in internal combustion engines operating in or transitioning to homogeneous charge combustion ignition mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert M [Knoxville, TN; Daw, Charles S [Knoxville, TN; Green, Johney B [Knoxville, TN; Edwards, Kevin D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-07

    This invention is a method of achieving stable, optimal mixtures of HCCI and SI in practical gasoline internal combustion engines comprising the steps of: characterizing the combustion process based on combustion process measurements, determining the ratio of conventional and HCCI combustion, determining the trajectory (sequence) of states for consecutive combustion processes, and determining subsequent combustion process modifications using said information to steer the engine combustion toward desired behavior.

  16. The development of pollution control technology in coal combustion in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xuchang; ZHANG Hu; ZHUO Yuqun; TONG Huiling; WANG Shujuan; LI Yan

    2007-01-01

    The recent development of coal combustion pollution control technologies in China,including desulphurization,denitrification,particulate matters and heavy metals emission control technologies,have been reviewed.The development histories and the advantages of China's self-developed technologies have been introduced in detail.The key points of future research and development in coal combustion pollution control,e.g.,combined emission control and CO2 emission control technologies,have also been discussed.

  17. Diesel-Minimal Combustion Control of a Natural Gas-Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Zurbriggen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the combustion phasing control of natural gas-diesel engines. In this study, the combustion phasing is influenced by manipulating the start and the duration of the diesel injection. Instead of using both degrees of freedom to control the center of combustion only, we propose a method that simultaneously controls the combustion phasing and minimizes the amount of diesel used. Minimizing the amount of diesel while keeping the center of combustion at a constant value is formulated as an optimization problem with an equality constraint. A combination of feedback control and extremum seeking is used to solve this optimization problem online. The necessity to separate the different time scales is discussed and a structure is proposed that facilitates this separation for this specific example. The proposed method is validated by experiments on a test bench.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be

  19. Control strategies for CAI combustion processes; Strategien zur Regelung von CAI-Brennverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karrelmeyer, R.; Graf, G.; Scherrer, D.; Fischer, W.; Hathout, J.P. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The contribution presents concepts for control of a CAI combustion process with internal exhaust trapping. The concepts are based on combustion characteristics obtained from the combustion chamber pressure signal. Combustion is controlled using the control variables of the air and fuel systems. The engines investigated were engines with variable valve drive, with different degrees of variability, and with a direct injection system. In a first step, a fully variable valve control system is investigated which enables adjustment of the gas change valves for the individual cylinders. In the second step, the cost aspect is considered and a control strategy is presented which does not control individual cylinders but uses a valve control strategy with conventional phase control elements. The control concepts presented here are a combination of pre-control and combustion characteristics control. Results obtained during operating mode switching, dynamic operation and stabilisation of the CAI mode are presented as well. Pre-control is particularly important in order to prevent misfires as well as extremely early and loud combustion both in dynamic operation and during switching. (orig.)

  20. Combustion Control System Design of Diesel Engine via ASPR based Output Feedback Control Strategy with a PFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Ikuro; Tsunematsu, Junpei; Fujii, Seiya

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a design method of an output feedback control system with a simple feedforward input for a combustion model of diesel engine will be proposed based on the almost strictly positive real-ness (ASPR-ness) of the controlled system for a combustion control of diesel engines. A parallel feedforward compensator (PFC) design scheme which renders the resulting augmented controlled system ASPR will also be proposed in order to design a stable output feedback control system for the considered combustion model. The effectiveness of our proposed method will be confirmed through numerical simulations.

  1. Control of the low-load region in partially premixed combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingesson, Gabriel; Yin, Lianhao; Johansson, Rolf; Tunestal, Per

    2016-09-01

    Partially premixed combustion (PPC) is a low temperature, direct-injection combustion concept that has shown to give promising emission levels and efficiencies over a wide operating range. In this concept, high EGR ratios, high octane-number fuels and early injection timings are used to slow down the auto-ignition reactions and to enhance the fuel and are mixing before the start of combustion. A drawback with this concept is the combustion stability in the low-load region where a high octane-number fuel might cause misfire and low combustion efficiency. This paper investigates the problem of low-load PPC controller design for increased engine efficiency. First, low-load PPC data, obtained from a multi-cylinder heavy- duty engine is presented. The data shows that combustion efficiency could be increased by using a pilot injection and that there is a non-linearity in the relation between injection and combustion timing. Furthermore, intake conditions should be set in order to avoid operating points with unfavourable global equivalence ratio and in-cylinder temperature combinations. Model predictive control simulations were used together with a calibrated engine model to find a gas-system controller that fulfilled this task. The findings are then summarized in a suggested engine controller design. Finally, an experimental performance evaluation of the suggested controller is presented.

  2. Investigation of combustion control in a dump combustor using the feedback free fluidic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.

    mechanism by which the fluidic oscillators were able to suppress the combustion instability. Results for steady jet secondary injection, showed a strong coupling between the jet injection and the combustion instability pressure pulse. The computational results were able to closely match the experimental results and previous CFD data. The model with the oscillating fluidic oscillator injection was unable to match the stable combustion seen in the experimental data. Further investigation is needed to determine the role higher order chemistry kinetics play in the process and the role of manifolds on the un-choked fuel and fluidic oscillator inlets. This research demonstrates the ability to modulate propellant injection and suppress combustion instabilities using fluidic devices that require no electrical power or moving parts. The advent of advanced manufacturing technologies such as direct metal laser sintering will allow for integration of fluidic devices into combustors to provide open loop active control with a high degree of reliability. Additionally, 2-D CFD analysis is demonstrated to be a valid tool for predicting the feedback free fluidic oscillator oscillation mechanism.

  3. The use of electrical discharge for ignition and control of combustion of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Tsuruo; Matsuda, Takashi; Kimura, Itsuro

    1987-01-01

    As the first step of the study of the combustion control of solid propellants by electrical discharges, the effects of an arc discharge, which flows along the burning surface, on the burning rate and on the increase of enthalpy of the combustion product were investigated. For specially devised composite propellants, which are composed of Al and Teflon powders, it was shown that the combination can be controlled by an arc discharge; the combustion continues when the arc discharge is applied and is interrupted when the arc discharge breaks. In the present investigation, it was also shown that an arc discharge coupled with a high-frequency electrical discharge has potential as an effective ignition method for solid propellants. For the application of this type of combustion control to an ignitor for a solid propellant rocket motor or to a control rocket motor, this method lacks flexibility in the configuration scale and needs relatively high electric power at the present stage.

  4. Time varying voltage combustion control and diagnostics sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Thornton, Jimmy D.; Huckaby, E. David; Fincham, William

    2011-04-19

    A time-varying voltage is applied to an electrode, or a pair of electrodes, of a sensor installed in a fuel nozzle disposed adjacent the combustion zone of a continuous combustion system, such as of the gas turbine engine type. The time-varying voltage induces a time-varying current in the flame which is measured and used to determine flame capacitance using AC electrical circuit analysis. Flame capacitance is used to accurately determine the position of the flame from the sensor and the fuel/air ratio. The fuel and/or air flow rate (s) is/are then adjusted to provide reduced flame instability problems such as flashback, combustion dynamics and lean blowout, as well as reduced emissions. The time-varying voltage may be an alternating voltage and the time-varying current may be an alternating current.

  5. Real-time combustion control and diagnostics sensor-pressure oscillation monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Thornton, Jimmy; Huckaby, E. David; Richards, George A.

    2009-07-14

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and controlling the combustion process in a combustion system to determine the amplitude and/or frequencies of dynamic pressure oscillations during combustion. An electrode in communication with the combustion system senses hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by the combustion process and calibration apparatus calibrates the relationship between the standard deviation of the current in the electrode and the amplitudes of the dynamic pressure oscillations by applying a substantially constant voltage between the electrode and ground resulting in a current in the electrode and by varying one or more of (1) the flow rate of the fuel, (2) the flow rate of the oxidant, (3) the equivalence ratio, (4) the acoustic tuning of the combustion system, and (5) the fuel distribution in the combustion chamber such that the amplitudes of the dynamic pressure oscillations in the combustion chamber are calculated as a function of the standard deviation of the electrode current. Thereafter, the supply of fuel and/or oxidant is varied to modify the dynamic pressure oscillations.

  6. Real-time combustion control and diagnostics sensor-pressure oscillation monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Thornton, Jimmy; Huckaby, E. David; Richards, George A.

    2009-07-14

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and controlling the combustion process in a combustion system to determine the amplitude and/or frequencies of dynamic pressure oscillations during combustion. An electrode in communication with the combustion system senses hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by the combustion process and calibration apparatus calibrates the relationship between the standard deviation of the current in the electrode and the amplitudes of the dynamic pressure oscillations by applying a substantially constant voltage between the electrode and ground resulting in a current in the electrode and by varying one or more of (1) the flow rate of the fuel, (2) the flow rate of the oxidant, (3) the equivalence ratio, (4) the acoustic tuning of the combustion system, and (5) the fuel distribution in the combustion chamber such that the amplitudes of the dynamic pressure oscillations in the combustion chamber are calculated as a function of the standard deviation of the electrode current. Thereafter, the supply of fuel and/or oxidant is varied to modify the dynamic pressure oscillations.

  7. Model based control of grate combustion; Modellbaserad roststyrning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broden, Henrik; Kjellstroem, Bjoern; Niklasson, Fredrik; Boecher Poulsen, Kristian

    2006-12-15

    An existing dynamic model for grate combustion has been further developed. The model has been used for studies of possible advantages that can be gained from utilisation of measurements of grate temperatures and fuel bed height for control of a boiler after disturbances caused by varying fuel moisture and fuel feeding. The objective was to asses the possibilities to develop a control system that would adjust for such disturbances quicker than measurements of steam output and oxygen in the exhaust. The model is based on dividing the fuel bed into three layers, where the different layers include fuel being dried, fuel being pyrolysed and char reacting with oxygen. The grate below the fuel bed is also considered. A mass balance, an energy balance and a volume balance is considered for each layer in 22 cells along the grate. The energy balances give the temperature distribution and the volume balances the bed height. The earlier version of the model could not handle layers that are consumed. This weakness has now been eliminated. Comparisons between predicted grate temperatures and measurements in a 25 MW boiler fuelled with biofuel have been used for validation of the model. The comparisons include effects of variations in primary air temperature, fuel moisture and output power. The model shows good agreement with observations for changes in the air temperature but the ability of the model to predict effects of changed fuel moisture is difficult to judge since the steam dome pressure control caused simultaneous changes of the primary air flow, which probably had a larger influence on the grate temperature. A linearised, tuned and reduced version of the model was used for design of a linear quadratic controller. This was used for studies of advantages of using measurements of grate temperatures and bed height for control of pusher velocity, grate speed, primary air flow and air temperature after disturbances of fuel moisture and fuel flow. Measurements of the grate

  8. Multifunctional (NOx/CO/O2) Solid-State Sensors For Coal Combustion Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2006-12-31

    Solid-state sensors were developed for coal combustion control and the understanding of sensing mechanisms was advanced. Several semiconducting metal oxides (p-type and n-type) were used to fabricate sensor electrodes. The adsorption/desorption characteristics and catalytic activities of these materials were measured with Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Temperature Programmed Reaction (TPR) experiments. The sensitivity, selectivity, and response time of these sensors were measured for steps of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O vapor in simple N{sub 2}-balanced and multi-component, simulated combustion-exhaust streams. The role of electrode microstructure and fabrication parameters on sensing performance was investigated. Proof for the proposed sensing mechanism, Differential Electrode Equilibria, was demonstrated by relating the sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities) of the various electrode materials to their gas adsorption/desorption behaviors and catalytic activities. A multifunctional sensor array consisting of three sensing electrodes and an integrated heater and temperature sensors was fabricated with tape-casting and screen-printing and its NO{sub x} sensing performance was measured. The multifunctional sensor demonstrated it was possible to measure NO{sub 2} independent of NO by locally heating one of the sensing electrodes. The sensor technology was licensed to Fuel FX International, Inc. Fuel FX has obtained investor funding and is developing prototype sensors as a first step in their commercialization strategy for this technology.

  9. A Graph Based Approach to Nonlinear Model Predictive Control with Application to Combustion Control and Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-21

    compute carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations as well. Both pollutants are regulated by the UN Kyoto Protocol as well as by...combustion control. 1993. [16] I Culjak, A Sikanic, and V Koroman. Renewable energy sources in compliance of kyoto protocol targets: Case study of 42 mw

  10. Study on the active sites of Cu-ZSM-5 in trichloroethylene catalytic combustion with air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Hua Xu; Chuan Qi Liu; Yan Zhong; Xiu Zhou Yang; Jian Ying Liu; Ying Chun Yang; Zhi Xiang Ye

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Cu-ZSM-5 in trichloroethylene (TCE) combustion increases with the increasing skeletal Cu amount and however decreases with the increase of surface amorphous CuO,which is detected by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (DRS-UV-vis),therefore the skeletal Cu species are concluded to be the active sites for the TCE combustion.

  11. Impact of oxy-fuel combustion gases on mercury retention in activated carbons from a macroalgae waste: effect of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Anton, M A; Ferrera-Lorenzo, N; Fuente, E; Díaz-Somoano, M; Suarez-Ruíz, I; Martínez-Tarazona, M R; Ruiz, B

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the different sorption behaviors of mercury species on activated carbons in the oxy-fuel combustion of coal and the effect of high quantities of water vapor on the retention process. The work evaluates the interactions between the mercury species and a series of activated carbons prepared from a macroalgae waste (algae meal) from the agar-agar industry in oxy-combustion atmospheres, focussing on the role that the high concentration of water in the flue gases plays in mercury retention. Two novel aspects are considered in this work (i) the impact of oxy-combustion gases on the retention of mercury by activated carbons and (ii) the performance of activated carbons prepared from biomass algae wastes for this application. The results obtained at laboratory scale indicate that the effect of the chemical and textural characteristics of the activated carbons on mercury capture is not as important as that of reactive gases, such as the SOx and water vapor present in the flue gas. Mercury retention was found to be much lower in the oxy-combustion atmosphere than in the O2+N2 (12.6% O2) atmosphere. However, the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg0) to form oxidized mercury (Hg2+) amounted to 60%, resulting in an enhancement of mercury retention in the flue gas desulfurization units and a reduction in the amalgamation of Hg0 in the CO2 compression unit. This result is of considerable importance for the development of technologies based on activated carbon sorbents for mercury control in oxy-combustion processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Controlling the excess heat from oxy-combustion of coal by blending with biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Turan, A.Z.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Two different biomass species such as sunflower seed shell and hazelnut shell were blended with Soma-Denis lignite to determine the effects of co-combustion on the thermal reactivity and the burnout of the lignite sample. For this purpose, Thermogravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry techniques were applied from ambient to 900 C with a heating rate of 40 C/min under dry air and pure oxygen conditions. It was found that the thermal reactivities of the biomass materials and the lignite are highly different from each other under each oxidizing medium. On the other hand, the presence of biomass in the burning medium led to important influences not only on the burnout levels but also on the heat flows. The heat flow from the burning of lignite increased fivefold when the oxidizing medium was altered from dry air to pure oxygen. But, in case of co-combustion under oxygen, the excess heat arising from combustion of lignite could be reduced and this may be helpful to control the temperature of the combustion chamber. Based on this, co-combustion of coal/biomass blends under oxygen may be suggested as an alternative method to the ''Carbon Dioxide Recycle Method'' encountered in the oxyfuel combustion systems. (author)

  13. Engine modeling and control modeling and electronic management of internal combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Isermann, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The increasing demands for internal combustion engines with regard to fuel consumption, emissions and driveability lead to more actuators, sensors and complex control functions. A systematic implementation of the electronic control systems requires mathematical models from basic design through simulation to calibration. The book treats physically-based as well as models based experimentally on test benches for gasoline (spark ignition) and diesel (compression ignition) engines and uses them for the design of the different control functions. The main topics are: - Development steps for engine control - Stationary and dynamic experimental modeling - Physical models of intake, combustion, mechanical system, turbocharger, exhaust, cooling, lubrication, drive train - Engine control structures, hardware, software, actuators, sensors, fuel supply, injection system, camshaft - Engine control methods, static and dynamic feedforward and feedback control, calibration and optimization, HiL, RCP, control software developm...

  14. Hybrid intelligent control of combustion process for ore-roasting furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aijun YAN; Tianyou CHAI; Fenghua WU; Pu WANG

    2008-01-01

    Because of its synthetic and complex characteristics, the combustion process of the shaft ore-roasting furnace is very difficult to control stably. A hybrid intelligent control approach is developed which consists of two systems: one is a cascade fuzzy control system with a temperature soft-sensor, and the other is a ratio control system for air flow with a compensation model for heating gas flow and air-fuel ratio. This approach combined intelligent control, soft-sensing and fault diagnosis with conventional control. It can adjust both the heating gas flow and the air-fuel ratio in real time. By this way, the difficulty of online measurement of the furnace temperature is solved, the fault ratios during combustion process is decreased, the steady control of the furnace temperature is achieved, and the gas consumption is reduced. The successful application in shaft furnaces of a mineral processing plant in China indicates its effectiveness.

  15. Optimal control structure of combustion in coke oven battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Kostúr

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Big energetic aggregates require a complicated control system, which provide an effective running or production. Among these aggregates belongs the coke – oven battery. This article contains a proposal of the two – level control system. The basic control is realized by a direct digital control. The advanced control continuously optimalizes regulator parameters of the basic control. The present control system has been verified in real conditions of a coking plant.

  16. Artificial intelligence for the modeling and control of combustion processes: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soteris A. Kalogirou, [Higher Technical Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) systems are widely accepted as a technology offering an alternative way to tackle complex and ill-defined problems. They can learn from examples, are fault tolerant in the sense that they are able to handle noisy and incomplete data, are able to deal with non-linear problems, and once trained can perform prediction and generalization at high speed. They have been used in diverse applications in control, robotics, pattern recognition, forecasting, medicine, power systems, manufacturing, optimization, signal processing, and social/psychological sciences. They are particularly useful in system modeling such as in implementing complex mappings and system identification. AI systems comprise areas like, expert systems, artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic and various hybrid systems, which combine two or more techniques. The major objective of this paper is to illustrate how AI techniques might play an important role in modeling and prediction of the performance and control of combustion process. The paper outlines an understanding of how AI systems operate by way of presenting a number of problems in the different disciplines of combustion engineering. The various applications of AI are presented in a thematic rather than a chronological or any other order. Problems presented include two main areas: combustion systems and internal combustion (IC) engines. Combustion systems include boilers, furnaces and incinerators modeling and emissions prediction, whereas, IC engines include diesel and spark ignition engines and gas engines modeling and control. Results presented in this paper, are testimony to the potential of AI as a design tool in many areas of combustion engineering. 109 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Artificial intelligence for the modeling and control of combustion processes: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalogirou, S.A. [Higher Technical Inst., Nicosia, Cyprus (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) systems are widely accepted as a technology offering an alternative way to tackle complex and ill-defined problems. They can learn from examples, are fault tolerant in the sense that they are able to handle noisy and incomplete data, are able to deal with non-linear problems, and once trained can perform prediction and generalization at high speed. They have been used in diverse applications in control, robotics, pattern recognition, forecasting, medicine, power systems, manufacturing, optimization, signal processing, and social/psychological sciences. They are particularly useful in system modeling such as in implementing complex mappings and system identification. Al systems comprise areas like, expert systems, artificial neural networks, genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic and various hybrid systems, which combine two or more techniques. The major objective of this paper is to illustrate how Al techniques might play an important role in modeling and prediction of the performance and control of combustion process. The paper outlines an understanding of how AI systems operate by way of presenting a number of problems in the different disciplines of combustion engineering. The various applications of AI are presented in a thematic rather than a chronological or any other order. Problems presented include two main areas: combustion systems and internal combustion (IC) engines. Combustion systems include boilers, furnaces and incinerators modeling and emissions prediction, whereas, IC engines include diesel and spark ignition engines and gas engines modeling and control. Results presented in this paper, are testimony to the potential of Al as a design tool in many areas of combustion engineering. (author)

  18. Control of mercury emissions from stationary coal combustion sources in China: Current status and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-11-01

    Coal burning in power plants and industrial boilers is the largest combustion source of mercury emissions in China. Together, power plants and industrial boilers emit around 250 tonnes of mercury each year, or around half of atmospheric mercury emissions from anthropogenic sources in the country. Power plants in China are generally equipped with multi-pollutant control technologies, which offer the co-benefit of mercury removal, while mercury-specific control technologies have been installed in some facilities. In contrast, most industrial boilers have only basic or no flue gas cleaning. A combination of measures, including energy conservation, coal switching and blending, reducing the mercury contents of coals through washing, combustion controls, and flue gas cleaning, can be used to reduce mercury emissions from these stationary combustion sources. More stringent emission standards for the major air pollutants from coal-fired power plants and industrial boiler, along with standards for the previously unregulated mercury, were implemented recently, which is expected to bring significant reduction in their mercury emissions through the necessary upgrades of multi-pollutant and mercury-specific control technologies. Meanwhile, strong monitoring capacity and strict enforcement are necessary to ensure that the combustion sources operate in compliance with the new emission standards and achieve significant reduction in the emissions of mercury and other air pollutants.

  19. Characterization of Coal Combustion Residues from Electric Utilities Using Wet Scrubbers for Multi-Pollutant Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report evaluates changes that may occur to coal combustion residues (CCRs) in response to changes in air pollution control technology at coal-fired power plants, which will reduce emissions from the flue gas stack by transferring pollutants to fly ash and other air pollution...

  20. Study of instrumentation needs for process control and safety in coal fluidized-bed combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzenberg, C.L.; Griggs, K.E.; Henry, R.F.; Podolski, W.F.

    1981-02-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the current state of the art of instrumentation for planned and operating fluidized-bed combustion systems. This study is intended to identify instrumentation needs and serve as a data base for projects to develop this instrumentation. A considerable number of needs for measurements for which presently available instrumentation is not suitable were reported by respondents. The identified deficiencies are presented with the associated physical parameter ranges for FBC processes. New techniques and instrumentation under development, as well as some available alternative instruments, are discussed briefly. Also, newly instituted mechanisms for technical information exchange on instrumentation for fossil energy applications are identified. Development of instruments to meet the identified measurement deficiencies is recommended in order to ensure the feasibility of automatic control of large-scale fluidized-bed combustion systems, and to advance the state of the art of fluidized-bed combustion technology.

  1. Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor Testing in a Thermal Barrier Coated Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorpening, B.T.; Dukes, M.G.; Robey, E.H.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-05-01

    The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) continues to be developed as an in-situ combustion sensor, with immediate application to natural gas fired turbines. In-situ combustion monitoring is also expected to benefit advanced power plants of the future, fueled by coal-derived syngas, liquified natural gas (LNG), hydrogen, or hydrogen blend fuels. The in-situ monitoring that CCADS provides can enable the optimal operation of advanced, fuel-flexible turbines for minimal pollutant emissions and maximum efficiency over the full operating range of an advanced turbine. Previous work has demonstrated CCADS as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff, in experimental combustors without thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Since typical TBC materials are electrical insulators at room temperature, and CCADS operation requires conduction of electrical current to the walls of the combustor, a TBC on the combustion liner was identified as a potential barrier to CCADS operation in commercial application. This paper reports on CCADS experiments in a turbulent lean premixed combustor with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on the combustor wall. The tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa (1 atm), with a 15V excitation voltage on the CCADS electrodes. The results confirm that for a typical thermal barrier coating, CCADS operates properly, and the total measured average resistance is close to that of an uncoated combustor. This result is consistent with previous materials studies that found the electrical resistance of typical TBC materials considerably decreases at combustor operating temperatures.

  2. Space station contamination control study: Internal combustion, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    Contamination inside Space Station modules was studied to determine the best methods of controlling contamination. The work was conducted in five tasks that identified existing contamination control requirements, analyzed contamination levels, developed outgassing specification for materials, wrote a contamination control plan, and evaluated current materials of offgassing tests used by NASA. It is concluded that current contamination control methods can be made to function on the Space Station for up to 1000 days, but that current methods are deficient for periods longer than about 1000 days.

  3. Combustion Property Analysis and Control System for the Dynamics of a Single Cylinder Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Wahono

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Corresponding to global environment problems in recent year, the technology for reducing fuel consumption and exhaust gas emission of engine was needed. Simulation of transient engine response is needed to predict engine performance that frequently experience rapid changes of speed. The aim of this research is to develop a non-linear dynamic control model for direct injection single cylinder diesel engine which can simulate engine performance under transient conditions. In this paper, the combustion model with multistage injection and conducted experiments in the transient conditions to clarify the combustion characteristics was proposed. In order to perform the analysis of acceleration operation characteristics, it was built a Model Predictive Control (MPC to reproduce the characteristic values of the exhaust gas and fuel consumption from the control parameters in particular. Finally, MPC is an effective method to perform the analysis of characteristic in diesel engine under transient conditions.

  4. Energy Recycling in Municipal Refuse and Its Pollution Control in Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴发勇; 段丽平; 陈红; 谢茂清

    2004-01-01

    Recycling the energy in municipal refuse and controlling the secondary pollution are common concerns.After analyzing the status and disposal of the municipal refuse in China, this paper proposes a technique of refuse incineration, using a fluid-bed incinerator, which converts refuse into energy.The technique of controlling secondary pollution in combustion is also discussed.In this paper, the technique of incineration using a fluid-bed incinerator is introduced.During the combustion process, the refuse is mixed with coal and remover and a noxious gas removal system is installed, which helps to decrease the generation and emission of noxious material, such as dioxins.The result shows that the secondary pollution in refuse incineration is efficiently controlled.

  5. Combustion, Performance and Emission Analysis of an Oxygen-Controlling Downsized SI Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou J.X.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, experiments were carried out in a single-cylinder downsized SI engine with different rates of oxygen (15% to 27% by volume in the total mixture of intake gases except fuel and equivalence ratios (from 0.45 to 1. Therefore, the oxygen volume fraction is due to oxygen enrichment or nitrogen dilution. The study of the impact of controlling the oxygen concentration on the combustion characteristics and emissions was performed at 1 400 rpm, at several loads (Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP from 400 to 1 000 kPa. For each operation point, the spark advance and the intake pressure were adjusted simultaneously in order to maintain the load and obtain a minimum value of the indicated Specific Fuel Consumption (SFC. The effect of the oxygen concentration on the engine combustion characteristics was simulated by using the commercial software AMESim, with the combustion model developed by IFP Energies nouvelles, and an adapted algorithm was used to avoid residual gas calibration. By implementing a correlation for the laminar burning velocity, the in-cylinder pressures were perfectly predicted with a maximum pressure relative error of less than 2% for almost all the operating points. The classification of engine combustion according to the Peters-Borghi diagram, gives a deeper insight into the interaction between turbulence and the flame front.

  6. Auto-Ignition and Heat Release Correlations for Controlled Auto-Ignition Combustion in Gasoline Engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Auto-ignition and heat release correlations for controlled auto-ignition (CAI) combustion were derived from extensive in-cylinder pressure data of a four-stroke gasoline engine operating in CAI combustion mode. Abundant experiments were carried out under a wide range of air/fuel ratio,speed and residual gas fraction to ensure that the combustion correlations can be used in the entire CAI engine operation range. Furthermore, a more accurate method to compute the residual gas fraction was proposed by calculating the working fluid temperature at the exhaust valve close timing in the experiments. The heat release correlation was described in two parts, one is for the first slower heat release process at low temperature, and the other is for the second faster heat release process at high temperature. Finally the heat release correlation was evaluated on the single cylinder gasoline engine running with CAI combustion by comparing the experimental data with the 1-D engine simulation results obtained with the aid of the GT-Power simulation program. The results show that the predicted loads and ignition timings match closely with the measurements.

  7. H∞ control of combustion in diesel engines using a discrete dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Mitsuo; Ishizuki, Sota; Suzuki, Masayasu

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a control method for combustion in diesel engines using a discrete dynamics model. The proposed two-degree-of-freedom control scheme achieves not only good feedback properties such as disturbance suppression and robust stability but also a good transient response. The method includes a feedforward controller constructed from the inverse model of the plant, and a feedback controller designed by an Hcontrol method, which reduces the effect of the turbocharger lag. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated via numerical simulations.

  8. Control Scheme Formulation for the Production of Hydrogen on Demand to Feed an Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarniel García Morales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a control strategy is presented to produce hydrogen on demand to feed an internal combustion (IC engine. For this purpose, the modeling of the IC engine fueled by gasoline blended with 10 % v/v of anhydrous ethanol (E10 and hydrogen as an additive is developed. It is considered that the hydrogen gas is produced according to the IC engine demand, and that the hydrogen gas is obtained by an alkaline electrolyzer. The gasoline–ethanol blend added into the combustion chamber is determined according to the stoichiometric ratio and the production of hydrogen gas is regulated by a proportional and integral controller (P.I.. The controller reference is varying according to the mass flow air induced into the cylinder, in order to ensure an adequate production of hydrogen gas for any operating condition of the IC engine. The main contribution of this work is the control scheme developed, through simulation, in order to produce hydrogen on demand for any operating point of an internal combustion engine fueled by an E10 blend. The simulation results showed that the use of hydrogen gas as an additive in an E10 blend decreases the E10 fuel consumption 23 % on average, and the thermal efficiency is increased approximately 2.13 % , without brake power loss in the IC engine.

  9. Strategy for Advanced Sensing and Control of Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-06

    leads to a stable closed-loop system A satisfactory stability criterion might be the off-axis circle criterion [Hedrick and Paynter. 1980]. This...shown in Figure 2 to the system shown in Figure 3. Figure 3 represents a system with simple proportional control. The off-axis circle criterion requires...Application of the off-axis circle criterion to the Nyquist curves in Figure 4 suggests that the gain, k , that can be tolerated by the system of Figure

  10. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Zhongxian Cheng; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2006-09-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2006 through September 30, 2006. The following activities have been completed: the steel floor grating around the riser in all levels and the three-phase power supply for CFBC System was installed. Erection of downcomers, loop seals, ash bunker, thermal expansion joints, fuel and bed material bunkers with load cells, rotary air-lock valves and fuel flow monitors is underway. Pilot-scale slipstream tests conducted with bromine compound addition were performed for two typical types of coal. The purposes of the tests were to study the effect of bromine addition on mercury oxidization. From the test results, it was observed that there was a strong oxidization effect for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The proposed work for next quarter and project schedule are also described.

  11. Method and systems for power control of internal combustion engines using individual cycle cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorenko, Y.; Korzhov, M.; Filippov, A.; Atamanenko, N.

    1996-09-01

    A new method of controlling power has been developed for improving efficiency and emissions performance of internal combustion engines at partial load. The method involves cutting-off some of the work cycles, as the load decreases, to obtain required power. Theoretical and experimental material is presented to illustrate the underlying principle, the implementation means and the results for the 4- and 8-cylinder piston engine and a twin rotor Wankel engine applications.

  12. Advanced combustion, emission control, health impacts, and fuels merit review and peer evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2006-10-01

    This report is a summary and analysis of comments from the Advisory Panel at the FY 2006 DOE National Laboratory Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation, held May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory. The work evaluated in this document supports the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE in making its funding decisions for the upcoming fiscal year.

  13. Control of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion in a two-cylinder gasoline direct injection engine with negative valve overlap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi; WANG Jianxin; SHUAI Shijin; MA Qingjun; TIAN Guohong

    2007-01-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition(HCCI) has challenges in ignition timing control,combustion rate control,and operating range extension.In this paper,HCCI combustion was studied in a two-cylinder gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine with negative valve overlap (NVO).A two-stage gasoline direct injection strategy combined with negative valve overlap was used to control mixture formation and combustion.The gasoline engine could be operated in HCCI combustion mode at a speed range of 800-2 200 r/min and load,indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) range of 0.1-0.53 MPa.The engine fuel consumption 4× 10-5 without soot emission.The effect of different injection strategies on HCCI combustion was studied.The experimental results indicated that the coefficient of variation of the engine cycle decreased by using NVO with two-stage direct injection;the ignition timing and combustion rate could be controlled;and the operational range of HCCI combustion could be extended.

  14. Coal combustion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C.S.

    1996-06-01

    This section describes research and development related to coal combustion being performed for the Fossil Energy Program under the direction of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The key activity involves the application of chaos theory for the diagnosis and control of fossil energy processes.

  15. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  16. Combustion Model and Control Parameter Optimization Methods for Single Cylinder Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Wahono

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a method to construct a combustion model and a method to optimize some control parameters of diesel engine in order to develop a model-based control system. The construction purpose of the model is to appropriately manage some control parameters to obtain the values of fuel consumption and emission as the engine output objectives. Stepwise method considering multicollinearity was applied to construct combustion model with the polynomial model. Using the experimental data of a single cylinder diesel engine, the model of power, BSFC, NOx, and soot on multiple injection diesel engines was built. The proposed method succesfully developed the model that describes control parameters in relation to the engine outputs. Although many control devices can be mounted to diesel engine, optimization technique is required to utilize this method in finding optimal engine operating conditions efficiently beside the existing development of individual emission control methods. Particle swarm optimization (PSO was used to calculate control parameters to optimize fuel consumption and emission based on the model. The proposed method is able to calculate control parameters efficiently to optimize evaluation item based on the model. Finally, the model which added PSO then was compiled in a microcontroller.

  17. Design and Testing of a Breadboard Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluid Combustion Facility Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Fluid Combustion Facility (FCF) Project and the Power Technology Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) at Lewis Field in Cleveland, OH along with the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL are jointly developing an Electrical Power Converter Unit (EPCU) for the Fluid Combustion Facility to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The FCF facility experiment contains three racks: A core rack, a combustion rack, and a fluids rack. The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS 120V(sub dc) power distribution system by each FCF experiment rack which requires 28V(sub dc). The EPCU is a modular design which contains three 120V(sub dc)-to-28V(sub dc) full-bridge, power converters rated at 1 kW(sub e) each bus transferring input relays and solid-state, current-limiting input switches, 48 current-limiting, solid-state, output switches; and control and telemetry hardware. The EPCU has all controls required to autonomously share load demand between the power feeds and--if absolutely necessary--shed loads. The EPCU, which maximizes the usage of allocated ISS power and minimizes loss of power to loads, can be paralleled with other EPCUs. This paper overviews the electrical design and operating characteristics of the EPCU and presents test data from the breadboard design.

  18. Development of a Pulsed Combustion Actuator For High-Speed Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Beck, B. Terry; Wilkes, Jennifer A.; Drummond, J. Philip; Alderfer, David W.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the flow within a prototype actuator, energized by pulsed combustion or detonations, that provides a pulsed jet suitable for flow control in high-speed applications. A high-speed valve, capable of delivering a pulsed stream of reactants a mixture of H2 and air at rates of up to 1500 pulses per second, has been constructed. The reactants burn in a resonant chamber, and the products exit the device as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers have been used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device at various reactant injection frequencies, including both resonant and off-resonant conditions. The combustion chamber has been constructed with windows, and the flow inside it has been visualized using Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). The pulsed jet at the exit of the device has been observed using schlieren.

  19. Axisymmetric vortex method for low-Mach number, diffusion-controlled combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Lakkis, I

    2003-01-01

    A grid-free, Lagrangian method for the accurate simulation of low-Mach number, variable-density, diffusion-controlled reacting flow is presented. A fast-chemistry model in which the conversion rate of reactants to products is limited by the local mixing rate is assumed in order to reduce the combustion problem to the solution of a convection-diffusion-generation equation with volumetric expansion and vorticity generation at the reaction fronts. The solutions of the continuity and vorticity equations, and the equations governing the transport of species and energy, are obtained using a formulation in which particles transport conserved quantities by convection and diffusion. The dynamic impact of exothermic combustion is captured through accurate integration of source terms in the vorticity transport equations at the location of the particles, and the extra velocity field associated with volumetric expansion at low Mach number computed to enforced mass conservation. The formulation is obtained for an axisymmet...

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2004-10-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2004 through September 30, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building have started. Second, the design if the component parts of the CFBC system have been reviewed and finalized so that the drawings may be released to the manufacturers during the next quarter. Third, the experiments for solid waste (chicken litter) incineration have been conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). This is in preparation for testing in the simulated fluidized-bed combustor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

  1. Effect of Drying Methods on the Structure and Combustion Activity of Mn-Substituted Hexaaluminate Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinguang Xu; Zhijian Tian; Junwei Wang; Yunpeng Xu; Zhusheng Xu; Liwu Lin

    2003-01-01

    Conventional oven drying (COD) and supercritical drying (SCD) methods were applied to the preparation of Mn-substituted hexaaluminate (BaMnAl11O19-α) catalysts. The effect of drying methods on phase composition, specific surface area, pore structure, reduction behavior of Mn3+ ions, and combustion activity of the samples was investigated. The homogenous mixing of the components in the sol-gel process could be maintained by SCD, and the hexaaluminate phase was almost the only phase of the resulting materials after calcination. H2-TPR revealed that the Mn3+ ions in the sample obtained by SCD were easier to be reduced than that by COD. Moreover, the samples obtained by SCD have higher surface area, narrower pore size distribution, and higher combustion activity than those obtained by COD.

  2. Passive control of thermoacoustic instabilities in swirl-stabilized combustion at elevated pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Justin Williams

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a porous insert is placed at the dump plane of a swirl-stabilized lean premixed combustor to passively suppress thermoacoustic instabilities. The diffuser-shaped annular ring of porous inert material influences the turbulent flow field directly, including recirculation zones and vortical and/or shear layer structures to passively control the acoustic performance of the combustor. The porous inert material is made of silicon carbide–hafnium carbide coated, high-strength, high-temperature-resistant open-cell foam materials. In this study, the porous insert concept is investigated at above-ambient operating pressures to demonstrate its suitability for practical combustion applications. Experiments are conducted in quartz and metal combustors, without and with the porous insert while varying operating pressure, equivalence ratio, and reactant flow rate. Measurements show that the porous insert, and consequent changes in the combustor flow field, decrease the sound pressure levels at the frequency of combustion instability at all operating conditions investigated in this study. The porous insert also decreases the broadband combustion noise, i.e. the measured sound pressure levels over a wide frequency range.

  3. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-07-30

    This purpose of this report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the new Combustion Laboratory was occupied on June 15, 2005, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final painting stage. Second, the fabrication and manufacturing contract for the CFBC Facility was awarded to Sterling Boiler & Mechanical, Inc. of Evansville, Indiana. Sterling is manufacturing the assembly and component parts of the CFBC system. The erection of the CFBC system is expected to start September 1, 2005. Third, mercury emissions from the cofiring of coal and chicken waste was studied experimentally in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed combustion facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described.

  4. Highly-controlled, reproducible measurements of aerosol emissions from African biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Sophie; Thomas, J. Chris; Morgan, William; Hadden, Rory; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Williams, Paul; Sekou, Keïta; Liousse, Catherine; Coe, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    Particulate emissions from biomass burning can alter the atmosphere's radiative balance and cause significant harm to human health. However, the relationship between these emissions and fundamental combustion processes is, to date, poorly characterised. In atmospheric models, aerosol emissions are represented by emission factors based on mass loss, which are averaged over an entire combustion event for each particulate species. This approach, however, masks huge variability in emissions during different phases of the combustion period. Laboratory tests have shown that even small changes to the burning environment can lead to huge variation in observed aerosol emission factors (Akagi et al., 2011). In order to address this gap in understanding, in this study, small wood samples sourced from Côte D'Ivoire were burned in a highly-controlled laboratory environment. The shape and mass of samples, available airflow and surrounding heat were carefully regulated. Organic aerosol and refractory black carbon emissions were measured in real-time using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and a Single Particle Soot Photometer, respectively. Both of these instruments are used regularly to measure aerosol concentrations in the field. This methodology produced remarkably repeatable results, allowing three different phases of combustion to be identified by their emissions. Black carbon was emitted predominantly during flaming combustion; organic aerosols were emitted during pyrolysis before ignition and from smouldering-dominated behaviour near the end of combustion. During the flaming period, there was a strong correlation between the emission of black carbon and the rate of mass loss, which suggests there is value in employing a mass-based emission factor for this species. However, very little correlation was seen between organic aerosol and mass loss throughout the tests. As such, results here suggest that emission factors averaged over an entire combustion event are unlikely to be

  5. Control concepts for a gasoline HCCI combustion engine; Strategien zur Regelung von HCCI-Brennverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karrelmeyer, Roland; Fischer, Wolfgang [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). CR/AEH; Graf, Gerald [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). DGS-EC/ESG; Scherrer, Daniel [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany). GS/ECS1; Hathout, Jean-Pierre [Bosch Thermotechnology Sanayi ve Ticaret, A.S. Organize Sanayi Boelgesi, Manisa (Turkey)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss an in-cylinder-pressure based controls concept for a HCCI-engine with internal exhaust-gas trapping. Combustion is controlled via the fuel- and air-path. The controls concept is based upon a combination of a feed-forward and a feed-back path. The work has been carried out on gasoline engines with direct-injection and different types of flexible valve trains. In a first step it will be considered a fully flexible type of valve train. On based of cost optimal aspects flexibility will be decreased which resulted in a partly flexible valve train with cam phasers an e. g. two step lift control. A control strategy based on this type of valve train also will be considered. (orig.)

  6. CFB gasification of biomass residues for co-combustion in large utility boilers studies on ash control and gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurkela, E.; Moilanen, A.; Nieminen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    -bed, is simpler and much cheaper than the complete fluidised-bed boilers with steam cycles or complete pyrolysis oil production plants. Secondly, the product gas can be cleaned from trace metals, chlorine and other harmful contaminants prior to leading into the coal-fired boiler. Depending on the feedstock quality and on the requirements for contaminant control different gas cleaning methods from simple hot cyclones to effective low-temperature filtration can be used. Thirdly, the separation of gasification and gas combustion makes it possible to maintain stable high-temperature combustion in order to minimise risks for the formation of dioxins and other chlorinated organic compounds. Finally, the biomass-derived gas may even have positive effects also on the NO{sub x} emissions if it is introduced to the coal-fired boiler as a reburning feedstock. At present, there are a lot of on-going activities in Europe aiming at the demonstration and commercialisation of this promising co-utilisation concept. Almost all activities are based on Circulating Fluidised-Bed gasifiers. Series of studies on the critical technical questions of this co-utilisation concept are carried out by VTT Energy in the PROGAS R and D programme. The results obtained with wheat straw, demolition wood and fresh wood are outlined in this paper.

  7. Subsurface combustion in Mali: Refutation of the active volcanism hypothesis in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, Henrik; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Bandlien, Einar H.; Sacko, Samba; Coulibaly, Henri; Planke, Sverre

    2003-07-01

    Surface heat anomalies have been known in the Timbuktu region in northern Mali for more than a century. Since about 1960, several authors have argued that these heat anomalies are caused by incipient volcanic and hydrothermal activity. Surface temperatures as high as 765 °C were measured locally in January 2002, and smoke emanated from holes and fractures in the ground. We demonstrate that subsurface combustion of organic material is the source of the heat and the gases. Several square kilometers are currently active or have been affected by subsurface fires since 2001. Self-ignition during biological degradation of organic-rich layers in the lacustrine deposits is the most likely mechanism that started the subsurface combustion that caused the heat anomalies in the area. An important consequence of this conclusion is that West Africa should still be regarded as volcanologically inactive, and that possible reactivations of the major EW-trending Guinean-Nubian lineament are not associated with volcanism. We suggest that the subsurface combustion in the Timbuktu region today represents a phenomenon with a very long record in the Trans-Saharan region.

  8. Electric Current Activated Combustion Synthesis and Chemical Ovens Under Terrestrial and Reduced Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unuvar, C.; Fredrick, D.; Anselmi-Tamburini, U.; Manerbino, A.; Guigne, J. Y.; Munir, Z. A.; Shaw, B. D.

    2004-01-01

    Combustion synthesis (CS) generally involves mixing reactants together (e.g., metal powders) and igniting the mixture. Typically, a reaction wave will pass through the sample. In field activated combustion synthesis (FACS), the addition of an electric field has a marked effect on the dynamics of wave propagation and on the nature, composition, and homogeneity of the product as well as capillary flow, mass-transport in porous media, and Marangoni flows, which are influenced by gravity. The objective is to understand the role of an electric field in CS reactions under conditions where gravity-related effects are suppressed or altered. The systems being studied are Ti+Al and Ti+3Al. Two different ignition orientations have been used to observe effects of gravity when one of the reactants becomes molten. This consequentially influences the position and concentration of the electric current, which in turn influences the entire process. Experiments have also been performed in microgravity conditions. This process has been named Microgravity Field Activated Combustion Synthesis (MFACS). Effects of gravity have been demonstrated, where the reaction wave temperature and velocity demonstrate considerable differences besides the changes of combustion mechanisms with the different high currents applied. Also the threshold for the formation of a stable reaction wave is increased under zero gravity conditions. Electric current was also utilized with a chemical oven technique, where inserts of aluminum with minute amounts of tungsten and tantalum were used to allow observation of effects of settling of the higher density solid particles in liquid aluminum at the present temperature profile and wave velocity of the reaction.

  9. On the effects of organic matter and sulphur-containing compounds on the CCN activation of combustion particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The European PartEmis project (Measurement and prediction of emissions of aerosols and gaseous precursors from gas turbine engines was focussed on the characterisation and quantification of exhaust emissions from a gas turbine engine. The combustion aerosol characterisation included on-line measurements of mass and number concentration, size distribution, mixing state, thermal stability of internally mixed particles, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activation potential, and off-line analysis of chemical composition. Based on this extensive data set, the role of sulphuric acid coating and of the organic fraction of the combustion particles for the CCN activation was investigated. Modelling of CCN activation was conducted using microphysical and chemical properties obtained from the measurements as input data. Coating the combustion particles with water-soluble sulphuric acid, increases the potential CCN activation, or lowers the activation diameter, respectively. The adaptation of a Köhler model to the experimental data yielded coatings from 0.1 to 3 vol-% of water-soluble matter, which corresponds to an increase in the fraction of CCN-activated combustion particles from ≤10−4 to ≌10−2 at a water vapour saturation ratio Sw=1.006. Additional particle coating by coagulation of combustion particles and aqueous sulphuric acid particles formed by nucleation further reduces the CCN activation diameter. In contrast, particles containing a large fraction of non-volatile organic compounds grow significantly less at high relative humidity than particles with a lower content of non-volatile OC. The resulting reduction in the potential CCN activation with an increasing fraction of non-volatile OC becomes visible as a trend in the experimental data. While a coating of water-soluble sulphuric acid increases the potential CCN activation, or lowers the activation diameter, respectively, the non-volatile organic compounds, mainly found at

  10. Environment variations into the combustion control. A control system mixtures the air rate in the environmental characteristics. Influencia de las condiciones ambientales en el control de combustion. Un sistema de control que corrige el indice de exceso de aire en funcion de las caracteristicas ambientales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro Garcia, R.; Gonzalez Marco, P.P. (Universidad de la Corua. Dpto. Electronica y Sistemas (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a combustion control application for a fired drum type boiler system. The contribution is based in the compensation of disturbances by means of feed forward and feedback methods, which enters the combustion system from the environment variations as it is the case of moisture and ambient temperature in the combustion air. With the proposed strategy, efficiency is achieved at economic cost because of the simplicity of the system to correct automatically the stoichiometric combustion air flow even under large modelling errors design, which makes the control system robust and efficient under a wide range of operating conditions. (Author) 4 ref.

  11. Active oxygen by Ce–Pr mixed oxide nanoparticles outperform diesel soot combustion Pt catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Guillén Hurtado, Noelia; Garcia-Garcia, Avelina; Bueno López, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    A Ce0.5Pr0.5O2 mixed oxide has been prepared with the highest surface area and smallest particle size ever reported (125 m2/g and 7 nm, respectively), also being the most active diesel soot combustion catalyst ever tested under realistic conditions if catalysts forming highly volatile species are ruled out. This Ce–Pr mixed oxide is even more active than a reference platinum-based commercial catalyst. This study provides an example of the efficient participation of oxygen species released by ...

  12. Solution combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate particles for controlled release of bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Junfeng, E-mail: daidai02304@163.com [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Zhao, Junjie; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Xiali; Zhou, Feifei; Zhang, Hong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Lu, Hongbin [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China); Chen, JianHua; Wang, XuHong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China); Yu, Wencong [School of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu (China)

    2015-05-01

    Four different phase compositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) particles were prepared via a solution combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld analysis results revealed that the variations in the nominal Ca/P (molar) ratios were found to provide a favorable control in the different proportions of CaP materials. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to study the loading and release behavior. The release profile indicated that the BSA release rates depended on the phase compositions of the CaP particles, and showed an order of TCP-BSA > BCP-1-BSA > BCP-2-BSA > HA-BSA. The results suggested that the BSA protein release rate can be controlled by varying the phase compositions of CaP carriers. Moreover, the release process involved two stages: firstly surface diffusion via ion exchange and secondly intraparticle diffusion. - Highlights: • Solution combustion method was an efficient way to produced CaP powders. • Ca/P (molar) ratios provided a favorable control in the different proportions of phase composition. • BSA release rate varied depending on the phase composition of the CaP particles. • Two kinetic models were chosen to simulate the release kinetics of the drugs from CaP carriers.

  13. Active noise control primer

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Scott D

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control - the reduction of noise by generating an acoustic signal that actively interferes with the noise - has become an active area of basic research and engineering applications. The aim of this book is to present all of the basic knowledge one needs for assessing how useful active noise control will be for a given problem and then to provide some guidance for designing, setting up, and tuning an active noise-control system. Written for students who have no prior knowledge of acoustics, signal processing, or noise control but who do have a reasonable grasp of basic physics and mathematics, the book is short and descriptive. It leaves for more advanced texts or research monographs all mathematical details and proofs concerning vibrations, signal processing and the like. The book can thus be used in independent study, in a classroom with laboratories, or in conjunction with a kit for experiment or demonstration. Topics covered include: basic acoustics; human perception and sound; sound intensity...

  14. Catalytic activity of Mn-substituted barium hexaaluminates for methane combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The catalysts of hexaaluminate (BaMnxAl12-xO19-δ , x = 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0) to be used in methane combustion have been successfully synthesized by co-precipitation method and supercritical drying. The crystalline structure and surface area of catalyst were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption analysis of BET method. BET analysis revealed that the preparing and drying method proposed here provides stable materials with higher surface area of 51.4 m2/g in comparison to materials prepared using conventional ambient drying method for BaMnxAl12?xO19-δ calcined at 1200℃ under oxygen. XRD analysis indicated that formation of a pure single phase BaMnxAl12-xO19-δ occurred up to x = 3 in the case of Mn-substituted barium hexaaluminates. Incorporation of Mn in excess leads to BaAl2O4 phase formation. As far as the valence state of Manganese ions was concerned, the introduced Mn ions were either divalent or trivalent. The first Mn ions were introduced in the matrix essentially as Mn2+ and only for BaMn3Al9O19-δ does manganese exist exclusively as Mn3+; the higher the Mn concen- tration, the higher the proportion of Mn3+. Catalytic activity for methane combustion has been measured for Mn-substituted barium hexaaluminates, light-off temperature was observed in the 512-624℃ range. The highest activity was obtained for catalysts containing 3 Mn ions per unit cell, which reveals that the BaMnxAl12-xO19-δ catalyst was a promising methane combustion catalyst with high activity and good thermal stability. Temperature programmed reduction (TPR) under hydrogen has been used to correlate the catalytic activity with the amount of easily reducible species.

  15. Status of combustion-modification technology for utility-boiler NO/sub x/ control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    This report documents significant developments in the subject area of combustion modifications as applied to coal-fired utility boilers. The primary emphasis is on the status of NO/sub x/ control technology, but related topics, such as boiler corrosion and hazardous emissions during modified-combustion operation, are also discussed. This report is intended as a complement to the 1977 Assessment of NO/sub x/ Control Technology for Coal-Fired Utility Boilers (ANL/ECT-3, Appendix D). A synopsis of recent NO/sub x/ field-test programs undertaken by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is presented along with a status report on the major boiler manufacturers' low-NO/sub x/ burner/boiler development efforts. Because of concerns that low-NO/sub x/ operating modes may increase boiler-tubewall corrosion and increase polycyclic-organic-matter (POM) and SO/sub 3/ emissions, discussions of recent test programs and analytical studies on these topics are also included.

  16. DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

    2012-10-26

    The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

  17. Dynamic Exergy Method for Evaluating the Control and Operation of Oxy-Combustion Boiler Island Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Zhao, Haibo; Zheng, Chuguang; Liang, Zhiwu

    2017-01-03

    Exergy-based methods are widely applied to assess the performance of energy conversion systems; however, these methods mainly focus on a certain steady-state and have limited applications for evaluating the control impacts on system operation. To dynamically obtain the thermodynamic behavior and reveal the influences of control structures, layers and loops, on system energy performance, a dynamic exergy method is developed, improved, and applied to a complex oxy-combustion boiler island system for the first time. The three most common operating scenarios are studied, and the results show that the flow rate change process leads to less energy consumption than oxygen purity and air in-leakage change processes. The variation of oxygen purity produces the largest impact on system operation, and the operating parameter sensitivity is not affected by the presence of process control. The control system saves energy during flow rate and oxygen purity change processes, while it consumes energy during the air in-leakage change process. More attention should be paid to the oxygen purity change because it requires the largest control cost. In the control system, the supervisory control layer requires the greatest energy consumption and the largest control cost to maintain operating targets, while the steam control loops cause the main energy consumption.

  18. A Study on the Antibacterial Activity Of Zno Nanoparticles Prepared By Combustion Method against E Coli

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles were synthesized by low temperature solution combustion method using Oxalyl dihydrazide (ODH) as fuel, at much lower temperature (300oC). X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the formation of wurtzite-structured pure ZnO No peaks from any else phases of ZnO and no impurity peaks were observed, indicating the high purity of the obtained hexagonal ZnO nanocrystals. The antibacterial activity of the formed nano ZnO were investigated against...

  19. Progress in the computation of flows in combustion in controlled ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji, H.; Borghi, R.; Souhaite, P.; Argueyrolles, B.

    1987-01-01

    The characterization by computation of reactive flows in the combustion chambers is now used directly to design piston engines. This computation requires numerical programs taking into account fluid mechanics, heat transfer, combustion and turbulence. For these flows, turbulence and combustion cannot be dissociated. Moreover the latter should be represented by a process with a finite speed. The existing program has been improved by incorporation of two combustion models. The turbulent fluctuations are taken into account by a modelisation of their probability densities. Numerical results show that the two models give a realistic values of the burnt fraction and of the average pressure during the combustion phase.

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-04-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2005 through March 31, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory is nearly complete, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final stages. Second, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is being discussed with a potential contractor. Discussions with potential contactor regarding the availability of materials and current machining capabilities have resulted in the modification of the original designs. The selection of the fabrication contractor for the CFBC Facility is expected during the next quarter. Third, co-firing experiments conducted with coal and chicken waste have been initiated in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  1. Investigation of Combustion Control in a Dump Combustor Using the Feedback Free Fluidic Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.; Casiano, Matthew J.; Anderson, William E.; Heister, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    A feedback free fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into a single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. The fluidic oscillator uses internal fluid dynamics to create an unsteady outlet jet at a specific frequency. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the combustor dump plane. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide with an overall O/F ratio of 11.7. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics enabling the study of a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared against equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 67% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. Additionally, computational fluid dynamics analysis of the combustor gives insight into the flow field interaction of the fluidic oscillators. The results indicate that open loop high frequency propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate.

  2. Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

    2006-05-30

    This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance

  3. Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Samveg

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are one of the most promising engine technologies for the future of energy conversion from clean, efficient combustion. HCCI engines allow high efficiency and lower CO2 emission through the use of high compression ratios and the removal of intake throttle valves (like Diesel), and allow very low levels of urban pollutants like nitric oxide and soot (like Otto). These engines, however, are not without their challenges, such as low power density compared with other engine technologies, and a difficulty in controlling combustion timing. This dissertation first addresses the power output limits. The particular strategies for enabling high power output investigated in this dissertation focus on avoiding five critical limits that either damage an engine, drastically reduce efficiency, or drastically increase emissions: (1) ringing limits, (2) peak in-cylinder pressure limits, (3) misfire limits, (4) low intake temperature limits, and (5) excessive emissions limits. The research shows that the key factors that enable high power output, sufficient for passenger vehicles, while simultaneously avoiding the five limits defined above are the use of: (1) high intake air pressures allowing improved power output, (2) highly delayed combustion timing to avoid ringing limits, and (3) using the highest possible equivalence ratio before encountering ringing limits. These results are revealed by conducting extensive experiments spanning a wide range of operating conditions on a multi-cylinder HCCI engine. Second, this dissertation discusses strategies for effectively sensing combustion characteristics on a HCCI engine. For effective feedback control of HCCI combustion timing, a sensor is required to quantify when combustion occurs. Many laboratory engines use in-cylinder pressure sensors but these sensors are currently prohibitively expensive for wide-scale commercialization. Instead, ion sensors made from inexpensive sparkplugs

  4. Emission factors for PM2.5, CO, CO2, NOx, SO2 and particle size distributions from the combustion of wood species using a new controlled combustion chamber 3CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereceda-Balic, Francisco; Toledo, Mario; Vidal, Victor; Guerrero, Fabian; Diaz-Robles, Luis A; Petit-Breuilh, Ximena; Lapuerta, Magin

    2017-04-15

    The objective of this research was to determine emission factors (EF) for particulate matter (PM2.5), combustion gases and particle size distribution generated by the combustion of Eucalyptus globulus (EG), Nothofagus obliqua (NO), both hardwoods, and Pinus radiata (PR), softwood, using a controlled combustion chamber (3CE). Additionally, the contribution of the different emissions stages associated with the combustion of these wood samples was also determined. Combustion experiments were performed using shaving size dried wood (0% humidity). The emission samples were collected with a tedlar bag and sampling cartridges containing quartz fiber filters. High reproducibility was achieved between experiment repetitions (CVcombustion smoldering have also very significant contributions. This demonstrates that particle concentrations measured only in stationary state during flame stage may cause underestimation of emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. On supersonic combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁生学

    1999-01-01

    Some basic concepts and features of supersonic combustion are explained from the view point of macroscopic aerodynamics. Two kinds of interpretations of supersonic combustion are proposed. The difference between supersonic combustion and subsonic combustion is discussed, and the mechanism of supersonic combustion propagation and the limitation of heat addition in supersonic flow are pointed out. The results of the calculation of deflagration in supersonic flow show that the entropy increment and the total pressure loss of the combustion products may decrease with the increase of combustion velocity. It is also demonstrated that the oblique detonation wave angle may not be controlled by the wedge angle under weak underdriven solution conditions and be determined only by combustion velocity. Therefore, the weak underdriven solution may become self-sustaining oblique detonation waves with a constant wave angle.

  6. In vitro immunotoxic and genotoxic activities of particles emitted from two different small-scale wood combustion appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapanainen, Maija; Jalava, Pasi I.; Mäki-Paakkanen, Jorma; Hakulinen, Pasi; Happo, Mikko S.; Lamberg, Heikki; Ruusunen, Jarno; Tissari, Jarkko; Nuutinen, Kati; Yli-Pirilä, Pasi; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O.; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2011-12-01

    Residential wood combustion appliances emit large quantities of fine particles which are suspected to cause a substantial health burden worldwide. Wood combustion particles contain several potential health-damaging metals and carbon compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which may determine the toxic properties of the emitted particles. The aim of the present study was to characterize in vitro immunotoxicological and chemical properties of PM 1 ( Dp ≤ 1 μm) emitted from a pellet boiler and a conventional masonry heater. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed for 24 h to different doses of the emission particles. Cytotoxicity, production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the chemokine MIP-2, apoptosis and phases of the cell cycle as well as genotoxic activity were measured after the exposure. The type of wood combustion appliance had a significant effect on emissions and chemical composition of the particles. All the studied PM 1 samples induced cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory responses in a dose-dependent manner. The particles emitted from the conventional masonry heater were 3-fold more potent inducers of programmed cell death and DNA damage than those emitted from the pellet boiler. Furthermore, the particulate samples that induced extensive DNA damage contained also large amounts of PAH compounds. Instead, significant differences between the studied appliances were not detected in measurements of inflammatory mediators, although the chemical composition of the combustion particles differed considerably from each other. In conclusion, the present results show that appliances representing different combustion technology have remarkable effects on physicochemical and associated toxicological and properties of wood combustion particles. The present data indicate that the particles emitted from incomplete combustion are toxicologically more potent than those emitted from more complete combustion processes.

  7. Active control of combustors after twenty years' efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culick, F. E. C.; Palm, S.

    2009-09-01

    Active control of combustion was proposed by Bollay [1]. Following that idea, Tsien [2] worked out an analysis of controlling low-frequency oscillations in a liquid rocket but no successful experimental results followed. More than thirty years passed before the first laboratory demonstrations were performed at Cambridge University. Interest grew rapidly in the 1990s due to potentially wonderful applications to practical combustion systems including liquid and solid rockets, gas turbines, and thrust augmentors. Dreams have not materialized: There are presently no operational control systems, despite considerable efforts, and examples of partially controlled phenomena. Only one practical installation for control of oscillations has been documented, for a large Siemens machine [3]. Its use has been rendered unnecessary by further experimental work leading to development of successful passive control with modifications of hardware [4]. The purpose of this paper is to examine briefly some of the reasons that active control of combustion has failed to become the panacea widely anticipated two decades ago. The authors' view is that the subject is far from exhausted, but rather requires carefully planned research to understand the basis of successful applications.

  8. Instruments used to measure or check {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma} activity and neutron emission in the course of processing ore or irradiated fuel; Appareils de mesure ou de controle {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, n, des circuits des usines de traitement du minerai ou du combustible irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, A.; Brunet, M.; Kermagoret, M.; Labeyrie, J.; Roux, G.; Vasseur, J.; Weil, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    One of the methods checking ores in the course of treatment is the rapid quantitative determination of thorium. This measurement is carried out by means of a scintillation instrument which shows the {beta} and {alpha} coincidences of ThC and ThC'. The treatment of irradiated fuel is accompanied by a large number of radioactive checks relative to the performance of the fixation and elution operations of uranium in the ion exchangers, to the concentration of radioactivity of effluent sent from the plant into watercourses. The operations of fixation and elution of the uranium are checked automatically by an instrument which takes a sample of 5 cm{sup 3} of solution, evaporates it and measures its activity every 10 or 20 minutes. Plutonium concentrations are measured: - in the presence of strong {beta} {gamma} activities, by means of rotating cylinder detectors; - in the presence of weak {beta} {gamma} activities, by means of {alpha} detectors scanning a constant level liquid surface; - by means of fission chambers relatively insensitive to {gamma}. Fission product concentrations are measured by chambers, counters or scintillators, according to the amount of {gamma} activity present. Finally, the activity of effluent to be emptied into watercourses is checked by means of a scintillation instrument, which measures the {alpha} activity on the one hand, and on the other hand the {beta} {gamma} activity of residue from a 100 cm{sup 3} sample taken and evaporated in 20 minutes. (author) [French] Parmi les controles relatifs au minerai en cours de traitement, figure le dosage rapide de thorium. Cette mesure est realisee au moyen d'un appareillage a scintillation qui met en evidence la coincidence des emissions {beta} et {alpha} du ThC et du ThC'. Le traitement des combustibles irradies s'accompagne d'un grand nombre de controles radioactifs portant sur le fonctionnement des operations de fixation et d'elution de l'uranium dans les

  9. On the effects of hydrocarbon and sulphur-containing compounds on the CCN activation of combustion particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The European PartEmis project (''Measurement and prediction of emissions of aerosols and gaseous precursors from gas turbine engines'' was focussed on the characterisation and quantification of exhaust emissions from a gas turbine engine. A comprehensive suite of aerosol, gas and chemi-ion measurements were conducted under different combustor operating conditions and fuel sulphur concentrations. Combustion aerosol characterisation included on-line measurements of mass and number concentration, size distribution, mixing state, thermal stability of internally mixed particles, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activation potential, and off-line analysis of chemical composition. Modelling of CCN activation of combustion particles was conducted using microphysical and chemical properties obtained from the measurements as input data. Based on this unique data set, the role of sulphuric acid coatings on the combustion particles, formed in the cooling exhaust plume through either direct condensation of gaseous sulphuric acid or coagulation with volatile condensation particles nucleating from gaseous sulphuric acid, and the role of the organic fraction for the CCN activation of combustion particles was investigated. It was found that particles containing a large fraction of non-volatile organic compounds grow significantly less at high relative humidity than particles with a lower content of non-volatile OC. Also the effect of the non-volatile OC fraction on the potential CCN activation is significant. While a coating of water-soluble sulphuric acid increases the potential CCN activation, or lowers the activation diameter, respectively, the non-volatile organic compounds, mainly found at lower combustion temperatures, can partially compensate this sulphuric acid-related enhancement of CCN activation of carbonaceous combustion aerosol particles.

  10. Upscaling Self-Sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR): Experimental Study of Scaling Relationships for Smouldering Combustion to Remediate Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, L.; Gerhard, J.; Torero, J.; Scholes, G.; Murray, C.

    2013-12-01

    Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR) is a relatively new remediation approach for soil contaminated with organic industrial liquids. This technology uses smouldering combustion, a controlled, self-sustaining burning reaction, to destroy nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and thereby render soil clean. While STAR has been proven at the bench scale, success at industrial scales requires the process to be scaled-up significantly. The objective of this study was to conduct an experimental investigation into how liquid smouldering combustion phenomena scale. A suite of detailed forward smouldering experiments were conducted in short (16 cm dia. x 22 cm high), intermediate (16 cm dia. x 127 cm high), and large (97 cm dia. x 300 cm high; a prototype ex-situ reactor) columns; this represents scaling of up to 530 times based on the volume treated. A range of fuels were investigated, with the majority of experiments conducted using crude oil sludge as well as canola oil as a non-toxic surrogate for hazardous contaminants. To provide directly comparable data sets and to isolate changes in the smouldering reaction which occurred solely due to scaling effects, sand grain size, contaminant type, contaminant concentration and air injection rates were controlled between the experimental scales. Several processes could not be controlled and were identified to be susceptible to changes in scale, including: mobility of the contaminant, heat losses, and buoyant flow effects. For each experiment, the propagation of the smouldering front was recorded using thermocouples and analyzed by way of temperature-time and temperature-distance plots. In combination with the measurement of continuous mass loss and gaseous emissions, these results were used to evaluate the fundamental differences in the way the reaction front propagates through the mixture of sand and fuel across the various scales. Key governing parameters were compared between the small, intermediate, and large

  11. Constant speed control of four-stroke micro internal combustion swing engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dedong; Lei, Yong; Zhu, Honghai; Ni, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The increasing demands on safety, emission and fuel consumption require more accurate control models of micro internal combustion swing engine (MICSE). The objective of this paper is to investigate the constant speed control models of four-stroke MICSE. The operation principle of the four-stroke MICSE is presented based on the description of MICSE prototype. A two-level Petri net based hybrid model is proposed to model the four-stroke MICSE engine cycle. The Petri net subsystem at the upper level controls and synchronizes the four Petri net subsystems at the lower level. The continuous sub-models, including breathing dynamics of intake manifold, thermodynamics of the chamber and dynamics of the torque generation, are investigated and integrated with the discrete model in MATLAB Simulink. Through the comparison of experimental data and simulated DC voltage output, it is demonstrated that the hybrid model is valid for the four-stroke MICSE system. A nonlinear model is obtained from the cycle average data via the regression method, and it is linearized around a given nominal equilibrium point for the controller design. The feedback controller of the spark timing and valve duration timing is designed with a sequential loop closing design approach. The simulation of the sequential loop closure control design applied to the hybrid model is implemented in MATLAB. The simulation results show that the system is able to reach its desired operating point within 0.2 s, and the designed controller shows good MICSE engine performance with a constant speed. This paper presents the constant speed control models of four-stroke MICSE and carries out the simulation tests, the models and the simulation results can be used for further study on the precision control of four-stroke MICSE.

  12. Manufacturing of Porous Al-Cr Preforms for Composite Reinforcing Using Microwave Activated Combustion Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naplocha K.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The combustion synthesis of porous skeletons (preforms of intermetallic Al–Cr compounds intended for metal matrix composite MMC reinforcing was developed. Mixture of Al and Cr powders with granularity of −10, −44, −74mm were cold isostatic pressed and next ignited and synthetized in a microwave reactor under argon atmosphere (microwave-activated combustion synthesis MACS. In order to ignite the synthesis, microwave energy was focused by a tuner on the specimen. The analysis of reaction temperature diagrams revealed that the synthesis proceeded through the following peritectic transformations: L(liquidus+Al7Cr→L+Al11Cr2→L+Al4Cr. Moreover, EDS and XRD examinations showed that the reaction proceeded between a solid Cr and a liquid Al to create a distinct envelope of Al9Cr4 on Cr particle which next extended and spreaded over the entire structure. The produced preforms with uniform structure and interconnected porosity were infiltrated with liquid Cu and Al alloy. The obtained composite materials exhibited high hardness, wear and distinct temperature oxidation resistance.

  13. Fuel gas combustion research at METC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, T.S.

    1995-06-01

    The in-house combustion research program at METC is an integral part of many METC activities, providing support to METC product teams, project managers, and external industrial and university partners. While the majority of in-house combustion research in recent years has been focussed on the lean premixed combustion of natural gas fuel for Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) applications, increasing emphasis is being placed on issues of syngas combustion, as the time approaches when the ATS and coal-fired power systems programs will reach convergence. When the METC syngas generator is built in 1996, METC will have the unique combination of mid-scale pressurized experimental facilities, a continuous syngas supply with variable ammonia loading, and a team of people with expertise in low-emissions combustion, chemical kinetics, combustion modeling, combustion diagnostics, and the control of combustion instabilities. These will enable us to investigate such issues as the effects of pressure, temperature, and fuel gas composition on the rate of conversion of fuel nitrogen to NOx, and on combustion instabilities in a variety of combustor designs.

  14. Floating-point coprocessor for fault detection and isolation in electronically controlled internal combustion engines. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, T.L.; Ribbens, W.B.

    1991-09-01

    The report details the design of a floating-point coprocessor intended for real-time fault detection in electronically controlled internal combustion engines. The fault detection strategies are based on dynamic models of various engine subsystems and require the use of state estimators. The coprocessor can be operated at a clock rate of 24 MHz, and is capable of operating up to sixteen state estimators in real time. The design is suitable for application to internal combustion engines used for vehicle propulsion or power generation, whether diesel or spark ignited.

  15. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  16. Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Theory Applied to the Expansion of Combustion Products in the Power Stroke of an Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Metghalchi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Rate-controlled constrained-equilibrium method, firmly based on the second law of thermodynamics, is applied to the expansion of combustion products of methane during the power stroke of an internal combustion engine. The constraints used in this study are the elemental oxygen, hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen together with other four dynamic constraints of total number of moles, moles of DCO (CO+HCO, moles of free valence and moles of free oxygen. Since at chemical equilibrium, the mixture composition is dominated by H/O, CO/CO2, and a few other carbon-containing species, almost independent of the fuel molecule, the set results in accurate predictions of the kinetic effects observed in all H/O and CO/CO2 compounds and temperature history. It is shown that the constrained-equilibrium predictions of all the species composed of the specified atomic elements can be obtained independent of a kinetic path, provided their Gibbs free energies are known.

  17. Towards Control-Oriented Modeling of Natural Gas-Diesel RCCI Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekdemir, C.; Baert, R.; Willems, F.; Somers, B.

    2015-01-01

    For natural gas (NG)-diesel RCCI, a multi-zonal, detailed chemistry modeling approach is presented. This dual fuel combustion process requires further understanding of the ignition and combustion processes to maximize thermal efficiency and minimize (partially) unburned fuel emissions. The introduct

  18. Towards Control-Oriented Modeling of Natural Gas-Diesel RCCI Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekdemir, C.; Baert, R.; Willems, F.; Somers, B.

    2015-01-01

    For natural gas (NG)-diesel RCCI, a multi-zonal, detailed chemistry modeling approach is presented. This dual fuel combustion process requires further understanding of the ignition and combustion processes to maximize thermal efficiency and minimize (partially) unburned fuel emissions. The

  19. Active Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    FFOWCS WILLIAMS, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers the two-dimensional problem of a plane vortex sheet disturbed by an impulsive line source. A previous incorrect treatment of this problem is examined in detail. Instabilities of the vortex sheet are triggered by the source and grow exponentially in space and time. The Green function is constructed for the problem and it is shown that a point source properly positioned and delayed will induce a field that cancels the unstable growing modes. The resulting displacement of the vortex sheet is expressed in simple terms. The instabilities are checked by the anti-source which combines with the field of the primary source into a vortex sheet response which decays with time at large time. This paper is a contribution to the study of active control of shear layer instabilities, the main contribution being to clear up a previous paper with peculiar results that are, in fact, wrong.

  20. Energy from Waste--clean, efficient, renewable: transitions in combustion efficiency and NOx control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, M H; Halter, R; Sigg, A; Brosch, B; Gehrmann, H J; Keunecke, M

    2013-02-01

    Traditionally EfW (Energy from Waste) plants apply a reciprocating grate to combust waste fuel. An integrated steam generator recovers the heat of combustion and converts it to steam for use in a steam turbine/generator set. This is followed by an array of flue gas cleaning technologies to meet regulatory limitations. Modern combustion applies a two-step method using primary air to fuel the combustion process on the grate. This generates a complex mixture of pyrolysis gases, combustion gases and unused combustion air. The post-combustion step in the first pass of the boiler above the grate is intended to "clean up" this mixture by oxidizing unburned gases with secondary air. This paper describes modifications to the combustion process to minimize exhaust gas volumes and the generation of noxious gases and thus improving the overall thermal efficiency of the EfW plant. The resulting process can be coupled with an innovative SNCR (Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction) technology to form a clean and efficient solid waste combustion system. Measurements immediately above the grate show that gas compositions along the grate vary from 10% CO, 5% H(2) and 0% O(2) to essentially unused "pure" air, in good agreement with results from a mathematical model. Introducing these diverse gas compositions to the post combustion process will overwhelm its ability to process all these gas fractions in an optimal manner. Inserting an intermediate step aimed at homogenizing the mixture above the grate has shown to significantly improve the quality of combustion, allowing for optimized process parameters. These measures also resulted in reduced formation of NO(x) (nitrogenous oxides) due to a lower oxygen level at which the combustion process was run (2.6 vol% O(2,)(wet) instead of 6.0 vol% O(2,)(wet)). This reduction establishes optimal conditions for the DyNOR™ (Dynamic NO(x) Reduction) NO(x) reduction process. This innovative SNCR technology is adapted to situations typically

  1. Mult-Pollutant Control Through Novel Approaches to Oxygen Enhanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Axelbaum; Pratim Biswas

    2009-02-28

    Growing concerns about global climate change have focused effortss on identifying approaches to stabilizing carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. One approach utilizes oxy-fuel combustion to produce a concentrated flue gas that will enable economical CO{sub 2} capture by direct methods. Oxy-fuel combustion rewuires an Air Separation Unit (ASU) to provide a high-purity stream of oxygen as well as a Compression and Purification Unit (CPU) to clean and compress the CO{sub 2} for long term storage. Overall plant efficiency will suffer from the parasitic load of both the ASU and CPU and researchers are investigating techniques to enhance other aspects of the combustion and gas cleanup proceses to improve the benefit-to-cost ratio. This work examines the influence of oxy-fuel combustion and non-carbon based sorbents on the formation and fate of multiple combustion pollutants both numerically and experimentally.

  2. Mutagenicity and Induction of Drug—metabolizing Enzyme Activity by LPG Combustion Particulates in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YINXue-Jun; LIUJun-Zhuo; 等

    1994-01-01

    Methylene chloride extracts of particulates from liquefied petroleum gas(LPG)combustion appliance were studied by using Ames test,micronucleus test and inducibility of pulmonary and hepatic aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase(AHH)and glutathione S-transferase(GST)in rats.The extracts showed mutagenicity for Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 and its derivatives TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 with or without S9 mix.The revertants in strains TA98NR and TA98/1,8-DNP6 were less than 40%and 50% of than in strain TA98 without S9 mix,respectively.Positive results were obtained in mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay.Intratracheal instillation of the extracts led to increase in pulmonary(but not hepatic)AHH and GST activities in rats.In was seen that AHH was more sensitive than GST to induction by the extracts.

  3. AN ALGORITHM OF ADAPTIVE TORQUE CONTROL IN INJECTOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Gerasimov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Internal combustion engine as a plant is a highly nonlinear complex system that works mostly in dynamic regimes in the presence of noise and disturbances. A number of engine characteristics and parameters is not known or known approximately due to the complex structure and multimode operating of the engine. In this regard the problem of torque control is not trivial and motivates the use of modern techniques of control theory that give the possibility to overcome the mentioned problems. As a consequence, a relatively simple algorithm of adaptive torque control of injector engine is proposed in the paper. Method. Proposed method is based on nonlinear dynamic model with parametric and functional uncertainties (static characteristics which are suppressed by means of adaptive control algorithm with single adjustable parameter. The algorithm is presented by proportional control law with adjustable feedback gain and provides the exponential convergence of the control error to the neighborhood of zero equilibrium. It is shown that the radius of the neighborhood can be arbitrary reduced by the change of controller design parameters. Main Results. A dynamical nonlinear model of the engine has been designed for the purpose of control synthesis and simulation of the closed-loop system. The parameters and static functions of the model are identified with the use of data aquired during Federal Test Procedure (USA of Chevrolet Tahoe vehicle with eight cylinders 5,7L engine. The algorithm of adaptive torque control is designed, and the properties of the closed-loop system are analyzed with the use of Lyapunov functions approach. The closed-loop system operating is verified by means of simulation in the MatLab/Simulink environment. Simulation results show that the controller provides the boundedness of all signals and convergence of the control error to the neighborhood of zero equilibrium despite significant variations of engine speed. The

  4. STUDIES AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH CONCERNING THE PERFORMANCES OF THE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE, CONTROLLED OVER THE POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcis URICANU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available the paper present how can be controlled a road vehicle through a powertrain control module, a type of ECU, programmable ECU (Electronic Control Unit, when we want to increase the performances of the engine, compared with the standard performances of the engine. The programmable ECU is a control system which replaces the ECU from the vehicle and is able to manage, better than the standard ECU, the behaviour of the spark ignition engine on increasing the performances. Sports cars need to obtain the best performances from them engine, the specific regimes at which them must function impose certain limits which will be achieved during the competition. Nowadays the vehicles designers and engineering, working for the production cars, have adopted many solutions from the race cars area, due to the advantage offered by these elements (lightweight materials, fasts responses, high speeds and system like programmable ECU. To obtain more power on the engine, we have to find and applied the best solution concerning the internal combustion processes and the consequences concerning the exhaust. This papers present who can be increased the performances of the spark ignition engine through the air-flow ratio, controlled by the programmable ECU and with the sensors help, like water temperature sensor, intake air temperature sensor, throttle position sensor, lambda sensor

  5. Control of Ignition and Combustion of Dimethyl Ether in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Azetsu, Akihiko; Oikawa, Chikashi

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is known to have high thermal efficiency and low nitrogen oxide emission. However, the control of ignition timing and its combustion period over a wide range of engine speeds and loads is one of the barriers to the realization of the engine. On the lean side of the equivalence ratio, control of ignition is difficult due to its long delay of ignition, and there is knocklike problem under high load. In both computations and experiments of HCCI engine operated on dimethyl ether, the operable range (the possible range of fuel input from just ignitable to knock-occurring state) shifted to the rich side with decreasing intake temperature and amount of mixing of carbon dioxide. The range of fuel input was reduced at low intake temperatures, because the hot flame onset angle advanced more quickly than it did at high intake temperatures. However, the mixing of CO2 caused the operable range to shift to the rich side while retaining the same range. The results of this study indicated the possibility of high-load operation or extension of the load range by exhaust gas recirculation.

  6. Progress in analytical methods to predict and control azimuthal combustion instability modes in annular chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerheim, M.; Nicoud, F.; Poinsot, T.

    2016-02-01

    Longitudinal low-frequency thermoacoustic unstable modes in combustion chambers have been intensively studied experimentally, numerically, and theoretically, leading to significant progress in both understanding and controlling these acoustic modes. However, modern annular gas turbines may also exhibit azimuthal modes, which are much less studied and feature specific mode structures and dynamic behaviors, leading to more complex situations. Moreover, dealing with 10-20 burners mounted in the same chamber limits the use of high fidelity simulations or annular experiments to investigate these modes because of their complexity and costs. Consequently, for such circumferential acoustic modes, theoretical tools have been developed to uncover underlying phenomena controlling their stability, nature, and dynamics. This review presents recent progress in this field. First, Galerkin and network models are described with their pros and cons in both the temporal and frequency framework. Then, key features of such acoustic modes are unveiled, focusing on their specificities such as symmetry breaking, non-linear modal coupling, forcing by turbulence. Finally, recent works on uncertainty quantifications, guided by theoretical studies and applied to annular combustors, are presented. The objective is to provide a global view of theoretical research on azimuthal modes to highlight their complexities and potential.

  7. Effect of CO Combustion Promoters on Combustion Air Partition in FCC under Nearly Complete Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王锐; 罗雄麟; 许锋

    2014-01-01

    With CO combustion promoters, the role of combustion air flow rate for concerns of economics and control is important. The combustion air is conceptually divided to three parts:the air consumed by coke burning, the air consumed by CO combustion and the air unreacted. A mathematical model of a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit, which includes a quantitative correlation of CO heterogeneous combustion and the amount of CO combustion promoters, is introduced to investigate the effects of promoters on the three parts of combustion air. The results show that the air consumed by coke burning is almost linear to combustion air flow rate, while the air consumed by CO combustion promoters tends to saturate as combustion air flow rate increases, indicating that higher air flow rate can only be used as a manipulated variable to control the oxygen content for an economic concern.

  8. Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxian; Wu, Wenzhong; Henkelmann, Bernhard; You, Li; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, PAHs and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

  9. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  10. Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.X.; Wu, W.Z.; Henkelmann, B.; You, L.; Kettrup, A.; Schramm, K.W. [GSF, Neuherberg (Germany). National Research Center for Environmental & Health

    2003-07-01

    Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials measured. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, PAHs and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem.

  11. Mechanically Activated Combustion Synthesis of MoSi2-Based Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafirovich, Evgeny [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The thermal efficiency of gas-turbine power plants could be dramatically increased by the development of new structural materials based on molybdenum silicides and borosilicides, which can operate at temperatures higher than 1300 °C with no need for cooling. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. One approach is based on the fabrication of MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites that combine high oxidation resistance of MoSi2 and good mechanical properties of Mo5Si3. Another approach involves the addition of boron to Mo-rich silicides for improving their oxidation resistance through the formation of a borosilicate surface layer. In particular, materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase are promising materials that offer favorable combinations of high temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. However, the synthesis of Mo-Si-B multi-phase alloys is difficult because of their extremely high melting temperatures. Mechanical alloying has been considered as a promising method, but it requires long milling times, leading to large energy consumption and contamination of the product by grinding media. In the reported work, MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites and several materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase have been obtained by mechanically activated self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (MASHS). Short-term milling of Mo/Si mixture in a planetary mill has enabled a self-sustained propagation of the combustion front over the mixture pellet, leading to the formation of MoSi2-T1 composites. Combustion of Mo/Si/B mixtures for the formation of T2 phase becomes possible if the composition is designed for the addition of more exothermic reactions leading to the formation of MoB, TiC, or TiB2. Upon ignition, Mo/Si/B and Mo/Si/B/Ti mixtures exhibited spin combustion, but the products were porous, contained undesired secondary phases, and had low oxidation resistance. It has been shown that use of

  12. A Study on the Antibacterial Activity Of Zno Nanoparticles Prepared By Combustion Method against E Coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durga Prasad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline Zinc Oxide (ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by low temperature solution combustion method using Oxalyl dihydrazide (ODH as fuel, at much lower temperature (300oC. X-ray diffraction (XRD confirmed the formation of wurtzite-structured pure ZnO No peaks from any else phases of ZnO and no impurity peaks were observed, indicating the high purity of the obtained hexagonal ZnO nanocrystals. The antibacterial activity of the formed nano ZnO were investigated against the pathogenic bacteria namely against E-coli. The bacteriological test is performed in Luria-Bertani and Nutrient agar media on solid agar plates and liquid broth system using different concentration of ZnO by standard microbial method. We have used both colony counting method and disk diffusion method. In both the methods ZnO nanoparticles with 100microg/L showed best antibacterial activity, and further studies on destruction of bacterial genomic DNA was done using PCR and gel electrophoresis revealed the DNA fragment bands, this activity might be due to surface charge interactions between the particles and cells. Free radical scavenging properties of the particles might have helped in cell wall disruption, and drastic antimicrobial action.

  13. The influence of beam energy, mode and focal length on the control of laser ignition in an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullett, J. D.; Dodd, R.; Williams, C. J.; Triantos, G.; Dearden, G.; Shenton, A. T.; Watkins, K. G.; Carroll, S. D.; Scarisbrick, A. D.; Keen, S.

    2007-08-01

    This work involves a study on laser ignition (LI) in an internal combustion (IC) engine and investigates the effects on control of engine combustion performance and stability of varying specific laser parameters (beam energy, beam quality, minimum beam waist size, focal point volume and focal length). A Q-switched Nd : YAG laser operating at the fundamental wavelength 1064 nm was successfully used to ignite homogeneous stoichiometric gasoline and air mixtures in one cylinder of a 1.6 litre IC test engine, where the remaining three cylinders used conventional electrical spark ignition (SI). A direct comparison between LI and conventional SI is presented in terms of changes in coefficient of variability in indicated mean effective pressure (COVIMEP) and the variance in the peak cylinder pressure position (VarPPP). The laser was individually operated in three different modes by changing the diameter of the cavity aperture, where the results show that for specific parameters, LI performed better than SI in terms of combustion performance and stability. Minimum ignition energies for misfire free combustion ranging from 4 to 28 mJ were obtained for various optical and laser configurations and were compared with the equivalent minimum optical breakdown energies in air.

  14. Numerical Studies on Controlling Gaseous Fuel Combustion by Managing the Combustion Process of Diesel Pilot Dose in a Dual-Fuel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Protection of the environment and counteracting global warming require finding alternative sources of energy. One of the methods of generating energy from environmentally friendly sources is increasing the share of gaseous fuels in the total energy balance. The use of these fuels in compression-ignition (CI engines is difficult due to their relatively high autoignition temperature. One solution for using these fuels in CI engines is operating in a dualfuel mode, where the air and gas mixture is ignited with a liquid fuel dose. In this method, a series of relatively complex chemical processes occur in the engine's combustion chamber, related to the combustion of individual fuel fractions that interact with one another. Analysis of combustion of specific fuels in this type of fuel injection to the engine is difficult due to the fact that combustion of both fuel fractions takes place simultaneously. Simulation experiments can be used to analyse the impact of diesel fuel combustion on gaseous fuel combustion. In this paper, we discuss the results of simulation tests of combustion, based on the proprietary multiphase model of a dual-fuel engine. The results obtained from the simulation allow for analysis of the combustion process of individual fuels separately, which expands the knowledge obtained from experimental tests on the engine.

  15. Intelligent Control via Wireless Sensor Networks for Advanced Coal Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aman Behal; Sunil Kumar; Goodarz Ahmadi

    2007-08-05

    Numerical Modeling of Solid Gas Flow, System Identification for purposes of modeling and control, and Wireless Sensor and Actor Network design were pursued as part of this project. Time series input-output data was obtained from NETL's Morgantown CFB facility courtesy of Dr. Lawrence Shadle. It was run through a nonlinear kernel estimator and nonparametric models were obtained for the system. Linear and first-order nonlinear kernels were then utilized to obtain a state-space description of the system. Neural networks were trained that performed better at capturing the plant dynamics. It is possible to use these networks to find a plant model and the inversion of this model can be used to control the system. These models allow one to compare with physics based models whose parameters can then be determined by comparing them against the available data based model. On a parallel track, Dr. Kumar designed an energy-efficient and reliable transport protocol for wireless sensor and actor networks, where the sensors could be different types of wireless sensors used in CFB based coal combustion systems and actors are more powerful wireless nodes to set up a communication network while avoiding the data congestion. Dr. Ahmadi's group studied gas solid flow in a duct. It was seen that particle concentration clearly shows a preferential distribution. The particles strongly interact with the turbulence eddies and are concentrated in narrow bands that are evolving with time. It is believed that observed preferential concentration is due to the fact that these particles are flung out of eddies by centrifugal force.

  16. Testing of the Engineering Model Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluids and Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.; Fox, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field (GRC) in Cleveland, OH and the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL have designed and developed an Engineering Model (EM) Electrical Power Control Unit (EPCU) for the Fluids Combustion Facility, (FCF) experiments to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS power distribution system for the FCF's space experiments'test and telemetry hardware. Furthermore. it is proposed to be the common power interface for all experiments. The EPCU is a three kilowatt 12OVdc-to-28Vdc converter utilizing three independent Power Converter Units (PCUs), each rated at 1kWe (36Adc @ 28Vdc) which are paralleled and synchronized. Each converter may be fed from one of two ISS power channels. The 28Vdc loads are connected to the EPCU output via 48 solid-state and current-limiting switches, rated at 4Adc each. These switches may be paralleled to supply any given load up to the 108Adc normal operational limit of the paralleled converters. The EPCU was designed in this manner to maximize allocated-power utilization. to shed loads autonomously, to provide fault tolerance. and to provide a flexible power converter and control module to meet various ISS load demands. Tests of the EPCU in the Power Systems Facility testbed at GRC reveal that the overall converted-power efficiency, is approximately 89% with a nominal-input voltage of 12OVdc and a total load in the range of 4O% to 110% rated 28Vdc load. (The PCUs alone have an efficiency of approximately 94.5%). Furthermore, the EM unit passed all flight-qualification level (and beyond) vibration tests, passed ISS EMI (conducted, radiated. and susceptibility) requirements. successfully operated for extended periods in a thermal/vacuum chamber, was integrated with a proto-flight experiment and passed all stability and functional requirements.

  17. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2007-03-31

    This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. The effort in this quarter has concentrated on installing the CFBC Facility and for conducting cold fluidization operations tests in the CFBC facility. The assembly of the ash recirculation pipe duct from the cyclones back to the bed area of the combustor, including the upper and lower loop seals was completed. The electric bed pre-heater was installed to heat the fluidizing air as it enters the wind box. The induced draft fan along with its machine base and power supply was received and installed. The flue gas duct from secondary cyclone outlet to induced draft fan inlet was received and installed, as well as the induced fan flue gas discharge duct. Pressure testing from the forced draft fan to the outlet of the induced fan was completed. In related research a pilot-scale halogen addition test was conducted in the empty slipstream reactor (without (Selective Catalytic Reduction) SCR catalyst loading) and the SCR slipstream reactor with two commercial SCR catalysts. The greatest benefits of conducting slipstream tests can be flexible control and isolation of specific factors. This facility is currently used in full-scale utility and will be combined into 0.6MW CFBC in the future. This work attempts to first investigate performance of the SCR catalyst in the flue gas atmosphere when burning Powder River Basin (PRB), including the impact of PRB coal flue gas composition on the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) under SCR conditions. Secondly, the impacts of hydrogen halogens (Hydrogen fluoride (HF), Hydrogen chloride (HCl), Hydrogen Bromide (HBr) and Hydrogen Iodine (HI)) on Hg(0) oxidation and their mechanisms can be explored.

  18. MULTIFUNCTIONAL (NOx/CO/O2) SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR COAL COMBUSTION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2005-05-29

    We have made great progress in both developing solid state sensors for coal combustion control and understanding the mechanism by which they operate. We have fabricated and tested numerous sensors and identified the role electrode microstructure plays in sensor response. We have developed both p-type (La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}) and n-type (WO{sub 3}) semiconducting NO{sub x} sensing electrodes. We have demonstrated their respective sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities), related this behavior to their gas adsorption/desorption behavior and catalytic activity, and in so doing verified that our proposed Differential Electrode Equilibria is a more comprehensive sensing mechanism. These investigations and their results are summarized below. The composition and microstructure of the sensing electrode is the key parameters that influence the sensing performance. We investigated the effect of electrode microstructure on the NO{sub x} sensitivity and response time using a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}-based potentiometric sensor. Temperature dependence, cross-sensitivity and selectivities of a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}- and WO{sub 3}-based potentiometric NO{sub x} sensor were investigated both in N{sub 2} and in a simulated exhaust gas. We performed temperature programmed reaction (TPR) and desorption (TPD) experiments to determine the reaction and adsorption characteristics of O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and their mixtures on the electrodes, and related the results to sensor performance. In order to optimize the sensor electrode microstructure, powders were prepared using four different powder synthesis routes, resulting in different particle size distributions and BET surface areas. Different sintering conditions were also applied. The microstructure of electrodes, synthesized with the same composition, has a dramatic effect on both sensitivity and response time of potentiometric NO sensors, showing that large surface areas generate a porous morphology with smaller

  19. MULTIFUNCTIONAL (NOx/CO/O2) SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR COAL COMBUSTION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2005-05-29

    We have made great progress in both developing solid state sensors for coal combustion control and understanding the mechanism by which they operate. We have fabricated and tested numerous sensors and identified the role electrode microstructure plays in sensor response. We have developed both p-type (La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}) and n-type (WO{sub 3}) semiconducting NO{sub x} sensing electrodes. We have demonstrated their respective sensing behavior (sensitivities and cross-sensitivities), related this behavior to their gas adsorption/desorption behavior and catalytic activity, and in so doing verified that our proposed Differential Electrode Equilibria is a more comprehensive sensing mechanism. These investigations and their results are summarized below. The composition and microstructure of the sensing electrode is the key parameters that influence the sensing performance. We investigated the effect of electrode microstructure on the NO{sub x} sensitivity and response time using a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}-based potentiometric sensor. Temperature dependence, cross-sensitivity and selectivities of a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}- and WO{sub 3}-based potentiometric NO{sub x} sensor were investigated both in N{sub 2} and in a simulated exhaust gas. We performed temperature programmed reaction (TPR) and desorption (TPD) experiments to determine the reaction and adsorption characteristics of O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and their mixtures on the electrodes, and related the results to sensor performance. In order to optimize the sensor electrode microstructure, powders were prepared using four different powder synthesis routes, resulting in different particle size distributions and BET surface areas. Different sintering conditions were also applied. The microstructure of electrodes, synthesized with the same composition, has a dramatic effect on both sensitivity and response time of potentiometric NO sensors, showing that large surface areas generate a porous morphology with smaller

  20. Simulation on an optimal combustion control strategy for 3-D temperature distributions in tangentially pc-fired utility boiler furnaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xi-fen; ZHOU Huai-chun

    2005-01-01

    The control of 3-D temperature distribution in a utility boiler furnace is essential for the safe, economic and clean operation of pcfired furnace with multi-burner system. The development of the visualization of 3-D temperature distributions in pc-fired furnaces makes it possible for a new combustion control strategy directly with the fumacs temperature as its goal to improve the control quality for the combustion processes. Studied in this paper is such a new strategy that the whole furnace is divided into several parts in the vertical direction, and the average temperature and its bias from the center in every cross section can be extracted from the visualization results of the 3-D temperature distributions. In the simulation stage, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code served to calculate the 3-D temperature distributions in a furnace, then a linear model was set up to relate the features of the temperature distributions with the input of the combustion processes, such as the flow rates of fuel and air fed into the furnaces through all the burners. The adaptive genetic algorithm was adopted to find the optimal combination of the whole input parameters which ensure to form an optimal 3-D temperature field in the furnace desired for the operation of boiler. Simulation results showed that the strategy could soon find the factors making the temperature distribution apart from the optimal state and give correct adjusting suggestions.

  1. Active control of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  2. Plume-exit modeling to determine cloud condensation nuclei activity of aerosols from residential biofuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Francisco; Bond, Tami C.; Riemer, Nicole

    2017-08-01

    Residential biofuel combustion is an important source of aerosols and gases in the atmosphere. The change in cloud characteristics due to biofuel burning aerosols is uncertain, in part, due to the uncertainty in the added number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from biofuel burning. We provide estimates of the CCN activity of biofuel burning aerosols by explicitly modeling plume dynamics (coagulation, condensation, chemical reactions, and dilution) in a young biofuel burning plume from emission until plume exit, defined here as the condition when the plume reaches ambient temperature and specific humidity through entrainment. We found that aerosol-scale dynamics affect CCN activity only during the first few seconds of evolution, after which the CCN efficiency reaches a constant value. Homogenizing factors in a plume are co-emission of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) or emission at small particle sizes; SVOC co-emission can be the main factor determining plume-exit CCN for hydrophobic or small particles. Coagulation limits emission of CCN to about 1016 per kilogram of fuel. Depending on emission factor, particle size, and composition, some of these particles may not activate at low supersaturation (ssat). Hygroscopic Aitken-mode particles can contribute to CCN through self-coagulation but have a small effect on the CCN activity of accumulation-mode particles, regardless of composition differences. Simple models (monodisperse coagulation and average hygroscopicity) can be used to estimate plume-exit CCN within about 20 % if particles are unimodal and have homogeneous composition, or when particles are emitted in the Aitken mode even if they are not homogeneous. On the other hand, if externally mixed particles are emitted in the accumulation mode without SVOCs, an average hygroscopicity overestimates emitted CCN by up to a factor of 2. This work has identified conditions under which particle populations become more homogeneous during plume processes. This

  3. Computer controlled measurement of spontaneous combustion in coal stockpiles of the Western Lignite Corporation, Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The spontaneous combustion event in coal stockpiles is inevitable when appropriate environmental conditions are available.The objective of a computerized measurement system is to measure temperature changes existing in a coal stockpile.In order to achieve this intention, the electrical signal conversion of temperatures sensed by 20 temperature sensors placed in certain points inside the coal stockpile, the transfer of these electrical signals into computer media by using analogue-digital conversion unit after applying necessary filterization and upgrading processes and the record of these information into a database in particular time intervals are provided.Afterwards, the diagrams of these time-temperature data are plotted.With the help of these graphs, the competent company will be able to examine the behavior of coal stockpiles in terms of spontaneous combustion and take necessary precautions against self-combustion beforehand.

  4. Combustion of dried animal dung as biofuel results in the generation of highly redox active fine particulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Frank J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burning of biomass in the developing world for heating and cooking results in high indoor particle concentrations. Long-term exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM has been associated with increased rates of acute respiratory infections, chronic obstructive lung disease and cancer. In this study we determined the oxidative activity of combustion particles derived from the biomass fuel dung cake by examining their capacity to deplete antioxidants from a model human respiratory tract lining fluid (RTLF. For comparison, the observed oxidative activity was compared with that of particles derived from industrial and vehicular sources. Results Incubation of the dung cake particle suspensions in the RTLF for 4 h resulted in a mean loss of ascorbate of 72.1 ± 0.7 and 89.7 ± 2.5% at 50 and 100 μg/ml, respectively. Reduced glutathione was depleted by 49.6 ± 4.3 and 63.5 ± 22.4% under the same conditions. The capacity of these samples to deplete ascorbate was in excess of that observed with diesel or gasoline particles, but comparable to that seen with residual oil fly ash and considerably in excess of all three control particles in terms of glutathione depletion. Co-incubation with the metal chelator diethylenetriaminepentaacetate inhibited these losses, whilst minimal inhibition was seen with superoxide dismutase and catalase treatment. The majority of the activity observed appeared to be contained within aqueous particle extracts. Conclusion These data demonstrate that biomass derived particles have considerable oxidative activity, largely attributable to their transition metal content.

  5. State-of-the-art combustion controls CO{sub 2} emissions from coal : part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzan, H.; Vecci, S.; McDonald, D.; McCauley, K [Babcock and Wilcox Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Pranda, P.; Varagani, R.; Gautier, F.; Tranier, J.P.; Perrin, N. [Air Liquide Canada Inc., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2007-11-15

    Power plant operators use the cost of electricity (COE) as a way to compare different generating technologies, including those that require investment into costly carbon management. This article addressed issues regarding the goals that management sets and how they are measured in terms of economic profit. It was noted that power companies are not as likely to invest in carbon management technologies until there is assurance that competing power companies will do the same, or until incentives encourage it. A few power companies are well located to provide carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery, but others intend to master the technology of carbon management in preparation for a time when it may be a key competitive advantage. This article described key elements of oxy-coal combustion feasibility and competitiveness. This included oxygen production and specification for oxy-coal combustion. It was shown that for oxy-coal combustion plants, the best solution to purify the flue gas from the boiler is a lower temperature partial condensation scheme as soon as oxygen removal is considered. Oxy-coal combustion technology for retrofitting coal-fired boilers was also presented. A Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) project in Ohio for oxy-coal combustion was described along with the proposed development of a 300 MWe commercial oxy-coal boiler by SaskPower, Babcock and Wilcox Canada and AL. It was concluded that the ability to capture carbon dioxide from power plants is feasible in advanced modes of current technology and with new technology under development. However, oxy-combustion technology requires introducing new equipment to power plants, such as the air separation unit (ASU) and the carbon dioxide central processing unit (CPU). 1 tab., 5 figs.

  6. State-of-the-art combustion controls CO{sub 2} emissions from coal : part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzan, H.; Vecci, S.; McDonald, D.; McCauley, K. [Babcock and Wilcox Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Pranda, P.; Varagani, R.; Gautier, F.; Tranier, J.P.; Perrin, N. [Air Liquide Canada Inc., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2007-10-15

    This article provided highlights of a pilot-scale oxy coal combustion experiment for new and retrofitted boiler applications. The oxy-coal combustion technology was assessed with supercritical (SC) and ultra-supercritical (USC) steam cycles. The study was performed on bituminous coal at a 1.5 MWth pilot plant. Engineering and economic evaluations were used to demonstrate that oxy-coal combustion is less expensive than other technologies. A design and cost estimation of an oxy-coal and PC boiler was conducted to evaluate a regulatory design basis for an air separation unit (ASU) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) compression design systems. Different plant configurations considered in the study included a flue gas composition exiting system with 95 mol per cent 02 oxidant after drying specified moisture content; a flue gas composition exiting system with 99 mol per cent 02 oxidant; and flue gas purified to meet enhanced oil recovery (EOR) specifications. The results of the air-fired SC and USC boilers compared with amine scrubbing and SC and USC oxy-combustion cases showed an efficiency decrease of 11 and 12 per cent for the SC and USC cases. Oxy-combustion was also the lowest in cost of all CO{sub 2} technologies considered in the project. Results showed that conversion of air blown SC and USC designs for oxy-coal combustion facilitated CO{sub 2} capture, and resulted in net plant efficiency penalties of 11 to 12 per cent. No air emissions were released in cases modelled to meet CO{sub 2} specifications. It was concluded that the 95 per cent mole oxygen treatment is more economical than the 99 per cent mole oxygen system. 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of Ce-doped ZnO nanopowders synthesized by combustion method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪樟连

    2015-01-01

    Facile and fast combustion method was used to synthesize ZnO and Ce-doped ZnO (CZO) nanocrystalline powders photo-catalysts with different cerium concentrations (0.5 wt.%–10.0 wt.%) followed by calcination at 700 ºC for 3 h. The prepared samples were characterized by a variety of characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible spectroscopy, BET surface area analyser and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), to study the crystal structure, surface morphology, chemical compo-sition and optical properties. It was observed from XRD results that synthesized powders had hexagonal wurtzite structure with the smallest crystallite size about 13 nm. Absorption spectra showed that cerium doping enhanced the light absorption properties towards the visible light region. Photoluminescence spectra for Ce-doped ZnO samples exhibited relatively weak near band edge (NBE) emis-sion peaks as compared to that of pristine ZnO. The photocatalytic activities of the prepared samples were evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) under UV light and visible light (λ≥420 nm) irradiation. The textile mill effluent containing or-ganic matters was also treated under sunlight using photocatalysis and the reduction in the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the treated effluent revealed a complete destruction of the organic molecules along with colour removal. The results showed that the CZO photocatalyst doped with 3.0 wt.% cerium exhibited four times enhanced photocatalytic activity compared to pure ZnO. The en-hanced photocatalytic activity could be attributed to extended visible light absorption and inhibition of the electron-hole pair’s recom-bination.

  8. Comparison of the carbon-sequestering abilities of pineapple leaf residue chars produced by controlled combustion and by field burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, L Y; Husni, M H A; Samsuri, A W

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the chemical properties and yields of pineapple leaf residue (PLR) char produced by field burning (CF) with that produced by a partial combustion of air-dried PLR at 340 °C for 3 h in a furnace (CL). Higher total C, lignin content, and yield from CL as well as the presence of aromatic compounds in the Fourier Transform Infrared spectra of the char produced from CL suggest that the CL process was better in sequestering C than was the CF process. Although the C/N ratio of char produced from CL was low indicating a high N content of the char, the C in the char produced from CL was dominated by lignin suggesting that the decomposition of char produced from CL would be slow. To sequester C by char application, the PLR should be combusted in a controlled process rather than by burning in the field.

  9. Control of combustion and detonation by means of resonance laser radiation: analysis and potentialities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starik, Alexander M.; Titova, Nataliya S.; Loukhovitski, Boris I.

    2003-07-01

    The theoretical and computational studies based on the novel physical and mathematical model of nonequilibrium chemical processes involving vibrationally and electronically exited molecules have shown that selective excitation of reacting species by laser radiation results in a considerable reduction of self-ignition temperature, decrease of induction and combustion times, and initiates detonation in supersonic flow at relatively low radiation energy inputted into the mixture. These effects are due to production of the novel channels of high reactive radicals formation and enhancement of chain mechanism of combustion and are not associated with the thermal action of absorbed radiation.

  10. Controle de ruídos em postos de combustíveis: estudo de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Eduardo Amaral Herzer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Os altos níveis de ruído urbano têm se transformado nas últimas décadas em uma das formas de poluição que mais tempreocupado os agentes de saúde. Os valores registrados acusam níveis de desconforto tão altos que a poluição sonora urbanapassou a ser considerada como a forma de poluição que atinge o maior número de pessoas. Existem medidas eficazes no seucontrole, mas ainda são poucas as empresas que adotam medidas de controle e programas de conservação auditiva. Dessa forma, oobjetivo do trabalho foi de avaliar o nível de ruído aos quais os funcionários e usuários de postos de combustíveis estão expostosdiariamente. O levantamento de dados quantitativos foi feito medindo-se o nível de ruído diretamente na fonte emissora e fazendomedias aritméticas com as amostras obtidas. As médias obtidas revelaram que o ambiente de trabalho não é ideal, ou seja, o ruídopode afetar diretamente a comunicação e a produtividade dos trabalhadores. Com o objetivo de prevenir ou estabilizar as perdasauditivas aos quais estão sujeitos os trabalhadores e freqüentadores do referido posto foram propostas medidas para a implantaçãode um Programa de Conservação Auditiva (PCA.Abstract The high noise level in urban has changed, inthe last decades, in some way of pollution that has worriedthe health agents. The value registered accused levels of sohigh discomfort that the urban sound pollution passed to beconsidered as a kind of pollution that hit the outnumberedpeople. There are efficient measures in its control, but stillthere are few companies that adopt measure control andauditive conservation program. This way, the objective ofthe work was to evaluate the noise level in which theemployees and users of the gas station are daily exposed.The survey of quantitative datum was done measuring thenoise level right in the emission source and makingarithmetic means with the gotten sample. The averageobtained revealed that the working

  11. Dry sorbent injection of trona to control acid gases from a pilot-scale coal-fired combustion facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany L. B. Yelverton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available  Gaseous and particulate emissions from the combustion of coal have been associated with adverse effects on human and environmental health, and have for that reason been subject to regulation by federal and state governments. Recent regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency have further restricted the emissions of acid gases from electricity generating facilities and other industrial facilities, and upcoming deadlines are forcing industry to consider both pre- and post-combustion controls to maintain compliance. As a result of these recent regulations, dry sorbent injection of trona to remove acid gas emissions (e.g. HCl, SO2, and NOx from coal combustion, specifically 90% removal of HCl, was the focus of the current investigation. Along with the measurement of HCl, SO2, and NOx, measurements of particulate matter (PM, elemental (EC, and organic carbon (OC were also accomplished on a pilot-scale coal-fired combustion facility. Gaseous and particulate emissions from a coal-fired combustor burning bituminous coal and using dry sorbent injection were the focus of the current study. From this investigation it was shown that high levels of trona were needed to achieve the goal of 90% HCl removal, but with this increased level of trona injection the ESP and BH were still able to achieve greater than 95% fine PM control. In addition to emissions reported, measurement of acid gases by standard EPA methods were compared to those of an infrared multi-component gas analyzer. This comparison revealed good correlation for emissions of HCl and SO2, but poor correlation in the measurement of NOx emissions.

  12. Ab Initio Computations and Active Thermochemical Tables Hand in Hand: Heats of Formation of Core Combustion Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippenstein, Stephen J; Harding, Lawrence B; Ruscic, Branko

    2017-09-07

    The fidelity of combustion simulations is strongly dependent on the accuracy of the underlying thermochemical properties for the core combustion species that arise as intermediates and products in the chemical conversion of most fuels. High level theoretical evaluations are coupled with a wide-ranging implementation of the Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) approach to obtain well-validated high fidelity predictions for the 0 K heat of formation for a large set of core combustion species. In particular, high level ab initio electronic structure based predictions are obtained for a set of 348 C, N, O, and H containing species, which corresponds to essentially all core combustion species with 34 or fewer electrons. The theoretical analyses incorporate various high level corrections to base CCSD(T)/cc-pVnZ analyses (n = T or Q) using H2, CH4, H2O, and NH3 as references. Corrections for the complete-basis-set limit, higher-order excitations, anharmonic zero-point energy, core-valence, relativistic, and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects are ordered in decreasing importance. Independent ATcT values are presented for a subset of 150 species. The accuracy of the theoretical predictions is explored through (i) examination of the magnitude of the various corrections, (ii) comparisons with other high level calculations, and (iii) through comparison with the ATcT values. The estimated 2σ uncertainties of the three methods devised here, ANL0, ANL0-F12, and ANL1, are in the range of ±1.0-1.5 kJ/mol for single-reference and moderately multireference species, for which the calculated higher order excitations are 5 kJ/mol or less. In addition to providing valuable references for combustion simulations, the subsequent inclusion of the current theoretical results into the ATcT thermochemical network is expected to significantly improve the thermochemical knowledge base for less-well studied species.

  13. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps...

  14. Design and implementation of a control system to improve the quality of the combustion gases in the fire-tube boiler of 5 BHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alfredo Pérez Albán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is the design and implementation of a system for controlling the quality of the combustion gases in a fire-tube boiler of 5 BHP. Based on the percentage of O2 present in the combustion gases, measured by a lambda sensor, the percentage of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere is determined. PID proportional control is responsible for the automatic regulation of the entry of air to the boiler by an actuator, according to the percentage of the oxygen concentration in the combustion gases. The control system has an HMI display and a modular PLC. The results achieved ensure pollutant gases emissions within the parameters established by current environmental standards, achieving the required quality of combustion gases and reducing the fuel consumption of the boiler.

  15. Session 6: Highly active Pt/zeolite catalysts for combustion of C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garetto, T.F.; Rincon, E.; Apesteguia, C.R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica -INCAPE- (UNL-CONICET), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    In an attempt for developing more active Pt-based catalysts for lower-alkane combustion, we investigate in this work the deep oxidation of C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} alkanes over Pt-based catalysts. Results show that the lower alkane oxidation turnover rates are more than two orders of magnitude higher on Pt/zeolites compared to Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. (authors)

  16. Flexible engine control systems for the development of innovative combustion processes; Flexibles Motorsteuerungssystem fuer die Entwicklung innovativer Brennverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steuer, Josef; Mladek, Michael; Dengler, Christian; Mayer, Werner [Daimler AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Kracke, Thomas; Jakubek, Peter [IAV, Gifhorn (Germany); Brune, Andreas; Rick, Ralf [Etas GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Daimler AG (Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany), IAV GmbH (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) and Etas Deutschland GmbH (Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany) present a flexible motor control system for the development of innovative fuel procedures. With this, the functionality of conventional indicating systems is merged into a high-dynamic real time control circuit and implemented, tested and used algorithms for the pressure evaluation of combustion chambers flexibly - an important step in order to make progress with the development of new fuel procedures.

  17. Kinetic investigation for slow combustion of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The renewed interest in biomass as a renewable, clean, and inexpensive fuel was discussed. Many different mechanisms take place simultaneously during biomass combustion and also during other thermal processes such as gasification, pyrolysis or carbonization. These mechanisms have a pronounced influence on the design and operation of thermal conversion processes. In addition, product yields and product distributions from the thermal processes are sensitive to the kinetic properties of biomass. In order to evaluate the combustion mechanisms and the combustion kinetics of biomass, the behavior of these constituents under combustion conditions were properly evaluated. In this study, combustion of biomass samples was carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer by heating them from ambient to 1173 K with heating rates of 5 K/min and 10 K/min under dynamic dry air atmosphere of 40 mL/min. The biomass samples included olive refuse, sunflower seed shell, rapeseed, grape seed, and hybrid poplar. The purpose of the study was to examine the kinetic properties of biomass during slow combustion for the overall combustion process as well as for some definite temperature intervals at which different combustion mechanisms are present according to the type and complexity of biomass used. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) curves were derived, and data obtained from these curves were used to compute the kinetic parameters such as activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and governing mechanisms for the combustion processes. The governing mechanisms for individual temperature intervals were examined along with the overall combustion process. The study showed that at lower temperature intervals, the combustion process was controlled primarily by the chemical reaction. At least 3 sequential mechanisms may occur at different temperature intervals during combustion of biomass. Activation energy and pre-exponential factors were determined for each temperature interval

  18. Controlling the heat release in HCCI combustion of DME with methanol and EGR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper; Yanai, Tadanori

    2010-01-01

    The effects of methanol and EGR on HCCI combustion of dimethyl ether have been tested separately in a diesel engine. The engine was equipped with a common rail injection system which allowed for random injection of DME. The engine could therefore be operated either as a normal DI CI engine or, by...

  19. Controlling the heat release in HCCI combustion of DME with methanol and EGR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr; Schramm, Jesper; Yanai, Tadanori

    2010-01-01

    The effects of methanol and EGR on HCCI combustion of dimethyl ether have been tested separately in a diesel engine. The engine was equipped with a common rail injection system which allowed for random injection of DME. The engine could therefore be operated either as a normal DI CI engine or, by...

  20. Inhibition of progesterone receptor activity in recombinant yeast by soot from fossil fuel combustion emissions and air particulate materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxian; Xie, Ping; Kettrup, Antonius; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2005-10-15

    Numerous environmental pollutants have been detected for estrogenic activity by interacting with the estrogen receptor, but little information is available about their interactions with the progesterone receptor. In this study, emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion (FFC) and air particulate material (APM) collected from an urban location near a traffic line in a big city of China were evaluated to interact with the human progesterone receptor (hPR) signaling pathway by examining their ability to interact with the activity of hPR expressed in yeast. The results showed that the soot of a petroleum-fired vehicle possessed the most potent anti-progesteronic activity, that of coal-fired stove and diesel fired agrimotor emissions took the second place, and soot samples of coal-fired heating work and electric power station had lesser progesterone inhibition activity. The anti-progesteronic activity of APM was between that of soot from petroleum-fired vehicle and soot from coal-fired establishments and diesel fired agrimotor. Since there was no other large pollution source near the APM sampling sites, the endocrine disrupters were most likely from vehicle emissions, tire attrition and house heating sources. The correlation analysis showed that a strong relationship existed between estrogenic activity and anti-progesteronic activity in emissions of fossil fuel combustion. The discoveries that some environmental pollutants with estrogenic activity can also inhibit hPR activity indicate that further studies are required to investigate potential mechanisms for the reported estrogenic activities of these pollutants.

  1. Effect of nitrogen-containing impurities on the activity of perovskitic catalysts for the catalytic combustion of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchneva, Olga; Gallo, Alessandro; Rossetti, Ilenia

    2012-11-05

    LaMnO(3), either pure or doped with 10 mol % Sr, has been prepared by flame pyrolysis in nanostructured form. Such catalysts have been tested for the catalytic flameless combustion of methane, achieving very high catalytic activity. The resistance toward poisoning by some model N-containing impurities has been checked in order to assess the possibility of operating the flameless catalytic combustion with biogas, possibly contaminated by S- or N-based compounds. This would be a significant improvement from the environmental point of view because the application of catalytic combustion to gas turbines would couple improved energy conversion efficiency and negligible noxious emissions, while the use of biogas would open the way to energy production from a renewable source by means of very efficient technologies. A different behavior has been observed for the two catalysts; namely, the undoped sample was more or less heavily poisoned, whereas the Sr-doped sample showed slightly increasing activity upon dosage of N-containing compounds. A possible reaction mechanism has been suggested, based on the initial oxidation of the organic backbone, with the formation of NO. The latter may adsorb more or less strongly depending on the availability of surface oxygen vacancies (i.e., depending on doping). Decomposition of NO may leave additional activated oxygen species on the surface, available for low-temperature methane oxidation and so improving the catalytic performance.

  2. Controls and measurements of KU engine test cells for biodiesel, SynGas, and assisted biodiesel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecrle, Eric Daniel

    This thesis is comprised of three unique data acquisition and controls (CDAQ) projects. Each of these projects differs from each other; however, they all include the concept of testing renewable or future fuel sources. The projects were the following: University of Kansas's Feedstock-to-Tailpipe Initiative's Synthesis Gas Reforming rig, Feedstock-to-Tailpipe Initiative's Biodiesel Single Cylinder Test Stand, and a unique Reformate Assisted Biodiesel Combustion architecture. The main responsibility of the author was to implement, develop and test CDAQ systems for the projects. For the Synthesis Gas Reforming rig, this thesis includes a report that summarizes the analysis and solution of building a controls and data acquisition system for this setup. It describes the purpose of the sensors selected along with their placement throughout the system. Moreover, it includes an explanation of the planned data collection system, along with two models describing the reforming process useful for system control. For the Biodiesel Single Cylinder Test Stand, the responsibility was to implement the CDAQ system for data collection. This project comprised a variety of different sensors that are being used collect the combustion characteristics of different biodiesel formulations. This project is currently being used by other graduates in order to complete their projects for subsequent publication. For the Reformate Assisted Biodiesel Combustion architecture, the author developed a reformate injection system to test different hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures as combustion augmentation. Hydrogen combustion has certain limiting factors, such as pre-ignition in spark ignition engines and inability to work as a singular fuel in compression ignition engines. To offset these issues, a dual-fuel methodology is utilized by injecting a hydrogen/carbon monoxide mixture into the intake stream of a diesel engine operating on biodiesel. While carbon monoxide does degrade some of the

  3. High-frequency combustion instability control through acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary for liquid rocket engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewitz, John William

    This research investigation encompasses experimental tests demonstrating the control of a high-frequency combustion instability by acoustically modulating the propellant flow. A model rocket combustor burned gaseous oxygen and methane using a single-element, pentad-style injector. Flow conditions were established that spontaneously excited a 2430 Hz first longitudinal combustion oscillation at an amplitude up to p'/pc ≈ 6%. An acoustic speaker was placed at the base of the oxidizer supply to modulate the flow and alter the oscillatory behavior of the combustor. Two speaker modulation approaches were investigated: (1) Bands of white noise and (2) Pure sinusoidal tones. The first approach adjusted 500 Hz bands of white noise ranging from 0-500 Hz to 2000-2500 Hz, while the second implemented single-frequency signals with arbitrary phase swept from 500-2500 Hz. The results showed that above a modulation signal amplitude threshold, both approaches suppressed 95+% of the spontaneous combustion oscillation. By increasing the applied signal amplitude, a wider frequency range of instability suppression became present for these two acoustic modulation approaches. Complimentary to these experiments, a linear modal analysis was undertaken to investigate the effects of acoustic modulation at the inlet boundary on the longitudinal instability modes of a dump combustor. The modal analysis employed acoustically consistent matching conditions with a specific impedance boundary condition at the inlet to represent the acoustic modulation. From the modal analysis, a naturally unstable first longitudinal mode was predicted in the absence of acoustic modulation, consistent with the spontaneously excited 2430 Hz instability observed experimentally. Subsequently, a detailed investigation involving variation of the modulation signal from 0-2500 Hz and mean combustor temperature from 1248-1685 K demonstrated the unstable to stable transition of a 2300-2500 Hz first longitudinal mode. The

  4. Combustion control and model based optimization. Modeling of combustion process and development of supporting control systems for plant operation; Palamisprosessin saeaetoe ja mallipohjainen optimointi; Voimalaitoksen polttoprosessin mallitus ja saeaetoe sekae operoinnin tukiohjelmien kehitys ja testaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortela, U.; Mononen, J.; Leppaekoski, K.; Hiltunen, J.; Jouppila, M.; Karppinen, R. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Systems Engineering Lab.

    1997-10-01

    The aims of the project are to develop the combustion control strategies and to minimize the flue gas emissions. The common goal of the studies has been the reduction of flue gas emissions by using advanced control and optimization methods. The behaviour of different kind of boilers and fuels has been modelled using experimental data from fullscale plants, such as a 42 MW bubbling fluidized bed boiler, 23 MW bubbling fluidized bed boiler and a 300 MW circulating fluidized bed boiler. Many of the individual observations and modelled correlations between control variables and flue gas emissions have lead to operation instructions and/or re-organized control schemes which help to control total emissions. The most part of this knowledge can be formed to the standard IF- THEN - type rules which contain some uncertainty or fuzziness. Rule-based instruction system for the reduction of flue gas emissions is under work. (orig.)

  5. Application of Foam-gel Technique to Control CO Exposure Generated During Spontaneous Combustion of Coal in Coal Mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xing W; Wang, Feng Z; Guo, Qing; Zuo, Zhao B; Fang, Qi S

    2015-01-01

    In China, 47.3% of state-owned coal mines are located in coal seams that are prone to spontaneous combustion. The spontaneous combustion of coal is the main cause of the generation of a large amount of carbon monoxide, which can cause serious health issues to miners. A new technique using foam-gel formation was developed to effectively control the spontaneous combustion of coal. The gel can capture more than 90% of the water in the grout and at the same time the foam can cover dangerous areas in the goaf by stacking and cooling of foam in all directions. In this study, a mechanism of foam-gel formation was introduced and the optimal proportions of additives were defined based on experiments of different foaming properties, gelling time and water loss rate as the main index parameters. The results of a field application in a coal mine promise that this new technique would effectively prevent coal oxidation in the goaf and reduce the generation of carbon monoxide.

  6. High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

    2012-01-31

    The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

  7. Control of toxic metallic emissions formed during the combustion of Ohio coals. Final report, September 1994--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chang-Yu; Owens, T.M.; Biswas, P.

    1996-03-29

    The objective of this project was to characterize metallic emissions from representative coals and develop strategies for their control. A technique for flue gas desulfurization is the use of calcium based sorbents, and the degree of metals capture of these sorbents under different conditions will be researched. The objective of the first year of the study was to understand the evolution of metallic aerosol size distributions and the capture characteristics of various sorbents. Also, the metallic emissions resulting from the combustion of two seams of Ohio coals were to be characterized. Studies on the evolution of the metallic aerosol size distributions have been completed and the use of silicon and calcium based sorbents for capture of lead species has been examined. Co-injection of metallic compounds along with organometallic silicon indicated a high degree of capture of lead in a certain temperature region. Preliminary results with calcium based sorbents also indicate capture of metallic species. In the second year, the work was extended to examine three different aspects: (1) understanding the mechanisms of capture of metals by vapor phase sorbents; (2) role of chlorine in speciation of metals and its importance in metals capture; and (3) capture of mercury by aerosol transformation. It was established that aerosol formation rates for Hg species is rather slow under typical combustion conditions, and hence would not be an effective way of capture of mercury. However, the use of titania based sorbents have provided exciting results. This is being developed further for effective capture of Hg species in combustion environments. Several theoretical investigations were also carried out to better understand and predict trace metal behavior in combustion environments. Publications and conference presentations resulting from work this year is listed.

  8. A Dynamic Simulation Strategy for PCCI Combustion Control Design Méthode de développement de lois de commande pour la combustion PCCIbasée sur la simulation système

    OpenAIRE

    Peters N.; Hoffmann K; Felsch C.; Abel D.

    2011-01-01

    Subject of this work is a dynamic simulation strategy for PCCI combustion that can be used in closed-loop control development. A detailed multi-zone chemistry model for the high-pressure part of the engine cycle is extended by a mean value model accounting for the gas exchange losses. The resulting stationary model is capable of describing PCCI combustion sufficiently well. It is at the same time very economic with respect to computational costs. The model is further extended by identifi...

  9. Automaticity or active control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tudoran, Ana Alina; Olsen, Svein Ottar

    This study addresses the quasi-moderating role of habit strength in explaining action loyalty. A model of loyalty behaviour is proposed that extends the traditional satisfaction–intention–action loyalty network. Habit strength is conceptualised as a cognitive construct to refer to the psychologic......, respectively, between intended loyalty and action loyalty. At high levels of habit strength, consumers are more likely to free up cognitive resources and incline the balance from controlled to routine and automatic-like responses.......This study addresses the quasi-moderating role of habit strength in explaining action loyalty. A model of loyalty behaviour is proposed that extends the traditional satisfaction–intention–action loyalty network. Habit strength is conceptualised as a cognitive construct to refer to the psychological...... aspects of the construct, such as routine, inertia, automaticity, or very little conscious deliberation. The data consist of 2962 consumers participating in a large European survey. The results show that habit strength significantly moderates the association between satisfaction and action loyalty, and...

  10. Method and apparatus for achieving hypergolic combustion by partial catalytic combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1987-03-24

    This patent describes an apparatus for pretreatment of a hydrocarbon fuel for hypergolic combustion in an oxidizing atmosphere in the combustion chamber of a combustion device comprising: a source of fuel; a source of oxidizing fluid; a mixing chamber for receiving oxidizer fluid from the source; means for directing fuel received from the fuel source into the oxidizer fluid in the mixing chamber so as to create a rich fuel-oxidizer fluid mixture therein substantially above the stoichiometric ratio; catalytic reactor means receiving the rich fuel-oxidizer fluid mixture from the mixture from the mixture chamber and partially catalytically combusting the mixture to form a high temperature, hydrogen-rich product gas at temperatures on the order of 1,000 degrees farenheit. It is thereby activated by the formation of a sufficient proportion of fuel molecules to enable hypergolic combustion thereof; means controllably directing the high temperature product gas in the activated state into the combustion chamber, whereby enabling hypergolic combustion therein as a result of the high temperature activated condition of the product gas.

  11. Coal Combustion Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

  12. Pilot Testing of WRI'S Novel Mercury Control Technology by Pre-Combustion Thermal Treatment of Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Bland; Jesse Newcomer; Kumar Sellakumar

    2008-08-17

    The challenges to the coal-fired power industry continue to focus on the emission control technologies, such as mercury, and plant efficiency improvements. An alternate approach to post-combustion control of mercury, while improving plant efficiency deals with Western Research Institute's (WRI)'s patented pre-combustion mercury removal and coal upgrading technology. WRI was awarded under the DOE's Phase III Mercury program, to evaluate the effectiveness of WRI's novel thermal pretreatment process to achieve >50% mercury removal, and at costs of <$30,000/lb of Hg removed. WRI has teamed with Etaa Energy, Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Foster Wheeler North America Corp. (FWNA), and Washington Division of URS (WD-URS), and with project co-sponsors including Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Southern Company, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC), Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU), North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), Detroit Edison (DTE), and SaskPower to undertake this evaluation. The technical objectives of the project were structured in two phases: Phase I--coal selection and characterization, and bench-and PDU-scale WRI process testing and; and Phase II--pilot-scale pc combustion testing, design of an integrated boiler commercial configuration, its impacts on the boiler performance and the economics of the technology related to market applications. This report covers the results of the Phase I testing. The conclusion of the Phase I testing was that the WRI process is a technically viable technology for (1) removing essentially all of the moisture from low rank coals, thereby raising the heating value of the coal by about 30% for subbituminous coals and up to 40% for lignite coals, and (2) for removing volatile trace mercury species (up to 89%) from the coal prior to combustion. The results established that the process meets the goals of DOE of removing <50% of the mercury from the coals by pre-combustion methods

  13. Experimental Replication of an Aeroengine Combustion Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2000-01-01

    Combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines are most frequently encountered during the late phases of engine development, at which point they are difficult and expensive to fix. The ability to replicate an engine-traceable combustion instability in a laboratory-scale experiment offers the opportunity to economically diagnose the problem (to determine the root cause), and to investigate solutions to the problem, such as active control. The development and validation of active combustion instability control requires that the causal dynamic processes be reproduced in experimental test facilities which can be used as a test bed for control system evaluation. This paper discusses the process through which a laboratory-scale experiment was designed to replicate an instability observed in a developmental engine. The scaling process used physically-based analyses to preserve the relevant geometric, acoustic and thermo-fluid features. The process increases the probability that results achieved in the single-nozzle experiment will be scalable to the engine.

  14. 锅炉燃烧控制系统优化%Optimization of Boiler Combustion Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鹏

    2012-01-01

    在锅炉燃烧运行控制中,锅炉燃烧器控制部分是锅炉控制系统的一个重要组成.本文分析了锅炉应用进口燃烧器存在的一些问题,通过改善锅炉控制系统整体控制结构的方法,解决了原有锅炉控制系统控制结构复杂,控制器独立和封闭的特点,采用通用的PLC实现了锅炉的燃烧和运行控制.控制方案的成功也为今后锅炉配套进口燃烧器时应用PLC代替专用燃烧程控器奠定了基础,为企业在锅炉上应用进口燃烧器提供了新的解决思路.%In the boiler combustion operation control, boiler burner control part of the boiler control system is an important component. This paper analyzes the imported burner boiler applications of existing problems through the boiler control system to improve overall control structure, the method solves the complexity of the existing boiler control system control structure and the characteristics of the independent closed of contrller. The general PLC is adopted to realize the control of the boiler combustion and operation control. The success of the control scheme settles the foundation of the application of PLC and provides a new solving idea for imported burner.

  15. Dilution effects on the controlled auto-ignition (CAI) combustion of hydrocarbon and alcohol fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Oakley, A.; Zhao, H.; Ma, T.; Ladommatos, N

    2001-01-01

    Copyright © 2001 SAE International. This paper is posted on this site with permission from SAE International. Further use of this paper is not permitted without permission from SAE This paper presents results from an experimental programme researching the in-cylinder conditions necessary to obtain homogenous CAI (or HCCI) combustion in a 4-stroke engine. The fuels under investigation include three blends of Unleaded Gasoline, a 95 RON Primary Reference Fuel, Methanol, and Ethanol. This wor...

  16. The effect of kaolin on the combustion of demolition wood under well-controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Roger A; Todorovic, Dusan; Skreiberg, Oyvind; Becidan, Michael; Backman, Rainer; Goile, Franziska; Skreiberg, Alexandra; Sørum, Lars

    2012-07-01

    In an attempt to look at means for reduction of corrosion in boilers, combustion experiments are performed on demolition wood with kaolin as additive. The experiments were performed in a multi-fuel reactor with continuous feed of pellets and by applying staged air combustion. A total characterization of the elemental composition of the fuel, the bottom ash and some particle size stages of fly ash was performed. This was done in order to follow the fate of some of the problematic compounds in demolition wood as a function of kaolin addition and other combustion-related parameters. In particular chlorine and potassium distribution between the gas phase, the bottom ash and the fly ash is reported as a function of increased kaolin addition, reactor temperature and air staging. Kaolin addition of 5 and 10% were found to give the least aerosol load in the fly ash. In addition, the chlorine concentration in aerosol particles was at its lowest levels for the same addition of kaolin, although the difference between 5 and 10% addition was minimal. The reactor temperature was found to have a minimal effect on both the fly ash and bottom ash properties.

  17. Flash Atomization: A New Concept to Control Combustion Instability in Water-Injected Gas Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwas Iyengar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to explore methods to reduce combustor rumble in a water-injected gas turbine. Attempts to use water injection as a means to reduce NOX emissions in gas turbines have been largely unsuccessful because of increased combustion instability levels. This pulsation causes chronic fretting, wear, and fatigue that damages combustor components. Of greater concern is that liberated fragments could cause extensive damage to the turbine section. Combustion instability can be tied to the insufficient atomization of injected water; large water droplets evaporate non-uniformly that lead to energy absorption in chaotic pulses. Added pulsation is amplified by the combustion process and acoustic resonance. Effervescent atomization, where gas bubbles are injected, is beneficial by producing finely atomized droplets; the gas bubbles burst as they exit the nozzles creating additional energy to disperse the liquid. A new concept for effervescent atomization dubbed “flash atomization” is presented where water is heated to just below its boiling point in the supply line so that some of it will flash to steam as it leaves the nozzle. An advantage of flash atomization is that available heat energy can be used rather than mechanical energy to compress injection gas for conventional effervescent atomization.

  18. Sensitivity of natural gas HCCI combustion to fuel and operating parameters using detailed kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, S; Dibble, R; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Westbrook, C K

    1999-07-19

    This paper uses the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to analyze natural gas HCCI combustion in an engine. The HCT code has been modified to better represent the conditions existing inside an engine, including a wall heat transfer correlation. Combustion control and low power output per displacement remain as two of the biggest challenges to obtaining satisfactory performance out of an HCCI engine, and these are addressed in this paper. The paper considers the effect of natural gas composition on HCCI combustion, and then explores three control strategies for HCCI engines: DME (dimethyl ether) addition, intake heating and hot EGR addition. The results show that HCCI combustion is sensitive to natural gas composition, and an active control may be required to compensate for possible changes in composition. The three control strategies being considered have a significant effect in changing the combustion parameters for the engine, and should be able to control HCCI combustion.

  19. Sistema de instrumentação e controle para células a combustível

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez García, Álvaro

    2012-01-01

    Este trabajo presenta un estudio sobre el funcionamiento y aplicaciones de las células de combustible de membrana tipo PEM, o de intercambio de protones, alimentadas con hidrógeno puro y oxigeno obtenido de aire comprimido. Una vez evaluado el proceso de dichas células y las variables que intervienen en el mismo, como presión, humedad y temperatura, se presenta una variedad de métodos para la instrumentación de tales variables así como métodos y sistemas para la estabilidad y control de...

  20. Combustion devices technology team - An overview and status of STME-related activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, P. K.; Croteau-Gillespie, Margie

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for CFD applications in propulsion technology has been formed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The combustion devices technology team is one of the three teams that constitute the Consortium. While generally aiming to advance combustion devices technology for rocket propulsion, the team's efforts for the last 1 and 1/2 years have been focused on issues relating to the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) nozzle. The nozzle design uses hydrogen-rich turbine exhaust to cool the wall in a film/dump scheme. This method of cooling presents challenges and associated risks for the nozzle designers and the engine/vehicle integrators. Within the nozzle itself, a key concern is the ability to effectively and efficiently film cool the wall. From the National Launch System vehicle base standpoint, there are concerns with dumping combustible gases at the nozzle exit and their potential adverse effects on the base thermal environment. The Combustion Team has developed and is implementing plans to use validated CFD tools to aid in risk mitigation for both areas.

  1. Nanocasted synthesis of the mesostructured LaCoO3 perovskite and its catalytic activity in methane combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangang; Wang, Yanqin; Liu, Xiaohui; Guo, Yun; Guo, Yanglong; Lu, Guanzhong

    2009-02-01

    Extremely high surface area, mesostructured LaCoO3 perovskite has been synthesized by nanocasting from mesoporous cubic (Ia3d) vinyl silica. Thus-prepared material was characterized by XRD, TEM, and N2-sorption, and its catalytic property was also tested in methane combustion. The catalytic results demonstrated that thus-prepared mesostructured LaCoO3 perovskite had higher activity than the conventional bulk LaCoO3 perovskite prepared by citrate method. Further analysis showed that both the high surface area and the existence of high valent cobalt ions (Co4+, XPS analysis) were contributed to the high activity.

  2. Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity of Bismuth Precursor by Rapid Phase and Surface Transformation Using Structure-Guided Combustion Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Yeol; Hwang, Hayoung; Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-02-10

    The development of an efficient method for manipulating phase and surface transformations would facilitate the improvement of catalytic materials for use in a diverse range of applications. Herein, we present the first instance of a submicrosecond time frame direct phase and surface transformation of Bi(NO3)3 rods to nanoporous β-Bi2O3 rods via structure-guided combustion waves. Hybrid composites of the prepared Bi(NO3)3·H2O rods and organic fuel were fabricated by a facile preparation method. The anisotropic propagation of combustion waves along the interfacial boundaries of Bi(NO3)3·H2O rods induced direct phase transformation to β-Bi2O3 rods in the original structure due to the rapid pyrolysis, while the release of gas molecules enabled the formation of nanoporous structures on the surfaces of rods. The developed β-Bi2O3 rods showed improved photocatalytic activity for the photodegradation of rhodamine B in comparison with Bi(NO3)3·H2O rods and α-Bi2O3 rods due to the more suitable interdistance and the large contact areas of the porous surfaces. This new method of using structure-guided combustion waves for phase and surface transformation may contribute to the development of new catalysts as well as the precise manipulation of diverse micronanostructured materials.

  3. Internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmich, M.J.; Hoagland, M.C.; Hubbard, R.L.; Schaub, F.S.

    1981-12-22

    A method of combusting natural gas fuel in a two cycle, turbocharged internal combustion engine substantially reduces the production of nitrogen-oxygen emissions. An improved turbocharger design provides increased air charging pressure, produces a controlled lean air/fuel mixture and lowers peak combustion temperatures. A jet cell ignition device ensures uniform, reliable ignition of the lean air/fuel mixture under all operating conditions and the lean air/fuel mixture in turn encourages complete fuel combustion and provides excellent combustion characteristics with methane, ethane and heavier paraffinic hydrocarbon fuels. These structural modifications and adjustment of other operating parameters combine to reduce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) emissions by as much as 75% while effecting only a negligible increase in fuel consumption.

  4. Measures for a quality combustion (combustion chamber exit and downstream); Mesures pour une combustion de qualite (sortie de chambre de combustion et en aval)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epinat, G. [APAVE Lyonnaise, 69 (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a review of the different pollutants related to the various types of stationary and mobile combustion processes (stoichiometric, reducing and oxidizing combustion), measures and analyses than may be used to ensure the quality and efficiency of combustion processes are reviewed: opacimeters, UV analyzers, etc. The regulation and control equipment for combustion systems are then listed, according to the generator capacity level

  5. A status of the activities of the NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Combustion Devices Technology Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Applications in Propulsion Technology was established to focus on computational fluid dynamics applications in propulsion. Specific areas of effort include developing the CFD technology required to address rocket propulsion issues, validating the technology, and applying the validated technology to design problems. The Combustion Devices Technology Team was formed to implement the above objectives in the broad area of combustion driven flows. In an effort to bring CFD to bear in the design environment, the team has focused its efforts on the Space Transportation Main Engine nozzle. The main emphasis has been on the film cooling scheme used to cool the nozzle wall. Benchmark problems have been chosen to validate CFD film cooling capabilities. CFD simulations of the subscale nozzle have been made. Also, CFD predictions of the base flow resulting from this type of nozzle have been made. The status of these calculations is presented along with future plans. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  6. Methods for the control of NOx and particles in the combustion; Metodos para el control de NOx y particulas en la combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romo Millares, Cesar A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electrica, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    This present the techniques and equipment of control of transmissions for thermoelectric power stations appear that have mayor possibilities of being considered in the future immediate within the national energetic panorama and the frame established by the environmental normative. The subject polluting compounds to overhaul are oxides of nonburned nitrogen and particles [Espanol] Se presentan las tecnicas y equipos de control de emisiones para centrales termoelectricas que tienen mayores posibilidades de ser consideradas en el futuro inmediato dentro del panorama energetico nacional y el marco establecido por la normatividad ambiental. Los compuestos contaminantes sujetos a revision son los oxidos de nitrogeno y las particulas inquemadas

  7. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  8. Voluntary control of electrogastric activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B B; Lawton, C A; Sandman, C A

    1978-12-01

    The tonic component of the electrogastrogram (EGG) has been shown to differentiate duodenal ulcer patients from healthy individuals (15). It has therefore been of considerable interest to investigate the possibility that individuals can learn to modify electrogastric activity. Using a discriminative conditioning paradigm with analogue feedback (Experiment I), subjects were generally unsuccessful at controlling tonic EGG activity. However, when the conditioning paradigm was altered (Experiment II) it was clear that subjects were able to modify specific electrogastric changes. In addition to EGG, heart rate, respiration, abdominal muscle activity, and digital blood flow were measured in order to assess the physiological concomitants of learned control of gastrointestinal activity. Subjects who evidenced discriminative control also showed the least amount of abdominal muscle activity and reported being the most relaxed. The results of these studies suggest that exploration of the physiological processes underlying the electrical activity of the gastrointestinal system and the ability of individuals to modify this activity may lead to significant clinical and theoretical advances.

  9. Emission control for precursors causing acid rain(V):Improvement of acid soil with the bio-briquette combustion ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xu-hui; SAKAMOTO Kazuhiko; WANG Wei; GAO Shi-dong; ISOBE Yugo

    2004-01-01

    The bio-briquette technique which mixes coal, biomass and sulfur fixation agent and bio-briquettes under 3-5 t/cm2 line pressure has aroused people's attention in view of controlling the air pollution and the acid rain. In this paper, the physicochemical properties of bio-briquette and its ash were investigated. And the acid soil was improved by the bio-briquette combustion ash, which contained nutritive substances such as P, N, K and had the acid-neutralizing capacity(ANC). The pH, EC, effective nutrient elements(Ca, Mg, K, P and N), heavy metal elements(Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn) and acid-neutralizing capacity change of ash-added soils within the range of 0%-10%, were also studied. Specially, when 5% bio-briquette combustion ash was added to the tested soil, the content of the effective elements such as Ca, Mg and K rose by 100 times, 7 times and twice, respectively. The total nitrogen also increased by about twice. The results showed the oxyanions such as that of Al, Cu, Cd, Cr, Zn and Mn were not potentially dangerous, because they were about the same as the averages of them in Chinese soil. It is shown that the ANC became stronger, though the ANC hardly increases in the ash-added soil. On the basis of the evaluation indices, it is concluded that the best mixture ratio is to add 2.5%-8% of the bio-briquette combustion ash to the tested soil.

  10. EFFECT OF FOREIGN CARBON ON ACTIVITY OF METHANE COMBUSTION OVER SUPPORTED PALLADIUM CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Caixia; An Lidun; Wang Hongli

    2001-01-01

    EDTA as precursor of carbon was introduced into Pd(NO3)2 catalysts supported on γ-Al2O3 or 5%MgO/γ-Al2O3. Two kinds of samples,denoted as Pd(NO3)2/[support+EDTA] and [Pd(NO3)2/support]+EDTA, were prepared by changing sequence of impregnating EDTA to the supports. After only being dried they were tested for methane combustion. XPS analyses to the samples at different stages of testing reaction were performed. It was found that the Pd(NO3)2 catalysts became more inactive due to the introduction of EDTA. EDTA in the catalysts was naturally in situ oxidized,partially became into CO2 and escaped, partially coked and deposited on palladium and support with temperature increasing in oxygen-rich atmosphere.Formation of Pd-C solid solution was also confirmed during the reaction. It can be suggested that foreign carbon, in spite of its any existing forms and position in catalysts, inhibits methane combustion largely. The role of carbon on morphological change of palladium during methane combustion was also discussed.

  11. Computational Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  12. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  13. Active control: Wind turbine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project 'Active Control of Wind Turbines'. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to designcontrollers. This report describes the model...... developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This hasbeen done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model...... validation as well as parameter estimation. The model includes a simple model of the structure of the turbine including tower and flapwise blade bending,a detailed model of the gear box and induction generator, a linearized aerodynamic model including modelling of induction lag and actuator and sensor models...

  14. Active control: Wind turbine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindner, Henrik

    1999-07-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project `Active Control of Wind Turbines`. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to design controllers. This report describes the model developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This has been done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model validation as well as parameter estimation. The model includes a simple model of the structure of the turbine including tower and flapwise blade bending, a detailed model of the gear box and induction generator, a linearized aerodynamic model including modelling of induction lag and actuator and sensor models. The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated through comparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch controlled wind turbine. The model and the measurements corresponds well in the relevant frequency range. The developed model is therefore applicable for controller design. (au) EFP-91. 18 ills., 22 refs.

  15. Trends of multiple air pollutants emissions from residential coal combustion in Beijing and its implication on improving air quality for control measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yifeng; Zhou, Zhen; Nie, Teng; Wang, Kun; Nie, Lei; Pan, Tao; Wu, Xiaoqing; Tian, Hezhong; Zhong, Lianhong; Li, Jing; Liu, Huanjia; Liu, Shuhan; Shao, Panyang

    2016-10-01

    Residential coal combustion is considered to be an important source of air pollution in Beijing. However, knowledge regarding the emission characteristics of residential coal combustion and the related impacts on the air quality is very limited. In this study, we have developed an emission inventory for multiple hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) associated with residential coal combustion in Beijing for the period of 2000-2012. Furthermore, a widely used regional air quality model, the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality model (CMAQ), is applied to analyze the impact of residential coal combustion on the air quality in Beijing in 2012. The results show that the emissions of primary air pollutants from residential coal combustion have basically remained the same levels during the past decade, however, along with the strict emission control imposed on major industrial sources, the contribution of residential coal combustion emissions to the overall emissions from anthropogenic sources have increased obviously. In particular, the contributions of residential coal combustion to the total air pollutants concentrations of PM10, SO2, NOX, and CO represent approximately 11.6%, 27.5%, 2.8% and 7.3%, respectively, during the winter heating season. In terms of impact on the spatial variation patterns, the distributions of the pollutants concentrations are similar to the distribution of the associated primary HAPs emissions, which are highly concentrated in the rural-urban fringe zones and rural suburb areas. In addition, emissions of primary pollutants from residential coal combustion are forecasted by using a scenario analysis. Generally, comprehensive measures must be taken to control residential coal combustion in Beijing. The best way to reduce the associated emissions from residential coal combustion is to use economic incentive means to promote the conversion to clean energy sources for residential heating and cooking. In areas with reliable energy supplies, the coal used

  16. Design factors for stable lean premix combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J.; Gemmen, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program includes the development of low-emission combustors. Low emissions have already been achieved by premixing fuel and air to avoid the hot gas pockets produced by nozzles without premixing. While the advantages of premixed combustion have been widely recognized, turbine developers using premixed nozzles have experienced repeated problems with combustion oscillations. Left uncontrolled, these oscillations can lead to pressure fluctuations capable of damaging engine hardware. Elimination of such oscillations is often difficult and time consuming - particularly when oscillations are discovered in the last stages of engine development. To address this issue, METC is studying oscillating combustion from lean premixing fuel nozzles. These tests are providing generic information on the mechanisms that contribute to oscillating behavior in gas turbines. METC is also investigating the use of so-called {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} control of combustion oscillations. This technique periodically injects fuel pulses into the combustor to disrupt the oscillating behavior. Recent results on active combustion control are presented in Gemmen et al. (1995) and Richards et al. (1995). This paper describes the status of METC efforts to avoid oscillations through simple design changes.

  17. Enhancement of Electrical Conductivity of LiFePO4 by Controlled Solution Combustion Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoba, S. J.; Jadhav, L. D.; Patil, P. S.; Tyagi, D. K.; Varma, S.; Wani, B. N.

    2017-03-01

    LiFePO4 has been synthesized by a solution combustion method at different oxidant-to-fuel ratios. At stoichiometric oxidant-to-fuel ratio (1:2), Fe2O3 formed in addition to LiFePO4 during combustion. Hence, reducing atmosphere was generated by increasing the ratio from stoichiometric to 1:4 and 1:8, named as 1-LFP, 2-LFP, and 4-LFP, respectively. Furthermore, as-prepared powders were calcined in inert atmosphere to avoid oxidation of LiFePO4 to Fe2O3 and Li3PO4, as confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. The calcined powders were characterized by XRD analysis, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ascertained oxidation state of +2 and +5 for Fe and P, respectively. With increasing oxidant-to-fuel ratio, the binding energies of 2 p 3/2 and 2 p 1/2 levels of Fe shifted downwards and showed increased splitting. According to Raman spectroscopy results, the residual carbon is amorphous with sp 2 C-C bond. The conductivity of 1-LFP, 2-LFP, and 4-LFP measured at 313 K was 0.15 × 10-6 S/cm, 8.46 × 10-6 S/cm, and 1.21 × 10-3 S/cm, respectively. The enhanced conductivity of 4-LFP is due to presence of residual carbon and Fe2P.

  18. Scramjet Combustion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    plan for these flights is as follows: Scramjet Combustion Processes RTO-EN-AVT-185 11 - 21 HyShot 5 – A Free-Flying Hypersonic Glider HyShot...5 will be a hypersonic glider designed to fly at Mach 8. It will separate from its rocket booster in space and perform controlled manoeuvres as it...RTO-EN-AVT-185 11 - 1 Scramjet Combustion Processes Michael Smart and Ray Stalker Centre for Hypersonics The University of Queensland

  19. Enhancement of photocatalytic activity of combustion-synthesized CeO2/C3N4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Feng; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao-qin; Ma, Ya-Li; Huang, Gui-Fang; Huang, Wei-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Nanocrystalline CeO2/C3N4 was synthesized via a one-step solution combustion method using urea as fuel for the first time. The effects of the molar ratio of urea to cerium chloride on the photocatalytic activity of the synthesized samples were investigated. The synthesized nanocrystalline CeO2/C3N4 shows small size and large surface exposure area. Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue demonstrates that the synthesized nanocrystalline CeO2/C3N4 possesses enhanced photocatalytic activity. It is proposed that the enhanced photocatalytic activity might be related to the favorable morphology and structure, and the effective charge separation between C3N4 and CeO2 in the photocatalytic process.

  20. Third millenium ideal gas and condensed phase thermochemical database for combustion (with update from active thermochemical tables).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burcat, A.; Ruscic, B.; Chemistry; Technion - Israel Inst. of Tech.

    2005-07-29

    The thermochemical database of species involved in combustion processes is and has been available for free use for over 25 years. It was first published in print in 1984, approximately 8 years after it was first assembled, and contained 215 species at the time. This is the 7th printed edition and most likely will be the last one in print in the present format, which involves substantial manual labor. The database currently contains more than 1300 species, specifically organic molecules and radicals, but also inorganic species connected to combustion and air pollution. Since 1991 this database is freely available on the internet, at the Technion-IIT ftp server, and it is continuously expanded and corrected. The database is mirrored daily at an official mirror site, and at random at about a dozen unofficial mirror and 'finger' sites. The present edition contains numerous corrections and many recalculations of data of provisory type by the G3//B3LYP method, a high-accuracy composite ab initio calculation. About 300 species are newly calculated and are not yet published elsewhere. In anticipation of the full coupling, which is under development, the database started incorporating the available (as yet unpublished) values from Active Thermochemical Tables. The electronic version now also contains an XML file of the main database to allow transfer to other formats and ease finding specific information of interest. The database is used by scientists, educators, engineers and students at all levels, dealing primarily with combustion and air pollution, jet engines, rocket propulsion, fireworks, but also by researchers involved in upper atmosphere kinetics, astrophysics, abrasion metallurgy, etc. This introductory article contains explanations of the database and the means to use it, its sources, ways of calculation, and assessments of the accuracy of data.

  1. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine. The Gantt Chart on the following page details progress by task.

  2. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion -- FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis will be covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  3. Time- and energy-efficient solution combustion synthesis of binary metal tungstate nanoparticles with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Abegayl; Janáky, Csaba; Samu, Gergely F; Huda, Muhammad N; Sarker, Pranab; Liu, J Ping; van Nguyen, Vuong; Wang, Evelyn H; Schug, Kevin A; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2015-05-22

    In the search for stable and efficient photocatalysts beyond TiO2 , the tungsten-based oxide semiconductors silver tungstate (Ag2 WO4 ), copper tungstate (CuWO4 ), and zinc tungstate (ZnWO4 ) were prepared using solution combustion synthesis (SCS). The tungsten precursor's influence on the product was of particular relevance to this study, and the most significant effects are highlighted. Each sample's photocatalytic activity towards methyl orange degradation was studied and benchmarked against their respective commercial oxide sample obtained by solid-state ceramic synthesis. Based on the results herein, we conclude that SCS is a time- and energy-efficient method to synthesize crystalline binary tungstate nanomaterials even without additional excessive heat treatment. As many of these photocatalysts possess excellent photocatalytic activity, the discussed synthetic strategy may open sustainable materials chemistry avenues to solar energy conversion and environmental remediation.

  4. Catalytic combustion of methane over alumina-supported palladium: Relationships between the oxidation state, particle size, morphology and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubovsky, Maxim R.

    Supported palladium was studied as a catalyst for combustion of natural gas. The influence of variations in temperature and oxygen concentration, of addition of CO and water and of in situ hydrogen reduction on catalyst activity was studied experimentally. The activation energy for methane oxidation over crystalline PdO is about 17.5 kcal/mole and over metallic Pd - 40--45 kcal/mole. The difference in the activation energy is compensated by the preexponential coefficient that is 5--6 orders of magnitude higher for Pd than for PdO. In this work the activity variations under the different reaction conditions were correlated with the corresponding changes in the catalyst oxidation state, particle size and morphology. Formation of metallic hexagonal crystallites 100--200 nm in size was observed by TEM after PdO reduction, which resulted in an increase in the catalyst activity. Redispersion of these metallic crystallites into PdO clusters of 3--5 nm in size occurred during the Pd reoxidation, which resulted in a reversible increase of the catalyst activity on the cooling cycle, known as "negative activation." Activation of the methane molecule is the limiting step of the reaction over both the Pd and the PdO states. We propose that on the Pd surface the reaction occurs through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. Under conditions of catalytic combustion the surface is completely covered with oxygen and competitive dissociative adsorption of methane is the limiting step of the process. The high heat of oxygen adsorption explains the high activation energy for the overall process. On the PdO surface the reaction occurs through a redox mechanism. A methane molecule interacts with a surface Pd-O dimer resulting in adsorbed CH3 and OH species. The activation energy of this interaction is about 15 kcal/mole and the probability is low due to the different multiplicity of the initial and final states of the transition complex. Oscillations in the reaction rate under fuel

  5. Effect of Complex Agents on Structure and Activity of Fe-Substituted Rare Earth Hexaaluminate Catalysts for Methane Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Peng; Hu Ruisheng; Long Zerong; Meng He

    2004-01-01

    A series of catalysts were prepared by using complex sol-gel methods.Experimental results confirm the effect of different agents on structure and activity of Fe-substituted rare earth hexaaluminate catalyst (LaFeAl11 O19 ) for methane combustion.The catalyst is yielded by complex sol-gel, respectively using three different complex agents (maltose, glucose and citric acid).XRD demonstrated that haxaaluminate is the major phase of catalyst prepared by maltose,while LaAlO3 is the major one of the catalyst by glucose and citric acid.At the same time, there is a little LaFeO3 and surface areas as well as 29.5 nm particle diameter when the complex agent is maltose.However, T10 ( temperature for 10% conversion of methane) and T100 ( temperature for 100% conversion of methane) for catalyst by glucose is 543 and 758 ℃, which is the best among the three complex agents for methane combustion.

  6. An experimental study of pyrite bio-leaching as a way to control spontaneous combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Shenghua; Wu Aixiang; Liu Jinzhi; Huang Mingqing; Wang Hongjiang

    2011-01-01

    Bio-leaching of pyrite by native strains of acidophilic bacteria was examined by laboratory scale tests.Three groups of batch trials in agitated flasks and three continuous column leaching tests were performed.The leaching ability and efficiency of native bacteria was greatly improved by adaptation of the bacteria to the test conditions.These cultivated bacteria were then used for the leaching process.The changes in solution pH,Eh,Fe2+ concentration,and sulfate ion concentration were monitored throughout the tests.A portion of the pyritic sulfur is transformed into soluble sulfate ion.The desulfurization ratio of 42.6% was obtained in a flask shaking test and a ratio of 39.4% was obtained during column leaching.A weight gain test was performed on leached and unleached samples by exposing the samples to humid air for several days.A smaller weight gain of the bio-leached samples indicates that removing sulfur from the sulphide ore helps reduce its oxidation rate and the potential for spontaneous combustion.

  7. Incorporation of lanthanum into SBA-15 and its catalytic activity in trichloroethylene combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dao; CHEN Guoping; WANG Xingyi

    2008-01-01

    s: The direct synthesis of La-SBA- 15 mesoporous material by two-step synthesis method was reported. The effect of pH value dur-ing the process on the incorporation of La into the framework of SBA-15 was investigated, and XRD, UV-vis, FT-IR, and ICP were used to characterize the obtained La-SBA-15. The experimental results showed that a large amount of La could enter SBA-15 framework under suitable pH value while a highly ordered mesostructure of samples containing La was retained. In addition, the obtained La-SBA-15 exhib-ited good catalytic performance in the combustion of trichioroethylene.

  8. Tapioca starch: An efficient fuel in gel-combustion synthesis of photocatalytically and anti-microbially active ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasami, Alamelu K. [Centre for Nano and Material Sciences, Jain University, Jakkasandra, Kanakapura (T) (India); Raja Naika, H. [Dept. of Biotechnology, University College of Science, Tumkur University, Tumkur (India); Nagabhushana, H. [CNR Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur (India); Ramakrishnappa, T.; Balakrishna, Geetha R. [Centre for Nano and Material Sciences, Jain University, Jakkasandra, Kanakapura (T) (India); Nagaraju, G., E-mail: nagarajugn@rediffmail.com [Centre for Nano and Material Sciences, Jain University, Jakkasandra, Kanakapura (T) (India); Dept. of Chemistry, Siddaganga Institute of Technology, Tumkur (India)

    2015-01-15

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by gel-combustion method using novel bio-fuel tapioca starch pearls, derived from the tubers of Manihotesculenta. The product is characterized using various techniques. The X-ray diffraction pattern correspond to a hexagonal zincite structure. Fourier transform infrared spectrum showed main absorption peaks at 394 and 508 cm{sup −} {sup 1} due to stretching vibration of Zn–O. Ultravoilet–visible spectrum of zinc oxide nanoparticles showed absorption maximum at 373 nm whereas the maximum of the bulk zinc oxide was 377 nm. The morphology of the product was studied using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopic images showed that the products are agglomerated and porous in nature. The transmission electron microscopic images revealed spherical particles of 40–50 nm in diameter. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue was examined using zinc oxide nanoparticles and found more efficient in sunlight than ultra-violet light due to reduced band gap. The antibacterial properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles were investigated against four bacterial strains Klebsiella aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aereus, where Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aereus exhibited significant antibacterial activity in agar well diffusion method when compared to positive control. - Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles have been prepared from a new bio-fuel, tapioca starch by gel combustion method. • XRD pattern revealed hexagonal zincite crystal structure with crystallite size 33 nm. • ZnO nanoparticles exhibited a band gap of 2.70 eV. • The ZnO nanoparticles exhibited superior degradation in sunlight in comparison with UV light. • The product showed a good anti-bacterial activity against two bacterial strains.

  9. Improved Recovery Boiler Performance Through Control of Combustion, Sulfur, and Alkali Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Larry L.

    2008-06-09

    This project involved the following objectives: 1. Determine black liquor drying and devolatilization elemental and total mass release rates and yields. 2. Develop a public domain physical/chemical kinetic model of black liquor drop combustion, including new information on drying and devolatilization. 3. Determine mechanisms and rates of sulfur scavenging in recover boilers. 4. Develop non-ideal, public-domain thermochemistry models for alkali salts appropriate for recovery boilers 5. Develop data and a one-dimensional model of a char bed in a recovery boiler. 6. Implement all of the above in comprehensive combustion code and validate effects on boiler performance. 7. Perform gasification modeling in support of INEL and commercial customers. The major accomplishments of this project corresponding to these objectives are as follows: 1. Original data for black liquor and biomass data demonstrate dependencies of particle reactions on particle size, liquor type, gas temperature, and gas composition. A comprehensive particle submodel and corresponding data developed during this project predicts particle drying (including both free and chemisorbed moisture), devolatilization, heterogeneous char oxidation, char-smelt reactions, and smelt oxidation. Data and model predictions agree, without adjustment of parameters, within their respective errors. The work performed under these tasks substantially exceeded the original objectives. 2. A separate model for sulfur scavenging and fume formation in a recovery boiler demonstrated strong dependence on both in-boiler mixing and chemistry. In particular, accurate fume particle size predictions, as determined from both laboratory and field measurements, depend on gas mixing effects in the boilers that lead to substantial particle agglomeration. Sulfur scavenging was quantitatively predicted while particle size required one empirical mixing factor to match data. 3. Condensed-phase thermochemistry algorithms were developed for salt

  10. Sensors for control and minimization of emissions from small scale bio fuel combustion - preliminary study; Sensorer foer styrning och minimering av emissioner fraan smaaskalig biobraenslefoerbraenning - foerstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskilsson, David; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    The objectives with this study was to survey various types of sensors for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons that could be used for development of operation and control strategies in small-scale biomass combustion, and to identify and purchase a suitable sensor for testing of its performance in comparison with conventional gas analysers in tests with a small-scale biomass combustion device. In the initial phase of the project, a comprehensive literature study was carried out. In addition, contacts were taken with research groups, manufacturers, users and retailers of sensor equipment. The development of sensors for exhaust gas measurements is intensive, although it is often directed towards measurements and engine control in the enormous market of the automotive industry. However, sensors developed for engines can for instance also be used for flue gas measurements in small-scale biomass combustion. The large market will make sure that a commercial sensor will have a competitive price as it will be produced in large series. Many of the commercial sensors on the market is based on semi-conducting tin oxide (SnO{sub 2})- In recent years, new sensors based on other semi-conducting materials have been developed. One of these sensors is based on gallium oxide (Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}) which consequently can be used to monitor the concentration of unburnt (carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons) in the flue gas. This sensor fulfils many of the requirements on a sensor to be used in small-scale biomass combustion. These requirements include: The surface of the sensor can be heated to 900 deg C; The sensor signal is nonsensitive to variations in moisture content; A stable signal is obtained also in absence of oxygen; A relatively low price. In the trials at SP, the signal from a Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}-sensor and a oxygen sensor was measured as they were exposed to flue gases from a pellet burner. Simultaneously, the gas concentrations were monitored using conventional gas analysers. The air

  11. Formation and Control of Sulfur Oxides in Sour Gas Oxy-Combustion: Prediction Using a Reactor Network Model

    KAUST Repository

    Bongartz, Dominik

    2015-11-19

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Sour natural gas currently requires expensive gas cleanup before it can be used in power generation because it contains large amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2) that entail a low heating value and highly corrosive combustion products. A potential alternative is to use the gas directly in a gas turbine process employing oxy-fuel combustion, which could eliminate the need for gas cleanup while also enabling the application of carbon capture and sequestration, possibly combined with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). However, the exact influence of an oxy-fuel environment on the combustion products of sour gas has not been quantified yet. In this work, we used a reactor network model for the combustor and the gas turbine together with our recently assembled and validated detailed chemical reaction mechanism for sour gas combustion to investigate the influence of some basic design parameters on the combustion products of natural gas and sour gas in CO2 or H2O diluted oxy-fuel combustion as well as in conventional air combustion. Our calculations show that oxy-fuel combustion produces up to 2 orders of magnitude less of the highly corrosive product sulfur trioxide (SO3) than air combustion, which clearly demonstrates its potential in handling sulfur containing fuels. Unlike in air combustion, in oxy-fuel combustion, SO3 is mainly formed in the flame zone of the combustor and is then consumed as the combustion products are cooled in the dilution zone of the combustor and the turbine. In oxy-fuel combustion, H2O dilution leads to a higher combustion efficiency than CO2 dilution. However, if the process is to be combined with EOR, CO2 dilution makes it easier to comply with the very low levels of oxygen (O2) required in the EOR stream. Our calculations also show that it might even be beneficial to operate slightly fuel-rich because this simultaneously decreases the O2 and SO3 concentration further. The flame zone

  12. Comparison of catalytic activity of bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by combustion and co-precipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Venkat Savunthari; Sumathi, Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    In this study, cobalt ferrite and bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite (CoFe2-xBixO4x=0, 0.1) nanoparticles were synthesized by two different methods viz combustion and co-precipitation. The nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results of powder XRD pattern showed an increase in lattice parameter and decrease in particle size of cobalt ferrite by the substitution of bismuth. Catalytic activity of cobalt ferrite and bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by two different methods were compared for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol using NaBH4 as a reducing agent.

  13. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D.; Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  14. Periodical control of combustion facilities in agreement with the decree no. 98-833 from September 16, 1998. Specialist's guidebook; Controle periodique des installations de combustion au titre du decret no. 98-833 du 16 septembre 1998. Guide de l'expert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This guidebook aims at specifying some of the conditions of application of the French decree no. 98-833 from September 16, 1998 relative to the periodical control of combustion facilities: 1 - introduction (goal, definitions, reference documents); 2 - objective of the periodical control; 3 - calculation of the characteristic efficiency of a boiler (type of boiler, losses with smokes, losses with unburnt solid residues, radiant and convection losses); 4 - measurement and control instrumentation; 5 - facilities devoted to thermal energy distribution; 6 - combustion quality and good operation of boilers; 7 - filling up of the maintenance book; 8 - operation and maintenance; 9 - report. (J.S.)

  15. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  16. Applied combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    From the title, the reader is led to expect a broad practical treatise on combustion and combustion devices. Remarkably, for a book of modest dimension, the author is able to deliver. The text is organized into 12 Chapters, broadly treating three major areas: combustion fundamentals -- introduction (Ch. 1), thermodynamics (Ch. 2), fluid mechanics (Ch. 7), and kinetics (Ch. 8); fuels -- coal, municipal solid waste, and other solid fuels (Ch. 4), liquid (Ch. 5) and gaseous (Ch. 6) fuels; and combustion devices -- fuel cells (Ch. 3), boilers (Ch. 4), Otto (Ch. 10), diesel (Ch. 11), and Wankel (Ch. 10) engines and gas turbines (Ch. 12). Although each topic could warrant a complete text on its own, the author addresses each of these major themes with reasonable thoroughness. Also, the book is well documented with a bibliography, references, a good index, and many helpful tables and appendices. In short, Applied Combustion does admirably fulfill the author`s goal for a wide engineering science introduction to the general subject of combustion.

  17. Combustion Control of Diesel Engine using Feedback Error Learning with Kernel Online Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widayaka, Elfady Satya; Ohmori, Hiromitsu

    2016-09-01

    This paper shows how to design Multivariable Model Reference Adaptive Control System (MRACS) for “Tokyo University discrete-time engine model” proposed by Yasuda et al (2014). This controller configuration has the structure of “Feedback error learning (FEL)” and adaptive law is based on kernel method. Simulation results indicate that “kernelized” adaptive controllers can improve the tracking performance, the speed of convergence and the robustness to disturbances.

  18. Luminescence of divalent europium activated spinels synthesized by combustion and the enhanced afterglow by dysprosium incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Haoyi, E-mail: manofchina@gmail.com; Jin, Yahong

    2016-05-01

    Herein we report a luminescent phenomenon of Eu{sup 2+} in the spinel MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples which are successfully synthesized via a combustion method. The XRD shows cubic spinel structure is obtained from the prepared samples. The mean crystal sizes estimated from XRD data are 30 and 10 nm for MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} respectively, and the large grain particles are the agglomeration of crystallites. The Eu{sup 2+} ions show a blue emission at around 480 nm and an afterglow phenomenon is observed after the removal of excitation. The afterglow spectrum of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: Eu{sup 2+}, Dy{sup 3+} shows two emissions at 480 and 520 nm while only one at 480 nm is observed in ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: Eu{sup 2+}, Dy{sup 3+}. The afterglow intensity and the persisting duration can be substantially enhanced by the Dy{sup 3+} incorporation because the trapping ability of the electron traps is reinforced. This is confirmed by the TL curves of the samples.

  19. Combustion synthesis and luminescence characteristic of rare earth activated LiCaBO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.S. Bajaj; S.K. Omanwar

    2012-01-01

    Lithium calcium borate (LiCaBO3) polycrystalline thermoluminescence (TL) phosphor doped with rare earth (Tb3+ and Dy3+) elements was synthesized by novel solution combustion synthesis.The reaction produced very stable crystalline LiCaBO3:D (D=Tb3+ and Dy3+)phosphors.These rare earth doped phosphors material showed maximum TL sensitivity with favorable glow curve shape.TL glow curve of X-ray irradiated that LiCaBO3:Tb3+ and LiCaBO3:Dy3+ samples showed two major well-separated glow peaks.The TL sensitivity of these phosphors to X-ray radiation was comparable with that of TLD-100 (Harshaw).Photoluminescence spectra of LiCaBO3:Tb3+ and LiCaBO3:Dy3+ showed the characteristic Tb3+ and Dy3+ peaks respectively.TL response to X-ray radiation dose was linear up to 25 Gy.

  20. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  1. Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-15

    engine speed and load conditions. The closed-cycle integrated and peak heat transfer rates were found to be lower for HCCI and RCCI when compared to...limit the load of HCCI due to practical engine limitations. Additionally, HCCI lacks a fast-response combustion phasing control, such as spark...cylinder research engine under Conventional Diesel (CDC), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition ( HCCI ), and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition

  2. Model-Based Self-Tuning Multiscale Method for Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Dzu, K.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-scale representation of the combustor dynamics was used to create a self-tuning, scalable controller to suppress multiple instability modes in a liquid-fueled aero engine-derived combustor operating at engine-like conditions. Its self-tuning features designed to handle the uncertainties in the combustor dynamics and time-delays are essential for control performance and robustness. The controller was implemented to modulate a high-frequency fuel valve with feedback from dynamic pressure sensors. This scalable algorithm suppressed pressure oscillations of different instability modes by as much as 90 percent without the peak-splitting effect. The self-tuning logic guided the adjustment of controller parameters and converged quickly toward phase-lock for optimal suppression of the instabilities. The forced-response characteristics of the control model compare well with those of the test rig on both the frequency-domain and the time-domain.

  3. Internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.J.

    1986-06-03

    A variable power internal combustion engine is described which consists of: a separate air compressor for receiving and compressing a flow of air to a given pressure, the compressor having an inlet valve introducing a flow of air into the compressor and an outlet valve for exhausting compressed air out of the compressor into a compressed air storage means, at least one expander having a cylinder, a cylinder head closing an end of the cylinder, a piston reciprocally mounted in the cylinder for movement away from the cylinder head in a power stroke from an initial position defining a combustion chamber within the cylinder between the cylinder head and the piston, the compressed air storage means receiving the pressurized flow of air from the compressor and being of a volume adequate to provide compressed air in the combustion chamber essentially at the given pressure essentially over the power output of the engine, means for introducing an amount of combustible fuel in the compressed charge to be present with compressed air in the combustion chamber and providing combustion of the amount of fuel in the cylinder with the inlet and exhaust valves closed, cam shaft means in contact with the piston for absorbing and storing the energy of the power stroke of the piston and controlling movement of the piston within the cylinder during the exhaust stroke; the means for varying the volume of the combustion chamber being controlled in accordance with power requirements to provide variable power output and improved efficiency of the engine at power outputs reduced relative to a given design power output of the engine by providing a variable expansion ratio of a minimum of at least about 30 to 1 at the given design power output and higher with reduced power output.

  4. Development of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriott, Craig; Gonzalez, Manual; Russell, Durrett

    2011-06-30

    This report summarizes activities related to the revised STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated June 2010 for the Development of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion engine Designs for Spark-Ignition and Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Engines (COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-05NT42415) project. In both the spark- (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) development activities covered in this program, the goal was to develop potential production-viable internal combustion engine system technologies that both reduce fuel consumption and simultaneously met exhaust emission targets. To be production-viable, engine technologies were also evaluated to determine if they would meet customer expectations of refinement in terms of noise, vibration, performance, driveability, etc. in addition to having an attractive business case and value. Prior to this activity, only proprietary theoretical / laboratory knowledge existed on the combustion technologies explored The research reported here expands and develops this knowledge to determine series-production viability. Significant SI and CI engine development occurred during this program within General Motors, LLC over more than five years. In the SI program, several engines were designed and developed that used both a relatively simple multi-lift valve train system and a Fully Flexible Valve Actuation (FFVA) system to enable a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process. Many technical challenges, which were unknown at the start of this program, were identified and systematically resolved through analysis, test and development. This report documents the challenges and solutions for each SOPO deliverable. As a result of the project activities, the production viability of the developed clean combustion technologies has been determined. At this time, HCCI combustion for SI engines is not considered production-viable for several reasons. HCCI combustion is excessively sensitive to control variables

  5. Preparation and evaluation of coal-derived activated carbons for removal of mercury vapor from simulated coal combustion flue fases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, H.-C.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.; Richardson, C.F.; Carey, T.R.; Chang, R.

    1998-01-01

    Coal-derived activated carbons (CDACs) were tested for their suitability in removing trace amounts of vapor-phase mercury from simulated flue gases generated by coal combustion. CDACs were prepared in bench-scale and pilot-scale fluidized-bed reactors with a three-step process, including coal preoxidation, carbonization, and then steam activation. CDACs from high-organicsulfur Illinois coals had a greater equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacity than activated carbons prepared from a low-organic-sulfur Illinois coal. When a low-organic-sulfur CDAC was impregnated with elemental sulfur at 600 ??C, its equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacity was comparable to the adsorption capacity of the activated carbon prepared from the high-organicsulfur coal. X-ray diffraction and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure examinations showed that the sulfur in the CDACs was mainly in organic forms. These results suggested that a portion of the inherent organic sulfur in the starting coal, which remained in the CDACs, played an important role in adsorption of Hg0. Besides organic sulfur, the BET surface area and micropore area of the CDACs also influenced Hg0 adsorption capacity. The HgCl2 adsorption capacity was not as dependent on the surface area and concentration of sulfur in the CDACs as was adsorption of Hg0. The properties and mercury adsorption capacities of the CDACs were compared with those obtained for commercial Darco FGD carbon.

  6. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  7. Controllability and flexibility analysis of CO2 post-combustion capture using piperazine and MEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed a decentralized control scheme and investigate the performance of the piperazine (PZ) and monoethanolamine (MEA) CO2 capture process for industrially-relevant operation scenarios. The base for the design of the control schemes is Relative Gain Array (RGA) analysis...... a critical operational bottleneck, especially when PZ is being used. The MEA plant controllers drive the system towards drying out/flooding while the CO2 capture rate performance of the PZ plant reduces drastically in the presence of constraints in the availability of steam. These findings suggest the need...

  8. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  9. Deuterium Isotope Effects During HMX Combustion: Chemical Kinetic Burn Rate Control Mechanism Verified

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    propellant contain- controls the I-IMX burn rate in the pressure range cited. The ing a chemically modified double base ( CMDB ) high oxygen 1.41 KDIE...controlling the observed overall or global burn rate of the could expect from the deuterium labeled HMX methylene HMX/ CMDB composite propellant. It is...measured in the HMX/ CMDB system. A graphic representa- densed phase KDIE investigation of thermochemical decom- non of one cornposic HMX binder

  10. Validation of an Adaptive Combustion Instability Control Method for Gas-Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing testing of an adaptive control method to suppress high frequency thermo-acoustic instabilities like those found in lean-burning, low emission combustors that are being developed for future aircraft gas turbine engines. The method called Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control, was previously tested in an experimental rig designed to simulate a combustor with an instability of about 530 Hz. Results published earlier, and briefly presented here, demonstrated that this method was effective in suppressing the instability. Because this test rig did not exhibit a well pronounced instability, a question remained regarding the effectiveness of the control methodology when applied to a more coherent instability. To answer this question, a modified combustor rig was assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The modified rig exhibited a more coherent, higher amplitude instability, but at a lower frequency of about 315 Hz. Test results show that this control method successfully reduced the instability pressure of the lower frequency test rig. In addition, due to a certain phenomena discovered and reported earlier, the so called Intra-Harmonic Coupling, a dramatic suppression of the instability was achieved by focusing control on the second harmonic of the instability. These results and their implications are discussed, as well as a hypothesis describing the mechanism of intra-harmonic coupling.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of CeO2 Nanoparticles via Solution Combustion Method for Photocatalytic and Antibacterial Activity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Thammadihalli Nanjundaiah; Ramakrishnappa, Thippeswamy; Nagaraju, Ganganagappa; Rajanaika, Hanumanaika

    2015-04-01

    CeO2 nanoparticles have been proven to be competent photocatalysts for environmental applications because of their strong redox ability, nontoxicity, long-term stability, and low cost. We have synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles via solution combustion method using ceric ammonium nitrate as an oxidizer and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as fuel at 450 °C. These nanoparticles exhibit good photocatalytic degradation and antibacterial activity. The obtained product was characterized by various techniques. X-ray diffraction data confirms a cerianite structure: a cubic phase CeO2 having crystallite size of 35 nm. The infrared spectrum shows a strong band below 700 cm(-1) due to the Ce-O-Ce stretching vibrations. The UV/Vis spectrum shows maximum absorption at 302 nm. The photoluminescence spectrum shows characteristic peaks of CeO2 nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images clearly show the presence of a porous network with a lot of voids. From transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, it is clear that the particles are almost spherical, and the average size of the nanoparticles is found to be 42 nm. CeO2 nanoparticles exhibit photocatalytic activity against trypan blue at pH 10 in UV light, and the reaction follows pseudo first-order kinetics. Finally, CeO2 nanoparticles also reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and show antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  12. Mineralogical controls on the partitioning of trace elements between smoke and ash during the combustion of tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, W. E.; Calder, A.

    2003-04-01

    Tobacco smoke is a potential source of some toxic trace elements including inorganic carcinogens1,2. In order to understand the controls on trace elements in smoke and their potential toxic effects it is necessary to know their distribution between the various inorganic (mineral) and organic repositories in tobacco, the relative concentrations of these repositories, the effects of combustion on these repositories, and the role of particles in adsorbing and transporting trace elements. Few trace element data are available for any of these materials and the partitioning processes are poorly understood. We have applied Rietveld XRD to quantifying the major minerals the tobacco of all available cigarette references standards, as well as the most popular UK cigarette brands and a selection of international brands. Most common are calcium oxalate biominerals (up to 4% by dry weight), calcium carbonate, sylvite, and several silicate minerals typical of soils amounting to a few wt%. We have developed an accurate and rapid method for determining 23 trace elements in tobacco using polarised X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and applied it to the same samples. Although the concentrations vary over about five orders of magnitude the abundance patterns for standards and brands are remarkably consistent. We present a model to account for these variations in which anthropogenic inputs of fertilisers, manufacturers’ additives and environmental pollution supplement natural sources based on soils and plant processes. Combustion of tobacco (400-900^oC) causes the oxalates (whewellite &weddellite) to decompose and other non-silicates react to form new phases such as fairchildite (K_2Ca(CO_3)_2) and arcanite (K_2SO_4). Ash amounts to ˜15% of the mass of unburned tobacco. Comparison of trace element concentrations in smoke with those in tobacco and ash indicates that a few metals, most notably Cd, may partition strongly into the smoke phase. It is noteworthy that Cd levels are higher

  13. A Dynamic Simulation Strategy for PCCI Combustion Control Design Méthode de développement de lois de commande pour la combustion PCCIbasée sur la simulation système

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters N.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of this work is a dynamic simulation strategy for PCCI combustion that can be used in closed-loop control development. A detailed multi-zone chemistry model for the high-pressure part of the engine cycle is extended by a mean value model accounting for the gas exchange losses. The resulting stationary model is capable of describing PCCI combustion sufficiently well. It is at the same time very economic with respect to computational costs. The model is further extended by identified system dynamics influencing the stationary inputs. For this, a Wiener model is set up that uses the stationary model as a nonlinear system representation. In this way, a dynamic nonlinear model for the representation of the controlled plant Diesel engine is created. This paper summarizes an important outcome of the the Collaborative Research Centre "SFB 686 - Modellbasierte Regelung der homogenisierten Niedertemperatur-Verbrennung" at RWTH Aachen University and Bielefeld University, Germany. Cet article présente une méthodologie de développement de lois de commande pour la combustion PCCI. La méthode proposée repose sur l’utilisation d’un simulateur du moteur dont le niveau de représentation est adapté aux besoins de l’application ciblée. Le simulateur proposé repose sur l’association d’un modèle de combustion multidimensionnel (pour la partie haute pression du cycle moteur et d’un modèle à valeurs moyennes (pour la description des d’échanges gazeux. L’association des caractéristiques de ces modèles permet d’aboutir à un niveau de représentation suffisamment précis pour accompagner le développement de lois de commande. De plus, les simplifications réalisées permettent des gains conséquents en termes de temps de simulation. Cet article propose aussi une simplification supplémentaire en introduisant une méthode d’identification d’un modèle de Wiener. Les résultats présentés dans cette publication sont le fruit

  14. 30 CFR 56.4104 - Combustible waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combustible waste. 56.4104 Section 56.4104... Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4104 Combustible waste. (a) Waste materials, including... properly, waste or rags containing flammable or combustible liquids that could create a fire hazard shall...

  15. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  16. Experiences of co-combustion and quality control of industrial waste in Sweden and Europe; Erfarenheter av samfoerbraenning och kvalitetssaekring av verksamhetsavfall i Sverige och Europa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Elisabet; Ekvall, Annika; Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Sundqvist, Jan-Olov [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst. (SP), Boraas (Sweden)

    2004-03-01

    the fuel has a stable quality over time, and that fuel particle size is even and suitable. In several cases, problems with slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces and also corrosion has been experienced. The content of zinc and chlorine e.g. in surface coatings as well as PVC plastics plays a significant role. Sorting out such material as well as pre-treatment improve the situation considerably. In other cases, co-combustion can lead to positive synergistic effects, e,g, concerning emissions. In most cases, complete QA systems for the fuel are not employed. However, some kind of specification of heating value, PVC content, content of CCA treated wood etc are often used, which are mainly controlled by the eye. QA systems which correspond to those used in Finland and Germany has not yet been established in Sweden. The report is concluded by an assessment of the need for further R and D within the field.

  17. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  18. Pulsating combustion - Combustion characteristics and reduction of emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Annika

    1999-11-01

    In the search for high efficiency combustion systems pulsating combustion has been identified as one of the technologies that potentially can meet the objectives of clean combustion and good fuel economy. Pulsating combustion offers low emissions of pollutants, high heat transfer and efficient combustion. Although it is an old technology, the interest in pulsating combustion has been renewed in recent years, due to its unique features. Various applications of pulsating combustion can be found, mainly as drying and heating devices, of which the latter also have had commercial success. It is, however, in the design process of a pulse combustor, difficult to predict the operating frequency, the heat release etc., due to the lack of a well founded theory of the phenomenon. Research concerning control over the combustion process is essential for developing high efficiency pulse combustors with low emissions. Natural gas fired Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been the experimental objects of this study. In order to investigate the interaction between the fluid dynamics and the chemistry in pulse combustors, laser based measuring techniques as well as other conventional measuring techniques have been used. The experimental results shows the possibilities to control the combustion characteristics of pulsating combustion. It is shown that the time scales in the large vortices created at the inlet to the combustion chamber are very important for the operation of the pulse combustor. By increasing/decreasing the time scale for the large scale mixing the timing of the heat release is changed and the operating characteristics of the pulse combustor changes. Three different means for NO{sub x} reduction in Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been investigated. These include exhaust gas recirculation, alteration of air/fuel ratio and changed inlet geometry in the combustion chamber. All used methods achieved less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} emitted (referred to stoichiometric

  19. Different Boosting Systems and their Control Strategies for a Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Bolehovský Ondřej; Macek Jan

    2016-01-01

    This research uses 1-D simulation in GT-Power for evaluation of boosting systems for a spark ignition engine. Exhaust gas driven (waste-gated turbocharger) and mechanical driven (Roots blower) boosting systems are assessed in both steady state and transient modes in terms of performance, efficiency, fuel consumption, drivability, energy distribution and other aspects that influence gas exchange phase. Moreover, different boost control strategies, particularly at partial load, are also evaluat...

  20. Longitudinal-Mode Combustion Instabilities: Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2000-01-01

    Combustion instabilities can lead to increased development time and cost for aeroengine gas turbines. This problem has been evident in the development of very-low emissions stationary gas turbines, and will likely be encountered in the newer, more aggressive aeroengine designs. In order to minimize development time and cost, it is imperative that potential combustion dynamics issues be resolved using analyses and smaller-scale experimentation. This paper discusses a methodology through which a problem in a full-scale engine was replicated in a single-nozzle laboratory combustor. Specifically, this approach is valid for longitudinal and "bulk" mode combustion instabilities. An explanation and partial validation of the acoustic analyses that were used to achieve this replication are also included. This approach yields a testbed for the diagnosis of combustion dynamics problems and for their solution through passive and active control techniques.

  1. Antitubercular activity of ZnO nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion synthesis using lemon juice as bio-fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopala Krishna, Prashanth; Paduvarahalli Ananthaswamy, Prashanth; Trivedi, Priyanka; Chaturvedi, Vinita; Bhangi Mutta, Nagabhushana; Sannaiah, Ananda; Erra, Amani; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis, structural and morphological characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles using solution combustion synthesis method where lemon juice was used as the fuel. In vitro anti-tubercular activity of the synthesized ZnO nanoparticles and their biocompatibility studies, both in vitro and in vivo were carried out. The synthesized nanoparticles showed inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra strain at concentrations as low as 12.5μg/mL. In vitro cytotoxicity study performed with normal mammalian cells (L929, 3T3-L1) showed that ZnO nanoparticles are non-toxic with a Selectivity Index (SI) >10. Cytotoxicity performed on two human cancer cell lines DU-145 and Calu-6 indicated the anti-cancer activity of ZnO nanoparticles at varied concentrations. Results of blood hemolysis indicated the biocompatibility of ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, in vivo toxicity studies of ZnO nanoparticles conducted on Swiss albino mice (for 14days as per the OECD 423 guidelines) showed no evident toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Longitudinal Mode Aeroengine Combustion Instability: Model and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. M.; Hibshman, J. R.; Proscia, W.; Rosfjord, T. J.; Wake, B. E.; McVey, J. B.; Lovett, J.; Ondas, M.; DeLaat, J.; Breisacher, K.

    2001-01-01

    Combustion instabilities in gas turbine engines are most frequently encountered during the late phases of engine development, at which point they are difficult and expensive to fix. The ability to replicate an engine-traceable combustion instability in a laboratory-scale experiment offers the opportunity to economically diagnose the problem more completely (to determine the root cause), and to investigate solutions to the problem, such as active control. The development and validation of active combustion instability control requires that the casual dynamic processes be reproduced in experimental test facilities which can be used as a test bed for control system evaluation. This paper discusses the process through which a laboratory-scale experiment and be designed to replicate an instability observed in a developmental engine. The scaling process used physically-based analyses to preserve the relevant geometric, acoustic, and thermo-fluid features, ensuring that results achieved in the single-nozzle experiment will be scalable to the engine.

  3. Different Boosting Systems and their Control Strategies for a Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolehovský Ondřej

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research uses 1-D simulation in GT-Power for evaluation of boosting systems for a spark ignition engine. Exhaust gas driven (waste-gated turbocharger and mechanical driven (Roots blower boosting systems are assessed in both steady state and transient modes in terms of performance, efficiency, fuel consumption, drivability, energy distribution and other aspects that influence gas exchange phase. Moreover, different boost control strategies, particularly at partial load, are also evaluated. Results of the research are aimed at helping identify an optimal boosting system for standardized or real-world drive cycles.

  4. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  5. MULTIFUNCTIONAL (NOx/CO/O2) SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR COAL COMBUSTION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2003-12-31

    The composition and microstructure of the sensing electrode are the key parameters that influence the sensing mechanism, and hence key sensor performance parameters: sensitivity, selectivity and response time. During this reporting period we investigated the effect of microstructure and the fundamental heterogeneous gas solid interactions of our NO sensor electrode material. In order to optimize the sensor electrode microstructure, powders were prepared using four different powder synthesis routes, resulting in different particle sizes distributions and BET surface areas. Different electrode processing conditions, e.g. screen-printing slurry composition, sintering schedule, etc. were also applied. In this report we demonstrate that the microstructure of electrodes, synthesized with the same composition, has a dramatic effect on both sensitivity and response time of potentiometric NO sensors. A quartz reactor and a tube furnace were built for the catalysis experiments. The installation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and a multi gas controller were completed. Moreover, the system for the temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) and desorption (TPD) were completed by combining the equipment. We used this heterogeneous catalysis system to determine the adsorption characteristics of O{sub 2}, NO, CO, CO{sub 2}, and their mixtures, on the electrode material using TPD, and related the results to sensor performance.

  6. Enhanced sunlight photocatalytic activity of Ag3PO4 decorated novel combustion synthesis derived TiO2 nanobelts for dye and bacterial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswar, Neerugatti KrishnaRao; Ramamurthy, Praveen Chandrashekarapura; Madras, Giridhar

    2015-07-01

    This study demonstrates the synthesis of TiO2 nanobelts using solution combustion derived TiO2 with enhanced photocatalytic activity for dye degradation and bacterial inactivation. Hydrothermal treatment of combustion synthesized TiO2 resulted in unique partially etched TiO2 nanobelts and Ag3PO4 was decorated using the co-precipitation method. The catalyst particles were characterized using X-ray diffraction analysis, BET surface area analysis, diffuse reflectance and electron microscopy. The photocatalytic properties of the composites of Ag3PO4 with pristine combustion synthesized TiO2 and commercial TiO2 under sunlight were compared. Therefore the studies conducted proved that the novel Ag3PO4/unique combustion synthesis derived TiO2 nanobelt composites exhibited extended light absorption, better charge transfer mechanism and higher generation of hydroxyl and hole radicals. These properties resulted in enhanced photodegradation of dyes and bacteria when compared to the commercial TiO2 nanocomposite. These findings have important implications in designing new photocatalysts for water purification.

  7. Combustion synthesis of Eu2+ and Dy3+ activated Sr3(VO4)2 phosphor for LEDs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Roshani Singh; S J Dhoble

    2011-06-01

    Combustion synthesis and photoluminescence (PL) characterization of Sr3(VO4)2:Eu,Dy phosphors are presented in this paper. PL emission of Sr3(VO4)2:Eu phosphor shows green broad emission band centring at 511 nm and a red sharp band at 614 nm by excitation wavelength of 342 nm. The PL emission spectrum of Sr3(VO4)2:Dy phosphor exhibits an intense blue emission peak at 479 nm, yellow broad band centring at 573 nm and red band at 644 nm by the excitation wavelength of 426 nm in near visible blue region. The excitation wavelength of Eu (342 nm) and Dy (426 nm) activated Sr3(VO4)2 phosphor are well matched with the excitation of near UV excited solid state lighting and blue chip excitation of light emitting diodes, respectively. The effect of Eu2+ and Eu3+ ions concentration on the emission intensity of Sr3(VO4)2 was also investigated. The Sr3(VO4)2:Eu is a potential green and red emitting phosphor as well as Sr3(VO4)2:Dy is blue and yellow emitting phosphor for solid state lighting i.e. white LEDs. The XRD and SEM characteristics of Sr3(VO4)2 materials was also reported in this paper.

  8. MULTIFUNCTIONAL (NOx/CO/O2) SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR COAL COMBUSTION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2005-03-21

    Sensing properties of a La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}- and WO{sub 3}-based potentiometric NO{sub x} sensor were investigated both in N{sub 2} and in a simulated exhaust gas. We performed temperature programmed reaction (TPR) and desorption (TPD) experiments to determine the reaction and adsorption characteristics of O{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and their mixtures on the electrodes, and related the results to sensor performance. The relative responses of the La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}-based sensor under varied concentrations of NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were studied. The results showed a very high sensitivity to CO and NO{sub 2} at 450 C in 3% O{sub 2}, whereas the response to O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases was negligible. The NO response at 400-500 C agreed with the NO adsorption behavior. The high NO{sub 2} sensitivity at 450 C was probably related to heterogeneous catalytic activity of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The adsorption of NO was not affected by the change of O{sub 2} concentration and thus the sensor showed selective detection of NO over O{sub 2}. However, the NO sensitivity was strongly influenced by the existence of CO, H{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}, as the adsorption behavior of NO was influenced by these gases. The WO{sub 3}-based sensor was able to selectively detect NO in the presence of CO{sub 2} in 3% O{sub 2} and at 650 C. The NO sensitivity, however, was affected by the variation of the NO{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O concentration. No gas-solid reactions were observed using TPR in the NO containing gas mixture, indicating that the NO response was not obtained by the conventionally accepted mixed-potential mechanism. At the same condition the sensor had high sensitivity to {approx}10 ppm NO{sub 2} and selectivity in the presence of CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O, showing it to be applicable to the monitoring of NO{sub 2}. Significantly different sensing properties of NO in simulated exhaust gas suggested the occurrence of gas composition change

  9. Development of inexpensive continuous emission monitors for feedback control of combustion devices that minimize greenhouse gases, toxic emissions, and ozone damaging products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, D.J.; Moore, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Mongia, R.K.; Tomita, E.; Hsu, F.K.; Talbot, L.; Dibble, R.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US); Lovett, J. [Pratt and Whitney (US); Yamazaki, Akira [Tsukuba Univ. (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Combustion is the major cause of poor urban air quality, of depletion of the ozone layer, and a major source of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. Careful control of combustor conditions is important for minimizing the effects of combustion on the environment. The authors have developed sensitive, inexpensive continuous emission monitors that will assist in direct feedback of turbine power systems and provide assurance to the public and the operators of the facilities that their facility emissions lie within the accepted bounds. These include a robust solid-state Fourier transform spectrometer for rapid gas analysis, based on the use of ferroelectric liquid crystal technology, and an infrared helium-neon probe for real time measurement of combustor air-to-fuel ratios.

  10. Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in RPP active catch tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-06-03

    T Plant is the primary decontamination facility for the Hanford Site, and also performs waste handling, verification, and repackaging. This Interim Operational Safety Requirement (IOSR) document provides required limits, programs, and administrative controls at the T Plant Complex. It is to be used in conjunction with HNF-SD-WM-ISB-006, Interim Safety Basis (ISB) for Solid Waste Facilities (T Plant), and HNF-2896, Safety Assessment for Project W-259, which is an addendum to the ISB.

  11. Solution combustion synthesis of {gamma}(L)-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} and photocatalytic activity under solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Dipankar; Madras, Giridhar [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Guru Row, T.N., E-mail: ssctng@sscu.iisc.ernet.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Solution combustion technique was used to synthesize {gamma}(L)-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}. {yields} The material was in crystalline orthorhombic phase. {yields} High photocatalytic activity under solar radiation was observed. -- Abstract: The facile method of solution combustion was used to synthesize {gamma}(L)-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}. The material was crystallized in a purely crystalline orthorhombic phase with sizes varying from 300 to 500 nm. Because the band gap was 2.51 eV, the degradation of wide variety of cationic and anionic dyes was investigated under solar radiation. Despite the low surface area (<1 m{sup 2}/g) of the synthesized material, {gamma}(L)-Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} showed high photocatalytic activity under solar radiation due to its electronic and morphological properties.

  12. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  13. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  14. Microwave-Assisted Combustion Synthesis of Nano Iron Oxide/Iron-Coated Activated Carbon, Anthracite, Cellulose Fiber, and Silica, with Arsenic Adsorption Studies

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was completed within a few minutes. The method used no additional fuel and nitrate, which is present in the precursor itself, to drive the reaction. The obtained samples were then characterized with X-ray mapping, scanning...

  15. Chemical and light absorption properties of humic-like substances from biomass burning emissions under controlled combustion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Shik; Yu, Jaemyeong

    2016-07-01

    PM2.5 samples from biomass burning (BB) emissions of three types - rice straw (RS), pine needles (PN), and sesame stems (SS) - were collected through laboratory-controlled combustion experiments and analyzed for the mass, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), humic-like substances (HULIS), and water soluble inorganic species (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, and oxalate). The combustion experiments were carried out at smoldering conditions. Water-soluble HULIS in BB samples was isolated using a one-step solid phase extraction method, followed by quantification with a total organic carbon analyzer. This study aims to explore chemical and light absorption characteristics of HULIS from BB emissions. The contributions of HULIS (=1.94 × HULIS-C) to PM2.5 emissions were observed to be 29.5 ± 2.0, 15.3 ± 3.1, and 25.8 ± 4.0%, respectively, for RS, PN, and SS smoke samples. Contributions of HULIS-C to OC and WSOC for the RS, PN, and SS burning emissions were 0.26 ± 0.03 and 0.63 ± 0.05, 0.15 ± 0.04 and 0.36 ± 0.08, and 0.29 ± 0.08 and 0.51 ± 0.08, respectively. Light absorption by the water extracts from BB aerosols exhibited strong wavelength dependence, which is characteristic of brown carbon spectra with a sharply increasing absorption as wavelength decreases. The average absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) of the water extracts (WSOC) fitted between wavelengths of 300-400 nm were 8.3 (7.4-9.0), 7.4 (6.2-8.5), and 8.0 (7.1-9.3) for the RS, PN, and SS burning samples, which are comparable to the AAE values of BB samples reported in previous publications (e.g., field and laboratory chamber studies). The average mass absorption efficiencies of WSOC measured at 365 nm (MAE365) were 1.37 ± 0.23, 0.86 ± 0.09, and 1.38 ± 0.21 m2/gṡC for RS, PN, and SS burning aerosols, respectively. Correlations of total WSOC, hydrophilic WSOC (= total WSOC-HULIS-C), and HULIS-C concentrations in solution with the light

  16. EMISIONES AL AIRE DE LA COMBUSTION DE LLANTAS USADAS (SPANISH VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  17. EMISIONES AL AIRE DE LA COMBUSTION DE LLANTAS USADAS (SPANISH VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  18. Active Control of Open Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  19. Vibration control of active structures an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Preumont, Andre

    2002-01-01

    This text is an introduction to the dynamics of active structures and to the feedback control of lightly damped flexible structures. The emphasis is placed on basic issues and simple control strategies that work.

  20. Breakthrough adsorption study of a commercial activated carbon for pre-combustion CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    García López, Susana; Gil Matellanes, María Victoria; Fernández Martín, Claudia; Pis Martínez, José Juan; Rubiera González, Fernando; Pevida García, Covadonga

    2011-01-01

    In this study a commercial activated carbon (Norit R2030CO2) was assessed as a solid sorbent for precombustion CO2 capture. This technology involves the removal of CO2 from the shifted-syngas prior to the generation of electricity and the production of high-purity clean H2. The CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity and breakthrough time were evaluated in a flow-through system where the adsorbent was subjected to four consecutive adsorption–desorption cycles. A CO2/H2/N2 gas mixture (20/70/10 vo...

  1. Active Compliance And Damping In Telemanipulator Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won S.; Bejczy, Antal K.; Hannaford, Blake

    1991-01-01

    Experimental telemanipulator system of force-reflecting-hand-controller type provides for active compliance and damping in remote, robotic manipulator hand. Distributed-computing and -control system for research in various combinations of force-reflecting and active-compliance control regimes. Shared compliance control implemented by low-pass-filtered force/torque feedback. Variable simulated springs and shock absorbers soften collisions and increase dexterity.

  2. Environmental control implications of generating electric power from coal. 1977 technology status report. Appendix D. Assessment of NO/sub x/ control technology for coal fired utility boilers. [Low-excess-air, staged combustion, flu gas recirculation and burner design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    An NOx control technology assessment study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of low-excess-air firing, staged combustion, flue gas recirculation, and current burner/boiler designs as applied to coal-fired utility boilers. Significant variations in NOx emissions exist with boiler type, firing method, and coal type, but a relative comparison of emissions control performance, cost, and operational considerations is presented for each method. The study emphasized the numerous operational factors that are of major importance to the user in selecting and implementing a combustion modification technique. Staged combustion and low-excess-air operation were identified as the most cost-effective methods for existing units. Close control of local air/fuel ratios and rigorous combustion equipment maintenance are essential to the success of both methods. Flue gas recirculation is relatively ineffective and has the added concern of tube erosion. More research is needed to resolve potential corrosion concerns with low-NOx operating modes. Low-NOx burners in conjunction with a compartmentalized windbox are capable of meeting a 0.6-lb/million Btu emission level on new units. Advanced burner designs are being developed to meet research emission goals of approximately 0.25 lb/MBtu.

  3. Residential proximity to industrial combustion facilities and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, A.; Nuckols, J.R.; Roos, A.J. de; Airola, M.; Colt, J.S.; Cerhan, J.R.; Morton, L.; Cozen, W.; Severson, R.; Blair, A.; Cleverly, D.; Ward, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Residence near municipal solid waste incinerators, a major historical source of dioxin emissions, has been associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in European studies. The aim of our study was to evaluate residence near industrial combustion facilities and estimates

  4. Residential proximity to industrial combustion facilities and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, A.; Nuckols, J.R.; Roos, A.J. de; Airola, M.; Colt, J.S.; Cerhan, J.R.; Morton, L.; Cozen, W.; Severson, R.; Blair, A.; Cleverly, D.; Ward, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Residence near municipal solid waste incinerators, a major historical source of dioxin emissions, has been associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in European studies. The aim of our study was to evaluate residence near industrial combustion facilities and estimates

  5. Process for the regeneration of an additive used to control emissions during the combustion of high sulfur fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polanco, D.R.; Bueno, C.O.; Salazar, R.; Chamorra, F.A.S

    1989-05-23

    A process is described for regenerating a sulfur capturing additive used in the preparation of a hydrocarbon in water emulsion for combustion as a fuel comprising: (a) forming a hydrocarbon in water emulsion by admixing a sulfur containing hydrocarbon and water with an emulsifier and a water soluble sulfur capturing additive wherein the sulfur capturing additive is selected from the group consisting of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Li/sup +/, Ca/sup ++/, Ba/sup ++/, Mg/sup ++/, Fe/sup +++/ and mixtures thereof; (b) burning the emulsion so as to form a combustion ash containing the water soluble additive as a sulfate compound; (c) leaching the combustion ash wherein the combustion ash is leached with water in a water to ash ratio in ml to grams of 1:1 to 30:1 so as to dissolve the water soluble additive sulfate compound to form a pregnant leach liquor containing the additive; (d) separating the pregnant leach liquor containing the additive; (e) adjusting the pregnant leach liquor with a basic precipitating agent wherein the base precipitating agent is selected from the group consisting of NH/sub 4/OH, NaOH, Ca(OH)/sub 2/, NaCO/sub 3/ and mixtures thereof wherein the pregnant leach liquor is adjusted with the base to a pH of greater than 7 so as to precipitate an additive compound; and (f) recovering the additive compound.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY-ENRICHED COAL COMBUSTION RESIDUES FROM ELECTRIC UTILITIES USING ENHANCED SORBENTS FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaching of mercury and other constituents of potential concern during land disposal or beneficial use of coal combustion residues (CCRs) is the environmental impact pathway evaluated in this report. The specific objectives of the research was to: (1) evaluate mercury, arsenic an...

  7. Dry sorbent injection of trona to control acid gases from a pilot-scale coal-fired combustion facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaseous and particulate emissions from the combustion of coal have been associated with adverse effects on human and environmental health, and have for that reason been subject to regulation by federal and state governments. Recent regulations by the United States Environmental ...

  8. Experimental research on combustion fluorine retention using calcium-based sorbets during coal combustion (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Qing-jie; LIN Zhi-yan; LIU Jian-zhong; WU Xian; ZHOU Jun-hu; CEN Ke-fa

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide experimental guide to commercial use of fluorine pollution control during coal combustion, with fluorine pollution control during coal combustion in mind, this paper proposed the theory of combustion fluorine retention technology. Feasibility of fluorine retention reaction with calcium-based fluorine retention agent was analyzed through thermo-dynamic calculation during coal combustion. By simulating the restraining and retention effects and influential factors of calcium-based sorbets on vaporized fluoride during experimental combustion using fixed bed tube furnace, the paper systematically explored the influential law of such factors as combustion temperature, retention time, and added quantities of calcium-based sorbets on effects of fluorine retention. The research result shows that adding calcium-based fluorine retention agent in coal combustion has double effects of fluorine retention and sulfur retention, it lays an experimental foundation for commercial test of combustion fluorine retention.

  9. An Improved Production Activity Control Architecture for Shop Floor Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAHIDIkramullahButt; SUNHou-fang; HAMIDUllahKhanNiazi

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a further improved Production Activity Control Architecture to deal with the complexity of information by creating Sub-Producers and Sub-Movers which will not only give a better control at workstation level but also reduce load on the Dispatcher. It also makes an analysis of the basic and improved PAC (Production Activity Control) Architecture in the Control System for Integrated Manufacturing. The PAC Architecture and the improvement will further enhance the flexibility and adaptability of the architecture in the ever changing environment of the Shop Floor Control (SFC) Systems.

  10. Regulation possibilities of biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzdalenko, Vera; Gedrovics, Martins; Zake, Maija; Barmina, Inesa

    2012-11-01

    The focus of the recent experimental research is to analyze the regulation possibilities of biomass combustion. Three possibilities were chosen as part of this research: a) biomass cofiring with propane, b) swirling flow with re-circulation zone, and c) use of a permanent magnet. The aim of the research is to provide stable, controllable and effective biomass combustion with minimum emissions. The special pilot device was created where biomass can be combusted separately and co-fired with propane. Wood pellets were used during the experiments.

  11. Study of the catalytic activity of ceramic nano fibers in the methane combustion; Estudo da atividade catalitica de nanofibras ceramicas na combustao de metano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reolon, R.P.; Berutti, F.A.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (LACER/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais Ceramicos

    2009-07-01

    In this work titanium oxide fibers, doped with cerium and copper, were synthesized using the electro spinning process. Titanium propoxide was used as a precursor in the electro spinning synthesis. The obtained fibers were heat treated after receive a spray with an alcoholic solution of cerium acetate and copper nitrate. The non-tissue material obtained was characterized by X-ray diffraction to determine the phase and crystallite size, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), BET method to determine the surface and SEM to analyze the microstructure of the fibers. The catalytic activity was evaluated by methane and air combustion under different temperatures. The amount of combustion gases such as NO{sub x}, C{sub x}H{sub y}, CO e CO{sub 2}, were analyzed. (author)

  12. Putting combustion optimization to work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, N.

    2009-05-15

    New plants and plants that are retrofitting can benefit from combustion optimization. Boiler tuning and optimization can complement each other. The continuous emissions monitoring system CEMS, and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy TDLAS can be used for optimisation. NeuCO's CombustionOpt neural network software can determine optimal fuel and air set points. Babcock and Wilcox Power Generation Group Inc's Flame Doctor can be used in conjunction with other systems to diagnose and correct coal-fired burner performance. The four units of the Colstrip power plant in Colstrips, Montana were recently fitted with combustion optimization systems based on advanced model predictive multi variable controls (MPCs), ABB's Predict & Control tool. Unit 4 of Tampa Electric's Big Bend plant in Florida is fitted with Emerson's SmartProcess fuzzy neural model based combustion optimisation system. 1 photo.

  13. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  14. Automobile active suspension system with fuzzy control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘少军; 黄中华; 陈毅章

    2004-01-01

    A quarter-automobile active suspension model was proposed. High speed on/off solenoid valves were used as control valves and fuzzy control was chosen as control method . Based on force analyses of system parts, a mathematical model of the active suspension system was established and simplified by linearization method. Simulation study was conducted with Matlab and three scale coefficients of fuzzy controller (ke, kec, ku) were acquired. And an experimental device was designed and produced. The results indicate that the active suspension system can achieve better vibration isolation performance than passive suspension system, the displacement amplitude of automobile body can be reduced to 55%. Fuzzy control is an effective control method for active suspension system.

  15. SLIDING MODE CONTROL FOR ACTIVE AUTOMOBILE SUSPENSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear control methods are presented based on theory of sliding mode control (SMC) or variable structure control (VSC) for application to active automobile suspensions. Requirements of reducing manufacturing cost and energy consumption of the active suspension system may be satisfiedby reasonable design of the sliding surface and hydraulic servo system. Emphasis is placed on the study of the discrete sliding mode control method (DSMC) applicable for a new sort of speed on-off solenoid valves of anti-dust capability and low price. Robustness and effectiveness of the feedback linearized controller in typical road conditions are demonstrated by numerical results fora quarter-car suspension model.

  16. Fluidized-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudjoi, A.; Heinolainen, A.; Hippinen, I.; Lu, Y. [Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Hybrid combined cycle processes have been presented as possibilities for power generation in the future. In the processes based on partial gasification of coal, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed char) contain unburned fuel, which is burned either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. Pressurised fluidised-bed (PFB) combustion of gasification residues were studied experimentally by Helsinki University of Technology. The gasification residues, i.e. cyclone fines and bed chars, came from pilot scale PFB gasification tests of bituminous coals. The combustion efficiency was high in cyclone fines combustion. The calcium sulphide oxidised effectively to calcium sulphate in the combustion of cyclone fines. In bed char combustion the residual sulphide contents in solids after combustion were still relatively high. In general, sulphur dioxide emissions in residue combustion were low. The recarbonation of calcium oxide was observed in bed char combustion. Fuel-N conversion to NO{sub x} during bed char combustion and in most of the test runs with cyclone fines was higher than in bituminous coal combustion. In bed char combustion the conversion was significantly higher than in cyclone fines combustion. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing excess air for both residues, as was expected. In bed char combustion the highest NO{sub x} emissions were measured at higher pressure. Calculated mass reactivity values of equal particle size of all bed chars studied had similar trends with burnout. The biggest particles had the lowest reactivity values throughout the combustion, while reactivity for finer particles was at considerably higher level and sharply increases with burnout. In the constant combustion conditions used in the tests, no significant differences were observed in rate-controlling mechanisms for bed char fractions studied. 25 refs., 13 figs., 15 tab.

  17. Combustion Properties of Straw Briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Qing-ling

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The low bulk density of straw is one of the major barriers, which blocks the collection, handling, transportation and storage. Densification of biomass into briquettes/pellets is a suitable method of increasing the bulk density of biomass. Yet in the process, a tremendous amount of air is ejected from biomass grind, which brings substantial specific variation including combustion property. Among them, combustion property is critical for proper design and operation of burning facilities. Therefore, a series of tests about combustion properties of 75mm diameter corn briquettes were done. First, the combustion process (ignition, full flaming and glowing phases., precipitation of tar were investigated by a heating stove, then, Some ash sample from the muffle burner was subjected to an ash melting characteristic test. The results show the combustion of briquettes takes more time than that of raw straw from ignition to complete combustion; in order to meet complete combustion in a short time, the raw straw needs more supply air volume than briquettes under the same α value; the temperature of furnace chamber should been controlled under 900°C, which help to reduce the dark smoke, tar and slag.

  18. Activities of the control services; Activites des services du controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes the control activities of the technical service of electric power and big dams: annual examinations, administrative instructions (draining, floods, granting renewal), decennial examinations etc. (J.S.)

  19. Active Control of Fan Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nobuhiko YAMASAKI; Hirotoshi TAJIMA

    2008-01-01

    In the wake-rotor interaction fan noise, a number of the interacting modes at the blade passing frequency (BPF)and its harmonics are generated which are prescribed by the number of stator and rotor blades etc. In the present study, the dominant mode is tried to be suppressed by the secondary sound from the loudspeaker actuators. One of the novel features of the present system is the adoption of the control board with the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) hardware and the LabVIEW software to synchronize the circumferentially installed loudspeaker actuators with the relative location of rotational blades under arbitrary fan rotational speeds. The experiments were conducted under the conditions of three rotational speeds of 2004, 3150, and 4002 [rpm]. The reduction in the sound pressure level (SPL) was observed for all three rotational speeds. The sound pressure level at the BPF was reduced approximately 13 [dB] for 2004 [rpm] case, but not so large reduction was attained for other cases probably due to the inefficiency of the loudspeaker actuators at high frequencies

  20. Influence of Ce-precursor and fuel on structure and catalytic activity of combustion synthesized Ni/CeO{sub 2} catalysts for biogas oxidative steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vita, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.vita@itae.cnr.it; Italiano, Cristina; Fabiano, Concetto; Laganà, Massimo; Pino, Lidia

    2015-08-01

    A series of nanosized Ni/CeO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by Solution Combustion Synthesis (SCS) varying the fuel (oxalyldihydrazide, urea, carbohydrazide and glycerol), the cerium precursor (cerium nitrate and cerium ammonium nitrate) and the nickel loading (ranging between 3.1 and 15.6 wt%). The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2}-physisorption, CO-chemisorption, Temperature Programmed Reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The catalytic activity towards the Oxy Steam Reforming (OSR) of biogas was assessed. The selected operating variables have a strong influence on the nature of combustion and, in turn, on the morphological and structural properties of the synthesized catalysts. Particularly, the use of urea allows to improve nickel dispersion, surface area, particle size and reducibility of the catalysts, affecting positively the biogas OSR performances. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Ni/CeO{sub 2} nanopowders by quick and easy solution combustion synthesis. • The fuel and precursor drive the structural and morphological properties of the catalysts. • The use of urea as fuel allows to improve nickel dispersion, surface area and particle size. • Ni/CeO{sub 2} (7.8 wt% of Ni loading) powders synthesized by urea route exhibits high performances for the biogas OSR process.

  1. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  2. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  3. Fundamental combustion and diagnostics research at Sandia. Progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusinow, M.A. (ed.)

    1980-09-01

    The combustion research emphasizes basic research into fundamental problems associated with combustion. The overall program addresses detailed chemistry of combustion, fundamental processes associated with laminar and turbulent flames, development of research techniques specifically applicable to combustion environments, and operation of the user-oriented Combustion Research Facility. The first section of this report contains activities in Combustion Research, the second section contains activities in Molecular Physics and Spectroscopy, and the third section contains activities in Diagnostics Research.

  4. Nitrous Oxide from Combustion and Industry: Chemistry, Emissions and Control Protoxyde d'azote provenant de la combustion et de l'industrie : chimie, émissions et techniques de réduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Soete G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available After an Introductory Part, presenting a survey of the present knowledge of nitrous oxide chemistry related to fossil fuel combustion and flue gas treatment, as a background for the understanding of emission factors, the paper deals successively with the average N2O emission factors from combustion and other industrial sources, and gives guidelines for appropriate N2O control technology ; with respect to the former item, some comments and criticisms on the 1991 OEDC/IPCC Report are formulated. As far as updated emission sources are concerned, emphasis is put on those which presently constitute issues : emissions from fluidized bed combustors, emissions caused by non catalytic selective NO reduction by ammonia and urea injection, N2O emissions caused by the use of automotive three-way catalysts as well as emissions from nitric acid and adipic acid manufacturing and from municipal wastes and sewage sludges incineration. Comments on the 1991 OEDC/IPCC Report mainly emphasize : (1 the surprising absence of emission factors from stationary combustion facilities and the inadequacy of some of the scarcely presented data, (2 the strange ignorance of the important effect of aging of three-way catalysts on the emission of N2O from gasoline vehicles. These omissions are the more surprising since reliable information in these two fields were already available at the period the OEDC Report was issued and or revised. For the assessment of adequate N2O control technologies, there is an urgent need for further R&D work. Presently existing understanding of homogeneous and heterogeneous N2O chemistry may provide interesting hints for N2O control, either by gas phase treatment or by catalytic reduction, depending on the concentration levels present in the off-gases to be treated. Le but de cet article est double : d'une part il fait le point sur les facteurs d'émission de N2O provenant de la combustion des combustibles fossiles et de certains autres secteurs de l

  5. A multi-harmonic amplitude and relative-phase controller for active sound quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera-Sánchez, Jaime A.; de Oliveira, Leopoldo P. R.

    2014-04-01

    Current active sound quality control systems aim at dealing with the amplitude level of the primary disturbance, e.g. sound pressure, forces, velocities and/or accelerations, which implicitly leads to Loudness control, regardless of the spectral structure of the disturbance. As far as multi-harmonic disturbances are concerned, auditory Roughness, arguably the most related psychoacoustic metric with rumbling perception in passenger cars, can be tackled not merely by dealing with magnitudes but also with the relative-phase of the narrowband components. This paper presents an adaptive control scheme conceived for dealing with multi-harmonic disturbances, which features the independent amplitude and/or relative-phase control of the input periodic components and an improved robustness to impulsive events. The adaptive control scheme is based on a frequency-domain delayless implementation of the complex-domain, least mean squares algorithm, whereof its convergence process is improved by using a forgetting factor. The control capabilities are evaluated numerically for single- and multiple-harmonic disturbances, including realistic internal combustion engine sound contaminated with noise and by impulsive events. By using long transfer paths obtained from a real vehicle mock-up, sound pressure level reductions of 39 dBSPL and the ability to displacing the relative-phase of a number of narrowband components between [-π,π] are accomplished by the proposed control scheme. The assessment of the results by using Zwicker-Loudness and auditory Roughness models shows that the proposed adaptive algorithm is able to accomplish and stably preserve various sound quality targets, after completion of the robust convergence procedure, regardless of impulsive events that can occur during the system operation.

  6. Effects of heat release rate on NOx time history in diesel combustion; Diesel nensho ni okeru netsu hasseiritsu keika ga NOx nodo rireki ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, T.; Miwa, K.; Higashida, M. [Tokushima Univ., Tokushima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Watanabe, S. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1996-06-25

    For determining the optimum combination of combustion control techniques to reduce NOx emission from diesel engines, it is important to clarify the effects of each technique not only on the NOx emission but also on its time history during combustion. In this paper, NOx concentration in the combustion chamber of a rapid compression machine has been measured by using a total gas sampling method. In order to elucidate the relation between NOx history and heat release rate, air temperatures nozzle hole size and air motion are varied to control the heat release process. The results show that NOx emission is not solely dependent upon initial combustion. Air utilization in the main diffusive combustion phase has great influence on NOx formation and its decay. NOx formation is accelerated by activation of the initial stage of the main combustion when using a nozzle with small holes. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  8. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  9. Classifying controllers by activities : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, B.; De Loo, I.G.M.; Mol, P.; Slagter, K.; Geerkens, H.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to discern variables (triggers) that affect a controller’s role in an organisation. Using survey data, groups of controllers are distinguished based on coherent combinations of activities. We find that controllers either operate as so-called ‘information adapters’ or ‘watch

  10. Active and passive vibration control of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Active and Passive Vibration Control of Structures form an issue of very actual interest in many different fields of engineering, for example in the automotive and aerospace industry, in precision engineering (e.g. in large telescopes), and also in civil engineering. The papers in this volume bring together engineers of different background, and it fill gaps between structural mechanics, vibrations and modern control theory.  Also links between the different applications in structural control are shown.

  11. Energetic study of combustion instabilities and genetic optimisation of chemical kinetics; Etude energetique des instabilites thermo-acoustiques et optimisation genetique des cinetiques reduites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ch.E.

    2005-12-15

    Gas turbine burners are now widely operated in lean premixed combustion mode. This technology has been introduced in order to limit pollutants emissions (especially the NO{sub x}), and thus comply with environment norms. Nevertheless, the use of lean premixed combustion decreases the stability margin of the flames. The flames are then more prone to be disturbed by flow disturbances. Combustion instabilities are then a major problem of concern for modern gas turbine conception. Some active control systems have been used to ensure stability of gas turbines retro-fitted to lean premixed combustion. The current generation of gas turbines aims to get rid of these control devices getting stability by a proper design. To do so, precise and adapted numerical tools are needed even it is impossible at the moment to guarantee the absolute stability of a combustion chamber at the design stage. Simulation tools for unsteady combustion are now able to compute the whole combustion chamber. Its intrinsic precision, allows the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) to take into account numerous phenomena involved in combustion instabilities. Chemical modelling is an important element for the precision of reactive LES. This study includes the description of an optimisation tools for the reduced chemical kinetics. The capacity of the LES to capture combustion instabilities in gas turbine chamber is also demonstrated. The acoustic energy analysis points out that the boundary impedances of the combustion systems are of prime importance for their stability. (author)

  12. A novel solid-gas process to synthesize LaMnO3 perovskite with high surface area and excellent activity for methane combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guojun Zou; Zhonglai Wang; Mingjuan Sun; Xu Luo; Xiaolai Wang

    2011-01-01

    A novel solid-gas route to prepare LaMnO3 perovskite catalysts for methane combustion has been developed. The method was carried out using a polyvinylpyrrolidone-metal complex as precursor via a solid-gas process to obtain the target materials. The structure and properties of the precursor and the catalysts were characterized by FT-IR, TG-DSC, XRD and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. The results indicate that the catalysts synthesized via the solid-gas process possess higher surface areas, better thermal resistance and catalytic activity as compared to those prepared with the conventional sol-gel citrate method.

  13. Foundations of Active Control - Active Noise Reduction Helmets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmkjær, Torsten Haaber Leth

    2008-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis includes fundamental considerations about topologies, algorithms, implementations, methods etc., that can enter in the next generation of active control (AC) systems. Specifically, a new variant of feedforward control referred to as confined feedforward active control (CFFAC......-output (MIMO) system that facilitates both feedforward and feedback control. The general system is then referred to as hybrid MIMO confined-feedforward feedback (HMIMOCFFFB) active noise reduction (ANR) system. The investigation of a multi-channel ANR system with hybrid feedforward and feedback topologies...... be computational intensive takes place at an even slower sampling rate hereby relaxing the requirements on a high bandwidth. It is demonstrated that computational savings as high as 40% can be achieved in a 192, 24, 3 kHz triple-rate system as compared with a 24 kHz single-rate system without sacrificing the ANR...

  14. THE CONTROL AND EVALUATION OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Sabou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focused on importance and benefits of control and evaluation of marketing activities. The control of efficiency review the assessment of the resources for marketing activity, checking also the efficiency of the human resources, advertising, promotion activities and distribution activities. In the analyse of human resources the most important ratio are: the average of costumers visits on a day, the number of custom order received from 100 visits, the number of new customers from a period, the number of lost customers from a period, the marketing human expenditures from all the sales.The strategic control is made to check if the objectives and the company strategy are adapted to the marketing environment.

  15. Smoldering Combustion Experiments in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, David C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment is part of a study of the smolder characteristics of porous combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a non-flaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of porous materials and takes place in a number of processes ranging from smoldering of porous insulation materials to high temperature synthesis of metals. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smolder, both in microgravity and normal-gravity. As with many forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of oxidizer and transport of heat, and therefore the rate of combustion. Microgravity smolder experiments, in both a quiescent oxidizing environment, and in a forced oxidizing flow have been conducted aboard the NASA Space Shuttle (STS-69 and STS-77 missions) to determine the effect of the ambient oxygen concentration and oxidizer forced flow velocity on smolder combustion in microgravity. The experimental apparatus is contained within the NASA Get Away Special Canister (GAS-CAN) Payload. These two sets of experiments investigate the propagation of smolder along the polyurethane foam sample under both diffusion driven and forced flow driven smoldering. The results of the microgravity experiments are compared with identical ones carried out in normal gravity, and are used to verify present theories of smolder combustion. The results of this study will provide new insights into the smoldering combustion process. Thermocouple histories show that the microgravity smolder reaction temperatures (Ts) and propagation velocities (Us) lie between those of identical normal-gravity upward and downward tests. These observations indicate the effect of buoyancy on the transport of oxidizer to the reaction front.

  16. Control of combustion rates: A decisive step towards a further optimization of CO{sub 2}, emissions and NVH; Verbrennungsratenregelung. Ein entscheidender Schritt zur weiteren Optimierung von CO{sub 2}, Emissionen und NVH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, Florian; Schaub, Joschka; Pischinger, Stefan [RWTH Aachen (DE) Lehrstuhl fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen (VKA); Hinkelbein, Jan; Koerfer, Thomas; Kolbeck, Andreas; Lamping, Matthias [FEV Motorentechnik GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Both, the constant increase in emission legislation as well as the striving for lower greenhouse gas emissions strongly affects the automobile industry and its development processes and strategies. In this context, especially the engine optimization is being considered as a means of choice to sustainably lower the relevant emissions. From the big variety of possible methods to do so the combustion development stands out by still allowing high optimization yields at comparably low costs and effort. As an example, the evolution of the injection technology over the last years has lead to a noticeable emission reduction of the internal combustion engine. Besides the injection system the closed-loop combustion control (CLCC) offers a number of concepts to further optimize the combustion process. Based on the cylinder pressure information obtained with piezoelectric pressure sensors, a highly accurate analysis of the combustion becomes possible. As a direct result of this analysis, the injection scheme (timing, quantity, rate) can be adjusted in order to meet predefined target values. This combination of pressure data processing and injection adjustment can be considered as the main idea of close-loop combustion control. For the realization of this concept, rate-shaping injectors, featuring functionalities for an individual modification of the injection rate, offer the largest degree of freedom to design the combustion. In the present publication, the potential of combustion rate shaping to lower fuel consumption, exhaust gas and noise emissions is assessed. The combustion rate shaping is realized in two different ways: The first approach is based on rate-shaping injection technology using a unique pressure-modulated prototype diesel injector. In the second part, a novel control algorithm is presented, that enables the realization of predefined pressure traces by multiple injection strategies using a conventional piezo-driven common-rail injector. With these methods an

  17. Oxygen-enhanced combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Combustion technology has traditionally been dominated by air/fuel combustion. However, two developments have increased the significance of oxygen-enhanced combustion-new technologies that produce oxygen less expensively and the increased importance of environmental regulations. Advantages of oxygen-enhanced combustion include less pollutant emissions as well as increased energy efficiency and productivity. Oxygen-Enhanced Combustion, Second Edition compiles information about using oxygen to enhance industrial heating and melting processes. It integrates fundamental principles, applications, a

  18. Multi-Point Combustion System: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeke, Jerry; Pack, Spencer; Zink, Gregory; Ryon, Jason

    2014-01-01

    A low-NOx emission combustor concept has been developed for NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aircraft (ERA) program to meet N+2 emissions goals for a 70,000 lb thrust engine application. These goals include 75 percent reduction of LTO NOx from CAEP6 standards without increasing CO, UHC, or smoke from that of current state of the art. An additional key factor in this work is to improve lean combustion stability over that of previous work performed on similar technology in the early 2000s. The purpose of this paper is to present the final report for the NASA contract. This work included the design, analysis, and test of a multi-point combustion system. All design work was based on the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling with the end results tested on a medium pressure combustion rig at the UC and a medium pressure combustion rig at GRC. The theories behind the designs, results of analysis, and experimental test data will be discussed in this report. The combustion system consists of five radially staged rows of injectors, where ten small scale injectors are used in place of a single traditional nozzle. Major accomplishments of the current work include the design of a Multipoint Lean Direct Injection (MLDI) array and associated air blast and pilot fuel injectors, which is expected to meet or exceed the goal of a 75 percent reduction in LTO NOx from CAEP6 standards. This design incorporates a reduced number of injectors over previous multipoint designs, simplified and lightweight components, and a very compact combustor section. Additional outcomes of the program are validation that the design of these combustion systems can be aided by the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict and reduce emissions. Furthermore, the staging of fuel through the individually controlled radially staged injector rows successfully demonstrated improved low power operability as well as improvements in emissions over previous multipoint designs. Additional comparison

  19. Active control of robot manipulator compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Pooran, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed at Catholic University on the research grant entitled Active Control of Robot Manipulator Compliance, supported by NASA/Goddard space Flight Center during the period of May 15th, 1986 to November 15th, 1986 is described. The modelling of the two-degree-of-freedom robot is first presented. Then the complete system including the robot and the hybrid controller is simulated on an IBM-XT Personal Computer. Simulation results showed that proper adjustments of controller gains enable the robot to perform successful operations. Further research should focus on developing a guideline for the controller gain design to achieve system stability.

  20. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  1. Control and reduction of NOx emissions on light hydrocarbons combustion in fluidized bed combustors: a technological prospection surveys; Controle e reducao de emissoes de NOx durante queima de hidrocarbonetos leves em combustores a leito fluidizado: um estudo de prospeccao tecnologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Douglas Alves; Winter, Eduardo [Instituto Nacional da Propriedade Industrial (INPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The present paper aims a technological prospecting study of the main technological agents involved in industrial light hydrocarbons combustion process. More specifically, the work approaches technologies applied to nitrogen oxides emissions control and reduction. Nitrogen oxides are typically known as 'NOx' (NO, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}). 'NOx' are byproducts from fuel burning in combustion systems, including also in fluidized bed combustion systems. The technological prospecting study employed 'technology foresight' as tool for evaluating the technological perspectives of the thermal generation, basis on environment protection. Such technological perspectives of the thermal generation were evaluated through invention patent documents. The query methodology for obtaining of patent documents employed a free patent base, known as ESPACENET. Additionally, the documents obtained were evaluated, considering beyond the countries and the publication dates, technological perspectives employed to 'NOx' emissions control and reduction. It is very important to highlight around 70% of the industrial technological information are just found in invention patent documents. (author)

  2. Adaptive Piezoelectric Absorber for Active Vibration Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Herold

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive vibration control solutions are often limited to working reliably at one design point. Especially applied to lightweight structures, which tend to have unwanted vibration, active vibration control approaches can outperform passive solutions. To generate dynamic forces in a narrow frequency band, passive single-degree-of-freedom oscillators are frequently used as vibration absorbers and neutralizers. In order to respond to changes in system properties and/or the frequency of excitation forces, in this work, adaptive vibration compensation by a tunable piezoelectric vibration absorber is investigated. A special design containing piezoelectric stack actuators is used to cover a large tuning range for the natural frequency of the adaptive vibration absorber, while also the utilization as an active dynamic inertial mass actuator for active control concepts is possible, which can help to implement a broadband vibration control system. An analytical model is set up to derive general design rules for the system. An absorber prototype is set up and validated experimentally for both use cases of an adaptive vibration absorber and inertial mass actuator. Finally, the adaptive vibration control system is installed and tested with a basic truss structure in the laboratory, using both the possibility to adjust the properties of the absorber and active control.

  3. Simulation studies for multichannel active vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Shashikala; Balasubramaniam, R.; Praseetha, K. K.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional approach to vibration control uses passive techniques, which are relatively large, costly and ineffective at low frequencies. Active Vibration Control (AVC) is used to overcome these problems & in AVC additional sources (secondary) are used to cancel vibration from primary source based on the principle of superposition theorem Since the characteristics of the vibration source and environment are time varying, the AVC system must be adaptive. Adaptive systems have the ability to track time varying disturbances and provide optimal control over a much broader range of conditions than conventional fixed control systems. In multi channel AVC vibration fields in large dimensions are controlled & is more complicated. Therefore to actively control low frequency vibrations on large structures, multi channel AVC requires a control system that uses multiple secondary sources to control the vibration field simultaneously at multiple error sensor locations. The error criterion that can be directly measured is the sum of squares of outputs of number of sensors. The adaptive algorithm is designed to minimize this & the algorithm implemented is the "Multiple error LMS algorithm." The best known applications of multiple channel FXLMS algorithm is in real time AVC and system identification. More wider applications are in the control of propeller induced noise in flight cabin interiors. In the present paper the results of simulation studies carried out in MATLAB as well as on TMS320C32 DSP processor will be brought out for a two-channel case.

  4. Sandia Combustion Research Program: Annual report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This report presents research results of the past year, divided thematically into some ten categories. Publications and presentations arising from this work are included in the appendix. Our highlighted accomplishment of the year is the announcement of the discovery and demonstration of the RAPRENOx process. This new mechanism for the elimination of nitrogen oxides from essentially all kinds of combustion exhausts shows promise for commercialization, and may eventually make a significant contribution to our nation's ability to control smog and acid rain. The sections of this volume describe the facility's laser and computer system, laser diagnostics of flames, combustion chemistry, reacting flows, liquid and solid propellant combustion, mathematical models of combustion, high-temperature material interfaces, studies of engine/furnace combustion, coal combustion, and the means of encouraging technology transfer. 182 refs., 170 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yang; Wang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrically controlled rotor (ECR) system has the potential to enhance the rotor perfor-mance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor perfor-mance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3%rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  6. Active control of ionized boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, R V

    1997-01-01

    The challenging problems, in the field of control of chaos or of transition to chaos, lie in the domain of infinite-dimensional systems. Access to all variables being impossible in this case and the controlling action being limited to a few collective variables, it will not in general be possible to drive the whole system to the desired behaviour. A paradigmatic problem of this type is the control of the transition to turbulence in the boundary layer of fluid motion. By analysing a boundary layer flow for an ionized fluid near an airfoil, one concludes that active control of the transition amounts to the resolution of an generalized integro-differential eigenvalue problem. To cope with the required response times and phase accuracy, electromagnetic control, whenever possible, seems more appropriate than mechanical control by microactuators.

  7. Smart actuators for active vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourboghrat, Farzad; Daneshdoost, Morteza

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, the design and implementation of smart actuators for active vibration control of mechanical systems are considered. A smart actuator is composed of one or several layers of piezo-electric materials which work both as sensors and actuators. Such a system also includes micro- electronic or power electronic amplifiers, depending on the power requirements and applications, as well as digital signal processing systems for digital control implementation. In addition, PWM type micro/power amplifiers are used for control implementation. Such amplifiers utilize electronic switching components that allow for miniaturization, thermal efficiency, cost reduction, and precision controls that are robust to disturbances and modeling errors. An adaptive control strategy is then developed for vibration damping and motion control of cantilever beams using the proposed smart self-sensing actuators.

  8. STEADY-STATE AND IDLE OPTIMIZA- TION OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng; MAO Xiaojian; YANG Lin; ZHUO Bin

    2008-01-01

    A novel steady-state optimization (SSO) of internal combustion engine (ICE) strategy is proposed to maximize the efficiency of the overall powertrain for hybrid electric vehicles, in which the ICE efficiency, the efficiencies of the electric motor (EM) and the energy storage device are all explicitly taken into account. In addition, a novel idle optimization of ICE strategy is implemented to obtain the optimal idle operating point of the ICE and corresponding optimal parking generation power of the EM using the view of the novel SSO of ICE strategy. Simulations results show that potential fuel economy improvement is achieved relative to the conventional one which only optimized the ICE efficiency by the novel SSO of ICE strategy, and fuel consumption per voltage increment decreases a lot during the parking charge by the novel idle optimization of ICE strategy.

  9. Enhancement of photocatalytic activity of combustion-synthesized CeO{sub 2}/C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dong-Feng; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao-qin; Ma, Ya-Li; Huang, Gui-Fang; Huang, Wei-Qing [Hunan University, Department of Applied Physics, School of Physics and Electronics, Changsha (China)

    2015-09-15

    Nanocrystalline CeO{sub 2}/C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was synthesized via a one-step solution combustion method using urea as fuel for the first time. The effects of the molar ratio of urea to cerium chloride on the photocatalytic activity of the synthesized samples were investigated. The synthesized nanocrystalline CeO{sub 2}/C{sub 3}N{sub 4} shows small size and large surface exposure area. Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue demonstrates that the synthesized nanocrystalline CeO{sub 2}/C{sub 3}N{sub 4} possesses enhanced photocatalytic activity. It is proposed that the enhanced photocatalytic activity might be related to the favorable morphology and structure, and the effective charge separation between C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and CeO{sub 2} in the photocatalytic process. (orig.)

  10. Effect of tourmaline additive on the crystal growth and activity of LaCoO3 for catalytic combustion of methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王赛飞; 薛刚; 梁金生; 孟军平

    2014-01-01

    LaCoO3/tourmaline was prepared as catalysts on the methane catalytic combustion. As additive tourmaline, its effect on crystal growth and catalytic activity of LaCoO3, were investigated via X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H2-temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and catalyst evaluation techniques. SEM and TEM indicated that the spontaneous polarizability of tourmaline made LaCoO3 particles grow dispersedly on tourmaline, allevi-ated the agglomeration and exposed more reactive sites. It was a main influence leading to the improvement of catalysts activity, ex-posed via catalyst evaluation device. Among the different additive proportion of compound samples, the 2% tourmaline added La-CoO3 showed an obvious enhancement activity compared to non-tourmaline sample-the light-off temperature was 454 °C and CH4 reached the full conversion at 563 °C.

  11. Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: Combustion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This environmental information handbook was prepared to assist both the non-technical reader (i.e., homeowner) and technical persons (such as researchers, policy analysts, and builders/designers) in understanding the current state of knowledge regarding combustion sources of indoor air pollution. Quantitative and descriptive data addressing the emissions, indoor concentrations, factors influencing indoor concentrations, and health effects of combustion-generated pollutants are provided. In addition, a review of the models, controls, and standards applicable to indoor air pollution from combustion sources is presented. The emphasis is on the residential environment. The data presented here have been compiled from government and privately-funded research results, conference proceedings, technical journals, and recent publications. It is intended to provide the technical reader with a comprehensive overview and reference source on the major indoor air quality aspects relating to indoor combustion activities, including tobacco smoking. In addition, techniques for determining potential concentrations of pollutants in residential settings are presented. This is an update of a 1985 study documenting the state of knowledge of combustion-generated pollutants in the indoor environment. 191 refs., 51 figs., 71 tabs.

  12. Investigating co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Wang, Ruijuan; Jiang, Changle; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Wanhe; Mi, Bingbing; Liu, Zhijia

    2017-07-04

    To investigate co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood, moso bamboo and masson pine were torrefied and mixed with different blend ratios. The combustion process was examined by thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed the combustion process of samples included volatile emission and oxidation combustion as well as char combustion. The main mass loss of biomass blends occurred at volatile emission and oxidation combustion stage, while that of torrefied biomass occurred at char combustion stage. With the increase of bamboo content, characteristic temperatures decreased. Compared with untreated biomass, torrefied biomass had a higher initial and burnout temperature. With the increase of heating rates, combustion process of samples shifted to higher temperatures. Compared with non-isothermal models, activation energy obtained from isothermal model was lower. The result is helpful to promote development of co-combustion of bamboo and masson pine wastes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. JCMT active surface control system: implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian A.

    1998-05-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii is a 15 meter sub-millimeter telescope which operates in the 350 microns to 2 millimeter region. The primary antenna surface consists of 276 panels, each of which is positioned by 3 stepper motors. In order to achieve the highest possible surface accuracy we are embarking upon a project to actively control the position of the panels adjuster system is based on a 6809 micro connected to the control computer by a GPIB interface. This system is slow and inflexible and it would prove difficult to build an active surface control system with it. Part of the upgrade project is to replace the existing micro with a 68060 VME micro. The poster paper will describe how the temperature of the antenna is monitored with the new system, how a Finite Element Analyses package transforms temperature changes into a series of panel adjuster moves, and how these moves are then applied to the surface. The FEA package will run on a high end Sun workstation. A series of DRAMA tasks distributed between the workstation and the Baja 68060 VxWorks Active Surface Control System micro will control the temperature monitoring, FEA and panel adjustment activities. Users can interact with the system via a Tcl/TK based GUI.

  14. 30 CFR 57.4104 - Combustible waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combustible waste. 57.4104 Section 57.4104... Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4104 Combustible waste. (a) Waste materials, including liquids, shall not accumulate in quantities that could create a fire hazard. (b) Waste or rags containing...

  15. Active steering control strategy for articulated vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyong-il KIM; Hsin GUAN; Bo WANG; Rui GUO; Fan LIANG

    2016-01-01

    To improve maneuverability and stability of articulated vehicles, we design an active steering controller, including tractor and trailer controllers, based on linear quadratic regulator (LQR) theory. First, a three-degree-of-freedom (3-DOF) model of the tractor-trailer with steered trailer axles is built. The simulated annealing particle swarm optimization (SAPSO) algorithm is applied to identify the key parameters of the model under specified vehicle speed and steering wheel angle. Thus, the key pa-rameters of the simplified model can be obtained according to the vehicle conditions using an online look-up table and interpola-tion. Simulation results show that vehicle parameter outputs of the simplified model and TruckSim agree well, thus providing the ideal reference yaw rate for the controller. Then the active steering controller of the tractor and trailer based on LQR is designed to follow the desired yaw rate and minimize their side-slip angle of the center of gravity (CG) at the same time. Finally, simulation tests at both low speed and high speed are conducted based on the TruckSim-Simulink program. The results show significant effects on the active steering controller on improving maneuverability at low speed and lateral stability at high speed for the articulated vehicle. The control strategy is applicable for steering not only along gentle curves but also along sharp curves.

  16. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I., E-mail: roxana.both@aut.utcluj.ro [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  18. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  19. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  20. Active fault diagnosis by controller modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Two active fault diagnosis methods for additive or parametric faults are proposed. Both methods are based on controller reconfiguration rather than on requiring an exogenous excitation signal, as it is otherwise common in active fault diagnosis. For the first method, it is assumed that the system...... in a way that guarantees the continuity of transition and global stability using a recent result on observer parameterization. An illustrative example inspired by a field study of a drag racing vehicle is given. For the second method, an active fault diagnosis method for parametric faults is proposed...

  1. Natural Gas for Advanced Dual-Fuel Combustion Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Nicholas Ryan

    Natural gas fuels represent the next evolution of low-carbon energy feedstocks powering human activity worldwide. The internal combustion engine, the energy conversion device widely used by society for more than one century, is capable of utilizing advanced combustion strategies in pursuit of ultra-high efficiency and ultra-low emissions. Yet many emerging advanced combustion strategies depend upon traditional petroleum-based fuels for their operation. In this research the use of natural gas, namely methane, is applied to both conventional and advanced dual-fuel combustion strategies. In the first part of this work both computational and experimental studies are undertaken to examine the viability of utilizing methane as the premixed low reactivity fuel in reactivity controlled compression ignition, a leading advanced dual-fuel combustion strategy. As a result, methane is shown to be capable of significantly extending the load limits for dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition in both light- and heavy-duty engines. In the second part of this work heavy-duty single-cylinder engine experiments are performed to research the performance of both conventional dual-fuel (diesel pilot ignition) and advanced dual-fuel (reactivity controlled compression ignition) combustion strategies using methane as the premixed low reactivity fuel. Both strategies are strongly influenced by equivalence ratio; diesel pilot ignition offers best performance at higher equivalence ratios and higher premixed methane ratios, whereas reactivity controlled compression ignition offers superior performance at lower equivalence ratios and lower premixed methane ratios. In the third part of this work experiments are performed in order to determine the dominant mode of heat release for both dual-fuel combustion strategies. By studying the dual-fuel homogeneous charge compression ignition and single-fuel spark ignition, strategies representative of autoignition and flame propagation

  2. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  3. Active vibration isolation by adaptive proportional control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Hui; Wu, Wei-Hao; Chu, Chih-Liang

    2013-01-01

    An active vibration isolation system that applies proportional controller incorporated with an adaptive filter to reduce the transmission of base excitations to a precision instrument is proposed in this work. The absolute vibration velocity signal acquired from an accelerator and being processed through an integrator is input to the controller as a feedback signal, and the controller output signal drives the voice coil actuator to produce a sky-hook damper force. In practice, the phase response of integrator at low frequency such as 2~5 Hz deviate from the 90 degree which is the exact phase difference between the vibration velocity and acceleration. Therefore, an adaptive filter is used to compensate the phase error in this paper. An analysis of this active vibration isolation system is presented, and model predictions are compared to experimental results. The results show that the proposed method significantly reduces transmissibility at resonance without the penalty of increased transmissibility at higher frequencies.

  4. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  5. 30 CFR 57.4103 - Fueling internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fueling internal combustion engines. 57.4103... Prevention and Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4103 Fueling internal combustion engines. Internal combustion engines shall be switched off before refueling if the fuel tanks are integral parts of...

  6. 30 CFR 56.4103 - Fueling internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fueling internal combustion engines. 56.4103... Prevention and Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4103 Fueling internal combustion engines. Internal combustion engines shall be switched off before refueling if the fuel tanks are integral parts of...

  7. Formation and control of fuel-nitrogen pollutants in catalytic combustion of coal-derived gases. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, P. M.; Bruno, C.; Santavicca, D. A.; Bracco, F. V.

    1980-02-01

    The objective of this program has been the elucidation of the mechanism of high temperature catalytic oxidation of coal-derived gases, including their individual constituents,and the effects of sulfur and nitrogen impurities. Detailed experimental data were obtained and a two-dimensional model is being developed and tested by comparison with the experimental data. When complete, the model can be used to optimize designs of catalytic combustors. The model at present includes axial and radial diffusion and gas and surface chemical reactions. Measured substrate temperatures are input in lieu of complete coupling of gas and solid energy conservation equations and radiative heat transfer. Axial and radial gas temperature and composition profiles inside a catalyst channel were computed and compared with experimental measurements at the catalyst outlet. Experimental investigations were made of carbon monoxide and medium-Btu gas combustion in the presence of platinum supported on a monolithic Cordierite substrate. Axial profiles of substrate temperature, gas temperature, and gas composition were determined at different gas velocities and equivalence ratios. The effects of H/sub 2/S and NH/sub 3/ in the medium-Btu gas were also investigated. Systems were proposed for making resonance absorption and Raman scattering measurements of gas temperature and/or species concentrations in a catalytic reactor. A new pulsed multipass Raman scattering technique for increasing photon yield from a scattering volume was developed.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF SiC DEVICES FOR DIAGNOSTICS AND CONTROL OF COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN ENERGY PLANT ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruby N. Ghosh; Peter Tobias

    2003-12-01

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. The response of these metal/insulator/SiC (MISiC) devices to reducing gases has been assumed to be due to the reduction in the metal work function at the metal/oxide interface that shifts the capacitance to lower voltages. From in-situ capacitance-voltage measurements taken under sensor operating conditions we have discovered that two independent mechanisms are responsible for the sensor response to hydrogen and oxygen. We present a model of the device response based on the chemically induced shift of the metal/semiconductor barrier height as well as the passivation and creation of charged states at the SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface. The latter mechanism is much slower than the barrier height shift. Preliminary photoemission experiments have been performed to independently monitor the contribution of the two phenomena. We discuss in detail the effect of these results on sensor design and the choice of operating point for high temperature operation.

  9. Controller modification applied for active fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    This paper is focusing on active fault detection (AFD) for parametric faults in closed-loop systems. This auxiliary input applied for the fault detection will also disturb the external output and consequently reduce the performance of the controller. Therefore, only small auxiliary inputs are used...... with the result that the detection and isolation time can be long. In this paper it will be shown, that this problem can be handled by using a modification of the feedback controller. By applying the YJBK-parameterization (after Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno and Kucera) for the controller, it is possible to modify...... the feedback controller with a minor effect on the external output in the fault free case. Further, in the faulty case, the signature of the auxiliary input can be optimized. This is obtained by using a band-pass filter for the YJBK parameter that is only effective in a small frequency range where...

  10. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  11. Active vibration control of nonlinear benchmark buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xing-de; CHEN Dao-zheng

    2007-01-01

    The present nonlinear model reduction methods unfit the nonlinear benchmark buildings as their vibration equations belong to a non-affine system. Meanwhile,the controllers designed directly by the nonlinear control strategy have a high order, and they are difficult to be applied actually. Therefore, a new active vibration control way which fits the nonlinear buildings is proposed. The idea of the proposed way is based on the model identification and structural model linearization, and exerting the control force to the built model according to the force action principle. This proposed way has a better practicability as the built model can be reduced by the balance reduction method based on the empirical Grammian matrix. A three-story benchmark structure is presented and the simulation results illustrate that the proposed method is viable for the civil engineering structures.

  12. Dynamic Discontinuous Control for Active Control of Mechanical Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestes Llanes Santiago

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the use of the discontinuous control using dynamic sliding modes for the active isolation of vibrations in mechanical systems. This type of control law constitutes a robust feedback control policy due to its insensitivity to external disturbance inputs, certain immunity to model parameter variations, within known bounds, and to the ever present modelling errors.  The whole theoretical analysis is applied to a lineal model of two degrees of freedom of the vehicle's suspension where the irregularities of the land represent of direct  way the external interferences to the system . To carry out the isolation an electro-hydraulic operator it is used. Simulations are performed which validate the proposed approach.

  13. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  14. Active vibration control using DEAP actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarban, Rahimullah; Jones, Richard W.

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP) is a new type of smart material, which has the potential to be used to provide effective actuation for a wide range of applications. The properties of DEAP material place it somewhere between those of piezoceramics and shape memory alloys. Of the range of DEAP-based actuators that have been developed those having a cylindrical configuration are among the most promising. This contribution introduces the use of a tubular type DEAP actuator for active vibration control purposes. Initially the DEAP-based tubular actuator to be used in this study, produced by Danfoss PolyPower A/S, is introduced along with the static and dynamic characteristics. Secondly an electromechanical model of the tubular actuator is briefly reviewed and its ability to model the actuator's hysteresis characteristics for a range of periodic input signals at different frequencies demonstrated. The model will be used to provide hysteresis compensation in future vibration isolation studies. Experimental active vibration control using the actuator is then examined, specifically active vibration isolation of a 250 g mass subject to shaker generated 'ground vibration'. An adaptive feedforward control strategy is used to achieve this. The ability of the tubular actuator to reject both tonal and broadband random vibratory disturbances is then demonstrated.

  15. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Kiil, Søren

    2000-01-01

    Several options are available to control the emission of SO2 from combustion processes. One possibility is to use a cleaner technology, i.e. fuel switching from oil and coal to natural gas or biomass, or to desulphurize coal and oil. Another possibility is to change to a different technology for ...

  16. Gestión óptima de la energía en vehículos híbridos basados en pilas de combustible utilizando control predictivo económico

    OpenAIRE

    Sampietro, Jose Luis; Costa Castelló, Ramon; Puig Cayuela, Vicenç

    2016-01-01

    Las pilas de combustible que utilizan el hidrégeno como combustible están siendo consideradas, en estos últimos años, como una alternativa a los combustibles fósiles para su uso en automóviles. Dicha tecnología se puede utilizar en los vehículos eléctricos o de propulsión híbrida ya en uso. Este trabajo introduce el control predictivo económico (EMPC, siglas en inglés) como técnica de gestión óptima de la energía. Finalmente, se presentan simulaciones de varios escenarios, basados en un contr...

  17. Combustion and emission characteristics of jet controlled compression ignition engine at different loads%射流控制压缩着火发动机不同负荷下燃烧及排放特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 杨培源; 隆武强; 田江平

    2016-01-01

    针对柴油预混合气着火相位难以直接控制的问题,提出射流控制压缩着火(jet controlled compression ignition, JCCI)方式。将一台单缸农用柴油机改造为JCCI发动机:压缩比降至12,增加一个带液化石油气(liquefied petroleum gas, LPG)供给通道和火花塞的点火室,并进行了JCCI发动机全负荷特性试验研究。试验结果表明:采用射流控制压缩着火方式可以有效控制发动机的燃烧相位和排放。在平均有效压力低于0.44 MPa的工况范围,NOx排放比原机降低较多,燃烧始点相位CA10与滞燃期几乎不随负荷增加而改变;在平均有效压力高于0.44直至0.54 MPa负荷范围内,燃烧始点相位迅速前移,滞燃期迅速减小,柴油提前自燃,射流对着火相位控制作用减弱,NOx排放迅速增加并超过原机;在全负荷范围,烟度始终维持在低水平,HC和CO排放较高。该研究可为柴油预混合燃烧着火相位控制提供参考。%One of the key points in diesel premixed combustion is the realization of combustion phasing control. The sensitivity of diesel to temperature and equivalent ratio was the crucial obstacle. In order to directly control the diesel premixed combustion phasing, a novel method called the jet controlled compression ignition (JCCI) for diesel premixed compression ignition was proposed. A single cylinder diesel engine was modified to study the JCCI system. First, a small ignition chamber comprising a gas fuel injector and a spark plug was mounted on the cylinder head in this diesel engine. Six small orifices were used to connect the ignition chamber and the main chamber. Furthermore, the compression ratio was reduced to 12 to avoid the auto-ignition of the premixed diesel fuel. Experiments were conducted on the JCCI engine under overall loads at a constant speed to study the trend of combustion and the emission characteristics of JCCI system. The results showed that

  18. Robust Active Damping Control of LCL Filtered Grid Connected Converter Based Active Disturbance Rejection Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdeldjabar, Benrabah; Xu, Dianguo; Wang, Xiongfei;

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of LCL filter resonance in grid connected inverter control. The system equations are reformulated to allow the application of the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC). The resonance, assumed unknown, is treated as a disturbance, then estimated and mitigated....... By using this new robust control, a high level of performance is achieved with a minimum complexity in the controller design, and without any adaptive algorithm. It is demonstrated that the true quality of the control system is obtained by the proposed solution. Furthermore, it is shown that this control...... is robust against parameter variations and disturbances....

  19. Jacket Substructure Fatigue Mitigation through Active Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanis, Tomas; Natarajan, Anand

    2014-01-01

    As offshore wind farms are being installed farther and in deeper waters offshore, new, and more sophisticated marine substructures such as jackets need to be used. Herein, a 10MW wind turbine mounted on a jacket sub structure at a mean water depth of 50 meters is investigated with regards...... to the fatigue design loads on the braces of the jacket. Since large wind turbines of 10MW rating have low rotor speeds (p), the modal frequencies of the sub structures approach 3p at low wind speeds, which leads to a modal coupling and resonance. Therefore an active control system is developed which provides...... sufficient structural damping and consequently a fatigue reduction at the substructure. The resulting reduction in fatigue design loads on the jacket structure based on the active control system is presented....

  20. Internal Model Based Active Disturbance Rejection Control

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Jinwen; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The basic active disturbance rejection control (BADRC) algorithm with only one order higher extended state observer (ESO) proves to be robust to both internal and external disturbances. An advantage of BADRC is that in many applications it can achieve high disturbance attenuation level without requiring a detailed model of the plant or disturbance. However, this can be regarded as a disadvantage when the disturbance characteristic is known since the BADRC algorithm cannot exploit such informa...

  1. NANOROBOTS CONTROL ACTIVATION FOR STENOSED CORONARY OCCLUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Christo Ananth; R.K. Shunmuga Priya; T.Rashmi Anns; S.Kadhirunnisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the study of nanorobots control activation for stenosed coronary occlusion, with the practical use of chemical and thermal gradients for biomedical problems. The recent developments on nanotechnology new materials allied with electronics device miniaturization may enable nanorobots for the next few years. New possibilities for medicine are expected with the development of nanorobots. It may help to advance the treatment of a wide number ...

  2. Active Control of Shear Thickening in Suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Neil Y C; Cates, Michael E; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-01-01

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomena in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allow for active control of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to two decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a...

  3. Control of ovarian primordial follicle activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The ovarian follicles develop initially from primordial follicles. The majority of ovarian primordial follicles are maintained quiescently as a reserve for the reproductive life span. Only a few of them are activated and develop to an advanced follicular stage. The maintenance of dormancy and activation of primordial follicles are controlled by coordinated actions of a suppressor/activator with close communications with somatic cells and intra-oocyte signaling pathways. Many growth factors and signaling pathways have been identified and the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily plays important roles in early folliculogenesis. However, the mechanism of maintaining the dormancy and survival of primordial follicles has remained unknown for decades. Recently, since the first finding that all primordial follicles are activated prematurely in mice deficient forkhead box O3a, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) signaling pathway was reported to be important in the regulation of dormancy and initial follicular activation. With these informations on early folliculogenesis, clinical application can be expected such as in vitro maturation of immature oocytes or in vitro activation of follicles by PTEN inhibitor in cryopreserved ovarian cortical tissues for fertility preservation. PMID:22563545

  4. N-doped P25 TiO2-amorphous Al2O3 composites: one-step solution combustion preparation and enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fa-tang; Zhao, Ye; Hao, Ying-juan; Wang, Xiao-jing; Liu, Rui-hong; Zhao, Di-shun; Chen, Dai-mei

    2012-11-15

    Nitrogen-doped Degussa P25 TiO2-amorphous Al2O3 composites were prepared via facile solution combustion. The composites were characterised using X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-vis light-diffusion reflectance spectrometry (DRS), zeta-potential measurements, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The DRS results showed that TiO2 and amorphous Al2O3 exhibited absorption in the UV region. However, the Al2O3/TiO2 composite exhibited visible-light absorption, which was attributed to N-doping during high-temperature combustion and to alterations in the electronic structure of Ti species induced by the addition of Al. The optimal molar ratio of TiO2 to Al2O3 was 1.5:1, and this composite exhibited a large specific surface area of 152 m2/g, surface positive charges, and enhanced photocatalytic activity. These characteristics enhanced the degradation rate of anionic methylene orange, which was 43.6 times greater than that of pure P25 TiO2. The high visible-light photocatalytic activity was attributed to synthetic effects between amorphous Al2O3 and TiO2, low recombination efficiency of photo-excited electrons and holes, N-doping, and a large specific surface area. Experiments that involved radical scavengers indicated that OH and O2- were the main reactive species. A potential photocatalytic mechanism was also proposed.

  5. Fuzzy control for the operation of an electrical energy generation system based on standard fuel cells PEM; Control difuso para la operacion de un sistema de generacion de energia electrica basado en celdas de combustible tipo PEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez R, Miguel; Gutierrez A, Ruben [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Rodriguez P, Alejandro [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico (Cenidet), Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    Fuel cells, as totally clean power plants, have many applications in the industry in general, in the transport system, in the electricity generation for domestic consumption and in the communication systems, among others. When developing new forms of generation with renewable energy sources, it must be considered that petroleum will stop in being an available power resource. The interest in the study of the fuel cells has been increased in the last years because it is considered a solution to the supply of distributed energy problem. Therefore, already exist research institutions that are developing work on this technology. A generation of electrical energy system based on fuel cells is a nonlinear system where the control of the variables of the process, such as the temperature of the system and the pressurization of the reactants, are an important aspect for its proper operation, since it influences in the water balance and therefore in the global efficiency of the system. [Spanish] Las celdas de combustible, como fuente de energia totalmente limpia, tienen muchas aplicaciones en la industria en general: en el sistema de transporte, en la generacion de electricidad para consumo domestico y en los sistemas de comunicacion, entre otros. Al desarrollar nuevas formas de generacion con fuentes de energia renovables, se debe considerar que el petroleo dejara de ser un recurso energetico disponible. El interes en el estudio de las celdas de combustible se ha incrementado en los ultimos anos debido a que se le considera una solucion al problema de abasto de energia distribuida. Por lo tanto, ya existen instituciones de investigacion que estan desarrollando trabajos sobre esta tecnologia. Un sistema de generacion de energia electrica basado en celdas de combustible es un sistema no lineal en donde el control de las variables del proceso, tales como la temperatura del sistema y la presurizacion de los reactantes, es un aspecto importante para su buen funcionamiento, ya que

  6. Steady state HNG combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Two simplified modeling approaches are used to model the combustion of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF, N{sub 2}H{sub 5}-C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}). The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: the classical high activation energy, and the recently introduced low activation energy approach. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of both models are compared with experimental results of HNF combustion. It is shown that the low activation energy approach yields better agreement with experimental observations (e.g. regression rate and temperature sensitivity), than the high activation energy approach.

  7. Combustion synthesis of advanced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John J.

    1993-01-01

    Self-propagating high temperature (combustion) synthesis (SHS), has been investigated as a means of producing both dense and expanded (foamed) ceramic and ceramic-metal composites, ceramic powders and whiskers. Several model exothermic combustion synthesis reactions were used to establish the importance of certain reaction parameters, e.g., stoichiometry, green density, combustion mode, particle size, etc. on the control of the synthesis reaction, product morphology and properties. The use of an in situ liquid infiltration technique and the effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e., solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g., volatility and thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized composite materials is discussed. Conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment to take advantage of the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport is also examined.

  8. Local flow control for active building facades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligotla, Srikar; Chen, Wayne; Glauser, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Existing building facade designs are for a passive and an impermeable shell to prevent migration of outdoor air into the building and to control heat transfers between the exterior environment and the building interior. An active facade that can respond in real time to changing environmental conditions like wind speed and direction, pollutant load, temperature, humidity and light can lower energy use and maximize occupant comfort. With an increased awareness of cost and environmental effects of energy use, cross or natural ventilation has become an attractive method to lower energy use. Separated flow regions around such buildings are undesirable due to high concentration of pollutants, especially if the vents or dynamic windows for cross ventilation are situated in these regions. Outside pollutant load redistribution through vents can be regulated via flow separation control to minimize transport of pollutants into the building. Flow separation has been substantially reduced with the application of intelligent flow control tools developed at Syracuse University for flow around "silo" (turret) like structures. Similar flow control models can be introduced into buildings with cross ventilation for local external flow separation control. Initial experiments will be performed for turbulent flow over a rectangular block (scaled to be a mid-rise building) that has been configured with dynamic vents and unsteady suction actuators in a wind tunnel at various wind speeds.

  9. Some characteristics of fine beryllium particle combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, D. A.; Kholopova, O. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-08-01

    Beryllium dust will be produced under plasma interaction with beryllium armor of the first wall in ITER. Exothermal reaction of this dust with water steam or air, which can leak into the reactor vacuum chamber in some accidents, gives concern in respect to reactor safety. Results of studies devoted to combustion of fine beryllium particles are reviewed in the paper. A chemically active medium and elevated temperature are prerequisite to the combustion of beryllium particles. Their ignition is hampered by oxide films, which form a diffusion barrier on the particle surface as a result of pre-flame oxidation. The temperature to initiate combustion of particles depends on flame temperature, particle size, composition of combustible mixture, heating rate and other factors. In mixtures enriched with combustible, the flame temperature necessary to ignite individual particles approaches the beryllium boiling temperature.

  10. Control of a post-combustion CO2 capture plant during process start-up and load variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    capture. The study demonstrates that the implemented control structure keeps the carbon capture process at 90% CO2 removal rate with a deviation up to 8% during load variations. In addition, it reveals that the control structure brings the process to the desired set point in approximately 10 min during...... and control system design are crucial. In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Moreover, we implement a decentralized proportional-integral (PI) based control scheme and we evaluate the performance of the control structure...... for various operational procedures, e.g. start-up, load changes, noise on the flue gas flow rate and composition. Note that the carbon capture plant is based on the solvent storage configuration. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing the issue of start-up operation and control of carbon...

  11. Combustion Limits and Efficiency of Turbojet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, H. C.; Jonash, E. R.

    1956-01-01

    Combustion must be maintained in the turbojet-engine combustor over a wide range of operating conditions resulting from variations in required engine thrust, flight altitude, and flight speed. Furthermore, combustion must be efficient in order to provide the maximum aircraft range. Thus, two major performance criteria of the turbojet-engine combustor are (1) operatable range, or combustion limits, and (2) combustion efficiency. Several fundamental requirements for efficient, high-speed combustion are evident from the discussions presented in chapters III to V. The fuel-air ratio and pressure in the burning zone must lie within specific limits of flammability (fig. 111-16(b)) in order to have the mixture ignite and burn satisfactorily. Increases in mixture temperature will favor the flammability characteristics (ch. III). A second requirement in maintaining a stable flame -is that low local flow velocities exist in the combustion zone (ch. VI). Finally, even with these requirements satisfied, a flame needs a certain minimum space in which to release a desired amount of heat, the necessary space increasing with a decrease in pressure (ref. 1). It is apparent, then, that combustor design and operation must provide for (1) proper control of vapor fuel-air ratios in the combustion zone at or near stoichiometric, (2) mixture pressures above the minimum flammability pressures, (3) low flow velocities in the combustion zone, and (4) adequate space for the flame.

  12. Sandia combustion research program: Annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.E.; Sanders, B.R.; Ivanetich, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    More than a decade ago, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Our strategy was to apply the rapidly increasing capabilities in lasers and computers to combustion science and technology. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''User Facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative--involving US universities, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions of several research projects which have been stimulated by Working Groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship Program has been instrumental in the success of some of the joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents research results of calendar year 1987, separated thematically into nine categories. Refereed journal articles appearing in print during 1987, along with selected other publications, are included at the end of Section 10. In addition to our ''traditional'' research--chemistry, reacting flow, diagnostics, engine combustion, and coal combustion--you will note continued progress in somewhat recent themes: pulse combustion, high temperature materials, and energetic materials, for example. Moreover, we have just started a small, new effort to understand combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  13. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30

    UU focused on the behavior of trace metals in the combustion zone by studying vaporization from single coal particles. The coals were burned at 1700 K under a series of fuel-rich and oxygen-rich conditions. The data collected in this study will be applied to a model that accounts for the full equilibrium between carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model also considers many other reactions taking place in the combustion zone, and involves the diffusion of gases into the particle and combustion products away from the particle. A comprehensive study has been conducted at UA to investigate the post-combustion partitioning of trace elements during large-scale combustion of pulverized coal combustion. For many coals, there are three distinct particle regions developed by three separate mechanisms: (1) a submicron fume, (2) a micron-sized fragmentation region, and (3) a bulk (>3 {micro}m) fly ash region. The controlling partitioning mechanisms for trace elements may be different in each of the three particle regions. A substantial majority of semi-volatile trace elements (e.g., As, Se, Sb, Cd, Zn, Pb) volatilize during combustion. The most common partitioning mechanism for semi-volatile elements is reaction with active fly ash surface sites. Experiments conducted under this program at UC focused on measuring mercury oxidation under cooling rates representative of the convective section of a coal-fired boiler to determine the extent of homogeneous mercury oxidation under these conditions. In fixed bed studies at EERC, five different test series were planned to evaluate the effects of temperature, mercury concentration, mercury species, stoichiometric ratio of combustion air, and ash source. Ash samples generated at UA and collected from full-scale power plants were evaluated. Extensive work was carried out at UK during this program to develop new methods for identification of mercury species in fly ash and sorbents. We demonstrated the usefulness of XAFS spectroscopy for

  14. TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.L. Senior; F. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Shah; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F. Sarofim; S. Swenson; J.S. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowski; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco; R. Sterling; G. Dunham; S. Miller

    2001-06-30

    UU focused on the behavior of trace metals in the combustion zone by studying vaporization from single coal particles. The coals were burned at 1700 K under a series of fuel-rich and oxygen-rich conditions. The data collected in this study will be applied to a model that accounts for the full equilibrium between carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The model also considers many other reactions taking place in the combustion zone, and involves the diffusion of gases into the particle and combustion products away from the particle. A comprehensive study has been conducted at UA to investigate the post-combustion partitioning of trace elements during large-scale combustion of pulverized coal combustion. For many coals, there are three distinct particle regions developed by three separate mechanisms: (1) a submicron fume, (2) a micron-sized fragmentation region, and (3) a bulk (>3 {micro}m) fly ash region. The controlling partitioning mechanisms for trace elements may be different in each of the three particle regions. A substantial majority of semi-volatile trace elements (e.g., As, Se, Sb, Cd, Zn, Pb) volatilize during combustion. The most common partitioning mechanism for semi-volatile elements is reaction with active fly ash surface sites. Experiments conducted under this program at UC focused on measuring mercury oxidation under cooling rates representative of the convective section of a coal-fired boiler to determine the extent of homogeneous mercury oxidation under these conditions. In fixed bed studies at EERC, five different test series were planned to evaluate the effects of temperature, mercury concentration, mercury species, stoichiometric ratio of combustion air, and ash source. Ash samples generated at UA and collected from full-scale power plants were evaluated. Extensive work was carried out at UK during this program to develop new methods for identification of mercury species in fly ash and sorbents. We demonstrated the usefulness of XAFS spectroscopy for

  15. Determination of {sup 60} Co by means of Neutron Activation Analysis in the sorption of Co in synthesized porous oxides by the combustion method; Determinacion de {sup 60} Co por medio de AAN en la sorcion de Co en oxidos porosos sintetizados por metodo de combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, V.; Bulbulian, S.; Urena, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: violelugo@yahoo.es

    2005-07-01

    Recently inorganic materials are investigating as sorbent of radioactive pollutants present in water. The inorganic oxides belong to this group of materials. A quick method exists for the obtaining of inorganic oxides, denominated combustion method that could be used to produce porous oxides successfully with good properties for the sorption of radioactive ions. In this investigation, iron oxides, magnesium and zinc were synthesized obtained by the combustion method, comparing them with those synthesized by the calcination method, using two different synthesis temperatures. The obtained solids were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (Sem), by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and by semiquantitative elemental analysis (EDS). After the characterization, the crystalline oxides synthesized by both methods, to temperature of 800 C, were evaluated as sorbents in the removal of Co{sup 2+} ions, through experiments in batch, and using neutron activation analysis, determining the sorption percentage, with this it was concluded that the magnesium oxide produced by combustion it is more effective in the removal of Co{sup 2+} ions than that synthesized by calcination. It was determined the surface area of the magnesium oxides, obtaining a surface area greater for the synthesized oxide by combustion method. (Author)

  16. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kertész Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES. The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL. APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC are updated based upon a “gap sensor” which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  17. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  18. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  19. Active Control of Long Bridges Using Flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    The main problem in designing ultra-long span suspension bridges is flutter. A solution to this problem might be to introduce an active flap control system to increase the flutter wind velocity. The investigated flap control system consists of flaps integrated in the bridge girder so each flap...... is the streamlined part of the edge of the girder. Additional aerodynamic derivatives are shown for the flaps and it is shown how methods already developed can be used to estimate the flutter wind velocity for a bridge section with flaps. As an example, the flutter wind velocity is calculated for different flap...... configurations for a bridge section model by using aerodynamic derivatives for a flat plate. The example shows that different flap configurations can either increase or decrease the flutter wind velocity. for optimal flap configurations flutter will not occur....

  20. Coordinated Voltage Control of Active Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a centralized coordinated voltage control method for active distribution network to solve off-limit problem of voltage after incorporation of distributed generation (DG. The proposed method consists of two parts, it coordinated primal-dual interior point method-based voltage regulation schemes of DG reactive powers and capacitors with centralized on-load tap changer (OLTC controlling method which utilizes system’s maximum and minimum voltages, to improve the qualified rate of voltage and reduce the operation numbers of OLTC. The proposed coordination has considered the cost of capacitors. The method is tested using a radial edited IEEE-33 nodes distribution network which is modelled using MATLAB.

  1. EPR and photoluminescence properties of Mn{sup 2+}-activated zinc gallate phosphor prepared by urea combustion route and post heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Vijay, E-mail: vijayjiin2006@yahoo.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156 756 (Korea, Republic of); Chakradhar, R.P.S. [Glass Technology Lab, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India); Rao, J.L. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Kwak, Ho-Young, E-mail: kwakh@cau.ac.kr [Mechanical Engineering Department, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156 756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Mn{sup 2+} activated ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} powder phosphors have been prepared by urea combustion route. Powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques have been used to characterize the as-prepared and post-treated (900 deg. C, 3 h) phosphors. The morphology shows small particles, voids and pores, with non-uniform shapes and sizes. The EPR spectrum exhibits an intense resonance signal at g{approx}1.985 with a sextet hyperfine structure (hfs) besides a weak broad signal at g{approx}4.05 and a hump near g{approx}2.27. The g{approx}1.985 resonance is due to Mn{sup 2+} ions in an environment close to tetrahedral symmetry. The resonances at g{approx}4.05 and 2.27 are attributed to the rhombic surroundings of the Mn{sup 2+} ions. The spin concentration (N) and the paramagnetic susceptibility ({chi}) are evaluated and discussed. It is observed that the intensity of the resonance signal at g{approx}1.985 increases with decrease in temperature obeying the Boltzmann law. Upon post treatment the intensity of the green emission ({lambda}{sub em}=528 nm,{sup 4}T{sub 1}{yields}{sup 6}A{sub 1} transition of Mn{sup 2+} ions) has been increased to 3.35 times and a red shift has been observed. - Highlights: > The paper deals with the synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Mn phosphor by an easy combustion method. > Upon post treatment the luminescence intensity of the green emission enhanced by 3.35 times. > EPR results also support such an enhancement in the intensity of the resonance signals.

  2. Active noise control technology. Active soon seigyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, M.; Kokubo, F.; Tanaka, S.; Yao, K. (Sharp Corp., Osaka (Japan))

    1994-05-10

    The signal processing method of the Active Noise Control (ANC) system was studied. The principle of ANC is to output secondary sound waves having opposite phase, identical amplitude from the control point of the sound wave of the primary sound source, and eliminate the noise by interference. As application fields, there are air conditioner ducts and compressors as one dimensional noise source, and automobile and axial fan as three dimensional noise source. In order to improve the stability of coefficient renewal algorithm of Adaptive Digital Filter (ADF), for generation of opposite phase noise, DC-LMS algorithm which can control the rise in gain of specified frequency zone was proposed. Furthermore, with the purpose of reducing the amount of operation, the introduction of lattice type AR filter was tested for the stability of the filter in IIR-ADF (Infinite Impulse Response Adaptive Digital Filter) and its application process. The applicability studies of these improved methods on the noise inside of ducts were actually measured, and the effect was verified. For the multi-channel control of 3 dimensional noise source, reference scanning method to reduce the filter operation was proposed. In the partial space noise eliminating experiment, it was made clear that it possesses equivalent effect to error scanning method. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Actively-controlled Beds for Ambulances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takahiko Ono; Hikaru Inooka

    2009-01-01

    During transportation by ambulance,a patient is exposed to inertial acceleration when an ambulance decelerates or turns a corner.Such acceleration often gives a patient physical stress such as blood pressure variation or body sway,which causes strong pain,feeling of discomfort or sometimes critical damage for seriously injured persons.To reduce this undesirable effect of the acceleration,the authors developed the actively-controlled bed (ACB) which controls the posture of a stretcher in real time to reduce foot-to-head and lateral acceleration acting on a supine person.This paper describes development of the ACB,including control system design and performance evaluation.The control system is designed by Zakian's framework,which comprises the principle of matching and the method of inequalities,so that the design specifications on the tracking error and the motor torque are satisfied.From the results of driving experiments and simulation,it is estimated that the ACB can reduce the acceleration acting on a patient by 65% in the foot-to-head direction and by 75% in the lateral direction.

  4. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J. (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  5. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  6. Control of a post-combustion CO2 capture plantduring process start-up and load variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic and flexible operation of a carbon capture plant is important as thermal power plants must be operated very flexibly to accommodate large shares of intermittent energy sources such as wind and solar energy. To facilitate such operation, dynamic models for simulation, optimization...... and control system design are crucial. In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Moreover, we implement a decentralized proportional-integral (PI) based control scheme and we evaluate the performance of the control structure...... for various operational procedures, e.g. start-up, load changes, noise on the flue gas flow rate and composition. Note that the carbon capture plant is based on the solvent storage configuration. To the authors knowledge, this is the first paper addressing the issue of start-up operation and control of carbon...

  7. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  8. Real Time Vibration Control of Active Suspension System with Active Force Control using Iterative Learning Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaivani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents concurrent vibration control of a laboratory scaled vibration isolator platform with Active Force Control (AFC using Iterative Learning Algorithm (ILA. The work investigates the performance of the traditional Proportional Integral Derivative Controller (PIDC with and without AFC using ILA for vibration suppression. The physical single degree of freedom quarter car has been interfaced with a personal computer using a National Instruments data acquisition card NI USB 6008. The controllers are designed and simulated using LabVIEW simulation software. The results infer that the PIDC with AFC using ILA works superior than the PIDC.

  9. Variable compression ratio device for internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Ronald P.; Faletti, James J.

    2004-03-23

    An internal combustion engine, particularly suitable for use in a work machine, is provided with a combustion cylinder, a cylinder head at an end of the combustion cylinder and a primary piston reciprocally disposed within the combustion cylinder. The cylinder head includes a secondary cylinder and a secondary piston reciprocally disposed within the secondary cylinder. An actuator is coupled with the secondary piston for controlling the position of the secondary piston dependent upon the position of the primary piston. A communication port establishes fluid flow communication between the combustion cylinder and the secondary cylinder.

  10. On-line measurement of heat of combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, S. K.; Chegini, H.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental method for an on-line measurement of heat of combustion of a gaseous hydrocarbon fuel mixture of unknown composition is developed. It involves combustion of a test gas with a known quantity of air to achieve a predetermined oxygen concentration level in the combustion products. This is accomplished by a feedback controller which maintains the gas volumetric flow rate at a level consistent with the desired oxygen concentration in the products. The heat of combustion is determined from a known correlation with the gas volumetric flow rate. An on-line microcomputer accesses the gas volumetric flow data, and displays the heat of combustion values at desired time intervals.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of Nanocrystalline La1-xEuxFeO3 during the Combustion of Toluene%Synthesis,Characterization,and Catalytic Activity of Nanocrystalline La1-xEuxFeO3during the Combustion of Toluene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Ali HOSSEINI; Mohammad Taghi SADEGHI-SORKHANI; Leila KAFI-AHMADI; Abdolali ALEMI; Aligholi NIAEI; Dariush SALARI

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured LaFeO3 and substituted La1-xEuxFeO3 (x =0.1,0.15,and 0.2) perovskites were synthesized by sol-gel auto-combustion and their activities during the combustion of toluene were evaluated.The structure and physico-chemical properties of the perovskites were characterized by X-ray diffraction,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,scanning electron microscopy,and BET surface area analyses.The compounds were crystallized as a perovskite phase with an orthorhombic structure.The mean particle size of the perovskites increased with an increase in europium loading while the specific surface area decreased.Characterization data confirmed that a total insertion of Eu into LaFeO3 occurred at x ≤ 0.15.However,Eu2O3 segregation occurred to some extent especially at x >0.15.The catalytic activity of the catalysts increased substantially with an increase in Eu substitution in the evaluated range.

  12. Microwave-Assisted Combustion Synthesis of Nano Iron Oxide/Iron-Coated Activated Carbon, Anthracite, Cellulose Fiber, and Silica, with Arsenic Adsorption Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjuna N. Nadagouda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was completed within a few minutes. The method used no additional fuel and nitrate, which is present in the precursor itself, to drive the reaction. The obtained samples were then characterized with X-ray mapping, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS, selected area diffraction pattern (SAED, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectroscopy. The size of the iron oxide/iron nanoparticle-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were found to be in the nano range (50–400 nm. The iron oxide/iron nanoparticles mostly crystallized into cubic symmetry which was confirmed by SAED. The XRD pattern indicated that iron oxide/iron nano particles existed in four major phases. That is, γ-Fe2O3, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and Fe. These iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica samples were tested for arsenic adsorption through batch experiments, revealing that few samples had significant arsenic adsorption.

  13. Satellite cascade attitude control via fuzzy PD controller with active force control under momentum dumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Z.; Varatharajoo, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, fuzzy proportional-derivative (PD) controller with active force control (AFC) scheme is studied and employed in the satellite attitude control system equipped with reaction wheels. The momentum dumping is enabled via proportional integral (PI) controller as the system is impractical without momentum dumping control. The attitude controllers are developed together with their governing equations and evaluated through numerical treatment with respect to a reference satellite mission. From the results, it is evident that the three axis attitudes accuracies can be improved up to ±0.001 degree through the fuzzy PD controller with AFC scheme for the attitude control. In addition, the three-axis wheel angular momentums are well maintained during the attitude control tasks.

  14. Closed-Loop Control of Low Temperature Combustion and Transition Process of Diesel Engine%柴油机低温燃烧闭环控制及切换过程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲栓; 石磊; 邓康耀

    2012-01-01

    Transition from conventional combustion to low temperature combustion was studied by using closed loop combustion control system. The test results reveal that the cycle-based closed loop control sys- tem can follow φc(crank angle corresponding to 50% of total heat release) step input and restrain system disturbances such as speed, load, rail pressure and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). During the transition process, fuel injection timing can be adjusted in time to keep the combustion phase at the set point, in oth- er words, combustion stability is ensured.%借助于燃烧闭环控制系统,研究了传统燃烧到低温燃烧的切换过程.试验结果表明:基于循环的燃烧闭环控制系统能够跟踪累计放热50%对应的曲轴转角的阶跃输入,并且能很好地抑制转速、负荷、油轨压力和废气再循环(EGR)等系统干扰.在传统燃烧到低温燃烧的切换过程中,通过燃烧闭环控制系统实时地调节喷油提前角,可以使燃烧相位保持在参考值附近,从而保证了切换过程的燃烧稳定性.

  15. Persistent free radicals, heavy metals and PAHs generated in particulate soot emissions and residue ash from controlled combustion of common types of plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Iliopoulos, Nikiforos; Gotsis, George; Fiotakis, Konstantinos

    2008-08-15

    The production and use of polymeric materials worldwide has reached levels of 150 million tonnes per year, and the majority of plastic materials are discarded in waste landfills where are burned generating toxic emissions. In the present study we conducted laboratory experiments for batch combustion/burning of commercial polymeric materials, simulating conditions of open fire combustion, with the purpose to analyze their emissions for chemical characteristics of toxicological importance. We used common types of plastic materials: poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), low and high density poly(ethylene) (LDPE, HDPE), poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). Samples of particulate smoke (soot) collected on filters and residue solid ash produced by controlled burning conditions at 600-750 degrees C are used for analysis. Emissions of particulate matter, persistent free radicals embedded in the carbonaceous polymeric matrix, heavy metals, other elements and PAHs were determined in both types of samples. Results showed that all plastics burned easily generating charred residue solid ash and black airborne particulate smoke. Persistent carbon- and oxygen-centered radicals, known for their toxic effects in inhalable airborne particles, were detected in both particulate smoke emissions and residue solid ash. Concentrations of heavy metals and other elements (determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry, ICP, method) were measured in the airborne soot and residue ash. Toxic heavy metals, such as Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Cd were relatively at were found at low concentrations. High concentrations were found for some lithophilic elements, such as Na, Ca, Mg, Si and Al in particulate soot and residue solid ash. Measurements of PAHs showed that low molecular weight PAHs were at higher concentrations in the airborne particulate soot than in the residue solid ash for all types of plastic. Higher-ringed PAHs were detected at higher

  16. Environmental optimisation of waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Robert [AaF Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Berge, Niclas; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The regulations concerning waste combustion evolve through R and D and a strive to get better and common regulations for the European countries. This study discusses if these rules of today concerning oxygen concentration, minimum temperature and residence time in the furnace and the use of stand-by burners are needed, are possible to monitor, are the optimum from an environmental point of view or could be improved. No evidence from well controlled laboratory experiments validate that 850 deg C in 6 % oxygen content in general is the best lower limit. A lower excess air level increase the temperature, which has a significant effect on the destruction of hydrocarbons, favourably increases the residence time, increases the thermal efficiency and the efficiency of the precipitators. Low oxygen content is also necessary to achieve low NO{sub x}-emissions. The conclusion is that the demands on the accuracy of the measurement devices and methods are too high, if they are to be used inside the furnace to control the combustion process. The big problem is however to find representative locations to measure temperature, oxygen content and residence time in the furnace. Another major problem is that the monitoring of the operation conditions today do not secure a good combustion. It can lead to a false security. The reason is that it is very hard to find boilers without stratifications. These stratifications (stream lines) has each a different history of residence time, mixing time, oxygen and combustible gas levels and temperature, when they reach the convection area. The combustion result is the sum of all these different histories. The hydrocarbons emission is in general not produced at a steady level. Small clouds of unburnt hydrocarbons travels along the stream lines showing up as peaks on a THC measurement device. High amplitude peaks has a tendency to contain higher ratio of heavy hydrocarbons than lower peaks. The good correlation between some easily detected

  17. Coal combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, R.S.; Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Coal-burning powerplants, which supply more than half of U.S. electricity, also generate coal combustion products, which can be both a resource and a disposal problem. The U.S. Geological Survey collaborates with the American Coal Ash Association in preparing its annual report on coal combustion products. This Fact Sheet answers questions about present and potential uses of coal combustion products.

  18. Support studies in fluidized-bed combustion. Quarterly report, April--June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, I.; Vogel, G.J.; Lee, S.H.D.

    1978-01-01

    This work supports the development of atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion. Laboratory and process development studies are aimed at providing needed information on limestone utilization, control of emission of alkali metal compounds and SO/sub 2/ during combustion, particulate loadings of flue gas, and other aspects of fluidized-bed coal combustion. This report presents information on: the SO/sub 2/ reactivities and thus the limestone requirements of sixty different limestones, the morphology of a few selected stones, the effect of water in the gaseous mixture on the SO/sub 2/ reactivities of three limestones, the effect of combustion conditions on the attrition of limestones, the effect of temperature on SO/sub 2/ retention by limestone in a carbon burnup cell, the effect of CaCl/sub 2/ and MgCl/sub 2/ additives on the SO/sub 2/ capacity of limestones, the use of diatomaceous earth and activated bauxite to remove alkali metal compounds from simulated combustion gas mixtures, selection of laser spectroscopy methods to be evaluated for the measurement of gaseous alkali metal species in hot flue gases, the application of acoustic dust conditioning to flue gas cleaning, and the conceptual design of a granular-bed filter for cleaning of flue gas in a 200-MWe fluidized-bed combustion facility.

  19. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  20. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  1. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  2. Distributed Low Temperature Combustion: Fundamental Understanding of Combustion Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Excellent optical access for laser- based diagnostic measurements ; (ii) Accurate experimental control of boundary conditions; (iii) Aerodynamic flame...potential to extend methods based on bimodal approximations, such as the BML [21] framework , by permitting inter- mediate fluid states, which is of...identify the impact of the major chemical pathways on combustion mode transitions. The conceptual multifluid approach of Spalding can be used to avoid

  3. Fuel mediated solution combustion synthesis of ZnO supported gold clusters and nanoparticles and their catalytic activity and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanu, T Inakhunbi; Muthukumar, Thangavelu; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T

    2014-11-21

    Nanocomposites of gold nanoparticles and semiconductor ZnO with wurtzite structure, made by solution combustion synthesis (SCS), as a function of the Zn/fuel ratio with polyethylene glycol (PEG) as fuel exhibit the presence of both nanoparticles and clusters. Atomic gold clusters present on the surface of ZnO nanorods which can be identified by XPS and SEM are easily monitored and characterized by positive ion MALDI experiments as mostly odd numbered clusters, Au3 to Au11 in decreasing amounts. Low concentrations of the fuel produce AuClO and nanoparticles (NPs), with no clusters. Au-ZnO nanocomposites at all [Au] exhibit single blue shifted plasmon absorption and corresponding photoluminescence (PL). Increasing particle size prefers surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scattering of metal that could lead to PL enhancement; however, available ZnO surface in the Au-ZnO composite becomes more important than the particle size of the composite with higher [Au]. The catalytic activity of these Au-ZnO nanocomposites tested on 4-nitrophenol clearly revealed the presence of an intermediate with both NPs and clusters playing different roles. An in vitro study of cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cell lines revealed that these gold nanostructures have turned out to be powerful nanoagents for destruction of cancer cells even with small amounts of gold particles/clusters. The nanorods of ZnO, known to be nontoxic to normal cells, play a lesser role in the anticancer activity of these Au-ZnO nanocomposites.

  4. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    } separation, and also syngas production from coal with the calcium sulfide (CaS)/calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) loop utilizing the PDU facility. The results of Phase I were reported in Reference 1, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase I Report' The objective for Phase II was to develop the carbonate loop--lime (CaO)/calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) loop, integrate it with the gasification loop from Phase I, and ultimately demonstrate the feasibility of hydrogen production from the combined loops. The results of this program were reported in Reference 3, 'Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping Coal Power Development Technology Development Phase II Report'. The objective of Phase III is to operate the pilot plant to obtain enough engineering information to design a prototype of the commercial Chemical Looping concept. The activities include modifications to the Phase II Chemical Looping PDU, solids transportation studies, control and instrumentation studies and additional cold flow modeling. The deliverable is a report making recommendations for preliminary design guidelines for the prototype plant, results from the pilot plant testing and an update of the commercial plant economic estimates.

  5. Prediction control of active power filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莉娜; 罗安

    2003-01-01

    A prediction method to obtain harmonic reference for active power filter is presented. It is a new use ofthe adaptive predictive filter based on FIR. The delay inherent in digital controller is successfully compensated by u-sing the proposed method, and the computing load is not very large compared with the conventional method. Moreo-ver, no additional hardware is needed. Its DSP-based realization is also presented, which is characterized by time-va-riant rate sampling, quasi synchronous sampling, and synchronous operation among the line frequency, PWM gener-ating and sampling in A/D unit. Synchronous operation releases the limitation on PWM modulation ratio and guar-antees that the electrical noises resulting from the switching operation of IGBTs do not interfere with the sampledcurrent. The simulation and experimental results verify the satisfactory performance of the proposed method.

  6. Active controlled studies in antibiotic drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The increasing concern of antibacterial resistance has been well documented, as has the relative lack of antibiotic development. This paradox is in part due to challenges with clinical development of antibiotics. Because of their rapid progression, untreated bacterial infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, placebo-controlled studies of new agents are unethical. Rather, pivotal development studies are mostly conducted using non-inferiority designs versus an active comparator. Further, infections because of comparator-resistant isolates must usually be excluded from the trial programme. Unfortunately, the placebo-controlled data classically used in support of non-inferiority designs are largely unavailable for antibiotics. The only available data are from the 1930s and 1940s and their use is associated with significant concerns regarding constancy and assay sensitivity. Extended public debate on this challenge has led to proposed solutions by some in which these concerns are addressed by using very conservative approaches to trial design, endpoints and non-inferiority margins, in some cases leading to potentially impractical studies. To compound this challenge, different Regulatory Authorities seem to be taking different approaches to these key issues. If harmonisation does not occur, antibiotic development will become increasingly challenging, with the risk of further decreases in the amount of antibiotic drug development. However with clarity on Regulatory requirements and an ability to feasibly conduct global development programmes, it should be possible to bring much needed additional antibiotics to patients.

  7. Combustion performance of flame-ignited high-speed train seats via full-scale tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Determining the combustion characteristics of combustibles in high-speed trains is the foundation of evaluating the fire hazard on high-speed trains scientifically, and establishing effective active and passive fire precautions. In this study, the double seats in the compartments of CRH1 high-speed trains were used as the main research object. Under different test conditions, including the power of ignition sources and ventilation rates, full-scale furniture calorimeter tests were conducted to study important fire combustion characteristics such as the ignition characteristics of seats, heat release rate, mass loss rate, total heat release, temperature variation, and smoke release rate. The relationships among these parameters were analyzed and summarized into combustion behavior and characteristics, thus providing fundamental data and reference for the development of fire precautions and safety design of high-speed trains. The results in this test are as follows: (i The double seats of high-speed trains are relatively easy to ignite and susceptible to the fire ground environment. (ii The combustion temperature in the test apparatus exceeded 600 °C in only 2 min for the larger ignition source. (iii The heat release rate exceeded 800 kW. (iv The total heat release resulted mainly from flame combustion. (v The final mass loss rate was ∼30%. (vi The lowest light transmittance was <25%. (vii The change process of temperature with time has the same trend as the change process of heat release rate. (viii Suppressing flame combustion and controlling the smoke generated from the seat materials themselves played key roles in retarding the combustion of high-speed train seats.

  8. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species.

  9. INTEROCC case-control study: lack of association between glioma tumors and occupational exposure to selected combustion products, dusts and other chemical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourt, Aude; Cardis, Elisabeth; Pintos, Javier; Richardson, Lesley; Kincl, Laurel; Benke, Geza; Fleming, Sarah; Hours, Martine; Krewski, Daniel; McLean, Dave; Parent, Marie-Elise; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schlaefer, Klaus; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Lavoue, Jerome; van Tongeren, Martie; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2013-04-12

    The aim was to investigate possible associations between glioma (an aggressive type of brain cancer) and occupational exposure to selected agents: combustion products (diesel and gasoline exhaust emissions, benzo(a)pyrene), dusts (animal dust, asbestos, crystalline silica, wood dust) and some other chemical agents (formaldehyde, oil mist, sulphur dioxide). The INTEROCC study included cases diagnosed with glioma during 2000-2004 in sub-regions of seven countries. Population controls, selected from various sampling frames in different centers, were frequency or individually matched to cases by sex, age and center. Face-to-face interviews with the subject or a proxy respondent were conducted by trained interviewers. Detailed information was collected on socio-economic and lifestyle characteristics, medical history and work history. Occupational exposure to the 10 selected agents was assessed by a job exposure matrix (JEM) which provides estimates of the probability and level of exposure for different occupations. Using a 25% probability of exposure in a given occupation in the JEM as the threshold for considering a worker exposed, the lifetime prevalence of exposure varied from about 1% to about 15% for the different agents. Associations between glioma and each of the 10 agents were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and using three separate exposure indices: i) ever vs. never; ii) lifetime cumulative exposure; iii) total duration of exposure. The study sample consisted of 1,800 glioma cases and 5,160 controls. Most odds ratio estimates were close to the null value. None of the ten agents displayed a significantly increased odds ratio nor any indication of dose-response relationships with cumulative exposure or with duration of exposure. Thus, there was no evidence that these exposures influence risk of glioma.

  10. Quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication on the inspection basis; Control de calidad para fabricacion de combustible nuclear en base a inspecciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes S, A. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Toluca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    Every plant productive of electric power requires the use of energetics for the transformation to electricity. In the nucleo electric plant the energetic is the uranium, in which it makes ensembles and is used as fuel in the reactor. To assure that the fuel ensembles fulfill the specifications and requirements of design stipulated in the nucleo electric plant is that under a quality control through inspections during the fabrication process. The purpose of this work is to study and verify that the lineaments of the standard 10 CFR 50 appendix B `Quality assurement for nuclear plants` specially in the criteria `Inspections` that is used to guarantee the quality of the ensembles. This standard is the one that rules every activity and operation inside the pilot plant and its established in the quality program in the production of nuclear fuel for the Laguna Verde plant. The quality of the assemble is verified through each one of the tests or inspections due to the importance of it in the fabrication of fuel. (Author)

  11. Active control of aerodynamic noise; Active control ni yoru furyoku soon no seigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    This paper introduces summary and examples of active noise control (ANC) and active flow control (AFC) as the aerodynamic noise control techniques. The ANC is a technique to generate noise of a reverse phase which cancels the original noise. Noise reduced especially effectively by the ANC is noise from fans and ducts used for engine air supply and exhaust. The ANC is effective in low frequencies, and when used with a passive method, a compact exhaust silencer can be realized, which has high noise reducing performance over the whole frequency band and has low pressure loss. Signal processing in active noise reduction system is always so adjusted that noise is discharged from a secondary noise source in which signals detected by a detection microphone is given a digital filter treatment, and output from an error microphone is minimized. The AFC has been incapable of realizing a reverse phase over a wide frequency band when depended on analog treatment. However, the authors have developed an adaptive type feedback control system, and verified that the system can be applied to any frequency variation and control it in a stable manner. 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Composite Propellant combustion and Transition to Detonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    I combustion BYU Brigham Young University I CMDB Composite-modified double-base propellant CPIA Chemical Propulsion Information Agency (at Johns...incorporate a model of active binder combustion and apply the model to composite-modified double-base ( CMDB ) propellants. The porous burner apparatus...Hercules composite-modified double-base ( CMDB ) pro- pellants, containing AP or HMX, but not containing aluminum. Qualita- tive effects of composition and

  13. Real time identification of the internal combustion engine combustion parameters based on the vibration velocity signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuliang; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Limei; Ji, Shaobo

    2017-03-01

    Accurate combustion parameters are the foundations of effective closed-loop control of engine combustion process. Some combustion parameters, including the start of combustion, the location of peak pressure, the maximum pressure rise rate and its location, can be identified from the engine block vibration signals. These signals often include non-combustion related contributions, which limit the prompt acquisition of the combustion parameters computationally. The main component in these non-combustion related contributions is considered to be caused by the reciprocating inertia force excitation (RIFE) of engine crank train. A mathematical model is established to describe the response of the RIFE. The parameters of the model are recognized with a pattern recognition algorithm, and the response of the RIFE is predicted and then the related contributions are removed from the measured vibration velocity signals. The combustion parameters are extracted from the feature points of the renovated vibration velocity signals. There are angle deviations between the feature points in the vibration velocity signals and those in the cylinder pressure signals. For the start of combustion, a system bias is adopted to correct the deviation and the error bound of the predicted parameters is within 1.1°. To predict the location of the maximum pressure rise rate and the location of the peak pressure, algorithms based on the proportion of high frequency components in the vibration velocity signals are introduced. Tests results show that the two parameters are able to be predicted within 0.7° and 0.8° error bound respectively. The increase from the knee point preceding the peak value point to the peak value in the vibration velocity signals is used to predict the value of the maximum pressure rise rate. Finally, a monitoring frame work is inferred to realize the combustion parameters prediction. Satisfactory prediction for combustion parameters in successive cycles is achieved, which

  14. ABB Combustion Engineering nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzie, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    The activities of ABB Combustion Engineering in the design and construction of nuclear systems and components are briefly reviewed. ABB Construction Engineering continues to improve the design and design process for nuclear generating stations. Potential improvements are evaluated to meet new requirements both of the public and the regulator, so that the designs meet the highest standards worldwide. Advancements necessary to meet market needs and to ensure the highest level of performance in the future will be made.

  15. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the beginni

  16. Strobes: An Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; van Lingen, J.N.J.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the beginni

  17. Lectures on combustion theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstein, S.Z.; Lax, P.D.; Sod, G.A. (eds.)

    1978-09-01

    Eleven lectures are presented on mathematical aspects of combustion: fluid dynamics, deflagrations and detonations, chemical kinetics, gas flows, combustion instability, flame spread above solids, spark ignition engines, burning rate of coal particles and hydrocarbon oxidation. Separate abstracts were prepared for three of the lectures. (DLC)

  18. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-06-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

  19. Combustion of coffee husks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenger, M.; Hartge, E.-U.; Werther, J. [Technical Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Chemical Engineering 1, Hamburg (Germany); Ogada, T.; Siagi, Z. [Moi Univ., Dept. of Production Engineering, Eldoret (Kenya)

    2001-05-01

    Combustion mechanisms of two types of coffee husks have been studied using single particle combustion techniques as well as combustion in a pilot-scale fluidized bed facility (FBC), 150 mm in diameter and 9 m high. Through measurements of weight-loss and particle temperatures, the processes of drying, devolatilization and combustion of coffee husks were studied. Axial temperature profiles in the FBC were also measured during stationary combustion conditions to analyse the location of volatile release and combustion as a function of fuel feeding mode. Finally the problems of ash sintering were analysed. The results showed that devolatilization of coffee husks (65-72% volatile matter, raw mass) starts at a low temperature range of 170-200degC and takes place rapidly. During fuel feeding using a non water-cooled system, pyrolysis of the husks took place in the feeder tube leading to blockage and non-uniform fuel flow. Measurements of axial temperature profiles showed that during under-bed feeding, the bed and freeboard temperatures were more or less the same, whereas for over-bed feeding, freeboard temperatures were much higher, indicating significant combustion of the volatiles in the freeboard. A major problem observed during the combustion of coffee husks was ash sintering and bed agglomeration. This is due to the low melting temperature of the ash, which is attributed to the high contents of K{sub 2}O (36-38%) of the coffee husks. (Author)

  20. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, William de

    2010-07-31

    The project which extended from November 2005 to May of 2010 demonstrated the application of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) with engine out NOx levels of 0.2 g/bhp-hr throughout the program target load of 12.6bar BMEP. The project showed that the range of loads could be extended to 16.5bar BMEP, therefore matching the reference lug line of the base 2007 MY Navistar 6.4L V8 engine. Results showed that the application of LTC provided a dramatic improvement over engine out emissions when compared to the base engine. Furthermore LTC improved thermal efficiency by over 5% from the base production engine when using the steady state 13 mode composite test as a benchmark. The key enablers included improvements in the air, fuel injection, and cooling systems made in Phases I and II. The outcome was the product of a careful integration of each component under an intelligent control system. The engine hardware provided the conditions to support LTC and the controller provided the necessary robustness for a stable combustion. Phase III provided a detailed account on the injection strategy used to meet the high load requirements. During this phase, the control strategy was implemented in a production automotive grade ECU to perform cycle-by-cycle combustion feedback on each of the engine cylinders. The control interacted on a cycle base with the injection system and with the Turbo-EGR systems according to their respective time constants. The result was a unique system that could, first, help optimize the combustion system and maintain high efficiency, and secondly, extend the steady state results to the transient mode of operation. The engine was upgraded in Phase IV with a Variable Valve Actuation system and a hybrid EGR loop. The impact of the more versatile EGR loop did not provide significant advantages, however the application of VVA proved to be an enabler to further extend the operation of LTC and gain considerable benefits in fuel economy and soot reduction. Finally

  1. Physics and chemistry of plasma-assisted combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-08-13

    There are several mechanisms that affect a gas when using discharge plasma to initiate combustion or to stabilize a flame. There are two thermal mechanisms-the homogeneous and inhomogeneous heating of the gas due to 'hot' atom thermalization and vibrational and electronic energy relaxation. The homogeneous heating causes the acceleration of the chemical reactions. The inhomogeneous heating generates flow perturbations, which promote increased turbulence and mixing. Non-thermal mechanisms include the ionic wind effect (the momentum transfer from an electric field to the gas due to the space charge), ion and electron drift (which can lead to additional fluxes of active radicals in the gradient flows in the electric field) and the excitation, dissociation and ionization of the gas by e-impact, which leads to non-equilibrium radical production and changes the kinetic mechanisms of ignition and combustion. These mechanisms, either together or separately, can provide additional combustion control which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition engines, among others. Despite the lack of knowledge in mechanism details, non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential for controlling ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and is extremely promising technology for a very wide range of applications.

  2. Spectroscoping analysis of ignition in a spark ignition engine with jet-controlled combustion; Spektroskopische Untersuchung der Entflammung an einem Ottomotor mit strahlgefuehrtem Brennverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palaveev, S. [MOT Forschungs- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft fuer Motorentechnik, Optik und Thermodynamik GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany); Buri, S.; Xander, B.; Spicher, U. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Kolbenmaschinen

    2007-07-01

    The gasoline direct injection engine is one of the most promising strategies today to reduce the fuel consumption and CO{sub 2}-emissions of spark-ignition engines. The commercial launch of that combustion system was possible only through the development of new optical measurement techniques, which have been a major contribution for understanding the basics of the combustion in a stratified mode. In terms of space and time, compared to the homogeneous approach, the air-fuel-ratio for a stratified mode may vary significantly. This fluctuation affects in a critical way the process of ignition and combustion. The knowledge of the air-fuel-ratio in the spark plug area both at time of ignition and in during the combustion is therefore critical for the development of this combustion system and it components. This paper presents the spark-emission spectroscopy as a non invasive optical technique for measuring the air-fuel-ratio {lambda} in the spark gap at time of ignition. (orig.)

  3. A low-energy chilled ammonia process exploiting controlled solid formation for post-combustion CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Daniel; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2016-10-20

    A new ammonia-based process for CO2 capture from flue gas has been developed, which utilizes the formation of solid ammonium bicarbonate to increase the CO2 concentration in the regeneration section of the process. Precipitation, separation, and dissolution of the solid phase are realized in a dedicated process section, while the packed absorption and desorption columns remain free of solids. Additionally, the CO2 wash section applies solid formation to enable a reduction of the wash water consumption. A rigorous performance assessment employing the SPECCA index (Specific Primary Energy Consumption for CO2 Avoided) has been implemented to allow for a comparison of the overall energy penalty between the new process and a standard ammonia-based capture process without solid formation. A thorough understanding of the relevant solid-solid-liquid-vapor phase equilibria and an accurate modeling of them have enabled the synthesis of the process, and have inspired the development of the optimization algorithm used to screen a wide range of operating conditions in equilibrium-based process simulations. Under the assumptions on which the analysis is based, the new process with controlled solid formation achieved a SPECCA of 2.43 MJ kgCO2(-1), corresponding to a reduction of 17% compared to the process without solid formation (with a SPECCA of 2.93 MJ kgCO2(-1)). Ways forward to confirm this significant improvement, and to increase the accuracy of the optimization are also discussed.

  4. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  5. System identification and control of the JPL active structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanson, J. L.; Lurie, B. J.; O'Brien, J. F.; Chu, C.-C.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in structural quieting technology as applied to active truss structures intended for high precision space based optics applications. Collocated active damping control loops are designed in order to impedance match piezoelectric active members to the structure. Noncollocated control loops are also studied in relation to controlling lightly damped structures.

  6. Potential of Porous-Media Combustion Technology as Applied to Internal Combustion Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Weclas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the knowledge concerning porous media combustion techniques as applied in engines. One of most important reasons of this review is to introduce this still not well known technology to researchers doing with internal combustion engine processes, thermal engines, reactor thermodynamics, combustion, and material science. The paper gives an overview of possible applications of a highly porous open cell structures to in-cylinder processes. This application means utilization of unique features of porous media for supporting engine processes, especially fuel distribution in space, vaporization, mixing with air, heat recuperation, ignition and combustion. There are three ways for applying porous medium technology to engines: support of individual processes, support of homogeneous combustion process (catalytic and non-catalytic with temperature control, and utilization of the porous structure as a heat capacitor only. In the first type of application, the porous structure may be utilized for fuel vaporization and improved fuel distribution in space making the mixture more homogeneous in the combustion chamber. Extension of these processes to mixture formation and ignition inside a combustion reactor allows the realization of a homogeneous and a nearly zero emissions level combustion characterized by a homogeneous temperature field at reduced temperature level.

  7. 活性炭自燃点测定及影响因素研究%Study on the influence factors of spontaneous combustion of activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栗娜

    2014-01-01

    自燃火灾在诸多类型火灾中所占比例较小,但火灾发生后往往造成较大的经济损失。本实验以活性炭为研究对象,分别制备了不同氧化程度、粒径、含水率的系列样品,利用自燃性能测试仪,分别对制备的系列样品进行了实验研究,找出了影响活性炭自燃点的因素并对其原因进行讨论。实验结果表明,氧化程度、含水率和粒径是影响活性炭自燃的重要因素。对活性炭自燃火灾的原因调查和物证鉴定工作具有一定的指导意义,也能为活性炭使用行业提供相应的参考帮助,同时为消防教学丰富相关的资料。%The spontaneous combustion fire occured low proportion in the fire summary ,but often caused great losses once it happened. In this paper ,We fecused on activated carbon ,the series of activated carbon samples with different influence factors had been prepared by the self-ignition test machine and their self-ignition temperature had been tested. The results show that the oxidation degree ,particle size and the humility are the important influnce factors of the activated carbon self-ignition temperature.

  8. Use of filtered combustion light and backlit high-speed images in combustion stability studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, B.; Wierman, M.; Anderson, W. E.

    2013-03-01

    The measurement of the heat release is a key part of characterizing the combustion instability, but it is extremely difficult to directly measure in a rocket combustion chamber due to high temperatures and pressures, as well as the complexity of the turbulent reacting flowfield, which can often have more than one phase. Measuring the light emission from excited species during a combustion is a nonintrusive method to approximate a global heat release in combustion chambers. CH∗ and OH∗ are the most often measured species. This paper outlines methods of using a filtered combustion light to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms active in the combustion instability, and to provide partial validation data for predictive models of the combustion instability. Methods that are discussed include Rayleigh index, phase-angle plots, a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), and a simultaneous imaging of combustion light and backlit flow structures. The methods are applied to an experiment that studies the effects of imposed transverse oscillations on a gas-centered, swirl-coaxial injector element.

  9. Automotive active noise control (ANC) system. Jidoshayo active noise control (ANC) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, S. (Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-11-25

    This paper introduces a successful development of an active noise control (ANC) system that selects and controls noise in an automobile compartment. This is a system that Nissan has developed for practical use for the first time in the world by using an adaptive control theory and a digital signal processor (DSP) that uses ultra-high speed operating elements. The principle for noise silencing in the ANC system utilizes interference of cyclic amplitude of sound with opposite phase. Sounds in an automobile include informative sounds, agreeable sounds, and noise, and combinations of these sounds work complexly on people in a car, of which extent varies depending on individuals. The adaptive control minimizes sounds picked up by a microphone into controlled speaker sound via an multiple error filtered algorithm (MEF-[sub X]LMS) and an adaptive digital filter. Major components of the system include a microphone, a speaker, and a control unit (comprising the adaptive algorithm and the adaptive filter), all having been developed newly. A DSP that operates on ultra-high speed operating elements was used for speedy compliance with complex algorithms, so that the controlled sound combined of engine noise with compartment sound field can be calculated. The noise was reduced by more than 10 dB at maximum. 7 figs.

  10. Alkali activation of recovered fuel-biofuel fly ash from fluidised-bed combustion: Stabilisation/solidification of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yliniemi, Juho; Pesonen, Janne; Tiainen, Minna; Illikainen, Mirja

    2015-09-01

    Recovered fuel-biofuel fly ash from a fluidized bed boiler was alkali-activated and granulated with a sodium-silicate solution in order to immobilise the heavy metals it contains. The effect of blast-furnace slag and metakaolin as co-binders were studied. Leaching standard EN 12457-3 was applied to evaluate the immobilisation potential. The results showed that Ba, Pb and Zn were effectively immobilised. However, there was increased leaching after alkali activation for As, Cu, Mo, Sb and V. The co-binders had minimal or even negative effect on the immobilisation. One exception was found for Cr, in which the slag decreased leaching, and one was found for Cu, in which the slag increased leaching. A sequential leaching procedure was utilized to gain a deeper understanding of the immobilisation mechanism. By using a sequential leaching procedure it is possible fractionate elements into watersoluble, acid-soluble, easily-reduced and oxidisable fractions, yielding a total 'bioavailable' amount that is potentially hazardous for the environment. It was found that the total bioavailable amount was lower following alkali activation for all heavy metals, although the water-soluble fraction was higher for some metals. Evidence from leaching tests suggests the immobilisation mechanism was chemical retention, or trapping inside the alkali activation reaction products, rather than physical retention, adsorption or precipitation as hydroxides.

  11. Two phase exhaust for internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuk, Carl T [Denver, IA

    2011-11-29

    An internal combustion engine having a reciprocating multi cylinder internal combustion engine with multiple valves. At least a pair of exhaust valves are provided and each supply a separate power extraction device. The first exhaust valves connect to a power turbine used to provide additional power to the engine either mechanically or electrically. The flow path from these exhaust valves is smaller in area and volume than a second flow path which is used to deliver products of combustion to a turbocharger turbine. The timing of the exhaust valve events is controlled to produce a higher grade of energy to the power turbine and enhance the ability to extract power from the combustion process.

  12. Combustion Reactivity of Rice Husk:An Experimantal and Numerical Investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q.T.Pham; I.R.Brown; 等

    1993-01-01

    The combustion reactivity of rice husk from New South Wales,ustralia was measured by heating cubical baskets in controlled environment and monitoring the centre temperature.Frank-Kamenetskii's ignition theory was used to calculate the activation energy,Results agreed well with tests on other cellulosic materials,Numerical simulations of temperature changes were carried out,using a special technique to deal with non-linearities in the heat conduction equation.The numerical Results indicate that the time factor should be taken into account when evaluating self-combustion risks.

  13. Free-radicals aided combustion with scramjet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Kumar, Ramohalli

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations aimed at altering 'nature-prescribed' combustion rates in hydrogen/hydrocarbon reactions with (enriched) air are presented. The intent is to anchor flame zones in supersonic streams, and to ensure proper and controllable complete combustion in scramjets. The diagnostics are nonintrusive through IR thermograms and acoustic emissions in the control and free-radicals altered flame zones.

  14. Headspace-solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer and to enantioselective gas chromatography for strawberry flavoured food quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipilliti, Luisa; Dugo, Paola; Bonaccorsi, Ivana; Mondello, Luigi

    2011-10-21

    Authenticity assessment of flavoured strawberry foods was performed using headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). An authenticity range was achieved, investigating on the carbon isotope ratio of numerous selected aroma active volatile components (methyl butanoate, ethyl butanoate, hex-(2E)-enal, methyl hexanoate, buthyl butanoate, ethyl hexanoate, hexyl acetate, linalool, hexyl butanoate, octyl isovalerate, γ-decalactone and octyl hexanoate) of organic Italian fresh strawberries. To the author's knowledge, this is the first time that all these components were investigated simultaneously by GC-C-IRMS on the same sample. The results were compared, when applicable, with those obtained by analyzing the HS-SPME extracts of commercial flavoured food matrices. In addition, one Kenyan pineapple and one fresh Italian peach were analyzed to determine the δ(13)C(VPDB) of the volatile components common to strawberry. The δ(13)C(VPDB) values are allowed to differentiate between different biogenetic pathways (C(3) and CAM plants) and more interestingly between plants of the same CO(2) fixation group (C(3) plants). Additional analyses were performed on all the samples by means of Enantioselective Gas Chromatography (Es-GC), measuring the enantiomeric distribution of linalool and γ-decalactone. It was found that GC-C-IRMS and Es-GC measurements were in agreement to detect the presence of non-natural strawberry aromas in the food matrices studied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A highly combustible composite solid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonetaka, K.; Iketani, Y.; Nisino, A.; Takeuti, Y.

    1983-07-12

    To increase the combustibility, the briqueted solid fuel is coated with an auxiliary fuel which is characterized by high flamability. The composition ofthe basic fuel includes a solid fuel with a high combustion temperature and seeming density (mineral coal, activated charcoal, coke, graphite and a carbonized product), a desulfurizing agent (CaCO3 or MgO), a combustion promotor (Ca(CO3)2, KNO3, sodium acetate, iron oxalate) and forming additives (bentonite, clay or talc) or a binder (pitch, tar, methylcellulose or cement). The auxiliary fuel has the very same composition, but is characterized by a low ignition temperature and density (for instance, due to the addition of sawdust). The obtained two layer composite fuel is characterized by improved ignitibility and combustibility.

  16. Technologies adopted in the lean-burn GA15DE engine for improving combustion and controlling the air-fuel ratio; Kogata 4 kito lean burn engine (GA15DE) ni okeru nensho kaizen oyobi seigyo gijutsu ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K.; Matsumura, M. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-10-07

    This paper summarizes an automotive engine with improved fuel consumption, having realized lean combustion. The lean-burn engine is such an engine that can be operated in an air-fuel ratio compatible in the combustion stability limit and the NOx emission limit by means of combustion improvement, and achieved improvement in fuel consumption as the result. The engine can be expected of higher fuel consumption improving effect than the EGR of the conventional engines because of the lean-burn mechanism. The newly developed lean-burn engine is characterized by less change in its specifications from the basic specifications. Lean fuel burning requires creating a gas mixture condition that is easy to ignite and acquiring a gas flowing field which spreads quickly upon ignition. To achieve these goals, swirl control valves and phase difference cams were disposed. Further, long-discharge coils are used to improve the ignitability. In order to operate the tertiary catalyst more effectively, an A/F sensor that operates in the catalytic area was adopted for the air-fuel ratio feedback control in place of an O2 sensor. The mileage of a vehicle equipped with the lean-burn engine was increased by 17.8% to 20.5 km/l. 2 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. NH4Cl对机械活化Al粉燃烧合成AlN的控制%Effects of NH4CI on the synthesis of aluminum nitride by the spontaneous combustion of mechanically activated aluminium powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建平; 张晖

    2011-01-01

    添加NH4Cl到经由高能球磨制得的机械活化铝粉中后,铝粉在空气中于室温下即可发生自燃反应.本研究通过含有不同量NH4Cl的机械活化铝粉的自燃制得了Al2O3-AlN疏松粉末,并研究了NH4CL添加量对燃烧产物成分和结构的控制.结果表明:NH4Cl不仅控制了产物的形貌,而且改变了铝粉的氮化初理.在NH4Cl添加量为3%~5%(质量分数)时,所得燃烧产物颗粒大小相对较均匀,并含有700%(质量分数)以上的AlN.%With the addition of NH4CI, the mechanically activated aluminum powder made by high energy ball milling could bum spontaneously in air at room temperature with the formation of Al2O3-AIN powder. In this study, AIN powders were prepared by the spontaneous combustion of aluminum powder including different amounts of NH4CI. The effects of NH4Cl content on the composition and structure of the combustion product were studied by characterizing the phase and morphology of combustion products. The results show that NH4CI not only affects the morphology of products, but also changes the nitridation mechanism of aluminum powder. When 3%~5% (mass fraction) NH4CI is added, the sizes of particles included in the combustion product show small variation and the content of AIN in the combustion product is above 70% (mass fraction).

  18. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion of Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels Dyhr

    mechanism greatly reduces both. Reaction paths for methanol and methane were included amongst the elementary reactions, since these two fuels are commonly used to control the radical behavior in the initial phase of combustion and hence the combustion phasing of the fuel in an engine, as well as enabling...... an increase in engine power. The use of methanol for combustion phasing control was tested successfully in a large diesel engine with common rail, in which the piston bowls were widened to give a compression ratio of 14.5. This compression ratio still allows DI CI operation with DME, but requires...... a substantial combustion delay in HCCI operation with DME to achieve post TDC combustion. By adding methanol to the inlet port during HCCI combustion of DME, the engine reached 50 percent of its full DI CI load capability without engine knock at 1000 rpm and somewhat less at 1800 rpm. The engine also had EGR...

  19. Optimal Control of Active Recoil Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    pressures in different chambers, rod pull are available and can be plotted. A linear state feedback control system is proposed to adapt this...desirable. A linear state feedback control system with variable gains is proposed in the report. A separate control law is designed for each...optimization algorithm to choose a feasible solution. 27 3.3 Results for M-37 Recoil Mechanism The linear state feedback control system and

  20. Combustion characteristics of aluminium-iron oxidein SHS-gravitational process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to get high quality of products, the combustion of aluminium-iron oxide thermite in SHS-gravitational process must be under control. The effects of thermite filling density, hole in thermite and inclined angle of pipe on combustion rate were studied. It shows that the combustion rate decreases with the decrease of filling density. The thermite combusts downwards the pipe much more quickly if there are holes in the thermite. And the combustion rate increases with the increase of the inclined angle of pipe. The experiment results show that the combustion of thermite is predominantly controlled by gas phasereaction, which is attributed to the high temperature of the thermitecombustion.

  1. Active Vibration Control of a Flexible Structure Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fei

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been devoted recently to active vibration control using intelligent materials as actuators. This paper presents results on active control schemes for vibration suppression of flexible steel cantilever beam with bonded piezoelectric actuators. The PZT patches are surface bonded near the fixed end of flexible steel cantilever beam. The dynamic model of the flexible steel cantilever beam is derived. Active vibration control methods, strain rate feedback control (SRF, positive position feedback control (PPF are investigated and implemented using xPC Target real-time system. Experimental results demonstrate that the SRF control and PPF control achieve effective vibration suppression results of steel cantilever beam.

  2. Active control of transient rotordynamic vibration by optimal control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, A. B.; Lin, R. R.; Alexander, R. M.; Kascak, A. F.

    1988-01-01

    Although considerable effort has been put into the study of steady state vibration control, there are few methods applicable to transient vibration control of rotorbearing systems. In this paper optimal control theory has been adopted to minimize rotor vibration due to sudden imbalance, e.g., blade loss. The system gain matrix is obtained by choosing the weighting matrices and solving the Riccati equation. Control forces are applied to the system via a feedback loop. A seven mass rotor system is simulated for illustration. A relationship between the number of sensors and the number of modes used in the optimal control model is investigated. Comparisons of responses are made for various configurations of modes, sensors, and actuators. Furthermore, spillover effect is examined by comparing results from collocated and noncollocated sensor configurations. Results show that shaft vibration is significantly attenuated in the closed loop system.

  3. Low Activity Waste Feed Process Control Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-06-14

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF COMBUSTION, PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF DI DIESEL ENGINE UNDER HCCI MODE WITH POROUS MEDIUM COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C KANNAN

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, homogeneous combustion has been a proven technology to attain high efficient and low emission engines. Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engines are able to have efficiencies as high as Compression Ignition, Direct Injection (CIDI engines, while producing ultra-low emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx and particulate matter (PM.HCCI combustion is achieved by controlling the temperature, pressure and composition of the fuel-air mixture so that it spontaneously gets ignited in the combustion chamber. Numeroustechniques such as Variable Exhaust Gas Recirculation (VEGR, ariable Compression Ratio (VCR and Variable Valve Timing (VVT have been proposed to control the homogeneous combustion inside the engine cylinder. Even though these techniques are attractive and having good time response, they are too expensive to afford. This paper investigates the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Direct Injection (DI diesel engine under HCCI mode which is established through an effective and affordable technique called Porous Medium Combustion (PMC.

  5. Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelbaum, Richard; Xia, Fei; Gopan, Akshay; Kumfer, Benjamin

    2014-09-30

    Washington University in St. Louis and its project partners are developing a unique pressurized oxy-combustion process that aims to improve efficiency and costs by reducing the recycling of flue gas to near zero. Normally, in the absence of recycled flue gas or another inert gas, combustion of fuel and oxygen results in a dramatic increase in temperature of the combustion products and radiant energy, as compared to combustion in air. High heat flux to the boiler tubes may result in a tube surface temperatures that exceed safe operating limits. In the Staged Pressurized Oxy-Combustion (SPOC) process, this problem is addressed by staging the delivery of fuel and by novel combustion design that allows control of heat flux. In addition, the main mode of heat transfer to the steam cycle is by radiation, as opposed to convection. Therefore, the requirement for recycling large amounts of flue gas, for temperature control or to improve convective heat transfer, is eliminated, resulting in a reduction in auxiliary loads. The following report contains a detailed summary of scientific findings and accomplishments for the period of Oct. 1, 2013 to Sept 30, 2014. Results of ASPEN process and CFD modelling activities aimed at improving the SPOC process and boiler design are presented. The effects of combustion pressure and fuel moisture on the plant efficiency are discussed. Combustor pressure is found to have only a minor impact beyond 16 bar. For fuels with moisture content greater than approx 30%, e.g. coal/water slurries, the amount of latent heat of condensation exceeds that which can be utilized in the steam cycle and plant efficiency is reduced significantly. An improved boiler design is presented that achieves a more uniform heat flux profile. In addition, a fundamental study of radiation in high-temperature, high-pressure, particle-laden flows is summarized which provides a more complete understanding of heat transfer in these unusual conditions and to allow for

  6. Progressive combustion in SI-Engines—Experimental investigation on influence of combustion related parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Harish Kumar; A J Antony

    2008-12-01

    The fuel heat release rate which virtually controls the combustion process is dependent on the ‘Mass-Fraction-Burnt (MFB)’. In the present research work, a ‘logistic model with conditional variability in MFB’, has been developed for precise simulation of combustion in SI engines as the model has built in routines to take into account such factors as location of spark plug, single/dual spark plugs, intake generated swirl, combustion chamber geometry (associated with Bore/Stroke ratio), etc. A major contribution of this paper is that new and improved models for the ‘overall combustion duration’, and ‘ignition delay/flame development angle’, taking into account primarily the influence of compression ratio on the overall combustion process in SI engine have been developed. Taylor’s original equation for estimating the overall combustion duration has been modified by including a logistic equation for the error term and incorporating it in the original equation. Ignition delay as proposed by Keck et al has been modified by incorporating a polynomial of 3rd order into the original equation. The empirical correlations that have been proposed in this paper may serve to be the starting point for simulation of ‘photodetonation concept’ to simulate HCCI combustion which is presently the hot research work in the area of pre-mixed combustion. A program in Turbo-C++ has been developed for the complete simulation of SI engine combustion, taking into account the conditional variability effect, variable specific heats of burnt gases, dissociation of gases at high temperatures, progressive combustion phenomena, heat transfer (based on Woschni‘s equation), gas exchange process based on 1D-steady gas flow equation employing Taylor’s mach index of 0·6 for valve design.

  7. DSP Control of Line Hybrid Active Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan, Stan George; Benjamin, Doniga Daniel; Magureanu, R.;

    2005-01-01

    Active Power Filters have been intensively explored in the past decade. Hybrid active filters inherit the efficiency of passive filters and the improved performance of active filters, and thus constitute a viable improved approach for harmonic compensation. In this paper a parallel hybrid filter ...

  8. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report - France 2010; Rapport d'activites Hydrogene et Piles a combustible - France 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The report gathers the main outstanding facts which occurred in France in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in 2010. After having noticed some initiatives (the Grenelle II law, an investment package, the new role of the CEA, the new role of the IFP), the report presents several projects and programs regarding hydrogen: ANR programs, creation of a national structure (the HyPaC platform), regional initiatives and local actions, colloquiums and meetings in France and in the world, research projects (photo-synthesis as a new electric energy source), a technical-economic investigation (HyFrance3), demonstrator projects (the Althytude project by GDF and Suez, the Plathee hybrid locomotive by the SNCF, the H2E project, the Zero CO{sub 2} sailing boat, and the Myrte project), educational applications, activity in small and medium-sized enterprises (CETH, SAGIM, HYCAN, McPhy, N-GHY).

  9. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report - France 2009; Rapport d'activites Hydrogene et Piles a combustible - France 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The report gathers the main outstanding facts which occurred in France in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in 2009. After having noticed some initiatives (French commitment in renewable energy production, new role for the CEA, cooperation between different research and industrial bodies, development of electric vehicles, research programs), the report presents several projects and programs regarding hydrogen: ANR programs, creation of a national structure, basic research by the CEA and CNRS, demonstration projects (H2E), transport applications (a hybrid 307 by Peugeot, the Althytude project by GDF and Suez, the Hychain European project by Air Liquide, a dirigible airship, an ultra-light aviation project, a submarine), some stationary applications (the Myrte project, a wind energy project), activity in small and medium-sized enterprises, regional initiatives, colloquiums and meetings.

  10. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  11. Optimization of control bars patterns and fuel recharges of coupled form; Optimizacion de patrones de barras de control y recargas de combustible de forma acoplada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia S, D.M.; Ortiz S, J.J. [ININ, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: dulcema6715@hotmail.com

    2006-07-01

    In this work a system coupled for the optimization of fuel recharges and control bars patterns in boiling water reactors (BWR by its initials in English) is presented. It was used a multi state recurrent neural net like optimization technique. This type of neural net has been used in the solution of diverse problems, in particular the design of patterns of control bars and the design of the fuel recharge. However, these problems have been resolved in an independent way with different optimization techniques. The system was developed in FORTRAN 77 language, it calls OCORN (Optimization of Cycles of Operation using Neural Nets) and it solves both problems of combinatory optimization in a coupled way. OCORN begins creating a seed recharge by means of an optimization through the Haling principle. Later on a pattern of control bars for this recharge seed is proposed. Then a new fuel recharge is designed using the control bars patterns previously found. By this way an iterative process begins among the optimization of control bars patterns and the fuel recharge until a stop criteria it is completed. The stop criteria is completed when the fuel recharges and the control bars patterns don't vary in several successive iterations. The final result is an optimal fuel recharge and its respective control bars pattern. In this work the obtained results by this system for a cycle of balance of 18 months divided in 12 steps of burnt are presented. The obtained results are very encouraging, since the fuel recharge and the control bars pattern, its fulfill with the restrictions imposed in each one of the problems. (Author)

  12. Combustion Synthesis in a Mechanically Activated Mg-C-TiO2-H3BO3 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminikia, B.; Tayebifard, S. A.; Youzbashi, A. A.

    2012-06-01

    TiC-TiB2 nanocomposite was fabricated by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) of mechanically milled powders. H3BO3, TiO2, Mg, and C as starting materials were milled for 0.5, 1, and 3 h then pressed to form pellets. Green compacts were placed in a tube furnace which had been preheated to three different temperatures of 900, 1000, and 1100 °C with argon atmosphere, for the synthesis. The prepared samples were studied by XRD, SEM, and TEM analytical technique. TiC and TiB2 were not formed during milling process. According to the XRD patterns of synthesized samples, ball milling for 0.5 h is the optimum time for mechanical activation of the mixed powders. Further investigation indicated that 900 °C is the best temperature for the synthesis of this mixture. By using Williamson-Hall method, the average crystallite sizes of TiB2 and TiC were calculated 40.7 and 75.6 nm, respectively, which were confirmed by TEM images.

  13. Project of multiple controller models for the maintenance of air/fuel ratio in natural gas internal combustion motors; Projeto de controladores multiplos modelos para manutencao da relacao ar/combustivel em motores de combustao interna movidos a gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas Junior, Fernando Sousa e; Fleury, Agenor de Toledo [Sao Paulo Univ. SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: ffreitas@usp.br; agfleury@ipt.br

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work is the study of advanced control techniques for the reduction of pollutant gases generated by internal combustion engines powered by natural gas. In this paper three techniques are applied to control the fuel injection and the ignition timing: the Generalized Predictive Control (GPC), the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and H{infinity} Control by Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMI). To each one of those techniques were developed a multiple model structure seeking to include the vast operation region of the engine. The controller's performance is measured by the efficiency in maintaining the fuel/air ratio around 1% of maximum deviation in relation to the stoichiometric value. The results show the possibility of controlling pollutant emission generated by this kind of engine to conform to international emission standards, improving life quality. (author)

  14. Improving combustion efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulsari, A.; Wemberg, A.; Multas, A. [Nonlinear Solutions Oy (Finland)

    2009-06-15

    The paper describes how nonlinear models are used to improve the efficiency of coal combustion while keeping NOx and other emissions under desired limits in the Naantali 2 boiler of Fortum Power and Heat Oy. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Fluidized coal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, P. I.; Young, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Fluidized-bed coal combustion process, in which pulverized coal and limestone are burned in presence of forced air, may lead to efficient, reliable boilers with low sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide emissions.

  16. Modelling diesel combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, P A; Shi, Yu; Reitz, Rolf D

    2010-01-01

    The underlying principles of combustion phenomena are presented here, providing the basis for quantitative evaluation. These phenomena - ignition delay, fuel air mixing, rate of release, etc. - are then modelled for greater understanding and applicability.

  17. TENORM: Coal Combustion Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burning coal in boilers to create steam for power generation and industrial applications produces a number of combustion residuals. Naturally radioactive materials that were in the coal mostly end up in fly ash, bottom ash and boiler slag.

  18. Control of NO sub x emissions by combustion-air staging: the measurement of NH sub 3 , HCN, NO and N sub 2 O concentrations in fuel-oil flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimmo, W.; Hampartsoumian, E.; Sedighi, K.; Williams, A. (Leeds Univ. (GB). Dept. of Fuel and Energy)

    1991-09-01

    The control of NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen in the combustion of coal and oil can give significant reductions in the final emission. One of the simplest and most cost-effective combustion modifications is that of staging the combustion air, whereby up to 50% is separated from the primary air and introduced into the flame further downstream. Thus the early part of the flame has a fuel-rich centre which provides a chemical environment that encourages the reaction of NO to form harmless products N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The work presented here has investigated the in-flame development of NH{sub 3}, HCN, NO and N{sub 2}O for an unstaged and a staged (35%) oil flame, since they are the principal intermediates in the formation of NO. The oil spray was characterised by means of a laser particle-sizing technique over a range of oil pressures and combustion-air flows and two nozzle spray angles. The results were correlated with NO{sub x} emission measurements. The air-staging results showed that the virtually oxygen-free condition at the centre of the staged flame altered the ratio of HCN:NH{sub 3} significantly, and that in-flame development of NO was limited. Measurements of N{sub 2}O emissions from the unstaged and staged flames showed levels of typically less than 2 vpm in the exit flue, but the in-flame measurements showed that the unstaged flame exhibited a peak of circa 6 vpm at an axial position coincident with maximum NO concentrations. The staged flame did not display this feature. (author).

  19. Fine particle emissions from residential wood combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissari, J.

    2008-07-01

    Residential wood combustion (RWC) appliances have the high probability of incomplete combustion, producing e.g. fine particles and hazardous organic compounds. In this thesis, the fine particle number and mass emissions, particle composition and morphology, and gas emissions were investigated from the modern (MMH) and conventional masonry heaters (CMH), sauna stoves (SS) and pellet burner. The investigation was based on laboratory and field experiments applying extensive and unique particle sampling methods. The appliance type, fuel and operational practices were found to affect clearly the fine particle emissions. In good combustion conditions (e.g. in pellet combustion), the fine particle mass (PM{sub 1}) emission factors were low, typically below 0.3 g kg-1, and over 90% of the PM{sub 1} consisted of inorganic compounds (i.e fine ash). From the CMH the typical PM{sub 1} values were 1.6-1.8 g kg-1, and from the SS 2.7-5.0 g kg-1, but were strongly dependent on operational practices. The smouldering combustion in CMH increased PM{sub 1} emission up to 10 g kg-1. The good secondary combustion in the MMH reduced the particle organic matter (POM) and gaseous emissions, but not substantially the elemental carbon (EC, i.e. soot) emission, and the typical PM{sub 1} values were 0.7-0.8 g kg-1. The particle number emissions were high, and did not correspond with the completition of combustion. The particle number distributions were mainly dominated by ultrafine (<100 nm) particles, but varied dependent on combustion conditions. The electronmicroscopy analyses showed that ultrafine particles were composed mainly of K, S and Zn. From the smouldering combustion, particles were composed mainly of carbon compounds and they had a closed sinteredlike structure, due to organic matter on the particles. Controlling the gasification rate via the primary air supply, log and batch size, as well as fuel moisture content, is important for the reduction of emissions in batch combustion

  20. METC Combustion Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halow, J.S.; Maloney, D.J.; Richards, G.A.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) high pressure combustion facility is to provide a mid-scale facility for combustion and cleanup research to support DOE`s advanced gas turbine, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleanup programs. The facility is intended to fill a gap between lab scale facilities typical of universities and large scale combustion/turbine test facilities typical of turbine manufacturers. The facility is now available to industry and university partners through cooperative programs with METC. High pressure combustion research is also important to other DOE programs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems and second-generation, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems use gas turbines/electric generators as primary power generators. The turbine combustors play an important role in achieving high efficiency and low emissions in these novel systems. These systems use a coal-derived fuel gas as fuel for the turbine combustor. The METC facility is designed to support coal fuel gas-fired combustors as well as the natural gas fired combustor used in the advanced turbine program.

  1. Tuning of active vibration controllers for ACTEX by genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1999-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal tuning of digitally programmable analog controllers on the ACTEX-1 smart structures flight experiment. The programmable controllers for each channel include a third order Strain Rate Feedback (SRF) controller, a fifth order SRF controller, a second order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, and a fourth order PPF controller. Optimal manual tuning of several control parameters can be a difficult task even though the closed-loop control characteristics of each controller are well known. Hence, the automatic tuning of individual control parameters using Genetic Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The optimal control parameters of each control law are obtained by imposing a constraint on the closed-loop frequency response functions using the ACTEX mathematical model. The tuned control parameters are then uploaded to the ACTEX electronic control electronics and experiments on the active vibration control are carried out in space. The experimental results on ACTEX will be presented.

  2. Active vibration and noise control by hybrid active acoustic panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoebener, U.; Gaul, L. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. A fuer Mechanik

    2001-07-01

    In the present paper a hybrid passive and active treatment for vibration and noise reduction of plate type structures is proposed. The treatment is manufactured as sandwich structure and is called hybrid active acoustic panel. The passive component is used to reduce the vibration and sound radiation for high frequencies whereas the active part of the system is designed for the low frequency range. By selecting the thickness of the passive damping layer a certain frequency limit is defined, which divides the high and low frequency range. The actuator and sensor layout of the active component is evaluated by using the mode shapes of the low frequency range. According to the evaluated layout a hybrid active acoustic panel is manufactured and experimentally tested. The experimental results validate the proposed concept. (orig.)

  3. Heavy fuel oil pyrolysis and combustion: kinetics and evolved gases investigated by TGA-FTIR

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2017-08-24

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) obtained from crude oil distillation is a widely used fuel in marine engines and power generation technologies. In the present study, the pyrolysis and combustion of a Saudi Arabian HFO in nitrogen and in air, respectively, were investigated using non-isothermal thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. TG and DTG (differential thermo-gravimetry) were used for the kinetic analysis and to study the mass loss characteristics due to the thermal degradation of HFO at temperatures up to 1000°C and at various heating rates of 5, 10 and 20°C/min, in air and N2 atmospheres. FTIR analysis was then performed to study the composition of the evolved gases. The TG/DTG curves during HFO combustion show the presence of three distinct stages: the low temperature oxidation (LTO); fuel decomposition (FD); and high temperature oxidation (HTO) stages. The TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO pyrolysis show the presence of two devolatilization stages similar to that seen in the LTO stage of HFO combustion. Apart from this, the TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO combustion and pyrolysis differ significantly. Kinetic analysis was also performed using the distributed activation energy model, and the kinetic parameter (E) was determined for the different stages of HFO combustion and pyrolysis processes, yielding a good agreement with the measured TG profiles. FTIR analysis showed the signal of CO2 as approximately 50 times more compared to the other pollutant gases under combustion conditions. Under pyrolytic conditions, the signal intensity of alkane functional groups was the highest followed by alkenes. The TGA-FTIR results provide new insights into the overall HFO combustion processes, which can be used to improve combustor designs and control emissions.

  4. Nitrate control strategies in an activated sludge wastewater treatment process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wenhao; Tao, Erpan; Chen, Xiaoquan; Liu, Dawei [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Hongbin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We studied nitrate control strategies in an activated sludge wastewater treatment process (WWTP) based on the activated sludge model. Two control strategies, back propagation for proportional-integral-derivative (BP-PID) and adaptive-network based fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS), are applied in the WWTP. The simulation results show that the simple local constant setpoint control has poor control effects on the nitrate concentration control. However, the ANFIS (4*1) controller, which considers not only the local constant setpoint control of the nitrate concentration, but also three important indices in the effluent--ammonia concentration, total suspended sludge concentration and total nitrogen concentration--demonstrates good control performance. The results also prove that ANFIS (4*1) controller has better control performance than that of the controllers PI, BP-PID and ANFIS (2*1), and that the ANFIS (4*1) controller is effective in improving the effluent quality and maintaining the stability of the effluent quality.

  5. Model and experiments of diesel fuel HCCI combustion with external mixture formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canova, M.; Vosz, A.; Dumbauld, D.; Garcin, R.; Midlam-Mohler, S.; Guezennec, Y.; Rizzoni, G. [Ohio State Univ. (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition represents a promising concept for achieving high efficiencies and low emissions at part-load operations. In particular, HCCI combustion can be successfully applied to conventional Direct Injection Diesel engines with very low extra costs and no modification to the DI system by performing the mixture formation in the intake manifold with a novel fuel atomizer. The present paper describes the experimental and modeling activity oriented to the control of HCCI combustion on a conventional CIDI 4-cylinder engine fitted with this external fueling device. Paralleling preliminary results obtained last year on single-cylinder engine in collaboration with FKFS at the University of Stuttgart, Diesel-fuel HCCI combustion was achieved and characterized over a range of engine speeds, loads, EGR dilution and boost pressure. Stable HCCI combustion with negligible NO{sub x} formation (10 ppm) was achieved with no modification of a high compression ratio engine (c{sub r}=18). The in-cylinder pressure traces were analyzed by performing a detailed heat release analysis while accounting for the wall heat transfer, which is substantially higher during the combustion phase than in a conventional CIDI engine. This analysis led to the joint identification of 2 sub-models: a heat transfer model, and a heat release model. It was found that under the wide range of conditions experimentally measured, the heat release can be approximated by the superposition of 3 Wiebe functions. The sub-models developed were then implemented in a combustion model based on a first-law thermodynamic analysis of in-cylinder processes, in order to identify the influence of the main control parameters on HCCI auto-ignition and to control the combustion process in a HCCI Diesel engine with external mixture formation. The model predictions were then compared to the results of a parallel experimental activity made on a 4-cylinder CIDI Diesel engine equipped with the fuel

  6. Active magnetic bearing system based on sliding mode control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhong

    2017-07-01

    A new sliding mode variable structure control algorithm suitable for active magnetic bearing is proposed, which is widely used for nonlinear control system. The model and controller is designed, simulation and experimental parts are also made, according to the switching function and the sliding mode control law. The current of electromagnet is adjusted to realize stable levitation of the rotor. The experimental result shows that the sliding mode variable structure controller is an effective way for magnetic bearing control, and the active magnetic bearing system is a highly nonlinear and advanced control method that can reduce the setting time and the cost.

  7. Flow and Combustion in Advanced Gas Turbine Combustors

    CERN Document Server

    Janicka, Johannes; Schäfer, Michael; Heeger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    With regard to both the environmental sustainability and operating efficiency demands, modern combustion research has to face two main objectives, the optimization of combustion efficiency and the reduction of pollutants. This book reports on the combustion research activities carried out within the Collaborative Research Center (SFB) 568 “Flow and Combustion in Future Gas Turbine Combustion Chambers” funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). This aimed at designing a completely integrated modeling and numerical simulation of the occurring very complex, coupled and interacting physico-chemical processes, such as turbulent heat and mass transport, single or multi-phase flows phenomena, chemical reactions/combustion and radiation, able to support the development of advanced gas turbine chamber concepts.

  8. Combustion of Sewage Sludge as Alternative Fuel for Cement Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fuzhou; ZHANG Wei

    2011-01-01

    The combustion of sewage sludge and coal was studied by thermogravimetric analysis.Both differential scanning calorimetric analysis and derivative thermogravimetric profiles showed differences between combustion of sewage sludge and coal, and non-isothermal kinetics analysis method was applied to evaluate the combustion process. Based on Coats-Redfem integral method, some reaction models were tested,the mechanism and kinetics of the combustion reaction were discussed. The results show that the combustion of sewage sludge is mainly in the Iow temperature stage, meanwhile the ignition temperature and Arrhenius activation energy are lower than that of coal. The combustion of sewage sludge has the advantage over coal in some aspects, thus sewage sludge can partly replace coal used as cement industry fuel.

  9. Active chatter control in a milling machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohner, J.L.; Hinnerichs, T.D.; Lauffer, J.P. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The use of active feedback compensation to mitigate cutting instabilities in an advanced milling machine is discussed in this paper. A linear structural model delineating dynamics significant to the onset of cutting instabilities was combined with a nonlinear cutting model to form a dynamic depiction of an existing milling machine. The model was validated with experimental data. Modifications made to an existing machine model were used to predict alterations in dynamics due to the integration of active feedback compensation. From simulations, subcomponent requirements were evaluated and cutting enhancements were predicted. Active compensation was shown to enable more than double the metal removal rate over conventional milling machines. 25 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Digitally Controlled ’Programmable’ Active Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    Mitra, S. K., Analysis and Synthesis of Linear Active .. Networks, Wiley, New York, 1969. * 6. Sedra , A. S. and Smith , K. C., "A Second-Generation...Current Conveyor and its Applications," IEEE Trans. Circuit Theory, Vol. CT-17, pp. 132-134, 1970. 7. Sedra , A. S., "A New Approach to Active Network...CT-18, pp. 358-361, May 1971. 27. Hamilton, T. A., and Sedra , A. S., "Some New IJ Configurations for Active Filters," IEEE Trans. Circuit Tehory, Vol

  11. Controlling postoperative ileus by vagal activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tim; Lubbers; Wim; Buurman; Misha; Luyer

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative ileus is a frequently occurring surgical complication, leading to increased morbidity and hospital stay. Abdominal surgical interventions are known to result in a protracted cessation of bowel movement. Activation of inhibitory neural pathways by nociceptive stimuli leads to an inhibition of propulsive activity, which resolves shortly after closure of the abdomen. The subsequent formation of an inflammatory infiltrate in the muscular layers of the intestine results in a more prolonged phase of...

  12. Active Noise Feedback Control Using a Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Qizhi; Jia Yongle

    2001-01-01

    The active noise control (ANC) is discussed. Many digital ANC systems often based on the filter-x algorithm for finite impulse response (FIR) filter use adaptive filtering techniques. But if the primary noise path is nonlinear, the control system based on adaptive filter technology will be invalid. In this paper, an adaptive active nonlinear noise feedback control approach using a neural network is derived. The feedback control system drives a secondary signal to destructively interfere with ...

  13. Combustion Enhancement Using a Silent Discharge Plasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosocha, Louis; Platts, David; Coates, Don; Stange, Sy

    2003-10-01

    Electric fields affect flame propagation speed, stability, and combustion chemistry. External electrodes, arc discharges, and plasma jets have been used to combust gas mixtures outside their flammability limits. Experiments with silent electrical discharges (SEDs) and propagating flames have shown that flame propagation velocity is actually decreased (combustion retarded) when an SED is applied directly to the flame region, but velocity is increased (combustion promoted) when applied to the unburned gas mixture upstream of a flame. More recent work has proposed electric arc/microwave-driven plasma-generating fuel nozzles to produce dissociated fuel or ionized fuel for aircraft gas turbine engine combustor mixers. In contrast to prior works, we have used a silent discharge plasma (SDP) reactor to break up large fuel molecules into smaller molecules and create free radicals/active species in a gas stream before the fuel is mixed with an oxidizer and combusted. A cylindrical SDP reactor was used to 'activate' propane before mixing it with air and igniting the combustible gas mixture. With the plasma, the physical appearance of the flame changes and substantial changes in mass spectrometer fragmentation peaks for fuel and combustion products are observed (i.e., combustion is enhanced). Results of changes in the degree of combustion will be discussed in terms of variations in the plasma specific energy.

  14. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from

  15. Power active filter control based on a resonant disturbance observer

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Fuentes, German A.; Cortés Romero, John Alexander; Zou, Zhixiang; Costa Castelló, Ramon; Zhou, Keliang

    2015-01-01

    Active filters are power electronics devices used to eliminate harmonics from the distribution network. This article presents an active disturbance rejection control scheme for active filters. The controller is based on a linear disturbance observer combined with a disturbance rejection scheme. The parameter tuning is based on a combined pole placement and an optimal estimation based on Kalman-Bucy filter. Proposed scheme is validated through simulation and experimental work in an active filter.

  16. Towards a general turbulent combustion model for spark ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji, H.; Said, R.; Borghi, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The prediction of combustion within spark ignition engines needs to take into account the interaction of turbulent fluctuations. Previous attempts at this used a model in which the chemical processes were supposed infinitely fast and the combustion was controlled by turbulent mixing only. This paper describes their progress in extending such models in two directions.

  17. STUDY ON MAJOR FACTORS INFLUENCING SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION OF COAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Jun; Xu Jingcai; Zhang Xinghai

    2000-01-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes major factors influencing spontaneous combustion of coal, such as molecule structure of coal, porosity, temperature, concentration of oxygen, coal thickness, velocity of face advance, and so on; and probes into how they affect the process of spontaneous combustion of coal, which is of momentous significance to predict or control self-ignition of coal.

  18. Nonlinear theory of combustion stability in liquid rocket engine based on chemistry dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉辉; 王振国; 周进

    2002-01-01

    Detailed models of combustion instability based on chemistry dynamics are developed. The results show that large activation energy goes against the combustion stability. The heat transfer coefficient between the wall and the combust gas is an important bifurcation parameter for the combustion instability. The acoustics modes of the chamber are in competition and cooperation with each other for limited vibration energy. Thermodynamics criterion of combustion stability can be deduced from the nonlinear thermodynamics. Correlations of the theoretical results and historical experiments indicate that chemical kinetics play a critical role in the combustion instability.

  19. Experimental investigation of active machine tool vibration control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, J.; Liang, Chen; Geng, Zheng J.

    1996-05-01

    The successful vibration reduction of machine tools during machining process can improve productivity, increase quality, and reduce tool wear. This paper will present our initial investigation in the application of smart material technologies in machine tool vibration control using magnetostrictive actuators and electrorheological elastomer dampers on an industrial Sheldon horizontal lathe. The dynamics of the machining process are first studied, which reveals the complexity in the machine tool vibration response and the challenge to the active control techniques. The active control experiment shows encouraging results. The use of electrorheological elastomer damping device for active/passive vibration control provides significant vibration reduction in the high frequency range and great improvement in the workpiece surface finishing. The research presented in this paper demonstrates that the combination of active and active/passive vibration control techniques is very promising for successful machine tool vibration control.

  20. Active control of radiated sound using nearfield pressure sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ke'an; YIN Xuefei

    2004-01-01

    Based on nearfield sound pressure sensing to pick up error information, an approach for constructing active acoustic structure to effectively reduce radiated sound power at low frequency is proposed. The idea is that a nearfield pressure after active control is used as error signals and transformed into an objective function in adaptive active control process.Firstly sound power expression using near-field pressure radiated from a flexible structure is derived, and then three kind of nearfield pressure based active control strategies, I.e. Minimization of radiated sound power, minimization of sound power for dominant radiation modes and minimization of sound power for modified dominant radiation modes are respectively presented and applied to active control of radiated single and broadband noise. Finally computer simulations on sound power reduction under three strategies are conducted and it is shown that the proposed active control strategies are invalid and considerable reduction in radiated sound power can be achieved.