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Sample records for active catalytic sites

  1. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability. PMID:25671686

  2. Study on the active sites of Cu-ZSM-5 in trichloroethylene catalytic combustion with air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Hua Xu; Chuan Qi Liu; Yan Zhong; Xiu Zhou Yang; Jian Ying Liu; Ying Chun Yang; Zhi Xiang Ye

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Cu-ZSM-5 in trichloroethylene (TCE) combustion increases with the increasing skeletal Cu amount and however decreases with the increase of surface amorphous CuO,which is detected by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (DRS-UV-vis),therefore the skeletal Cu species are concluded to be the active sites for the TCE combustion.

  3. Twinning in fcc lattice creates low-coordinated catalytically active sites in porous gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajčí, Marian; Kameoka, Satoshi; Tsai, An-Pang

    2016-08-28

    We describe a new mechanism for creation of catalytically active sites in porous gold. Samples of porous gold prepared by de-alloying Al2Au exhibit a clear correlation between the catalytic reactivity towards CO oxidation and structural defects in the fcc lattice of Au. We have found that on the stepped {211} surfaces quite common twin boundary defects in the bulk structure of porous gold can form long close-packed rows of atoms with the coordination number CN = 6. DFT calculations confirm that on these low-coordinated Au sites dioxygen chemisorbs and CO oxidation can proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the activation energy of 37 kJ/mol or via the CO-OO intermediate with the energy barrier of 19 kJ/mol. The existence of the twins in porous gold is stabilized by the surface energy.

  4. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, Lindsay R; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Flemming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefan

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the "holy grails" is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFT+U calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  5. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, L. R.; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Fleming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefen

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the “holy grails” is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFTþU calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  6. Catalytic combustion of methane on Co/MgO. Characterisation of active cobalt sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulla, M.A.; Spretz, R.; Lombardo, E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica, INCAPE (FIQ, UNL-CONICET), Santiago del Estero 2829, C.P. 3000, Santa Fe (Argentina); Daniell, W.; Knoezinger, H. [Department Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet, Butenandtstr. 5-13, Haus E, D-81377 Muenchen (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    A series of Co/MgO catalysts with 3-12wt.% Co were prepared by impregnation and calcined at 1073K for 10h. The catalytic behaviour of these samples toward CH{sub 4} combustion was found to increase with cobalt loading, though a plateau was reached at ca. 9wt.% Co content. Bulk characterisation was carried out using XRD, TPR and Raman spectroscopy, and showed that the solids were made up of a CoO-MgO solid solution and a MgO phase. A detailed examination of their surfaces was achieved through FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO probe molecules, which indicated that at low cobalt loadings only a small proportion of the Co going into the solid solution was present on exposed faces as either Co{sup 2+} oxo-species or pentacoordinated Co{sup 2+}. However, as the cobalt content of the samples increased, a larger amount was exposed on the surface. This effect levelled off at 9wt.% Co, after which the increase in exposed Co{sup 2+} sites was countered by the masking effect of islands of MgO. In addition, at high cobalt loadings (9 and 12wt.%) Co formed small clusters which showed bulk CoO-like behaviour. Consequently, the benefit of having surface Co{sup 2+} species was balanced by the clustering effect of these species and the presence of MgO islands, negating their contribution to the overall catalytic activity of the samples.

  7. A single active catalytic site is sufficient to promote transport in P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bársony, Orsolya; Szalóki, Gábor; Türk, Dóra; Tarapcsák, Szabolcs; Gutay-Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Bacsó, Zsolt; Holb, Imre J; Székvölgyi, Lóránt; Szabó, Gábor; Csanády, László; Szakács, Gergely; Goda, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ABC transporter responsible for the ATP-dependent efflux of chemotherapeutic compounds from multidrug resistant cancer cells. Better understanding of the molecular mechanism of Pgp-mediated transport could promote rational drug design to circumvent multidrug resistance. By measuring drug binding affinity and reactivity to a conformation-sensitive antibody we show here that nucleotide binding drives Pgp from a high to a low substrate-affinity state and this switch coincides with the flip from the inward- to the outward-facing conformation. Furthermore, the outward-facing conformation survives ATP hydrolysis: the post-hydrolytic complex is stabilized by vanadate, and the slow recovery from this state requires two functional catalytic sites. The catalytically inactive double Walker A mutant is stabilized in a high substrate affinity inward-open conformation, but mutants with one intact catalytic center preserve their ability to hydrolyze ATP and to promote drug transport, suggesting that the two catalytic sites are randomly recruited for ATP hydrolysis. PMID:27117502

  8. Catalytic stimulation by restrained active-site floppiness--the case of high density lipoprotein-bound serum paraoxonase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Moshe; Sussman, Joel L; Maxwell, Christopher I; Szeler, Klaudia; Kamerlin, Shina C L; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-03-27

    Despite the abundance of membrane-associated enzymes, the mechanism by which membrane binding stabilizes these enzymes and stimulates their catalysis remains largely unknown. Serum paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is a lipophilic lactonase whose stability and enzymatic activity are dramatically stimulated when associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Our mutational and structural analyses, combined with empirical valence bond simulations, reveal a network of hydrogen bonds that connect HDL binding residues with Asn168--a key catalytic residue residing >15Å from the HDL contacting interface. This network ensures precise alignment of N168, which, in turn, ligates PON1's catalytic calcium and aligns the lactone substrate for catalysis. HDL binding restrains the overall motion of the active site and particularly of N168, thus reducing the catalytic activation energy barrier. We demonstrate herein that disturbance of this network, even at its most far-reaching periphery, undermines PON1's activity. Membrane binding thus immobilizes long-range interactions via second- and third-shell residues that reduce the active site's floppiness and pre-organize the catalytic residues. Although this network is critical for efficient catalysis, as demonstrated here, unraveling these long-rage interaction networks is challenging, let alone their implementation in artificial enzyme design.

  9. Efficient Catalytic Ozonation over Reduced Graphene Oxide for p-Hydroxylbenzoic Acid (PHBA) Destruction: Active Site and Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxian; Xie, Yongbing; Sun, Hongqi; Xiao, Jiadong; Cao, Hongbin; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-04-20

    Nanocarbons have been demonstrated as promising environmentally benign catalysts for advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) upgrading metal-based materials. In this study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with a low level of structural defects was synthesized via a scalable method for catalytic ozonation of p-hydroxylbenzoic acid (PHBA). Metal-free rGO materials were found to exhibit a superior activity in activating ozone for catalytic oxidation of organic phenolics. The electron-rich carbonyl groups were identified as the active sites for the catalytic reaction. Electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical competition tests revealed that superoxide radical ((•)O2(-)) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) were the reactive oxygen species (ROS) for PHBA degradation. The intermediates and the degradation pathways were illustrated from mass spectroscopy. It was interesting to observe that addition of NaCl could enhance both ozonation and catalytic ozonation efficiencies and make ·O2(-) as the dominant ROS. Stability of the catalysts was also evaluated by the successive tests. Loss of specific surface area and changes in the surface chemistry were suggested to be responsible for catalyst deactivation. PMID:27007603

  10. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei;

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  11. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  12. Active catalytic sites in the ammoxidation of propane and propene over V-Sb-O catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, S.A.; Zanthoff, H.W. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie

    1998-12-31

    The ammoxidation of propane over VSb{sub y}O{sub x} catalysts (y=1, 2, 5) was investigated with respect to the role of different oxygen species in the selective and non selective reaction steps using transient experiments in the Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor. Only lattice oxygen is involved in the oxidation reactions. Using isotopic labelled oxygen it is shown that two different active sites exist on the surface. On site A, which can be reoxidized faster by gas phase oxygen compared to site B, mainly CO is formed. On site B CO{sub 2} and acrolein as well as NO and N{sub 2}O in the presence of ammonia in the feed gas are formed and reoxidation mainly occurs with bulk lattice oxygen. (orig.)

  13. Active site mutants of Escherichia coli dethiobiotin synthetase: effects of mutations on enzyme catalytic and structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G; Sandalova, T; Lohman, K; Lindqvist, Y; Rendina, A R

    1997-04-22

    Five active site residues, Thr11, Glu12, Lys15, Lys37, and Ser41, implicated by the protein crystal structure studies of Escherichia coli DTBS, were mutated to determine their function in catalysis and substrate binding. Nine mutant enzymes, T11V, E12A, E12D, K15Q, K37L, K37Q, K37R, S41A, and S41C, were overproduced in an E. coli strain lacking a functional endogenous DTBS gene and purified to homogeneity. Replacement of Thr11 with valine resulted in a 24,000-fold increase in the Km(ATP) with little or no change in the Kd(ATP), KM(DAPA) and DTBS k(cat), suggesting an essential role for this residue in the steady-state affinity for ATP. The two Glu12 mutants showed essentially wild-type DTBS activity (slightly elevated k(cat)'s). Unlike wild-type DTBS, E12A had the same apparent KM(DAPA) at subsaturating and saturating ATP concentrations, indicating a possible role for Glu12 in the binding synergy between DAPA and ATP. The mutations in Lys15 and Lys37 resulted in loss of catalytic activity (0.01% and cat) for K15Q and the Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and higher KM's for both DAPA (40-fold and >100-fold higher than wild-type for the K15Q and Lys37 mutant enzymes, respectively) and ATP (1800-fold and >10-fold higher than wild-type for K15Q and the K37 mutant enzymes, respectively). These results strongly suggest that Lys15 and Lys37 are crucial to both catalysis and substrate binding. S41A and S41C had essentially the same k(cat) as wild-type and had moderate increases in the DAPA and ATP KM and Kd (ATP) values. Replacement of Ser41 with cysteine resulted in larger effects than replacement with alanine. These data suggest that the H-bond between N7 of DAPA and the Ser41 side chain is not very important for catalysis. The catalytic behavior of these mutant enzymes was also studied by pulse-chase experiments which produced results consistent with the steady-state kinetic analyses. X-ray crystallographic studies of four mutant enzymes, S41A, S41C, K37Q, and K37L

  14. Catalytic water co-existing with a product peptide in the active site of HIV-1 protease revealed by X-ray structure analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Prashar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not been found so far in the crystal structures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the first observation of the coexistence in the active site, of a water molecule WAT1, along with the carboxyl terminal product (Q product peptide. The product peptide has been generated in situ through cleavage of the full-length substrate. The N-terminal product (P product has diffused out and is replaced by a set of water molecules while the Q product is still held in the active site through hydrogen bonds. The position of WAT1, which hydrogen bonds to both the catalytic aspartates, is different from when there is no substrate bound in the active site. We propose WAT1 to be the position from where catalytic water attacks the scissile peptide bond. Comparison of structures of HIV-1 protease complexed with the same oligopeptide substrate, but at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.0 shows interesting changes in the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions from the catalytic aspartates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The structure is suggestive of the repositioning, during substrate binding, of the catalytic water for activation and subsequent nucleophilic attack. The structure could be a snap shot of the enzyme active site primed for the next round of catalysis. This structure further suggests that to achieve the goal of designing inhibitors mimicking the transition-state, the hydrogen-bonding pattern between WAT1 and the enzyme should be replicated.

  15. VaSP1, catalytically active serine proteinase from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom with unconventional active site triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtović, Tihana; Brgles, Marija; Leonardi, Adrijana; Lang Balija, Maja; Sajevic, Tamara; Križaj, Igor; Allmaier, Günter; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Halassy, Beata

    2014-01-01

    VaSP1, a serine proteinase from Vipera ammodytes ammodytes venom, is a glycosylated monomer of 31.5 kDa, as determined by MALDI mass spectrometry, showing multiple isoelectric points between pH 6.5 and pH 8.5. Partial amino acid sequencing of VaSP1 by Edman degradation and MS/MS analysis identified sequences which allowed its classification among the so-called snake venom serine proteinase homologues, members of the peptidase S1 family, however being devoid of the canonical catalytic triad. Only few representatives of this group have been identified so far with just two of them characterised in detail at the protein level. Despite substitution of His57 with Arg, VaSP1 possesses proteolytic activity which can be inhibited by Pefabloc, benzamidine, Zn²⁺ ions, DTT and trypsin inhibitor II, a Kunitz/BPTI group member. It hydrolyses N(α)-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-NA, exhibiting Michaelis-Menten behaviour with K(m) = 48.2 μM and V(m) = 0.019 nM s⁻¹. The pH for optimal activity on tested substrate is around 9.0. VaSP1 also cleaves insulin B-chain, digesting it at positions His¹⁰-Leu¹¹, Ala¹⁴-Leu¹⁵ and Tyr¹⁶-Leu¹⁷. Furthermore, the novel serine proteinase is active towards wide array of proteins involved in haemostasis where its degradation of fibrinogen, fibrin, prothrombin, factor X and plasminogen in vivo probably results in depletion of coagulation factors in blood circulation. The possibility that VaSP1 possesses anticoagulant properties has been further indicated by its ability to prolong prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time.

  16. Confirmation of Isolated Cu2+ Ions in SSZ-13 Zeolite as Active Sites in NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deka, U.; Juhin, A.F.; Eilertsen, E.A.; Emerich, H.; Green, M.A.; Korhonen, S.T.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Beale, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    NH3-Selective Catalytic Reduction (NH3-SCR) is a widely used technology for NOx reduction in the emission control systems of heavy duty diesel vehicles. Copper-based ion exchanged zeolites and in particular Cu-SSZ-13 (CHA framework) catalysts show both exceptional activity and hydrothermal stability

  17. Catalytic Water Co-Existing with a Product Peptide in the Active Site of HIV-1 Protease Revealed by X-Ray Structure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash; Das, Amit; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Hosur, Madhusoodan

    2009-01-01

    Background It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not...

  18. Dimer-dimer interaction of the bacterial selenocysteine synthase SelA promotes functional active-site formation and catalytic specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-04-17

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is incorporated translationally into proteins and is synthesized on its specific tRNA (tRNA(Sec)). In Bacteria, the selenocysteine synthase SelA converts Ser-tRNA(Sec), formed by seryl-tRNA synthetase, to Sec-tRNA(Sec). SelA, a member of the fold-type-I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme superfamily, has an exceptional homodecameric quaternary structure with a molecular mass of about 500kDa. Our previously determined crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexed with tRNA(Sec) revealed that the ring-shaped decamer is composed of pentamerized SelA dimers, with two SelA dimers arranged to collaboratively interact with one Ser-tRNA(Sec). The SelA catalytic site is close to the dimer-dimer interface, but the significance of the dimer pentamerization in the catalytic site formation remained elusive. In the present study, we examined the quaternary interactions and demonstrated their importance for SelA activity by systematic mutagenesis. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of "depentamerized" SelA variants with mutations at the dimer-dimer interface that prevent pentamerization. These dimeric SelA variants formed a distorted and inactivated catalytic site and confirmed that the pentamer interactions are essential for productive catalytic site formation. Intriguingly, the conformation of the non-functional active site of dimeric SelA shares structural features with other fold-type-I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes with native dimer or tetramer (dimer-of-dimers) quaternary structures. PMID:24456689

  19. Steady-state NTPase activity of Dengue virus NS3: number of catalytic sites, nucleotide specificity and activation by ssRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jeremías Incicco

    Full Text Available Dengue virus nonstructural protein 3 (NS3 unwinds double stranded RNA driven by the free energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates. This paper presents the first systematic and quantitative characterization of the steady-state NTPase activity of DENV NS3 and their interaction with ssRNA. Substrate curves for ATP, GTP, CTP and UTP were obtained, and the specificity order for these nucleotides - evaluated as the ratio (kcat /KM - was GTP[Formula: see text]ATP[Formula: see text]CTP [Formula: see text] UTP, which showed that NS3 have poor ability to discriminate between different NTPs. Competition experiments between the four substrates indicated that all of them are hydrolyzed in one and the same catalytic site of the enzyme. The effect of ssRNA on the ATPase activity of NS3 was studied using poly(A and poly(C. Both RNA molecules produced a 10 fold increase in the turnover rate constant (kcat and a 100 fold decrease in the apparent affinity (KM for ATP. When the ratio [RNA bases]/[NS3] was between 0 and [Formula: see text]20 the ATPase activity was inhibited by increasing both poly(A and poly(C. Using the theory of binding of large ligands (NS3 to a one-dimensional homogeneous lattice of infinite length (RNA we tested the hypothesis that inhibition is the result of crowding of NS3 molecules along the RNA lattices. Finally, we discuss why this hypothesis is consistent with the idea that the ATPase catalytic cycle is tightly coupled to the movement of NS3 helicase along the RNA.

  20. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  1. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass. PMID:26059194

  2. Effects of vaccinia virus uracil DNA glycosylase catalytic site and deoxyuridine triphosphatase deletion mutations individually and together on replication in active and quiescent cells and pathogenesis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of uracil in DNA result from misincorporation of dUMP or cytosine deamination. Vaccinia virus (VACV, the prototype poxvirus, encodes two enzymes that can potentially reduce the amount of uracil in DNA. Deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase hydrolyzes dUTP, generating dUMP for biosynthesis of thymidine nucleotides while decreasing the availability of dUTP for misincorporation; uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG cleaves uracil N-glycosylic bonds in DNA initiating base excision repair. Studies with actively dividing cells showed that the VACV UNG protein is required for DNA replication but the UNG catalytic site is not, whereas the dUTPase gene can be deleted without impairing virus replication. Recombinant VACV with an UNG catalytic site mutation was attenuated in vivo, while a dUTPase deletion mutant was not. However, the importance of the two enzymes for replication in quiescent cells, their possible synergy and roles in virulence have not been fully assessed. Results VACV mutants lacking the gene encoding dUTPase or with catalytic site mutations in UNG and double UNG/dUTPase mutants were constructed. Replication of UNG and UNG/dUTPase mutants were slightly reduced compared to wild type or the dUTPase mutant in actively dividing cells. Viral DNA replication was reduced about one-third under these conditions. After high multiplicity infection of quiescent fibroblasts, yields of wild type and mutant viruses were decreased by 2-logs with relative differences similar to those observed in active fibroblasts. However, under low multiplicity multi-step growth conditions in quiescent fibroblasts, replication of the dUTPase/UNG mutant was delayed and 5-fold lower than that of either single mutant or parental virus. This difference was exacerbated by 1-day serial passages on quiescent fibroblasts, resulting in 2- to 3-logs lower titer of the double mutant compared to the parental and single mutant viruses. Each mutant was more

  3. Local Environment and Nature of Cu Active Sites in Zeolite-Based Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deka, U.; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Beale, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cu-exchanged zeolites have demonstrated widespread use as catalyst materials in the abatement of NOx, especially from mobile sources. Recent studies focusing on Cu-exchanged zeolites with the CHA structure have demonstrated them to be excellent catalysts in the ammonia-assisted selective catalytic r

  4. Active sites, deactivation and stabilization of Fe-ZSM-5 for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröcher, Oliver; Brandenberger, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Fe-ZSM-5 has been systematically investigated as catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH(3), concentrating on the active sites, the deactivation mechanism during hydrothermal aging and the chemical possibilities to stabilize this type of SCR catalyst. Regarding the active SCR sites, it could be shown that monomeric species start to become active at the lowest temperatures (E(a,app) ≈ 36.3 ± 0.2 kJ/mol), followed by dimeric species at intermediate temperatures (E(a,app) ≈ 77 ± 16 kJ/mol) and oligomeric species at high temperatures. Experiments with Fe-ZSM-5 samples, in which the Brønsted acidity was specifically removed, proved that Brønsted acidity is not required for high SCR activity and that NH(3) can also be adsorbed on other acidic sites on the zeolite surface. The hydrothermal deactivation of Fe-ZSM-5 could be explained by the migration of active iron ions from the exchange sites. Parallel to the iron migration dealumination of the zeolite framework occurs, which has to be regarded as an independent process. The migration of iron can be reduced by the targeted reaction of the aluminum hydroxide groups in the lattice with trimethylaluminium followed by calcination. With respect to the application of iron zeolites in the SCR process in diesel vehicles, the most efficient stabilization method would be to switch from the ZSM-5 to the BEA structure type. The addition of NO(2) to the feed gas is another effective measure to increase the activity of even strongly deactivated iron zeolites tremendously. PMID:23211727

  5. Active sites, deactivation and stabilization of Fe-ZSM-5 for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröcher, Oliver; Brandenberger, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    Fe-ZSM-5 has been systematically investigated as catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH(3), concentrating on the active sites, the deactivation mechanism during hydrothermal aging and the chemical possibilities to stabilize this type of SCR catalyst. Regarding the active SCR sites, it could be shown that monomeric species start to become active at the lowest temperatures (E(a,app) ≈ 36.3 ± 0.2 kJ/mol), followed by dimeric species at intermediate temperatures (E(a,app) ≈ 77 ± 16 kJ/mol) and oligomeric species at high temperatures. Experiments with Fe-ZSM-5 samples, in which the Brønsted acidity was specifically removed, proved that Brønsted acidity is not required for high SCR activity and that NH(3) can also be adsorbed on other acidic sites on the zeolite surface. The hydrothermal deactivation of Fe-ZSM-5 could be explained by the migration of active iron ions from the exchange sites. Parallel to the iron migration dealumination of the zeolite framework occurs, which has to be regarded as an independent process. The migration of iron can be reduced by the targeted reaction of the aluminum hydroxide groups in the lattice with trimethylaluminium followed by calcination. With respect to the application of iron zeolites in the SCR process in diesel vehicles, the most efficient stabilization method would be to switch from the ZSM-5 to the BEA structure type. The addition of NO(2) to the feed gas is another effective measure to increase the activity of even strongly deactivated iron zeolites tremendously.

  6. Designing functional metalloproteins: from structural to catalytic metal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrow, Melissa L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2013-09-01

    Metalloenzymes efficiently catalyze some of the most important and difficult reactions in nature. For many years, coordination chemists have effectively used small molecule models to understand these systems. More recently, protein design has been shown to be an effective approach for mimicking metal coordination environments. Since the first designed proteins were reported, much success has been seen for incorporating metal sites into proteins and attaining the desired coordination environment but until recently, this has been with a lack of significant catalytic activity. Now there are examples of designed metalloproteins that, although not yet reaching the activity of native enzymes, are considerably closer. In this review, we highlight work leading up to the design of a small metalloprotein containing two metal sites, one for structural stability (HgS3) and the other a separate catalytic zinc site to mimic carbonic anhydrase activity (ZnN3O). The first section will describe previous studies that allowed for a high affinity thiolate site that binds heavy metals in a way that stabilizes three-stranded coiled coils. The second section will examine ways of preparing histidine rich environments that lead to metal based hydrolytic catalysts. We will also discuss other recent examples of the design of structural metal sites and functional metalloenzymes. Our work demonstrates that attaining the proper first coordination geometry of a metal site can lead to a significant fraction of catalytic activity, apparently independent of the type of secondary structure of the surrounding protein environment. We are now in a position to begin to meet the challenge of building a metalloenzyme systematically from the bottom-up by engineering and analyzing interactions directly around the metal site and beyond.

  7. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius Schneider

    Full Text Available Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast B(act spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the B(act crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25's step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing.

  8. Gold-Copper Nanoparticles: Nanostructural Evolution and Bifunctional Catalytic Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Jun; Shan, Shiyao; Yang, Lefu; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Petkov, Valeri; Cai, Fan; Ng, Mei; Luo, Jin; Chen, Bing H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-12-12

    Understanding of the atomic-scale structure is essential for exploiting the unique catalytic properties of any nanoalloy catalyst. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of the nanoscale alloying of gold-copper (AuCu) nanoparticles and its impact on the surface catalytic functions. Two pathways have been explored for the formation of AuCu nanoparticles of different compositons, including wet chemical synthesis from mixed Au- and Cu-precursor molecules, and nanoscale alloying via an evolution of mixed Au- and Cu-precursor nanoparticles near the nanoscale melting temperatures. For the evolution of mixed precursor nanoparticles, synchrotron x-ray based in-situ real time XRD was used to monitor the structural changes, revealing nanoscale alloying and reshaping towards an fcc-type nanoalloy (particle or cube) via a partial melting–resolidification mechanism. The nanoalloys supported on carbon or silica were characterized by in-situ high-energy XRD/PDFs, revealing an intriguing lattice "expanding-shrinking" phenomenon depending on whether the catalyst is thermochemically processed under oxidative or reductive atmosphere. This type of controllable structural changes is found to play an important role in determining the catalytic activity of the catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation reaction. The tunable catalytic activities of the nanoalloys under thermochemically oxidative and reductive atmospheres are also discussed in terms of the bifunctional sites and the surface oxygenated metal species for carbon monoxide and oxygen activation.

  9. Computational Introduction of Catalytic Activity into Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolani, Steve J; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Siegel, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there have been several successful cases of introducing catalytic activity into proteins. One method that has been used successfully to achieve this is the theozyme placement and enzyme design algorithms implemented in Rosetta Molecular Modeling Suite. Here, we illustrate how to use this software to recapitulate the placement of catalytic residues and ligand into a protein using a theozyme, protein scaffold, and catalytic constraints as input. PMID:27094294

  10. Study of Single Catalytic Events at Copper-in-Charcoal: Localization of Click Activity Through Subdiffraction Observation of Single Catalytic Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decan, Matthew R; Scaiano, Juan C

    2015-10-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy reveals that copper-in-charcoal--a high performance click catalyst- has remarkably few catalytic sites, with 90% of the charcoal particles being inactive, and for the catalytic ones the active sites represent a minute fraction (∼0.003%) of the surface. The intermittent nature of the catalytic events enables subdiffraction resolution and mapping of the catalytic sites. PMID:26722775

  11. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank;

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  12. Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks with Six-Coordinated Ln(III) Ions and Free Functional Organic Sites for Adsorptions and Extensive Catalytic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Zhu, Min; Xia, Li; Wu, Yunlong; Hua, Hui; Xie, Jimin

    2016-07-01

    Three chelating-amino-functionalized lanthanide metal-organic frameworks, Y-DDQ, Dy-DDQ and Eu-DDQ, were synthesized with a flexible dicarboxylate ligand based on quinoxaline (H2DDQ = N, N‧-dibenzoic acid-2,3-diaminoquinoxaline). The three-dimensional framework is constructed by the H2DDQ linkers connecting the zigzag ladders, showing a net of sra topology. In the structures, one kind of Ln(III) ions metal centers are six-coordinated and thus can potentially behave as open metal sites (OMSs), while the free chelating amino groups can act as free functional organic sites (FOSs). The N2 and Ar adsorption behaviors indicate that these Ln-DDQ exhibits stable microporous frameworks with high surface area after remove of the solvents. Owing to presence of OMSs and FOSs, these MOFs show good ability of CO2, dyes captures and Lewis acid catalyst for cyanosilylation reaction. In view of the existing FOSs in the framework, Pd NPs were immobilized onto the MOFs through graft interactions between free chelating amino groups and metal ions precursor using postsynthetic modification. The well dispersed Pd@Ln-DDQs exhibit efficient and recyclable catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and they can also act as an excellent catalyst for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions with the exposed Pd NPs.

  13. Cathepsin G Induces Cell Aggregation of Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells via a 2-Step Mechanism: Catalytic Site-Independent Binding to the Cell Surface and Enzymatic Activity-Dependent Induction of the Cell Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyo Morimoto-Kamata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils often invade various tumor tissues and affect tumor progression and metastasis. Cathepsin G (CG is a serine protease secreted from activated neutrophils. Previously, we have shown that CG induces the formation of E-cadherin-mediated multicellular spheroids of human breast cancer MCF-7 cells; however, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process are unknown. In this study, we investigated whether CG required its enzymatic activity to induce MCF-7 cell aggregation. The cell aggregation-inducing activity of CG was inhibited by pretreatment of CG with the serine protease inhibitors chymostatin and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. In addition, an enzymatically inactive S195G (chymotrypsinogen numbering CG did not induce cell aggregation. Furthermore, CG specifically bound to the cell surface of MCF-7 cells via a catalytic site-independent mechanism because the binding was not affected by pretreatment of CG with serine protease inhibitors, and cell surface binding was also detected with S195G CG. Therefore, we propose that the CG-induced aggregation of MCF-7 cells occurs via a 2-step process, in which CG binds to the cell surface, independently of its catalytic site, and then induces cell aggregation, which is dependent on its enzymatic activity.

  14. Single-Site VO x Moieties Generated on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Way To Enhance the Catalytic Activity in the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane

    KAUST Repository

    Barman, Samir

    2016-07-26

    We report here an accurate surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) approach to propane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) using a μ2-oxo-bridged, bimetallic [V2O4(acac)2] (1) (acac = acetylacetonate anion) complex as a precursor. The identity and the nuclearity of the product of grafting and of the subsequent oxidative treatment have been systematically studied by means of FT-IR, Raman, solid-state (SS) NMR, UV-vis DRS, EPR and EXAFS spectroscopies. We show that the grafting of 1 on the silica surface under a rigorous SOMC protocol and the subsequent oxidative thermal treatment lead exclusively to well-defined and isolated monovanadate species. The resulting material has been tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane in a moderate temperature range (400-525 °C) and compared with that of silica-supported vanadium catalysts prepared by the standard impregnation technique. The experimental results show that the catalytic activity in propane ODH is strongly upgraded by the degree of isolation of the VOx species that can be achieved by employing the SOMC protocol. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  15. Inhibition of CK2 Activity by TCDD via Binding to ATP-competitive Binding Site of Catalytic Subunit:Insight from Computational Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xian-jin; CANNISTRARO Salvatore; BIZZARRI Anna-rita; ZENG Yi; CHEN Wei-zu; WANG Cun-xin

    2013-01-01

    Alternative mechanisms of toxic effects induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin(TCDD),instead of the binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor(AhR),have been taken into consideration.It has been recently shown that TCDD reduces rapidly the activity of CK2(casein kinase Ⅱ) both in vivo and in vitro.It is found that TCDD has high molecular similarities to the known inhibitors of CK2 catalytic subunit(CK2α).This suggests that TCDD could also be an ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2α.In this work,docking TCDD to CK2 was carried out based on the two structures of CK2α from maize and human,respectively.The binding free energies of the predicted CK2α-TCDD complexes estimated by the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area(MM/PBSA) method are from -85.1 kJ/mol to-114.3 kJ/mol for maize and are from-96.1 kJ/mol to-118.2 kJ/mol for human,which are comparable to those estimated for the known inhibitor and also ATP with CK2α.The energetic analysis also reveals that the van der Waals interaction is the dominant contribution to the binding free energy.These results are also useful for designing new drugs for a target of overexpressing CK2 in cancers.

  16. The role of the K-channel and the active-site tyrosine in the catalytic mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-08-01

    The active site of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) comprises an oxygen-binding heme, a nearby copper ion (CuB), and a tyrosine residue that is covalently linked to one of the histidine ligands of CuB. Two proton-conducting pathways are observed in CcO, namely the D- and the K-channels, which are used to transfer protons either to the active site of oxygen reduction (substrate protons) or for pumping. Proton transfer through the D-channel is very fast, and its role in efficient transfer of both substrate and pumped protons is well established. However, it has not been fully clear why a separate K-channel is required, apparently for the supply of substrate protons only. In this work, we have analysed the available experimental and computational data, based on which we provide new perspectives on the role of the K-channel. Our analysis suggests that proton transfer in the K-channel may be gated by the protonation state of the active-site tyrosine (Tyr244) and that the neutral radical form of this residue has a more general role in the CcO mechanism than thought previously. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26898520

  17. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  18. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  19. Human holocarboxylase synthetase with a start site at methionine-58 is the predominant nuclear variant of this protein and has catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Unambiguous evidence is provided that methionine-58 serves as an in-frame alternative translation site for holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS58). → Full-length HLCS and HLCS58 enter the nucleus, but HLCS58 is the predominant variant. → HLCS58 has biological activity as biotin protein ligase. -- Abstract: Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to both carboxylases in extranuclear structures and histones in cell nuclei, thereby mediating important roles in intermediary metabolism, gene regulation, and genome stability. HLCS has three putative translational start sites (methionine-1, -7, and -58), but lacks a strong nuclear localization sequence that would explain its participation in epigenetic events in the cell nucleus. Recent evidence suggests that small quantities of HLCS with a start site in methionine-58 (HLCS58) might be able to enter the nuclear compartment. We generated the following novel insights into HLCS biology. First, we generated a novel HLCS fusion protein vector to demonstrate that methionine-58 is a functional translation start site in human cells. Second, we used confocal microscopy and western blots to demonstrate that HLCS58 enters the cell nucleus in meaningful quantities, and that full-length HLCS localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but may also enter the nucleus. Third, we produced recombinant HLCS58 to demonstrate its biological activity toward catalyzing the biotinylation of both carboxylases and histones. Collectively, these observations are consistent with roles of HLCS58 and full-length HLCS in nuclear events. We conclude this report by proposing a novel role for HLCS in epigenetic events, mediated by physical interactions between HLCS and other chromatin proteins as part of a larger multiprotein complex that mediates gene repression.

  20. Human holocarboxylase synthetase with a start site at methionine-58 is the predominant nuclear variant of this protein and has catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Baolong [Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Key Laboratory of Exploration and Utilization of Aquatic Genetic Resources, Shanghai Ocean University, Ministry of Education (China); Wijeratne, Subhashinee S.K.; Rodriguez-Melendez, Rocio [Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States); Zempleni, Janos, E-mail: jzempleni2@unl.edu [Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Unambiguous evidence is provided that methionine-58 serves as an in-frame alternative translation site for holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS58). {yields} Full-length HLCS and HLCS58 enter the nucleus, but HLCS58 is the predominant variant. {yields} HLCS58 has biological activity as biotin protein ligase. -- Abstract: Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to both carboxylases in extranuclear structures and histones in cell nuclei, thereby mediating important roles in intermediary metabolism, gene regulation, and genome stability. HLCS has three putative translational start sites (methionine-1, -7, and -58), but lacks a strong nuclear localization sequence that would explain its participation in epigenetic events in the cell nucleus. Recent evidence suggests that small quantities of HLCS with a start site in methionine-58 (HLCS58) might be able to enter the nuclear compartment. We generated the following novel insights into HLCS biology. First, we generated a novel HLCS fusion protein vector to demonstrate that methionine-58 is a functional translation start site in human cells. Second, we used confocal microscopy and western blots to demonstrate that HLCS58 enters the cell nucleus in meaningful quantities, and that full-length HLCS localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but may also enter the nucleus. Third, we produced recombinant HLCS58 to demonstrate its biological activity toward catalyzing the biotinylation of both carboxylases and histones. Collectively, these observations are consistent with roles of HLCS58 and full-length HLCS in nuclear events. We conclude this report by proposing a novel role for HLCS in epigenetic events, mediated by physical interactions between HLCS and other chromatin proteins as part of a larger multiprotein complex that mediates gene repression.

  1. Preparation and Catalytic Oxidation Activity on 2-mercaptoethanol of a Novel Catalytic Cellulose Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yu-yuan; LI Ying-jie; CHEN Wen-xing; Lü Wang-yang; Lü Su-fang; XU Min-hong; LIU Fan

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt tetra(N-carbonylacylic) aminophthalocyanine was supported on cellulose fibres by graft reaction to obtain a novel polymer catalyst, catalytic cellulose fibres (CCF),and the optimal supporting conditions were pH = 6, 80℃,t = 120 min. The catalytic oxidation activity of CCF towards oxidation of 2-mereaptoethanol (MEA) in aqueous solution was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that CCF had good catalytic oxidation activity on MEA at room temperature, causing no secondary pollution and remaining efficient for the repetitive tests with no obvious decrease of catalytic activity.

  2. Thrombomodulin Binding Selects the Catalytically Active Form of Thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Lindsey D; Treuheit, Nicholas A; Venkatesh, Varun J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Human α-thrombin is a serine protease with dual functions. Thrombin acts as a procoagulant, cleaving fibrinogen to make the fibrin clot, but when bound to thrombomodulin (TM), it acts as an anticoagulant, cleaving protein C. A minimal TM fragment consisting of the fourth, fifth, and most of the sixth EGF-like domain (TM456m) that has been prepared has much improved solubility, thrombin binding capacity, and anticoagulant activity versus those of previous TM456 constructs. In this work, we compare backbone amide exchange of human α-thrombin in three states: apo, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK)-bound, and TM456m-bound. Beyond causing a decreased level of amide exchange at their binding sites, TM and PPACK both cause a decreased level of amide exchange in other regions including the γ-loop and the adjacent N-terminus of the heavy chain. The decreased level of amide exchange in the N-terminus of the heavy chain is consistent with the historic model of activation of serine proteases, which involves insertion of this region into the β-barrel promoting the correct conformation of the catalytic residues. Contrary to crystal structures of thrombin, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results suggest that the conformation of apo-thrombin does not yet have the N-terminus of the heavy chain properly inserted for optimal catalytic activity, and that binding of TM allosterically promotes the catalytically active conformation. PMID:26468766

  3. Tunable Molecular MoS2 Edge-Site Mimics for Catalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Benjamin R; Polen, Shane M; Click, Kevin A; He, Mingfu; Huang, Zhongjie; Hadad, Christopher M; Wu, Yiying

    2016-04-18

    Molybdenum sulfides represent state-of-the-art, non-platinum electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). According to the Sabatier principle, the hydrogen binding strength to the edge active sites should be neither too strong nor too weak. Therefore, it is of interest to develop a molecular motif that mimics the catalytic sites structurally and possesses tunable electronic properties that influence the hydrogen binding strength. Furthermore, molecular mimics will be important for providing mechanistic insight toward the HER with molybdenum sulfide catalysts. In this work, a modular method to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in MoO(S2)2L2 complexes is described. We studied the homogeneous electrocatalytic hydrogen production performance metrics of three catalysts with different bipyridine substitutions. By varying the electron-donating abilities, we present the first demonstration of using the ligand to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in molecular MoS2 edge-site mimics. This work can shed light on the relationship between the structure and electrocatalytic activity of molecular MoS2 catalysts and thus is of broad importance from catalytic hydrogen production to biological enzyme functions. PMID:27022836

  4. Reforming of methane in tubes with a catalytic active wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heterogeneous steam reforming process in tubes with catalytic active inner surface is studied. The purpose of this ivestigation is to find a method of predicting the reaction rate of the catalytic conversion of methane by steam. The dependency of the reaction rate upon the temperature, pressure, gas composition, Reynolds number, geometrical sizes of tubes and catalytic behaviour of the catalytic active inner wall of these tubes has been examined. It was found that the reaction rate mainly depends on the temperature. The reaction rate is limited by the catalytic behaviour and the heat resisting properties of the materials used. (author)

  5. Session 6: Active Sites for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO with NH{sub 3} or Isobutane over Fe-ZSM-5: A New View onto a Controversial Question

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwidder, M.; Klementiev, K.; GrUnert, W. [Bochum Ruhr Univ., Lab. of Industrial Chemistry (Germany); Matam, S.K.; Bentrup, U.; Bruckner, A. [Institute of Applied Chemistry Berlin-Adlershof (ACA), Berlin (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    In recent work, we have demonstrated that Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts prepared via CVD of FeCl{sub 3} contain iron species of a broad distribution of nuclearity, from monomeric species up to large oxide crystals. While this distribution is strongly affected by the nature of catalyst pretreatments, the resulting effects on the activity in HC-SCR are small. To elucidate the origin of this effect we have adopted a methodology that includes new spectroscopic techniques capable of differentiating coexisting iron species (UV-Vis, EPR), extends to new preparation routes with the goal of creating as much homogeneity in site structure as possible, and employs in-situ spectroscopic studies (IR, UV-Vis, EPR) to differentiate between catalytically relevant sites and spectators. Given the technological importance of NH{sub 3}-SCR and the likely role of NH{sub 3} as the actual reducing agent in HC-SCR we have included the NH{sub 3} reductant in our research. (authors)

  6. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. PMID:26958828

  7. Catalytic activity trends of CO oxidation – A DFT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Tao

    There are two goals of this thesis, the first one is to understand the reactivity of noble metal nanoparticles for CO oxidation reaction. The second goal is to gain understanding to the second derivative (Hessian matrix) of the potential energy surfaces (PES) of adsorption systems, especially its...... eigenmodes and eigenvalues, and improving algorithms for geometry optimization in electronic structure calculations. The catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles has received wide attention since the discovery of their activity on CO oxidation by Professor Haruta in 1987. By using density functional theory...... oxidation by molecular O2 occurs via a different reaction pathway, which instead involves a meta-stable intermediate CO-O2. However, although the two oxidizing agents used proceeded via different reaction pathways on different active sites, the apparent overall activation barriers obtained from both theory...

  8. Structural characterization of the catalytic site of a Nilaparvata lugens delta-class glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major class of detoxification enzymes that play a central role in the defense against environmental toxicants and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the crystal structure of a delta-class glutathione transferase from Nilaparvata lugens, nlGSTD, to gain insights into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of nlGSTD in complex with glutathione, determined at a resolution of 1.7Å, revealed that it exists as a dimer and its secondary and tertiary structures are similar to those of other delta-class GSTs. Analysis of a complex between nlGSTD and glutathione showed that the bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of nlGSTD mutants indicated that amino acid residues Ser11, His52, Glu66, and Phe119 contribute to catalytic activity.

  9. Catalytically active single-atom niobium in graphitic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Liu, Chunjing; Huang, Hao; Xue, Fanghong; Dong, Xinglong; Pennycook, Stephen J; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Carbides of groups IV through VI (Ti, V and Cr groups) have long been proposed as substitutes for noble metal-based electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. However, their catalytic activity has been extremely limited because of the low density and stability of catalytically active sites. Here we report the excellent performance of a niobium-carbon structure for catalysing the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. A large number of single niobium atoms and ultra small clusters trapped in graphitic layers are directly identified using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. This structure not only enhances the overall conductivity for accelerating the exchange of ions and electrons, but it suppresses the chemical/thermal coarsening of the active particles. Experimental results coupled with theory calculations reveal that the single niobium atoms incorporated within the graphitic layers produce a redistribution of d-band electrons and become surprisingly active for O2 adsorption and dissociation, and also exhibit high stability. PMID:23715283

  10. Functional identification of catalytic metal ion binding sites within RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Hougland

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The viability of living systems depends inextricably on enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions. For many enzymes in this class, including several ribozymes, divalent metal ions serve as obligate cofactors. Understanding how metal ions mediate catalysis requires elucidation of metal ion interactions with both the enzyme and the substrate(s. In the Tetrahymena group I intron, previous work using atomic mutagenesis and quantitative analysis of metal ion rescue behavior identified three metal ions (MA, MB, and MC that make five interactions with the ribozyme substrates in the reaction's transition state. Here, we combine substrate atomic mutagenesis with site-specific phosphorothioate substitutions in the ribozyme backbone to develop a powerful, general strategy for defining the ligands of catalytic metal ions within RNA. In applying this strategy to the Tetrahymena group I intron, we have identified the pro-SP phosphoryl oxygen at nucleotide C262 as a ribozyme ligand for MC. Our findings establish a direct connection between the ribozyme core and the functionally defined model of the chemical transition state, thereby extending the known set of transition-state interactions and providing information critical for the application of the recent group I intron crystallographic structures to the understanding of catalysis.

  11. An effective approach for modifying carbonaceous materials with niobium single sites to improve their catalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzi, A S; Lavall, R L; Souza, T E; Pereira, M C; de Souza, P P; De Abreu, H A; De Oliveira, A; Ortega, P F R; Paniago, R; Oliveira, L C A

    2015-12-14

    In this paper we show a very simple route for the incorporation of catalytically active niobium species on the surface of carbon materials, such as graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes and activated carbon. Some existing methods of incorporating a transition metal on a support have involved co-precipitation or wet impregnation, to obtain the corresponding oxides. These methods, however, cause reduction in the specific area of the support and can also form large metal oxide particles with loss of metal exposure. Therefore, here we present a novel way to add catalytically active species on the surfaces of different types of carbon through the formation of interaction complexes between the metal precursor and the functional groups of the carbon matrix. Because of the excellent catalytic properties exhibited by the niobium species we choose the NH4[NbO(C2O4)2(H2O)2]·2H2O salt as the model precursor. The characterization by XPS reveals the presence of the niobium species indicated by the displacement of the peaks between 206-212 eV related to the oxalate species according to the spectrum from pure niobium oxalate. Images obtained by TEM and SEM show the typical morphologies of carbonaceous materials without the niobium oxide formation signal, which indicates the presence of niobium complexes as isolated sites on the carbon surfaces. This new class of materials exhibited excellent properties as catalysts for pollutant oxidation. The presence of Nb promotes the catalytic activation of H2O2 generating hydroxyl radicals in situ, which allows their use in the organic compound oxidation processes. Tests for DBT oxidation indicate that Nb significantly improves the removal of such pollutants in biphasic reactions with removal around 90% under the tested conditions. Theoretical calculations showed that the most favorable adsorption model is an ionic complex presenting a ΔG = -108.7 kcal mol(-1) for the whole adsorption process. PMID:26514577

  12. Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Two New Cyclic Tetraaza Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard König

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Two new chiral cyclic tetraaza ligands were synthesized and characterized. Their catalytic activity was tested in the asymmetric addition of diethylzinc to benzaldehyde. The expected secondary alcohol was obtained in moderate yields, but with very low enantioselectivity.

  13. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone.

  14. Heparin enhances the catalytic activity of des-ETW-thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, C A; Deadman, J J; Le Bonniec, B F; Elgendy, S; Kakkar, V V; Scully, M F

    1996-04-01

    The thrombin mutant, des-ETW-thrombin, lacking Glu(146), Thr(147), and Trp(148) within a unique insertion loop located at the extreme end of the primary specificity pocket, has been shown previously to exhibit reduced catalytic activity with respect to macromolecular and synthetic thrombin substrates and reduced or enhanced susceptibility to inhibition. Investigation of the hydrolysis of peptidyl p-nitroanilide substrates by des-ETW-thrombin showed increased activity in the presence of heparin and other sulphated glycosaminoglycans. No effect was observed upon the activity of wild-type thrombin. Heparin was found to decrease the K(m) for cleavage of four thrombin-specific substrates by des-ETW-thrombin by 3-4-fold. Similarly, pentosan polysulphate (PPS) decreased the K(m) with these substrates by 8-10-fold. Heparin also increased the rate of inhibition of des-ETW-thrombin by antithrombin III and D-phenylalanyl-prolyl-arginylchloromethane (PPACK). The inhibition of des-ETW-thrombin by a number of thrombin-specific peptide boronic acids also showed significant reduction in the final K(i) in the presence of heparin, due to reduction in the off-rate. A peptide analogue of a sequence of hirudin which binds thrombin tightly to exosite I (fibrinogen recognition site) potentiated the activity of des-ETW-thrombin against peptide p-nitroanilide substrates in a manner similar to heparin. The K(i) for the inhibition of des-ETW-thrombin by p-aminobenzamidine was decreased by these ligands from 9.7 mM to 7.5 mM, 5.1 mM, and 2.5 mM in the presence of heparin, hirudin peptide and PPS respectively, suggesting the increased catalytic activity is due to enhanced access to the primary specificity pocket. The positive influence of these ligands on des-ETW-thrombin was reversed in the presence of ATP or ADP; the latter has previously been shown to inhibit thrombin activity by blocking initial interaction with fibrinogen at exosite 1. Because the effect of heparin and PPS is similar to

  15. Synthetic Peptides as Structural Maquettes of Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme Catalytic Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinovia Spyranti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The rational design of synthetic peptides is proposed as an efficient strategy for the structural investigation of crucial protein domains difficult to be produced. Only after half a century since the function of ACE was first reported, was its crystal structure solved. The main obstacle to be overcome for the determination of the high resolution structure was the crystallization of the highly hydrophobic transmembrane domain. Following our previous work, synthetic peptides and Zinc(II metal ions are used to build structural maquettes of the two Zn-catalytic active sites of the ACE somatic isoform. Structural investigations of the synthetic peptides, representing the two different somatic isoform active sites, through circular dichroism and NMR experiments are reported.

  16. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marino Buslje

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues (CR is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI, and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls, combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  17. The active sites of supported silver particle catalysts in formaldehyde oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaxin; Huang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Meijuan; Hu, Pingping; Du, Chengtian; Kong, Lingdong; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2016-08-01

    Surface silver atoms with upshifted d-orbitals are identified as the catalytically active sites in formaldehyde oxidation by correlating their activity with the number of surface silver atoms, and the degree of the d-orbital upshift governs the catalytic performance of the active sites. PMID:27406403

  18. Size-dependent catalytic activity of supported metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Xiao, F.-S.; Purnell, S. K.; Alexeev, O.; Kawi, S.; Deutsch, S. E.; Gates, B. C.

    1994-11-01

    BECAUSE catalysis by metals is a surface phenomenon, many technological catalysts contain small (typically nanometre-sized) supported metal particles with a large fraction of the atoms exposed1. Many reactions, such as hydrocarbon hydrogenations, are structure-insensitive, proceeding at approximately the same rate on metal particles of various sizes provided that they are larger than about 1 nm and show bulk-like metallic behaviour1. But it is not known whether the catalytic properties of metal particles become size-dependent as the particles become so small that they are no longer metallic in character. Here we investigate the catalytic behaviour of precisely defined clusters of just four and six iridium atoms on solid supports. We find that the Ir4 and Ir6 clusters differ in catalytic activity both from each other and from metallic Ir particles. This raises the possibility of tailoring the catalytic behaviour of metal clusters by controlling the cluster size.

  19. Trends in the Catalytic CO Oxidation Activity of Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Falsig, Hanne; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk;

    2008-01-01

    Going for gold: Density functional calculations show how gold nanoparticles are more active catalysts for CO oxidation than other metal nanoparticles. The high catalytic activity of nanosized gold clusters at low temperature is found to be related to the ability of low-coordinate metal atoms...

  20. Networks of High Mutual Information Define the Structural Proximity of Catalytic Sites: Implications for Catalytic Residue Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buslje, Cristina Marino; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas;

    2010-01-01

    throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI), and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from...... to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI) was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis....... A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC) was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls), combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0...

  1. Preparation of Pt-Ru hydrophobic catalysts and catalytic activities for liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pt/C and Pt-Ru/C catalysts with different ratios of Pt to Ru were synthesized, using ethylene glycol as both the dispersant and reducing agent at 1-2 MPa by microwave-assisted method. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, TEM and XPS. The mean particle sizes of the Pt/C and Pt-Ru/C catalysts were 1.9-2.0 nm. Pt and Ru existed as Pt(0), Pt(II), Pt(IV), Ru(0) and Ru(IV) for Pt-Ru/C catalysts, respectively. The face-centered cubic structure of the active mental particles would be changed upon the addition of Ru gradually. Then polytetrafluoroethylene and carbon-supported Pt and Pt-Ru catalysts were supported on foamed nickel to obtain hydrophobic catalysts. The catalytic activity was increased for liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) when uniform Pt based hydrophobic catalysts was mixed into appropriate Ru. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction occurs between hydration layer(H2O)nH+(ads)(n≥2) and D atoms due to intact water molecules being on Pt surface for LPCE. Water molecules have a tendency to dissociate to OH(ads) and H(ads) on metal Ru surface, and there is the other reaction path for Pt-Ru binary catalysts, which is probably the main reason of the increase of the catalytic activity of the hydrophobic Pt-Ru catalyst. (authors)

  2. Engineering a hyper-catalytic enzyme by photo-activated conformation modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme engineering for improved catalysis has wide implications. We describe a novel chemical modification of Candida antarctica lipase B that allows modulation of the enzyme conformation to promote catalysis. Computational modeling was used to identify dynamical enzyme regions that impact the catalytic mechanism. Surface loop regions located distal to active site but showing dynamical coupling to the reaction were connected by a chemical bridge between Lys136 and Pro192, containing a derivative of azobenzene. The conformational modulation of the enzyme was achieved using two sources of light that alternated the azobenzene moiety in cis and trans conformations. Computational model predicted that mechanical energy from the conformational fluctuations facilitate the reaction in the active-site. The results were consistent with predictions as the activity of the engineered enzyme was found to be enhanced with photoactivation. Preliminary estimations indicate that the engineered enzyme achieved 8-52 fold better catalytic activity than the unmodulated enzyme.

  3. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Marritt, Sophie J.; Kemp, Gemma L.; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes. PMID:24634538

  4. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Duncan G G; Marritt, Sophie J; Kemp, Gemma L; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2013-11-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels were prepared by soft citrate gel method. The synthesized material was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. All the samples showed a single-phase cubic structure. Lattice constant varies from 8.389 to 8.323 A. Transmission electron microscopic study indicated the nanostructure of the catalysts while homogenous grain distribution was presented by scanning electron microscopic studies. The catalytic activity of the samples was investigated towards acetylation of phenols. The presence of active centers on the surface of the material was confirmed through pyridine adsorption studies. The surface acidity of the catalyst is responsible for better catalytic performance. The material was found to serve as a promising catalyst for acylation and benzoylation of phenols under solvent free condition. These catalysts are ∼100% selective towards o-acylation of phenols, a promising reaction for perfumery intermediates. The catalysts were seen to be reusable without any further treatment. Catalytic activities of cobalt, chromium and iron oxides were also investigated for comparison. The cobalt ferrospinel was found to have better catalytic activity as compared to the Cr-substituted ferrospinels and the pure oxides. Cobalt ferrite catalyst offers high yields in a short reaction time under solvent-free conditions.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankare, P.P., E-mail: p_hankarep@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Sankpal, U.B., E-mail: sankpalumesh@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Patil, R.P. [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Lokhande, P.D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India); Sasikala, R. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels were prepared by soft citrate gel method. The synthesized material was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. All the samples showed a single-phase cubic structure. Lattice constant varies from 8.389 to 8.323 A. Transmission electron microscopic study indicated the nanostructure of the catalysts while homogenous grain distribution was presented by scanning electron microscopic studies. The catalytic activity of the samples was investigated towards acetylation of phenols. The presence of active centers on the surface of the material was confirmed through pyridine adsorption studies. The surface acidity of the catalyst is responsible for better catalytic performance. The material was found to serve as a promising catalyst for acylation and benzoylation of phenols under solvent free condition. These catalysts are {approx}100% selective towards o-acylation of phenols, a promising reaction for perfumery intermediates. The catalysts were seen to be reusable without any further treatment. Catalytic activities of cobalt, chromium and iron oxides were also investigated for comparison. The cobalt ferrospinel was found to have better catalytic activity as compared to the Cr-substituted ferrospinels and the pure oxides. Cobalt ferrite catalyst offers high yields in a short reaction time under solvent-free conditions.

  7. Design parameters for measurements of local catalytic activity on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Johannessen, Tue; Jørgensen, Jan Hoffmann;

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics in combination with experiments is used to characterize a gas sampling device for measurements of the local catalytic activity on surfaces. The device basically consists of a quartz capillary mounted concentrically inside an aluminum tube. Reactant gas is blown toward...

  8. Catalytic site remodelling of the DOT1L methyltransferase by selective inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wenyu [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Chory, Emma J. [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Wernimont, Amy K. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Tempel, Wolfram [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Scopton, Alex [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Federation, Alexander [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Marineau, Jason J. [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Qi, Jun [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Yi, Joanna [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Marcellus, Richard [Ontario Inst. for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Iacob, Roxana E. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Engen, John R. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Griffin, Carly [Ontario Inst. for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Aman, Ahmed [Ontario Inst. for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wienholds, Erno [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Li, Fengling [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Pineda, Javier [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Estiu, Guillermina [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Shatseva, Tatiana [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Hajian, Taraneh [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Al-awar, Rima [Ontario Inst. for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dick, John E. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Vedadi, Masoud [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Brown, Peter J. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Bradner, James E. [Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Schapira, Matthieu [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-12-18

    Selective inhibition of protein methyltransferases is a promising new approach to drug discovery. An attractive strategy towards this goal is the development of compounds that selectively inhibit binding of the cofactor, S-adenosylmethionine, within specific protein methyltransferases. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the protein methyltransferase DOT1L bound toEPZ004777, the first S-adenosylmethionine-competitive inhibitor of a protein methyltransferase with in vivo efficacy. This structure and those of four new analogues reveal remodelling of the catalytic site. EPZ004777 and a brominated analogue, SGC0946, inhibit DOT1L in vitro and selectively kill mixed lineage leukaemia cells, in which DOT1L is aberrantly localized via interaction with an oncogenic MLL fusion protein. These data provide important new insight into mechanisms of cell-active S-adenosylmethionine-competitive protein methyltransferase inhibitors, and establish a foundation for the further development of drug-like inhibitors of DOT1L for cancer therapy.

  9. Pair interaction of catalytically active colloids: from assembly to escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Mozaffari, Ali; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics and pair trajectory of two self-propelled colloids are reported. The autonomous motions of the colloids are due to a catalytic chemical reaction taking place asymmetrically on their surfaces that generates a concentration gradient of interactive solutes around the particles and actuate particle propulsion. We consider two spherical particles with symmetric catalytic caps extending over the local polar angles $\\theta^1_{cap}$ and $\\theta^2_{cap}$ from the centers of active sectors in an otherwise quiescent fluid. A combined analytical-numerical technique was developed to solve the coupled mass transfer equation and the hydrodynamics in the Stokes flow regime. The ensuing pair trajectory of the colloids is controlled by the reacting coverages $\\theta^j_{cap}$ and their initial relative orientation with respect to each other. Our analysis indicates two possible scenarios for pair trajectories of catalytic self-propelled particles: either the particles approach, come into contact and assemble or they interact and move away from each other (escape). For arbitrary motions of the colloids, it is found that the direction of particle rotations is the key factor in determining the escape or assembly scenario. Based on the analysis, a phase diagram is sketched for the pair trajectory of the catalytically active particles as a function of active coverages and their initial relative orientations. We believe this study has important implications in elucidation of collective behaviors of auotophoretically self-propelled colloids.

  10. Effects of Colloidal Silica Binder on Catalytic Activity and Adhesion of HZSM-5 Coatings for Structured Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guozhu Liu; Jinhua Guo; Fanxu Meng; Xiangwen Zhang; Li Wang

    2014-01-01

    HZSM-5 coating using three colloidal silica binders, acidic col oidal silica (ACS), neutral colloidal silica (NCS) and basic col oidal silica (BCS), was prepared to study the effect of binders on their adhesion and catalytic activity. Scanning electron microscopy characterization indicated that the zeolite coating using BCS shows the smoothest surface with higher homogeneity and adherence strength. The specific surface area, relative crystallization and acid site strength of zeolites are also dependent on the binder used. Catalytic cracking of supercritical n-dodecane over the series of zeolite coating with various binders indicated that HZSM-5 coating with BCS exhibits the highest and the most stable catalytic activity compared with other kinds of binders, and also exhibits a stable catalytic activity ascribed to its proper acid property and microstructure.

  11. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Uspal, W E; Dietrich, S; Tasinkevych, M

    2016-01-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governi...

  12. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  13. Spectroscopic properties and the catalytic activity of new organo-lead supramolecular coordination polymer containing quinoxaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etaiw, Safaa El-din H.; Abdou, Safaa N.

    2015-01-01

    The 3D-supramolecular coordination polymer (SCP) 3∞[ Cu2(CN)3(Me3Pb)(qox)], 1, as the first example of the CuCN SCP containing the (Me3Pb) fragment, was explored to investigate its catalytic and photo-catalytic activities. The structure of 1 contains two chemically identical but crystallographically different [Cu2(CN)3ṡMe3Pbṡqox]2 units with four Cu(I) sites assuming distorted TP-3 geometry. Two non-linear chains of equal abundance are formed producing corrugated parallel chains which are connected laterally by quinoxaline creating 2D-layers which are arranged parallel in an (AB⋯AB⋯AB)n fashion forming 3D-network. IR, mass, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are also investigated. The SCP 1 is diamagnetic and exhibits good catalytic and photo-catalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The reaction is first order with respect to MB dye. The irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of MB mineralization. The efficiency of recycled the 1 and the mechanism of degradation of MB dye were investigated.

  14. Anacardic acid inhibits the catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Harris, Rodney M; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Varghese, Rebu K; Kumar, Geetha B; Tainer, John A; Banerji, Asoke; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nair, Bipin G

    2012-10-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1' pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC₅₀ of 11.11 μM. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action. PMID:22745359

  15. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-β. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.

  16. SITE-DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS OF PROPOSED ACTIVE-SITE RESIDUES OF PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN-5 FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLINDEN, MPG; DEHAAN, L; DIDEBERG, O; KECK, W

    1994-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) with the sequences of other members of the family of active-site-serine penicillin-interacting enzymes predicted the residues playing a role in the catalytic mechanism of PBP5. Apart from the active-site (Ser(44)), Lys(47),

  17. Catalytic activity of platinum on ruthenium electrodes with modified (electro)chemical states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Won; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2005-07-21

    Using Pt on Ru thin-film electrodes with various (electro)chemical states designed by the sputtering method, the effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt was investigated. The chemical and electrochemical properties of Pt/Ru thin-film samples were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Pt nanoparticles on Ru metal or oxide for an actual fuel cell system showed an effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt in methanol electrooxidation. Finally, it was concluded that such an enhancement of methanol electrooxidation on the Pt is responsible for Ru metallic and/or oxidation sites compared to pure Pt without any Ru state. PMID:16852701

  18. Highly Selective Synthesis of Catalytically Active Monodisperse Rhodium Nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Grass, M.E.; Kuhn, J.N.; Tao, F.; Habas, S.E.; Huang, W.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-02-21

    Synthesis of monodisperse and shape-controlled colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) is of increasing scientific interest and technological significance. Recently, shape control of Pt, Pd, Ag, Au, and Rh NCs has been obtained by tuning growth kinetics in various solution-phase approaches, including modified polyol methods, seeded growth by polyol reduction, thermolysis of organometallics, and micelle techniques. Control of reduction kinetics of the noble metal precursors and regulation of the relative growth rates of low-index planes (i.e. {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace}) via selective adsorption of selected chemical species are two keys for achieving shape modification of noble metal NCs. One application for noble metal NCs of well-defined shape is in understanding how NC faceting (determines which crystallographic planes are exposed) affects catalytic performance. Rh NCs are used in many catalytic reactions, including hydrogenation, hydroformylation, hydrocarbonylation, and combustion reactions. Shape manipulation of Rh NCs may be important in understanding how faceting on the nanoscale affects catalytic properties, but such control is challenging and there are fewer reports on the shape control of Rh NCs compared to other noble metals. Xia and coworkers obtained Rh multipods exhibiting interesting surface plasmonic properties by a polyol approach. The Somorjai and Tilley groups synthesized crystalline Rh multipods, cubes, horns and cuboctahedra, via polyol seeded growth. Son and colleagues prepared catalytically active monodisperse oleylamine-capped tetrahedral Rh NCs for the hydrogenation of arenes via an organometallic route. More recently, the Somorjai group synthesized sizetunable monodisperse Rh NCs using a one-step polyol technique. In this Communication, we report the highly selective synthesis of catalytically active, monodisperse Rh nanocubes of < 10 nm by a seedless polyol method. In this approach, Br{sup -} ions from trimethyl

  19. Catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles synthesized using essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Vidya; Philip, Daizy; Mathew, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    There are numerous reports on phytosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and various phytochemicals are involved in the reduction and stabilization. Pure explicit phytosynthetic protocol for catalytically and biologically active silver nanoparticles is of importance as it is an environmentally benign green method. This paper reports the use of essential oil of Myristica fragrans enriched in terpenes and phenyl propenes in the reduction and stabilization. FTIR spectra of the essential oil and the synthesized biogenic silver nanoparticles are in accordance with the GC-MS spectral analysis reports. Nanosilver is initially characterized by an intense SPR band around 420 nm, followed by XRD and TEM analysis revealing the formation of 12-26 nm sized, highly pure, crystalline silver nanoparticles. Excellent catalytic and bioactive potential of the silver nanoparticles is due to the surface modification. The chemocatalytic potential of nanosilver is exhibited by the rapid reduction of the organic pollutant, para nitro phenol and by the degradation of the thiazine dye, methylene blue. Significant antibacterial activity of the silver colloid against Gram positive, Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone - 12 mm) and Gram negative, Escherichia coli (inhibition zone - 14 mm) is demonstrated by Agar-well diffusion method. Strong antioxidant activity of the biogenic silver nanoparticles is depicted through NO scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, reducing power, DPPH and total antioxidant activity assays.

  20. Remarkable difference in catalytic performance of an organoamino-functionalized MCM-41-HPA composite with controlled site-isolation and site-aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiaofeng; Le, Ying-Yi; Zhu, Quanjing; Fan, Kangnian; Dai, Wei-Lin

    2011-08-01

    The organoamino-functionalized mesoporous silicas with different distribution patterns—site-isolation or site-aggregation are prepared using post-grafting method. We have investigated the effects of the solvents and the catalytic reactivity of these catalysts. It is found that, using the polar ethanol as solvent, the catalytic center is site-isolated. Contrarily, the catalytic center is site-aggregated with the non-polar toluene. Characterization techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen sorption experiments, thermogravimetric analysis, and ultraviolet-visible absorbance spectroscopy, demonstrate the most important dependencies of the distribution pattern on the polarity of solvent.

  1. Hydrophobic catalysts for liquid phase catalytic exchange: a review of preparation methods and influencing factors of catalytic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) between liquid water and gaseous hydro- gen has been developed for various applications, such as tritium recovery, water upgrade and heavy-water production. Good wetproofing properties of the hydrophobic catalysts can make the reaction to proceed smoothly. In this article, the preparation methods of the hydrophobic catalysts and the factors affecting the catalytic activities are reviewed. In particular, progress on the hydrophobic Pt/C/inert carrier catalysts is introduced, including the selection of inert carrier and active metal carrier, and the preparation methods of carbon- supported Pt based catalysts. Basic research activities on controllable fabrication of hydro- phobic catalysts are discussed, including the LPCE reaction mechanism, and the relation between the microstructure of active metal and the catalytic activity, etc. Finally, questions remaining to be answered and future directions in the field of hydrophobic catalysts are discussed. (authors)

  2. Protein composition of catalytically active human telomerase from immortal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Scott B; Graham, Mark E; Lovrecz, George O;

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex that adds 5'-TTAGGG-3' repeats onto the ends of human chromosomes, providing a telomere maintenance mechanism for approximately 90% of human cancers. We have purified human telomerase approximately 10(8)-fold, with the final elution dependent on the...... enzyme's ability to catalyze nucleotide addition onto a DNA oligonucleotide of telomeric sequence, thereby providing specificity for catalytically active telomerase. Mass spectrometric sequencing of the protein components and molecular size determination indicated an enzyme composition of two molecules...... each of telomerase reverse transcriptase, telomerase RNA, and dyskerin....

  3. TFB2 is a transient component of the catalytic site of the human mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Sologub, Marina; Litonin, Dmitry; Anikin, Michael; Mustaev, Arkady; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    Transcription in human mitochondria is carried out by a single-subunit, T7-like RNA polymerase assisted by several auxiliary factors. We demonstrate that an essential initiation factor, TFB2, forms a network of interactions with DNA near the transcription start site and facilitates promoter melting but may not be essential for promoter recognition. Unexpectedly, catalytic autolabeling reveals that TFB2 interacts with the priming substrate, suggesting that TFB2 acts as a transient component of...

  4. Probing substrate interactions in the active tunnel of a catalytically deficient cellobiohydrolase (Cel7)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Peter; Colussi, Francieli; Sørensen, Trine Holst;

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) break down cellulose sequentially by sliding along the crystal surface with a single cellulose strand threaded through the catalytic tunnel of the enzyme. This so-called processive mechanism relies on a complex pattern of enzyme-substrate interactions, which need to be...... sites in the catalytic tunnel, and using COS ligands with a degree of polymerization (DP) from 2 to 8, different regions of the tunnel could be probed. For COS ligands with DP of 2-3 the binding constants were around 105 M-1, and for longer ligands (DP 5-8) this value was about 107 M-1. Within each of......) decreased monotonously with both temperature and DP. Combined interpretation of these thermodynamic results and previously published structural data allowed assessment of an affinity profile along the length axis of the active tunnel...

  5. Catalytically active and hierarchically porous SAPO-11 zeolite synthesized in the presence of polyhexamethylene biguanidine

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Hierarchically porous SAPO-11 zeolite (H-SAPO-11) is rationally synthesized from a starting silicoaluminophosphate gel in the presence of polyhexamethylene biguanidine as a mesoscale template. The sample is well characterized by XRD, N2 sorption, SEM, TEM, NMR, XPS, NH3-TPD, and TG techniques. The results show that the sample obtained has good crystallinity, hierarchical porosity (mesopores at ca. 10nm and macropores at ca. 50-200nm), high BET surface area (226m2/g), large pore volume (0.25cm3/g), and abundant medium and strong acidic sites (0.36mmol/g). After loading Pt (0.5wt.%) on H-SAPO-11 by using wet impregnation method, catalytic hydroisomerization tests of n-dodecane show that the hierarchical Pt/SAPO-11 zeolite exhibits high conversion of n-dodecane and enhanced selectivity for branched products as well as reduced selectivity for cracking products, compared with conventional Pt/SAPO-11 zeolite. This phenomenon is reasonably attributed to the presence of hierarchical porosity, which is favorable for access of reactants on catalytically active sites. The improvement in catalytic performance in long-chain paraffin hydroisomerization over Pt/SAPO-11-based catalyst is of great importance for its industrial applications in the future. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  6. Modeling the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase: Electro-catalytic hydrogen evolution from acetic acid catalysed by [Fe2(-L)(CO)6] and [Fe2(-L)(CO)5(PPh3)] (L=pyrazine-2, 3-dithiolate, quinoxaline-2, 3-dithiolate and pyrido[2,3-b] pyrazine-2, 3-dithiolate)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gummadi Durgaprasad; Samar K Das

    2015-02-01

    Compounds [Fe2{-pydt}(CO)6] (pydt = pyrazine-2,3-dithiolate) (1), [Fe2{-qdt}(CO)6] (qdt = quinoxaline-2,3-dithiolate) (2), [Fe2{-ppdt}CO)6] (ppdt = pyrido[2,3-b]pyrazine-2,3-dithiolate) (3), [Fe2{-pydt}(CO)5PPh3] (4), [Fe2{-qdt}(CO)5PPh3] (5) and [Fe2{-ppdt}(CO)5PPh3] (6) have been synthesized in order to model the active sites of `[FeFe]-hydrogenase’. Compounds 1–6 have been characterized by routine spectral studies and unambiguously by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Supramolecular chemistry of compounds 1–6 have been described in terms of intermolecular interactions, observed in their respective crystal structures. Electro-catalytic hydrogen evaluation studies (from acetic acid) have been performed using compounds 1–6 as electro-catalysts. The mechanistic aspects of relevant electro–catalytic proton reductions have been discussed in detail.

  7. The Botrytis cinerea xylanase Xyn11A contributes to virulence with its necrotizing activity, not with its catalytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Celedonio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Botrytis cinerea xylanase Xyn11A has been previously shown to be required for full virulence of this organism despite its poor contribution to the secreted xylanase activity and the low xylan content of B. cinerea hosts. Intriguingly, xylanases from other fungi have been shown to have the property, independent of the xylan degrading activity, to induce necrosis when applied to plant tissues, so we decided to test the hypothesis that secreted Xyn11A contributes to virulence by promoting the necrosis of the plant tissue surrounding the infection, therefore facilitating the growth of this necrotroph. Results We show here that Xyn11A has necrotizing activity on plants and that this capacity is conserved in site-directed mutants of the protein lacking the catalytic activity. Besides, Xyn11A contributes to the infection process with the necrotizing and not with the xylan hydrolyzing activity, as the catalytically-impaired Xyn11A variants were able to complement the lower virulence of the xyn11A mutant. The necrotizing activity was mapped to a 30-amino acids peptide in the protein surface, and this region was also shown to mediate binding to tobacco spheroplasts by itself. Conclusions The main contribution of the xylanase Xyn11A to the infection process of B. cinerea is to induce necrosis of the infected plant tissue. A conserved 30-amino acids region on the enzyme surface, away from the xylanase active site, is responsible for this effect and mediates binding to plant cells.

  8. Imaging Isolated Gold Atom Catalytic Sites in Zeolite NaY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jing; Aydin, C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2012-06-11

    Gold, the most stable metallic element, attracted wide attention as a catalyst only after the discovery that gold nanoclusters on oxide supports are highly active and selective for reactions including numerous oxidation,[1–8] hydrogenation,[9–11] hydroamination,[12, 13] ring expansion,[14, 15] and coupling[16, 17] reactions. The catalytic properties of supported gold strongly dependent on the gold–support interactions and the size of the active species, which must be small—typically clusters with diameters of the order of 1 nm.[18–20] Frequent discoveries of new gold-catalyzed reactions are leading the science; understanding has been slow to emerge.[21] Major challenges are to identify the catalytically active species and to characterize gold–support interactions.

  9. A Redox 2-Cys Mechanism Regulates the Catalytic Activity of Divergent Cyclophilins1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Bruna Medéia; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Brasil de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalvez; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Perez, Carlos Alberto; Whittaker, Sara Britt-Marie; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Matos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The citrus (Citrus sinensis) cyclophilin CsCyp is a target of the Xanthomonas citri transcription activator-like effector PthA, required to elicit cankers on citrus. CsCyp binds the citrus thioredoxin CsTdx and the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and is a divergent cyclophilin that carries the additional loop KSGKPLH, invariable cysteine (Cys) residues Cys-40 and Cys-168, and the conserved glutamate (Glu) Glu-83. Despite the suggested roles in ATP and metal binding, the functions of these unique structural elements remain unknown. Here, we show that the conserved Cys residues form a disulfide bond that inactivates the enzyme, whereas Glu-83, which belongs to the catalytic loop and is also critical for enzyme activity, is anchored to the divergent loop to maintain the active site open. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys-40 and Cys-168 are required for the interaction with CsTdx and that CsCyp binds the citrus carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II YSPSAP repeat. Our data support a model where formation of the Cys-40-Cys-168 disulfide bond induces a conformational change that disrupts the interaction of the divergent and catalytic loops, via Glu-83, causing the active site to close. This suggests a new type of allosteric regulation in divergent cyclophilins, involving disulfide bond formation and a loop-displacement mechanism. PMID:23709667

  10. The non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and microtubule-disassembly activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D Grode

    Full Text Available Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules.

  11. Size Effect of Gold Sol/γ-Alumina on the Catalytic Activities of CO Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-Hua; GAO Geng-Yu

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between particle size and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticle catalysts with γ-Al2O3 as support has been investigated. The catalysts were prepared via the gold sol with different particle sizes by micelle method, and their structures were characterized by HRTEM and XRD, respectively. Furthermore, the catalytic activities were tested by CO oxidation. Experimental results showed that the catalytic activity became much weaker when gold particles were increased from 3.2 to 6.6 nm. Additionally, the particle size was also a key factor to govern catalytic activity with regard to gold supported on TiO2 prepared by the methods of deposition-precipitation.

  12. Orthogonal gene knock out and activation with a catalytically active Cas9 nuclease

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlman, James E.; Abudayyeh, Omar O.; Joung, Julia; Gootenberg, Jonathan S.; Zhang, Feng; Konermann, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a CRISPR-based method that uses catalytically active Cas9 and distinct sgRNA constructs to knock out and activate different genes in the same cell. These sgRNAs, with 14 15 bp target sequences and MS2 binding loops, can activate gene expression using an active Cas9 nuclease, without inducing DSBs. We use these ‘dead RNAs’ to perform orthogonal gene knockout and transcriptional activation in human cells.

  13. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of CdO nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, G., E-mail: gsingh4us@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273009 (India); Kapoor, I.P.S.; Dubey, Reena; Srivastava, Pratibha [Department of Chemistry, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273009 (India)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of nanocrystalline cadmium oxide (CdO) and its characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Its catalytic activity was investigated on the thermal decomposition of 1,2,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), ammonium perchlorate (AP), hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and composite solid propellants (CSPs) using thermogravimetric analysis (TG), simultaneous thermogravimerty and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and ignition delay measurements. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP + CdO has also been investigated using model free (isoconversional) and model-fitting approaches which have been applied to data for isothermal TG decomposition. All these studies show enhancement in the rate of decomposition of AP, HTPB and CSPs but no effect on HMX. The burning rate of CSPs has also been found to be increased with CdO nanocrystals.

  14. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: NiWO4 nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: ► NiWO4 spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. ► Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. ► Composition and structural properties of NiWO4 nanoparticles were characterized. ► EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV–vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. ► Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  15. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi, E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi, E-mail: rahiminasrabadi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh [Islamic Azad University, Varamin Pishva Branch, Varamin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omrani, Ismail [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiWO{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition and structural properties of NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO{sub 4} particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO{sub 4} were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV

  16. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  17. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: A platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Berta; Ziegler, Kharla K.; Carrillo, Fernando; Muñoz, Maria; Muraviev, Dimitri N.; Macanás, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride.

  19. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Mary A; Sewell, B Trevor; Benedik, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme's thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its k cat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein-protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  20. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  1. Isolation of an Active Catalytic Core of Streptococcus downei MFe28 GTF-I Glucosyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Monchois, Vincent; Arguello-Morales, Martha; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1999-01-01

    Truncated variants of GTF-I from Streptococcus downei MFe28 were purified by means of a histidine tag. Sequential deletions showed that the C-terminal domain was not directly involved in the catalytic process but was required for primer activation. A fully active catalytic core of only 100 kDa was isolated.

  2. Catalytically active cobalt and copper complexes in polyelectrolyte multilayer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work an approach to obtain effective and easy reusable heterogeneous catalyst, LbL deposition of polyelectrolytes followed by covalently binding with cobalt (II) and copper (II) ions were described. Immobilization of metal complexes via covalent attachment to insoluble template is an attractive method to facilitate catalyst recovery, recycling. The reaction in the heterogeneous catalysis goes in the interface of catalyst and reaction solution and it is important to create a catalyst with large surface area. We have used polycations as polyethyleneimine (BPEI), quaternized poly(4- vynilpyridine) (QPVP) and polyanions as poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(styrene sulphonate) sodium salt (PSS) and the electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly technique to make uniform thin film coating on SiO2 nanoparticles and glass slides with controllable thickness, roughness and mechanically durability. The stability of metals within multilayers in reaction condition were tested. We compared the amount of metal in PEMs of different polyelectrolytes. The stability constants of complex forming processes of the polymer-metal complexes in water and in alcohol were calculated by modified method of Bjerrum. Catalytic activity of immobilized catalysts was investigated for oxidation of toluene by molecular oxygen. Catalysts were separated from reaction mixture easily and had been used for this reaction five times without significant loss of activity. Key words: catalysis, layer-by-layer (LbL), polymer-metal complexes, oxidation, cobalt and copper immobilization

  3. Synthesis and catalytic activity of polysaccharide templated nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherly, K. B.; Rakesh, K. [Mahatma Gandhi University Regional Research Center in Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Mar Athanasius College, Kothamangalam-686666, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-28

    Nanoscaled materials are of great interest due to their unique enhanced optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Sulfate-promoted zirconia has been shown to exhibit super acidic behavior and high activity for acid catalyzed reactions. Nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared in the presence of polysaccharide template by interaction between ZrOCl{sub 2}⋅8H{sub 2}O and chitosan template. The interaction was carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the removal of templates by calcination at optimum temperature and sulfation. The structural and textural features were characterized by powder XRD, TG, SEM and TEM. XRD patterns showed the peaks of the diffractogram were in agreement with the theoretical data of zirconia with the catalytically active tetragonal phase and average crystalline size of the particles was found to be 9 nm, which was confirmed by TEM. TPD using ammonia as probe, FTIR and BET surface area analysis were used for analyzing surface features like acidity and porosity. The BET surface area analysis showed the sample had moderately high surface area. FTIR was used to find the type species attached to the surface of zirconia. UV-DRS found the band gap of the zirconia was found to be 2.8 eV. The benzylation of o-xylene was carried out batchwise in atmospheric pressure and 433K temperature using sulfated zirconia as catalyst.

  4. Role of Arginine 293 and Glutamine 288 in Communication between Catalytic and Allosteric Sites in Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey (Case Western); (Colorado)

    2012-11-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 ({alpha}) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 ({beta}) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  5. Role of arginine 293 and glutamine 288 in communication between catalytic and allosteric sites in yeast ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Md Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2012-06-22

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 (α) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 (β) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  6. Principles of water oxidation and O2-based hydrocarbon transformation by multinuclear catalytic sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G [Chemistry, Emory University; Hill, Craig L [Chemistry, Emory University; Morokuma, Keiji [Chemistry, Emory University

    2014-10-28

    Abstract The central thrust of this integrated experimental and computational research program was to obtain an atomistic-level understanding of the structural and dynamic factors underlying the design of catalysts for water oxidation and selective reductant-free O2-based transformations. The focus was on oxidatively robust polyoxometalate (POM) complexes in which a catalytic active site interacts with proximal metal centers in a synergistic manner. Thirty five publications in high-impact journals arose from this grant. I. Developing an oxidatively and hydrolytically stable and fast water oxidation catalyst (WOC), a central need in the production of green fuels using water as a reductant, has proven particularly challenging. During this grant period we have designed and investigated several carbon-free, molecular (homogenous), oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOCs, including the Rb8K2[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(γ-SiW10O36)2]·25H2O (1) and [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- (2). Although complex 1 is fast, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC, Ru is neither abundant nor inexpensive. Therefore, development of a stable and fast carbon-free homogenous WOC, based on earth-abundant elements became our highest priority. In 2010, we reported the first such catalyst, complex 2. This complex is substantially faster than 1 and stable under homogeneous conditions. Recently, we have extended our efforts and reported a V2-analog of the complex 2, i.e. [Co4(H2O)2(α-VW9O34)2]10- (3), which shows an even greater stability and reactivity. We succeeded in: (a) immobilizing catalysts 1 and 2 on the surface of various electrodes, and (b) elucidating the mechanism of O2 formation and release from complex 1, as well as the Mn4O4L6 “cubane” cluster. We have shown that the direct O-O bond formation is the most likely pathway for O2 formation during water oxidation catalyzed by 1. II. Oxo transfer catalysts that contain two proximal and synergistically interacting redox active metal

  7. Enhanced Activity of Nanocrystalline Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanocrystalline zeolites with discrete crystal sizes of less than 100 nm have different properties relative to zeolites with larger crystal sizes. Nanocrystalline zeolites have improved mass transfer properties and very large internal and external surface areas that can be exploited for many different applications. The additional external surface active sites and the improved mass transfer properties of nanocrystalline zeolites offer significant advantages for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysis with ammonia as a reductant in coal-fired power plants relative to current zeolite based SCR catalysts. Nanocrystalline NaY was synthesized with a crystal size of 15-20 nm and was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Copper ions were exchanged into nanocrystalline NaY to increase the catalytic activity. The reactions of nitrogen dioxides (NOx) and ammonia (NH3) on nanocrystalline NaY and CuY were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy. Significant conversion of NO2 was observed at room temperature in the presence of NH3 as monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy. Copper-exchanged nanocrystalline NaY was more active for NO2 reduction with NH3 relative to nanocrystalline NaY

  8. CO oxidation over ruthenium: identification of the catalytically active phases at near-atmospheric pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Goodman, Wayne D.

    2012-05-21

    CO oxidation was carried out over Ru(0001) and RuO2(110) thin film grown on Ru(0001) at various O2/CO ratios near atmospheric pressures. Reaction kinetics, coupled with in situ polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) and post-reaction Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurements were used to identify the catalytically relevant phases at different reaction conditions. Under stoichiometric and reducing conditions at all reaction temperatures, as well as net-oxidizing reaction conditions below {approx}475 K, a reduced metallic phase with chemisorbed oxygen is the thermodynamically stable and catalytically active phase. On this surface CO oxidation occurs at surface defect sites, for example step edges. Only at net-oxidizing reaction conditions and above {approx}475 K is the RuO2 thin film grown on metallic Ru stable and active. However, RuO2 is not active itself without the existence of the metal substrate, suggesting the importance of a strong metal-substrate interaction (SMSI).

  9. Kinetics of catalytically activated duplication in aggregation growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hai-Feng; Lin Zhen-Quan; Gao Yan; Xu Chao

    2009-01-01

    We propose a catalytically activated duplication model to mimic the coagulation and duplication of the DNA polymer system under the catalysis of the primer RNA.In the model,two aggregates of the same species can coagulate themselves and a DNA aggregate of any size can yield a new monomer or double itself with the help of RNA aggregates.By employing the mean-field rate equation approach we analytically investigate the evolution behaviour of the system.For the system with catalysis-driven monomer duplications,the aggregate size distribution of DNA polymers ak(t) always follows a power law in size in the long-time limit,and it decreases with time or approaches a time-independent steady-state form in the case of the duplication rate independent of the size of the mother aggregates,while it increases with time increasing in the case of the duplication rate proportional to the size of the mother aggregates.For the system with complete catalysis-driven duplications,the aggregate size distribution ak(t) approaches a generalized or modified scaling form.

  10. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-12-01

    Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  11. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  12. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Respiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent Adduct With a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 (angstrom) resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation

  13. STUDIES ON THE CATALYTIC REACTION OF NITROGEN OXIDE ON METAL MODIFIED ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ruowen; DU Xiuying; LIN Yuansheng; XU Hao; HU Yiongjun

    2003-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of NO with CO and decomposition of NO over metal modified ACFs were investigated and compared with other carriers supported catalysts. It is demonstrated that Pd/ACF and Pd/Cu/ACF have high catalytic activity for the reaction of NO/CO, while Pt/ACF.Pt/Cu/ACF and Co/Cu/ACF have very Iow catalytic activity in similar circumstance. Pd-modified ACF possesses high catalytic decomposition of NO at 300 ℃. Pd/CB and Pd/GAC present good catalytic decomposition ability for NO only at low flowrate. Pd/G, Pd/ZMS and Pd/A however, do not show any catalytic activity for NO decomposition even at 400 ℃. Catalytic temperature, NO flowrate and loading of metal components affect the decomposition rate of NO. The coexistence of Cu with Pd on Cu/Pd/ACF leads to crystalline of palladium to more unperfected so as to that increase the catalytic activity.

  14. Nanoscale mapping of catalytic activity using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N; Stephanidis, B; Zenobi, R; Wain, A J; Roy, D

    2015-04-28

    Chemical mapping of a photocatalytic reaction with nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated for the first time using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). An ultrathin alumina film applied to the Ag-coated TERS tip blocks catalytic interference whilst maintaining near-field electromagnetic enhancement, thus enabling spectroscopic imaging of catalytic activity on nanostructured Ag surfaces.

  15. Evidence for Participation of Remote Residues in the Catalytic Activity of Co-type Nitrile Hydratase from Pseudomonas putida†

    OpenAIRE

    Brodkin, Heather R.; Novak, Walter R. P.; Milne, Amy C.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Karabacak, N. M.; Agar, Jeffrey N.; Payne, Mark S.; Petsko, Gregory A; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Ringe, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Active sites may be regarded as layers of residues, whereby the residues that interact directly with substrate also interact with residues in a second shell, and these in turn interact with residues in a third shell. These residues in the second and third layers may have distinct roles in maintaining the essential chemical properties of the first-shell catalytic residues, particularly their spatial arrangement relative to the substrate binding pocket, and their electrostatic and dynamic prope...

  16. Preparation and Acid Catalytic Activity of TiO2 Grafted Silica MCM-41 with Sulfate Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai-shi Guo; Zi-feng Ma; Chun-sheng Yin; Qi-zhong Jiang

    2008-01-01

    TiO2 grafted silica MCM-41 catalyst with and without sulfate treatment were prepared.The structural and acid properties of these materials were investigated by XRD,N2 adsorption-desorption,element analysis,thermal analysis,Raman and FTIR measurements.Their acid-catalytic activities were evaluated using the cyclization reaction of pseudoionone.It was found that the obtained materials possess well-ordered mesostructure,and the grafted TiO2 components were in highly dispersed amorphous form.T/MCM41 without sulfation contained only Lewis acid sites,while Br(o)nsted and Lewis acidities were remarkably improved for the sulfated materials ST/MCM41 and d-ST/MCM41.T/MCM-41 was not active for the cyclization reaction of pseudoionone,but ST/MCM-41 and d-ST/MCM-41 possessed favorable catalytic activities.The catalytic performance of ST/MCM-41 was comparable with that of the commercial solid acid catalyst of Amberlyst-15,and better than that of d-ST/MCM-41,although the latter underwent a second TiO2 grafting process and accordingly had higher Ti and S content.The specific surface structure of Si-O-Ti-O-S=O in ST/MCM-41 and the bilateral induction effect of Si and S=O on Si-O-Ti bonds were speculated to account for its higher acid catalytic activity.

  17. Active sites for NO reduction over Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwidder, M; Santhosh Kumar, M; Brückner, A; Grünert, W

    2005-02-14

    A study of Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts with variable amounts of isolated, oligomeric and heavily aggregated Fe3+ oxo sites (as evidenced by UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopic data) and their catalytic properties in the selective catalytic reduction of NO by isobutane or by NH3 is presented, which allows development of a unified concept of the active Fe sites in these reactions, according to which isolated Fe sites catalyse both SCR reactions while oligomeric sites, though also involved in the selective reduction path, limit the catalyst performance by causing the total oxidation of the reductant. PMID:15685345

  18. Synthesis and characterization of vanadium nanoparticles on activated carbon and their catalytic activity in thiophene hydrodesulphurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Susana [Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 40679 (Venezuela); Centro de Quimica Organometalica y Macromolecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 47778 (Venezuela); D' Ornelas, Lindora [Centro de Quimica Organometalica y Macromolecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 47778 (Venezuela); Betancourt, Paulino [Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 40679 (Venezuela)], E-mail: pbetanco@strix.ciens.ucv.ve

    2008-06-30

    Vanadium nanoparticles ({approx}7 nm) stabilized on activated carbon were synthesized by the reduction of VCl{sub 3}.3THF with K[BEt{sub 3}H]. This material was characterized by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The catalytic performance of the carbon-supported vanadium was studied using thiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) as model reaction at 300 deg. C and P = 1 atm. The catalytic activity of the vanadium carbide phase on the activated carbon carrier was more significant than that of the reference catalysts, alumina supported NiMoS. The method proposed for the synthesis of such a catalyst led to an excellent performance of the HDS process.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of vanadium nanoparticles on activated carbon and their catalytic activity in thiophene hydrodesulphurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Susana; D'Ornelas, Lindora; Betancourt, Paulino

    2008-06-01

    Vanadium nanoparticles (˜7 nm) stabilized on activated carbon were synthesized by the reduction of VCl 3·3THF with K[BEt 3H]. This material was characterized by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The catalytic performance of the carbon-supported vanadium was studied using thiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) as model reaction at 300 °C and P = 1 atm. The catalytic activity of the vanadium carbide phase on the activated carbon carrier was more significant than that of the reference catalysts, alumina supported NiMoS. The method proposed for the synthesis of such a catalyst led to an excellent performance of the HDS process.

  20. Quantitative study of catalytic activity and catalytic deactivation of Fe–Co/Al2O3 catalysts for multi-walled carbon nanotube synthesis by the CCVD process

    OpenAIRE

    Pirard, Sophie; Heyen, Georges; Pirard, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic deactivation during multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) synthesis by the CCVD process and the influence of hydrogen on it were quantified. Initial specific reaction rate, relative specific productivity and catalytic deactivation were studied. Carbon source was ethylene, and a bimetallic iron–cobalt catalyst supported on alumina was used. The catalytic deactivation was modeled by a decreasing hyperbolic law, reflecting the progressive accumulation of amorphous carbon on active si...

  1. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  2. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts.

  3. Activities of human RRP6 and structure of the human RRP6 catalytic domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Januszyk, Kurt; Liu, Quansheng; Lima, Christopher D. (SKI)

    2011-08-29

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a highly conserved multi-subunit complex that catalyzes degradation and processing of coding and noncoding RNA. A noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core interacts with Rrp44 and Rrp6, two subunits that possess processive and distributive 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity, respectively. While both Rrp6 and Rrp44 are responsible for RNA processing in budding yeast, Rrp6 may play a more prominent role in processing, as it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by stable RNA secondary structure in vitro and because the null allele in budding yeast leads to the buildup of specific structured RNA substrates. Human RRP6, otherwise known as PM/SCL-100 or EXOSC10, shares sequence similarity to budding yeast Rrp6 and is proposed to catalyze 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity on a variety of nuclear transcripts including ribosomal RNA subunits, RNA that has been poly-adenylated by TRAMP, as well as other nuclear RNA transcripts destined for processing and/or destruction. To characterize human RRP6, we expressed the full-length enzyme as well as truncation mutants that retain catalytic activity, compared their activities to analogous constructs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6, and determined the X-ray structure of a human construct containing the exoribonuclease and HRDC domains that retains catalytic activity. Structural data show that the human active site is more exposed when compared to the yeast structure, and biochemical data suggest that this feature may play a role in the ability of human RRP6 to productively engage and degrade structured RNA substrates more effectively than the analogous budding yeast enzyme.

  4. Substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. Kinetic evaluation of binding and activation parameters controlling the catalytic cycles of unbranched, acyclic secondary alcohols and ketones as substrates of the native and active-site-specific Co(II)-substituted enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, H W; Maurer, P; Schneider-Bernlöhr, H; Sartorius, C; Zeppezauer, M

    1991-11-01

    1. The steady-state parameters kcat and Km and the rate constants of hydride transfer for the substrates isopropanol/acetone; (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone; (S)-2-pentanol, (R)-2-pentanol/2-pentanone; 3-pentanol/3-pentanone; (S)-2-octanol and (R)-2-octanol have been determined for the native Zn(II)-containing horse-liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) and the specific active-site-substituted Co(II)LADH. 2. A combined evaluation of steady-state kinetic data and rate constants obtained from stopped-flow measurements, allowed the determination of all rate constants of the following ordered bi-bi mechanism: E in equilibrium E.NAD in equilibrium E.NAD.R1R2 CHOH in equilibrium E.NADH.R1R2CO in equilibrium E.NADH in equilibrium E. 3. On the basis of the different substrate specificities of LADH and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), a procedure has been developed to evaluate the enantiomeric product composition of ketone reductions. 2-Butanone and 2-pentanone reductions revealed (S)-2-butanol (86%) and (S)-2-pentanol (95%) as the major products. 4. The observed enantioselectivity implies the existence of two productive ternary complexes; E.NADH.(pro-S) 2-butanone and E.NADH.(pro-R) 2-butanone. All rate constants describing the kinetic pathways of the system (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone have been determined. These data have been used to estimate the expected enantiomer product composition of 2-butanone reductions using apparent kcat/Km values for the two different ternary-complex configurations of 2-butanone. Additionally, these data have been used for computer simulations of the corresponding reaction cycles. Calculated, simulated and experimental data were found to be in good agreement. Thus, the system (S)-2-butanol, (R)-2-butanol/2-butanone is the first example of a LADH-catalyzed reaction for which the stereochemical course could be described in terms of rate constants of the underlying mechanism. 5. The effects of Co(II) substitution on the

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    This project was directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction on carbonaceous supports at low temperatures. The experimental work was conducted primarily in a packed bed reactor/gas flow system that was constructed for this work. The analytical techniques employed were mass spectrometry, NO{sub x} chemiluminescence, and gas chromatography. The experimental plan was focused on steady-state reactivity experiments, followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of surface intermediates, and also selected temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed (potassium-promoted) phenolic resin char, were investigated as well as the catalytic effect of additional CO in the gas phase.

  6. Mutations in the catalytic loop HRD motif alter the activity and function of Drosophila Src64.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor C Strong

    Full Text Available The catalytic loop HRD motif is found in most protein kinases and these amino acids are predicted to perform functions in catalysis, transition to, and stabilization of the active conformation of the kinase domain. We have identified mutations in a Drosophila src gene, src64, that alter the three HRD amino acids. We have analyzed the mutants for both biochemical activity and biological function during development. Mutation of the aspartate to asparagine eliminates biological function in cytoskeletal processes and severely reduces fertility, supporting the amino acid's critical role in enzymatic activity. The arginine to cysteine mutation has little to no effect on kinase activity or cytoskeletal reorganization, suggesting that the HRD arginine may not be critical for coordinating phosphotyrosine in the active conformation. The histidine to leucine mutant retains some kinase activity and biological function, suggesting that this amino acid may have a biochemical function in the active kinase that is independent of its side chain hydrogen bonding interactions in the active site. We also describe the phenotypic effects of other mutations in the SH2 and tyrosine kinase domains of src64, and we compare them to the phenotypic effects of the src64 null allele.

  7. Size-dependent peroxidase-like catalytic activity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang Peng; Yu Zhang; Ning Gu

    2008-01-01

    Peroxidase-like catalytic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) with three different sizes, synthesized by chemical coprecipitation and sol-gel methods, were investigated by UV-vis spectrum analysis. By comparing Fe3O4 NPs with average diameters of 11,20, and 150 nm, we found that the catalytic activity increases with the reduced nanoparticle size. The electrochemical method to characterize the catalytic activity of Fe3O4 NPs using the response currents of the reaction product and substrate was also developed.

  8. Integrating nanotubes into microsystems with electron beam lithography and in situ catalytically activated growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerde, Kjetil; Fornés-Mora, Marc; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    Integration of freestanding wire-like structures such as multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into microsystems has many potential applications. Devices such as AFM tips or improved electrodes for conductivity measurements are obvious candidates. Catalytically activated growth opens up...

  9. Microbially supported synthesis of catalytically active bimetallic Pd-Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Søbjerg, Lina Sveidal; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena;

    2012-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are considered the next generation of nanocatalysts with increased stability and catalytic activity. Bio-supported synthesis of monometallic nanoparticles has been proposed as an environmentally friendly alternative to the conventional chemical and physical protocols. In ...

  10. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Penate, I. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Julcour-Lebigue, C., E-mail: carine.julcour@ensiacet.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Jauregui-Haza, U.J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana (Cuba); Wilhelm, A.M.; Delmas, H. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient hybrid adsorption-regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  11. Design and Preparation of Supported Au Catalyst with Enhanced Catalytic Activities by Rationally Positioning Au Nanoparticles on Anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Rice, Andrew E; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Mingshu; Meng, Xiangju; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-06-18

    A synergistic effect between individual components is crucial for increasing the activity of metal/metal oxide catalysts. The greatest challenge is how to control the synergistic effect to obtain enhanced catalytic performance. Through density functional theory calculations of model Au/TiO2 catalysts, it is suggested that there is strong interaction between Au nanoparticles and Ti species at the edge/corner sites of anatase, which is favorable for the formation of stable oxygen vacancies. Motivated by this theoretical analysis, we have rationally prepared Au nanoparticles attached to edge/corner sites of anatase support (Au/TiO2-EC), confirmed by their HR-TEM images. As expected, this strong interaction is well characterized by Raman, UV-visible, and XPS techniques. Very interestingly, compared with conventional Au catalysts, Au/TiO2-EC exhibits superior catalytic activity in the oxidations using O2. Our approach to controlling Au nanoparticle positioning on anatase to obtain enhanced catalytic activity offers an efficient strategy for developing more novel supported metal catalysts. PMID:26266615

  12. Toward efficient nanoporous catalysts: controlling site-isolation and concentration of grafted catalytic sites on nanoporous materials with solvents and colorimetric elucidation of their site-isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishna K; Anan, Abhishek; Buckley, Robert P; Ouellette, Wayne; Asefa, Tewodros

    2008-01-01

    We report that the polarity and dielectric constants of solvents used for grafting organosilanes on mesoporous materials strongly affect the concentration of grafted organic groups, the degree of their site-isolation, and the catalytic properties of the resulting materials. Polar and nonpolar organosilanes as well as polar-protic, dipolar-aprotic, and nonpolar solvents were investigated. Polar-protic solvents, which have high dielectric constants, resulted in smaller concentrations ( approximately 1-2 mmol/g) of polar organic groups such as 3-aminopropyl groups, higher surface area materials, site-isolated organic groups, and more efficient catalytic properties toward the Henry reaction of p-hydroxybenzaldehyde with nitromethane. On the other hand, dipolar-aprotic and nonpolar solvents resulted in larger concentrations ( approximately 2-3 mmol/g) of grafted polar functional groups, lower-to-higher surface area materials, more densely populated catalytic groups, and poor-to-efficient catalytic properties toward the Henry reaction. Both the polar-protic and dipolar-aprotic solvents resulted in significantly lower concentration of grafted groups for nonpolar organosilanes such as (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane compared to corresponding grafting of the polar amino-organosilanes. The relationship between the solvent properties and the percentage and degree of site-isolation of the grafted functional groups was attributed to differences in solvation of the organosilanes and silanols in various solvents and possible hydrogen-bonding between the organsilanes and the solvents. The degree of site-isolation of the amine groups, which affect the material's catalytic properties, was elucidated by a new colorimetric method involving probing of the absorption maxima (lambdamax) on the d-d electronic spectrum of Cu2+ complexes with the amine-functionalized materials and the colors of the samples. The absorption lambdamax and the colors of the materials were found to be

  13. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-10

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0/sup 0/C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain.

  14. Simultaneous realization of high catalytic activity and stability for catalytic cracking of n-heptane on highly exposed (010) crystal planes of nanosheet ZSM-5 zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Yaoyuan; Jiang, Guiyuan; Liu, Jia; Han, Shanlei; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Ruipu; Li, Cong; Xu, Chunming; Duan, Aijun; Wang, Yajun; Liu, Jian; Wei, Yuechang

    2016-08-01

    Nanosheet ZSM-5 zeolite with highly exposed (010) crystal planes demonstrates high reactivity and good anti-coking stability for the catalytic cracking of n-heptane, which is attributed to the synergy of high external surface area and acid sites, fully accessible channel intersection acid sites, and hierarchical porosity caused by the unique morphology.

  15. Directed evolution of Tau class glutathione transferases reveals a site that regulates catalytic efficiency and masks co-operativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axarli, Irine; Muleta, Abdi W; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia; Kotzia, Georgia; Maltezos, Anastasios; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2016-03-01

    A library of Tau class GSTs (glutathione transferases) was constructed by DNA shuffling using the DNA encoding the Glycine max GSTs GmGSTU2-2, GmGSTU4-4 and GmGSTU10-10. The parental GSTs are >88% identical at the sequence level; however, their specificity varies towards different substrates. The DNA library contained chimaeric structures of alternated segments of the parental sequences and point mutations. Chimaeric GST sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzymatic activities towards CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and the herbicide fluorodifen (4-nitrophenyl α,α,α-trifluoro-2-nitro-p-tolyl ether) were determined. A chimaeric clone (Sh14) with enhanced CDNB- and fluorodifen-detoxifying activities, and unusual co-operative kinetics towards CDNB and fluorodifen, but not towards GSH, was identified. The structure of Sh14 was determined at 1.75 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution in complex with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione. Analysis of the Sh14 structure showed that a W114C point mutation is responsible for the altered kinetic properties. This was confirmed by the kinetic properties of the Sh14 C114W mutant. It is suggested that the replacement of the bulky tryptophan residue by a smaller amino acid (cysteine) results in conformational changes of the active-site cavity, leading to enhanced catalytic activity of Sh14. Moreover, the structural changes allow the strengthening of the two salt bridges between Glu(66) and Lys(104) at the dimer interface that triggers an allosteric effect and the communication between the hydrophobic sites.

  16. Encapsulating Metal Clusters and Acid Sites within Small Voids: Synthetic Strategies and Catalytic Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sarika

    active sites. We have demonstrated the selectivity of the encapsulation processes by combining transmission electron microscopy and chemisorptive titrations with rigorous catalytic assessments of the ability of these materials to catalyze reactions of small molecules, which can access the intracrystalline voids, but not of larger molecules that cannot access the metal clusters within such voids. The selective confinement of clusters also prevented their contact with sulfur compounds (e.g., thiophene and H2S), thus allowing reactions to occur at conditions that otherwise render unconfined clusters unreactive. We have also developed synthetic protocols and guiding principles, inspired by mechanistic considerations, for the synthesis of zeolites via interzeolite transformations without the use of organic structure-directing agents (OSDA). More specifically, we have synthesized high-silica MFI (ZSM-5), CHA (chabazite), STF (SSZ-35) and MTW (ZSM-12) zeolites from FAU (faujasite) or BEA (beta) parent materials. Structures with lower framework densities (FAU or BEA) were successfully transformed into thermodynamically-favored, more stable structures with higher framework densities (MFI, CHA, STF, and MTW); to date, target materials with higher Si/Al ratios (Si/Al >10) have not been synthesized via interzeolite transformations without the aid of the OSDA species used to discover these zeolite structures and deemed essential up until now for their successful synthesis. Overcoming kinetic hurdles in such transformations required either the presence of common composite building units (CBU) between parent and target structures or, in their absence, the introduction of small amount of seeds of the daughter structures. The NaOH/SiO2 ratio, H2O/SiO2 ratio and Al content in reagents are used to enforce synchronization between the swelling and local restructuring within parent zeolite domains with the spalling of fragments or building units from seeds of the target structure. The

  17. Enhancement in the Catalytic Activity of Pd/USY in the Heck Reaction Induced by H2 Bubbling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Niwa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pd was loaded on ultra stable Y (USY zeolites prepared by steaming NH4-Y zeolite under different conditions. Heck reactions were carried out over the prepared Pd/USY. We found that H2 bubbling was effective in improving not only the catalytic activity of Pd/USY, but also that of other supported Pd catalysts and Pd(OAc2. Moreover, the catalytic activity of Pd/USY could be optimized by choosing appropriate steaming conditions for the preparation of the USY zeolites; Pd loaded on USY prepared at 873 K with 100% H2O gave the highest activity (TOF = 61,000 h−1, which was higher than that of Pd loaded on other kinds of supports. The prepared Pd/USY catalysts were applicable to the Heck reactions using various kinds of substrates including bromo- and chloro-substituted aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds. Characterization of the acid properties of the USY zeolites revealed that the strong acid site (OHstrong generated as a result of steaming had a profound effect on the catalytic activity of Pd.

  18. Solubility of cerium in LaCoO3-influence on catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, S A; Catlow, C R A; Oldman, R J; Rogers, S C; Axon, S A

    2002-11-21

    The recent interest in the catalytic properties of lanthanum perovskites for methane combustion and three way catalysis has led to considerable debate as to their structure and defect chemistry. We have investigated the doping of LaCoO3 with the tetravalent cerium cation using atomistic simulation techniques. We have compared three routes for cerium insertion and identified the favoured doping mechanism, which explain experimental observations relating to the effect of cerium on catalytic activity.

  19. Catalytic activities of a cocaine hydrolase engineered from human butyrylcholinesterase against (+)- and (−)-cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Liu; Hou, Shurong; Wenchao YANG; Fang, Lei; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2012-01-01

    It can be argued that an ideal anti-cocaine medication would be one that accelerates cocaine metabolism producing biologically inactive metabolites via a route similar to the primary cocaine-metabolizing pathway, i.e. hydrolysis catalyzed by butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in plasma. However, wild-type BChE has a low catalytic efficiency against naturally occurring (−)cocaine. Interestingly, wild-type BChE has a much higher catalytic activity against unnatural (+)cocaine. According to available ...

  20. POISONING OF ACTIVE SITES ON ZIEGLER-NATTA CATALYST FOR PROPYLENE POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kitti Tangjituabun; Sang Yull Kim; Yuichi Hiraoka; Toshiaki Taniike; Minoru Terano; Bunjerd Jongsomjit; Piyasan Praserthdam

    2008-01-01

    The effects of poisoning materials on catalytic activity and isospecificity of the supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst were investigated.A minor amount of simple structure of Lewis base,i.e.,methanol,acetone,ethyl acetate,was introduced into the catalyst slurry for partial poisoning catalytic active centers.It was found that the variations in deactivation power were in the order of methanol>acetone>ethyl acetate.The kinetic investigation via stopped-flow polymerization showed that poisoning compounds caused a decrease in activity through the reduction of the number of active sites whereas no effect on the degree of isotacticity was observed.

  1. Some aspects of catalytic activity of pyrolyzed coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkova, Valentina [Institute of Chemistry, Jan Kochanowski University, Swietokrzyska Str.15G, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Grigoreva, Evgenija [Institute of High Temperature, The Russian Academy of Science, 13/19 Izhorskaja Street, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strojwas, Andrzej, E-mail: andrzej.strojwas@wp.pl [Institute of Chemistry, Jan Kochanowski University, Swietokrzyska Str.15G, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Czaplicka, Marianna [Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals, J. Sowińskiego Str. 5, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Prezhdo, Victor; Pruszkowska, Jolanta [Institute of Chemistry, Jan Kochanowski University, Swietokrzyska Str.15G, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)

    2013-10-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The pyrolysates of coal were investigated using XRD, SEM, FT–IR and GC–MS. • The pyrolyzed coal in the m.s.g. increases the destruction rate constant by 16.7 times. • In the m.s.g. some substances have catalytic influence on breakage of ether bonding. - Abstract: The influence of additives of initial coal and selected pyrolysates of this coal on the reaction rate constant was investigated during the test reaction of breakage of ether bonding. It was stated that pyrolyzed coal at the stage of maximally swollen grains increases the destruction rate constant by 16.7 times. The pyrolysates were investigated using X-ray diffraction, electron scanning microscopy (SEM), and FT–IR spectroscopy. The resistivity values were measured for the coal and its pyrolysates. Dichloromethane extracts of the pyrolyzed coals were analyzed by gas chromatography. It was proved that the composition and structure of substances in the layer of maximally swollen grains differ substantially from those of substances in the nearby layers. The authors suggest that in the maximally swollen grains some substances can be formed which have catalytic influence on the reaction of breakage of ether bonding.

  2. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  3. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  4. Structural models of vanadate-dependent haloperoxidases, their reactivity, immobilization on polymer support and catalytic activities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mannar R Maurya

    2011-03-01

    The design of structural and functional models of enzymes vanadate-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPO) and the isolation and/or generation of species having {VO(H2O)}, {VO2}, {VO(OH)} and {VO(O2)} cores, proposed as intermediate(s) during catalytic action, in solution have been studied. Catalytic potential of these complexes have been tested for oxo-transfer as well as oxidative bromination and sulfide oxidation reactions. Some of the oxidovanadium(IV) and dioxidovanadium(V) complexes have been immobilized on polymer support in order to improve their recycle ability during catalytic activities and turn over number. The formulations of the polymer-anchored complexes are based on the respective neat complexes and conclusions drawn from the various characterization studies. These catalysts have successfully been used for all catalytic reactions mentioned above. These catalysts are stable and recyclable.

  5. High activity in catalytic cracking of large molecules over micro-mesoporous silicoaluminophosphate with controlled morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A novel micro-mesoporous silicoaluminophosphate(MUS-5) with controlled morphology has been first synthesized in a two-step route.The physical properties of the silicoaluminophosphate were characterized using XRD,SEM,TEM,nitrogen adsorption-desorption and NH3-TPD techniques.When the pH value of the solution system was varied in the range from 2.0 to 5.0,three different morphologies of silicoaluminophosphate including chain-like,flower-like and barrel-like morphology were obtained.Catalytic tests showed that the silicoaluminophosphate exhibited higher catalytic activity compared with the conventional microporous SAPO-5 under the same conditions for catalytic cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene heavy aromatics.The remarkable catalytic reactivity was mainly attributed to the presence of the hierarchical porosity in the silicoaluminophosphate catalyst.

  6. Catalytic activity of nuclear PLC-beta(1) is required for its signalling function during C2C12 differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazzotti, Giulia; Faenza, Irene; Gaboardi, Gian Carlo; Piazzi, Manuela; Bavelloni, Alberto; Fiume, Roberta; Manzoli, Lucia; Martelli, Alberto M; Cocco, Lucio

    2008-11-01

    Here we report that PLC-beta(1) catalytic activity plays a role in the increase of cyclin D3 levels and induces the differentiation of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells. PLC-beta(1) mutational analysis revealed the importance of His(331) and His(378) for the catalysis. The expression of PLC-beta(1) and cyclin D3 proteins is highly induced during the process of skeletal myoblast differentiation. We have previously shown that PLC-beta(1) activates cyclin D3 promoter during the differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes, indicating that PLC-beta(1) is a crucial regulator of the mouse cyclin D3 gene. We show that after insulin treatment cyclin D3 mRNA levels are lower in cells overexpressing the PLC-beta(1) catalytically inactive form in comparison to wild type cells. We describe a novel signalling pathway elicited by PLC-beta(1) that modulates AP-1 activity. Gel mobility shift assay and supershift performed with specific antibodies indicate that the c-jun binding site is located in a cyclin D3 promoter region specifically regulated by PLC-beta(1) and that c-Jun binding activity is significantly increased by insulin and PLC-beta(1) overexpression. Mutation of AP-1 site decreased the basal cyclin D3 promoter activity and eliminated its induction by insulin and PLC-beta(1). These results hint at the fact that PLC-beta(1) catalytic activity signals a c-jun/AP-1 target gene, i.e. cyclin D3, during myogenic differentiation.

  7. Removal performance and mechanism of ibuprofen from water by catalytic ozonation using sludge-corncob activated carbon as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjuan; Zhang, Liqiu; Qi, Fei; Wang, Xue; Li, Lu; Feng, Li

    2014-09-01

    To discover the catalytic activity of sludge-corncob activated carbon in catalytic ozonation of Ibuprofen, the performance of sludge-corncob activated carbon and three selected commercial activated carbons as catalysts in catalytic ozonation was investigated. The observation indicates the degradation rate of Ibuprofen increases significantly in the presence of sludge-corncob activated carbon and the catalytic activity of sludge-corncob activated carbon is much higher than that of the other three commercial activated carbons. Ibuprofen's removal rate follows pseudo-first order kinetics model well. It is also found that the adsorption removal of Ibuprofen by sludge-corncob activated carbon is less than 30% after 40 min. And the removal efficiency of Ibuprofen in the hybrid ozone/sludge-corncob activated carbon system is higher than the sum of sludge-corncob activated carbon adsorption and ozonation alone, which is a supportive evidence for catalytic reaction. In addition, the results of radical scavenger experiments demonstrate that catalytic ozonation of Ibuprofen by sludge-corncob activated carbon follows a hydroxyl radical reaction pathway. During ozonation of Ibuprofen in the presence of activated carbon, ozone could be catalytically decomposed to form hydrogen peroxide, which can promote the formation of hydroxyl radical. The maximum amount of hydrogen peroxide occurs in the presence of sludge-corncob activated carbon, which can explain why sludge-corncob activated carbon has the best catalytic activity among four different activated carbons.

  8. Catalytic activity of cerium-doped Ru/Al2O3 during ozonation of dimethyl phthalate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunrui ZHOU; Wanpeng ZHU; Xun CHEN

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, factors influencing the mineraliza-tion of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) during catalytic ozona-tion with a cerium-doped Ru/Al2O3 catalyst were studied. The catalytic contribution was calculated through the results of a companrison experiment. It showed that doping cerium significantly enhanced catalytic activity. The total organic carbon (TOC) removal over the doped catalyst at 100 rain reached 75.1%, 61.3% using Ru/Al2O3 catalyst and only 14.0% using ozone alone. Catalytic activity reached the maximum when 0.2% of ruthenium and 1.0% of cerium'were simultaneously loaded onto Al2O3 support. Results of experiments on oxidation by ozone alone, adsorption of the catalyst, Ce ion's and heterogeneous catalytic ozonation confirmed that the contribution of het-erogeneous catalytic ozonation was about 50%, which showed the obvious effect of Ru-Ce/Al2O3 on catalytic activity.

  9. Catalytic activity of bimetallic catalysts highly sensitive to the atomic composition and phase structure at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Wu, Jinfang; Joseph, Pharrah; Skeete, Zakiya; Kim, Eunjoo; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-11-01

    The ability to determine the atomic arrangement in nanoalloy catalysts and reveal the detailed structural features responsible for the catalytically active sites is essential for understanding the correlation between the atomic structure and catalytic properties, enabling the preparation of efficient nanoalloy catalysts by design. Herein we describe a study of CO oxidation over PdCu nanoalloy catalysts focusing on gaining insights into the correlation between the atomic structures and catalytic activity of nanoalloys. PdCu nanoalloys of different bimetallic compositions are synthesized as a model system and are activated by a controlled thermochemical treatment for assessing their catalytic activity. The results show that the catalytic synergy of Pd and Cu species evolves with both the bimetallic nanoalloy composition and temperature of the thermochemical treatment reaching a maximum at a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50. The nanoalloys are characterized structurally by ex situ and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, including atomic pair distribution function analysis. The structural data show that, depending on the bimetallic composition and treatment temperature, PdCu nanoalloys adopt two different structure types. One features a chemically ordered, body centered cubic (B2) type alloy consisting of two interpenetrating simple cubic lattices, each occupied with Pd or Cu species alone, and the other structure type features a chemically disordered, face-centered cubic (fcc) type of alloy wherein Pd and Cu species are intermixed at random. The catalytic activity for CO oxidation is strongly influenced by the structural features. In particular, it is revealed that the prevalence of chemical disorder in nanoalloys with a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50 makes them superior catalysts for CO oxidation in comparison with the same nanoalloys of other bimetallic compositions. However, the catalytic synergy can be diminished if the Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys undergo phase

  10. Characterization of the structure and catalytic activity of Legionella pneumophila VipF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Byron H; Caldwell, Tracy A; McKenzie, Aidan M; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Berndsen, Christopher E

    2016-10-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Legionella pneumophila is known to cause Legionnaires' Disease, a severe pneumonia that can be fatal to immunocompromised individuals and the elderly. Shohdy et al. identified the L. pneumophila vacuole sorting inhibitory protein VipF as a putative N-acetyltransferase based on sequence homology. We have characterized the basic structural and functional properties of VipF to confirm this original functional assignment. Sequence conservation analysis indicates two putative CoA-binding regions within VipF. Homology modeling and small angle X-ray scattering suggest a monomeric, dual-domain structure joined by a flexible linker. Each domain contains the characteristic beta-splay motif found in many acetyltransferases, suggesting that VipF may contain two active sites. Docking experiments suggest reasonable acetyl-CoA binding locations within each beta-splay motif. Broad substrate screening indicated that VipF is capable of acetylating chloramphenicol and both domains are catalytically active. Given that chloramphenicol is not known to be N-acetylated, this is a surprising finding suggesting that VipF is capable of O-acetyltransferase activity. Proteins 2016; 84:1422-1430. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27315603

  11. Coordination environment of the active-site metal ion of liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Makinen, M W; Yim, M B

    1981-01-01

    The coordination environment of the catalytically active metal ion of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) has been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods with use of the active-site-specific Co2+-reconstituted enzyme. The EPR absorption spectrum of the metal-substituted enzyme is characteristic of a rhombically distorted environment. The spectrum of the enzyme--NAD+ complex shows approximate axial symmetry of the metal ion site, i...

  12. SABER: a computational method for identifying active sites for new reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-05-01

    A software suite, SABER (Selection of Active/Binding sites for Enzyme Redesign), has been developed for the analysis of atomic geometries in protein structures, using a geometric hashing algorithm (Barker and Thornton, Bioinformatics 2003;19:1644-1649). SABER is used to explore the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to locate proteins with a specific 3D arrangement of catalytic groups to identify active sites that might be redesigned to catalyze new reactions. As a proof-of-principle test, SABER was used to identify enzymes that have the same catalytic group arrangement present in o-succinyl benzoate synthase (OSBS). Among the highest-scoring scaffolds identified by the SABER search for enzymes with the same catalytic group arrangement as OSBS were L-Ala D/L-Glu epimerase (AEE) and muconate lactonizing enzyme II (MLE), both of which have been redesigned to become effective OSBS catalysts, demonstrated by experiments. Next, we used SABER to search for naturally existing active sites in the PDB with catalytic groups similar to those present in the designed Kemp elimination enzyme KE07. From over 2000 geometric matches to the KE07 active site, SABER identified 23 matches that corresponded to residues from known active sites. The best of these matches, with a 0.28 Å catalytic atom RMSD to KE07, was then redesigned to be compatible with the Kemp elimination using RosettaDesign. We also used SABER to search for potential Kemp eliminases using a theozyme predicted to provide a greater rate acceleration than the active site of KE07, and used Rosetta to create a design based on the proteins identified.

  13. [Catalytic ozonation of nitrobenzene in water by acidification-activated red mud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ya-ning; Li, Hua-nan; Xu, Bing-bing; Qi, Fei; Zhao, Lun

    2013-05-01

    Red mud as one kind of aluminum industrial wastes was used as raw material for catalyst preparation. It was activated by acidification in order to enhance its catalytic activity in the system of catalytic ozonation. Furthermore, removal performance and reaction mechanism in degradation of organic pollutants were discussed. Results showed that acid modified red mud had more significant catalytic activity than the raw red mud. The removal efficiency of nitrobenzene by catalytic ozonation with acidified red mud (RM6.0) increased with the increasing ozone concentration. When the ozone concentration was increased from 0.4 mg x L(-1) to 1.7 mg x L(-1), the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene increased from 45% to 92%. There was a consistent effect of water pH on the removal efficiency and the ozone concentration variation. The variation of the removal efficiency depended on the initial water pH. This was because the concentration of OH(-) led to ozone decomposition to generate hydroxyl radicals. The higher water pH value led to the quenching of hydroxyl radicals, resulting in the reduction of catalytic activity of RM6.0. The experimental results of aqueous ozone concentration variation in the presence of RM6.0 and inhibition by hydroxyl radicals indicated that the main reaction mechanism was catalytic ozonation of NB. Firstly, aqueous ozone was absorbed onto the surface of RM6.0, and then the concentrated ozone oxidized NB in water which was with a combination of direct and indirect oxidation. In catalytic reaction, hydroxyl radicals were present, which were generated during the oxidation of NB on the surface of RM6.0.

  14. Effects of Particle Size on the Gas Sensitivity and Catalytic Activity of In2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoshui; Gu, Ruiqin; Zhao, Jinling; Jin, Guixin; Zhao, Mengke; Xue, Yongliang

    2015-10-01

    Nanosized In2O3 powders with different particle sizes were prepared by the microemulsion synthetic method. The effects of particle size on the gas-sensing and catalytic properties of the as-prepared In2O3 were investigated. Reductions in particle size to nanometer levels improved the sensitivity and catalytic activity of In2O3 to i-C4H10 and C2H5OH. The sensitivity of nanosized In2O3 (<42 nm) sensors to i-C4H10, H2 and C2H5OH was 2-4 times higher than that of chemically precipitated In2O3 (130 nm) sensor. A nearly linear relationship was observed between the catalytic activity and specific surface area of In2O3 for the oxidation of i-C4H10 and C2H5OH at 275 °C. The relationship between gas sensitivity and catalytic activity was further discussed. The results of this work reveal that catalytic activity plays a key role in enhancing the sensitivity of gas-sensing materials.

  15. Effect of BaO on Catalytic Activity of Pt-Rh TWC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of BaO doping on the three-way catalytic activity of Pt-Rh catalyst and on water-gas shift were investigated. The results show that the light-off temperatures of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides of the fresh catalysts slightly differ from those of the aged catalysts, and the catalysts containing CeO2-ZrO2-BaO have lower lightoff temperature and better catalytic activity than these containing BaO and CeO2-ZrO2 after hydrothermal aging for 5 h at 1000 C. The catalysts were characterized by means of the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) in hydrogen and the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) in oxygen. It is confirmed that the suggested route of CeO2-ZrO2-BaO by coprecipitation can improve the catalytic activity of catalysts.

  16. Triosephosphate Isomerase I170V Alters Catalytic Site, Enhances Stability and Induces Pathology in a Drosophila Model of TPI Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Bartholomew P.; Amrich, Christopher G.; Kammerer, Charles J.; Stuchul, Kimberly A.; Larsen, Samantha B.; Rode, Sascha; Aslam, Anoshé A.; Heroux, Annie; Wetzel, Ronald; VanDemark, Andrew P.; Palladino, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a glycolytic enzyme which homodimerizes for full catalytic activity. Mutations of the TPI gene elicit a disease known as TPI Deficiency, a glycolytic enzymopathy noted for its unique severity of neurological symptoms. Evidence suggests that TPI Deficiency pathogenesis may be due to conformational changes of the protein, likely affecting dimerization and protein stability. In this report, we genetically and physically characterize a human disease-associated TPI mutation caused by an I170V substitution. Human TPII170V elicits behavioral abnormalities in Drosophila. An examination of hTPII170V enzyme kinetics revealed this substitution reduced catalytic turnover, while assessments of thermal stability demonstrated an increase in enzyme stability. The crystal structure of the homodimeric I170V mutant reveals changes in the geometry of critical residues within the catalytic pocket. Collectively these data reveal new observations of the structural and kinetic determinants of TPI deficiency pathology, providing new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:25463631

  17. Comparison of Two Preparation Methods on Catalytic Activity and Selectivity of Ru-Mo/HZSM5 for Methane Dehydroaromatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia M. Petkovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic performance of Mo/HZSM5 and Ru-Mo/HZSM5 catalysts prepared by vaporization-deposition of molybdenum trioxide and impregnation with ammonium heptamolybdate was analyzed in terms of catalyst activity and selectivity, nitrogen physisorption analyses, temperature-programmed oxidation of carbonaceous residues, and temperature-programmed reduction. Vaporization-deposition rendered the catalyst more selective to ethylene and coke than the catalyst prepared by impregnation. This result was assigned to lower interaction of molybdenum carbide with the zeolite acidic sites.

  18. Iridium ultrasmall nanoparticles, worm-like chain nanowires, and porous nanodendrites: One-pot solvothermal synthesis and catalytic CO oxidation activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Shuai-Chen; Zhu, Wei; Ke, Jun; Yu, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Dai, Lin-Xiu; Gu, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Wen

    2016-06-01

    We report a facile one-pot solvothermal synthesis of monodisperse iridium (Ir) ultrasmall (1.5-2.5 nm in diameter) nanoparticles (NPs), worm-like chain nanowires (NWs), and porous nanodendrites (NDs), for which CO oxidation reaction has been employed as a probe reaction to investigate the effects of nanoparticle size and surface-capping organics on the catalytic activities. Time-dependent experiments revealed that an oriented attachment mechanism induced by the strong adsorption of halide anions (Br- and I-) on specific facet of Ir nanoclusters or by decreasing the reduction rate of Ir precursors with changing their concentrations during the synthesis was responsible for the formation of Ir NWs and NDs. Annealing tests indicated that an O2-H2 atmosphere treatment turned out to be an effective measure to clean up the surface-capping organics of Ir NPs supported on commercial SiO2. Catalytic CO oxidation reaction illustrated that a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of CO oxidation reaction was achieved together with the changing of activation energies after such atmosphere treatment for the supported catalysts of the ultrasmall Ir NPs. It is noteworthy that this enhancement in catalytic activity could be ascribed to the changes in the surface status (including populations of Ir species in metallic and oxidized states, removal of surface capping organics, the variety of active sites, and total effective active site number) for the supported nanocatalysts during the atmosphere treatment.

  19. Ligninolytic Peroxidase-Like Activity of a Synthetic Metalloporphine Immobilized onto Mercapto-Grafted Crosslinked PVA Inspired by the Active Site of Cytochrome P450

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo ZUCCA; Antonio RESCIGNO; Enrico SANJUST

    2011-01-01

    A synthetic metalloporphine was immobilized onto a PVA-based and mercapto-grafted solid support,emulating the active site of cytochrome P450.Its ligninolytic peroxidase-like catalytic activity was studied.The coordinated mercapto ligand significantly affected the catalytic features of the catalyst because the oxidation of lignin-model compounds was very slow by comparison with imidazole- and pyridine-coordinated immobilized metalloporphines.Conversely,the catalyst efficiently bleached several industrial dyes and thus demonstrated promising activity for this application.Based on this altered substrate specificity the oxygen-donor catalytic route seems to be more favorable than a single electron oxidation pathway.

  20. Crystal Structure of Liganded Rat Peroxisomal Multifunctional Enzyme Type 1: A FLEXIBLE MOLECULE WITH TWO INTERCONNECTED ACTIVE SITES*

    OpenAIRE

    Kasaragod, Prasad; Venkatesan, Rajaram; Kiema, Tiila R.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Wierenga, Rik K.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the full-length rat peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme, type 1 (rpMFE1), has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. This enzyme has three catalytic activities and two active sites. The N-terminal part has the crotonase fold, which builds the active site for the Δ3,Δ2-enoyl-CoA isomerase and the Δ2-enoyl-CoA hydratase-1 catalytic activities, and the C-terminal part has the (3S)-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase fold and makes the (3S)-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase active sit...

  1. Nanostructured Samarium Doped Fluorapatites and Their Catalytic Activity towards Synthesis of 1,2,4-Triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangu, Kranthi Kumar; Maddila, Suresh; Maddila, Surya Narayana; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2016-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into the influence of the amino acids as organic modifiers in the facile synthesis of metal incorporated fluorapatites (FAp) and their properties. The nanostructured Sm doped fluorapatites (Sm-FAp) were prepared by a co-precipitation method using four different amino acids, namely glutamic acid, aspartic acid, glycine and histidine. The materials were characterized by various techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), N₂-adsorption/desorption isotherm, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Under similar conditions, Sm-FAp prepared using different amino acids exhibited distinctly different morphological structures, surface area and pore properties. Their activity as catalysts was assessed and Sm-FAp/Glycine displayed excellent efficiency in the synthesis of 1,2,4-triazole catalyzing the reaction between 2-nitrobenzaldehyde and thiosemicarbazide with exceptional selectivity and 98% yield in a short time interval (10 min). The study provides an insight into the role of organic modifiers as controllers of nucleation, growth and aggregation which significantly influence the nature and activity of the catalytic sites on Sm-FAp. Sm-FAp could also have potential as photoactive material. PMID:27669208

  2. Nanostructured Samarium Doped Fluorapatites and Their Catalytic Activity towards Synthesis of 1,2,4-Triazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kranthi Kumar Gangu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was conducted into the influence of the amino acids as organic modifiers in the facile synthesis of metal incorporated fluorapatites (FAp and their properties. The nanostructured Sm doped fluorapatites (Sm-FAp were prepared by a co-precipitation method using four different amino acids, namely glutamic acid, aspartic acid, glycine and histidine. The materials were characterized by various techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, N2-adsorption/desorption isotherm, temperature programmed desorption (TPD and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Under similar conditions, Sm-FAp prepared using different amino acids exhibited distinctly different morphological structures, surface area and pore properties. Their activity as catalysts was assessed and Sm-FAp/Glycine displayed excellent efficiency in the synthesis of 1,2,4-triazole catalyzing the reaction between 2-nitrobenzaldehyde and thiosemicarbazide with exceptional selectivity and 98% yield in a short time interval (10 min. The study provides an insight into the role of organic modifiers as controllers of nucleation, growth and aggregation which significantly influence the nature and activity of the catalytic sites on Sm-FAp. Sm-FAp could also have potential as photoactive material.

  3. Iridium-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes and its catalytic activity with Shell 405 in hydrazine decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, V.; Vasanthkumar, M. S., E-mail: vasanth.physics@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Physics (India)

    2015-10-15

    Iridium-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ir-MWNT) are the future catalyst support material for hydrazine fuel decomposition. The present work demonstrates decoration of iridium particle on iron-encapsulated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) by wet impregnation method in the absence of any stabilizer. Electron microscopy studies reveal the coated iridium particle size in the range of 5–10 nm. Elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction confirms 21 wt% of Ir coated over MWNT. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows 4f{sub 5/2} and 4f{sub 7/2} lines of iridium and confirms the metallic nature. The catalytic activity of Ir-MWNT/Shell 405 combination is performed in 1 N hydrazine micro-thrusters. The thruster performance shows increase in chamber pressure and decrease in chamber temperature when compared to Shell 405 alone. This enhanced performance is due to high thermal conducting nature of MWNTs and the presence of Ir active sites over MWNTs.

  4. Adenylate kinase from Streptococcus pneumoniae is essential for growth through its catalytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Thanh Thach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus infection causes more than 1.6 million deaths worldwide. Pneumococcal growth is a prerequisite for its virulence and requires an appropriate supply of cellular energy. Adenylate kinases constitute a major family of enzymes that regulate cellular ATP levels. Some bacterial adenylate kinases (AdKs are known to be critical for growth, but the physiological effects of AdKs in pneumococci have been poorly understood at the molecular level. Here, by crystallographic and functional studies, we report that the catalytic activity of adenylate kinase from S. pneumoniae (SpAdK serotype 2 D39 is essential for growth. We determined the crystal structure of SpAdK in two conformations: ligand-free open form and closed in complex with a two-substrate mimic inhibitor adenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A. Crystallographic analysis of SpAdK reveals Arg-89 as a key active site residue. We generated a conditional expression mutant of pneumococcus in which the expression of the adk gene is tightly regulated by fucose. The expression level of adk correlates with growth rate. Expression of the wild-type adk gene in fucose-inducible strains rescued a growth defect, but expression of the Arg-89 mutation did not. SpAdK increased total cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, lack of functional SpAdK caused a growth defect in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SpAdK is essential for pneumococcal growth in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Ratio-controlled synthesis of CuNi octahedra and nanocubes with enhanced catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Menglin; Wang, Liangbing; Li, Hongliang; Du, Wenpeng; Khan, Munir Ullah; Zhao, Songtao; Ma, Chao; Li, Zhenyu; Zeng, Jie

    2015-11-11

    Non-noble bimetallic nanocrystals (NCs) have been widely explored due to not only their low cost and abundant content in the Earth's crust but also their outstanding performance in catalytic reactions. However, controllable synthesis of non-noble alloys remains a significant challenge. Here we report a facile synthesis of CuNi octahedra and nanocubes with controllable shapes and tunable compositions. Its success relies on the use of borane morpholine as a reducing agent, which upon decomposition generates a burst of H2 molecules to induce rapid formation of the nuclei. Specifically, octahedra switched to nanocubes with an increased amount of borane morpholine. In addition, the ratio of CuNi NCs could be facilely tuned by changing the molar ratio of both precursors. The obtained CuNi NCs exhibited high activity in aldehyde-alkyne-amine coupling reactions, and their performance is strongly facet- and composition-dependent due to the competition of the surface energy (enhanced by increasing the percent of Ni) and active sites (derived from Cu atoms). PMID:26498199

  6. Iridium-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes and its catalytic activity with Shell 405 in hydrazine decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iridium-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Ir-MWNT) are the future catalyst support material for hydrazine fuel decomposition. The present work demonstrates decoration of iridium particle on iron-encapsulated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) by wet impregnation method in the absence of any stabilizer. Electron microscopy studies reveal the coated iridium particle size in the range of 5–10 nm. Elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction confirms 21 wt% of Ir coated over MWNT. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows 4f5/2 and 4f7/2 lines of iridium and confirms the metallic nature. The catalytic activity of Ir-MWNT/Shell 405 combination is performed in 1 N hydrazine micro-thrusters. The thruster performance shows increase in chamber pressure and decrease in chamber temperature when compared to Shell 405 alone. This enhanced performance is due to high thermal conducting nature of MWNTs and the presence of Ir active sites over MWNTs

  7. Use of an Improved Matching Algorithm to Select Scaffolds for Enzyme Design Based on a Complex Active Site Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Huang

    Full Text Available Active site preorganization helps native enzymes electrostatically stabilize the transition state better than the ground state for their primary substrates and achieve significant rate enhancement. In this report, we hypothesize that a complex active site model for active site preorganization modeling should help to create preorganized active site design and afford higher starting activities towards target reactions. Our matching algorithm ProdaMatch was improved by invoking effective pruning strategies and the native active sites for ten scaffolds in a benchmark test set were reproduced. The root-mean squared deviations between the matched transition states and those in the crystal structures were < 1.0 Å for the ten scaffolds, and the repacking calculation results showed that 91% of the hydrogen bonds within the active sites are recovered, indicating that the active sites can be preorganized based on the predicted positions of transition states. The application of the complex active site model for de novo enzyme design was evaluated by scaffold selection using a classic catalytic triad motif for the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate. Eighty scaffolds were identified from a scaffold library with 1,491 proteins and four scaffolds were native esterase. Furthermore, enzyme design for complicated substrates was investigated for the hydrolysis of cephalexin using scaffold selection based on two different catalytic motifs. Only three scaffolds were identified from the scaffold library by virtue of the classic catalytic triad-based motif. In contrast, 40 scaffolds were identified using a more flexible, but still preorganized catalytic motif, where one scaffold corresponded to the α-amino acid ester hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis and synthesis of cephalexin. Thus, the complex active site modeling approach for de novo enzyme design with the aid of the improved ProdaMatch program is a promising approach for the creation of active sites with

  8. A Model of Irregular Impurity at the Surface of Nanoparticle and Catalytic Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.V.Blinova; V.V.Gusarov; I.Yu.Popov

    2012-01-01

    A problem of nanocatalyst improvement is considered. The existence of irregularities at the surface of nanoparticle leads to the increasing of the surface/volume ratio and, correspondingly, to the improvement of the catalytic activity. But this impurity gives one an additional effect due to the change of the electronic density at the surface. We suggest simple model for the description of this effect. The model allows one to find the discrete spectrum of the Schrdinger operator for nanoparticle. Due to this impurity induced bound states the electron density increases near the surface. It leads to the increase of the catalytic activity of nanoparticles with surface impurities.

  9. Influence of Al content on textural properties and catalytic activity of hierarchical porous aluminosilicate materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ling Xu; Limei Duan; Zongrui Liu; Jingqi Guan; Qiubin Kan

    2013-12-01

    A series of hierarchical porous aluminosilicate materials were prepared using hydrothermal treatment of the composite formed by polystyrene colloidal spheres and aluminosilicate gel. Influence of Al content on the textural properties, acidic properties and catalytic activity of the hierarchical porous aluminosilicate materials was studied. The results showed that textural and acidic properties of the hierarchical porous aluminosilicate materials were strongly related to Al content. As Al content is increased (Si/Al = 25), the hierarchical porous catalysts exhibited higher catalytic activity and major product selectivity for alkylation of phenol with tert-butanol than the catalysts with a lower Al content (Si/Al = 50).

  10. Use of an Improved Matching Algorithm to Select Scaffolds for Enzyme Design Based on a Complex Active Site Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoqiang; Xue, Jing; Lin, Min; Zhu, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Active site preorganization helps native enzymes electrostatically stabilize the transition state better than the ground state for their primary substrates and achieve significant rate enhancement. In this report, we hypothesize that a complex active site model for active site preorganization modeling should help to create preorganized active site design and afford higher starting activities towards target reactions. Our matching algorithm ProdaMatch was improved by invoking effective pruning strategies and the native active sites for ten scaffolds in a benchmark test set were reproduced. The root-mean squared deviations between the matched transition states and those in the crystal structures were cephalexin using scaffold selection based on two different catalytic motifs. Only three scaffolds were identified from the scaffold library by virtue of the classic catalytic triad-based motif. In contrast, 40 scaffolds were identified using a more flexible, but still preorganized catalytic motif, where one scaffold corresponded to the α-amino acid ester hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis and synthesis of cephalexin. Thus, the complex active site modeling approach for de novo enzyme design with the aid of the improved ProdaMatch program is a promising approach for the creation of active sites with high catalytic efficiencies towards target reactions. PMID:27243223

  11. Catalytic decomposition of low level ozone with gold nanoparticles supported on activated carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengyi ZHANG; Bo ZHANG; Rui SHI

    2009-01-01

    Highly dispersed gold nanoparticles were supported on coal-based activated carbon (AC) by a sol immobilization method and were used to investigate their catalytic activity for low-level ozone decomposition at ambient temperature. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption,scanning electron microscope (SEM), and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the catalysts before and after ozone decomposition. The results showed that the supported gold nanoparticles prepared with microwave heating were much smaller and more uniformly dispersed on the activated carbon than those prepared with traditional conduction heating, exhibiting higher catalytic activity for ozone decomposition. The pH values of gold precursor solution significantly influenced the catalytic activity of supported gold for ozone decomposition, and the best pH value was 8. In the case of space velocity of 120000 h-1, inlet ozone concentration of 50mg/m3, and relative humidity of 45%, the Au/AC catalyst maintained the ozone removal ratio at 90.7% after 2500 min. After being used for ozone decomposition, the surface carbon of the catalyst was partly oxidized and the oxygen content increased accordingly, while its specific surface area and pore volume only decreased a little.Ozone was mainly catalytically decomposed by the gold nanoparticles supported on the activated carbon.

  12. Asymmetry of the Active Site Loop Conformation between Subunits of Glutamate-1-semialdehyde Aminomutase in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Campanini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase (GSAM is a dimeric, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP- dependent enzyme catalysing in plants and some bacteria the isomerization of L-glutamate-1-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, a common precursor of chlorophyll, haem, coenzyme B12, and other tetrapyrrolic compounds. During the catalytic cycle, the coenzyme undergoes conversion from pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate (PMP to PLP. The entrance of the catalytic site is protected by a loop that is believed to switch from an open to a closed conformation during catalysis. Crystallographic studies indicated that the structure of the mobile loop is related to the form of the cofactor bound to the active site, allowing for asymmetry within the dimer. Since no information on structural and functional asymmetry of the enzyme in solution is available in the literature, we investigated the active site accessibility by determining the cofactor fluorescence quenching of PMP- and PLP-GSAM forms. PLP-GSAM is partially quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that at least one catalytic site is accessible to the anionic quencher and therefore confirming the asymmetry observed in the crystal structure. Iodide induces release of the cofactor from PMP-GSAM, apparently from only one catalytic site, therefore suggesting an asymmetry also in this form of the enzyme in solution, in contrast with the crystallographic data.

  13. The importance of hinge sequence for loop function and catalytic activity in the reaction catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, J; Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    2001-04-01

    We have determined the sequence requirements for the N-terminal protein hinge of the active-site lid of triosephosphate isomerase. The codons for the hinge (PVW) were replaced with a genetic library of all possible 8000 amino acid combinations. The most active of these 8000 mutants were selected using in vivo complementation of a triosephosphate isomerase-deficient strain of Escherichia coli, DF502. Approximately 0.3 % of the mutants complement DF502 with an activity that is between 10 and 70 % of wild-type activity. They all contain Pro at the first position. Furthermore, the sequences of these hinge mutants reveal that hydrophobic packing is very important for efficient formation of the enediol intermediate. However, the reduced catalytic activities observed are not due to increased rates of loop opening. To explore the relationship between the N-terminal and C-terminal hinges, three semi-active mutants from the N-terminal hinge selection experiment (PLH, PHS and PTF), and six active C-terminal hinge mutants from previous work (NSS, LWA, YSL, KTK, NPN, KVA) were combined to form 18 "double-hinge" mutants. The activities of these mutants suggest that the N-terminal and C-terminal hinge structures affect one another. It appears that specific side-chain interactions are important for forming a catalytically active enzyme, but not for preventing release of the unstable enediol intermediate from the active site of the enzyme. The independence of intermediate release on amino acid sequence is consistent with the absence of a "universal" hinge sequence in structurally related enzymes.

  14. Catalytic activity of hydrophobic Pt/C/PTFE catalysts of different PTFE content for hydrogen-water liquid exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    10%Pt/C catalysts were prepared by liquid reduction method. PTFE and Pt/ C catalysts were adhered to porous metal and hydrophobic Pt/C/PTFE catalysts were prepared. The structure and size of Pt crystal particles of Pt/C catalysts were analyzed by XRD, and their mean size was 3.1 nm. The dispersion state of Pt/C and PTFE was analyzed by SEM, and they had good dispersion mostly, but PTFE membrane could be observed on local parts of Pt/C/PTFE surface. Because of low hydrophobicity, Pt/C/ PTFE catalysts have low activity when the mass ratio of PTFE and Pt/C is 0.5: 1, and their catalytic activity increases markedly when the ratio is 1:1. When the ratio increases again, more Pt active sites would be covered by PTFE and interior diffusion effect would increase, which result in the decrease of catalytic activity of Pt/C/PTFE. By PTFE pretreatment of porous metal carrier, the activity of Pt/C/PTFE catalysts decreases when the mass ratio of PTFE and Pt/C is 0.5:1, and their activity decreases when the mass ratio is 1:1. (authors)

  15. Effect of Calcination Temperature on Catalytic Activity and Textual Property of Cu/HMOR Catalysts in Dimethyl Ether Carbonylation Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Zhang; Yu-ping Li; Song-bai Qiu; Tie-jun Wang; Long-long Ma; Qi Zhang; Ming-yue Ding

    2013-01-01

    The effect of calcination temperature on the catalytic activity for the dimethyl ether (DME) carbonylation into methyl acetate (MA) was investigated over mordenite supported copper (Cu/HMOR) prepared by ion-exchange process.The results showed that the catalytic activity was obviously affected by the calcination temperature.The maximal DME conversion of 97.2% and the MA selectivity of 97.9% were obtained over the Cu/HMOR calcined at 430 ℃ under conditions of 210 ℃,1.5 MPa,and GSHV of 4883 h-1.The obtained Cu/HMOR catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction,N2 absorption,NH3 temperature program desorption,CO temperature program desorption,and Raman techniques.Proper calcination temperature was effective to promote copper ions migration and diffusion,and led the support HMOR to possess more acid activity sites,which exhibited the complete decomposing of copper nitrate,large surface area and optimum micropore structure,more amount of CO adsorption site and proper amount of weak acid centers.

  16. Spectroscopic evidence for an engineered, catalytically active Trp radical that creates the unique reactivity of lignin peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew T; Doyle, Wendy A; Dorlet, Pierre; Ivancich, Anabella

    2009-09-22

    The surface oxidation site (Trp-171) in lignin peroxidase (LiP) required for the reaction with veratryl alcohol a high-redox-potential (1.4 V) substrate, was engineered into Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by introducing a Trp residue into a heme peroxidase that has similar protein fold but lacks this activity. To create the catalytic activity toward veratryl alcohol in CiP, it was necessary to reproduce the Trp site and its negatively charged microenvironment by means of a triple mutation. The resulting D179W+R258E+R272D variant was characterized by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy. The spectra unequivocally showed that a new Trp radical [g values of g(x) = 2.0035(5), g(y) = 2.0027(5), and g(z) = 2.0022(1)] was formed after the [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate, as a result of intramolecular electron transfer between Trp-179 and the porphyrin. Also, the EPR characterization crucially showed that [Fe(IV)=O Trp-179(*)] was the reactive intermediate with veratryl alcohol. Accordingly, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the physicochemical properties of the radical, fine-tuned by the microenvironment, as well as those of the preceding [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate to engineer a catalytically competent Trp site for a given substrate. Manipulation of the microenvironment of the Trp-171 site in LiP allowed the detection by EPR spectroscopy of the Trp-171(*), for which direct evidence has been missing so far. Our work also highlights the role of Trp residues as tunable redox-active cofactors for enzyme catalysis in the context of peroxidases with a unique reactivity toward recalcitrant substrates that require oxidation potentials not realized at the heme site.

  17. Study on the Carbon-Methanation and Catalytic Activity of Ru/AC for Ammonia Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝一锋; 李小年; 季德春; 刘化章

    2004-01-01

    The effects of promoters K, Ba, Sm on the resistance to carbon-methanation and catalytic activity of ruthenium supported on active carbon (Ru/AC) for ammonia synthesis have been studied by means of TG-DTG (thermalgravity-differential thermalgravity), temperature-programmed desorption, and activity test. Promoters Ba,K, and Sm increased the activity of Ru/AC catalysts for ammonia synthesis significantly. Much higher activity can be reached for Ru/AC catalyst with bi- or tri-promoters. Indeed, the triply promoted catalyst showed the highest activity, coupled to a surprisingly high resistance to methanation. The ability of resistance of promoter to methanation of Ru/AC catalyst is dependent on the adsorption intensity of hydrogen. The strong adsorption of hydrogen would enhance methanation and impact the adsorption of nitrogen, which results in the decrease of catalytic activity.

  18. Sulphate-activated phosphorylase b: the pH-dependence of catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zographos, S E; Oikonomakos, N G; Dixon, H B; Griffin, W G; Johnson, L N; Leonidas, D D

    1995-09-01

    The pH-dependence of sulphate-activated phosphorylase b has been studied in the direction of glycogen synthesis. The bell-shaped curve of the pH-dependence of the catalytic constant for the AMP-activated enzyme showed pK values of 6.1 and 7.3, but the curve for the enzyme activated by 0.9 M ammonium sulphate showed a drop of activity on the acid side at much higher pH values. Its bell was centred at pH 7.8 but it was too narrow to be characterized by only two pK values. The narrowness of the curve could be explained by positive co-operativity, but not its unusually steep acid side. We suggest that the fall on the acid side is due to more than one hydronation (addition of H+). The points can be fitted by a curve with two de-activating hydronations and a de-activating dehydronation having identical titration pK values of 7.5, and hence molecular values of 7.0, 7.5 and 8.0. If both 0.9 M ammonium sulphate and 5 mM AMP are added, the bell is as broad as with AMP alone, but is somewhat raised in pH optimum. The results are discussed in the light of new structural data from crystallographic studies on binary complexes of the enzyme. PMID:7654195

  19. Catalytic deactivation of methane steam reforming catalysts. I. Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnelli, M.E.; Demicheli, M.C.; Ponzi, E.N.

    1987-08-01

    An alumina-supported catalyst was studied both in its original state and after activation and sintering. Chemical composition and textural properties were determined, and crystalline compounds were identified. Active-phase and support transformations occurring during activation were determined by differential thermoanalysis (DTA), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst activated by means of various procedures was characterized by measuring crystallite size.

  20. Structural insights into omega-class glutathione transferases: a snapshot of enzyme reduction and identification of a non-catalytic ligandin site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Brock

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GSTs are dimeric enzymes containing one active-site per monomer. The omega-class GSTs (hGSTO1-1 and hGSTO2-2 in humans are homodimeric and carry out a range of reactions including the glutathione-dependant reduction of a range of compounds and the reduction of S-(phenacylglutathiones to acetophenones. Both types of reaction result in the formation of a mixed-disulfide of the enzyme with glutathione through the catalytic cysteine (C32. Recycling of the enzyme utilizes a second glutathione molecule and results in oxidized glutathione (GSSG release. The crystal structure of an active-site mutant (C32A of the hGSTO1-1 isozyme in complex with GSSG provides a snapshot of the enzyme in the process of regeneration. GSSG occupies both the G (GSH-binding and H (hydrophobic-binding sites and causes re-arrangement of some H-site residues. In the same structure we demonstrate the existence of a novel "ligandin" binding site deep within in the dimer interface of this enzyme, containing S-(4-nitrophenacylglutathione, an isozyme-specific substrate for hGSTO1-1. The ligandin site, conserved in Omega class GSTs from a range of species, is hydrophobic in nature and may represent the binding location for tocopherol esters that are uncompetitive hGSTO1-1 inhibitors.

  1. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mini Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs and ii the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs. NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly.

  2. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Yant, Stephen R; Tsai, Luong; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly. PMID:24040198

  3. Observation of Different Catalytic Activity of Various 1-Olefins during Ethylene/1-Olefin Copolymerization with Homogeneous Metallocene Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingkwan Wannaborworn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to investigate the copolymerization of ethylene and various 1-olefins. The comonomer lengths were varied from 1-hexene (1-C6 up to 1-octadecene (1-C18 in order to study the effect of comonomer chain length on the activity and properties of the polymer in the metallocene/MAO catalyst system. The results indicated that two distinct cases can be described for the effect of 1-olefin chain length on the activity. Considering the short chain length comonomers, such as 1-hexene, 1-octene and 1-decene, it is obvious that the polymerization activity decreased when the length of comonomer was higher, which is probably due to increased steric hindrance at the catalytic center hindering the insertion of ethylene monomer to the active sites, hence, the polymerization rate decreased. On the contrary, for the longer chain 1-olefins, namely 1-dodecene, 1-tetradecene and 1-octadecene, an increase in the comonomer chain length resulted in better activity due to the opening of the gap aperture between Cp(centroid-M-Cp-(centroid, which forced the coordination site to open more. This effect facilitated the polymerization of the ethylene monomer at the catalytic sites, and thus, the activity increased. The copolymers obtained were further characterized using thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and 13C-NMR techniques. It could be seen that the melting temperature and comonomer distribution were not affected by the 1-olefin chain length. The polymer crystallinity decreased slightly with increasing comonomer chain length. Moreover, all the synthesized polymers were typical LLDPE having random comonomer distribution.

  4. Biochemical characterization of mutants in the active site residues of the β-galactosidase enzyme of Bacillus circulans ATCC 31382

    OpenAIRE

    Bultema, Jelle B; Bas J.H. Kuipers; Lubbert Dijkhuizen

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus circulans ATCC 31382 β-galactosidase (BgaD) is a retaining-type glycosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 2 (GH2). Its commercial enzyme preparation, Biolacta N5, is used for commercial-scale production of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS). The BgaD active site and catalytic amino acid residues have not been studied. Using bioinformatic routines we identified two putative catalytic glutamates and two highly conserved active site histidines. The site-directed mutants E447N, E532Q, an...

  5. Studies relevant to the catalytic activation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, P.C.

    1992-06-04

    Research activity during the 1991--1992 funding period has been concerned with the following topics relevant to carbon monoxide activation. (1) Exploratory studies of water gas shift catalysts heterogenized on polystyrene based polymers. (2) Mechanistic investigation of the nucleophilic activation of CO in metal carbonyl clusters. (3) Application of fast reaction techniques to prepare and to investigate reactive organometallic intermediates relevant to the activation of hydrocarbons toward carbonylation and to the formation of carbon-carbon bonds via the migratory insertion of CO into metal alkyl bonds.

  6. CATALYTIC ACTIVITIES OF RARE-EARTH CALIXARENE COMPLEXES IN POLYMER SYNTHESES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-quan Shen

    2005-01-01

    The studies of our group on the catalytic activities of rare earth calixarene complexes in polymer syntheses are reviewed. Rare earth calixarene complexes are effect catalysts for the polymerizations of butadiene, isoprene, ethylene,styrene, propylene oxide, styrene oxide, trimethylene carbonate and 2,2-dimethyl-trimethylene carbonate.

  7. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  8. Synthesis of concave gold nanocuboids with high-index facets and their enhanced catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Yue, Yonghai; Hu, Ye; Liang, Xiu; Yin, Penggang; Guo, Lin

    2015-07-25

    Novel concave gold nanocuboids bounded by 24 high-index {611} facets are synthesized using the seed-mediated growth method via an overgrowth mechanism. The as-synthesized products demonstrated greatly enhanced catalytic activity for the electro-oxidation of glucose and the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NTP) under a laser. PMID:26097908

  9. Synthesis and catalytic activity of histidine-based NHC ruthenium complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Monney, Angèle; Venkatachalam, Galmari; Albrecht, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Main-chain C,N-protected histidine has been successfully alkylated at both side-chain nitrogens. The corresponding histidinium salt was metallated with ruthenium(II) by a transmetalation procedure, thus providing histidine-derived NHC ruthenium complexes. These bio-inspired comsxsxsplexes show appreciable activity in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketones. peer-reviewed

  10. The Significance of Lewis Acid Sites for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitric Oxide on Vanadium-Based Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marberger, Adrian; Ferri, Davide; Elsener, Martin; Kröcher, Oliver

    2016-09-19

    The long debated reaction mechanisms of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia (NH3 ) on vanadium-based catalysts rely on the involvement of Brønsted or Lewis acid sites. This issue has been clearly elucidated using a combination of transient perturbations of the catalyst environment with operando time-resolved spectroscopy to obtain unique molecular level insights. Nitric oxide reacts predominantly with NH3 coordinated to Lewis sites on vanadia on tungsta-titania (V2 O5 -WO3 -TiO2 ), while Brønsted sites are not involved in the catalytic cycle. The Lewis site is a mono-oxo vanadyl group that reduces only in the presence of both nitric oxide and NH3 . We were also able to verify the formation of the nitrosamide (NH2 NO) intermediate, which forms in tandem with vanadium reduction, and thus the entire mechanism of SCR. Our experimental approach, demonstrated in the specific case of SCR, promises to progress the understanding of chemical reactions of technological relevance.

  11. The Significance of Lewis Acid Sites for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitric Oxide on Vanadium-Based Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marberger, Adrian; Ferri, Davide; Elsener, Martin; Kröcher, Oliver

    2016-09-19

    The long debated reaction mechanisms of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia (NH3 ) on vanadium-based catalysts rely on the involvement of Brønsted or Lewis acid sites. This issue has been clearly elucidated using a combination of transient perturbations of the catalyst environment with operando time-resolved spectroscopy to obtain unique molecular level insights. Nitric oxide reacts predominantly with NH3 coordinated to Lewis sites on vanadia on tungsta-titania (V2 O5 -WO3 -TiO2 ), while Brønsted sites are not involved in the catalytic cycle. The Lewis site is a mono-oxo vanadyl group that reduces only in the presence of both nitric oxide and NH3 . We were also able to verify the formation of the nitrosamide (NH2 NO) intermediate, which forms in tandem with vanadium reduction, and thus the entire mechanism of SCR. Our experimental approach, demonstrated in the specific case of SCR, promises to progress the understanding of chemical reactions of technological relevance. PMID:27553251

  12. Activity prediction of substrates in NADH-dependent carbonyl reductase by docking requires catalytic constraints and charge parameterization of catalytic zinc environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoke, Gaurao V; Loderer, Christoph; Davari, Mehdi D; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Bocola, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Molecular docking of substrates is more challenging compared to inhibitors as the reaction mechanism has to be considered. This becomes more pronounced for zinc-dependent enzymes since the coordination state of the catalytic zinc ion is of greater importance. In order to develop a predictive substrate docking protocol, we have performed molecular docking studies of diketone substrates using the catalytic state of carbonyl reductase 2 from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR2). Different docking protocols using two docking methods (AutoDock Vina and AutoDock4.2) with two different sets of atomic charges (AM1-BCC and HF-RESP) for catalytic zinc environment and substrates as well as two sets of vdW parameters for zinc ion were examined. We have selected the catalytic binding pose of each substrate by applying mechanism based distance criteria. To compare the performance of the docking protocols, the correlation plots for the binding energies of these catalytic poses were obtained against experimental Vmax values of the 11 diketone substrates for CPCR2. The best correlation of 0.73 was achieved with AutoDock4.2 while treating catalytic zinc ion in optimized non-bonded (NBopt) state with +1.01 charge on the zinc ion, compared to 0.36 in non-bonded (+2.00 charge on the zinc ion) state. These results indicate the importance of catalytic constraints and charge parameterization of catalytic zinc environment for the prediction of substrate activity in zinc-dependent enzymes by molecular docking. The developed predictive docking protocol described here is in principle generally applicable for the efficient in silico substrate spectra characterization of zinc-dependent ADH.

  13. Efficient oxygen electrocatalysis on special active sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halck, Niels Bendtsen

    is used to explain the increase in activity observed for the OER catalyst ruthenium dioxide when it is mixed with nickel or cobalt. Manganese and cobalt oxides when in the vicinity of gold also display an increase in OER activity which can be explained by locally created special active sites. Density...

  14. Detailed characterization of the cooperative mechanism of Ca(2+) binding and catalytic activation in the Ca(2+) transport (SERCA) ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Lewis, D; Strock, C; Inesi, G; Nakasako, M; Nomura, H; Toyoshima, C

    2000-08-01

    Expression of heterologous SERCA1a ATPase in Cos-1 cells was optimized to yield levels that account for 10-15% of the microsomal protein, as revealed by protein staining on electrophoretic gels. This high level of expression significantly improved our characterization of mutants, including direct measurements of Ca(2+) binding by the ATPase in the absence of ATP, and measurements of various enzyme functions in the presence of ATP or P(i). Mutational analysis distinguished two groups of amino acids within the transmembrane domain: The first group includes Glu771 (M5), Thr799 (M6), Asp800 (M6), and Glu908 (M8), whose individual mutations totally inhibit binding of the two Ca(2+) required for activation of one ATPase molecule. The second group includes Glu309 (M4) and Asn796 (M6), whose individual or combined mutations inhibit binding of only one and the same Ca(2+). The effects of mutations of these amino acids were interpreted in the light of recent information on the ATPase high-resolution structure, explaining the mechanism of Ca(2+) binding and catalytic activation in terms of two cooperative sites. The Glu771, Thr799, and Asp800 side chains contribute prominently to site 1, together with less prominent contributions by Asn768 and Glu908. The Glu309, Asn796, and Asp800 side chains, as well as the Ala305 (and possibly Val304 and Ile307) carbonyl oxygen, contribute to site 2. Sequential binding begins with Ca(2+) occupancy of site 1, followed by transition to a conformation (E') sensitive to Ca(2+) inhibition of enzyme phosphorylation by P(i), but still unable to utilize ATP. The E' conformation accepts the second Ca(2+) on site 2, producing then a conformation (E' ') which is able to utilize ATP. Mutations of residues (Asp813 and Asp818) in the M6/M7 loop reduce Ca(2+) affinity and catalytic turnover, suggesting a strong influence of this loop on the correct positioning of the M6 helix. Mutation of Asp351 (at the catalytic site within the cytosolic domain

  15. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  16. Comparison of three microbial hosts for the expression of an active catalytic scFv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Sylvain; Petrov, Kliment; Dintinger, Thierry; Kujumdzieva, Anna; Tellier, Charles; Dion, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Antibodies represent an interesting protein framework on which catalytic functions can be grafted. In previous studies, we have reported the characterization of the catalytic antibody 4B2 obtained on the basis of the "bait and switch" strategy which catalyzes two different chemical reactions: the allylic isomerization of beta,gamma-unsaturated ketones and the Kemp elimination. We have cloned the antibody 4B2 and expressed it as a single-chain Fv (scFv) fragment in different expression systems, Escherichia coli and two yeasts species, in order to elicit the most suitable system to study its catalytic activity. The scFv4B2 was secreted as an active form in the culture medium of Pichia pastoris and Kluyveromyces lactis, which led respectively to 4 and 1.3mg/l after purification. In E. coli, different strategies were investigated to increase the cytoplasmic soluble fraction, which resulted, in all cases, in the expression of a low amount of functional antibodies. By contrast, substantial amount of scFv4B2 could be purified when it was expressed as inclusion bodies (12mg/l) and submitted to an in vitro refolding process. Its catalytic activity was measured and proved to be comparable to that of the whole IgG. However, the instability of the scFv4B2 in solution prevented from an exhaustive characterization of its activity and stabilization of this protein appears to be essential before designing strategies to improve its catalytic activity. PMID:12531284

  17. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site...

  18. Role of the NC-loop in catalytic activity and stability in lipase from Fervidobacterium changbaicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binchun Li

    Full Text Available Flexible NC-loops between the catalytic domain and the cap domain of the α/β hydrolase fold enzymes show remarkable diversity in length, sequence, and configuration. Recent investigations have suggested that the NC-loop might be involved in catalysis and substrate recognition in many enzymes from the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. To foster a deep understanding of its role in catalysis, stability, and divergent evolution, we here systemically investigated the function of the NC-loop (residues 131-151 in a lipase (FClip1 from thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium changbaicum by loop deletion, alanine-scanning mutagenesis and site-directed mutagenesis. We found that the upper part of the NC-loop (residues 131-138 was of great importance to enzyme catalysis. Single substitutions in this region could fine-tune the activity of FClip1 as much as 41-fold, and any deletions from this region rendered the enzyme completely inactive. The lower part of the NC-loop (residues 139-151 was capable of enduring extensive deletions without loss of activity. The shortened mutants in this region were found to show both improved activity and increased stability simultaneously. We therefore speculated that the NC-loop, especially the lower part, would be a perfect target for enzyme engineering to optimize the enzymatic properties, and might present a hot zone for the divergent evolution of α/β hydrolases. Our findings may provide an opportunity for better understanding of the mechanism of divergent evolution in the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily, and may also guide the design of novel biocatalysts for industrial applications.

  19. Analysis of surface binding sites (SBSs) in carbohydrate active enzymes with focus on glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Ruzanski, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    Surface binding sites (SBSs) interact with carbohydrates outside of the enzyme active site. They are frequently situated on catalytic domains and are distinct from carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). SBSs are found in a variety of enzymes and often seen in crystal structures. Notably about half ...

  20. Widely available active sites on Ni2P for electrochemical hydrogen evolution - insights from first principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Stern, Lucas-Alexandre; Feng, Ligang;

    2015-01-01

    . In the present study, using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, we show that several widely available low index crystal facets on Ni2P have better properties for a high catalytic activity. DFT calculations were used to identify moderately bonding nickel bridge sites and nickel hollow sites for hydrogen...

  1. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A. (ASCR); (UIUC); (Michigan)

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  2. Characterization of Reuse Activities at Contaminated Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Vitulli; Charlotte Dougherty; Kimberly Bosworth

    2004-01-01

    Given the increased focus on reuse activity within EPA and state site cleanup programs, policy makers would benefit from looking across programs to better understand the extent and nature of reuse; examine site characteristics that influence reuse; leverage lessons learned; and coordinate reuse activities, data collection, and information management. This research paper begins to examine these issues. It reports the results of a preliminary review and analysis of available EPA and state progr...

  3. Fingerprinting differential active site constraints of ATPases

    OpenAIRE

    Hacker, Stephan M.; Hardt, Norman; Buntru, Alexander; Pagliarini, Dana; Möckel, Martin; Mayer, Thomas U; Scheffner, Martin; Hauck, Christof R.; Marx, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The free energy provided by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis is central to many cellular processes and, therefore, the number of enzymes utilizing ATP as a substrate is almost innumerable. Modified analogues of ATP are a valuable means to understand the biological function of ATPases. Although these enzymes have evolved towards binding to ATP, large differences in active site architectures were found. In order to systematically access the specific active site constraints of different A...

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Activity of Cu/Cu2O Nanoparticles Prepared in Aqueous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Badawy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper/Copper oxide (Cu/Cu2O nanoparticles were synthesized by modified chemical reduction method in an aqueous medium using hydrazine as reducing agent and copper sulfate pentahydrate as precursor. The Cu/Cu2O nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM. The analysis revealed the pattern of face-centered cubic (fcc crystal structure of copper Cu metal and cubic cuprites structure for Cu2O. The SEM result showed monodispersed and agglomerated particles with two micron sizes of about 180 nm and 800 nm, respectively. The TEM result showed few single crystal particles of face-centered cubic structures with average particle size about 11-14 nm. The catalytic activity of Cu/Cu2O nanoparticles for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was investigated and compared with manganese oxide MnO2. The results showed that the second-order equation provides the best correlation for the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 on Cu/Cu2O. The catalytic activity of hydrogen peroxide by Cu/Cu2O is less than the catalytic activity of MnO2 due to the presence of copper metal Cu with cuprous oxide Cu2O. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 6th January 2015; Revised: 14th March 2015; Accepted: 15th March 2015How to Cite: Badawy, S.M., El-Khashab, R.A., Nayl, A.A. (2015. Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Activity of Cu/Cu2O Nanoparticles Prepared in Aqueous Medium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2: 169-174. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7984.169-174 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7984.169-174  

  5. Gold Sulfinyl Mesoionic Carbenes: Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, María; Avello, Marta G; Viso, Alma; Fernández de la Pradilla, Roberto; de la Torre, María C; Sierra, Miguel A; Gornitzka, Heinz; Hemmert, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Gold mesoionic carbenes having a chiral sulfoxide group attached to the C4 position of the five membered ring have been prepared and tested as catalysts in the cycloisomerization of enynes. These new catalysts are very efficient, with the sulfoxide moiety playing a key role in their activity and the N1-substituent in control of the regioselectivity of these processes. PMID:27403763

  6. Chelating ruthenium phenolate complexes: synthesis, general catalytic activity, and applications in olefin metathesis polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Anna; Dranka, Maciej; Zachara, Janusz; Pump, Eva; Slugovc, Christian; Skowerski, Krzysztof; Grela, Karol

    2014-10-20

    Cyclic Ru-phenolates were synthesized, and these compounds were used as olefin metathesis catalysts. Investigation of their catalytic activity pointed out that, after activation with chemical agents, these catalysts promote ring-closing metathesis (RCM), enyne and cross-metathesis (CM) reactions, including butenolysis, with good results. Importantly, these latent catalysts are soluble in neat dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and show good applicability in ring-opening metathesis polymeriyation (ROMP) of this monomer.

  7. Chelating ruthenium phenolate complexes: synthesis, general catalytic activity, and applications in olefin metathesis polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Anna; Dranka, Maciej; Zachara, Janusz; Pump, Eva; Slugovc, Christian; Skowerski, Krzysztof; Grela, Karol

    2014-10-20

    Cyclic Ru-phenolates were synthesized, and these compounds were used as olefin metathesis catalysts. Investigation of their catalytic activity pointed out that, after activation with chemical agents, these catalysts promote ring-closing metathesis (RCM), enyne and cross-metathesis (CM) reactions, including butenolysis, with good results. Importantly, these latent catalysts are soluble in neat dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and show good applicability in ring-opening metathesis polymeriyation (ROMP) of this monomer. PMID:25204738

  8. Mapping the active site of vaccinia virus RNA triphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RNA triphosphatase component of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme (the product of the viral D1 gene) belongs to a family of metal-dependent phosphohydrolases that includes the RNA triphosphatases of fungi, protozoa, Chlorella virus, and baculoviruses. The family is defined by two glutamate-containing motifs (A and C) that form the metal-binding site. Most of the family members resemble the fungal and Chlorella virus enzymes, which have a complex active site located within the hydrophilic interior of a topologically closed eight-stranded β barrel (the so-called ''triphosphate tunnel''). Here we queried whether vaccinia virus capping enzyme is a member of the tunnel subfamily, via mutational mapping of amino acids required for vaccinia triphosphatase activity. We identified four new essential side chains in vaccinia D1 via alanine scanning and illuminated structure-activity relationships by conservative substitutions. Our results, together with previous mutational data, highlight a constellation of six acidic and three basic amino acids that likely compose the vaccinia triphosphatase active site (Glu37, Glu39, Arg77, Lys107, Glu126, Asp159, Lys161, Glu192, and Glu194). These nine essential residues are conserved in all vertebrate and invertebrate poxvirus RNA capping enzymes. We discerned no pattern of clustering of the catalytic residues of the poxvirus triphosphatase that would suggest structural similarity to the tunnel proteins (exclusive of motifs A and C). We infer that the poxvirus triphosphatases are a distinct lineage within the metal-dependent RNA triphosphatase family. Their unique active site, which is completely different from that of the host cell's capping enzyme, recommends the poxvirus RNA triphosphatase as a molecular target for antipoxviral drug discovery

  9. Aged nano-structured platinum based catalyst: effect of chemical treatment on adsorption and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Nahm, Seung Won; Park, Hyuk Ryeol; Yun, Hyung Sun; Seo, Seong Gyu; Kim, Sang Chai

    2011-02-01

    To examine the effect of chemical treatment on the adsorption and catalytic activity of nanostructured platinum based catalyst, the aged commercial Pt/AC catalyst was pretreated with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and a cleaning agent (Hexane). Several reliable methods such as nitrogen adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were employed to characterize the aged Pt/AC catalyst and its chemically pretreated Pt/AC catalysts. The catalytic and adsorption activities of nano-structured heterogeneous Pt/AC catalyst were investigated on the basis of toluene oxidation and adsorption isotherm data. In addition, the adsorption isotherms of toluene were used to calculate the adsorption energy distribution functions for the parent catalyst and its pre-treated nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts. It was found that sulfuric acid aqueous treatment can enhance the catalytic performance of aged Pt/AC catalyst toward catalytic oxidation of toluene. It was also shown that a comparative analysis of the energy distribution functions for nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts as well as the pore size distribution provides valuable information about their structural and energetic heterogeneity.

  10. Trends in Catalytic Activity for SOFC Anode materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Bessler, W. G.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations on the level of density-functional theory are used to calculate the stability of surface-adsorbed hydrogen atoms, oxygen atoms, and hydroxyl radicals for a variety of metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) that may be used as electrode materials...... for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The reaction energies along the hydrogen oxidation pathway were quantified for both, oxygen spillover and hydrogen spillover mechanisms at the three-phase boundary. The ab initio results are compared to previously-obtained experimental anode activities measured...... that oxygen spillover, where adsorbed oxygen is a key intermediate, is the dominant reaction pathway under the conditions used in the experiments. In this way the activity is linked directly to the microscopic binding affinities of reaction intermediates, providing a new understanding of the anode reaction...

  11. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  12. Preparation and Catalytic Activity for Aerobic Glucose Oxidation of Crown Jewel Structured Pt/Au Bimetallic Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Liqiong; Lu, Lilin; Toshima, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the “structure-activity” relations for catalysts at an atomic level has been regarded as one of the most important objectives in catalysis studies. Bimetallic nanoclusters (NCs) in its many types, such as core/shell, random alloy, cluster-in-cluster, bi-hemisphere, and crown jewel (one kind of atom locating at the top position of another kind of NC), attract significant attention owing to their excellent optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. PVP-protected crown jewel-structured Pt/Au (CJ-Pt/Au) bimetallic nanoclusters (BNCs) with Au atoms located at active top sites were synthesized via a replacement reaction using 1.4-nm Pt NCs as mother clusters even considering the fact that the replacement reaction between Pt and Au3+ ions is difficult to be occurred. The prepared CJ-Pt/Au colloidal catalysts characterized by UV-Vis, TEM, HR-TEM and HAADF-STEM-EELS showed a high catalytic activity for aerobic glucose oxidation, and the top Au atoms decorating the Pt NCs were about 15 times more active than the Au atoms of Au NCs with similar particle size.

  13. Establishing efficient cobalt based catalytic sites for oxygen evolution on a Ta3N5 photocatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2015-08-05

    In a photocatalytic suspension system with a powder semiconductor, the interface between the photocatalyst semiconductor and catalyst should be constructed to minimize resistance for charge transfer of excited carriers. This study demonstrates an in-depth understanding of pretreatment effects on the photocatalytic O2 evolution reaction (OER) activity of visible-light-responsive Ta3N5 decorated with CoOx nanoparticles. The CoOx/Ta3N5 sample was synthesized by impregnation followed by sequential heat treat-ments under NH3 flow and air flow at various temperatures. Various characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS), were used to clarify the state and role of cobalt. No improvement in photocatalytic activity for OER over the bare Ta3N5 was observed for the as-impregnated CoOx/Ta3N5, likely because of insufficient contact between CoOx and Ta3N5. When the sample was treated in NH3 at high temperature, a substantial improvement in the photocatalytic activity was observed. After NH3 treatment at 700 °C, the Co0-CoOx core-shell agglomerated cobalt structure was identified by XAS and STEM. No metallic cobalt species was evident after the photocatalytic OER, indicating that the metallic cobalt itself is not essential for the reaction. Accordingly, mild oxidation (200 °C) of the NH3-treated CoOx/Ta3N5 sample enhanced photocatalytic OER activity. Oxidation at higher temperatures drastically eliminated the photocatalytic activity, most likely because of unfavorable Ta3N5 oxidation. These results suggest that the intimate contact between cobalt species and Ta3N5 facilitated at high temperature is beneficial to enhancing hole transport and that the cobalt oxide provides electrocatalytic sites for OER.

  14. Stability and phase transfer of catalytically active platinum nanoparticle suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sriram, Indira; Curtin, Alexandra E.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Cuchiaro, J. Hunter; Weidner, Andrew R.; Tingley, Tegan M.; Greenlee, Lauren F.; Jeerage, Kavita M., E-mail: jeerage@boulder.nist.gov [National Instrument of Standards and Technology, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In this work, we present a robust synthesis protocol for platinum nanoparticles that yields a monomodal dispersion of particles that are approximately 100 nm in diameter. We determine that these particles are actually agglomerates of much smaller particles, creating a “raspberry” morphology. We demonstrate that these agglomerates are stable at room temperature for at least 8 weeks by dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, we demonstrate consistent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. Finally, we quantitatively explore the relationship between dispersion solvent and particle agglomeration; specifically, particles are found to agglomerate abruptly as solvent polarity decreases.

  15. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  16. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  17. Influenza C virus esterase: analysis of catalytic site, inhibition, and possible function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The active site serine of the acetylesterase of influenza C virus was localized to amino acid 71 of the hemagglutinin-esterase protein by affinity labeling with 3H-labeled diisopropylfluorophosphate. This serine and the adjacent amino acids (Phe-Gly-Asp-Ser) are part of a consensus sequence motif found in serine hydrolases. Since comparative analysis failed to reveal esterase sequence similarities with other serine hydrolases, the authors suggest that this viral enzyme is a serine hydrolase constituting a new family of serine esterases. Furthermore, they found that the influenza C virus esterase was inhibited by isocoumarin derivatives, with 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin being the most potent inhibitor. Addition of this compound prevented elution of influenza C virus from erythrocytes and inhibited virus infectivity, possibly through inhibition of virus entry into cells

  18. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Lyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites ('catalophores'). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C-C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  19. A facile reflux procedure to increase active surface sites form highly active and durable supported palladium@platinum bimetallic nanodendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A series of well-dispersed bimetallic Pd@Pt nanodendrites uniformly supported on XC-72 carbon black are fabricated by using different capping agents. These capping agents are essential for the branched morphology control. However, the surfactant adsorbed on the nanodendrites surface blocks the access of reactant molecules to the active surface sites, and the catalytic activities of these bimetallic nanodendrites are significantly restricted. Herein, a facile reflux procedure to effectively remove the capping agent molecules without significantly affecting their sizes is reported for activating supported nanocatalysts. More significantly, the structure and morphology of the nanodendrites can also be retained, enhancing the numbers of active surface sites, catalytic activity and stability toward methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions. The as-obtained hot water reflux-treated Pd@Pt/C catalyst manifests superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities, as compared to the untreated catalysts and the commercial Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts. We anticipate that this effective and facile removal method has more general applicability to highly active nanocatalysts prepared with various surfactants, and should lead to improvements in environmental protection and energy production.

  20. The role of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites in the selective oxidation of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongxuan; ZHAO Zhen

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the role of catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites (active sites: supported atoms f≤0.5 % ) in the selective oxidation of light hydrocarbons, such as methane, ethane and propane, into oxygenatesand the epoxidation of olefins. The plausible structures of the highly dispersed and isolated active species, as well as their effects on the catalytic performances are discussed. The special physico-chemical properties and the functional mechanism of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites, as well as the preparation, characterization of the catalysts with highly dispersed and isolated active sites and their applications in other types of reactions of lower hydrocarbons are summarized.

  1. Structural properties of cyanase. Denaturation, renaturation, and role of sulfhydryls and oligomeric structure in catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, R M; Anderson, P M

    1987-07-25

    Cyanase is an inducible enzyme in Escherichia coli that catalyzes bicarbonate-dependent decomposition of cyanate to give ammonia and bicarbonate. The enzyme is composed of 8-10 identical subunits (Mr = 17,008). The objective of this study was to clarify some of the structural properties of cyanase for the purpose of understanding the relationship between oligomeric structure and catalytic activity. Circular dichroism studies showed that cyanase has a significant amount of alpha-helix and beta-sheet structure. The one sulfhydryl group per subunit does not react with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) unless cyanase is denatured. Denaturation is apparently complete in 10 M urea or 6 M guanidine hydrochloride, but is significantly reduced in 10 M urea by the presence of azide (analog of cyanate) and is incomplete in 8 M urea. Denatured cyanase could be renatured and reactivated (greater than 85%) by removal of denaturants. Reactivation was greatly facilitated by the presence of certain anions, particularly bicarbonate, and by high ionic strength and protein concentration. The catalytic activity of renatured cyanase was associated only with oligomer. Cyanase that had been denatured in the presence of DTNB to give a cyanase-DTNB derivative could also be renatured at 26 degrees C to give active cyanase-DTNB oligomer. The active oligomeric form of the cyanase-DTNB derivative could be converted reversibly to inactive dimer by lowering the temperature to 4 degrees C or by reduction of the ionic strength and removal of monoanions. These results provide evidence that free sulfhydryl groups are not required for catalytic activity and that catalytic activity may be dependent upon oligomeric structure.

  2. E. coli histidine triad nucleotide binding protein 1 (ecHinT is a catalytic regulator of D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA activity in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Bardaweel

    Full Text Available Histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins (Hints are highly conserved members of the histidine triad (HIT protein superfamily. Hints comprise the most ancient branch of this superfamily and can be found in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. Prokaryotic genomes, including a wide diversity of both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, typically have one Hint gene encoded by hinT (ycfF in E. coli. Despite their ubiquity, the foundational reason for the wide-spread conservation of Hints across all kingdoms of life remains a mystery. In this study, we used a combination of phenotypic screening and complementation analyses with wild-type and hinT knock-out Escherichia coli strains to show that catalytically active ecHinT is required in E. coli for growth on D-alanine as a sole carbon source. We demonstrate that the expression of catalytically active ecHinT is essential for the activity of the enzyme D-alanine dehydrogenase (DadA (equivalent to D-amino acid oxidase in eukaryotes, a necessary component of the D-alanine catabolic pathway. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that catalytically active C-terminal mutants of ecHinT are unable to activate DadA activity. In addition, we have designed and synthesized the first cell-permeable inhibitor of ecHinT and demonstrated that the wild-type E. coli treated with the inhibitor exhibited the same phenotype observed for the hinT knock-out strain. These results reveal that the catalytic activity and structure of ecHinT is essential for DadA function and therefore alanine metabolism in E. coli. Moreover, they provide the first biochemical evidence linking the catalytic activity of this ubiquitous protein to the biological function of Hints in Escherichia coli.

  3. Biosynthesis of selenosubtilisin: A novel way to target selenium into the active site of subtilisin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; LIU XiaoMan; JI YueTong; QI ZhenHui; GE Yan; XU JiaYun; LIU JunQiu; LUO GuiMin; SHEN JiaCong

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx,EC1.11.1.9),an important anti-oxidative selenoenzyme,can catalyze the reduction of harmful hydroperoxides with concomitant glutathione,thereby protecting cells and other biological issues against oxidative damage.It captures considerable interest in redesign of its function for either the mechanism study or the pharmacological development as an antioxidant.In order to de-velop a general strategy for specifically targeting and operating selenium in active sites of enzymes,the catalytically essential residue selenocysteine (Sec) was first successfully bioincorporated into the catalytic center of subtilisin by using an auxotrophic expression system.The studies of the catalytic activity and the steady-state kinetics demonstrated that selenosubtilisin is an excellent GPx-like bio-catalyst.In comparison with the chemically modified method,biosynthesis exhibits obvious advan-tages:Sec could be site-directly incorporated into active sites of enzymes to overcome the non-speci-ficity generated by chemical modification.This study provides an important strategy for specifically targeting and operating selenium in the active site of an enzyme.

  4. Surface binding sites in carbohydrate active enzymes: An emerging picture of structural and functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Cockburn, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes, particularly those that are active on polysaccharides, are often found associated with carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which can play several roles in supporting enzyme function, such as localizing the enzyme to the substrate. However, the presence of CBMs...... is not universal and is in fact rare among some families of enzymes. In some cases an alternative to possessing a CBM is for the enzyme to bind to the substrate at a site on the catalytic domain, but away from the active site. Such a site is termed a surface (or secondary) binding site (SBS). SBSs have been...... identified in enzymes from a wide variety of families, though almost half are found in the α-amylase family GH13. The roles attributed to SBSs are not limited to targeting the enzyme to the substrate, but also include a variety of others such as guiding the substrate into the active site, altering enzyme...

  5. Catalytic activity of pyrite for coal liquefaction reaction; Tennen pyrite no shokubai seino ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, K.; Kozu, M.; Okada, T.; Kobayashi, M. [Nippon Coal Oil Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Since natural pyrite is easy to obtain and cheap as coal liquefaction catalyst, it is to be used for the 150 t/d scale NEDOL process bituminous coal liquefaction pilot plant. NEDO and NCOL have investigated the improvement of catalytic activity of pulverized natural pyrite for enhancing performance and economy of the NEDOL process. In this study, coal liquefaction tests were conducted using natural pyrite catalyst pulverized by dry-type bowl mill under nitrogen atmosphere. Mechanism of catalytic reaction of the natural pyrite was discussed from relations between properties of the catalyst and liquefaction product. The natural pyrite provided an activity to transfer gaseous hydrogen into the liquefaction product. It was considered that pulverized pyrite promotes the hydrogenation reaction of asphaltene because pulverization increases its contact rate with reactant and the amount of active points on its surface. It was inferred that catalytic activity of pyrite is affected greatly by the chemical state of Fe and S on its surface. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A substrate-driven allosteric switch that enhances PDI catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekendam, Roelof H.; Bendapudi, Pavan K.; Lin, Lin; Nag, Partha P.; Pu, Jun; Kennedy, Daniel R.; Feldenzer, Alexandra; Chiu, Joyce; Cook, Kristina M.; Furie, Bruce; Huang, Mingdong; Hogg, Philip J.; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is an oxidoreductase essential for folding proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. The domain structure of PDI is a–b–b′–x–a′, wherein the thioredoxin-like a and a′ domains mediate disulfide bond shuffling and b and b′ domains are substrate binding. The b′ and a′ domains are connected via the x-linker, a 19-amino-acid flexible peptide. Here we identify a class of compounds, termed bepristats, that target the substrate-binding pocket of b′. Bepristats reversibly block substrate binding and inhibit platelet aggregation and thrombus formation in vivo. Ligation of the substrate-binding pocket by bepristats paradoxically enhances catalytic activity of a and a′ by displacing the x-linker, which acts as an allosteric switch to augment reductase activity in the catalytic domains. This substrate-driven allosteric switch is also activated by peptides and proteins and is present in other thiol isomerases. Our results demonstrate a mechanism whereby binding of a substrate to thiol isomerases enhances catalytic activity of remote domains. PMID:27573496

  7. Chaperones are necessary for the expression of catalytically active potato apyrases in prokaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porowińska, Dorota; Czarnecka, Joanna; Komoszyński, Michał

    2014-07-01

    NTPDases (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases) (also called in plants apyrases) hydrolyze nucleoside 5'-tri- and/or diphosphate bonds producing nucleosides di or monophosphate and inorganic phosphate. For years, studies have been carried out to use both plant and animal enzymes for medicine. Therefore, there is a need to develop an efficient method for the quick production of large amounts of homogeneous proteins with high catalytic activity. Expression of proteins in prokaryotic cells is the most common way for the protein production. The aim of our study was to develop a method of expression of potato apyrase (StAPY4, 5, and 6) genes in bacterial cells under conditions that allowed the production of catalytically active form of these enzymes. Apyrase 4 and 6 were overexpressed in BL21-CodonPlus (DE3) bacteria strain but they were accumulated in inclusion bodies, regardless of the culture conditions and induction method. Co-expression of potato apyrases with molecular chaperones allowed the expression of catalytically active apyrase 5. However, its high nucleotidase activity could be toxic for bacteria and is therefore synthesized in small amounts in cells. Our studies show that each protein requires other conditions for maturation and even small differences in amino acid sequence can essentially affect protein folding regardless of presence of chaperones.

  8. An improved d-band model of the catalytic activity of magnetic transition metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharjee, Satadeep; Lee, S C

    2016-01-01

    The d-band center model of Hammer and N{\\o}rskov is widely used in understanding and predicting catalytic activity on transition metal (TM) surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that this model is inadequate for capturing the complete catalytic activity of the magnetically polarized TM surfaces and propose its generalization. We validate the generalized model through comparison of adsorption energies of the NH$_3$ molecule on the surfaces of 3d TMs (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) determined with spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT)-based methods with the predictions of our model. Compared to the conventional d-band model, where the nature of the metal-adsorbate interaction is entirely determined through the energy and the occupation of the d-band center, we emphasize that for the surfaces with high spin polarization, the metal-adsorbate system can be stabilized through a competition of the spin-dependent metal-adsorbate interactions.

  9. Gold Incorporated Mesoporous Silica Thin Film Model Surface as a Robust SERS and Catalytically Active Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandakumari Chandrasekharan Sunil Sekhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-small gold nanoparticles incorporated in mesoporous silica thin films with accessible pore channels perpendicular to the substrate are prepared by a modified sol-gel method. The simple and easy spin coating technique is applied here to make homogeneous thin films. The surface characterization using FESEM shows crack-free films with a perpendicular pore arrangement. The applicability of these thin films as catalysts as well as a robust SERS active substrate for model catalysis study is tested. Compared to bare silica film our gold incorporated silica, GSM-23F gave an enhancement factor of 103 for RhB with a laser source 633 nm. The reduction reaction of p-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride from our thin films shows a decrease in peak intensity corresponding to –NO2 group as time proceeds, confirming the catalytic activity. Such model surfaces can potentially bridge the material gap between a real catalytic system and surface science studies.

  10. ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2011-03-24

    Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

  11. Catalytic Activity of Iridium Dioxide With Different Morphologies for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guangjin; HUANG Fei; XU Tian; YU Yi; CHENG Feng; ZHANG Yue; PAN Mu

    2015-01-01

    Iridium dioxide with different morphologies (nanorod and nanogranular) is successfully prepared by a modiifed sol-gel and Adams methods. The catalytic activity of both samples for oxygen reduction reaction is investigated in an alkaline solution. The electrochemical results show that the catalytic activity of the nanogranular IrO2 sample is superior to that of the nanorod sample due to its higher onset potential for oxygen reduction reaction and higher electrode current density in low potential region. The results of Koutecky-Levich analysis indicate that the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by both samples is a mixture transfer pathway. It is dominated by four electron transfer pathway for both samples in high overpotential area, while it is controlled by two electron transfer process for both samples in low overpotential area.

  12. Peroxidase-like catalytic activity of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals prepared by a colloidal route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjun Liu

    Full Text Available Nearly monodispersed Ag3PO4 nanocrystals with size of 10 nm were prepared through a colloidal chemical route. It was proven that the synthesized Ag3PO4 nanoparticles have intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity. They can quickly catalyze oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3, 3, 5, 5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB in the presence of H2O2, producing a blue color. The catalysis reaction follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The calculated kinetic parameters indicate a high catalytic activity and the strong affinity of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals to the substrate (TMB. These results suggest the potential applications of Ag3PO4 nanocrystals in fields such as biotechnology, environmental chemistry, and medicine.

  13. Orange II removal by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using activated carbon xerogels

    OpenAIRE

    Pinho, Maria; Silva, Adrián; Fathy, Nady; Attia, Amina; Gomes, Helder; Faria, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Orange II is a synthetic dye widely employed in the textile industry and responsible for serious environrnentaI cancerns. Dyes like this urge the development af new technologies for the treatment af wastewaters generated in this industrial activity. Those include catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO), which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP) based on the generation of hydroxyl radicais (I-lO·) from hydrogen peroxide with tlle aid ofa suitable catalysl [I].

  14. Synthesis and catalytic activities of porphyrin-based PCP pincer complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimoto, Keisuke; Yoneda, Tomoki; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    2,18-Bis(diphenylphosphino)porphyrins undergo peripheral cyclometalation with group 10 transition-metal salts to afford the corresponding porphyrin-based PCP pincer complexes. The porphyrinic plane and the PCP-pincer unit are apparently coplanar, with small strain. The catalytic activities of the porphyrin-based pincer complexes at the periphery were investigated in the allylation of benzaldehyde with allylstannane and in the 1,4-reduction of chalcone to discover the electronic interplay betw...

  15. Catalytic layer for oxygen activation on ionic solid electrolytes at high temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Serra Alfaro, José Manuel; Vert Belenguer, Vicente Bernard; Escolástico Rozalén, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalytic porous layer for oxygen activation which may be utilised in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and in dense ceramic membranes for oxygen separation at high temperature. Said porous layer is principally formed by a mixed electron and oxygen ion conductive material possessing a structure selected from among structures of the simple perovskite or double perovskite type or structures related to perovskite, that is to say: structures of the Ruddlesden-Poppe...

  16. Briefly Bound to Activate: Transient Binding of a Second Catalytic Magnesium Activates the Structure and Dynamics of CDK2 Kinase for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Zhao Qin; Jacobsen, Douglas M.; Young, Matthew A. (Michigan-Med)

    2014-10-02

    We have determined high-resolution crystal structures of a CDK2/Cyclin A transition state complex bound to ADP, substrate peptide, and MgF{sub 3}{sup -}. Compared to previous structures of active CDK2, the catalytic subunit of the kinase adopts a more closed conformation around the active site and now allows observation of a second Mg{sup 2+} ion in the active site. Coupled with a strong [Mg{sup 2+}] effect on in vitro kinase activity, the structures suggest that the transient binding of the second Mg{sup 2+} ion is necessary to achieve maximum rate enhancement of the chemical reaction, and Mg{sup 2+} concentration could represent an important regulator of CDK2 activity in vivo. Molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the simultaneous binding of substrate peptide, ATP, and two Mg{sup 2+} ions is able to induce a more rigid and closed organization of the active site that functions to orient the phosphates, stabilize the buildup of negative charge, and shield the subsequently activated {gamma}-phosphate from solvent.

  17. A simple red-ox titrimetric method for the evaluation of photo-catalytic activity of titania based catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y S Satpute; S A Borkar; S R Dharwadkar

    2003-12-01

    A simple red-ox titrimetry method has been developed for rapid evaluation of the photo catalytic activity of TiO2 based photo-catalysts. The analytical procedure employs monitoring the kinetics of a simple one electron transfer reduction reaction of conversion of Ce4+ to Ce3+ in dilute aqueous solution in presence of sunlight. The photo-catalytic activity of TiO2 synthesized by two different routes was evaluated by the above technique. The effect of surface area, crystallite size and polymorphic contents on the photo-catalytic activity of TiO2 was also studied employing this method.

  18. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  19. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B; Morreale, Bryan D; Gellman, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  20. Supercritical CO{sub 2} mediated synthesis and catalytic activity of graphene/Pd nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lulu [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeoungbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Van Hoa [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeoungbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Nha Trang University, 2 Nguyen Dinh Chieu, Nha Trang (Viet Nam); Shim, Jae-Jin, E-mail: jjshim@yu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeoungbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • RGO/Pd composite was efficiently prepared via a facile method in supercritical CO{sub 2}. • Graphene sheets were coated uniformly with Pd nanoparticles with a size of ∼8 nm. • Composites exhibited excellent catalytic activity in the Suzuki reaction even after 10 cycles. - Abstract: Graphene sheets were decorated with palladium nanoparticles using a facile and efficient method in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The nanoparticles were formed on the graphene sheets by the simple hydrogen reduction of palladium(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate precursor in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly dispersed nanoparticles with various sizes and shapes adhered well to the graphene sheets. The composites showed high catalytic activities for the Suzuki reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions within 5 min. The effects of the different Pd precursor loadings on the catalytic activities of the composites were also examined.

  1. Effects of Silylation on Zn-IM5 and Its Catalytic Activity for Butane Aromatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lei; Yi Dezhi; Lu Yannan; Shi Li; Chen Junwen; Meng Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Effects of silylation on surface properties and catalytic performance of Zn-IM5 for butane aromatization were studied in this paper. Collidine-IR and NH3-TPD analyses revealed that the silylation treatment not only decreased the quantity of both strong and weak acid sites but also led to a slightly reduced intensity of weak acidity. Silylation of the catalyst promoted the selec-tivity of BTX by narrowing the channel and cutting the acidity. The effect of temperature of silylation and amount of Si loading were evaluated. The best condition has speciifed a temperature of 50℃and a SiO2 loading of 4.0%.

  2. The influence of copper in dealloyed binary platinum–copper electrocatalysts on methanol electroxidation catalytic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we prepared and characterized carbon paper-supported dealloyed binary Pt–Cu core–shell electrocatalysts (denoted as PtxCu(100−x)/CP) by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective copper dealloying in an acidic medium, and we investigated the effect of the copper content in the samples on the catalytic activities toward methanol electroxidation reaction (MOR). X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) indicated that the structure of dealloyed binary Pt–Cu catalysts possessed a Pt-rich shell and a Cu rich core. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) displayed that the oxidation states of Pt and Cu were zero and one, respectively, implying the formation of metallic Pt and Cu2O, respectively. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) confirmed that Cu was inserted into a face-centered cubic Pt structure forming Pt–Cu alloys. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) displayed a cubic shape of Pt/CP and a spherical shape of PtxCu(100−x)/CP with several hundred nanometer sizes of agglomeration that depended on the Cu content. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed to confirm that the sample of Pt70Cu30/CP exhibited the best catalytic activities in terms of the specific current, current density, catalytic poisoning tolerance, and stability. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Binary electrocatalysts of PtxCu(100−x)/CP were prepared by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective copper dealloying. • The structures of PtxCu(100−x)/CP were a Pt rich shell and a Cu rich core. • The Pt70Cu30/CP was the excellent catalytic activity towards methanol electrooxidation and COads tolerance

  3. Effect of tourmaline additive on the crystal growth and activity of LaCoO3 for catalytic combustion of methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王赛飞; 薛刚; 梁金生; 孟军平

    2014-01-01

    LaCoO3/tourmaline was prepared as catalysts on the methane catalytic combustion. As additive tourmaline, its effect on crystal growth and catalytic activity of LaCoO3, were investigated via X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H2-temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and catalyst evaluation techniques. SEM and TEM indicated that the spontaneous polarizability of tourmaline made LaCoO3 particles grow dispersedly on tourmaline, allevi-ated the agglomeration and exposed more reactive sites. It was a main influence leading to the improvement of catalysts activity, ex-posed via catalyst evaluation device. Among the different additive proportion of compound samples, the 2% tourmaline added La-CoO3 showed an obvious enhancement activity compared to non-tourmaline sample-the light-off temperature was 454 °C and CH4 reached the full conversion at 563 °C.

  4. The roles of the catalytic and noncatalytic activities of Rpd3L and Rpd3S in the regulation of gene transcription in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Yeheskely-Hayon

    Full Text Available In budding yeasts, the histone deacetylase Rpd3 resides in two different complexes called Rpd3L (large and Rpd3S (small that exert opposing effects on the transcription of meiosis-specific genes. By introducing mutations that disrupt the integrity and function of either Rpd3L or Rpd3S, we show here that Rpd3 function is determined by its association with either of these complexes. Specifically, the catalytic activity of Rpd3S activates the transcription of the two major positive regulators of meiosis, IME1 and IME2, under all growth conditions and activates the transcription of NDT80 only during vegetative growth. In contrast, the effects of Rpd3L depends on nutrients; it represses or activates transcription in the presence or absence of a nitrogen source, respectively. Further, we show that transcriptional activation does not correlate with histone H4 deacetylation, suggesting an effect on a nonhistone protein. Comparison of rpd3-null and catalytic-site point mutants revealed an inhibitory activity that is independent of either the catalytic activity of Rpd3 or the integrity of Rpd3L and Rpd3S.

  5. Block copolymer hollow fiber membranes with catalytic activity and pH-response

    KAUST Repository

    Hilke, Roland

    2013-08-14

    We fabricated block copolymer hollow fiber membranes with self-assembled, shell-side, uniform pore structures. The fibers in these membranes combined pores able to respond to pH and acting as chemical gates that opened above pH 4, and catalytic activity, achieved by the incorporation of gold nanoparticles. We used a dry/wet spinning process to produce the asymmetric hollow fibers and determined the conditions under which the hollow fibers were optimized to create the desired pore morphology and the necessary mechanical stability. To induce ordered micelle assembly in the doped solution, we identified an ideal solvent mixture as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. We then reduced p-nitrophenol with a gold-loaded fiber to confirm the catalytic performance of the membranes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems.

  7. Nickel-doped ceria nanoparticles for promoting catalytic activity of Pt/C for ethanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiang; Du, Chunyu; Sun, Yongrong; Du, Lei; Yin, Geping; Gao, Yunzhi

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports the facile synthesis of monodispersed nickel-doped ceria nanoparticles by a thermal decomposition method, which is used to promote catalytic properties of Pt/C. The Pt/Ni-doped CeO2/C catalyst obtained exhibits remarkably high activity and stability towards the ethanol electrooxidation in acidic media. This is attributed to higher oxygen releasing capacity and stronger interaction of Ni-doped CeO2 with Pt than pure CeO2 nanoparticles that contribute positively to the removal of poisoning intermediates. We believe that the design concept and synthetic strategy of metal doped oxides used for fuel cell catalysts can be potentially extended to other catalytic fields.

  8. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems. PMID:27124717

  9. Catalytic Activity and Photophysical Properties of Biomolecules Immobilized on Mesoporous Silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki

    Michaelis constant (KM) and maximum rate (Vmax) were determined. Both thermal stability and the stability toward the denaturing agents guanidinium chloride and urea, of free and immobilized enzymes were compared next. The thermal stability of the immobilized enzyme is significantly improved in comparison...... with free HRP. The catalytic kinetics is slowed down notably, but Vmax is much more robust to heat than for the free enzyme. The stability resistance of the enzyme toward the denaturing agents depends on the chemical nature of the denaturing agentsand interactions between enzyme and silica nanopore walls....... Guanidinium chloride showed similar attenuation of the catalytic activity of immobilized and free enzyme. In contrast, immobilized HRP was much more resistant to urea than the free enzyme. The different behavior of free and immobilized enzyme is most likely due to different hydrogen bonding of water...

  10. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles, decorated on graphene oxide nanosheets and their catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekanth, T. V. M.; Jung, Min-Ji; Eom, In-Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we develop an inexpensive and green route for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Picrasma quassioides bark aqueous extract as reducing and capping agent and also eco-friendly decorate graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets with AgNPs (GO-AgNPs). Green synthesized AgNPs and GO-AgNPs composites were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, and TEM-SAED techniques. The resulting GO-AgNPs contained about 41.35% of Ag and the AgNPs size ranges 17.5-66.5 nm, and GO-AgNPs size ranges 10-49.5 nm. Moreover, the GO-AgNPs exhibited excellent catalytic activity towards the methylene blue (MB) in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) at room temperature. This catalytic reaction completed within 15 min.

  11. Green synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of palladium nanoparticles by xanthan gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoshi kumari, Amrutham; Venkatesham, Maragoni; Ayodhya, Dasari; Veerabhadram, Guttena

    2015-03-01

    Here, we report the synthesis, characterization and catalytic evaluation of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) using xanthan gum, acting as both reducing and stabilizing agent without using any synthetic reagent. The uniqueness of our method lies in its fast synthesis rates using hydrothermal method in autoclave at a pressure of 15 psi and at 120 °C temperature by 10 min time. The formation and size of the PdNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The catalytic activity of PdNPs was evaluated on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by sodium borohydride using spectrophotometry.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity toward methanol oxidation of electrocatalyst Pt4+-NH2-MCM-41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► It was first confirmed that the Pt4+ exhibited a good electro-catalytic property for methanol oxidation. ► The Pt4+ perfectly distributed on a mesoporous molecular sieve matrix synthesis by a facile method. ► The good performance of catalyst resistance to poisoning because of a homogeneous distribution of Pt4+ and large specific surface area. - Abstract: Mesoporous material with functional group (Pt4+-NH2-MCM-41) was prepared by grafting aminopropyl group and adsorbing platinum ions on the surface of the commercial molecular sieve (MCM-41). The characterization carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and N2 adsorption–desorption measurement pointed out that Pt was adsorbed on the NH2-MCM-41 surface as the oxidation state (Pt4+) and the surface area of Pt4+-NH2-MCM-41 was up to 564 m2/g. Transmission electron microscopy and elemental mapping indicated a homogeneous distribution of Pt4+ throughout all surface of the mesoporous materials. Electro-catalytic properties of methanol oxidation on the Pt4+-NH2-MCM-41 electrode were investigated with electrochemical methods. The results showed that the Pt4+-NH2-MCM-41 electrode exhibited catalytic activity in the methanol electro-oxidation with the apparent activation energy being 49.29 kJ/mol, and the control step of methanol electro-oxidation was the mass transfer process. It is first proved that platinum ions had good electro-catalytic property for methanol oxidation and provided a new idea for developing electrode materials in future.

  13. Strongly coupled Pd nanotetrahedron/tungsten oxide nanosheet hybrids with enhanced catalytic activity and stability as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yizhong; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaodan; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-20

    The design and synthesis of highly active oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts with strong durability at low cost is extremely desirable but still remains a significant challenge. Here we develop an efficient strategy that utilizes organopalladium(I) complexes containing palladium-palladium bonds as precursors for the synthesis of strongly coupled Pd tetrahedron-tungsten oxide nanosheet hybrids (Pd/W18O49) to improve the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pd nanocrystals. The hybrid materials are synthesized by direct nucleation, growth, and anchoring of Pd tetrahedral nanocrystals on the in situ-synthesized W18O49 nanosheets. Compared to supportless Pd nanocrystals and W18O49, their hybrids exhibited not only surprisingly high activity but also superior stability to Pt for the ORR in alkaline solutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical analyses indicated that the enhanced electrocatalytic activity and durability are associated with the increased number and improved catalytic activity of active sites, which is induced by the strong interaction between the Pd tetrahedrons and W18O49 nanosheet supports. The present study provides a novel strategy for synthesizing hybrid catalysts with strong chemical attachment and electrical coupling between nanocatalysts and supports. The strategy is expected to open up exciting opportunities for developing a novel class of metal-support hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts with improved ORR activity and durability for both fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:25054583

  14. Structural insight into the active site of a Bombyx mori unclassified glutathione transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here, we identify amino acid residues of an unclassified GST from Bombyx mori, bmGSTu-interacting glutathione (GSH). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTu mutants indicated that amino acid residues Asp103, Ser162, and Ser166 contribute to catalytic activity.

  15. Electrosynthesis and catalytic activity of polymer-nickel particles composite electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melki, Tahar; Zouaoui, Ahmed; Bendemagh, Barkahoum [Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif (Algeria). Faculte des Sciences de l' Ingenieur. Dept. du Tronc Commun; Oliveira, Ione M.F. de; Oliveira, Gilver F. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Lepretre, Jean-Claude [UMR-5631 CNRS-INPG-UJF, St. Martin d' Heres Cedex (France). Lab. d' Electrochimie et de Physicochimie des Materiaux et Interfaces; Bucher, Christophe; Mou tet, Jean-Claude [Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1 (France). Dept. de Chimie Moleculaire], e-mail: Jean-Claude.Moutet@ujf-grenoble.fr

    2009-07-01

    Nickel-polymer composite electrode materials have been synthesized using various strategies, all comprising the electrochemical reduction of nickel(II) cations or complexes, incorporated by either ion-exchange or complexation into various poly(pyrrole-carboxylate) thin films coated by oxidative electropolymerization onto carbon electrodes. The electrocatalytic activity and the stability of the different composites have been then evaluated in the course of the electrocatalytic hydrogenation of ketones and enones in aqueous electrolytes. The best results were obtained using nickel-polymer composites synthesized by electroreduction of nickel(II) ions complexed into polycarboxylate films, which are characterized by a high catalytic activity and a good operational stability. (author)

  16. Importance of the oxygen bond strength for catalytic activity in soot oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob M.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Anker D.

    2016-01-01

    (loose contact) the rate constants for a number of catalytic materials outline a volcano curve when plotted against their heats of oxygen chemisorption. However, the optima of the volcanoes correspond to different heats of chemisorption for the two contact situations. In both cases the activation...... oxidation. The optimum of the volcano curve in loose contact is estimated to occur between the bond strengths of α-Fe2O3 and α-Cr2O3. Guided by an interpolation principle FeaCrbOx binary oxides were tested, and the activity of these oxides was observed to pass through an optimum for an FeCr2Ox binary oxide...

  17. Flexibility and Stability Trade-Off in Active Site of Cold-Adapted Pseudomonas mandelii Esterase EstK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-06-28

    Cold-adapted enzymes exhibit enhanced conformational flexibility, especially in their active sites, as compared with their warmer-temperature counterparts. However, the mechanism by which cold-adapted enzymes maintain their active site stability is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of conserved D308-Y309 residues located in the same loop as the catalytic H307 residue in the cold-adapted esterase EstK from Pseudomonas mandelii. Mutation of D308 and/or Y309 to Ala or deletion resulted in increased conformational flexibility. Particularly, the D308A or Y309A mutant showed enhanced substrate affinity and catalytic rate, as compared with wild-type EstK, via enlargement of the active site. However, all mutant EstK enzymes exhibited reduced thermal stability. The effect of mutation was greater for D308 than Y309. These results indicate that D308 is not preferable for substrate selection and catalytic activity, whereas hydrogen bond formation involving D308 is critical for active site stabilization. Taken together, conformation of the EstK active site is constrained via flexibility-stability trade-off for enzyme catalysis and thermal stability. Our study provides further insights into active site stabilization of cold-adapted enzymes. PMID:27259687

  18. Catalytic dehydrogenation of isobutane in the presence of hydrogen over Cs-modified Ni{sub 2}P supported on active carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yanli [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, College of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Sang, Huanxin [Tianjin Academy of Environmental Sciences, Tianjin 300191 (China); Wang, Kang [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, College of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Xitao, E-mail: wangxt@tju.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science and Technology, College of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ni{sub 2}P catalyst is tested in dehydrogenation of isobutane for the first time. • The effects of Cs promoter on catalytic performance of Ni2P/AC were investigated. • Cs-Ni2P/AC exhibits high activity and selectivity for isobutane dehydrogenation. - Abstract: In this article, an environmentally friendly non-noble-metal class of Cs-Ni{sub 2}P/active carbon (AC) catalyst was prepared and demonstrated to exhibit enhanced catalytic performance in isobutane dehydrogenation. The results of activity tests reveal that Ni/AC catalyst was highly active for isobutane cracking, which led to the formation of abundant methane and coke. After the introduction of phosphorus through impregnation with ammonium di-hydrogen phosphate and H{sub 2}-temperature programmed reduction, undesired cracking reactions were effectively inhibited, and the selectivity to isobutene and stability of catalyst increased remarkably. The characterization results indicate that, after the addition of phosphorous, the improvement of dehydrogenation selectivity is ascribed to the partial positive charges carried on Ni surface in Ni{sub 2}P particles, which decreases the strength of Ni-C bond between Ni and carbonium-ion intermediates and the possibility of excessive dehydrogenation. In addition, Cs-modified Ni{sub 2}P/AC catalysts display much higher catalytic performance as compared to Ni{sub 2}P/AC catalyst. Cs-Ni{sub 2}P-6.5 catalyst has the highest catalytic performance, and the selectivity to isobutene higher than 93% can be obtained even after 4 h reaction. The enhancement in catalytic performance of the Cs-modified catalysts is mainly attributed to the function of Cs to improve the dispersion of Ni{sub 2}P particles, transfer electron from Cs to Ni, and decrease acid site number and strength.

  19. Influence of hydrophobic mismatch on the catalytic activity of Escherichia coli GlpG rhomboid protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Alexander C Y; Harvey, Brandon G R; Metz, Jeff J; Goto, Natalie K

    2015-04-01

    Rhomboids comprise a broad family of intramembrane serine proteases that are found in a wide range of organisms and participate in a diverse array of biological processes. High-resolution structures of the catalytic transmembrane domain of the Escherichia coli GlpG rhomboid have provided numerous insights that help explain how hydrolytic cleavage can be achieved below the membrane surface. Key to this are observations that GlpG hydrophobic domain dimensions may not be sufficient to completely span the native lipid bilayer. This formed the basis for a model where hydrophobic mismatch Induces thinning of the local membrane environment to promote access to transmembrane substrates. However, hydrophobic mismatch also has the potential to alter the functional properties of the rhomboid, a possibility we explore in the current work. For this purpose, we purified the catalytic transmembrane domain of GlpG into phosphocholine or maltoside detergent micelles of varying alkyl chain lengths, and assessed proteolytic function with a model water-soluble substrate. Catalytic turnover numbers were found to depend on detergent alkyl chain length, with saturated chains containing 10-12 carbon atoms supporting maximal activity. Similar results were obtained in phospholipid bicelles, with no proteolytic activity being detected in longer-chain lipids. Although differences in thermal stability and GlpG oligomerization could not explain these activity differences, circular dichroism spectra suggest that mismatch gives rise to a small change in structure. Overall, these results demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch can exert an inhibitory effect on rhomboid activity, with the potential for changes in local membrane environment to regulate activity in vivo.

  20. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  1. Autocatalytic activation of the furin zymogen requires removal of the emerging enzyme's N-terminus from the active site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Gawlik

    Full Text Available Before furin can act on protein substrates, it must go through an ordered process of activation. Similar to many other proteinases, furin is synthesized as a zymogen (profurin which becomes active only after the autocatalytic removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. We hypothesized that to activate profurin its prodomain had to be removed and, in addition, the emerging enzyme's N-terminus had to be ejected from the catalytic cleft.We constructed and analyzed the profurin mutants in which the egress of the emerging enzyme's N-terminus from the catalytic cleft was restricted. Mutants were autocatalytically processed at only the primary cleavage site Arg-Thr-Lys-Arg(107 downward arrowAsp(108, but not at both the primary and the secondary (Arg-Gly-Val-Thr-Lys-Arg(75 downward arrowSer(76 cleavage sites, yielding, as a result, the full-length prodomain and mature furins commencing from the N-terminal Asp108. These correctly processed furin mutants, however, remained self-inhibited by the constrained N-terminal sequence which continuously occupied the S' sub-sites of the catalytic cleft and interfered with the functional activity. Further, using the in vitro cleavage of the purified prodomain and the analyses of colon carcinoma LoVo cells with the reconstituted expression of the wild-type and mutant furins, we demonstrated that a three-step autocatalytic processing including the cleavage of the prodomain at the previously unidentified Arg-Leu-Gln-Arg(89 downward arrowGlu(90 site, is required for the efficient activation of furin.Collectively, our results show the restrictive role of the enzyme's N-terminal region in the autocatalytic activation mechanisms. In a conceptual form, our data apply not only to profurin alone but also to a range of self-activated proteinases.

  2. Catalytic oxidation of pulping effluent by activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bholu Ram; Garg, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    The present study deals with the non-catalytic and catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) for the removal of persistent organic compounds from the pulping effluent. Two activated carbon-supported heterogeneous catalysts (Cu/Ce/AC and Cu/Mn/AC) were used for CWO after characterization by the following techniques: temperature-programmed reduction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The oxidation reaction was performed in a batch high-pressure reactor (capacity = 0.7  L) at moderate oxidation conditions (temperature = 190°C and oxygen pressure = 0.9 MPa). With Cu/Ce/AC catalyst, the maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and lignin removals of 79%, 77% and 88% were achieved compared to only 50% removal during the non-catalytic process. The 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) to COD ratio (a measure for biodegradability) of the pulping effluent was improved to 0.52 from an initial value of 0.16. The mass balance calculations for solid recovered after CWO reaction showed 8% and 10% deduction in catalyst mass primarily attributed to the loss of carbon and metal leaching. After the CWO process, carbon deposition was also observed on the recovered catalyst which was responsible for around 3-4% TOC reduction. PMID:26508075

  3. Physics-based enzyme design: predicting binding affinity and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Sarah; Pearlman, David A; Sherman, Woody

    2014-12-01

    Computational enzyme design is an emerging field that has yielded promising success stories, but where numerous challenges remain. Accurate methods to rapidly evaluate possible enzyme design variants could provide significant value when combined with experimental efforts by reducing the number of variants needed to be synthesized and speeding the time to reach the desired endpoint of the design. To that end, extending our computational methods to model the fundamental physical-chemical principles that regulate activity in a protocol that is automated and accessible to a broad population of enzyme design researchers is essential. Here, we apply a physics-based implicit solvent MM-GBSA scoring approach to enzyme design and benchmark the computational predictions against experimentally determined activities. Specifically, we evaluate the ability of MM-GBSA to predict changes in affinity for a steroid binder protein, catalytic turnover for a Kemp eliminase, and catalytic activity for α-Gliadin peptidase variants. Using the enzyme design framework developed here, we accurately rank the most experimentally active enzyme variants, suggesting that this approach could provide enrichment of active variants in real-world enzyme design applications.

  4. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol;

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...... for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon...... resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding...

  5. Active sites in Cu-SSZ-13 deNOx catalyst under reaction conditions: a XAS/XES perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomachenko, Kirill A.; Borfecchia, Elisa; Bordiga, Silvia; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Beato, Pablo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 is a highly active catalyst for the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of the harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx, x=1, 2). Since the catalytically active sites for this reaction are mainly represented by isolated Cu ions incorporated into the zeolitic framework, element-selective studies of Cu local environment are crucial to fully understand the enhanced catalytic properties of this material. Herein, we highlight the recent advances in the characterization of the most abundant Cu-sites in Cu-SSZ-13 upon different reaction-relevant conditions made employing XAS and XES spectroscopies, complemented by computational analysis. A concise review of the most relevant literature is also presented.

  6. Characterization of a soluble, catalytically active form of Escherichia coli leader peptidase: requirement of detergent or phospholipid for optimal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschantz, W R; Paetzel, M; Cao, G; Suciu, D; Inouye, M; Dalbey, R E

    1995-03-28

    Leader peptidase is a novel serine protease in Escherichia coli, which functions to cleave leader sequences from exported proteins. Its catalytic domain extends into the periplasmic space and is anchored to the membrane by two transmembrane segments located at the N-terminal end of the protein. At present, there is no information on the structure of the catalytic domain. Here, we report on the properties of a soluble form of leader peptidase (delta 2-75), and we compare its properties to those of the wild-type enzyme. We find that the truncated leader peptidase has a kcat of 3.0 S-1 and a Km of 32 microM with a pro-OmpA nuclease A substrate. In contrast to the wild-type enzyme (pI of 6.8), delta 2-75 is water-soluble and has an acidic isoelectric point of 5.6. We also show with delta 2-75 that the replacement of serine 90 and lysine 145 with alanine residues results in a 500-fold reduction in activity, providing further evidence that leader peptidase employs a catalytic serine/lysine dyad. Finally, we find that the catalysis of delta 2-75 is accelerated by the presence of the detergent Triton X-100, regardless if the substrate is pro-OmpA nuclease A or a peptide substrate. Triton X-100 is required for optimal activity of delta 2-75 at a level far below the critical micelle concentration. Moreover, we find that E. coli phospholipids stimulate the activity of delta 2-75, suggesting that phospholipids may play an important physiological role in the catalytic mechanism of leader peptidase. PMID:7696258

  7. Facile synthesis of pristine graphene-palladium nanocomposites with extraordinary catalytic activities using swollen liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, T; Dutt, S; Kumar, R; Siril, P F

    2016-01-01

    Amazing conductivity, perfect honeycomb sp(2) arrangement and the high theoretical surface area make pristine graphene as one of the best materials suited for application as catalyst supports. Unfortunately, the low reactivity of the material makes the formation of nanocomposite with inorganic materials difficult. Here we report an easy approach to synthesize nanocomposites of pristine graphene with palladium (Pd-G) using swollen liquid crystals (SLCs) as a soft template. The SLC template gives the control to deposit very small Pd particles of uniform size on G as well as RGO. The synthesized nanocomposite (Pd-G) exhibited exceptionally better catalytic activity compared with Pd-RGO nanocomposite in the hydrogenation of nitrophenols and microwave assisted C-C coupling reactions. The catalytic activity of Pd-G nanocomposite during nitrophenol reduction reaction was sixteen times higher than Pd nanoparticles and more than double than Pd-RGO nanocomposite. The exceptionally high activity of pristine graphene supported catalysts in the organic reactions is explained on the basis of its better pi interacting property compared to partially reduced RGO. The Pd-G nanocomposite showed exceptional stability under the reaction conditions as it could be recycled upto a minimum of 15 cycles for the C-C coupling reactions without any loss in activity. PMID:27619321

  8. Insight into the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate mutase catalysis derived from site-directed mutagenesis studies of active site residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y; Lu, Z; Huang, K; Herzberg, O; Dunaway-Mariano, D

    1999-10-26

    PEP mutase catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate in biosynthetic pathways leading to phosphonate secondary metabolites. A recent X-ray structure [Huang, K., Li, Z., Jia, Y., Dunaway-Mariano, D., and Herzberg, O. (1999) Structure (in press)] of the Mytilus edulis enzyme complexed with the Mg(II) cofactor and oxalate inhibitor reveals an alpha/beta-barrel backbone-fold housing an active site in which Mg(II) is bound by the two carboxylate groups of the oxalate ligand and the side chain of D85 and, via bridging water molecules, by the side chains of D58, D85, D87, and E114. The oxalate ligand, in turn, interacts with the side chains of R159, W44, and S46 and the backbone amide NHs of G47 and L48. Modeling studies identified two feasible PEP binding modes: model A in which PEP replaces oxalate with its carboxylate group interacting with R159 and its phosphoryl group positioned close to D58 and Mg(II) shifting slightly from its original position in the crystal structure, and model B in which PEP replaces oxalate with its phosphoryl group interacting with R159 and Mg(II) retaining its original position. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of the key mutase active site residues (R159, D58, D85, D87, and E114) were carried out in order to evaluate the catalytic roles predicted by the two models. The observed retention of low catalytic activity in the mutants R159A, D85A, D87A, and E114A, coupled with the absence of detectable catalytic activity in D58A, was interpreted as evidence for model A in which D58 functions in nucleophilic catalysis (phosphoryl transfer), R159 functions in PEP carboxylate group binding, and the carboxylates of D85, D87 and E114 function in Mg(II) binding. These results also provide evidence against model B in which R159 serves to mediate the phosphoryl transfer. A catalytic motif, which could serve both the phosphoryl transfer and the C-C cleavage enzymes of the PEP mutase superfamily, is proposed. PMID:10571990

  9. Catalytic Activity and Stability of Oxides: The Role of Near-Surface Atomic Structures and Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhenxing; Hong, Wesley T; Fong, Dillon D; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Yacoby, Yizhak; Morgan, Dane; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-05-17

    the physical origin of segregation is discussed in comparison with (La1-ySry)2CoO4±δ/La1-xSrxCo0.2Fe0.8O3-δ. Sr enrichment in many electrocatalysts, such as La1-xSrxMO3-δ (M = Cr, Co, Mn, or Co and Fe) and Sm1-xSrxCoO3, has been probed using alternative techniques, including low energy ion scattering, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and X-ray fluorescence-based methods for depth-dependent, element-specific analysis. We highlight a strong connection between cation segregation and electrocatalytic properties, because cation segregation enhances oxygen transport and surface oxygen exchange kinetics. On the other hand, the formation of cation-enriched secondary phases can lead to the blocking of active sites, inhibiting oxygen exchange. With help from density functional theory, the links between cation migration, catalyst stability, and catalytic activity are provided, and the oxygen p-band center relative to the Fermi level can be identified as an activity descriptor. Based on these findings, we discuss strategies to increase a catalyst's activity while maintaining stability to design efficient, cost-effective electrocatalysts. PMID:27149528

  10. Biochemical Characterization and Validation of a Catalytic Site of a Highly Thermostable Ts2631 Endolysin from the Thermus scotoductus Phage vB_Tsc2631.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Plotka

    Full Text Available Phage vB_Tsc2631 infects the extremophilic bacterium Thermus scotoductus MAT2631 and uses the Ts2631 endolysin for the release of its progeny. The Ts2631 endolysin is the first endolysin from thermophilic bacteriophage with an experimentally validated catalytic site. In silico analysis and computational modelling of the Ts2631 endolysin structure revealed a conserved Zn2+ binding site (His30, Tyr58, His131 and Cys139 similar to Zn2+ binding site of eukaryotic peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs. We have shown that the Ts2631 endolysin lytic activity is dependent on divalent metal ions (Zn2+ and Ca2+. The Ts2631 endolysin substitution variants H30N, Y58F, H131N and C139S dramatically lost their antimicrobial activity, providing evidence for the role of the aforementioned residues in the lytic activity of the enzyme. The enzyme has proven to be not only thermoresistant, retaining 64.8% of its initial activity after 2 h at 95°C, but also highly thermodynamically stable (Tm = 99.82°C, ΔHcal = 4.58 × 10(4 cal mol(-1. Substitutions of histidine residues (H30N and H131N and a cysteine residue (C139S resulted in variants aggregating at temperatures ≥75°C, indicating a significant role of these residues in enzyme thermostability. The substrate spectrum of the Ts2631 endolysin included extremophiles of the genus Thermus but also Gram-negative mesophiles, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella panama, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Serratia marcescens. The broad substrate spectrum and high thermostability of this endolysin makes it a good candidate for use as an antimicrobial agent to combat Gram-negative pathogens.

  11. Identification of amino acids related to catalytic function of Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 carboxylesterase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Ho; Lee, Ye-Na; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hee-Bong

    2016-01-01

    The archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 carboxylesterase is a thermostable enzyme with a molecular mass of 33.5 kDa belonging to the mammalian hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family. In our previous study, we purified the enzyme and suggested the expected amino acids related to its catalysis by chemical modification and a sequence homology search. For further validating these amino acids in this study, we modified them using site-directed mutagenesis and examined the activity of the mutant enzymes using spectrophotometric analysis and then estimated by homology modeling and fluorescence analysis. As a result, it was identified that Ser151, Asp244, and His274 consist of a catalytic triad, and Gly80, Gly81, and Ala152 compose an oxyanion hole of the enzyme. In addition, it was also determined that the cysteine residues are located near the active site or at the positions inducing any conformational changes of the enzyme by their replacement with serine residues. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 349-354] PMID:27222124

  12. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Hua [School of Urban Rail Transportation, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Li, Zhihu [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China); Xu, Yanhui, E-mail: xuyanhui@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  13. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm−2 for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm−2 (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10−7–10−6 cm s−1. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER

  14. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB)

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  15. Facile synthesis and excellent catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles on graphene oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Qiang He; Na Na Zhang; Yu Liu; Jian Ping Gao; Mao Cong Yi; Qiao Juan Gong; Hai Xia Qiu

    2012-01-01

    For the first time,Au nanoparticles on graphene oxide (GO-AuNPs) were successfully fabricated without applying any additional reductants,just by the redox reaction between AuCl4-1 and GO.Their structure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction.The results show that flower-like AuNPs were successfully dispersed on GO surface.Importantly,they showed a high catalytic activity for the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction in an aqueous medium.

  16. Polyvinylpyrrolidone adsorption effects on the morphologies of synthesized platinum particles and its catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooi, Mahayatun Dayana Johan [Nano - Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Aziz, Azlan Abdul [Nano - Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Nanobiotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), INFORMM, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Flower-like Platinum micro-structures were synthesized from different concentration of the PVP using solvothermal method. At 5.0×10{sup −3} mmol of PVP, well-defined flower-like pattern consists of triangular petals radiating from the centre were produced whereas larger flower network developed at higher PVP concentration. High degree of crystallinity was obtained upon each increment of PVP. The well defined flower like pattern synthesized using 5.0×10{sup −3} mmol PVP exhibit the highest catalytic activity and stability towards electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  17. Polyvinylpyrrolidone adsorption effects on the morphologies of synthesized platinum particles and its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Mahayatun Dayana Johan; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Flower-like Platinum micro-structures were synthesized from different concentration of the PVP using solvothermal method. At 5.0×10-3 mmol of PVP, well-defined flower-like pattern consists of triangular petals radiating from the centre were produced whereas larger flower network developed at higher PVP concentration. High degree of crystallinity was obtained upon each increment of PVP. The well defined flower like pattern synthesized using 5.0×10-3 mmol PVP exhibit the highest catalytic activity and stability towards electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  18. Evaluation of the Catalytic Activity and Cytotoxicity of Palladium Nanocubes. The Role of Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photo-excitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,5,3′,5′-tetram...

  19. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    OpenAIRE

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a fac...

  20. Enhanced catalytic activity over MIL-100(Fe) loaded ceria catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH₃ at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Sun, Hong; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2016-01-15

    The development of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactions that are highly active at low temperatures and show good resistance to SO2 and H2O is still a challenge. In this study, we have designed and developed a high-performance SCR catalyst based on nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside the pores of MIL-100(Fe) that combines excellent catalytic power with a metal organic framework architecture synthesized by the impregnation method (IM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the encapsulation of ceria in the cavities of MIL-100(Fe). The prepared IM-CeO2/MIL-100(Fe) catalyst shows improved catalytic activity both at low temperatures and throughout a wide temperature window. The temperature window for 90% NOx conversion ranges from 196 to 300°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT) analysis indicated that the nano-sized ceria encapsulated inside MIL-100(Fe) promotes the production of chemisorbed oxygen on the catalyst surface, which greatly enhances the formation of the NO2 species responsible for fast SCR reactions. PMID:26414927

  1. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-10

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  2. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  3. Hot-electron-mediated surface chemistry: toward electronic control of catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Young; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Hyosun; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I

    2015-08-18

    nanoparticles on oxide supports and Pt-CdSe-Pt nanodumbbells. We show that the accumulation or depletion of hot electrons on metal nanoparticles, in turn, can also influence catalytic reactions. Mechanisms suggested for hot-electron-induced chemical reactions on a photoexcited plasmonic metal are discussed. We propose that the manipulation of the flow of hot electrons by changing the electrical characteristics of metal-oxide and metal-semiconductor interfaces can give rise to the intriguing capability of tuning the catalytic activity of hybrid nanocatalysts. PMID:26181684

  4. Relation between the structure and catalytic activity for automotive emissions. Use of x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuki, J; Tanaka, H

    2003-01-01

    The employment of the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect allows us to detect the change in structure of catalytic converters with the environment exposed. Here we show that palladium atoms in a perovskite crystal move into and out of the crystal by anomalous X-ray diffraction and absorption techniques. This movement of the precious metal plays an important role to keep the catalytic activity long-lived. (author)

  5. Parkin mitochondrial translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinde Zheng; Tony Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Pink1,a mitochondrial kinase,and Parkin,an E3 ubiquitin ligase,function in mitochondrial maintenance.Pink1 accumulates on depolarized mitochondria,where it recruits Parkin to mainly induce K63-1inked chain ubiquitination of outer membrane proteins and eventually mitophagy.Parkin belongs to the RBR E3 iigase family.Recently,it has been proposed that the RBR domain transfers ubiquitin to targets via a cysteine-ubiquitin enzyme intermediate,in a manner similar to HECT domain E3 ligases.However,direct evidence for a ubiquitin transfer mechanism and its importance for Parkin's in vivo function is still missing.Here,we report that Parkin E3 activity relies on cysteinemediated ubiquitin transfer during mitophagy.Mutating the putative catalytic cysteine to serine (Parkin C431S)traps ubiquitin,and surprisingly,also abrogates Parkin mitochondrial translocation,indicating that E3 activity is essential for Parkin translocation.We found that Parkin can bind to K63-1inked ubiquitin chains,and that targeting K63-mimicking ubiquitin chains to mitochondria restores Parkin C431S localization.We propose that Parkin translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism.

  6. Parkin mitochondrial translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinde; Hunter, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Pink1, a mitochondrial kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, function in mitochondrial maintenance. Pink1 accumulates on depolarized mitochondria, where it recruits Parkin to mainly induce K63-linked chain ubiquitination of outer membrane proteins and eventually mitophagy. Parkin belongs to the RBR E3 ligase family. Recently, it has been proposed that the RBR domain transfers ubiquitin to targets via a cysteine∼ubiquitin enzyme intermediate, in a manner similar to HECT domain E3 ligases. However, direct evidence for a ubiquitin transfer mechanism and its importance for Parkin's in vivo function is still missing. Here, we report that Parkin E3 activity relies on cysteine-mediated ubiquitin transfer during mitophagy. Mutating the putative catalytic cysteine to serine (Parkin C431S) traps ubiquitin, and surprisingly, also abrogates Parkin mitochondrial translocation, indicating that E3 activity is essential for Parkin translocation. We found that Parkin can bind to K63-linked ubiquitin chains, and that targeting K63-mimicking ubiquitin chains to mitochondria restores Parkin C431S localization. We propose that Parkin translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism. PMID:23670163

  7. Substrate-mediated enhanced activity of Ru nanoparticles in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The impact of carbon substrate-Ru nanoparticle interactions on benzene and hydrogen adsorption that is directly related to the performance in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene has been investigated by first-principles based calculations. The stability of Ru 13 nanoparticles is enhanced by the defective graphene substrate due to the hybridization between the dsp states of the Ru 13 particle with the sp 2 dangling bonds at the defect sites. The local curvature formed at the interface will also raise the Ru atomic diffusion barrier, and prohibit the particle sintering. The strong interfacial interaction results in the shift of averaged d-band center of the deposited Ru nanoparticle, from -1.41 eV for a freestanding Ru 13 particle, to -1.17 eV for the Ru/Graphene composites, and to -1.54 eV on mesocellular foam carbon. Accordingly, the adsorption energies of benzene are increased from -2.53 eV for the Ru/mesocellular foam carbon composites, to -2.62 eV on freestanding Ru 13 particles, to -2.74 eV on Ru/graphene composites. A similar change in hydrogen adsorption is also observed, and all these can be correlated to the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticle. Thus, Ru nanoparticles graphene composites are expected to exhibit both high stability and superior catalytic performance in hydrogenation of arenes. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. The influence of copper in dealloyed binary platinum–copper electrocatalysts on methanol electroxidation catalytic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poochai, Chatwarin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Veerasai, Waret, E-mail: waret.vee@mahidol.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Somsook, Ekasith [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Dangtip, Somsak [Department of Physics, and NANOTEC COE at Mahidol University, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we prepared and characterized carbon paper-supported dealloyed binary Pt–Cu core–shell electrocatalysts (denoted as Pt{sub x}Cu{sub (100−x)/}CP) by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective copper dealloying in an acidic medium, and we investigated the effect of the copper content in the samples on the catalytic activities toward methanol electroxidation reaction (MOR). X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) indicated that the structure of dealloyed binary Pt–Cu catalysts possessed a Pt-rich shell and a Cu rich core. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) displayed that the oxidation states of Pt and Cu were zero and one, respectively, implying the formation of metallic Pt and Cu{sub 2}O, respectively. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) confirmed that Cu was inserted into a face-centered cubic Pt structure forming Pt–Cu alloys. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) displayed a cubic shape of Pt/CP and a spherical shape of Pt{sub x}Cu{sub (100−x)/}CP with several hundred nanometer sizes of agglomeration that depended on the Cu content. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed to confirm that the sample of Pt{sub 70}Cu{sub 30}/CP exhibited the best catalytic activities in terms of the specific current, current density, catalytic poisoning tolerance, and stability. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Binary electrocatalysts of Pt{sub x}Cu{sub (100−x)}/CP were prepared by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective copper dealloying. • The structures of Pt{sub x}Cu{sub (100−x)}/CP were a Pt rich shell and a Cu rich core. • The Pt{sub 70}Cu{sub 30}/CP was the excellent catalytic activity towards methanol electrooxidation and CO{sub ads} tolerance.

  9. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism. PMID:26980729

  10. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism.

  11. The Ste5 scaffold directs mating signaling by catalytically unlocking the Fus3 MAP kinase for activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Matthew; Tang, Grace; Singleton, Julie; Reményi, Attila; Lim, Wendell A

    2009-03-20

    The scaffold protein Ste5 is required to properly direct signaling through the yeast mating pathway to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Fus3. Scaffolds are thought to function by tethering kinase and substrate in proximity. We find, however, that the previously identified Fus3-binding site on Ste5 is not required for signaling, suggesting an alternative mechanism controls Fus3's activation by the MAPKK Ste7. Reconstituting MAPK signaling in vitro, we find that Fus3 is an intrinsically poor substrate for Ste7, although the related filamentation MAPK, Kss1, is an excellent substrate. We identify and structurally characterize a domain in Ste5 that catalytically unlocks Fus3 for phosphorylation by Ste7. This domain selectively increases the k(cat) of Ste7-->Fus3 phosphorylation but has no effect on Ste7-->Kss1 phosphorylation. The dual requirement for both Ste7 and this Ste5 domain in Fus3 activation explains why Fus3 is selectively activated by the mating pathway and not by other pathways that also utilize Ste7. PMID:19303851

  12. Active site conformational dynamics are coupled to catalysis in the mRNA decapping enzyme Dcp2

    OpenAIRE

    Aglietti, Robin A.; Floor, Stephen N.; McClendon, Chris L.; Matthew P Jacobson; Gross, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Removal of the 5′ cap structure by Dcp2 is a major step in several 5′–3′ mRNA decay pathways. The activity of Dcp2 is enhanced by Dcp1 and bound coactivators, yet the details of how these interactions are linked to chemistry are poorly understood. Here we report three crystal structures of the catalytic Nudix hydrolase domain of Dcp2 that demonstrate binding of a catalytically essential metal ion, and enzyme kinetics are used to identify several key active site residues involved in acid/base ...

  13. Caught in the act: the crystal structure of cleaved cathepsin L bound to the active site of Cathepsin L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowski, Piotr; Turk, Dušan

    2016-04-01

    Cathepsin L is a ubiquitously expressed papain-like cysteine protease involved in the endosomal degradation of proteins and has numerous roles in physiological and pathological processes, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer. Insight into the specificity of cathepsin L is important for elucidating its physiological roles and drug discovery. To study interactions with synthetic ligands, we prepared a presumably inactive mutant and crystallized it. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure determined at 1.4 Å revealed that the cathepsin L molecule is cleaved, with the cleaved region trapped in the active site cleft of the neighboring molecule. Hence, the catalytic mutant demonstrated low levels of catalytic activity. PMID:26992470

  14. Caught in the act: the crystal structure of cleaved cathepsin L bound to the active site of Cathepsin L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowski, Piotr; Turk, Dušan

    2016-04-01

    Cathepsin L is a ubiquitously expressed papain-like cysteine protease involved in the endosomal degradation of proteins and has numerous roles in physiological and pathological processes, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer. Insight into the specificity of cathepsin L is important for elucidating its physiological roles and drug discovery. To study interactions with synthetic ligands, we prepared a presumably inactive mutant and crystallized it. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure determined at 1.4 Å revealed that the cathepsin L molecule is cleaved, with the cleaved region trapped in the active site cleft of the neighboring molecule. Hence, the catalytic mutant demonstrated low levels of catalytic activity.

  15. BET is active on Sellafield site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several companies, all part of BET Plant Services are carrying out work at the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) site at Sellafield, Cumbria, on one of the largest construction projects in Europe. The main development scheme is the THORP (Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant) buildings. One of the BET companies has the contract to paint the inside of the fuel storage ponds. It will also coat the surfaces of the MASWEP (Medium Active Solid Waste Encapsulation Plant) complex. Other work includes insulation and fire prevention installation. Scaffolding at the EARP (Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant) site is being provided on a common user basis so all the contractors can use the scaffolding and share the cost. Temporary office and living accommodation blocks have been provide by another BET company. (author)

  16. Precursor type affecting surface properties and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarubica Aleksandra R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium-hydroxide precursor samples are synthesized from Zr-hydroxide, Zr-nitrate, and Zr-alkoxide, by precipitation/impregnation, as well as by a modified sol-gel method. Precursor samples are further sulphated for the intended SO4 2- content of 4 wt.%, and calcined at 500-700oC. Differences in precursors’ origin and calcination temperature induce the incorporation of SO4 2- groups into ZrO2 matrices by various mechanisms. As a result, different amounts of residual sulphates are coupled with other structural, as well as surface properties, resulting in various catalytic activities of sulphated zirconia samples. Catalyst activity and selectivity are a complex synergistic function of tetragonal phase fraction, sulphates contents, textural and surface characteristics. Superior activity of SZ of alkoxide origin can be explained by a beneficial effect of meso-pores owing to a better accommodation of coke deposits.

  17. Effect of citrate on Aspergillus niger phytase adsorption and catalytic activity in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezeli, Malika; Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney; George, Timothy; Shand, Charlie; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Stutter, Marc; Blackwell, Martin; Darch, Tegan; Wearing, Catherine; Haygarth, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Current developments in cropping systems that promote mobilisation of phytate in agricultural soils, by exploiting plant-root exudation of phytase and organic acids, offer potential for developments in sustainable phosphorus use. However, phytase adsorption to soil particles and phytate complexion has been shown to inhibit phytate dephosphorylation, thereby inhibiting plant P uptake, increasing the risk of this pool contributing to diffuse pollution and reducing the potential benefits of biotechnologies and management strategies aimed to utilise this abundant reserve of 'legacy' phosphorus. Citrate has been seen to increase phytase catalytic efficiency towards complexed forms of phytate, but the mechanisms by which citrate promotes phytase remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated phytase (from Aspergillus niger) inactivation, and change in catalytic properties upon addition to soil and the effect citrate had on adsorption of phytase and hydrolysis towards free, precipitated and adsorbed phytate. A Langmuir model was fitted to phytase adsorption isotherms showing a maximum adsorption of 0.23 nKat g-1 (19 mg protein g-1) and affinity constant of 435 nKat gˉ1 (8.5 mg protein g-1 ), demonstrating that phytase from A.niger showed a relatively low affinity for our test soil (Tayport). Phytases were partially inhibited upon adsorption and the specific activity was of 40.44 nKat mgˉ1 protein for the free enzyme and 25.35 nKat mgˉ1 protein when immobilised. The kinetics of adsorption detailed that most of the adsorption occurred within the first 20 min upon addition to soil. Citrate had no effect on the rate or total amount of phytase adsorption or loss of activity, within the studied citrate concentrations (0-4mM). Free phytases in soil solution and phytase immobilised on soil particles showed optimum activity (>80%) at pH 4.5-5.5. Immobilised phytase showed greater loss of activity at pH levels over 5.5 and lower activities at the secondary peak at pH 2

  18. Photo-catalytic Activities of Plant Hormones on Semiconductor Nanoparticles by Laser-Activated Electron Tunneling and Emitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi2O3)0.07(CoO)0.03(ZnO)0.9 semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated.

  19. Photo-catalytic activities of plant hormones on semiconductor nanoparticles by laser-activated electron tunneling and emitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO₂), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi₂O₃)₀.₀₇(CoO)₀.₀₃(ZnO)₀.₉ semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated.

  20. Molecular dynamics characterization of five pathogenic factor X mutants associated with decreased catalytic activity

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Azeim, Safwat

    2014-11-11

    Factor X (FX) is one of the major players in the blood coagulation cascade. Upon activation to FXa, it converts prothrombin to thrombin, which in turn converts fibrinogen into fibrin (blood clots). FXa deficiency causes hemostasis defects, such as intracranial bleeding, hemathrosis, and gastrointestinal blood loss. Herein, we have analyzed a pool of pathogenic mutations, located in the FXa catalytic domain and directly associated with defects in enzyme catalytic activity. Using chymotrypsinogen numbering, they correspond to D102N, T135M, V160A, G184S, and G197D. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for 1.68 μs on the wild-type and mutated forms of FXa. Overall, our analysis shows that four of the five mutants considered, D102N, T135M, V160A, and G184S, have rigidities higher than those of the wild type, in terms of both overall protein motion and, specifically, subpocket S4 flexibility, while S1 is rather insensitive to the mutation. This acquired rigidity can clearly impact the substrate recognition of the mutants.

  1. Controllable preparation of CeO2 nanostructure materials and their catalytic activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wenjuan; Guo Hongjuan; Liu Chang; Wang Xiaonan

    2012-01-01

    Well-crystalline CeO2 nanostructures with the morphology ofnanorods and nanocubes were synthesized by a template-free hydrothermal method.X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements were employed to characterize the synthesized materials.The reducibility and catalytic activity of nanostructured CeO2 were examined by hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and CO oxidation.The results showed that CeO2 nanorods could be converted into CeO2 nanocubes with the increasing of the reaction time and the hydrothermal temperature,CeO2 nanorods became longer gradually with the increasing of the concentrations of NaOH.H2-TPR characterization demonstrated that the intense low-temperature reduction peak in the CeO2 nanorods indicated the amount of hydrogen consumed is larger than CeO2 nanocubes.Meantime the CeO2 nanorods enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation,the total conversion temperature was 340 ℃.The reasons were that CeO2 nanorods have much smaller crystalline sizes and higher surface areas than CeO2 nanocubes.

  2. Support-shape Dependent Catalytic Activity in Pt/alumina Systems Using USANS/SANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Han, Sugyeong; Ha, Heonphil; Byun, Jiyoung; Kim, Man-ho [KIST, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Pt nanoparticles dispersed on ceramic powder such as alumina and ceria powder are used as catalyst materials to reduce pollution from automobile exhaust, power plant exhaust, etc. Much effort has been put to investigate the relationship between types of catalyst support materials and reactivity of the supported metallic particles. The surface shape of support materials can also be expected to control the catalysts size with the surface shape of support materials. In this presentation, we show our SANS (small angle neutron scattering) -USANS (ultra small angle neutron scattering) analysis on the structural differences of different shapes of the same γ alumina powder with different loadings of Pt nanoparticles. Then, the reactivity of the prepared catalyst materials are presented and discussed based on the investigation of the structure of the support materials by SANS. The shapes of gamma alumina, rod-like or plate-like shape, were determined from nanometer to micrometer with USANS and SANS analysis. We found that the platelet-like alumina consists of an aggregate of 2 - 3 layers, which further reduce specific surface area and catalytic activity compared to rod-like shape. Rod-like shape shows more than 100% enhancement in the catalytic activities in model three-way-catalyst (TWC) reactions of CO, NO, and C{sub 3}H{sub 6} at low temperature around 200 .deg. C.

  3. Peroxidase-like catalytic activities of ionic metalloporphyrins supported on functionalised polystyrene surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mikki V Vinodu; M Padmanabhan

    2001-02-01

    Metalloderivatives of anionic tetrasulphonated tetraphenylporphyrin (MTPPS, M = Mn(III), Fe(III) and Co(III)) were synthesized and immobilized on cationically functionalised divinylbenzene(DVB)-crosslinked polystyrene(PS). These supported catalysts (PS-MTPPS) were found to exhibit peroxidase-like activity. The co-oxidation of 4-aminoantipyrine and phenol by H2O2 was attempted with these catalysts to mimic this enzyme function. The catalytic efficiency of all these immobilized MTPPS was found to be superior to the corresponding unsupported MTPPS in solution. The effect of the central metal ion of the porphyrin, H of the reaction medium and also the temperature effect are investigated. The ideal H was seen to be in the 8 0-8 5 range, with maximum effect at 8 2. The efficiency order for the various PS-MTPPS was seen to be Co>Mn>Fe, with CoTPPS showing efficiency comparable to that of horseradish peroxidase. The catalytic efficiency was found to be increasing with temperature for all the catalysts. The re-usability of these PS-MTPPS systems for peroxidase-like activity was also studied and it was found that they exhibited a very high degree of recyclability without much poisoning.

  4. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara; (Maryland)

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  5. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  6. The photo-catalytic activities of MP (M = Ba, Ca, Cu, Sr, Ag; P = PO43-, HPO42-) microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Shi, Yuanji; Zhao, Zongshan; Song, Weijie; Cheng, Yang

    2014-02-01

    For the good performance of apatite-based materials in the removal of dyes and their environment-friendly advantage, five kinds of apatite microparticles of MP (M = Ba, Ca, Cu, Sr, Ag; P = PO43-, HPO42-) were synthesized by a simple precipitation method and their photo-catalytic properties were invested. Better performance in the decolorization of methyl orange (MO) under the assistance of H2O2 than that of TiO2 were obtained for all the MPs. The photo-catalytic activity was mainly affected by surface area, energy band, impurity, crystallinity and crystal structure. The DFT calculation results demonstrated that the 2p of O and 3p of P in PO43- played the main role in the photo-catalytic process. This work would be helpful to design and synthesize low cost apatite materials with good photo-catalytic performance.

  7. Preparation of a highly active Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst through solid-state ion exchange for the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, M.; Kesore, K.; Moennig, R.; Schwieger, W. [Institut fuer Technische Chemie und Makromolekulare Chemie, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Schlossberg 2, D-06108 Halle/S (Germany); Tissler, A. [ALSI-PENTA Zeolithe GmbH, Alustrasse 50-52, D-92421 Schwandorf (Germany); Turek, T. [Institut fuer Chemische Verfahrenstechnik, Universitaet Karlsruhe TH, Kaiserstrasse 12, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1999-08-16

    This work describes a new and simple preparation method for Fe-ZSM-5 pentasil-zeolites through solid-state ion exchange process. The zeolite catalysts thus prepared exhibit high activity during the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O in the absence of reducing agents. The aimed choice of using FeSO{sub 4}x7H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}-ZSM-5 as starting materials consisted of forming such products (ammonium salts) after the ion exchange process that can be completely removed through thermal treatment. The complete preparation process leading to the formation of catalytically active iron species inside the zeolite takes place in two steps at two distinguished temperatures, respectively. The first step during which the solid-state ion exchange takes place has been carried out through two different routes, in air and in vacuum, in search for an enhanced catalytic activity. The second step has to be necessarily done under anaerobic conditions. XRD measurements have revealed the presence of hematite in samples with a Fe(II)/Al ratio above 0.5. The different numbers of Broensted sites occupied by the iron species in the catalysts with different Fe contents have also been determined

  8. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  9. Construction of a catalytically active iron superoxide dismutase by rational protein design

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Ann L.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Caradonna, John P.

    1997-01-01

    The rational protein design algorithm DEZYMER was used to introduce the active site of nonheme iron superoxide dismutase (SOD) into the hydrophobic interior of the host protein, Escherichia coli thioredoxin (Trx), a protein that does not naturally contain a transition metal-binding site. Reconstitution of the designed protein, Trx-SOD, showed the incorporation of one high-affinity metal-binding site. The electronic spectra of the holoprotein and its N3− and F− adducts are analogous to those p...

  10. Mapping Topoisomerase IV Binding and Activity Sites on the E. coli Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayyed, Hafez; Le Chat, Ludovic; Lebailly, Elise; Vickridge, Elise; Pages, Carine; Cornet, Francois; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco; Espéli, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Catenation links between sister chromatids are formed progressively during DNA replication and are involved in the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. Topo IV is a bacterial type II topoisomerase involved in the removal of catenation links both behind replication forks and after replication during the final separation of sister chromosomes. We have investigated the global DNA-binding and catalytic activity of Topo IV in E. coli using genomic and molecular biology approaches. ChIP-seq revealed that Topo IV interaction with the E. coli chromosome is controlled by DNA replication. During replication, Topo IV has access to most of the genome but only selects a few hundred specific sites for its activity. Local chromatin and gene expression context influence site selection. Moreover strong DNA-binding and catalytic activities are found at the chromosome dimer resolution site, dif, located opposite the origin of replication. We reveal a physical and functional interaction between Topo IV and the XerCD recombinases acting at the dif site. This interaction is modulated by MatP, a protein involved in the organization of the Ter macrodomain. These results show that Topo IV, XerCD/dif and MatP are part of a network dedicated to the final step of chromosome management during the cell cycle. PMID:27171414

  11. REPLACEMENT OF TRYPTOPHAN RESIDUES IN HALOALKANE DEHALOGENASE REDUCES HALIDE BINDING AND CATALYTIC ACTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KENNES, C; PRIES, F; KROOSHOF, GH; BOKMA, E; Kingma, Jacob; JANSSEN, DB

    1995-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenase catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds in short-chain haloalkanes. Two tryptophan residues of the enzyme (Trp125 and Trp175) form a halide-binding site in the active-site cavity, and were proposed to play a role in catalysis. The function of these residues

  12. Non-cell autonomous and non-catalytic activities of ATX in the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raanan eGreenman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The intricate formation of the cerebral cortex requires a well-coordinated series of events, which are regulated at the level of cell-autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Whereas cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate cortical development are well-studied, the non cell-autonomous mechanisms remain poorly understood. A non-biased screen allowed us to identify Autotaxin (ATX as a non cell-autonomous regulator of neural stem cell proliferation. ATX (also known as ENPP2 is best known to catalyze lysophosphatidic acid (LPA production. Our results demonstrate that ATX affects the localization and adhesion of neuronal progenitors in a cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous manner, and strikingly, this activity is independent from its catalytic activity in producing LPA.

  13. Synthesis, Structure and Catalytic Activity Comparison of Tris- and Tetracoordinated Lanthanide Amides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE,Mei-Hua(谢美华); LIU,Xin-Yuan(刘心元); WANG,Shao-Wu(王绍武); LIU,Li(刘莉); WU,Yong-Yong(吴勇勇); YANG,Gao-Sheng(杨高升); ZHOU,Shuang-Liu(周双六); SHENG,En-Hong(盛恩宏); HUANG,Zi-Xiang(黄子祥)

    2004-01-01

    Tetracoordinated lanthanide amides [(Me3Si)2N]3Ln (μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 (Ln=La (1), Pr (2)) were synthesized by the reaction of anhydrous lanthanide(Ⅲ) chlorides LnCl3 (Ln=La, Pr) with 3 equiv. of lithium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide (Me3Si)2NLi in THF, followed by recrystallization from toluene. Sublimation of 1 and 2 afforded the triscoordinate lanthanide amides [(Me3Si)2N]3Ln (Ln =La, Pr). The crystal structure of 2 was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The catalytic activity studies show that the tetracoordinate amides can be used as single-component MMA (methyl methacrylate) polymerization catalysts, while the triscoordinate amides showed poor activity on MMA polymerization under the same conditions.

  14. Catalytic enantioselective OFF ↔ ON activation processes initiated by hydrogen transfer: concepts and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Adrien; Rodriguez, Jean

    2016-08-18

    Hydrogen transfer initiated processes are eco-compatible transformations allowing the reversible OFF ↔ ON activation of otherwise unreactive substrates. The minimization of stoichiometric waste as well as the unique activation modes provided by these transformations make them key players for a greener future for organic synthesis. Long limited to catalytic reactions that form racemic products, considerable progress on the development of strategies for controlling diastereo- and enantioselectivity has been made in the last decade. The aim of this review is to present the different strategies that enable enantioselective transformations of this type and to highlight how they can be used to construct key synthetic building blocks in fewer operations with less waste generation. PMID:27381644

  15. PiZ mouse liver accumulates polyubiquitin conjugates that associate with catalytically active 26S proteasomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Haddock

    Full Text Available Accumulation of aggregation-prone human alpha 1 antitrypsin mutant Z (AT-Z protein in PiZ mouse liver stimulates features of liver injury typical of human alpha 1 antitrypsin type ZZ deficiency, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the 26S proteasome counteracts AT-Z accumulation and plays other roles that, when inhibited, could exacerbate the injury. However, it is unknown how the conditions of AT-Z mediated liver injury affect the 26S proteasome. To address this question, we developed a rapid extraction strategy that preserves polyubiquitin conjugates in the presence of catalytically active 26S proteasomes and allows their separation from deposits of insoluble AT-Z. Compared to WT, PiZ extracts had about 4-fold more polyubiquitin conjugates with no apparent change in the levels of the 26S and 20S proteasomes, and unassembled subunits. The polyubiquitin conjugates had similar affinities to ubiquitin-binding domain of Psmd4 and co-purified with similar amounts of catalytically active 26S complexes. These data show that polyubiquitin conjugates were accumulating despite normal recruitment to catalytically active 26S proteasomes that were available in excess, and suggest that a defect at the 26S proteasome other than compromised binding to polyubiquitin chain or peptidase activity played a role in the accumulation. In support of this idea, PiZ extracts were characterized by high molecular weight, reduction-sensitive forms of selected subunits, including ATPase subunits that unfold substrates and regulate access to proteolytic core. Older WT mice acquired similar alterations, implying that they result from common aspects of oxidative stress. The changes were most pronounced on unassembled subunits, but some subunits were altered even in the 26S proteasomes co-purified with polyubiquitin conjugates. Thus, AT-Z protein aggregates indirectly impair degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins at the level of the 26S

  16. Catalytic activity of Mn-substituted barium hexaaluminates for methane combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The catalysts of hexaaluminate (BaMnxAl12-xO19-δ , x = 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0) to be used in methane combustion have been successfully synthesized by co-precipitation method and supercritical drying. The crystalline structure and surface area of catalyst were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption analysis of BET method. BET analysis revealed that the preparing and drying method proposed here provides stable materials with higher surface area of 51.4 m2/g in comparison to materials prepared using conventional ambient drying method for BaMnxAl12?xO19-δ calcined at 1200℃ under oxygen. XRD analysis indicated that formation of a pure single phase BaMnxAl12-xO19-δ occurred up to x = 3 in the case of Mn-substituted barium hexaaluminates. Incorporation of Mn in excess leads to BaAl2O4 phase formation. As far as the valence state of Manganese ions was concerned, the introduced Mn ions were either divalent or trivalent. The first Mn ions were introduced in the matrix essentially as Mn2+ and only for BaMn3Al9O19-δ does manganese exist exclusively as Mn3+; the higher the Mn concen- tration, the higher the proportion of Mn3+. Catalytic activity for methane combustion has been measured for Mn-substituted barium hexaaluminates, light-off temperature was observed in the 512-624℃ range. The highest activity was obtained for catalysts containing 3 Mn ions per unit cell, which reveals that the BaMnxAl12-xO19-δ catalyst was a promising methane combustion catalyst with high activity and good thermal stability. Temperature programmed reduction (TPR) under hydrogen has been used to correlate the catalytic activity with the amount of easily reducible species.

  17. Evaluation of the Catalytic Activity and Cytotoxicity of Palladium Nanocubes. The Role of Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P.; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photo-excitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,5,3′,5′-tetramethyl-benzidine (TMB), as well as, analyzed the cytotoxic properties of PdNC on HeLa cells. Our findings showed no evidence of singlet oxygen production by PdNC. The nanocubes’ activity is not necessarily linked to activation of oxygen. The oxidation of substrate on PdNC can be a first step followed by PdNC regeneration with oxygen or other oxidant. The catalytic activity of PdNC towards oxidation of TMB is very high and shows direct two-electrons oxidation when the surface of PdNC is clean and the ratio of TMB/PdNC is not very high. Sequential one electron oxidation is observed when the pristine quality of PdNC surface is compromised by serum or uncontrolled impurities and/or the ratio of TMB/PdNC is high. Clean PdNC in serum-free media efficiently induce apoptosis of HeLa cells. It is the primary route of cell death and is associated with hyperpolarization of mitochondria, contrary to a common mitochondrial depolarization initiated by ROS. Again, the effects are very sensitive to how well the pristine surface of PdNC is preserved, suggesting that PdNC can be used as an apoptosis inducing agent but only with appropriate drug delivery system. PMID:25886644

  18. Evaluation of the catalytic activity and cytotoxicity of palladium nanocubes: the role of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Eshan; Curtiss, Jessica; Subedi, Deepak; Chen, Gen; Houston, Jessica P; Smirnov, Sergei

    2015-05-13

    Recently, it has been reported that palladium nanocubes (PdNC) are capable of generating singlet oxygen without photoexcitation simply via chemisorption of molecular oxygen on its surface. Such a trait would make PdNC a highly versatile catalyst suitable in organic synthesis and a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) inducing cancer treatment reagent. Here we thoroughly investigated the catalytic activity of PdNC with respect to their ability to produce singlet oxygen and to oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and analyzed the cytotoxic properties of PdNC on HeLa cells. Our findings showed no evidence of singlet oxygen production by PdNC. The nanocubes' activity is not necessarily linked to activation of oxygen. The oxidation of substrate on PdNC can be a first step, followed by PdNC regeneration with oxygen or other oxidant. The catalytic activity of PdNC toward the oxidation of TMB is very high and shows direct two-electron oxidation when the surface of the PdNC is clean and the ratio of TMB/PdNC is not very high. Sequential one electron oxidation is observed when the pristine quality of PdNC surface is compromised by serum or uncontrolled impurities and/or the ratio of TMB/PdNC is high. Clean PdNC in serum-free media efficiently induce apoptosis of HeLa cells. It is the primary route of cell death and is associated with hyperpolarization of mitochondria, contrary to a common mitochondrial depolarization initiated by ROS. Again, the effects are very sensitive to how well the pristine surface of PdNC is preserved, suggesting that PdNC can be used as an apoptosis inducing agent, but only with appropriate drug delivery system. PMID:25886644

  19. Effect of substrate (ZnO morphology on enzyme immobilization and its catalytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xuelei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO nanocrystals with different morphologies were synthesized and used as substrates for enzyme immobilization. The effects of morphology of ZnO nanocrystals on enzyme immobilization and their catalytic activities were investigated. The ZnO nanocrystals were prepared through a hydrothermal procedure using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a mineralizing agent. The control on the morphology of ZnO nanocrystals was achieved by varying the ratio of CH3OH to H2O, which were used as solvents in the hydrothermal reaction system. The surface of as-prepared ZnO nanoparticles was functionalized with amino groups using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the amino groups on the surface were identified and calculated by FT-IR and the Kaiser assay. Horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on as-modified ZnO nanostructures with glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker. The results showed that three-dimensional nanomultipod is more appropriate for the immobilization of enzyme used further in catalytic reaction.

  20. Effect of substrate (ZnO) morphology on enzyme immobilization and its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Haixia; Huang, Xuelei; Zhang, Jingyan; Guo, Shouwu

    2011-07-01

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals with different morphologies were synthesized and used as substrates for enzyme immobilization. The effects of morphology of ZnO nanocrystals on enzyme immobilization and their catalytic activities were investigated. The ZnO nanocrystals were prepared through a hydrothermal procedure using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a mineralizing agent. The control on the morphology of ZnO nanocrystals was achieved by varying the ratio of CH3OH to H2O, which were used as solvents in the hydrothermal reaction system. The surface of as-prepared ZnO nanoparticles was functionalized with amino groups using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the amino groups on the surface were identified and calculated by FT-IR and the Kaiser assay. Horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on as-modified ZnO nanostructures with glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker. The results showed that three-dimensional nanomultipod is more appropriate for the immobilization of enzyme used further in catalytic reaction.

  1. Antibiotic Binding Drives Catalytic Activation of Aminoglycoside Kinase APH(2″)-Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Shane J; Huang, Yue; Berghuis, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    APH(2″)-Ia is a widely disseminated resistance factor frequently found in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and pathogenic enterococci, where it is constitutively expressed. APH(2″)-Ia confers high-level resistance to gentamicin and related aminoglycosides through phosphorylation of the antibiotic using guanosine triphosphate (GTP) as phosphate donor. We have determined crystal structures of the APH(2″)-Ia in complex with GTP analogs, guanosine diphosphate, and aminoglycosides. These structures collectively demonstrate that aminoglycoside binding to the GTP-bound kinase drives conformational changes that bring distant regions of the protein into contact. These changes in turn drive a switch of the triphosphate cofactor from an inactive, stabilized conformation to a catalytically competent active conformation. This switch has not been previously reported for antibiotic kinases or for the structurally related eukaryotic protein kinases. This catalytic triphosphate switch presents a means by which the enzyme can curtail wasteful hydrolysis of GTP in the absence of aminoglycosides, providing an evolutionary advantage to this enzyme.

  2. Catalytic ozonation of pentachlorophenol in aqueous solutions using granular activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ghorban; Samiee, Fateme; Ahmadian, Mohammad; Poormohammadi, Ali; solimanzadeh, Bahman

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated in this study as a catalyst for the elimination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated streams in a laboratory-scale semi-batch reactor. The influence of important parameters including solution pH (2-10), radical scavenger (tert-butanol, 0.04 mol/L), catalyst dosage (0.416-8.33 g/L), initial PCP concentration (100-1000 mg/L) and ozone flow rate (2.3-12 mg/min) was examined on the efficiency of the catalytic ozonation process (COP) in degradation and mineralization of PCP in aqueous solution. The experimental results showed that catalytic ozonation with GAC was most effective at pH of 8 with ozone flow rate of 12 mg/min and a GAC dosage of 2 g. Compared to the sole ozonation process (SOP), the removal levels of PCP and COP were, 98, and 79 %, respectively. The degradation rate of kinetics was also investigated. The results showed that using a GAC catalyst in the ozonation of PCP produced an 8.33-fold increase in rate kinetic compared to the SOP under optimum conditions. Tert-butanol alcohol (TBA) was used as a radical scavenger. The results demonstrated that COP was affected less by TBA than by SOP. These findings suggested that GAC acts as a suitable catalyst in COP to remove refractory pollutants from aqueous solution.

  3. Improving the catalytic activity of semiconductor nanocrystals through selective domain etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khon, Elena; Lambright, Kelly; Khnayzer, Rony S; Moroz, Pavel; Perera, Dimuthu; Butaeva, Evgeniia; Lambright, Scott; Castellano, Felix N; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    Colloidal chemistry offers an assortment of synthetic tools for tuning the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals. While many nanocrystal architectures can be obtained directly via colloidal growth, other nanoparticle morphologies require alternative processing strategies. Here, we show that chemical etching of colloidal nanoparticles can facilitate the realization of nanocrystal shapes that are topologically inaccessible by hot-injection techniques alone. The present methodology is demonstrated by synthesizing a two-component CdSe/CdS nanoparticle dimer, constructed in a way that both CdSe and CdS semiconductor domains are exposed to the external environment. This structural morphology is highly desirable for catalytic applications as it enables both reductive and oxidative reactions to occur simultaneously on dissimilar nanoparticle surfaces. Hydrogen production tests confirmed the improved catalytic activity of CdSe/CdS dimers, which was enhanced 3-4 times upon etching treatment. We expect that the demonstrated application of etching to shaping of colloidal heteronanocrystals can become a common methodology in the synthesis of charge-separating nanocrystals, leading to advanced nanoparticles architectures for applications in areas of photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and light detection.

  4. The stability and catalytic activity of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Jin-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Xu; Li, Lu; Cheng, Hai-Xia; Su, Yan-Jing; Qian, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of the electronic properties, structural stability and catalytic activity of the W13@Pt42 core-shell structure using the First-principles calculations. The degree of corrosion of W13@Pt42 core-shell structure is simulated in acid solutions and through molecular absorption. The absorption energy of OH for this structure is lower than that for Pt55, which inhibits the poison effect of O containing intermediate. Furthermore we present the optimal path of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42. Corresponding to the process of O molecular decomposition, the rate-limiting step of oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by W13@Pt42 is 0.386 eV, which is lower than that for Pt55 of 0.5 eV. In addition by alloying with W, the core-shell structure reduces the consumption of Pt and enhances the catalytic efficiency, so W13@Pt42 has a promising perspective of industrial application. PMID:27759038

  5. Synthesis and catalytic activity of metallo-organic complexes bearing 5-amino 2-ethylpyridine -2-carboximidate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LUO MEI; XU JIA; ZHANG JING CHENG

    2016-06-01

    A series of copper, cobalt, nickel and manganese complexes were synthesized and characterized. Reaction of 5-amino-2-cyanopyridine with $ MCl_{2}$·x$H_{2}O$ (M: $Cu^{2+}$, $Co^{2+}$, $Ni^{2+}$, $Mn^{2+})$ in anhydrous ethanol resulted in the formation of four complexes $[NH_{2}EtPyCuCl_{2}(CH_{3}OH)].H_{2}O 1$, $[(NH_{2}EtPyHCl)_{3}Co]$$(Cl)_{3}.3H_{2}O 2$, $[(NH_{2}EtPy)_{2}$ 2$(H_{2}O)Ni]$ $(Cl_{2})$ 3, and $[(NH_{2}EtPy)_{2}$ 2$(H_{2}O)$ Mn]$(Cl_{2})$ 4 $[NH_{2} EtPy=5-amino-oethylpyridine-2-carboximidate], respectively. The structures of these compounds were determined by X-raydiffraction, NMR and IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Each complex was then used as a catalyst in the Henry reaction, and its catalytic activity was determined by 1H NMR. Good catalytic effects were achieved (69–87%).

  6. Decreased catalytic activity and altered activation properties of PDE6C mutants associated with autosomal recessive achromatopsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Tanja; Artemyev, Nikolai O; Rosenberg, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the cone photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6C) have been recently reported in patients with autosomal recessive inherited achromatopsia (ACHM) and early-onset cone photoreceptor dysfunction. Here we present the results of a comprehensive...... characterization of six missense mutations applying the baculovirus system to express recombinant mutant and wildtype chimeric PDE6C/PDE5 proteins in Sf9 insect cells. Purified proteins were analyzed using Western blotting, phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity measurements as well as inhibition assays by zaprinast...

  7. Catalytic effect of activated carbon on bioleaching of low-grade primary copper sulfide ores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic effect of activated carbon on the bioleaching of low-grade primary copper sulfide ores using mixture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans was investigated. The results show that the addition of activated carbon can greatly accelerate the rate and efficiency of copper dissolution from low-grade primary copper sulfide ores. The solution with the concentration of 3.0 g/L activated carbon is most beneficial to the dissolution of copper. The resting time of the mixture of activated carbon and ores has an impact on the bioleaching of low-grade primary copper sulfide ores. The 2 d resting time is most favorable to the dissolution of copper. The enhanced dissolution rate and efficiency of copper can be attributed to the galvanic interaction between activated carbon and chalcopyrite. The addition of activated carbon obviously depresses the dissolution of iron and the bacterial oxidation of ferrous ions in solution. The lower redox potentials are more favorable to the copper dissolution than the higher potentials for low-grade primary copper sulfide ores in the presence of activated carbon.

  8. MgATP-concentration dependence of protection of yeast vacuolar V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole supports a bi-site catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgrom, Elena M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210 (United States); Milgrom, Yakov M., E-mail: milgromy@upstate.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210 (United States)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MgATP protects V-ATPase from inactivation by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer V-ATPase activity saturation with MgATP is not sufficient for complete protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results support a bi-site catalytic mechanism for V-ATPase. -- Abstract: Catalytic site occupancy of the yeast vacuolar V-ATPase during ATP hydrolysis in the presence of an ATP-regenerating system was probed using sensitivity of the enzyme to inhibition by 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl). The results show that, regardless of the presence or absence of the proton-motive force across the vacuolar membrane, saturation of V-ATPase activity at increasing MgATP concentrations is accompanied by only partial protection of the enzyme from inhibition by NBD-Cl. Both in the presence and absence of an uncoupler, complete protection of V-ATPase from inhibition by NBD-Cl requires MgATP concentrations that are significantly higher than those expected from the K{sub m} values for MgATP. The results are inconsistent with a tri-site model and support a bi-site model for a mechanism of ATP hydrolysis by V-ATPase.

  9. Role of electrostatics at the catalytic metal binding site in xylose isomerase action: Ca(2+)-inhibition and metal competence in the double mutant D254E/D256E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxreiter, M; Böcskei, Z; Szeibert, A; Szabó, E; Dallmann, G; Naray-Szabo, G; Asboth, B

    1997-06-01

    The catalytic metal binding site of xylose isomerase from Arthrobacter B3728 was modified by protein engineering to diminish the inhibitory effect of Ca2+ and to study the competence of metals on catalysis. To exclude Ca2+ from Site 2 a double mutant D254E/D256E was designed with reduced space available for binding. In order to elucidate structural consequences of the mutation the binary complex of the mutant with Mg2+ as well as ternary complexes with bivalent metal ions and the open-chain inhibitor xylitol were crystallized for x-ray studies. We determined the crystal structures of the ternary complexes containing Mg2+, Mn2+, and Ca2+ at 2.2 to 2.5 A resolutions, and refined them to R factors of 16.3, 16.6, and 19.1, respectively. We found that all metals are liganded by both engineered glutamates as well as by atoms O1 and O2 of the inhibitor. The similarity of the coordination of Ca2+ to that of the cofactors as well as results with Be2+ weaken the assumption that geometry differences should account for the catalytic noncompetence of this ion. Kinetic results of the D254E/D256E mutant enzyme showed that the significant decrease in Ca2+ inhibition was accompanied by a similar reduction in the enzymatic activity. Qualitative argumentation, based on the protein electrostatic potential, indicates that the proximity of the negative side chains to the substrate significantly reduces the electrostatic stabilization of the transition state. Furthermore, due to the smaller size of the catalytic metal site, no water molecule, coordinating the metal, could be observed in ternary complexes of the double mutant. Consequently, the proton shuttle step in the overall mechanism should differ from that in the wild type. These effects can account for the observed decrease in catalytic efficiency of the D254E/D256E mutant enzyme. PMID:9188736

  10. Surface chemistry and catalytic activity of Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} irradiated with high-energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jin [Department of Optometry and Optic Science, Dongshin University, 252 Daeho-Dong, Naju 520-714 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jinjun@dsu.ac.kr; Dhayal, Marshal [Liquid Crystal and Self Assembled Monolayer Section, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. KS Krisnan Marg, New Delhi 120011 (India); Shin, Joong-Hyeok [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dongshin University, 252 Daeho-Dong, Naju 520-714 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Young Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Getoff, Nikola [Department of Nutrition, Section Radiation Biology, University of Vienna, Althanstr. 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2008-05-30

    The radiation effects induced effects by electron beam (EB) treatment on the catalytic activity of Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were studied for the carbon dioxide reforming of methane with different EB energy and absorbed radiation dose. Transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the change in structure and surface states of Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst before and after the EB treatment. Higher energy EB treatment is useful for increasing the proportion of the active sites (such as Ni{sup 0} and NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}-phase) on the surface. The increase of Ni/Al-ratio indicates that the Ni dispersion on the surface increased with the EB-treatment, resulting in an increase of the active sites, which leads to improving the catalytic activity. XPS measurement also showed a decrease of the surface carbon with EB dose. The maximum 20% increase in the conversion of CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}-mixture into CO/H{sub 2} gas was observed for the catalyst treated with 2 MeV energy and 600 kGy dose of EB relative to untreated.

  11. In situ DRIFTS studies on MnOx nanowires supported by activated semi-coke for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zuotai; Liu, Lili; Mi, Liang; Wang, Xidong

    2016-03-01

    To mitigate the threat of NOx on the environment, MnOx nanowires were fabricated on activated semi-coke (MnOx NW/ASC) for the first time. The prepared MnOx NW/ASC was used for the low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3, which achieved an efficiency of over 90% with a low loading content of 1.64 wt% at 150-210 °C. This high performance could be ascribed to synergistic effect between MnOx and ASC. Specifically, the large specific surface area and reducible property of ASC facilitated the dispersion of MnOx and the formation of Mn3+, respectively. Meanwhile, MnOx nanowires provided more redox sites and lattice oxygen species due to the coexistence of Mn3+ and Mn4+, which accelerated the catalytic cycle. The in situ DRIFTS studies revealed that ASC was conducive to the adsorption of NO and NH3. Most importantly, the existence of Mn3+ favored the formation of amide species and the subsequent reduction reaction. Furthermore, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) route between coordinated NH3 and bidentate nitrate was predominating in the SCR process and responsible for the high catalytic activity at low temperature.

  12. Optical Absorption Property and Photo-catalytic Activity of Tin Dioxide-doped Titanium Dioxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Huai-Xiang; XIA,Rong-Hua; JIANG,Zheng-Wei; CHEN,Shan-Shan; CHEN,De-Zhan

    2008-01-01

    SnO2-doped TiO2 films and composite oxide powders have been prepared by a sol-gel method. Ti(OC4H9)4 and SnCl4·5H2O were used as precursors and C2H5OH was used as solvent. The optical absorption measurements indicate that the composite oxide SnO2-TiO2 thin films exhibit smaller optical energy band gaps than pure TiO2 thin films and the optical energy band gap decreases as calcining temperature increases. X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the phase transition for the composite oxide powders at different calcining temperatures. Aanatase phase is the main crystal structure in both pure TiO2 and Sn0.05Ti0.95O2 samples if calcining temperature is below 500℃. The rutile phase has appeared and coexisted with the anatase crystal phase for both pure TiO2 and Sn0.05Ti0.95O2 composite oxides when calcining was at 600℃ . Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows a smaller grain size in Sn0.05Ti0.95O2 powders than TiO2 powders calcined at 600℃. When calcining temperature is 700℃ , there is only rutile phase in Sn0.05Ti0.95O2 samples, but there are still two crystal phases, anatase and rutile, coexisting in the pure TiO2 samples. Assuming the grain growth obeys the first order kinetics, Arrhenius empirical relation has been used to estimate the activation energy of 47.486 and 33.103 kJ·mol-1 for the grain growth of TiO2 and Sn0.05Ti0.95O2, respectively. The photo-catalytic activity of the powder samples has been examined by measuring the degradation of methylene blue solution under ultra-violet irradiation. Two effective factors of photo-catalytic activity namely, the content of SnO2 in the TiO2 samples and the calcining temperature, have been optimized based on the photo-catalytic degradation of methylene blue solution.

  13. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  14. Size-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Palladium Nanoparticles Fabricated in Porous Organic Polymers for Alkene Hydrogenation at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, John; Trinh, Quang Thang; Jana, Avijit; Ng, Wilson Kwok Hung; Borah, Parijat; Hirao, Hajime; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-06-22

    Ultrafine palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) with 8 and 3 nm sizes were effectively fabricated in triazine functionalized porous organic polymer (POP) TRIA that was developed by nonaqueous polymerization of 2,4,6-triallyoxy-1,3,5-triazine. The Pd NPs encapsulated POP (Pd-POP) was fully characterized using several techniques. Further studies revealed an excellent capability of Pd-POP for catalytic transfer hydrogenation of alkenes at room temperature with superior catalytic performance and high selectivity of desired products. Highly flammable H2 gas balloon at high pressure and temperature used in conventional hydrogenation reactions was not needed in the present synthetic system. Catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the size of encapsulated Pd NPs in the POP. The Pd-POP catalyst with Pd NPs of 8 nm in diameter exhibited higher catalytic activity for alkene hydrogenation as compared with the Pd-POP catalyst encapsulating 3 nm Pd NPs. Computational studies were undertaken to gain insights into different catalytic activities of these two Pd-POP catalysts. High reusability and stability as well as no Pd leaching of these Pd-POP catalysts make them highly applicable for hydrogenation reactions at room temperature. PMID:27258184

  15. Rational design of carbon nitride photocatalysts by identification of cyanamide defects as catalytically relevant sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Moudrakovski, Igor; Botari, Tiago; Weinberger, Simon; Mesch, Maria B.; Duppel, Viola; Senker, Jürgen; Blum, Volker; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2016-07-01

    The heptazine-based polymer melon (also known as graphitic carbon nitride, g-C3N4) is a promising photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution. Nonetheless, attempts to improve its inherently low activity are rarely based on rational approaches because of a lack of fundamental understanding of its mechanistic operation. Here we employ molecular heptazine-based model catalysts to identify the cyanamide moiety as a photocatalytically relevant `defect'. We exploit this knowledge for the rational design of a carbon nitride polymer populated with cyanamide groups, yielding a material with 12 and 16 times the hydrogen evolution rate and apparent quantum efficiency (400 nm), respectively, compared with the unmodified melon. Computational modelling and material characterization suggest that this moiety improves coordination (and, in turn, charge transfer kinetics) to the platinum co-catalyst and enhances the separation of the photogenerated charge carriers. The demonstrated knowledge transfer for rational catalyst design presented here provides the conceptual framework for engineering high-performance heptazine-based photocatalysts.

  16. Nanocasted synthesis of the mesostructured LaCoO3 perovskite and its catalytic activity in methane combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangang; Wang, Yanqin; Liu, Xiaohui; Guo, Yun; Guo, Yanglong; Lu, Guanzhong

    2009-02-01

    Extremely high surface area, mesostructured LaCoO3 perovskite has been synthesized by nanocasting from mesoporous cubic (Ia3d) vinyl silica. Thus-prepared material was characterized by XRD, TEM, and N2-sorption, and its catalytic property was also tested in methane combustion. The catalytic results demonstrated that thus-prepared mesostructured LaCoO3 perovskite had higher activity than the conventional bulk LaCoO3 perovskite prepared by citrate method. Further analysis showed that both the high surface area and the existence of high valent cobalt ions (Co4+, XPS analysis) were contributed to the high activity.

  17. On reasons of different catalytic activity of 4B-6B subgroup metallocenedichlorides in carbon monoxide amalgam reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made on catalytic activity of metallocenedichlorides of 4B-6B subgroup elements (Ti, Nb, Mo, W) in carbon monoxide amalgam reduction in THP and DMFA medium. It is shown that the difference in catalytic activity of these elements is conditioned by thermodynamic factors, which dictate impossibility of amalgam reduction of catalyst-substrate complex (4th subgroup), as well as by the difference in stability of corresponding metallocenes (5B and 6B subgroups). Amalgam reduction of CO bounded in complex with metallocene proceeds under conditions of the first electron transfer opposite to potential gradient

  18. Synthesis of novel carbon/silica composites based strong acid catalyst and its catalytic activities for acetalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yueqing Lu; Xuezheng Liang; Chenze Qi

    2012-06-01

    Novel solid acid based on carbon/silica composites are synthesized through one-pot hydrothermal carbonization of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid, sucrose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The novel solid acid owned the acidity of 2.0 mmol/g, much higher than that of the traditional solid acids such as Nafion and Amberlyst-15 (0.8 mmol/g). The catalytic activities of the solid acid are investigated through acetalization. The results showed that the novel solid acid was very efficient for the reactions. The high acidity and catalytic activities made the novel carbon/silica composites based solid acid hold great potential for the green chemical processes.

  19. Catalytic activities enhanced by abundant structural defects and balanced N distribution of N-doped graphene in oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaogong; Shi, Yantao; Guo, Jiahao; Gao, Liguo; Wang, Kai; Du, Yi; Ma, Tingli

    2016-02-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) is a promising candidate for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of fuel cells. However, the catalytic activity of NG is lower than that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline and acidic media. In this study, NG samples were obtained using urea as N source. The structural defects and N distribution in the samples were adjusted by regulating the pyrolysis temperature. The new NG type exhibited remarkable catalytic activities for ORR in both alkaline and acidic media.

  20. iCataly-PseAAC: Identification of Enzymes Catalytic Sites Using Sequence Evolution Information with Grey Model GM (2,1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Hui, Meng-Juan; Liu, Zi; Qiu, Wang-Ren

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes play pivotal roles in most of the biological reaction. The catalytic residues of an enzyme are defined as the amino acids which are directly involved in chemical catalysis; the knowledge of these residues is important for understanding enzyme function. Given an enzyme, which residues are the catalytic sites, and which residues are not? This is the first important problem for in-depth understanding the catalytic mechanism and drug development. With the explosive of protein sequences generated during the post-genomic era, it is highly desirable for both basic research and drug design to develop fast and reliable method for identifying the catalytic sites of enzymes according to their sequences. To address this problem, we proposed a new predictor, called iCataly-PseAAC. In the prediction system, the peptide sample was formulated with sequence evolution information via grey system model GM(2,1). It was observed by the rigorous jackknife test and independent dataset test that iCataly-PseAAC was superior to exist predictions though its only use sequence information. As a user-friendly web server, iCataly-PseAAC is freely accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCataly-PseAAC. A step-by-step guide has been provided on how to use the web server to get the desired results for the convenience of most experimental scientists.

  1. iCataly-PseAAC: Identification of Enzymes Catalytic Sites Using Sequence Evolution Information with Grey Model GM (2,1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Hui, Meng-Juan; Liu, Zi; Qiu, Wang-Ren

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes play pivotal roles in most of the biological reaction. The catalytic residues of an enzyme are defined as the amino acids which are directly involved in chemical catalysis; the knowledge of these residues is important for understanding enzyme function. Given an enzyme, which residues are the catalytic sites, and which residues are not? This is the first important problem for in-depth understanding the catalytic mechanism and drug development. With the explosive of protein sequences generated during the post-genomic era, it is highly desirable for both basic research and drug design to develop fast and reliable method for identifying the catalytic sites of enzymes according to their sequences. To address this problem, we proposed a new predictor, called iCataly-PseAAC. In the prediction system, the peptide sample was formulated with sequence evolution information via grey system model GM(2,1). It was observed by the rigorous jackknife test and independent dataset test that iCataly-PseAAC was superior to exist predictions though its only use sequence information. As a user-friendly web server, iCataly-PseAAC is freely accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCataly-PseAAC. A step-by-step guide has been provided on how to use the web server to get the desired results for the convenience of most experimental scientists. PMID:26077845

  2. Role of the tryptophan residue in the vicinity of the catalytic center of exonuclease III family AP endonucleases: AP site recognition mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneda, Kohichi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Shida, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms by which AP endonucleases recognize AP sites have not yet been determined. Based on our previous study with Escherichia coli exonuclease III (ExoIII), the ExoIII family AP endonucleases probably recognize the DNA-pocket formed at an AP site. The indole ring of a conserved tryptophan residue in the vicinity of the catalytic site presumably intercalates into this pocket. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a series of mutants of ExoIII and human APE1. Trp-212 of ExoIII and Tr...

  3. La{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}Mn{sub 1−y}Co{sub y}O{sub 3} perovskite oxides: Preparation, physico-chemical properties and catalytic activity for the reduction of diesel soot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shaohua; Song, Chonglin, E-mail: songchonglin@tju.edu.cn; Bin, Feng; Lv, Gang; Song, Jinou; Gong, Cairong

    2014-11-14

    La{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}Mn{sub 1−y}Co{sub y}O{sub 3} catalysts were prepared by the “glucose method”. The structures and physico-chemical properties for these catalysts were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), H{sub 2}-temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and O{sub 2}-tempreature-programmed desorption (O{sub 2}-TPD). Results showed that cerium substitution at the A-site in LaMnO{sub 3} produced a CeO{sub 2} phase. The cobalt can be introduced into the B-site in La{sub 0.8}Ce{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} at any substitution ratio because of the similar ionic radii between cobalt and manganese. The catalytic activity for soot combustion in air was evaluated using a TG/DTA analyzer. Cerium substitution at A-site enhances the catalytic activity, while cobalt substitution at B-site inhibits the catalytic activity. The activation energy for soot combustion was calculated using the Horowitz method. The activation energy for non-catalytic soot combustion was 164.1 kJ mol{sup −1}. The addition of catalysts decreased the activation energy by about 26–63 kJ mol{sup −1}. Among the applied catalysts, Ce20Mn exhibited the lowest activation energy (101.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). - Highlights: • Cerium substitution at A-site in Mn100 enhances the catalytic activity. • Cerium substitution leads to the formation of the CeO{sub 2} phase. • Cobalt substitution at B-site in Ce20Mn generally decreases the catalytic activity. • Cerium substitution increases the α-O{sub 2} amount and low-temperature reducibility. • Cobalt substitution decreases the α-O{sub 2} amount and low-temperature reducibility.

  4. Nickel(II) complexes containing thiosemicarbazone and triphenylphosphine: Synthesis, spectroscopy, crystallography and catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyarega, S.; Kalaivani, P.; Prabhakaran, R.; Hashimoto, T.; Endo, A.; Natarajan, K.

    2011-09-01

    Four new Ni(II) complexes of the general formula [Ni(PPh 3)(L)] (L = dibasic tridentate ligand derived from 4-diethylamino-salicylaldehyde and thiosemicarbazide or 4-N-substituted thiosemicarbazide) have been reported. The new complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectroscopic (IR, electronic, 1H NMR and 31P NMR) techniques. Molecular structure of one of the complexes has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The complex, [Ni(PPh 3)(L4)] (H 2L4 = thiosemicarbazone prepared from 4-diethylamino-salicylaldehyde and 4-phenylthiosemicarbazide) crystallized in monoclinic space group with two molecules per unit cell and has the dimensions of a = 13.232(6) Å, b = 10.181(5) Å, c = 13.574(7) Å, α = 90°, β = 98.483(2)° and γ = 90°. Catalytic activity of the complexes has been explored for aryl-aryl coupling reaction.

  5. Catalytic Pyrolyses of Rayon and the Effect on Activated Carbon Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾凡龙; 潘鼎

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic pyrolyses of rayon have been studied respectively by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) when rayon was treated with phosphoric acid (PA), three ammonium phosphate salts and ammonium sulfate (AS). The air is favorable to the catalysis of dibasic ammonium phosphate (DAP), but not to those of ADP, PA, AP, and AS obviously. It is put forward that a peak's shape character can be described with the ratio of height to half-height-width (H/W/2) of the peak on a differential thermo-gravimetric (DTG) curve. A flat cracking peak, presenting a more moderate dehydration reaction, has a smaller ratio and could lead to higher carbonization and activation yields. The experimental results prove this view. According to expectation, the order of catalysis is: DAP≥ADP>PA>AP(>>)AS(>>) no catalyst.

  6. Catalytic activity of polymer-bound Ru(III)–EDTA complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahesh K Dalal; R N Ram

    2001-04-01

    Chloromethylated styrene–divinylbenzene copolymer was chemically modified with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ligand. Catalytically active polymer containing Ru(III) moieties were synthesized from this polymeric ligand. They were characterized using FTIR, UV-vis, SEM, ESR and TGA. Other physico-chemical properties such as bulk density, surface area, moisture content and swelling behaviour in different solvents were also studied. The polymer bound complex was used to study hydrogenation of 1-hexene to -hexane under mild conditions. Influence of [1-hexene], [catalyst], temperature and nature of the solvent on the rate of the reaction was investigated. A rate expression is proposed based on the observed initial rate data. Recycling efficiency of the catalyst has also been studied.

  7. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using renewable Punica granatum juice and study of its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Shib Shankar; Bag, Braja Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Punica granatum juice, a delicious multivitamin drink of great medicinal significance, is rich in different types of phytochemicals, such as terpenoids, alkaloids, sterols, polyphenols, sugars, fatty acids, aromatic compounds, amino acids, tocopherols, etc. We have demonstrated the use of the juice for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at room temperature under very mild conditions. The synthesis of the AuNPs was complete in few minutes and no extra stabilizing or capping agents were necessary. The size of the nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the concentration of the fruit extract. The AuNPs were characterized by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Catalytic activity of the synthesized colloidal AuNPs has also been demonstrated.

  8. Catalytic Activity of Dual Metal Cyanide Complex in Multi-component Coupling Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anaswara RAVINDRAN; Rajendra SRIVASTAVA

    2011-01-01

    Several dual metal cyanide catalysts were prepared from potassium ferrocyanide,metal chloride (where metal =Zn2+,Mn2+,Ni2+,Co2+ and Fe2+),t-butanol (complexing agent) and PEG-4000 (co-complexing agent).The catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis (CHN and X-ray fluorescence),X-ray diffraction,N2 adsorption-desorption,scanning electron microscopy,Fourier-transform infiared spectroscopy,and UV-Visible spectroscopy.The dual metal cyanide catalysts were used in several acid catalyzed multi-component coupling reactions for the synthesis of pharmaceutically important organic derivatives.In all these reactions,the Fe-Fe containing dual metal cyanide catalyst was the best catalyst.The catalysts can be recycled without loss in catalytic activity.The advantage of this method is the use of mild,efficient and reusable catalysts for various reactions,which makes them candidates for commercial use.

  9. Improved Acylation of Phytosterols Catalyzed by Candida Antarctica Lipase a with Superior Catalytic Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panpipat, Worawan; Xu, Xuebing; Guo, Zheng

    approach to synthesize phytosterol ( -sitosterol as a model) fatty acid esters by employing immobilized CAL A which shows a superior catalytic activity to other immobilized lipases including CAL B, Lipozyme NS-40044 TLL and Lipozyme TL IM. CAL A achieves 6-14 times faster esterification of -sitosterol...... be achieved with hexane as solvent, fatty acid (C8-C18)/-sitosterol (1:1, mol:mol), 5-10% CALA load at 40- 50°C for 24h. This work demonstrated the promising potential of CAL A in bioprocess of phytosterols for value-added application....... with myristic acid than other lipases. The effects of enzyme concentration, fatty acid types, substrate molar ratio, reaction temperature and time, and polar/non-polar organic solvents were investigated. A series of -sitosteryl fatty acid esters (C2-C18) have been successfully prepared with structural...

  10. Carbon supported trimetallic nickel-palladium-gold hollow nanoparticles with superior catalytic activity for methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Changshuai; Hong, Wei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, Ni nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared in an aqueous solution by using sodium borohydride as reducing agent. With Ni NPs as the sacrificial template, hollow NiPdAu NPs are successfully prepared via partly galvanic displacement reaction between suitable metal precursors and Ni NPs. The as-synthesized hollow NiPdAu NPs can well dispersed on the carbon substrate. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are taken to analyze the morphology, structure and composition of the as-synthesized catalysts. The prepared catalysts show superior catalytic activity and stability for methanol electrooxidation in alkaline media compared with commercial Pd/C and Pt/C. Catalysts prepared in this work show great potential to be anode catalysts in direct methanol fuel cells.

  11. Palladium nanoparticle anchored polyphosphazene nanotubes: preparation and catalytic activity on aryl coupling reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Devi; A Ashok Kumar; S Sankar; K Dinakaran

    2015-06-01

    Highly accessible-supported palladium (Pd) nanoparticles anchored polyphosphazene (PPZ) nanotubes (NTs) having average diameter of 120 nm were synthesized rapidly at room temperature and homogeneously decorated with Pd nanoparticles. The resultant PPZ–Pd nanocomposites were morphologically and structurally characterized by means of transmission electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Characterization results showed that the Pd nanoparticles with good dispersibility could be well anchored onto the surfaces of the PPZ NTs. The PPZ–Pd NTs show enhanced catalytic activity for the Suzuki coupling of aryl bromides with arylboronic acid. In addition, these PPZ–Pd NTs show excellent behaviour as reusable catalysts of the Suzuki and Heck coupling reactions.

  12. Use of Metallopeptide Based Mimics Demonstrates That the Metalloprotein Nitrile Hydratase Requires Two Oxidized Cysteinates for Catalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.; Callan, P; Amie, J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) are non-heme Fe{sup III} or non-corrin Co{sup III} containing metalloenzymes that possess an N{sub 2}S{sub 3} ligand environment with nitrogen donors derived from amidates and sulfur donors derived from cysteinates. A closely related enzyme is thiocyanate hydrolase (SCNase), which possesses a nearly identical active-site coordination environment as CoNHase. These enzymes are redox inactive and perform hydrolytic reactions; SCNase hydrolyzes thiocyanate anions while NHase converts nitriles into amides. Herein an active CoNHase metallopeptide mimic, [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] (NHase-m1 = AcNH-CCDLP-CGVYD-PA-COOH), that contains Co{sup III} in a similar N{sub 2}S{sub 3} coordination environment as CoNHase is reported. [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] was characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Co-S: 2.21 {angstrom}; Co-N: 1.93 {angstrom}), vibrational, and optical spectroscopies. We find that [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] will perform the catalytic conversion of acrylonitrile into acrylamide with up to 58 turnovers observed after 18 h at 25 C (pH 8.0). FTIR data used in concert with calculated vibrational data (mPWPW91/aug-cc-TZVPP) demonstrates that the active form of [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] has a ligated SO{sub 2} (? = 1091 cm{sup -1}) moiety and a ligated protonated SO(H) (? = 928 cm{sup -1}) moiety; when only one oxygenated cysteinate ligand (i.e., a mono-SO{sub 2} coordination motif) or the bis-SO{sub 2} coordination motif are found within [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] no catalytic activity is observed. Calculations of the thermodynamics of ligand exchange (B3LYP/aug-cc-TZVPP) suggest that the reason for this is that the SO{sub 2}/SO(H) equatorial ligand motif promotes both water dissociation from the Co{sup III}-center and nitrile coordination to the Co{sup III}-center. In contrast, the under- or overoxidized motifs will either strongly favor a five coordinate Co

  13. Catalytic diesel particulate filters reduce the in vitro estrogenic activity of diesel exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, Daniela; Gerecke, Andreas C.; Heeb, Norbert V. [Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Naegeli, Hanspeter [University of Zurich-Vetsuisse, Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Zurich (Switzerland); Zenobi, Renato [ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-04-15

    An in vitro reporter gene assay based on human breast cancer T47D cells (ER-CALUX {sup registered}) was applied to examine the ability of diesel exhaust to induce or inhibit estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated gene expression. Exhaust from a heavy-duty diesel engine was either treated by iron- or copper/iron-catalyzed diesel particulate filters (DPFs) or studied as unfiltered exhaust. Collected samples included particle-bound and semivolatile constituents of diesel exhaust. Our findings show that all of the samples contained compounds that were able to induce ER-mediated gene expression as well as compounds that suppressed the activity of the endogenous hormone 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Estrogenic activity prevailed over antiestrogenic activity. We found an overall ER-mediated activity of 1.63 {+-} 0.31 ng E2 CALUX equivalents (E2-CEQs) per m{sup 3} of unfiltered exhaust. In filtered exhaust, we measured 0.74 {+-} 0.07 (iron-catalyzed DPF) and 0.55 {+-} 0.09 ng E2-CEQ m{sup -3} (copper/iron-catalyzed DPF), corresponding to reductions in estrogenic activity of 55 and 66%, respectively. Our study demonstrates that both catalytic DPFs lowered the ER-mediated endocrine-disrupting potential of diesel exhaust. (orig.)

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Alpha-Exosite of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype/A Inhibit Catalytic Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Fan

    Full Text Available The paralytic disease botulism is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, multi-domain proteins containing a zinc endopeptidase that cleaves the cognate SNARE protein, thereby blocking acetylcholine neurotransmitter release. Antitoxins currently used to treat botulism neutralize circulating BoNT but cannot enter, bind to or neutralize BoNT that has already entered the neuron. The light chain endopeptidase domain (LC of BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A was targeted for generation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that could reverse paralysis resulting from intoxication by BoNT/A. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv libraries from immunized humans and mice were displayed on the surface of yeast, and 19 BoNT/A LC-specific mAbs were isolated by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Affinities of the mAbs for BoNT/A LC ranged from a KD value of 9.0×10-11 M to 3.53×10-8 M (mean KD 5.38×10-9 M and median KD 1.53×10-9 M, as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Eleven mAbs inhibited BoNT/A LC catalytic activity with IC50 values ranging from 8.3 ~73×10-9 M. The fine epitopes of selected mAbs were also mapped by alanine-scanning mutagenesis, revealing that the inhibitory mAbs bound the α-exosite region remote from the BoNT/A LC catalytic center. The results provide mAbs that could prove useful for intracellular reversal of paralysis post-intoxication and further define epitopes that could be targeted by small molecule inhibitors.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  16. An arginine-aspartate network in the active site of bacterial TruB is critical for catalyzing pseudouridine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, Jenna; Leavens, Fern M V; Mercier, Evan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Kothe, Ute

    2014-04-01

    Pseudouridine synthases introduce the most common RNA modification and likely use the same catalytic mechanism. Besides a catalytic aspartate residue, the contributions of other residues for catalysis of pseudouridine formation are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the role of a conserved basic residue in the active site for catalysis using the bacterial pseudouridine synthase TruB targeting U55 in tRNAs. Substitution of arginine 181 with lysine results in a 2500-fold reduction of TruB's catalytic rate without affecting tRNA binding. Furthermore, we analyzed the function of a second-shell aspartate residue (D90) that is conserved in all TruB enzymes and interacts with C56 of tRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical and kinetic studies reveal that this residue is not critical for substrate binding but influences catalysis significantly as replacement of D90 with glutamate or asparagine reduces the catalytic rate 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of TruB wild type and TruB D90N, we propose an electrostatic network composed of the catalytic aspartate (D48), R181 and D90 that is important for catalysis by fine-tuning the D48-R181 interaction. Conserved, negatively charged residues similar to D90 are found in a number of pseudouridine synthases, suggesting that this might be a general mechanism.

  17. Catalytic activity of various pepsin reduced Au nanostructures towards reduction of nitroarenes and resazurin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepsin, a digestive protease enzyme, could function as a reducing as well as stabilizing agent for the synthesis of Au nanostructures of various size and shape under different reaction conditions. The simple tuning of the pH of the reaction medium led to the formation of spherical Au nanoparticles, anisotropic Au nanostructures such as triangles, hexagons, etc., as well as ultra small fluorescent Au nanoclusters. The activity of the enzyme was significantly inhibited after its participation in the formation of Au nanoparticles due to conformational changes in the native structure of the enzyme which was studied by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and infra red spectroscopy. However, the Au nanoparticle-enzyme composites served as excellent catalyst for the reduction of p-nitrophenol and resazurin, with the catalytic activity varying with size and shape of the nanoparticles. The presence of pepsin as the surface stabilizer played a crucial role in the activity of the Au nanoparticles as reduction catalysts, as the approach of the reacting molecules to the nanoparticle surface was actively controlled by the stabilizing enzyme

  18. Catalytic activity of various pepsin reduced Au nanostructures towards reduction of nitroarenes and resazurin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Bhagwati; Mandani, Sonam; Sarma, Tridib K., E-mail: tridib@iiti.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Chemistry, School of Basic Sciences (India)

    2015-01-15

    Pepsin, a digestive protease enzyme, could function as a reducing as well as stabilizing agent for the synthesis of Au nanostructures of various size and shape under different reaction conditions. The simple tuning of the pH of the reaction medium led to the formation of spherical Au nanoparticles, anisotropic Au nanostructures such as triangles, hexagons, etc., as well as ultra small fluorescent Au nanoclusters. The activity of the enzyme was significantly inhibited after its participation in the formation of Au nanoparticles due to conformational changes in the native structure of the enzyme which was studied by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and infra red spectroscopy. However, the Au nanoparticle-enzyme composites served as excellent catalyst for the reduction of p-nitrophenol and resazurin, with the catalytic activity varying with size and shape of the nanoparticles. The presence of pepsin as the surface stabilizer played a crucial role in the activity of the Au nanoparticles as reduction catalysts, as the approach of the reacting molecules to the nanoparticle surface was actively controlled by the stabilizing enzyme.

  19. Surface structure and catalytic activity of electrodeposited Ni-Fe-Co-Mo alloy electrode by partially leaching Mo and Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Bei-ping; GONG Zhu-qing; REN Bi-ye; YANG Yu-fang; CHEN Meng-jun

    2006-01-01

    Ni-Fe-Mo-Co alloy electrode was prepared in a citrate solution by electrodeposition, and then Mo and Fe were partially leached out from the electrode in 30% KOH solution. The unique surface micromorphology of a hive-like structure was obtained with an average pore size of about 50 nm. The electrode has a very large real surface area and a stable structure. The effects of sodium molybdate concentration on the composition, surface morphology, and structure of electrodes were analyzed by EDS, SEM and XRD. The polarization curves of the different electrodes show that the catalytic activity of electrodes is strongly correlated with the mole fraction of alloy elements (Ni, Fe, Mo, Co), and the addition of cobalt element to Ni-Fe-Mo alloy improves the catalytic activity. The Ni35.63Fe24.67Mo23.52Co16.18 electrode has the best activity for hydrogen evolution reaction(HER), with an over-potential of 66.2 mV, in 30% KOH at 80 ℃ and 200 mA/cm2. The alloy maintains its good catalytic activity for HER during continuous or intermittent electrolysis. Its electrochemical activity and catalytic stability are much higher than the other iron-group with Mo alloy electrodes.

  20. Crystal structure of the outer membrane protease OmpT from Escherichia coli suggests a novel catalytic site

    OpenAIRE

    Vandeputte-Rutten, Lucy; Kramer, R. Arjen; Kroon, Jan; Dekker, Niek; Egmond, Maarten R.; Gros, Piet

    2001-01-01

    OmpT from Escherichia coli belongs to a family of highly homologous outer membrane proteases, known as omptins, which are implicated in the virulence of several pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Here we present the crystal structure of OmpT, which shows a 10-stranded antiparallel β-barrel that protrudes far from the lipid bilayer into the extracellular space. We identified a putative binding site for lipopolysaccharide, a molecule that is essential for OmpT activity. The proteolytic site is ...

  1. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  2. An Alternate Splicing Variant of the Human Telomerase Catalytic Subunit Inhibits Telomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Yi

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase, adds telomeric repeats to chromosome ends. In normal human somatic cells, telomerase is repressed and telomeres progressively shorten, leading to proliferative senescence. Introduction of the telomerase (hTERT cDNA is sufficient to produce telomerase activity and immortalize normal human cells, suggesting that the repression of telomerase activity is transcriptional. The telomerase transcript has been shown to have at least six alternate splicing sites (four insertion sites and two deletion sites, and variants containing both or either of the deletion sites are present during development and in a panel of cancer cell lines we surveyed. One deletion (β site and all four insertions cause premature translation terminations, whereas the other deletion (α site is 36 by and lies within reverse transcriptase (RT motif A, suggesting that this deletion variant may be a candidate as a dominant-negative inhibitor of telomerase. We have cloned three alternately spliced hTERT variants that contain the α,β or both α and,β deletion sites. These alternate splicing variants along with empty vector and wild-type hTERT were introduced into normal human fibroblasts and several telomerase-positive immortal and tumor cell lines. Expression of the α site deletion variant (hTERT α− construct was confirmed by Western blotting. We found that none of the three alternate splicing variants reconstitutes telomerase activity in fibroblasts. However, hTERT α− inhibits telomerase activities in telomerase-positive cells, causes telomere shortening and eventually cell death. This alternately spliced dominant-negative variant may be important in understanding telomerase regulation during development, differentiation and in cancer progression.

  3. Elastase-like Activity Is Dominant to Chymotrypsin-like Activity in 20S Proteasome's β5 Catalytic Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensinger, Dennis; Neumann, Theresa; Scholz, Christoph; Voss, Constantin; Knorr, Sabine; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Hamacher, Kay; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Schmidt, Boris

    2016-07-15

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system is the major protein degradation pathway in eukaryotes with several key catalytic cores. Targeting the β5 subunit with small-molecule inhibitors is an established therapeutic strategy for hematologic cancers. Herein, we report a mouse-trap-like conformational change that influences molecular recognition depending on the substitution pattern of a bound ligand. Variation of the size of P1 residues from the highly β5-selective proteasome inhibitor BSc2118 allows for discrimination between inhibitory strength and substrate conversion. We found that increasing molecular size strengthens inhibition, whereas decreasing P1 size accelerates substrate conversion. Evaluation of substrate hydrolysis after silencing of β5 activity reveals significant residual activity for large residues exclusively. Thus, classification of the β5 subunit as chymotrypsin-like and the use of the standard tyrosine-containing substrate should be reconsidered. PMID:27111844

  4. "Hydro-metathesis" of olefins: A catalytic reaction using a bifunctional single-site tantalum hydride catalyst supported on fibrous silica (KCC-1) nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-02-18

    Tantalizing hydrocarbons: Tantalum hydride supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) catalyzes, in the presence of hydrogen, the direct conversion of olefins into alkanes that have higher and lower numbers of carbon atoms (see scheme). This catalyst shows remarkable catalytic activity and stability, with excellent potential of regeneration. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Evaluation of Performance Catalytic Ozonation Process with Activated Carbon in the Removal of Humic Acids from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Asgari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In recent years, the use of alternative disinfectants and the control of natural organic matters are two approaches that are typically applied in water treatment utilities to reduce the formation of chlorinated disinfection by-products. Catalytic ozonation is a new technology used to promote the efficiency of ozonation. The goal of this study was to survey the feasibility application of activated carbon as a catalyst in ozonation process for removal of humic acids from aqueous solution. Materials & Methods: This experimental study has been done in laboratory of water and wastewater chemistry, Tarbiat Modarres University. The solid structure and chemical composition of activated carbon were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF. Ozonation and catalytic ozonation experiments were performed in a semi-batch reactor and the mass of ozone produced was measured by iodometric titration methods. Concentration changes of humic acid in samples with a concentration of 15 mg/l were determined by using spectrophotometer at an absorbance wavelength of 254 nm. To evaluate the performance of catalytic ozonation in humic acid removal, total organic carbon and trihalomethane formation potential were evaluated and the results were analyzed by Excel software. Results: Catalytic ozone results showed that using activated carbon as a catalyst increased humic acid decomposition up to 11 times and removal efficiency increased with increasing pH (4-12 and catalyst dosage (0.25-1.5 g/250cc. The experimental results showed that catalytic ozonation was most effective in less time (10 min with considerable efficiency (95% compared to the sole ozonation process (SOP. Conclusion: The results indicated that the catalytic ozonation process, compared to SOP, was less affected by radical scavenger, and total organic carbon, and trihalomethane formation potential removal achieved were 30% and 83%, respectively. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2011;17(4:25-33

  6. Species active in the selective catalytic reduction of no with iso-butane on iron-exchanged ZSM-5 zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Batista

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Fe-ZSM-5 catalysts were prepared by ion exchange in aqueous medium or in the solid state and tested in the catalytic reduction of NO with iso-butane. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES, EXAFS, temperature-programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MÖS-S were used for sample characterisation. Irrespective of the method used in catalyst preparation, EPR, XANES and MÖS-S showed Fe atoms in the oxidation state of 3+. MÖS-S and H2-TPR data on Fe-ZSM-5 prepared by ion exchange in the solid state allowed quantification of a lower hematite (Fe2O3 concentration and a higher proportion of Fe cations than samples prepared in an aqueous medium. In all the catalysts studied these Fe cations were the active sites in the reduction of NO to N2 and in the oxidation of iso-butane. It is further suggested that coordination of Fe species is another important aspect to be considered in their behaviour.

  7. The origins of enhanced activity in factor VIIa analogs and the interplay between key allosteric sites revealed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Andersen, Mette D; Olsen, Ole H;

    2008-01-01

    to investigate the conformational effects of site-directed mutagenesis at key positions in FVIIa and the origins of enhanced intrinsic activity of FVIIa analogs. The differences in hydrogen exchange of two highly active variants, FVIIa(DVQ) and FVIIa(VEAY), imply that enhanced catalytic efficiency was attained...

  8. Enhancing the Activity of Peptide-Based Artificial Hydrolase with Catalytic Ser/His/Asp Triad and Molecular Imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengfan; Lv, Yuqi; Liu, Xiaojing; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an artificial hydrolase was developed by combining the catalytic Ser/His/Asp triad with N-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl diphenylalanine (Fmoc-FF), followed by coassembly of the peptides into nanofibers (CoA-HSD). The peptide-based nanofibers provide an ideal supramolecular framework to support the functional groups. Compared with the self-assembled catalytic nanofibers (SA-H), which contain only the catalytic histidine residue, the highest activity of CoA-HSD occurs when histidine, serine, and aspartate residues are at a ratio of 40:1:1. This indicates that the well-ordered nanofiber structure and the synergistic effects of serine and aspartate residues contribute to the enhancement in activity. Additionally, for the first time, molecular imprinting was applied to further enhance the activity of the peptide-based artificial enzyme (CoA-HSD). p-NPA was used as the molecular template to arrange the catalytic Ser/His/Asp triad residues in the proper orientation. As a result, the activity of imprinted coassembled CoA-HSD nanofibers is 7.86 times greater than that of nonimprinted CoA-HSD and 13.48 times that of SA-H. PMID:27191381

  9. Fabrication and Catalytic Activity of Thermally Stable Gold Nanoparticles on Ultrastable Y (USY Zeolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Iida

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Au was deposited on ultrastable Y (USY zeolites using an ion-exchange method. Up to 5.5 wt% Au was introduced into the NH4-form of USY zeolites. In contrast, deposition of Au hardly took place on the H- and Na-forms of Y-type zeolites, NH4-forms of mordenite, and ZSM-5. Treatment of the Au-loaded USY zeolite in a H2 atmosphere, afforded Au0 nanoparticles. These particles were thermally stable even at 973 K, where their mean particle diameter was 3.7 nm. In contrast, highly aggregated Au particles were observed after thermal treatment at temperatures lower than 523 K, followed by storage in air for a month. The resulting particle sizes were in good correlation with the IR band intensity of the adsorbed CO and the catalytic activity of Au in the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol. The Au nanoparticles showed highest activity when the Au/USY zeolite was thermally treated at 673–973 K. A negligible deactivation was observed after repeating the reaction at least 12 times. In the case of Au/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the deposition-precipitation method, the highest activity was observed at 573 K, which was lower than the temperature used for the Au/USY zeolites. This study demonstrated the potential use of the NH4-form of USY zeolites for supporting Au.

  10. Antitumour, antimicrobial and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles synthesized by different pH propolis extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatea, Florentina; Teodor, Eugenia Dumitra, E-mail: eu-teodor@yahoo.com [National Institute for Biological Sciences, Centre of Bioanalysis (Romania); Seciu, Ana-Maria [National Institute for Biological Sciences, Cellular and Molecular Biology Department (Romania); Covaci, Ovidiu Ilie [SARA Pharm Solutions (Romania); Mănoiu, Sorin [National Institute for Biological Sciences, Cellular and Molecular Biology Department (Romania); Lazăr, Veronica [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Biology (Romania); Radu, Gabriel Lucian [University “Politehnica” Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science (Romania)

    2015-07-15

    The Romanian propolis was extracted in five different media, respectively, in water (pH 6.8), glycine buffer (pH 2.5), acetate buffer (pH 5), phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and carbonate buffer (pH 9.2). The extracts presented different amounts of flavonoids and phenolic acids, increasing pH leading to higher concentrations of active compounds. Five variants of gold nanoparticles suspensions based on different pH Romanian propolis aqueous extracts were successfully synthesized. The obtained nanoparticles presented dimensions between 20 and 60 nm in dispersion form and around 18 nm in dried form, and different morphologies (spherical, hexagonal, triangular). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy proved the attachment of organic compounds from propolis extracts to the colloidal gold suspensions and X-ray diffraction certified that the suspensions contain metallic gold. The obtained propolis gold nanoparticles do not exhibit any antibacterial or antifungal activity, but presented different catalytic activities and toxicity on tumour cells.

  11. Mechanism of TRIM25 Catalytic Activation in the Antiviral RIG-I Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jacint G; Chiang, Jessica J; Sparrer, Konstantin M J; Alam, Steven L; Chi, Michael; Roganowicz, Marcin D; Sankaran, Banumathi; Gack, Michaela U; Pornillos, Owen

    2016-08-01

    Antiviral response pathways induce interferon by higher-order assembly of signaling complexes called signalosomes. Assembly of the RIG-I signalosome is regulated by K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are synthesized by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM25. We have previously shown that the TRIM25 coiled-coil domain is a stable, antiparallel dimer that positions two catalytic RING domains on opposite ends of an elongated rod. We now show that the RING domain is a separate self-association motif that engages ubiquitin-conjugated E2 enzymes as a dimer. RING dimerization is required for catalysis, TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination, interferon induction, and antiviral activity. We also provide evidence that RING dimerization and E3 ligase activity are promoted by binding of the TRIM25 SPRY domain to the RIG-I effector domain. These results indicate that TRIM25 actively participates in higher-order assembly of the RIG-I signalosome and helps to fine-tune the efficiency of the RIG-I-mediated antiviral response. PMID:27425606

  12. Antitumour, antimicrobial and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles synthesized by different pH propolis extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Romanian propolis was extracted in five different media, respectively, in water (pH 6.8), glycine buffer (pH 2.5), acetate buffer (pH 5), phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and carbonate buffer (pH 9.2). The extracts presented different amounts of flavonoids and phenolic acids, increasing pH leading to higher concentrations of active compounds. Five variants of gold nanoparticles suspensions based on different pH Romanian propolis aqueous extracts were successfully synthesized. The obtained nanoparticles presented dimensions between 20 and 60 nm in dispersion form and around 18 nm in dried form, and different morphologies (spherical, hexagonal, triangular). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy proved the attachment of organic compounds from propolis extracts to the colloidal gold suspensions and X-ray diffraction certified that the suspensions contain metallic gold. The obtained propolis gold nanoparticles do not exhibit any antibacterial or antifungal activity, but presented different catalytic activities and toxicity on tumour cells

  13. Synthesis and bio-catalytic activity of isostructural cobalt(III)-phenanthroline complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhananjay Dey; Arnab Basu Roy; Anandan Ranjani; Loganathan Gayathri; Saravanan Chandraleka; Dharumadurai Dhanasekaran; Mohammad Abdulkader Akbarsha; Chung-Yu Shen; Hui-Lien Tsai; Milan Maji; Niranjan Kole; Bhaskar Biswas

    2015-04-01

    We have synthesized two isostructural mononuclear cobalt(III) complexes [1]NO3·3H2O and [1]NO3·CH3CO2H·H2O {[1]+ = [Co(1,10-phenanthroline)2Cl2]+} and characterized by single crystal X-ray structural analyses. Mass spectral studies of the complexes indicate both the compounds to produce identical cationic species viz., [Co(phen)2Cl2]+ in methanol solution. [1]+ has been evaluated as model system for the catechol oxidase enzyme by using 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) as the substrate in methanol medium, which revealed that the cationic complex efficiently inhibits catalytic activity with kcat value 9.65 × 102 h−1. [1]+ cleaved pBR 322 DNA without addition of an activating agent. Further, the anti-cancer activity of [1]+ on human hepatocarcinoma cell line (HepG2) has been examined. The induction of apoptosis induced in the cell line was assessed base on the changes in cell morphology, which showed the efficacy of [1]+ to induce apoptosis in 53% of cells during 24 h treatment. Interestingly, the observed IC50 values reveal that [1]+ brings about conformational change on DNA strongly and exhibits remarkable cytotoxicity.

  14. Site-directed mutation of a laccase from Thermus thermophilus: Effect on the activity profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A site-directed mutant R453T of a laccase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 (Tth-laccase was constructed in order to investigate the effect on laccase catalytic properties. The mutated gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Nickel-affinity purification was achieved and followed by copper ion incorporation. The mature mutated enzyme was quantitatively equal to the wild type. A photometric assay based on the oxidation of the substrate 2,2-azino-bis-(3- ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS was employed in comparison with the wild-type Tth-laccase on catalytic properties. The R453T mutant exhibited improvement in substrate affinity and specific activity at room temperature, whereas those parameters were not significantly influenced when the temperature increased up to 65°C or higher. The mutant had better catalytic activity than that of the wild type at acidic pH. Investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy, the mutant Tth-laccase displayed similar profiles at low and high temperatures.

  15. Immobilized Cu (II)—Amino Acid Complexes as Prospective Highly Efficient Catalytic Materials: Synthesis, Structural Characterization and Catalytic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálinkó, István; Ordasi, Adrien; Kiss, János T.; Labádi, Imre

    2008-11-01

    In this work the covalent anchoring of N-or C-protected Cu(II)—L-tyrosine complexes onto a swellable resin or surface-modified silica gel is described. Experimental conditions (solvents, the availability of ligands) of the synthesis were varied; the structures (by IR spectroscopy) and the superoxide dismutase activities of the anchored complexes were studied.

  16. Structure and catalytic activities of ferrous centers confined on the interface between carbon nanotubes and humic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongqi; Yin, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hanqing; Gao, Xingfa; Zhang, Jing; Ibrahim, Kurash; Chai, Zhifang; Feng, Weiyue; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C&z.dbd;C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the ferrous sites. The experimental and theoretical results revealed octahedrally/tetrahedrally coordinated geometry at Fe centers, and the strong hybridization between CNT C π* and Fe 3d orbitals induces discretization of the atomic charges on aromatic rings of CNTs, which facilitates O2 adsorption and electron transfer from carbon to O2, which enhances O2 activation. The O2 activation by the novel HA/Fe-CNT complex can be applied in the oxidative degradation of phenol red (PR) and bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous media.Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C&z.dbd;C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the

  17. Facile Synthesis of Fe-Doped Titanate Nano tubes with Enhanced Photo catalytic Activity for Castor Oil Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron-doped titanate nano tubes were synthesized by hydrothermal method, and the photo catalytic activity was greatly enhanced by iron doping. Followed by the discovery of carbon nano tubes, synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) nano materials has attracted great interest because of their exceptional electrical and mechanical properties [1-4]. Some inorganic 1D nano materials including ZnO, VOx, and TiO2 have been synthesized in recent years [5-8]. Among these materials, titanic compound nanotubes have stimulated particular interest. Titanic nano crystals have been extensively studied in photo catalytic or photoelectrochemical systems and so forth [9-12], and fabrication of tubular structures offers an effective approach to adjust their properties, which are crucial in practical applications. For example, the photo catalytic activity of TiO2 could be enhanced by the tubular structures because of their large specific surface, which leads to a higher potential of applications in environmental purification and generation of hydrogen gas and so forth [13]. Recently, particular interest is devoted to obtain H2Ti3O7-type nano tubes synthesized by hydrothermal method [14-16], and these nano tubes show excellent ion-exchange ability and photo catalytic activities and may be applied to photo catalysis, photoluminescence, and dye-sensitized solar cells [3]. However, their structures are still not well understood. The photo catalytic property is originated from the charge carriers produced by the excitation process on the particle surface, and the photo catalytic efficiency is determined by the transfer rate and recombination rate of carriers [17]. However, the carriers are usually unstable and easy to recombine. To improve the photo catalytic efficiency, the transfer rate must be enhanced and recombination rate should be reduced. Introducing other elements especially the transition metal ions into the matrix has been proved to be an effective method to improve the photo catalytic

  18. Catalytic Activity of Mono- and Bi-Metallic Nanoparticles Synthesized via Microemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Y.G. König

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Water-in-oil (w/o microemulsions were used as a template for the synthesis of mono- and bi-metallic nanoparticles. For that purpose, w/o-microemulsions containing H2PtCl6, H2PtCl6 + Pb(NO32 and H2PtCl6 + Bi(NO3, respectively, were mixed with a w/o-microemulsion containing the reducing agent, NaBH4. The results revealed that it is possible to synthesize Pt, PtPb and PtBi nanoparticles of ~3–8 nm in diameter at temperatures of about 30°C. The catalytic properties of the bimetallic PtBi and PtPb nanoparticles were studied and compared with monometallic platinum nanoparticles. Firstly, the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid to carbon monoxide was investigated, and it was found that the resistance of the PtBi and PtPb nanoparticles against the catalyst-poisoning carbon monoxide was significantly higher compared to the Pt nanoparticles. Secondly, investigating the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol,we found that the bimetallic NPs are most active at 23 °C, while the order of the activity changes at higher temperatures, i.e., that the Pt nanoparticles are the most active ones at 36 and 49 °C. Furthermore, we observed a strong influence of the support, which was either a polymer or Al2O3. Thirdly, for the hydrogenation of allylbenzene to propylbenzene, the monometallic Pt NPs turned out to be the most active catalysts, followed by the PtPb and PtBi NPs. Comparing the two bimetallic nanoparticles, one sees that the PtPb NPs are significantly more active than the respective PtBi NPs.

  19. A remote palm domain residue of RB69 DNA polymerase is critical for enzyme activity and influences the conformation of the active site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Jacewicz

    Full Text Available Non-conserved amino acids that are far removed from the active site can sometimes have an unexpected effect on enzyme catalysis. We have investigated the effects of alanine replacement of residues distant from the active site of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase, and identified a substitution in a weakly conserved palm residue (D714A, that renders the enzyme incapable of sustaining phage replication in vivo. D714, located several angstroms away from the active site, does not contact the DNA or the incoming dNTP, and our apoenzyme and ternary crystal structures of the Pol(D714A mutant demonstrate that D714A does not affect the overall structure of the protein. The structures reveal a conformational change of several amino acid side chains, which cascade out from the site of the substitution towards the catalytic center, substantially perturbing the geometry of the active site. Consistent with these structural observations, the mutant has a significantly reduced k pol for correct incorporation. We propose that the observed structural changes underlie the severe polymerization defect and thus D714 is a remote, non-catalytic residue that is nevertheless critical for maintaining an optimal active site conformation. This represents a striking example of an action-at-a-distance interaction.

  20. Small molecule regulation of self-association and catalytic activity in a supramolecular coordination complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuirk, C Michael; Stern, Charlotte L; Mirkin, Chad A

    2014-03-26

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of the first weak-link approach (WLA) supramolecular construct that employs the small molecule regulation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions for the in situ control of catalytic activity. A biaryl urea group, prone to self-aggregation, was functionalized with a phosphinoalkyl thioether (P,S) hemilabile moiety and incorporated into a homoligated Pt(II) tweezer WLA complex. This urea-containing construct, which has been characterized by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study, can be switched in situ from a rigid fully closed state to a flexible semiopen state via Cl(-) induced changes in the coordination mode at the Pt(II) structural node. FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy studies were used to demonstrate that while extensive urea self-association persists in the flexible semiopen complex, these interactions are deterred in the rigid, fully closed complex because of geometric and steric restraints. Consequently, the urea moieties in the fully closed complex are able to catalyze a Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and methyl vinyl ketone to generate 2-acetyl-5-norbornene. The free urea ligand and the semiopen complex show no such activity. The successful incorporation and regulation of a hydrogen bond donating catalyst in a WLA construct open the doors to a vast and rapidly growing catalogue of allosteric catalysts for applications in the detection and amplification of organic analytes.

  1. Microwave-assisted facile green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and spectroscopic investigation of the catalytic activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siby Joseph; Beena Mathew

    2015-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized in aqueous medium by a green, rapid and costefficient synthetic approach based on microwave irradiation. In this study, iota-carrageenan (I-carrageenan) is used both as reducing and stabilizing agent. The formation of nanoparticles is determined using UV–vis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and high-resolution-transmission electron microscopic (HR-TEM) analysis. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images show that the nanoparticles are of spherical shape with an average diameter of 18.2 nm. I-carrageenan-stabilized silver nanoparticles show outstanding catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol in the presence of NaBH4 in aqueous medium. The reaction follows pseudo-first-order kinetics and the reaction rate increases with the increase in amount of the catalyst. The study of the temperature dependence of reaction rate gives activation energy of 42.81 kJ mol−1. The synthesized silver nanoparticles are anticipated to be a promising material for pollution abatement.

  2. Improved acylation of phytosterols catalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase A with superior catalytic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panpipat, Worawan; Xu, Xuebing; Guo, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    This work reported a novel approach to synthesize phytosterol (ˇ-sitosterol as a model) fatty acid esters by employing Candida antarctica lipase A (CAL A) which shows a superior catalytic activity to other lipases. A series of ˇ-sitosteryl fatty acid esters (C2–C18) have been successfully prepared...... with structural identification of products by 1H NMR and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Compared to other immobilized lipases, CAL A achieves 6–14 times faster esterification of ˇ-sitosterol with myristic acid. CAL A shows low activity toward short chain fatty acids (C2–C6), and remarkably high...... spectrum of log P values, was observed. 93–98% yield of ˇ-sitosteryl esters could be achieved with hexane as solvent, fatty acid (C8–C18)/ˇ-sitosterol (1:1, mol:mol), 5–10% CAL A load at 40–50 ◦C for 24 h. This work demonstrated the promising potential of CAL A in bioprocess of phytosterols for value...

  3. Structure of the Photo-catalytically Active Surface of SrTiO 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaza, Manuel; Huang, Xin; Ko, J. Y. Peter; Shen, Mei; Simpson, Burton H.; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Ritzert, Nicole L.; Letchworth-Weaver, Kendra; Gunceler, Deniz; Schlom, Darrell G.; Arias, Tomás A.; Brock, Joel D.; Abruña, Héctor D.

    2016-06-29

    A major goal of energy research is to use visible light to cleave water directly, without an applied voltage, into hydrogen and oxygen. Although SrTiO3 requires ultraviolet light, after four decades, it is still the "gold standard" for the photo-catalytic splitting of water. It is chemically robust and can carry out both hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions without an applied bias. While ultrahigh vacuum surface science techniques have provided useful insights, we still know relatively little about the structure of these electrodes in contact with electrolytes under operating conditions. Here, we report the surface structure evolution of a n-SrTiO3 electrode during water splitting, before and after "training" with an applied positive bias. Operando high-energy X-ray reflectivity measurements demonstrate that training the electrode irreversibly reorders the surface. Scanning electrochemical microscopy at open circuit correlates this training with a 3-fold increase of the activity toward the photo-induced water splitting. A novel first-principles joint density functional theory simulation, constrained to the X-ray data via a generalized penalty function, identifies an anatase-like structure as the more active, trained surface.

  4. Structure of the Photo-catalytically Active Surface of SrTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Manuel; Huang, Xin; Ko, J Y Peter; Shen, Mei; Simpson, Burton H; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Ritzert, Nicole L; Letchworth-Weaver, Kendra; Gunceler, Deniz; Schlom, Darrell G; Arias, Tomás A; Brock, Joel D; Abruña, Héctor D

    2016-06-29

    A major goal of energy research is to use visible light to cleave water directly, without an applied voltage, into hydrogen and oxygen. Although SrTiO3 requires ultraviolet light, after four decades, it is still the "gold standard" for the photo-catalytic splitting of water. It is chemically robust and can carry out both hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions without an applied bias. While ultrahigh vacuum surface science techniques have provided useful insights, we still know relatively little about the structure of these electrodes in contact with electrolytes under operating conditions. Here, we report the surface structure evolution of a n-SrTiO3 electrode during water splitting, before and after "training" with an applied positive bias. Operando high-energy X-ray reflectivity measurements demonstrate that training the electrode irreversibly reorders the surface. Scanning electrochemical microscopy at open circuit correlates this training with a 3-fold increase of the activity toward the photo-induced water splitting. A novel first-principles joint density functional theory simulation, constrained to the X-ray data via a generalized penalty function, identifies an anatase-like structure as the more active, trained surface. PMID:27281231

  5. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  6. Surface Acidity as Descriptor of Catalytic Activity for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Li-O2 Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinzhen; Wang, Fan; Wang, Beizhou; Wang, Youwei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2015-10-28

    Unraveling the descriptor of catalytic activity, which is related to physical properties of catalysts, is a major objective of catalysis research. In the present study, the first-principles calculations based on interfacial model were performed to study the oxygen evolution reaction mechanism of Li2O2 supported on active surfaces of transition-metal compounds (TMC: oxides, carbides, and nitrides). Our studies indicate that the O2 evolution and Li(+) desorption energies show linear and volcano relationships with surface acidity of catalysts, respectively. Therefore, the charging voltage and desorption energies of Li(+) and O2 over TMC could correlate with their corresponding surface acidity. It is found that certain materials with an appropriate surface acidity can achieve the high catalytic activity in reducing charging voltage and activation barrier of rate-determinant step. According to this correlation, CoO should have as active catalysis as Co3O4 in reducing charging overpotential, which is further confirmed by our comparative experimental studies. Co3O4, Mo2C, TiC, and TiN are predicted to have a relatively high catalytic activity, which is consistent with the previous experiments. The present study enables the rational design of catalysts with greater activity for charging reactions of Li-O2 battery.

  7. Synthesis of supported bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size and composition distributions for active site elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Sikander H.; Sener, Canan; Alba Rubio, Ana C.; Gostanian, Thomas M.; O' neill, Brandon J; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Dumesic, James A

    2015-08-01

    Elucidation of active sites in supported bimetallic catalysts is complicated by the high level of dispersity in the nanoparticle size and composition that is inherent in conventional methods of catalyst preparation. We present a synthesis strategy that leads to highly dispersed, bimetallic nanoparticles with uniform particle size and composition by means of controlled surface reactions. We demonstrate the synthesis of three systems, RhMo, PtMo, and RhRe, consisting of a highly reducible metal with an oxophilic promoter. These catalysts are characterized by FTIR, CO chemisorption, STEM/EDS, TPR, and XAS analysis. The catalytic properties of these bimetallic nanoparticles were probed for the selective CO hydrogenolysis of (hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyran to produce 1,6 hexanediol. Based on the characterization results and reactivity trends, the active sites in the hydrogenolysis reaction are identified to be small ensembles of the more noble metal (Rh, Pt) adjacent to highly reduced moieties of the more oxophilic metal (Mo, Re).

  8. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  9. Relationship between structure and catalytic performance of dealuminated Y zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dealuminated Y zeolites which have been prepared by hydrothermal and chemical treatments show differences in catalytic performance when tested fresh; however, these differences disappear after the zeolites have been steamed. The catalytic behavior of fresh and steamed zeolites is directly related to zeolite structural and chemical characteristics. Such characteristics determine the strength and density of acid sites for catalytic cracking. Dealuminated zeolites were characterized using x-ray diffraction, porosimetry, solid-state NMR and elemental analysis. Hexadecane cracking was used as a probe reaction to determine catalytic properties. Cracking activity was found to be proportional to total aluminum content in the zeolite. Product selectivity was dependent on unit cell size, presence of extra framework alumina and spatial distribution of active sites. The results from this study elucidate the role that zeolite structure plays in determining catalytic performance

  10. Catalytically active bovine serum amine oxidase bound to fluorescent and magnetically drivable nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidollari E

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Giulietta Sinigaglia1, Massimiliano Magro1, Giovanni Miotto1, Sara Cardillo1, Enzo Agostinelli2,3, Radek Zboril4, Eris Bidollari2,3, Fabio Vianello11Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; 2Istituto Pasteur-Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Department of Biochemical Sciences "A. Rossi Fanelli", SAPIENZA University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 3CNR, Institute Biology and Molecular Pathology, Rome, Italy; 4Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech RepublicAbstract: Novel superparamagnetic surface-active maghemite nanoparticles (SAMNs characterized by a diameter of 10 ± 2 nm were modified with bovine serum amine oxidase, which used rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC adduct as a fluorescent spacer-arm. A fluorescent and magnetically drivable adduct comprised of bovine serum copper-containing amine oxidase (SAMN–RITC–BSAO that immobilized on the surface of specifically functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was developed. The multifunctional nanomaterial was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and activity measurements. The results of this study demonstrated that bare magnetic nanoparticles form stable colloidal suspensions in aqueous solutions. The maximum binding capacity of bovine serum amine oxidase was approximately 6.4 mg g-1 nanoparticles. The immobilization procedure reduced the catalytic activity of the native enzyme to 30% ± 10% and the Michaelis constant was increased by a factor of 2. We suggest that the SAMN–RITC–BSAO complex, characterized by a specific activity of 0.81 IU g-1, could be used in the presence of polyamines to create a fluorescent magnetically drivable H2O2 and aldehydes-producing system. Selective tumor cell destruction is suggested as a potential future application of this system.Keywords: amine oxidase, hydrogen peroxide production, superparamagnetic

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-21

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) Steady-state reactivity studies in the packed bed reactor were extended to the NO/CO-carbon reaction system as a function of temperature and NO and CO concentrations. It was found that the NO reaction rate increased in the presence of CO, and the apparent activation energy decreased to about 75 {+-} 8 kJ/mol. In addition, the influence of mass transfer limitations were noted at low NO and CO concentrations. (2) The packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been applied to performing post-reaction temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of intermediate surface complexes following steady-state reaction. It was found that the amount of CO-evolving intermediate surface complexes exceeded that of the N{sub 2}-evolving surface complexes, and that both increased with reaction temperature. The TPD spectra indicates that both types of complexes desorb late, suggesting that they have high desorption activation energies. Plans for the next reporting period include extending the temperature programmed desorption studies in the packed bed reactor system to the NO/CO reaction system, including exposure to just CO, as well as NO/CO mixtures.

  12. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74-217% and 52%, 39-105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6-58%; 47%, 9-58%; and 52%, 24-75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs.

  13. Glucose transporter 4 can be inserted in the membrane without exposing its catalytic site for photolabeling from the medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manabu; ISHIKI; Philip; J; BILAN

    2007-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the production of PI(3,4,5)P3 in muscle cells, and this is required to stimulate GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane. Introduction of exogenous PI(3,4,5)P3 to muscle cells recapitulates insulin’s effects on GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane, but not glucose uptake. This study aims to explore the mechanism behind this difference. In L6-GLUT4myc muscle cells, the availability of the GLUT4 intracellular C-terminus and extracellular myc epitopes for immunoreactivity on plasma membrane lawns was detected with the corresponding antibody. The availability of the active site of GLUT4 from extracellular medium was assessed by affinity photolabeling with the cell impermeant compound Bio-LC-ATB-BMPA. 100nmol/L insulin and 10μmol/L PI(3,4,5)P3 caused myc signal gain on the plasma membrane lawns by 1.64-fold and 1.58-fold over basal, respectively. Insulin, but not PI(3,4,5)P3, increased photolabeling of GLUT4 and immunolabeling with C-terminus antibody by 2.47-fold and 2.04-fold over basal, respectively. Upon insulin stimulation, the C-terminus signal gain was greater than myc signal gain (2.04-fold vs. 1.64-fold over basal, respectively) in plasma membrane lawns. These results indicate that (i) PI(3,4,5)P3 does not make the active site of GLUT4 available from the extracellular surface despite causing GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane; (ii) the availability of the active site of GLUT4 from the extracellular medium and availability of the C-terminus from the cytosolic site are correlated; (iii) in addition to stimulating GLUT4 translocation, insulin stimulation displaces a protein which masks the GLUT4 C-terminus. We propose that a protein which masks the C-terminus also prevents the active site from being available for photolabelling and possibly glucose uptake after treatment with PI(3,4,5)P3.

  14. Glucose transporter 4 can be inserted in the membrane without exposing its catalytic site for photolabeling from the medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU WenYan; Manabu ISHIKI; Philip J BILAN; YAO Zhi

    2007-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the production of PI(3,4,5)P3 in muscle cells, and this is required to stimulate GLUT4fusion with the plasma membrane. Introduction of exogenous PI(3,4,5)P3 to muscle cells recapitulates insulin's effects on GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane, but not glucose uptake. This study aims to explore the mechanism behind this difference. In L6-GLUT4myc muscle cells, the availability of the GLUT4 intracellular C-terminus and extracellular myc epitopes for immunoreactivity on plasma membrane lawns was detected with the corresponding antibody. The availability of the active site of GLUT4from extracellular medium was assessed by affinity photolabeling with the cell impermeant compound Bio-LC-ATB-BMPA. 100 nmol/L insulin and 10 μmol/L PI(3,4,5)P3 caused myc signal gain on the plasma membrane lawns by 1.64-fold and 1.58-fold over basal, respectively. Insulin, but not PI(3,4,5)P3, increased photolabeling of GLUT4 and immunolabeling with C-terminus antibody by 2.47-fold and 2.04-fold over basal, respectively. Upon insulin stimulation, the C-terminus signal gain was greater than myc signal gain (2.04-fold vs. 1.64-fold over basal, respectively) in plasma membrane lawns. These results indicate that (i) PI(3,4,5)P3 does not make the active site of GLUT4 available from the extracellular surface despite causing GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane; (ii) the availability of the active site of GLUT4 from the extracellular medium and availability of the C-terminus from the cytosolic site are correlated; (iii) in addition to stimulating GLUT4 translocation, insulin stimulation displaces a protein which masks the GLUT4 C-terminus. We propose that a protein which masks the C-terminus also prevents the active site from being available for photolabeliing and possibly glucose uptake after treatment with PI(3,4,5)P3.

  15. Synthesis of a Novel Carbon Based Acid Catalyst and Its Catalytic Activity for the Acetalization and Ketalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xue-Zheng; GAO Shan; CHEN Wen-Ping; WANG Wen-Juan; YANG Jian-Guo

    2007-01-01

    A novel carbon based strong solid acid catalyst has been synthesized successfully.The catalytic activity for acetalization and ketalization was investigated.The results showed that the novel catalyst was very efficient with the average yield over 92%.The novel heterogeneous catalyst also has the advantages of high activity,wide applicability even to the preparation of 7 membered ring acetals and ketals,strikingly simple workup procedure,non-pollution and reusability,which will contribute to the green process greatly.

  16. Changes in Protein Domains outside the Catalytic Site of the Bacteriophage Qβ Replicase Reduce the Mutagenic Effect of 5-Azacytidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanillas, Laura; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The high genetic heterogeneity and great adaptability of RNA viruses are ultimately caused by the low replication fidelity of their polymerases. However, single amino acid substitutions that modify replication fidelity can evolve in response to mutagenic treatments with nucleoside analogues. Here, we investigated how two independent mutants of the bacteriophage Qβ replicase (Thr210Ala and Tyr410His) reduce sensitivity to the nucleoside analogue 5-azacytidine (AZC). Despite being located outside the catalytic site, both mutants reduced the mutation frequency in the presence of the drug. However, they did not modify the type of AZC-induced substitutions, which was mediated mainly by ambiguous base pairing of the analogue with purines. Furthermore, the Thr210Ala and Tyr410His substitutions had little or no effect on replication fidelity in untreated viruses. Also, both substitutions were costly in the absence of AZC or when the action of the drug was suppressed by adding an excess of natural pyrimidines (uridine or cytosine). Overall, the phenotypic properties of these two mutants were highly convergent, despite the mutations being located in different domains of the Qβ replicase. This suggests that treatment with a given nucleoside analogue tends to select for a unique functional response in the viral replicase. IMPORTANCE In the last years, artificial increase of the replication error rate has been proposed as an antiviral therapy. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which two substitutions in the Qβ replicase confer partial resistance to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue AZC. As opposed to previous work with animal viruses, where different mutations selected sequentially conferred nucleoside analogue resistance through different mechanisms, our results suggest that there are few or no alternative AZC resistance phenotypes in Qβ. Also, despite resistance mutations being highly costly in the absence of the drug, there was no sequential

  17. Mesoporous Silica Supported Pd-MnOx Catalysts with Excellent Catalytic Activity in Room-Temperature Formic Acid Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Min-Ho; Oh, Duckkyu; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Lee, Sung-Wook; Park, Jong-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lee, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    For the application of formic acid as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier, development of efficient catalysts for dehydrogenation of formic acid is a challenging topic, and most studies have so far focused on the composition of metals and supports, the size effect of metal nanoparticles, and surface chemistry of supports. Another influential factor is highly desired to overcome the current limitation of heterogeneous catalysis for formic acid decomposition. Here, we first investigated the effect of support pore structure on formic acid decomposition performance at room temperature by using mesoporous silica materials with different pore structures such as KIE-6, MCM-41, and SBA-15, and achieved the excellent catalytic activity (TOF: 593 h−1) by only controlling the pore structure of mesoporous silica supports. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D interconnected pore structure of mesoporous silica supports is more favorable to the mass transfer than 2D cylindrical mesopore structure, and the better mass transfer provides higher catalytic activity in formic acid decomposition. If the pore morphology of catalytic supports such as 3D wormhole or 2D cylinder is identical, large pore size combined with high pore volume is a crucial factor to achieve high catalytic performance. PMID:27666280

  18. Synthesis of Rh/Macro-Porous Alumina Over Micro-Channel Plate and Its Catalytic Activity Tests for Diesel Reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Yeon Baek; Kim, Yong Sul; Park, No-Kuk; Lee, Tae Jin

    2015-11-01

    Macro-porous Al2O3 as the catalytic support material was synthesized using colloidal polystyrene spheres over a micro-channel plate. The colloidal polystyrene spheres were used as a template for the production of an ordered macro porous material using an alumina nitrate solution as the precursor for Al2O3. The close-packed colloidal crystal array template method was applied to the formulation of ordered macro-porous Al2O3 used as a catalytic support material over a micro-channel plate. The solvent in the mixture solution, which also contained the colloidal polystyrene solution, aluminum nitrate solution and the precursor of the catalytic active materials (Rh), was evaporated in a vacuum oven at 50 degrees C. The ordered polystyrene spheres and aluminum salt of the solid state were deposited over a micro channel plate, and macro-porous Al2O3 was formed after calcination at 600 degrees C to remove the polystyrene spheres. The catalytic activity of the Rh/macro-porous alumina supported over the micro-channel plate was tested for diesel reforming.

  19. IFCC primary reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. Part 4. Reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of alanine aminotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Gerhard; Bonora, Roberto; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Férard, Georges; Ferrero, Carlo A; Franck, Paul F H; Gella, F Javier; Hoelzel, Wieland; Jørgensen, Poul Jørgen; Kanno, Takashi; Kessner, Art; Klauke, Rainer; Kristiansen, Nina; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Misaki, Hideo; Panteghini, Mauro; Pauwels, Jean; Schiele, Françoise; Schimmel, Heinz G; Weidemann, Gerhard; Siekmann, Lothar

    2002-07-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series dealing with reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C and the certification of reference preparations. Other parts deal with: Part 1. The Concept of Reference Procedures for the Measurement of Catalytic Activity Concentrations of Enzymes; Part 2. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Creatine Kinase; Part 3. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Lactate Dehydrogenase; Part 5. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Aspartate Aminotransferase; Part 6. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Gamma-Glutamyltransferase; Part 7. Certification of Four Reference Materials for the Determination of Enzymatic Activity of Gamma-Glutamyltransferase, Lactate Dehydrogenase, Alanine Aminotransferase and Creatine Kinase at 37 degrees C. A document describing the determination of preliminary upper reference limits is also in preparation. The procedure described here is deduced from the previously described 30 degrees C IFCC reference method. Differences are tabulated and commented on in Appendix 2.

  20. IFCC primary reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. Part 6. Reference procedure for the measurement of catalytic concentration of gamma-glutamyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Gerhard; Bonora, Roberto; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Férard, Georges; Ferrero, Carlo A; Franck, Paul F H; Gella, F Javier; Hoelzel, Wieland; Jørgensen, Poul Jørgen; Kanno, Takashi; Kessner, Art; Klauke, Rainer; Kristiansen, Nina; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Misaki, Hideo; Panteghini, Mauro; Pauwels, Jean; Schiele, Françoise; Schimmel, Heinz G; Weidemann, Gerhard; Siekmann, Lothar

    2002-07-01

    This paper is the sixth in a series dealing with reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C and the certification of reference preparations. Other parts deal with: Part 1. The Concept of Reference Procedures for the Measurement of Catalytic Activity Concentrations of Enzymes; Part 2. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Creatine Kinase; Part 3. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Lactate Dehydrogenase; Part 4. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Alanine Aminotransferase; Part 5. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Aspartate Aminotransferase; Part 7. Certification of Four Reference Materials for the Determination of Enzymatic Activity of Gamma-Glutamyltransferase, Lactate Dehydrogenase, Alanine Aminotransferase and Creatine Kinase at 37 degrees C A document describing the determination of preliminary upper reference limits is also in preparation. The procedure described here is deduced from the previously described 30 degrees C IFCC reference method. Differences are tabulated and commented on in Appendix 1.

  1. Elucidating the Roles of Conserved Active Site Amino Acids in the Escherichia coli Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The periplasmic cytochrome c nitrite reductase NrfA is a homodimeric protein containing ten c-type cytochromes. NrfA catalyses the six electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia which in turn facilitates anaerobic respiration. NrfA also reduces nitric oxide and hydroxylamine to ammonium. The reduction of substrate is carried out at the distal position of a lysine ligated heme and in an active site cavity dominated by a conserved catalytic triad of histidine, tyrosine and arginine...

  2. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of dibutyl phthalate in aqueous solution in the presence of iron-loaded activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanxing; Cui, Chenchen; Zhang, Daofang; Li, Liang; Pan, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Iron-loaded activated carbon was prepared and used as catalyst in heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of dibutyl phthalate (DBP). The catalytic activity of iron-loaded activated carbon was investigated under various conditions and the mechanisms of DBP removal were deduced. Characterization of catalyst indicated that the iron loaded on activated carbon was mainly in the form of goethite, which reduced its surface area, pore volume and pore diameter. The presence of metals on activated carbon positively contributed to its catalytic activity in ozonation of DBP. Iron loading content of 15% and initial water pH of 8 achieved highest DBP removal among all the tried conditions. Catalyst dosage of 10 mg L(-1) led to approximately 25% of increase in DBP (initial concentration 2 mg L(-1)) removal in 60 min as compared with ozone alone, and when catalyst dosage increased to 100 mg L(-1), the DBP removal was further improved by 46%. Based on a comparison of reaction rates for direct and indirect transformation of DBP, the increased removal of DBP in this study likely occurred via transformation of ozone into hydroxyl radicals on the catalyst surface.

  3. Towards a Physical Description for the Origin of Enhanced Catalytic Activity of Corroding Magnesium Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The so-called “negative difference effect” (NDE) exhibited by corroding magnesium (Mg) surfaces, where the rate of hydrogen evolution increases with the extent of anodic polarization, has been well documented. Recently this behaviour has been explained by a theory involving an increase in the cathodic exchange current density that occurs during anodic polarization, rather than the popular theory involving the formation of a univalent Mg+ ion and its subsequent chemical reaction with water to produce hydrogen. The present study reports on the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) conducted on focused ion beam (FIB) prepared cross-section lamellae of the dark film formed on a corroding area of a Mg surface from which hydrogen evolved. The film was found to consist of an outer columnar mixed magnesium oxide-hydroxide layer on top of a magnesium oxide-rich inner layer. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) reveals iron (Fe)-rich particles embedded in the columnar outer layer. Subsequent cathodic polarization measurements showed that the corroded surface became cathodically activated relative to a non-corroded surface. These observations demonstrate that a surface film enriched in more noble metals can catalyze the cathodic process, provide physical evidence towards support of the enhanced catalytic surface theory explaining the NDE, and validate the chemistry and structure of the surface film that forms upon corroding regions during anodic polarization

  4. Band gap calculation and photo catalytic activity of rare earths doped rutile TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BIAN Liang; SONG Mianxin; ZHOU Tianliang; ZHAO Xiaoyong; DAI Qingqing

    2009-01-01

    The density of states (DOS) of 17 kinds of rare earths (RE) doped futile TiO2 was by using fast-principles density functional the-ory (DFF) calculation. The band gap widths of RE doped rutile TiO2 were important factors for altering their absorbing wavelengths. The results show that RE ions could obviously reduce the band gap widths and form of energy of rutile TiO2 except Lu, Y, Yb and Sc, and the order of absorbing wavelengths of RE doped rutile TiO2 were the same as that of the results of calculation. The ratio of RE dopant was an-other important factor for the photo catalytic activity of RE doped rutile TiO2, and there was an optimal ratio of dopant. There was a constant for predigesting the calculation difficulty, respectively, which were 0.5mol.% and 100 mol-1 under supposition. The band gap widths of RE doped rutile TiO2 by DFT calculation were much larger than that by experiment. Finally, by transferring the calculation values to experiment values, it could be found and predicted that RE enlarged obviously the absorbing wavelengh of futile TiO2. In addition, the degree of RE ions edging out the Ti atom using the parameters of RE elements was computed.

  5. Facile synthesis of porous Pd nanoflowers with excellent catalytic activity towards CO oxidation☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tareque Odoom-Wubah; Mingming Du; Williams Brown Osei; Daohua Sun; Jiale Huang; Qingbiao Li

    2015-01-01

    Microorganism-mediated, hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC)-directed (MCD) method was employed in this work to synthesize Pd nanoflowers (PdNFs). Proper Pichia pastoris cel s (PPCs) dosage, ascorbic acid (AA), Pd(NO3)2 and CTAC concentrations were essential for the growth of the PdNFs. The size of the as-synthesized PdNFs could be tuned by adjusting the amount of Pd(NO3)2 solution and dosage of PPCs used. Char-acterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to verify the nature of the PdNFs. Finally the PdNF/PPC nanocomposites were immobilized onto TiO2 supports to obtain bio-PdNF/TiO2 catalysts which showed excellent catalytic activity for CO oxidation, obtaining 100%conversion at 100 °C and remaining stable over a period of 52 h of reaction time.

  6. Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Nanocrystalline Tungsten Carbide Thin Film and Its Electro-catalytic Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huajun ZHENG; Chunan MA; Jianguo HUANG; Guohua LI

    2005-01-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten carbide thin films were fabricated on graphite substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at H2 and Ar atmosphere, using WF6 and CH4 as precursors. The crystal phase, structure and chemical components of the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), respectively. The results show that the film prepared at CH4/WF6concentration ratio of 20 and at 800℃ is composed of spherical particles with a diameter of 20~35 nm. Electrochemical investigations show that the electrochemical real surface area of electrode of the film is large, and the electrode of the film exhibits higher electro-catalytic activity in the reaction of methanol oxidation. The designated constant current of the film catalyst is 123.6 mA/cm2 in the mixture solution of H2SO4 and CH3OH at the concentration of 0.5 and 2.0 mol/L at 70℃, and the designated constant potential is only 0.306 V (vs SCE).

  7. A supramolecular ruthenium macrocycle with high catalytic activity for water oxidation that mechanistically mimics photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Marcus; Kunz, Valentin; Frischmann, Peter D.; Würthner, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the ingenuity of nature and exploiting the billions of years over which natural selection has developed numerous effective biochemical conversions is one of the most successful strategies in a chemist's toolbox. However, an inability to replicate the elegance and efficiency of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (OEC-PSII) in its oxidation of water into O2 is a significant bottleneck in the development of a closed-loop sustainable energy cycle. Here, we present an artificial metallosupramolecular macrocycle that gathers three Ru(bda) centres (bda = 2,2‧-bipyridine-6,6‧-dicarboxylic acid) that catalyses water oxidation. The macrocyclic architecture accelerates the rate of water oxidation via a water nucleophilic attack mechanism, similar to the mechanism exhibited by OEC-PSII, and reaches remarkable catalytic turnover frequencies >100 s–1. Photo-driven water oxidation yields outstanding activity, even in the nM concentration regime, with a turnover number of >1,255 and turnover frequency of >13.1 s–1.

  8. A supramolecular ruthenium macrocycle with high catalytic activity for water oxidation that mechanistically mimics photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Marcus; Kunz, Valentin; Frischmann, Peter D; Würthner, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the ingenuity of nature and exploiting the billions of years over which natural selection has developed numerous effective biochemical conversions is one of the most successful strategies in a chemist's toolbox. However, an inability to replicate the elegance and efficiency of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (OEC-PSII) in its oxidation of water into O2 is a significant bottleneck in the development of a closed-loop sustainable energy cycle. Here, we present an artificial metallosupramolecular macrocycle that gathers three Ru(bda) centres (bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid) that catalyses water oxidation. The macrocyclic architecture accelerates the rate of water oxidation via a water nucleophilic attack mechanism, similar to the mechanism exhibited by OEC-PSII, and reaches remarkable catalytic turnover frequencies >100 s(-1). Photo-driven water oxidation yields outstanding activity, even in the nM concentration regime, with a turnover number of >1,255 and turnover frequency of >13.1 s(-1).

  9. Understanding Catalytic Activity Trends for NO Decomposition and CO Oxidation using Density Functional Theory and Microkinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne

    towards rationalizing trends in catalytic activity of transition metal catalysts for NO decomposition by combining microkinetic modelling with density functional theory calculations. We establish the full potential energy diagram for the direct NO decomposition reaction over stepped transition......The main aim of this thesis is to understand the catalytic activity of transition metals and noble metals for the direct decomposition of NO and the oxidation of CO. The formation of NOx from combustion of fossil and renewable fuels continues to be a dominant environmental issue. We take one step......-metal surfaces by combining a database of adsorption energies on stepped metal surfaces with known Brønsted–Evans–Polanyi (BEP) relations for the activation barriers of dissociation of diatomic molecules over stepped transition- and noble-metal surfaces. The potential energy diagram directly points to why Pd...

  10. Promotion of catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation on CoPc-Pt/C co-catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JingJie; XU YiMin; PAN Mu; MA WenTao; TANG HaoLin

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation on CoPc-Pt/C co-catalysts, prepared by impregnation method, was studied in details through electrochemical methods. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) result demonstrates that CoPc has higher forward anodic peak current density and jf/jb value (forward anodic peak current density/backward anodic peak current density) than Pt/C. Chronoamperometry (CA) analysis indicates that CoPc-Pt/C exhibits both excellent transient current density and stable current density for methanol electro-oxidation compared with Pt/C. Two main mechanisms related to the promotion of catalytic activity are as follows: CoPc-Pt/C has the activity of tolerance to carbonaceous intermediates, thus inhibiting the self-poisoning of catalysts; CoPc-Pt/C owns prominent intrinsic catalytic activity indicated by the apparent activation energy for methanol oxidation on CoPc-Pt/C, which is 18 kJ/mol, less than that on Pt and PtRu catalysts as reported.

  11. Molecular dioxygen enters the active site of 12/15-lipoxygenase via dynamic oxygen access channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saam, Jan; Ivanov, Igor; Walther, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kuhn, Hartmut

    2007-08-14

    Cells contain numerous enzymes that use molecular oxygen for their reactions. Often, their active sites are buried deeply inside the protein, which raises the question whether there are specific access channels guiding oxygen to the site of catalysis. Choosing 12/15-lipoxygenase as a typical example for such oxygen-dependent enzymes, we determined the oxygen distribution within the protein and defined potential routes for oxygen access. For this purpose, we have applied an integrated strategy of structural modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic measurements. First, we computed the 3D free-energy distribution for oxygen, which led to identification of four oxygen channels in the protein. All channels connect the protein surface with a region of high oxygen affinity at the active site. This region is localized opposite to the nonheme iron providing a structural explanation for the reaction specificity of this lipoxygenase isoform. The catalytically most relevant path can be obstructed by L367F exchange, which leads to a strongly increased Michaelis constant for oxygen. The blocking mechanism is explained in detail by reordering the hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules. Our results provide strong evidence that the main route for oxygen access to the active site of the enzyme follows a channel formed by transiently interconnected cavities whereby the opening and closure are governed by side chain dynamics. PMID:17675410

  12. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1(WD40)). To understand how Apc1(WD40) contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1(WD40) deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1(WD40) abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C-Cdh1 complex with Apc1(WD40) deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1(WD40) is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C.

  13. Characterization of the active site properties of CYP4F12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksterowicz, John; Rock, Dan A; Rock, Brooke M; Wienkers, Larry C; Foti, Robert S

    2014-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 4F12 is a drug-metabolizing enzyme that is primarily expressed in the liver, kidney, colon, small intestine, and heart. The properties of CYP4F12 that may impart an increased catalytic selectivity (decreased promiscuity) were explored through in vitro metabolite elucidation, kinetic isotope effect experiments, and computational modeling of the CYP4F12 active site. By using astemizole as a probe substrate for CYP4F12 and CYP3A4, it was observed that although CYP4F12 favored astemizole O-demethylation as the primary route of metabolism, CYP3A4 was capable of metabolizing astemizole at multiple sites on the molecule. Deuteration of astemizole at the site of O-demethylation resulted in an isotope effect of 7.1 as well as an 8.3-fold decrease in the rate of clearance for astemizole by CYP4F12. Conversely, although an isotope effect of 3.8 was observed for the formation of the O-desmethyl metabolite when deuterated astemizole was metabolized by CYP3A4, there was no decrease in the clearance of astemizole. Development of a homology model of CYP4F12 based on the crystal structure of cytochrome P450 BM3 predicted an active site volume for CYP4F12 that was approximately 76% of the active site volume of CYP3A4. As predicted, multiple favorable binding orientations were available for astemizole docked into the active site of CYP3A4, but only a single binding orientation with the site of O-demethylation oriented toward the heme was identified for CYP4F12. Overall, it appears that although CYP4F12 may be capable of binding similar ligands to other cytochrome P450 enzymes such as CYP3A4, the ability to achieve catalytically favorable orientations may be inherently more difficult because of the increased steric constraints of the CYP4F12 active site. PMID:25074871

  14. Crystallographic B factor of critical residues at enzyme active site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海龙; 宋时英; 林政炯

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-seven sets of crystallographic enzyme data were selected from Protein Data Bank (PDB, 1995). The average temperature factors (B) of the critical residues at the active site and the whole molecule of those enzymes were calculated respectively. The statistical results showed that the critical residues at the active site of most of the enzymes had lower B factors than did the whole molecules, indicating that in the crystalline state the critical residues at the active site of the natural enzymes possess more stable conformation than do the whole molecules. The flexibility of the active site during the unfolding by denaturing was also discussed.

  15. Sequencing of the amylopullulanase (apu) gene of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E, and identification of the active site by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathupala, S P; Lowe, S E; Podkovyrov, S M; Zeikus, J G

    1993-08-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the dual active amylopullulanase of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum) was determined. The structural gene (apu) contained a single open reading frame 4443 base pairs in length, corresponding to 1481 amino acids, with an estimated molecular weight of 162,780. Analysis of the deduced sequence of apu with sequences of alpha-amylases and alpha-1,6 debranching enzymes enabled the identification of four conserved regions putatively involved in substrate binding and in catalysis. The conserved regions were localized within a 2.9-kilobase pair gene fragment, which encoded a M(r) 100,000 protein that maintained the dual activities and thermostability of the native enzyme. The catalytic residues of amylopullulanase were tentatively identified by using hydrophobic cluster analysis for comparison of amino acid sequences of amylopullulanase and other amylolytic enzymes. Asp597, Glu626, and Asp703 were individually modified to their respective amide form, or the alternate acid form, and in all cases both alpha-amylase and pullulanase activities were lost, suggesting the possible involvement of 3 residues in a catalytic triad, and the presence of a putative single catalytic site within the enzyme. These findings substantiate amylopullulanase as a new type of amylosaccharidase.

  16. Identification of residues in the heme domain of soluble guanylyl cyclase that are important for basal and stimulated catalytic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmamalini Baskaran

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide signals through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, a heme-containing heterodimer. NO binds to the heme domain located in the N-terminal part of the β subunit of sGC resulting in increased production of cGMP in the catalytic domain located at the C-terminal part of sGC. Little is known about the mechanism by which the NO signaling is propagated from the receptor domain (heme domain to the effector domain (catalytic domain, in particular events subsequent to the breakage of the bond between the heme iron and Histidine 105 (H105 of the β subunit. Our modeling of the heme-binding domain as well as previous homologous heme domain structures in different states point to two regions that could be critical for propagation of the NO activation signal. Structure-based mutational analysis of these regions revealed that residues T110 and R116 in the αF helix-β1 strand, and residues I41 and R40 in the αB-αC loop mediate propagation of activation between the heme domain and the catalytic domain. Biochemical analysis of these heme mutants allows refinement of the map of the residues that are critical for heme stability and propagation of the NO/YC-1 activation signal in sGC.

  17. Fabrication of highly electro catalytic active layer of multi walled carbon nanotube/enzyme for Pt-free dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbab, Alvira Ayoub, E-mail: alvira_arbab@yahoo.com [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, Kyung Chul, E-mail: hytec@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Fuel cells and hydrogen technology, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sahito, Iftikhar Ali, E-mail: iftikhar.sahito@faculty.muet.edu.pk [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Qadir, Muhammad Bilal, E-mail: bilal_ntu81@hotmail.com [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sung Hoon, E-mail: shjeong@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared three different types of enzyme dispersed multiwall carbon nanotube (E-MWCNT) layer for application in Pt-free dye sensitized solar cell (DSSCs). • E-MWCNT catalysts exhibited an extremely good electro-catalytic activity (ECA), compared with the conventional catalyst, when synthesized with lipase enzyme. • E-MWCNT as counter electrode exhibits a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.5%, which can be compared to 8% efficiency of Pt catalyst. - Abstract: Highly dispersed conductive suspensions of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can have intrinsic electrical and electrochemical characteristics, which make them useful candidate for platinum (Pt)-free, dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). High energy conversion efficiency of 7.52% is demonstrated in DSSCs, based on enzyme dispersed MWCNT (E-MWCNT) layer deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. The E-MWCNT layer shows a pivotal role as platform to reduce large amount of iodide species via electro catalytically active layer, fabricated by facile tape casting under air drying technique. The E-MWCNT layer with large surface area, high mechanical adhesion, and good interconnectivity is derived from an appropriate enzyme dispersion, which provides not only enhanced interaction sites for the electrolyte/counter electrode interface but also improved electron transport mechanism. The surface morphology and structural characterization were investigated using field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and electronic microscopy techniques. Electro catalytic activity (ECA) and electrochemical properties of E-MWCNT counter electrode (CE) were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of E-MWCNT CE is associated with the low charge transfer

  18. Fabrication of highly electro catalytic active layer of multi walled carbon nanotube/enzyme for Pt-free dye sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared three different types of enzyme dispersed multiwall carbon nanotube (E-MWCNT) layer for application in Pt-free dye sensitized solar cell (DSSCs). • E-MWCNT catalysts exhibited an extremely good electro-catalytic activity (ECA), compared with the conventional catalyst, when synthesized with lipase enzyme. • E-MWCNT as counter electrode exhibits a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.5%, which can be compared to 8% efficiency of Pt catalyst. - Abstract: Highly dispersed conductive suspensions of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can have intrinsic electrical and electrochemical characteristics, which make them useful candidate for platinum (Pt)-free, dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). High energy conversion efficiency of 7.52% is demonstrated in DSSCs, based on enzyme dispersed MWCNT (E-MWCNT) layer deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. The E-MWCNT layer shows a pivotal role as platform to reduce large amount of iodide species via electro catalytically active layer, fabricated by facile tape casting under air drying technique. The E-MWCNT layer with large surface area, high mechanical adhesion, and good interconnectivity is derived from an appropriate enzyme dispersion, which provides not only enhanced interaction sites for the electrolyte/counter electrode interface but also improved electron transport mechanism. The surface morphology and structural characterization were investigated using field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and electronic microscopy techniques. Electro catalytic activity (ECA) and electrochemical properties of E-MWCNT counter electrode (CE) were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of E-MWCNT CE is associated with the low charge transfer

  19. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-08-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution.

  20. Theoretical Calculations of the Catalytic Triad in Short-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    OpenAIRE

    Gani, Osman A B S M; Adekoya, Olayiwola A; Giurato, Laura; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Guccione, Salvatore; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2007-01-01

    Three highly conserved active site residues (Ser, Tyr, and Lys) of the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) were demonstrated to be essential for catalytic activity and have been denoted the catalytic triad of SDRs. In this study computational methods were adopted to study the ionization properties of these amino acids in SDRs from Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila lebanonensis. Three enzyme models, with different ionization scenarios of the catalytic triad that...

  1. Mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis identify several autophosphorylated residues required for the activity of PrkC, a Ser/Thr kinase from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madec, Edwige; Stensballe, Allan; Kjellström, Sven;

    2003-01-01

    structure of PrkC modelled on the structure of known Hanks kinases, the first cluster of phospho-threonine residues falls precisely in the activation loop, controlling the access of substrate and ATP to the catalytic site of many eukaryotic receptor kinases, whereas the second cluster is located...

  2. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  3. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Benjamin E R; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L; Hallaert, Simon D; Böttger, Lars H; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2016-08-18

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(ii), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species-α-Fe(ii) and α-O-are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive 'spectator' iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(ii) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(ii) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(iv)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function-producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an 'entatic' state-might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:27535535

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-24

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, TPD studies were conducted following steady-state reaction in NO/CO mixtures in helium. From these studies, the following points have been concluded: (1) The total amount of CO and N{sub 2} evolved following reaction in NO increases with reaction temperature. The TPD spectra are skewed to high temperatures, indicating more stable surface complexes with high desorption activation energies. (2) The total amount of CO evolved following exposure of the char sample to CO at reaction temperatures decreases with reaction temperature, similar to chemisorption behavior. The CO TPD spectra are shifted to lower temperatures, indicating more labile oxygen surface complexes with lower desorption activation energies. (3) The total amount of CO evolved following reaction in NO/CO mixtures decreases with reaction temperature, while the evolved N{sub 2} still increases with reaction temperature. The CO TPD spectra appear more similar to those obtained following exposure to pure CO, while the N{sub 2} TPD spectra are more similar to those obtained followed reaction in just CO. Based on the preceding observations, a simple mechanism was formulated whereby two different types of surface complexes are formed by NO and CO; the former are more stable, and the latter more labile. This produces two parallel routes for the NO-carbon reaction: (a) the C(O) complexes formed directly by NO desorb as CO; and (b) The C(CO) complexes formed by CO, react with NO to produce CO{sub 2

  5. Ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binding orients the misaligned active site of the ubiquitin hydrolase UCHL1 into productive conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, David A.; Maiti, Tushar K.; Davies, Christopher W.; Das, Chittaranjan (Purdue)

    2010-07-06

    Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is a Parkinson disease-associated, putative cysteine protease found abundantly and selectively expressed in neurons. The crystal structure of apo UCHL1 showed that the active-site residues are not aligned in a canonical form, with the nucleophilic cysteine being 7.7 {angstrom} from the general base histidine, an arrangement consistent with an inactive form of the enzyme. Here we report the crystal structures of the wild type and two Parkinson disease-associated variants of the enzyme, S18Y and I93M, bound to a ubiquitin-based suicide substrate, ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester. These structures reveal that ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester binds primarily at two sites on the enzyme, with its carboxy terminus at the active site and with its amino-terminal {beta}-hairpin at the distal site - a surface-exposed hydrophobic crevice 17 {angstrom} away from the active site. Binding at the distal site initiates a cascade of side-chain movements in the enzyme that starts at a highly conserved, surface-exposed phenylalanine and is relayed to the active site resulting in the reorientation and proximal placement of the general base within 4 {angstrom} of the catalytic cysteine, an arrangement found in productive cysteine proteases. Mutation of the distal-site, surface-exposed phenylalanine to alanine reduces ubiquitin binding and severely impairs the catalytic activity of the enzyme. These results suggest that the activity of UCHL1 may be regulated by its own substrate.

  6. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities

  7. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  8. Effect of structure and surface properties on the catalytic activity of nanodiamond in the conversion of 1,2-dichloroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveritinova, E. A.; Zhitnev, Yu. N.; Kulakova, I. I.; Maslakov, K. I.; Nesterova, E. A.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Ivanov, A. S.; Savilov, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic activity of a detonation nanodiamond and its Ni-containing forms in the conversion of 1,2-dichloroethane is studied and compared with the activity of other carbon and nanocarbon materials: carbon nanotubes, "Dalan" synthetic diamond, and fluorinated graphite. The surface and structure of the carbon materials are characterized using XRD, diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy, XPS, BET, and TPR. The catalytic properties of the materials are studied using the pulsed microcatalytic method. It is found that the synthetic diamond, the nanodiamond, and its Ni-containing forms are catalysts for dichloroethane conversion in a nitrogen atmosphere, where the main product is ethylene. It is noted that the catalytic activity of deactivated diamond catalysts is restored after hydrogen treatment. It is shown that the carbon structure of the nanodiamond and the "Dalan" synthetic diamond with hydrogen groups located on it plays a key role in the dichloroethane conversion. It is found that the nanodiamond acts simultaneously as a catalyst and an adsorbent of chlorine-containing products of dichloroethane conversion.

  9. Catalytic activities of fungal oxidases in hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate-based microemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gui-Ping; Zhang, Yun; Huang, Xi-Rong; Shi, Chuan-Hong; Liu, Wei-Feng; Li, Yue-Zhong; Qu, Yin-Bo; Gao, Pei-Ji

    2008-10-01

    For hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF(6)]), an H(2)O-in-[BMIM][PF(6)] microemulsion could be formed in the presence of nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100). In such a medium, both lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase could express their catalytic activity with the optimum molar ratio of H(2)O to TX-100 at 8.0 for LiP and >20 for laccase, and the optimum pH values at 3.2 for LiP and 4.2 for laccase, respectively. As compared with pure or water saturated [BMIM][PF(6)], in which the two oxidases had negligible catalytic activity due to the strong inactivating effect of [BMIM][PF(6)] on both enzymes, the use of the [BMIM][PF(6)]-based microemulsion had some advantages. Not only the catalytic activities of both fungal oxidases greatly enhanced, but also the apparent viscosity of the medium decreased. PMID:18602799

  10. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites

  11. Surface composition and catalytic activity of La-Fe mixed oxides for methane oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fengxiang [School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Liangxiang East Road, Beijing 102488 (China); Li, Zhanping [Analysis Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Hongwei [School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Liangxiang East Road, Beijing 102488 (China); Gao, Zhiming, E-mail: zgao@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Liangxiang East Road, Beijing 102488 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The sample with La/Fe atomic ratio of 0.94 is single phase perovskite La{sub 0.94}FeO{sub 3−d}. • The excess ironic oxide exists on the surface of the perovskite crystallites. • La{sup 3+} ions are enriched on surface of the oxides even for the La{sub 0.68}Fe sample. - Abstract: Four La-Fe oxide samples with La/Fe atomic ratio y = 1.02 ∼ 0.68 (denoted as LayFe) were prepared by the citrate method. The samples had a decreased specific surface area with the La/Fe atomic ratio decreasing. XRD pattern proved that the sample La{sub 0.94}Fe is single phase perovskite La{sub 0.94}FeO{sub 3−d}. Phase composition of the samples was estimated by the Rietveld refinement method. XPS analyses indicate that La{sup 3+} ions are enriched on surface of crystallites for all the samples, and surface carbonate ions are relatively abundant on the samples La{sub 1.02}Fe and La{sub 0.94}Fe. Catalytic activity for methane oxidation per unit surface area of the samples is in the order of La{sub 0.68}Fe > La{sub 0.76}Fe > La{sub 0.94}Fe > La{sub 1.02}Fe both in the presence and in the absence of gaseous oxygen. A reason for this order would be the higher concentration of Fe{sup 3+} ion on the surface of the samples La{sub 0.68}Fe and La{sub 0.76}Fe.

  12. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst. PMID:27483759

  13. Physico-Chemical Property and Catalytic Activity of a CeO2-Doped MnO(x)-TiO2 Catalyst with SO2 Resistance for Low-Temperature NH3-SCR of NO(x).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Byeongkil; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cha, Jin-Sun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Heesoo

    2016-05-01

    The effects of CeO2 addition on the catalytic activity and the SO2 resistance of CeO2-doped MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts were investigated for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 of NO(x) emissions in marine applications. The most active catalyst was obtained from 30 wt% CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalyst in the whole temperature range of 100-300 degrees C at a low gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 10,000 h(-)1, and its de-NO(x) efficiency was higher than 90% over 250 degrees C. The enhanced catalytic activity may contribute to the dispersion state and catalytic acidity on the catalyst surface, and the highly dispersed Mn and Ce on the nano-scaled TiO2 catalyst affects the increase of Lewis and Brønsted acid sites. A CeO2-rich additive on MnO(x)-TiO2 could provide stronger catalytic acid sites, associated with NH3 adsorption and the SCR performance. As the results of sulfur resistance in flue gas that contains SO2, the de-NO(x) efficiency of MnO(x)-TiO2 decreased by 15% over 200 degrees C, whereas that of 30 wt% ceria-doped catalyst increased by 14-21% over 150 degrees C. The high SO2 resistance of CeO2-MnO(x)-TiO2 catalysts that resulted from the addition of ceria suppressed the formation of Mn sulfate species, which led to deactivation on the surface of nano-catalyst.

  14. Determination of the catalytic activity of binuclear metallohydrolases using isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Marcelo M; Ely, Fernanda; Lonhienne, Thierry; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large and diverse family of enzymes that are involved in numerous metabolic functions. An increasing number of members find applications as drug targets or in processes such as bioremediation. It is thus essential to have an assay available that allows the rapid and reliable determination of relevant catalytic parameters (k cat, K m, and k cat/K m). Continuous spectroscopic assays are frequently only possible by using synthetic (i.e., nonbiological) substrates that possess a suitable chromophoric marker (e.g., nitrophenol). Isothermal titration calorimetry, in contrast, affords a rapid assay independent of the chromophoric properties of the substrate-the heat associated with the hydrolytic reaction can be directly related to catalytic properties. Here, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method on several selected examples of this family of enzymes and show that, in general, the catalytic parameters obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from spectroscopic assays.

  15. Investigation on preparation of CuO-SnO2-CeO2/γ-Al2O3 catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation process and their catalytic activity for degradation of phenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-jun; ZHANG Mi-lin; WAN Jia-feng; XIA Zhi; LIU Xiao-hui; LIU hui

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation process is an efficient measure for treatment of wastewater with great strength which is not biodegradable. Heterocatalysts now become the key investigation subject of catalytic wet air oxidation process due to their good stability and easy separation. In the paper, CuO-SnOE-CeO2/γ-Al2O3 catalysts are prepared by impregnation method, with SnO2 as a doping component, CuO as an active component, CeO2 as a structure stabilizer, γ-Al2O3 as a substrate. XPS test is carried out to investigate the effect of Sn on the chemical surrounding of Cu and O element on the catalyst surface and their catalytic activity. It is shown that the right do-ping of Sn can increase Cu+ content on the catalyst surface, as a result the quantity of adsorption oxygen is also increased. It is found that Cu + content on the catalyst surface is one of the primary factors that determin catalytic activity of catalyst through analyzing the catalytic wet air oxidation process of phenol.

  16. The effect of chelating/combustion agent on catalytic activity and magnetic properties of Dy doped Ni-Zn ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samoila, P.; Slatineanu, T. [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I Boulevard 700506 (Romania); Postolache, P. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I Boulevard 700506 (Romania); Iordan, A.R. [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I Boulevard 700506 (Romania); Palamaru, M.N., E-mail: palamaru@uaic.ro [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I Boulevard 700506 (Romania)

    2012-09-14

    The spinel ferrite Ni{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 1.98}Dy{sub 0.02}O{sub 4} was prepared by sol-gel low temperature autocombustion method using four different chelating/combustion agents: citric acid, tartaric acid, urea and cellulose. Infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area measurement, the catalytic H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition and the magnetic behavior were employed to investigate the influence of the combustion agents on structural characteristics, catalytic activity and magnetic properties. Spinel-type phase in the nano-scale domain was accomplished during sol-gel synthesis and was confirmed by XRD and IR. The best catalytic activity is belonging to the sample obtained using urea, which shows the smallest grain size (SEM), the highest specific surface area (BET measurements) and DyFeO{sub 3} phase (XRD), while ferrimagnetic behavior prevails for all the samples independently of fuel agent. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-Zn ferrite doped with Dy as catalyst and magnetic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four chelating/combustion agents were used in sol-gel method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citric acid and cellulose allowed spinel monophase formation confirmed by XRD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of ferrite samples is affected by synthesis conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic behavior is not changed significantly as a function of fuel agent.

  17. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of diesel utilizing hydrogen peroxide and functionalized-activated carbon in a biphasic diesel-acetonitrile system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haw, Kok-Giap; Bakar, Wan Azelee Wan Abu; Ali, Rusmidah; Chong, Jiunn-Fat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Kadir, Abdul Aziz Abdul [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents the development of granular functionalized-activated carbon as catalysts in the catalytic oxidative desulfurization (Cat-ODS) of commercial Malaysian diesel using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Granular functionalized-activated carbon was prepared from oil palm shell using phosphoric acid activation method and carbonized at 500 C and 700 C for 1 h. The activated carbons were characterized using various analytical techniques to study the chemistry underlying the preparation and calcination treatment. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms exhibited the characteristic of microporous structure with some contribution of mesopore property. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy results showed that higher activation temperature leads to fewer surface functional groups due to thermal decomposition. Micrograph from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope showed that activation at 700 C creates orderly and well developed pores. Furthermore, X-ray Diffraction patterns revealed that pyrolysis has converted crystalline cellulose structure of oil palm shell to amorphous carbon structure. The influence of the reaction temperature, the oxidation duration, the solvent, and the oxidant/sulfur molar ratio were examined. The rates of the catalytic oxidative desulfurization reaction were found to increase with the temperature, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/S molar ratio. Under the best operating condition for the catalytic oxidative desulfurization: temperature 50 C, atmospheric pressure, 0.5 g activated carbon, 3 mol ratio of hydrogen peroxide to sulfur, 2 mol ratio of acetic acid to sulfur, 3 oxidation cycles with 1 h for each cycle using acetonitrile as extraction solvent, the sulfur content in diesel was reduced from 2189 ppm to 190 ppm with 91.3% of total sulfur removed. (author)

  18. Catalytic activity and stability of glucose oxidase/horseradish peroxidase co-confined in macroporous silica foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaodong; Li, Ying; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Jiachao; Qian, Jing; Liu, Songqin

    2012-12-21

    Investigation of the catalytic activity and stability of enzymes in confined nano/microspace provides valuable contributions to the fundamental understanding of biological reactions taking place on a mesoscopic scale within confined spaces. In this paper, macroporous silica foam (MSF) is used as a nanoreactor to co-confine glucose oxidase (GOD) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Then, the enzymatic cascade reactions, which act in tandem inside nanoreactors, for oxidation of glucose and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) were studied. The catalytic kinetic parameters of apparent Michaelis constant (K(m)(app)) and maximum rate (V(max)) were obtained from Lineweaver-Burk plot by UV-vis spectrometry. Results showed that the catalytic activity of the co-confined enzymes is reduced compared to that of free enzymes in solution at room temperature. The stabilities of co-confined enzymes in denaturing agents, such as guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and urea, were higher than those of free enzymes in solution. When employing a co-confined bienzyme system as a biosensor for the detection of glucose, a wider linear range of glucose was obtained for the co-confined bienzyme system than for free enzymes in solution. PMID:23096254

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and catalytic activity of triorganotin(IV) carboxylates for the production of biodiesel from rocket seed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organotin(IV) carboxylates have a wide range of industrial applications such as antifouling paints, PVC stabilization, ion carries in electrochemical membranes and homogeneous catalysts. The catalytic application of organotin carboxylates are in the field of silicone curing, polyurethane formation and esterification. Only a limited literature is available regarding the use of organotin carboxylates in the transesterification of vegetable oil to produce biodiesel . The present study deals with the synthesis of some new triorganotin(IV) carboxylates for their subsequent use as catalyst for transesterification of rocket seed oil to produce biodiesel. The three new triorganotin(IV) i.e. (Me/sub 3/SnL) (1),(Bu/sub 3/Snl) (2) and (Ph/sub 3/SnL) (3), were synthesized by refluxing sodium salt of ligand (NaL), where L=O/sub 2/C(CH/sub 3/)C=CHC/sub 6/H/sub 4/F with trimethyl, tributyl and triphenyl tin(IV) chlorides, respectively for 10 hrs. The synthesized compounds were characterized by instrumental techniques like FT-IR and NMR (1H, 13C). The catalytic activity of these compounds was assessed for transesterification of triglycerides in rocket seed oil to produce biodiesel. All the tested compounds showed good catalytic activity in the order 1> 2 > 3. (author)

  20. Catalytic modification of conventional SOFC anodes with a view to reducing their activity for direct internal reforming of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boder, M.; Dittmeyer, R. [Research Group Technical Chemistry, Karl-Winnacker-Institut, DECHEMA e.V., Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2006-04-18

    When using natural gas as fuel for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), direct internal reforming lowers the requirement for cell cooling and, theoretically, offers advantages with respect to capital cost and efficiency. The high metal content of a nickel/zirconia anode and the high temperature, however, cause the endothermic reforming reaction to take place very fast. The resulting drop of temperature at the inlet produces thermal stresses, which may lower the system efficiency and limit the stack lifetime. To reduce the reforming rate without lowering the electrochemical activity of the cell, a wet impregnation procedure for modifying conventional cermets by coverage with a less active metal was developed. As the coating material copper was chosen. Copper is affordable, catalytically inert for the reforming reaction and exhibits excellent electronic conductivity. The current density-voltage characteristics of the modified units showed that it is possible to maintain a good electrochemical performance of the cells despite the catalytic modification. A copper to nickel ratio of 1:3 resulted in a strong diminution of the catalytic reaction rate. This indicates that the modification could be a promising method to improve the performance of solid oxide fuel cells with direct internal reforming of hydrocarbons. (author)

  1. Activation of Al–Cu–Fe quasicrystalline surface: fabrication of a fine nanocomposite layer with high catalytic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kameoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A fine layered nanocomposite with a total thickness of about 200 nm was formed on the surface of an Al63Cu25Fe12 quasicrystal (QC. The nanocomposite was found to exhibit high catalytic performance for steam reforming of methanol. The nanocomposite was formed by a self-assembly process, by leaching the Al–Cu–Fe QC using a 5 wt% Na2CO3 aqueous solution followed by calcination in air at 873 K. The quasiperiodic nature of the QC played an important role in the formation of such a structure. Its high catalytic activity originated from the presence of highly dispersed copper and iron species, which also suppressed the sintering of nanoparticles.

  2. Sulfur-Functionalized N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Pd(II: Syntheses, Structures and Catalytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs can be easily modified by introducing functional groups at the nitrogen atoms, which leads to versatile coordination chemistry as well as diverse catalytic applications of the resulting complexes. This article summarizes our contributions to the field of NHCs bearing different types of sulfur functions, i.e., thioether, sulfoxide, thiophene, and thiolato. The experimental evidence for the truly hemilabile coordination behavior of a Pd(II thioether-NHC complex has been reported as well. In addition, complexes bearing rigid CSC-pincer ligands have been synthesized and the reasons for pincer versus pseudo-pincer formation investigated. Incorporation of the electron-rich thiolato function resulted in the isolation of structurally diverse complexes. The catalytic activities of selected complexes have been tested in Suzuki-Miyaura, Mizoroki-Heck and hydroamination reactions.

  3. 3D hierarchical walnut-like CuO nanostructures: Preparation, characterization and their efficient catalytic activity for CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Yujuan; Duan, Tao; Zhu, Wenkun; Yi, Zao; Cui, Xudong

    2016-07-01

    In this work, 3D hierarchical walnut-shaped, 2D nanosheet and 3D microspheres single phase CuO nanostructures are functioning as catalysts and supporting materials, differing from the conventional ways. The novel nanostructures were synthesized via hydrothermal method under a stainless steel autoclave. The as-prepared materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR). The walnut-shaped structures with high O/Cu atomic ratio (1.22) exhibit high oxygen adsorption capacity and greatly enhanced catalytic activity. These results will be enrich the techniques for tuning the morphologies of metal oxide micro/nanostructures and open a new field in catalytic applications.

  4. Catalytic activity of a novel serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP5 from Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris-Mullins Brianna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Our knowledge of protein phosphatases (PPs and their implication in signaling events is very limited. Here we report the expression, characterization and mutagenesis analysis of a novel protein phosphatase 5 (PP5 in Leishmania major. Recombinant PP5 is a bona fide phosphatase and is enzymatically active. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed auto-inhibitory roles of the N-terminal region. This is a rational first approach to understand the role of PP5 in the biology of the parasite better as well as its potential future applicability to anti-parasitic intervention.

  5. Influence of Sulfation on the Catalytic Activity of Ni-ZrO2 for NO Reduction with Propane in Excess Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shujuan Zhang; Landong Li; Fuxiang Zhang; Naijia Guan

    2005-01-01

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with propane in excess oxygen was investigated on Ni-ZrO2 (NZ) and sulfated Ni-ZrO2 (SNZ), prepared by coprecipitation from a mixture of nickel nitrate-zirconium oxychloride followed by modifying with (NH4)2SO4. It was found that sulfated Ni-ZrO2catalyst showed higher activity for the SCR of NO with propane than that of Ni-ZrO2. The structural and surface properties of catalysts were studied by XRD, BET, SEM and FT-IR of pyridine adsorption. The experimental results indicated that the modification of (NH4)2SO4 resulted in the generation of strong Bronsted and Lewis acid sites and promoted the dispersion of the Ni species, which could lead to higher NO conversion and propane efficiency in NO reduction.

  6. Catalytic catechol oxidation by copper complexes : development of a structure-activity relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ording-Wenker, Erica C M; Siegler, Maxime A; Lutz, Martin; Bouwman, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    A large library of Cu(II) complexes with mononucleating and dinucleating ligands was synthesized to investigate their potential as catalysts for the catalytic oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC). X-ray structure determination for a number of these complexes revealed relatively large Cu

  7. Catalytic dioxygen activation by Co(II) complexes employing a coordinatively versatile ligand scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savita K; May, Philip S; Jones, Matthew B; Lense, Sheri; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; MacBeth, Cora E

    2011-02-14

    The ligand bis(2-isobutyrylamidophenyl)amine has been prepared and used to stabilize both mononuclear and dinuclear cobalt(II) complexes. The nuclearity of the cobalt product is regulated by the deprotonation state of the ligand. Both complexes catalytically oxidize triphenylphosphine to triphenylphosphine oxide in the presence of O(2).

  8. Catalytic Decomposition of Methylene Chloride by Sulfated Titania Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of methylene chloride in air below 300℃ was studied.Sulfated titania was very effective in converting 959ppm methylene chloride selectively to CO,CO2 and HCl.Complete decomposition of methylene chloride was achieved at low temperature(275℃).It was found that the acidic property of catalyst was a determinant factor for the catalytic activity.The presence of water vapor in the feed stream remarkably reduced the catalytic activity,which could be due to the blockage of acidic sites on the surface of catalyst by water molecules.A bifunctional catalyst comprising copper oxide was developed to improve the selectivity of catalytic oxidation,which indicated that copper oxide can promote the deep oxidation of methylene chloride.The crystal form of TiO2 imposes an important influence upon the catalytic oxidation.

  9. Characterization and activity of alkaline earth metals loaded CeO{sub 2}–MO{sub x} (M = Mn, Fe) mixed oxides in catalytic reduction of NO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Seyed Mahdi [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 5166616471 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niaei, Aligholi, E-mail: niaei@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 5166616471 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Illán Gómez, María José [Carbon Materials and Environment Research Group, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante (Spain); Salari, Dariush; Nakhostin Panahi, Parvaneh [Department of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 5166616471 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abaladejo-Fuentes, Vicente [Carbon Materials and Environment Research Group, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante (Spain)

    2014-02-14

    Nanocrystalline CeO{sub 2}–MO{sub x} mixed oxides (M = Mn, Fe) with different M/(M + Ce) molar ratio are prepared by sol–gel combustion method. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Temperature Programmed Reduction with H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}-TPR) and N{sub 2}-adsorption (BET) analyses are conducted to characterize the physical–chemical properties of the catalysts. The activity of catalysts for reduction of NOx with ammonia has been evaluated. The CeO{sub 2}–MnO{sub x} catalysts showed better low temperature activity than CeO{sub 2}–FeO{sub x}. The superior activity of CeO{sub 2}–MnO{sub x} with Mn/(Mn + Ce) molar ratio of 0.25 respect to other catalysts (with 83% NO conversion and 68% N{sub 2} yield at 200 °C) is associated to nanocrystalline structure, reducibility at low temperature and synergistic effect between Ce and Mn that are observed by XRD, TEM and H{sub 2}-TPR. The CeO{sub 2}–FeO{sub x} catalysts were found to be active at high temperature, being Ce–Fe the best catalyst yielded 82% NO conversion at 300 °C. The effect of alkaline earth metals (Ca, Mg, Sr and Ba) loading on the structure and catalytic activity of cerium mixed oxides are also investigated. Loading of Ba enhanced the NO reduction activity of mixed oxides due to the increase of number of basic sites. Highest performance with 91% NO conversion and 80% N{sub 2} yield attained over CeO{sub 2}–MnO{sub x} (0.25)-Ba (7%) catalyst at 200 °C. - Highlights: • CeO{sub 2}–MO{sub x} mixed oxides (M = Mn, Fe) were synthesized by sol–gel combustion method. • The activity of mixed oxides is evaluated in catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3}. • The CeO{sub 2}–MnO{sub x} showed better activity than CeO{sub 2}–FeO{sub x} due to better redox properties. • Ba loading enhanced the activity due to the increase of number of basic sites. • 91% NO conversion and 80% N{sub 2} yield attained over 7%Ba–Ce{sub 0.75}Mn{sub 0.25}O{sub 2} at 200 °C.

  10. Understanding the catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles through multi-scale simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Simon Hedegaard; Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk;

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how the chemical reactivity of gold nanoparticles depends on the cluster size and shape using a combination of simulation techniques at different length scales, enabling us to model at the atomic level the shapes of clusters in the size range relevant for catalysis. The detailed......-coordinated active sites is found, and their reactivities are extracted from models based on Density Functional Theory calculations. This enables us to determine the chemical activity of clusters in the same range of particle sizes that is accessible experimentally. The variation of reactivity with particle size...... is in excellent agreement with experiments, and we conclude that the experimentally observed trends are mostly explained by the high reactivity of under-coordinated corner atoms on the gold clusters. Other effects, such as the effect of the substrate, may influence the reactivities significantly, but the presence...

  11. Understanding Trends in Catalytic Activity: The Effect of Adsorbate-Adsorbate Interactions for CO Oxidation Over Transition Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabow, Lars; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2010-01-01

    Using high temperature CO oxidation as the example, trends in the reactivity of transition metals are discussed on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Volcano type relations between the catalytic rate and adsorption energies of important intermediates are introduced...... and the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on the trends is discussed. We find that adsorbate-adsorbate interactions significantly increase the activity of strong binding metals (left side of the volcano) but the interactions do not change the relative activity of different metals and have a very small...... influence on the position of the top of the volcano, that is, on which metal is the best catalyst....

  12. Impact of Substituents Attached to N-Heterocyclic Carbenes on the Catalytic Activity of Copper Complexes in the Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds with Triethoxysilane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG, Jiajian; CHEN, Lingzhen; XU, Zheng; HU, Yingqian; LI, Jiayun; BAI, Ying; QIU, Huayu; LAI, Guoqiao

    2009-01-01

    By using functionalized imidazolium salts such as 1-allyl-3-alkylimidazolium or 1-alkyi-3-vinylimidazolium salts as carbene ligand precursors, the reduction of aryl ketones with triethoxysilane may be catalyzed by copper salt/imidazolium salt/KO~tBu systems. The functional substituents attached to the N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) serve to enhance the catalytic activity. Different copper salts also have an effect on the catalytic activity, with copper(Ⅱ) acetate monohydrate being superior to copper(I) chloride.

  13. Production of activated carbon and its catalytic application for oxidation of hydrogen sulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azargohar, Ramin

    coal-based and biomass-based catalysts to 115 and 141 minutes, respectively. The average amounts of sulphur dioxide produced during the reaction time were 0.14 and 0.03% (as % of hydrogen sulphide fed to the reactor) for modified activated carbons prepared from biochar and luscar char, respectively. The effects of porous structure, surface chemistry, and ash content on the performances of these activated carbon catalysts were investigated for the direct oxidation reaction of hydrogen sulphide. The acid-treatment followed by thermal desorption of activated carbons developed the porosity which produced more surface area for active sites and in addition, provided more space for sulphur product storage resulting in higher life time for catalyst. Boehm titration and temperature program desorption showed that the modification method increased basic character of carbon surface after thermal desorption in comparison to acid-treated sample. In addition, the effects of impregnating agents (potassium iodide and manganese nitrate) and two solvents for impregnation process were studied on the performance of the activated carbon catalysts for the direct oxidation of H2S to sulphur. Sulphur L-edge X-ray near edge structure (XANES) showed that the elemental sulphur was the dominant sulphur species in the product. The kinetic study for oxidation reaction of H2S over LusAC-O-D(650) was performed for temperature range of 160-190°C, oxygen to hydrogen sulphide molar ratio of 1-3, and H2S concentration of 6000-10000 ppm at 200 kPa. The values of activation energy were 26.6 and 29.3 kJ.gmol-1 for Eley-Rideal and Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanisms, respectively.

  14. The Surface Groups and Active Site of Fibrous Mineral Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Fa-qin; WAN Pu; FENG Qi-ming; SONG Gong-bao; PENG Tong-jiang; LI Ping; LI Guo-wu

    2004-01-01

    The exposed and transformed groups of fibrous brucite,wollastonite,chrysotile asbestos,sepiolite,palygorskite,clinoptilolite,crocidolite and diatomaceous earth mineral materials are analyzed by IR spectra after acid and alikali etching,strong mechanical and polarity molecular interaction.The results show the active sites concentrate on the ends in stick mineral materials and on the defect or hole edge in pipe mineral materials.The inside active site of mineral materials plays a main role in small molecular substance.The shape of minerals influence their distribution and density of active site.The strong mechanical impulsion and weak chemical force change the active site feature of minerals,the powder process enables minerals exposed more surface group and more combined types.The surface processing with the small polarity molecular or the brand of middle molecular may produce ionation and new coordinate bond,and change the active properties and level of original mineral materials.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of indium substituted nanocrystalline Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In situ modification of the MFI zeolite by incorporation of indium. • The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, UV–vis (DRS), SAA, EDX and SEM. • The incorporation of indium was confirmed by XRD, FT-IR, UV–vis (DRS), EDX and TGA. • Hydroxylation of phenol reaction was studied on the synthesized catalysts. - Abstract: A series of indium doped Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite were synthesized hydrothermally with silicon to aluminium and indium molar ratio of 100 and with aluminium to indium molar ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1. The MFI zeolite phase was identified by XRD and FT-IR analysis. In XRD analysis the prominent peaks were observed at 2θ values of around 6.5° and 23° with a few additional shoulder peaks in case of all the indium incorporated samples suggesting formation of pure phase of the MFI zeolite. All the samples under the present investigation were found to exhibit high crystallinity (∼92%). The crystallite sizes of the samples were found to vary from about 49 to 55 nm. IR results confirmed the formation of MFI zeolite in all cases showing distinct absorbance bands near 1080, 790, 540, 450 and 990 cm−1. TG analysis of In-MFI zeolites showed mass losses in three different steps which are attributed to the loss due to adsorbed water molecules and the two types TPA+ cations. Further, the UV–vis (DRS) studies reflected the position of the indium metal in the zeolite framework. Surface area analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out to characterize the synthesized samples The analysis showed that the specific surface area ranged from ∼357 to ∼361 m2 g−1 and the pore volume of the synthesized samples ranged from 0.177 to 0.182 cm3 g−1. The scanning electron microscopy studies showed the structure of the samples to be rectangular and twinned rectangular shaped. The EDX analysis was carried out for confirmation of Si, Al and In in zeolite frame work. The catalytic activities of the synthesized samples were

  16. Synthesis and catalytic activity of Ln(III) complexes with an unsymmetrical Schiff base including multigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO; Kemin; (

    2003-01-01

    [1]Elder, R. C., Tridentate and unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base ligands from salicylaldehydes and dimeric nickel(II) complexes, Aust. J. Chem., 1978, 31:35-45.[2]Atkins, R., Brewer, G., Kokot, G. et al., Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexesof unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base ligand, Inorg. Chem., 1985, 24: 127-134.[3]Meng Qingjin, Wang Ruixue, Bu Xiuren et al., New Ni (II) complexes with mixedtrimeric double Schiff ligands, Chemical Journal of Chinese Universities (in Chinese), 1990, 10: 1126-1130.[4]Yao Kemin, Zhou Wen, Lu Gui et al., Synthesis, mechanism and NMR spectra of lanthanide complexes with a novel unsymmetrical Schiff base, Science in China, Series B, 1999, 42(2): 164-169.[5]Yao Kemin, Li Ning, Huang Qiaohong et al., Synthesis and catalytic activity of novel heteronuclear Ln(III)-Cu(II) complexes with noncyclic polyether-amino acid Schiff base, Science in China, Series B, 1999, 42 (1) : 54-81.[6]Li Ning, Yao Kemin, Lou Kaiyan, Synthesis of La(III), Y(III) complexes with polyglycol aldehyde-amino acid Schiff base and their high resolution solid state 13C NMR spectra, Science in China, Series B, 1999, 42(6): 599-604.[7]Lam Berf, J. B., Shurvell, H. F., Verbet, L. et al., Organic Structural Analysis, New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. Inc., 1975, 234-250.[8]Yao Kemin, Cai Lezhen, Shen Liangfang et al., Synthesis and characterization of lanthanide perchlorates with noncyclic polyethylene glycols and their 13C-NMRspectra, Polyhedron, 1992,11(7): 2245-2251.[9]Dewar, M. J. S., Zoebisch, E. G., Healy, E. F., AM1: A new general purpose quantum mechanical molecular model, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 1985, 107: 3902-3909.[10]Feifer, P., Avnjr, D., Chemistry in noninteger dimensions between two and three, I. Fractal theory of heterogeneous surfaces, J. Chem. Phys., 1983, 79(7): 3558-3565.[11]Yang Haifeng, Wang Hui, Duan Jinxia et al., Ab initio research of organic ligand Schiff base 4-[(2-hydroxyphenyl) imine]-2

  17. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of indium substituted nanocrystalline Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Kishor Kr. [Department of Chemistry, ADP College, Nagaon, Assam 782002 (India); Nandi, Mithun [Department of Chemistry, Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam 781014 (India); Talukdar, Anup K., E-mail: anup_t@sify.com [Department of Chemistry, Gauhati University, Guwahati, Assam 781014 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • In situ modification of the MFI zeolite by incorporation of indium. • The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, UV–vis (DRS), SAA, EDX and SEM. • The incorporation of indium was confirmed by XRD, FT-IR, UV–vis (DRS), EDX and TGA. • Hydroxylation of phenol reaction was studied on the synthesized catalysts. - Abstract: A series of indium doped Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite were synthesized hydrothermally with silicon to aluminium and indium molar ratio of 100 and with aluminium to indium molar ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1. The MFI zeolite phase was identified by XRD and FT-IR analysis. In XRD analysis the prominent peaks were observed at 2θ values of around 6.5° and 23° with a few additional shoulder peaks in case of all the indium incorporated samples suggesting formation of pure phase of the MFI zeolite. All the samples under the present investigation were found to exhibit high crystallinity (∼92%). The crystallite sizes of the samples were found to vary from about 49 to 55 nm. IR results confirmed the formation of MFI zeolite in all cases showing distinct absorbance bands near 1080, 790, 540, 450 and 990 cm{sup −1}. TG analysis of In-MFI zeolites showed mass losses in three different steps which are attributed to the loss due to adsorbed water molecules and the two types TPA{sup +} cations. Further, the UV–vis (DRS) studies reflected the position of the indium metal in the zeolite framework. Surface area analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out to characterize the synthesized samples The analysis showed that the specific surface area ranged from ∼357 to ∼361 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and the pore volume of the synthesized samples ranged from 0.177 to 0.182 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. The scanning electron microscopy studies showed the structure of the samples to be rectangular and twinned rectangular shaped. The EDX analysis was carried out for confirmation of Si, Al and In in zeolite frame work. The catalytic activities of

  18. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  19. Extended Synaptotagmin Interaction with the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Depends on Receptor Conformation, Not Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Michel G; Herdman, Chelsea; Guillou, François; Mishra, Prakash K; Baril, Joëlle; Bellenfant, Sabrina; Moss, Tom

    2015-06-26

    We previously demonstrated that ESyt2 interacts specifically with the activated FGF receptor and is required for a rapid phase of receptor internalization and for functional signaling via the ERK pathway in early Xenopus embryos. ESyt2 is one of the three-member family of Extended Synaptotagmins that were recently shown to be implicated in the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-plasma membrane (PM) junctions and in the Ca(2+) dependent regulation of these junctions. Here we show that ESyt2 is directed to the ER by its putative transmembrane domain, that the ESyts hetero- and homodimerize, and that ESyt2 homodimerization in vivo requires a TM adjacent sequence but not the SMP domain. ESyt2 and ESyt3, but not ESyt1, selectively interact in vivo with activated FGFR1. In the case of ESyt2, this interaction requires a short TM adjacent sequence and is independent of receptor autophosphorylation, but dependent on receptor conformation. The data show that ESyt2 recognizes a site in the upper kinase lobe of FGFR1 that is revealed by displacement of the kinase domain activation loop during receptor activation.

  20. Influence of basic properties of Mg,Al-mixed oxides on their catalytic activity in knoevenagel condensation between benzaldehyde and phenylsulfonylacetonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad Noda Pérez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of Mg,Al-mixed oxides (MO20, MO25 and MO33 derived from hydrotalcites was evaluated in the Knoevenagel reaction between benzaldehyde and phenylsulfonylacetonitrile at 373 and 383 K. The best results were obtained for the sample MO20 that presented the highest basic sites density and external area and the smallest crystallite sizes. The relative amount of basic sites with weak to intermediate strength also played an important role on catalytic performance. By increasing the catalyst content from 1 to 5 wt.% at 383 K, a complete conversion of the reactants is attained, producing α-phenylsulfonylcinnamonitrile with a selectivity of 100%.

  1. Synthesis of chitosan supported palladium nanoparticles and its catalytic activity towards 2-nitrophenol reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanavel, S.; Nivethaa, E. A. K.; Esther, G.; Narayanan, V.; Stephen, A.

    2016-05-01

    Chitosan supported Palladium nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple cost effective chemical reduction method using NaBH4. The prepared nanocomposite was characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis, FESEM and Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis of X-rays (EDAX). The catalytic performance of the nanocomposite was evaluated on the reduction of 2-Nitrophenol to the 2-Amino phenol with rate constant 1.08 × 10-3 S-1 by NaBH4 using Spectrophotometer.

  2. Catalytic activity of MoS2 nanotubes in the hydrodesulphurization reaction of dibenzothiophene

    OpenAIRE

    F. Leonard-Deepak; R. Pérez-Hernández; Cruz-Reyes, J; Fuentes, S.; M.J. Yacaman

    2011-01-01

    In the need for developing better fuels and as a consequence better hydrodesulphurization catalysts (HDS), new generations of catalysts are necessary to reduce substantially the sulfur content in diesel and gasoline fuels. HDS are catalytic processes that involve Mo or W- based catalysts, often doped with other transition metals. We synthesized MoS 2 nanotubes by reacting MoO 3 with thiourea and used them as catalysts for the hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene in a batch reactor. X-ray ...

  3. 纳米N掺杂TiO2的制备及可见光催化活性研究%Preparation of Nitrogen-doped TiO2 Nanoparticle Catalyst and Its Catalytic Activity under Visible Light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    於煌; 郑旭煦; 殷钟意; 陶丰; 房蓓蓓; 侯苛山

    2007-01-01

    N-doped TiO2 nanoparticle photocatalysts were prepared through a sol-gel procedure using NH4Cl as the nitrogen source and followed by calcination at certain temperature. Systematic studies for the preparation parameters and their impact on the structure and photocatalytic activity under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light irradiation were carried out. Multiple techniques (XRD,TEM,DRIF,DSC,and XPS) were commanded to characterize the crystal structures and chemical binding of N-doped TiO2. Its photocatalytic activity was examined by the degradation of organic compounds. The catalytic activity of the prepared N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles under visible light (λ>400nm) irradiation is evidenced by the decomposition of 4-chlorophenol,showing that nitrogen atoms in the N-doped TiO2 nanoparticle catalyst are responsible for the visible light catalytic activity. The N-doped TiO2 nanoparticle catalyst prepared with this modified route exhibits higher catalytic activity under UV irradiation in contrast to TiO2 without N-doping. It is suggested that the doped nitrogen here is located at the interstitial site of TiO2 lattice.

  4. Catalytic activities of ultra-small β-FeOOH nanorods in ozonation of 4-chlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oputu, Ogheneochuko; Chowdhury, Mahabubur; Nyamayaro, Kudzanai; Fatoki, Olalekan; Fester, Veruscha

    2015-09-01

    We report the catalytic properties of ultra-small β-FeOOH nanorods in ozonation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). XRD, TEM, EDS, SAED, FTIR and BET were used to characterize the prepared material. Interaction between O3 and β-FeOOH was evident from the FTIR spectra. The removal efficiency of 4-CP was significantly enhanced in the presence of β-FeOOH compared to ozone alone. Removal efficiency of 99% and 67% was achieved after 40min in the presence of combined ozone and catalyst and ozone only, respectively. Increasing catalyst load increased COD removal efficiency. Maximum COD removal of 97% was achieved using a catalyst load of 0.1g/100mL of 4-CP solution. Initial 4-CP concentration was not found to be rate limiting below 2×10(-3)mol/L. The catalytic properties of the material during ozonation process were found to be pronounced at lower initial pH of 3.5. Two stage first order kinetics was applied to describe the kinetic behavior of the nanorods at low pH. The first stage of catalytic ozonation was attributed to the heterogeneous surface breakdown of O3 by β-FeOOH, while the second stage was attributed to homogeneous catalysis initiated by reductive dissolution of β-FeOOH at low pH. PMID:26354696

  5. Fluorescence energy transfer studies on the active site of papain

    OpenAIRE

    Henes, Jill B.; Briggs, Martha S.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Fruton, Joseph S.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements have been performed of the excited-state lifetimes and fluorescence yields of papain tryptophan units when acyl derivatives of Phe-glycinal are bound at the active site of the enzyme. The enhancement of tryptophan fluorescence in complexes of papain with the acetyl or benzyloxycarbonyl derivatives is not stereospecific with respect to the configuration of the phenylalanyl residue, and the L and D isomers are equally effective as active-site-directed inhibitors of papain action. E...

  6. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Michael J.

    2005-06-01

    Natural selection in highly radioactive waste sites may yield bacteria with favorable bioremediating characteristics. However, until recently the microbial ecology of such environments has remained unexplored because of the high costs and technical complexities associated with extracting and characterizing samples from such sites. We have examined the bacterial ecology within radioactive sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume in the vadose zone on the DOE?s Hanford Site in south-central Washington state (Fredrickson et al, 2004). Manganese-dependent, radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from this contaminated site including the highly Mn-dependent Deinococcus and Arthrobacter spp.

  7. Relevance of Co, Ag-ferrierite catalysts acidity and cation siting to CH4-NOx-SCR activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of acidity on Ag.Co exchanged ferrierite obtained from different parent forms was tested in CH4-DeNOx reaction. Ag and Co cation siting distribution and residual zeolite acidity were evaluated by means of a quantitative evaluation of catalyst acidity through NH3-TPD experiments and a detailed structural catalyst characterization by Rietveld refinement. A new nomenclature for the cation sites in hydrated and dehydrated cation exchange ferrierites was introduced for sake of clarity. The sites relative populations obtained by the UV-Vis spectra did not agree with the values given by the Rietveld refinement and the SCR. activity scale since the high abundance of Co cations in the retained most active position. Co2a, was shown by the less active catalyst obtained from the Na,K form. It was concluded that SCR activity does not only depend on Co and Ag siting within the zeolite framework but also by the presence of residual acidity evidenced on the most active catalysts. CH4 combustion tests showed that the presence of residual acidity appears relevant to SCR catalytic performances, likely related to its ability in methane activation. The importance of the coexistence of Co and zeolitic, acid sites for the HC-SCR suggested that SCR reaction could proceed on a dual site.

  8. Calpain-Mediated Processing of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Generates a Cytosolic Soluble Catalytically Active N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough pathogen, secretes several virulence factors among which adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT is essential for establishment of the disease in the respiratory tract. ACT weakens host defenses by suppressing important bactericidal activities of the phagocytic cells. Up to now, it was believed that cell intoxication by ACT was a consequence of the accumulation of abnormally high levels of cAMP, generated exclusively beneath the host plasma membrane by the toxin N-terminal catalytic adenylate cyclase (AC domain, upon its direct translocation across the lipid bilayer. Here we show that host calpain, a calcium-dependent Cys-protease, is activated into the phagocytes by a toxin-triggered calcium rise, resulting in the proteolytic cleavage of the toxin N-terminal domain that releases a catalytically active "soluble AC". The calpain-mediated ACT processing allows trafficking of the "soluble AC" domain into subcellular organella. At least two strategic advantages arise from this singular toxin cleavage, enhancing the specificity of action, and simultaneously preventing an indiscriminate activation of cAMP effectors throughout the cell. The present study provides novel insights into the toxin mechanism of action, as the calpain-mediated toxin processing would confer ACT the capacity for a space- and time-coordinated production of different cAMP "pools", which would play different roles in the cell pathophysiology.

  9. Catalytically active telomerase holoenzyme is assembled in the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus during S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Lee, Yang Sin; Jeong, Sun Ah; Khadka, Prabhat; Roth, Jürgen; Chung, In Kwon

    2014-02-01

    The maintenance of human telomeres requires the ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase, which is composed of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), telomerase RNA component, and several additional proteins for assembly and activity. Telomere elongation by telomerase in human cancer cells involves multiple steps including telomerase RNA biogenesis, holoenzyme assembly, intranuclear trafficking, and telomerase recruitment to telomeres. Although telomerase has been shown to accumulate in Cajal bodies for association with telomeric chromatin, it is unclear where and how the assembly and trafficking of catalytically active telomerase is regulated in the context of nuclear architecture. Here, we show that the catalytically active holoenzyme is initially assembled in the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus during S phase. The telomerase RNP is retained in nucleoli through the interaction of hTERT with nucleolin, a major nucleolar phosphoprotein. Upon association with TCAB1 in S phase, the telomerase RNP is transported from nucleoli to Cajal bodies, suggesting that TCAB1 acts as an S-phase-specific holoenzyme component. Furthermore, depletion of TCAB1 caused an increase in the amount of telomerase RNP associated with nucleolin. These results suggest that the TCAB1-dependent trafficking of telomerase to Cajal bodies occurs in a step separate from the holoenzyme assembly in nucleoli. Thus, we propose that the dense fibrillar component is the provider of active telomerase RNP for supporting the continued proliferation of cancer and stem cells.

  10. Catalytic activity and effect of modifiers on Ni-based catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso-Quiroga, Maria Martha; Castro-Luna, Adolfo Eduardo [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico-Sociales INTEQUI-CONICET-UNSL, Av. 25 de Mayo 384 (5730) Villa Mercedes (S.L.) (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    Ni catalysts supported on different ceramic oxides (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}) were prepared by wet impregnation. The catalytic behavior toward hydrogen production through the dry reforming of methane using a fixed-bed reactor was evaluated under certain experimental conditions, and the catalyst supported on ZrO{sub 2} showed the highest stable activity during the period of time studied. The catalyst supported on CeO{sub 2} has a relatively good activity, but shows signs of deactivation after a certain time during the reaction. This catalyst was chosen to be studied after the addition of 0.5 wt% Li and K as activity modifiers. The introduction of the alkaline metals produces a reduction of the catalytic activity but a better stability over the reactant conversion time. The reverse water-gas shift reaction influences the global system of reactions, and as the results indicate, should be considered near equilibrium. (author)

  11. Active Site Loop Dynamics of a Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegan, Scott D. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States); Rukseree, Kamolchanok [National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), Tha Khlong (Thailand); Capodagli, Glenn C. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States); Baker, Erica A. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States); Krasnykh, Olga [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Franzblau, Scott G. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Mesecar, Andrew D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2013-01-08

    The class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs, EC 4.1.2.13) comprises one of two families of aldolases. Instead of forming a Schiff base intermediate using an ε-amino group of a lysine side chain, class II FBAs utilize Zn(II) to stabilize a proposed hydroxyenolate intermediate (HEI) in the reversible cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, forming glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). As class II FBAs have been shown to be essential in pathogenic bacteria, focus has been placed on these enzymes as potential antibacterial targets. Although structural studies of class II FBAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtFBA), other bacteria, and protozoa have been reported, the structure of the active site loop responsible for catalyzing the protonation–deprotonation steps of the reaction for class II FBAs has not yet been observed. We therefore utilized the potent class II FBA inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) as a mimic of the HEI- and DHAP-bound form of the enzyme and determined the X-ray structure of the MtFBA–PGH complex to 1.58 Å. Remarkably, we are able to observe well-defined electron density for the previously elusive active site loop of MtFBA trapped in a catalytically competent orientation. Utilization of this structural information and site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies conducted on a series of residues within the active site loop revealed that E169 facilitates a water-mediated deprotonation–protonation step of the MtFBA reaction mechanism. Furthermore, solvent isotope effects on MtFBA and catalytically relevant mutants were used to probe the effect of loop flexibility on catalytic efficiency. Additionally, we also reveal the structure of MtFBA in its holoenzyme form.

  12. Base Catalytic Approach: A Promising Technique for the Activation of Biochar for Equilibrium Sorption Studies of Copper, Cu(II Ions in Single Solute System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah Bee Abdul Hamid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the feasibility of catalytically pretreated biochar derived from the dried exocarp or fruit peel of mangostene with Group I alkali metal hydroxide (KOH. The pretreated char was activated in the presence of carbon dioxide gas flow at high temperature to upgrade its physiochemical properties for the removal of copper, Cu(II cations in single solute system. The effect of three independent variables, including temperature, agitation time and concentration, on sorption performance were carried out. Reaction kinetics parameters were determined by using linear regression analysis of the pseudo first, pseudo second, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models. The regression co-efficient, R2 values were best for the pseudo second order kinetic model for all the concentration ranges under investigation. This implied that Cu(II cations were adsorbed mainly by chemical interactions with the surface active sites of the activated biochar. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used to interpret the equilibrium data at different temperature. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The surface area of the activated sample was 367.10 m2/g, whereas before base activation, it was only 1.22 m2/g. The results elucidated that the base pretreatment was efficient enough to yield porous carbon with an enlarged surface area, which can successfully eliminate Cu(II cations from waste water.

  13. Active site of Zn2+-dependent sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Suk Han

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gro1PDH, EC 1.1.1.261 is key to the formation of the enantiomeric configuration of the glycerophosphate backbone (sn-glycerol-1-phosphate of archaeal ether lipids. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible conversion between dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glycerol-1-phosphate. To date, no information about the active site and catalytic mechanism of this enzyme has been reported. Using the sequence and structural information for glycerol dehydrogenase, we constructed six mutants (D144N, D144A, D191N, H271A, H287A and D191N/H271A of Gro1PDH from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and examined their characteristics to clarify the active site of this enzyme. The enzyme was found to be a zinc-dependent metalloenzyme, containing one zinc ion for every monomer protein that was essential for activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of D144 increased the activity of the enzyme. Mutants D144N and D144A exhibited low affinity for the substrates and higher activity than the wild type, but their affinity for the zinc ion was the same as that of the wild type. Mutants D191N, H271A and H287A had a low affinity for the zinc ion and a low activity compared with the wild type. The double mutation, D191N/ H271A, had no enzyme activity and bound no zinc. From these results, it was clarified that residues D191, H271 and H287 participate in the catalytic activity of the enzyme by binding the zinc ion, and that D144 has an effect on substrate binding. The structure of the active site of Gro1PDH from A. pernix K1 seems to be similar to that of glycerol dehydrogenase, despite the differences in substrate specificity and biological role.

  14. Increased biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis by reduced overconsumption of amino acids and increased catalytic activities of enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaarel Adamberg

    Full Text Available Steady state cultivation and multidimensional data analysis (metabolic fluxes, absolute proteome, and transcriptome are used to identify parameters that control the increase in biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis from 0.10 to 0.12 C-mol C-mol(-1 with an increase in specific growth rate by 5 times from 0.1 to 0.5 h(-1. Reorganization of amino acid consumption was expressed by the inactivation of the arginine deiminase pathway at a specific growth rate of 0.35 h(-1 followed by reduced over-consumption of pyruvate directed amino acids (asparagine, serine, threonine, alanine and cysteine until almost all consumed amino acids were used only for protein synthesis at maximal specific growth rate. This balanced growth was characterized by a high glycolytic flux carrying up to 87% of the carbon flow and only amino acids that relate to nucleotide synthesis (glutamine, serine and asparagine were consumed in higher amounts than required for cellular protein synthesis. Changes in the proteome were minor (mainly increase in the translation apparatus. Instead, the apparent catalytic activities of enzymes and ribosomes increased by 3.5 times (0.1 vs 0.5 h(-1. The apparent catalytic activities of glycolytic enzymes and ribosomal proteins were seen to follow this regulation pattern while those of enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism increased more than the specific growth rate (over 5.5 times. Nucleotide synthesis formed the most abundant biomonomer synthetic pathway in the cells with an expenditure of 6% from the total ATP required for biosynthesis. Due to the increase in apparent catalytic activity, ribosome translation was more efficient at higher growth rates as evidenced by a decrease of protein to mRNA ratios. All these effects resulted in a 30% decrease of calculated ATP spilling (0.1 vs 0.5 h(-1. Our results show that bioprocesses can be made more efficient (using a balanced metabolism by varying the growth conditions.

  15. Key messages from active CO2 storage sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildenborg, T.; Wollenweber, J. [TNO, Princetonlaan 6, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Chadwick, A. [BGS, Environmental Science Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Deflandre, J.P. [IFP Energies nouvelles, 1-4 avenue de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Eiken, O. [Statoil Research Centre, Rotvoll, Arkitekt Ebbells vei 10, 7005 Trondheim (Norway); Mathieson, A. [BP, Alternative Energy, Chertsey Road, Sunbury on Thames (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, R. [QUINTESSA, The Hub, 14 Station Road, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Schmidt Hattenberger, C. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Centre for CO2Storage, Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    An extensive programme of modelling, monitoring and verification activities was deployed at a set of active storage sites worldwide including Sleipner, In Salah, Ketzin, Weyburn, K12-B and Snoehvit (EU CO2ReMoVe project). All investigated storage sites were well managed and did not have a negative impact on humans or the environment. Time-lapse seismic and pressure monitoring are key in verifying the deep subsurface performance of the storage sites. Evidence gathered during the site characterisation and operational phases is key to handover responsibility of the storage site to governmental authorities after injection has definitely ceased, which is the focus of the follow-up EU project CO2CARE.

  16. The catalytic residues of Tn3 resolvase

    OpenAIRE

    Olorunniji, F.J.; Stark, W M

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the residues that participate in the catalysis of DNA cleavage and rejoining by the site-specific recombinase Tn3 resolvase, we mutated conserved polar or charged residues in the catalytic domain of an activated resolvase variant. We analysed the effects of mutations at 14 residues on proficiency in binding to the recombination site ('site I'), formation of a synaptic complex between two site Is, DNA cleavage and recombination. Mutations of Y6, R8, S10, D36, R68 and R71 result...

  17. Stable Alkynyl Glycosyl Carbonates: Catalytic Anomeric Activation and Synthesis of a Tridecasaccharide Reminiscent of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Lipoarabinomannan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bijoyananda; Neralkar, Mahesh; Hotha, Srinivas

    2016-06-27

    Oligosaccharide synthesis is still a challenging task despite the advent of modern glycosidation techniques. Herein, alkynyl glycosyl carbonates are shown to be stable glycosyl donors that can be activated catalytically by gold and silver salts at 25 °C in just 15 min to produce glycosides in excellent yields. Benzoyl glycosyl carbonate donors are solid compounds with a long shelf life. This operationally simple protocol was found to be highly efficient for the synthesis of nucleosides, amino acids, and phenolic and azido glycoconjugates. Repeated use of the carbonate glycosidation method enabled the highly convergent synthesis of tridecaarabinomannan in a rapid manner. PMID:26879797

  18. New Element Organic Frameworks Based on Sn, Sb, and Bi, with Permanent Porosity and High Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Fritsch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present new element organic frameworks based on Sn, Sb and Bi atoms connected via organic linkers by element-carbon bonds. The open frameworks are characterized by specific surface areas (BET of up to 445 m2 g-1 and a good stability under ambient conditions resulting from a highly hydrophobic inner surface. They show good performance as heterogeneous catalysts in the cyanosylilation of benzaldehyde as a test reaction. Due to their catalytic activity, this class of materials might be able to replace common homogeneous element-organic and often highly toxic catalysts especially in the food industry.

  19. Effect of preparation method on the catalytic activity of Au/CeO_2 for VOCs oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锦卫; 黎维彬

    2010-01-01

    The Au/CeO2 catalysts were synthesized by co-precipitation (CP), deposition-precipitation (DP) and metallic colloids deposition (MCD) method, and tested for oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). It was revealed that the Au/CeO2 catalyst prepared by DP method was the most efficient catalyst towards the total oxidation of toluene. The Au/CeO2 catalysts had obviously high catalytic activity, and the best results was obtained on 3 wt.% Au/CeO2 catalyst prepared by DP method. These catalysts were chara...

  20. Near-Monodisperse Ni-Cu Bimetallic Nanocrystals of Variable Composition: Controlled Synthesis and Catalytic Activity for H2 Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yawen; Huang, Wenyu; Habas, Susan E.; Kuhn, John N.; Grass, Michael E.; Yamada, Yusuke; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-22

    Near-monodisperse Ni{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x} (x = 0.2-0.8) bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized by a one-pot thermolysis approach in oleylamine/1-octadecene, using metal acetylacetonates as precursors. The nanocrystals form large-area 2D superlattices, and display a catalytic synergistic effect in the hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} to generate H{sub 2} at x = 0.5 in a strongly basic medium. The Ni{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5} nanocrystals show the lowest activation energy, and also exhibit the highest H{sub 2} generation rate at 298 K.

  1. Syntheses, characterizations, and catalytic activities of mesostructured aluminophosphates with tailorable acidity assembled with various preformed zeolite nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Suo, Hongri

    2015-02-25

    © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. A series of ordered hexagonal mesoporous zeolites have been successfully synthesized by the assembly of various preformed aluminosilicates zeolite (MFI, FAU, BEA etc.) with surfactants (cetyltrimethylammonium chloride) under hydrothermal conditions. These unique samples were further characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption, infrared spectroscopy. Characterization results showed that these samples contain primary and secondary structural building units of various zeolites, which may be responsible for their distinguished acidic strength, suggesting that the acidic strength of these mesoporous silicoaluminophosphates could be tailored and controlled. Furthermore, the prepared samples were catalytically active in the cracking of cumene.

  2. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with [14C]iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined

  3. Copper sulfide nanoparticle-decorated graphene as a catalytic amplification platform for electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Juan; Han, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Yao, Hui-Qin; Gao, Zuo-Ning

    2015-06-01

    Copper sulfide nanoparticle-decorated graphene sheet (CuS/GR) was successfully synthesized and used as a signal amplification platform for electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity. First, CuS/GR was prepared through a microwave-assisted hydrothermal approach. The CuS/GR nanocomposites exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of ALP hydrolyzed products such as 1-naphthol, which produced a current response. Thus, a catalytic amplification platform based on CuS/GR nanocomposite for electrochemical detection of ALP activity was designed using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a model substrate. The current response increased linearly with ALP concentration from 0.1 to 100 U L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.02 U L(-1). The assay was applied to estimate ALP activity in human serum samples with satisfactory results. This strategy may find widespread and promising applications in other sensing systems that involves ALP.

  4. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:27494400

  5. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme.

  6. Evolutionary divergence in the catalytic activity of the CAM-1, ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis W Bainbridge

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors (ROR 1 and 2 are atypical members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family and have been associated with several human diseases. The vertebrate RORs contain an ATP binding domain that deviates from the consensus amino acid sequence, although the impact of this deviation on catalytic activity is not known and the kinase function of these receptors remains controversial. Recently, ROR2 was shown to signal through a Wnt responsive, β-catenin independent pathway and suppress a canonical Wnt/β-catenin signal. In this work we demonstrate that both ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains are catalytically deficient while CAM-1, the C. elegans homolog of ROR, has an active tyrosine kinase domain, suggesting a divergence in the signaling processes of the ROR family during evolution. In addition, we show that substitution of the non-consensus residues from ROR1 or ROR2 into CAM-1 and MuSK markedly reduce kinase activity, while restoration of the consensus residues in ROR does not restore robust kinase function. We further demonstrate that the membrane-bound extracellular domain alone of either ROR1 or ROR2 is sufficient for suppression of canonical Wnt3a signaling, and that this domain can also enhance Wnt5a suppression of Wnt3a signaling. Based on these data, we conclude that human ROR1 and ROR2 are RTK-like pseudokinases.

  7. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Trigonella foenum-graecum and its size-dependent catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathy Aromal, S.; Philip, Daizy

    2012-11-01

    The development of new synthesis methods for monodispersed nanocrystals using cheap and nontoxic chemicals, environmentally benign solvents and renewable materials remains a challenge to the scientific community. Most of the current methods involve known protocols which may be potentially harmful to either environment or human health. Recent research has been focused on green synthesis methods to produce new nanomaterials, ecofriendly and safer with sustainable commercial viability. The present work reports the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using the aqueous extract of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) as reducing and protecting agent. The pathway is based on the reduction of AuCl4- by the extract of fenugreek. This method is simple, efficient, economic and nontoxic. Gold nanoparticles having different sizes in the range from 15 to 25 nm could be obtained by controlling the synthesis parameters. The nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles is evident from clear lattice fringes in the HRTEM images, bright circular spots in the SAED pattern and peaks in the XRD pattern. FTIR spectrum indicates the presence of different functional groups present in the biomolecule capping the nanoparticles. The synthesized gold nanoparticles show good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by excess NaBH4. The catalytic activity is found to be size-dependent, the smaller nanoparticles showing faster activity.

  8. Triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI): phage display and antibodies as tools for finding target regions to inhibit catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Ayala, Víctor; Belmont, Iaraset; Abraham, Landa

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies against triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI) can alter its enzymatic catalysis. In the present study, we used antibodies produced against the NH2-terminal region of TTPI (1/3NH2TTPI) and the phage display technology to find target regions to inhibit TTPI activity. As a first step, we obtained polyclonal antibodies against non-conserved regions from the 1/3NH2TTPI, which had an inhibitory effect of about 74 % on catalytic activity. Afterward, they were used to screen a library of phage-displayed dodecapeptides; as a result, 41 phage mimotope clones were isolated and grouped according to their amino acid sequence, finding the consensus A1 (VPTXPI), A2 (VPTXXI), B (LTPGQ), and D (DPLPR). Antibodies against selected phage mimotope clones were obtained by rabbit's immunization; these ones clearly recognized TTPI by both Western blot and ELISA. However, only the mimotope PDTS16 (DSVTPTSVMAVA) clone, which belongs to the VPTXXI consensus, raised antibodies capable of inhibiting the TTPI catalytic activity in 45 %. Anti-PDTS16 antibodies were confronted to several synthetic peptides that encompass the 1/3NH2TTPI, and they only recognized three, which share the motif FDTLQK belonging to the helix-α1 in TTPI. This suggests that this motif is the main part of the epitope recognized by anti-PDTS16 antibodies and revealed its importance for TTPI catalysis.

  9. Catalytic activity vs. size correlation in platinum catalysts of PEM fuel cells prepared on carbon black by different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nores-Pondal, F.J.; Granada, M.; Corti, H.R. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vilella, I.M.J.; de Miguel, S.R.; Scelza, O.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica (INCAPE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica (Universidad Nacional del Litoral) - CONICET, Santiago del Estero 2654, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Troiani, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2009-10-15

    In this work nanoparticulated platinum catalysts have been prepared on carbon Vulcan XC-72 using three methods starting with chloroplatinic acid as a precursor: (i) formic acid as a reductor agent; (ii) impregnation method followed by reduction in hydrogen atmosphere at moderated temperature; and (iii) microwave-assisted reduction in ethylene glycol. The catalytic and size studies were also performed on a commercial Pt catalyst (E-Tek, De Nora). The characterization of the particle size and distribution was performed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The characterizations of the catalytic and electrocatalytic properties of the catalysts were determined by studying the cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction (CHD) and the behavior under cyclic voltammetry (CV) in sulfuric acid solutions. The measured electrochemical activity, along with the hydrogen chemisorption of the catalysts allows the estimation of effective particle sizes, which are much larger than those measured by TEM and XRD. The catalysts prepared by reduction with formic acid and ethylene glycol (microwave-assisted) show electrochemical activities very close to those of the commercial catalyst, and are almost insensitive to the Pt dispersion or Pt particle size. The chemical activity in CHD correlates well with the metallic dispersion determined by hydrogen chemisorption, indicating similar accesibility of H{sub 2} and cyclohexane to the catalyst surface. (author)

  10. Highly stable and re-dispersible nano Cu hydrosols with sensitively size-dependent catalytic and antibacterial activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Gang; Wang, Wenzhao; Chen, Liang; Lu, Daoqiang Daniel; Sun, Rong; Zhou, Feng; Wong, Chingping

    2015-08-01

    Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the obtained Cu colloidal nanoparticles was controlled from 0.96 to 26.26 nm by adjusting the dosage of the copper precursor. Moreover, the highly stable nano Cu hydrosols could be easily concentrated and re-dispersed in water meanwhile maintaining good dispersibility. A model catalytic reaction of reducing p-nitrophenol with NaBH4 in the presence of nano Cu hydrosols with different sizes was performed to set up the relationship between the apparent kinetic rate constant (kapp) and the particle size of Cu catalysts. The experimental results indicate that the corresponding kapp showed an obvious size-dependency. Calculations revealed that kapp was directly proportional to the surface area of Cu catalyst nanoparticles, and also proportional to the reciprocal of the particle size based on the same mass of Cu catalysts. This relationship might be a universal principle for predicting and assessing the catalytic efficiency of Cu nanoparticles. The activation energy (Ea) of this catalytic reaction when using 0.96 nm Cu hydrosol as a catalyst was calculated to be 9.37 kJ mol-1, which is considered an extremely low potential barrier. In addition, the synthesized nano Cu hydrosols showed size-dependent antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and the minimal inhibitory concentration of the optimal sample was lower than 5.82 μg L-1.Highly stable monodispersed nano Cu hydrosols were facilely prepared by an aqueous chemical reduction method through selecting copper hydroxide (Cu(OH)2) as the copper precursor, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and ethanol amine (EA) as the complexing agents, and hydrazine hydrate as the reducing agent. The size of the

  11. An active site-tail interaction in the structure of hexahistidine-tagged Thermoplasma acidophilum citrate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jesse R; Donini, Stefano; Kappock, T Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) plays a central metabolic role in aerobes and many other organisms. The CS reaction comprises two half-reactions: a Claisen aldol condensation of acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) and oxaloacetate (OAA) that forms citryl-CoA (CitCoA), and CitCoA hydrolysis. Protein conformational changes that `close' the active site play an important role in the assembly of a catalytically competent condensation active site. CS from the thermoacidophile Thermoplasma acidophilum (TpCS) possesses an endogenous Trp fluorophore that can be used to monitor the condensation reaction. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of TpCS fused to a C-terminal hexahistidine tag (TpCSH6) reported here is an `open' structure that, when compared with several liganded TpCS structures, helps to define a complete path for active-site closure. One active site in each dimer binds a neighboring His tag, the first nonsubstrate ligand known to occupy both the AcCoA and OAA binding sites. Solution data collectively suggest that this fortuitous interaction is stabilized by the crystalline lattice. As a polar but almost neutral ligand, the active site-tail interaction provides a new starting point for the design of bisubstrate-analog inhibitors of CS. PMID:26457521

  12. Enhanced Intrinsic Catalytic Activity of λ-MnO2 by Electrochemical Tuning and Oxygen Vacancy Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sanghan; Nam, Gyutae; Sun, Jie; Lee, Jang-Soo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Chen, Wei; Cho, Jaephil; Cui, Yi

    2016-07-18

    Chemically prepared λ-MnO2 has not been intensively studied as a material for metal-air batteries, fuel cells, or supercapacitors because of their relatively poor electrochemical properties compared to α- and δ-MnO2 . Herein, through the electrochemical removal of lithium from LiMn2 O4 , highly crystalline λ-MnO2 was prepared as an efficient electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The ORR activity of the material was further improved by introducing oxygen vacancies (OVs) that could be achieved by increasing the calcination temperature during LiMn2 O4 synthesis; a concentration of oxygen vacancies in LiMn2 O4 could be characterized by its voltage profile as the cathode in a lithiun-metal half-cell. λ-MnO2-z prepared with the highest OV exhibited the highest diffusion-limited ORR current (5.5 mA cm(-2) ) among a series of λ-MnO2-z electrocatalysts. Furthermore, the number of transferred electrons (n) involved in the ORR was >3.8, indicating a dominant quasi-4-electron pathway. Interestingly, the catalytic performances of the samples were not a function of their surface areas, and instead depended on the concentration of OVs, indicating enhancement in the intrinsic catalytic activity of λ-MnO2 by the generation of OVs. This study demonstrates that differences in the electrochemical behavior of λ-MnO2 depend on the preparation method and provides a mechanism for a unique catalytic behavior of cubic λ-MnO2 . PMID:27254822

  13. Aromaticity as stabilizing element in the bidentate activation for the catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenpin; Hausmann, Heike; Becker, Sabine; Wegner, Hermann A

    2015-04-29

    A new transition-metal-free mode for the catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide via bidentate interaction has been developed. In the presence of Li2[1,2-C6H4(BH3)2], CO2 can be selectively transformed to either methane or methanol, depending on the reducing agent. The bidentate nature of binding is supported by X-ray analysis of an intermediate analogue, which experiences special stabilization due to aromatic character in the bidentate interaction. Kinetic studies revealed a first-order reaction rate. The transformation can be conducted without any solvent. PMID:25871326

  14. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Julia; Belforte, Stefano; Boehm, Max; Casajus, Adrian; Flix, Josep; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Grigoras, Costin; Kokoszkiewicz, Lukasz; Lanciotti, Elisa; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Santinelli, Roberto; Sidorova, Irina; Sciabà, Andrea; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei

    2010-04-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  15. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, J; Boehm, M; Casajus, A; Flix, J; Gaidioz, B; Grigoras, C; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Lanciotti, E; Rocha, R; Saiz, P; Santinelli, R; Sidorova, I; Sciabà, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  16. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  17. Preparation and characterization of Ce1-xFexO2 complex oxides and its catalytic activity for methane selective oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kongzhai; WANG Hua; WEI Yonggang; LIU Mingchun

    2008-01-01

    A series of Ce1-xFexO2 (x=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1) complex oxide catalysts were prepared using the coprecipitation method. The catalysts were characterized by means of XRD and H2-TPR. The reactions between methane and lattice oxygen from the complex oxides were investigated. The characteristic results revealed that the combination of Ce and Fe oxide in the catalysts could lower the temperature necessary to reduce the cerium oxide. The catalytic activity for selective CH4 oxidation was strongly influenced by dropped Fe species. Adding the appropriate amount of Fe2O3 to CeO2 could promote the action between CH4 and CeO2. Dispersed Fe2O3 first returned to the original state and would then virtually form the Fe species on the catalyst, which could be considered as the active site for selective CH4 oxidation. The appearance of carbon formation was significant and the oxidation of carbon appeared to be the rate-determining step; the amounts of surface reducible oxygen species in CeO2 were also relevant to the activity. Among all the catalysts, Ce0.6Fe0.4O2 exhibited the best activity, which converted 94.52% of CH4 at 900 °C.

  18. Interaction Induced High Catalytic Activities of CoO Nanoparticles Grown on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Microspheres for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Jie; Jiang, Zhongqing

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen doped graphene hollow microspheres (NGHSs) have been used as the supports for the growth of the CoO nanoparticles. The nitrogen doped structure favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles and the CoO nanoparticles are mostly anchored on the quaternary nitrogen doped sites of the NGHSs with good monodispersity since the higher electron density of the quaternary nitrogen favors the nucleation and growth of the CoO nanoparticles through its coordination and electrostatic interactions with the Co2+ ions. The resulting NGHSs supported CoO nanoparticles (CoO/NGHSs) are highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with activity and stability higher than the Pt/C and for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) with activity and stability comparable to the most efficient catalysts reported to date. This indicates that the CoO/NGHSs could be used as efficient bi-functional catalysts for ORR and OER. Systematic analysis shows that the superior catalytic activities of the CoO/NGHSs for ORR and OER mainly originate from the nitrogen doped structure of the NGHSs, the small size of the CoO nanoparticles, the higher specific and electroactive surface area of the CoO/NGHSs, the good electric conductivity of the CoO/NGHSs, the strong interaction between the CoO nanoparticles and the NGHSs, etc.

  19. Magnetic Co@g-C3N4 Core-Shells on rGO Sheets for Momentum Transfer with Catalytic Activity toward Continuous-Flow Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shasha; Han, Guosheng; Su, Yongheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yanyan; Wu, Xianli; Li, Baojun

    2016-06-28

    Magnetic core-shell structures provide abundant opportunities for the construction of multifunctional composites. In this article, magnetic core-shells were fabricated with Co nanoparticles (NPs) as cores and g-C3N4 as shells. In the fabrication process, the Co@g-C3N4 core-shells were anchored onto the rGO nanosheets to form a Co@g-C3N4-rGO composite (CNG-I). For hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of NaBH4 or NH3BH3, the Co NP cores act as catalytic active sites. The g-C3N4 shells protect Co NPs cores from aggregating or growing. The connection between Co NPs and rGO was strengthened by the g-C3N4 shells to prevent them from leaching or flowing away. The g-C3N4 shells also work as a cocatalyst for hydrogen generation. The magnetism of Co NPs and the shape of rGO nanosheets achieve effective momentum transfer in the external magnetic field. In the batch reactor, a higher catalytic activity was obtained for CNG-I in self-stirring mode than in magneton stirring mode. In the continuous-flow process, stable hydrogen generation was carried out with CNG-I being fixed and propelled by the external magnetic field. The separation film is unnecessary because of magnetic momentum transfer. This idea of the composite design and magnetic momentum transfer will be useful for the development of both hydrogen generation and multifunctional composite materials. PMID:27276187

  20. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.